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Sample records for compact extragalactic radio

  1. The LBA Calibrator Survey of Southern Compact Extragalactic Radio Sources - LCS1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrov, Leonid; Phillips, Chris; Bertarini, Alessandra; Murphy, Tara; Sadler, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a catalogue of accurate positions and correlated flux densities for 410 flat-spectrum, compact extragalactic radio sources previously detected in the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey. The catalogue spans the declination range [-90deg, -40deg] and was constructed from four 24-h very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observing sessions with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 8.3 GHz. The VLBI detection rate in these experiments is 97 per cent, the median uncertainty of the source positions is 2.6 mas and the median correlated flux density on projected baselines longer than 1000 km is 0.14 Jy. The goals of this work are (1) to provide a pool of southern sources with positions accurate to a few milliarcsec, which can be used for phase-referencing observations, geodetic VLBI and space navigation; (2) to extend the complete flux-limited sample of compact extragalactic sources to the Southern hemisphere; and (3) to investigate the parsec-scale properties of high-frequency selected sources from the AT20G survey. As a result of this VLBI campaign, the number of compact radio sources south of declination -40deg which have measured VLBI correlated flux densities and positions known to milliarcsec accuracy has increased by a factor of 3.5.

  2. Radio-frequency heating of emission-line gas near compact extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Mckee, C. F.; Tarter, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    High-brightness-temperature radio sources significantly heat by free-free absorption any nearby gas that has properties similar to those inferred for QSO emission-line gas. As a result, the outer layers of the gas clouds expand, and their visible line emission decreases. Moderate heating enhances the collisionally excited ultraviolet line of O VI at 1034 A. Stronger heating penetrates the entire cloud and extinguishes all lines. Strong enough radio fluxes cause a thermal instability by stimulated Compton heating that is only saturated by Compton cooling at very high temperatures. It is speculated that BL Lac objects differ from quasars by having higher radio turnover frequencies, lower gas pressures, or more violent variability, all of which make radio heating more effective.

  3. Effects of gamma-ray, neutrino, and particle production on the energetics and dynamics of compact extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Scott, J. S.; Marscher, A. P.; Christiansen, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to particle production and high-energy radiation within apparently superluminal radio components of extragalactic radio sources forming within the apparent region of nuclear activity of a quasar or active galaxy. The physical conditions in compact components observed as radio emitters are derived for the quasars 3C 273 and 3C 345 and extrapolated to those of initial components of sizes on the order of 10 to the 15th cm on the basis of two-dimensional relativistic jet and relativistic three-dimensional models of component expansion. Probabilities that a given particle avoids an inelastic collision in the relativistic plasma are calculated for both cases which show that collisions which produce particles and radiation may be very important during the formation of a compact radio component. The consequences of electron-positron production, bremsstrahlung and proton-proton inelastic collisions ultimately giving rise to neutrinos and gamma rays for the development and energetics of the radio component are then examined, and upper limits to the amount of energy which can be channeled into radio components from an active region without giving rise to a high-energy X-ray source are derived.

  4. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  5. The Extragalactic Radio Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of an isotropic component of the high-latitude radio sky has been recognized for nearly fifty years, but has typically been assumed to be Galactic in origin. We use recent radio observations to test whether the observed high-latitude component could originate within either an extended Galactic halo or a more local "bubble" structure. The lack of significant polarization from the isotropic component, combined with the lack of significant correlation with the Galactic far-infrared emission, rule out an origin within the Galaxy. We conclude that an extragalactic origin is the only viable alternative for the bulk of the isotropic high-latitude emission. The extragalactic component is 2-3 times brighter than local (Galactic) emission towards the Galactic poles and is consistent with a power law in frequency with amplitude T(sub r) = 24.1 plus or minus 2.1 K and spectral index beta = -2.599 plus or minus 0.036 evaluated at reference frequency 310 MHz.

  6. Large scale X-ray and radio structures associated with compact extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, P.; Pauliny-Toth, I. I. K.; Witzel, A.; Fricke, K.; Johnston, K. J.; Kuehr, H.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Urbanik, M.

    1982-01-01

    Knots of X-ray emission have been detected within 20 arcmin of five compact sources initially selected from the MPIfR north polar 5 GHz survey. Two of the knots have also been detected at centimeter wavelengths and probably have nonthermal spectra. They appear to be associated with the compact sources since the probability of serendipitous discovery at the observed flux levels is low. While the apparent association may be due to colocation of the sources in a distant supercluster, it is suggested on the basis of overall alignment, and possible correlations with structures in the respective central sources, that the association may be similar to that found in extended radio sources. The observed emission may thus be due to synchrotron or inverse Compton radiation, the energy being supplied by jets from the central source.

  7. Evolution of powerful extragalactic radio sources.

    PubMed Central

    Readhead, A C

    1995-01-01

    Observations of complete flux density limited samples of powerful extragalactic radio sources by very-long-baseline interferometry enable us to study the evolution of these objects over the range of linear scales from 1 parsec to 15 kiloparsees (1 parsec = 3.09 x 10(18) cm). The observations are consistent with the unifying hypothesis that compact symmetric objects evolve into compact steep-spectrum doubles, which in turn evolve into large-scale Fanaroff-Riley class II objects. It is suggested that this is the primary evolutionary track of powerful extragalactic radio sources. In this case there must be significant luminosity evolution in these objects, but little velocity evolution, as they expand from 1 parsec to several hundred kiloparsecs in overall size. PMID:11607616

  8. Plan for VLBI observations of close approaches of Jupiter to compact extragalactic radio sources in 2014-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdiuk, A.; Titov, O.

    2014-12-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry is capable of measuring the gravitational delay caused by the Sun and planet gravitational fields. The post-Newtonian parameter gamma is now estimated with accuracy of sigma_gamma=2*10^(-4) using a global set of VLBI data from 1979 to present (Lambert, Gontier, 2009), and sigma_gamma=2*10^(-5) by the Cassini spacecraft (Bertotti et. al, 2003). Unfortunately, VLBI observations in S- and X-bands very close to the Solar limb (less than 2-3 degrees) are not possible due to the strong turbulence in the Solar corona. Instead, the close approach of big planets to the line of sight of the reference quasars could be also used for testing of the general relativity theory with VLBI. Jupiter is the most appropriate among the big planets due to its large mass and relatively fast apparent motion across the celestial sphere. Six close approaches of Jupiter with quasars in 2014-2016 were found using the DE405/LE405 ephemerides, including one occultation in 2016. We have formed tables of visibility for all six events for VLBI radio telescopes participating in regular IVS programs. Expected magnitudes of the relativistic effects to be measured during these events are discussed in this paper.

  9. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN LARGE-DIAMETER H II REGIONS REVEALED BY THE FARADAY ROTATION OF COMPACT EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Madsen, G. J.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2011-08-01

    We present a study of the line-of-sight magnetic fields in five large-diameter Galactic H II regions. Using the Faraday rotation of background polarized radio sources, as well as dust-corrected H{alpha} surface brightness as a probe of electron density, we estimated the strength and orientation of the magnetic field along 93 individual sight lines through the H II regions. Each of the H II regions displayed a coherent magnetic field. The magnetic field strength (line-of-sight component) in the regions ranges from 2 to 6 {mu}G, which is similar to the typical magnetic field strength in the diffuse interstellar medium. We investigated the relationship between magnetic field strength and electron density in the five H II regions. The slope of magnetic field versus density in the low-density regime (0.8 cm{sup -3} < n{sub e} <30 cm{sup -3}) is very slightly above zero. We also calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, {beta}{sub th}, for each data point, which fell in the range 1.01 < {beta}{sub th} < 25. Finally, we studied the orientation of the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood (d < 1.1 kpc) using our data from five H II regions along with existing measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength from polarized pulsars whose distances have been determined from their annual parallax. We identify a net direction for the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood, but find no evidence for a preferred vertical direction of the magnetic field above or below the Galactic plane.

  10. Radio studies of extragalactic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Weiler, K W; Sramek, R A; Panagia, N

    1986-03-14

    Some exploding stars (supernovae) are powerful emitters of centimeter radio radiation. Detailed observations have shown that these supernovae quickly become detectable in the radio range, first at shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) and later at progressively longer and longer wavelengths (lower frequencies). This part of the phenomenon appears to be well explained by a monotonic decrease in the amount of ionized material surrounding the radio-emitting regions as the shock from the explosion travels outward. The radio emission itself is of a nonthermal, synchrotron origin, as is the case in most bright cosmic radio sources. Once the absorption effects become negligible, the radio intensity declines with time until reaching the detection limit of the telescope. Models suggest that the absorbing material originates in a dense wind of matter lost by the supernova progenitor star, or by its companion if it is in a binary system, in the last stages of evolution before the explosion. The synchrotron radio emission can be generated either externally by the shock wave from the explosion propagating through this same high density stellar wind or internally by a rapidly rotating neutron star, which is the collapsed core of the exploded star. Present results appear to favor the former model for at least the first several years after the supernova explosion, although the latter model remains viable.

  11. Numerical models of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael L.; Clarke, David A.

    1991-01-01

    When supercomputer-implemented numerical simulations analyzing the nonlinear physics inherent in the hydrodynamic and MHD equations are applied to extragalactic radio sources, many of the complex structures observed on telescopic images are reproduced. Attention is presently given to recently obtained results from 2D and 3D numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of extended radio morphologies; these numerical models allow the exploration of such physical phenomena as the role of magnetic fields in the dynamics and emissivity of extended radio galaxies, intermittent outflow from the cores of active galaxies, fluid-jet instabilities, and the bending of collimated outflows by motion through the intergalactic medium.

  12. Planck intermediate results. VII. Statistical properties of infrared and radio extragalactic sources from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue at frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurinsky, N.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschènes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sajina, A.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2013-02-01

    We make use of the Planck all-sky survey to derive number counts and spectral indices of extragalactic sources - infrared and radio sources - from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) at 100 to 857 GHz (3 mm to 350 μm). Three zones (deep, medium and shallow) of approximately homogeneous coverage are used to permit a clean and controlled correction for incompleteness, which was explicitly not done for the ERCSC, as it was aimed at providing lists of sources to be followed up. Our sample, prior to the 80% completeness cut, contains between 217 sources at 100 GHz and 1058 sources at 857 GHz over about 12 800 to 16 550 deg2 (31 to 40% of the sky). After the 80% completeness cut, between 122 and 452 and sources remain, with flux densities above 0.3 and 1.9 Jy at 100 and 857 GHz. The sample so defined can be used for statistical analysis. Using the multi-frequency coverage of the Planck High Frequency Instrument, all the sources have been classified as either dust-dominated (infrared galaxies) or synchrotron-dominated (radio galaxies) on the basis of their spectral energy distributions (SED). Our sample is thus complete, flux-limited and color-selected to differentiate between the two populations. We find an approximately equal number of synchrotron and dusty sources between 217 and 353 GHz; at 353 GHz or higher (or 217 GHz and lower) frequencies, the number is dominated by dusty (synchrotron) sources, as expected. For most of the sources, the spectral indices are also derived. We provide for the first time counts of bright sources from 353 to 857 GHz and the contributions from dusty and synchrotron sources at all HFI frequencies in the key spectral range where these spectra are crossing. The observed counts are in the Euclidean regime. The number counts are compared to previously published data (from earlier Planck results, Herschel, BLAST, SCUBA, LABOCA, SPT, and ACT) and models taking into account both radio or infrared galaxies, and covering a

  13. The unusual smoothness of the extragalactic unresolved radio background

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, Gilbert P.

    2014-01-01

    If the radio background is coming from cosmological sources, there should be some amount of clustering due to the large scale structure in the universe. Simple models for the expected clustering combined with the recent measurement by ARCADE-2 of the mean extragalactic temperature lead to predicted clustering levels that are substantially above upper limits from searches for anisotropy on arcminute scales using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Very Large Array. The rms temperature variations in the cosmic radio background appear to be more than a factor of 10 smaller (in temperature) than the fluctuations in the cosmic infrared background. It is therefore extremely unlikely that this background comes from galaxies, galaxy clusters, or any sources that trace dark matter halos at z ≲ 5, unless typical sources are smooth on arcminute scales, requiring typical sizes of several Mpc.

  14. Luminosity and density evolution of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Evgeniya

    2011-07-01

    The counting of radio sources is a strong tool for the investigation of evolution of extragalactic sources. Additional information can also be obtained from the "power-linear size" diagram (P-D), which is analogues to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. On it there is clear evidence for the existence of a "main sequence" and the "sequence of giants". The "main sequence" consists mostly of the FR I sources. The "sequence of giants" consists of radio loud compact sources and quasars, and FR II sources, which grow in giant radio galaxies. Such evolution can be described with a theory based on the idea of fast adiabatic expansion of the source's extended parts (cocoons) and the synchrotron radiation of particles in these structures. Fixing the bulk kinetic power delivered to the cocoons by the jets, it is possible to obtain P-D tracks for FR II sources. In my work I have taken a sample of radio sources, constructed the P-D tracks, and divided all sources into two types: ones which belong to the "main consequence", and others to the "sequence of giants". As for the last sequence, it can be considered as an independent evolutionary track of some radio source classes. These defined samples I have used for the estimation of their independent and joint radio luminosity and density evolution, through which it is possible to obtain fruitful results.

  15. THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF YOUNG EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    An Tao; Baan, Willem A. E-mail: baan@astron.nl

    2012-11-20

    The evolution of symmetric extragalactic radio sources can be characterized by four distinct growth stages of the radio luminosity versus size of the source. The interaction of the jet with the ambient medium results in the formation and evolution of sources with non-standard (flaring) morphology. In addition, cessation or restarting of the jet power and obstruction of the jet will also result in distinct morphological structures. The radio source population may thus be classified in morphological types that indicate the prevailing physical processes. Compact symmetric objects (CSOs) occupy the earliest evolutionary phase of symmetric radio sources and their dynamical behavior is fundamental for any further evolution. Analysis of CSO dynamics is presented for a sample of 24 CSOs with known redshift and hotspot separation velocity and with a large range of radio power. Observables such as radio power, separation between two hotspots, hotspot separation velocity, and kinematic age of the source are found to be generally consistent with the self-similar predictions for individual sources that reflect the varying density structure of the ambient interstellar medium. Individual sources behave different from the group as a whole. The age and size statistics confirm that a large fraction of CSOs does not evolve into extended doubles.

  16. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernard, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  17. Radio, millimeter-submillimeter, and infrared spectra of flat-spectrum extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Steven D.; Marscher, Alan P.; Gear, Walter K.; Terasranta, Harri; Valtaoja, Esko; Aller, Hugh D.; Aller, Margo F.

    1994-01-01

    We present radio to submillimeter-wave continuum spectra of 44 bright, compact extragalactic radio sources with flat spectra at centimeter wavelengths ('blazars'). Infrared J, H, and K flux densities are added to the spectra of six of these objects. These spectra are useful in comparisons of x-ray and gamma-ray measurements with the multiwaveband properties of blazars. A number of the objects have been detected as strong, hard gamma-ray sources by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The millimeter-wave spectra of the gamma-ray bright blazars we observe are flatter on average than for the sample as a whole.

  18. Interstellar Scintillation of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    1998-05-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS) causes a Galactic seeing problem for radio astronomy. Thus the flux density from a very compact radio source appears to scintillate on a time scale that ranges from days to minutes depending on the wavelength and Galactic path length. I will review the observed variations from various sources, which are among the most compact cores of active galactic nuclei (AGN). An ISS interpretation of the observed variations yields estimates of the source sizes in the range 0.01 to 10 milliarcsec, often much smaller than the resolution from earth-based VLBI. The recognition of such variations as apparent reduces the implied brightness temperature by a factor as large as one million, compared to the extreme values deduced by interpreting the variations as intrinsic. Some such intraday variable sources also exhibit partially correlated variations in their polarized flux and angle. The changes in interstellar Faradya rotation are too slow to cause such variations by many orders of magnitude. I will report on attempts to model the polarized flux variations as due to independent ISS from polarized components with intrinsic polarization structure in the source at a level of tens of microarcseconds. I will also discuss how Frail et al. (Nature, 389, 261, 1997) used interstellar scintillation to estimate the size of the expanding fireball in the radio afterglow of gamma-ray burst 970508.

  19. Radio properties of Compact Steep Spectrum and GHz-Peaked Spectrum radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.

    2016-02-01

    Compact steep spectrum (CSS) and GHz-peaked spectrum (GPS) radio sources represent a large fraction of the extragalactic objects in flux density-limited samples. They are compact, powerful radio sources whose synchrotron peak frequency ranges between a few hundred MHz to several GHz. CSS and GPS radio sources are currently interpreted as objects in which the radio emission is in an early evolutionary stage. In this contribution I review the radio properties and the physical characteristics of this class of radio sources, and the interplay between their radio emission and the ambient medium of the host galaxy.

  20. The Catalog of Positions of Optically Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources OBRS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrov, L.

    2011-01-01

    It is expected that the European Space Agency mission Gaia will make it possible to determine coordinates in the optical domain of more than 500,000 quasars. In 2006, a radio astrometry project was launched with the overall goal of making comparisons between coordinate systems derived from future space-born astrometry instruments and the coordinate system constructed from analysis of global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) more robust. Investigation of the rotation, zonal errors, and non-alignment of the radio and optical positions caused by both radio and optical structures is needed to validate both techniques. In order to support these studies, the densification of the list of compact extragalactic objects that are bright in both radio and optical ranges is desirable. A set of 105 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with decl. > -10deg was observed with the Very Long Baseline Array and European VLBI Network (EVN) with the primary goal of producing images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 mag in the V band, and they were previously detected by the EVN. In this paper, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations using an absolute astrometry method. The catalog of positions for 105 target sources is presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in the range of 0.3.7 mas, with a median of 1.1 mas.

  1. Sco X-1 - A galactic radio source with an extragalactic radio morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geldzahler, B. J.; Corey, B. E.; Fomalont, E. B.; Hilldrup, K.

    1981-01-01

    VLA observations of radio emissions at 1465 and 4885 MHz, of Sco X-1 confirm the existence of a colinear triple structure. Evidence that the three components of Sco X-1 are physically associated is presented, including the morphology, spectrum, variability, volume emissivity and magnetic field strength. The possibility of a physical phenomenon occurring in Sco X-1 similar to that occurring in extragalactic radio sources is discussed, and two galactic sources are found having extended emission similar to that in extragalactic objects. The extended structure of Sco X-1 is also observed to be similar to that of the hot spots in luminous extragalactic sources, and a radio source 20 arcmin from Sco X-1 is found to lie nearly along the radio axis formed by the components of Sco X-1.

  2. Flicker of extragalactic radio sources at two frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, J.H.; Cordes, J.M.; Heeschen, D.S.

    1985-09-01

    Dual-frequency observations of flat and steep-spectrum extragalactic radio sources made at Arecibo Observatory over a 20-day period are analyzed. As first reported by Heeschen (1982, 1984), flat-spectrum sources generally have larger intensity variations than steep-spectrum ones. A structure function analysis demonstrates a qualitative difference in the time series of the sources. The case against interstellar scintillation is examined, including a review of applicable scintillation theory. Relativistic source motion is treated as a solution to the brightness-temperature problems which arise if the variations are assumed intrinsic to the sources. 16 references.

  3. The core dominance parameter and Fermi detection of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen-Kuo; Wu, Zhong-Zu; Gu, Min-Feng

    2016-08-01

    By cross-correlating an archive sample of 542 extragalactic radio sources with the Fermi-LAT Third Source Catalog (3FGL), we have compiled a sample of 80 γ-ray sources and 462 non-Fermi sources with available core dominance parameter (R CD), and core and extended radio luminosity; all the parameters are directly measured or derived from available data in the literature. We found that R CD has significant correlations with radio core luminosity, γ-ray luminosity and γ-ray flux; the Fermi sources have on average higher R CD than non-Fermi sources. These results indicate that the Fermi sources should be more compact, and the beaming effect should play a crucial role in the detection of γ-ray emission. Moreover, our results also show Fermi sources have systematically larger radio flux than non-Fermi sources at fixed R CD, indicating larger intrinsic radio flux in Fermi sources. These results show a strong connection between radio and γ-ray flux for the present sample and indicate that the non-Fermi sources are likely due to the low beaming effect, and/or the low intrinsic γ-ray flux. This supports a scenario that has been published in the literature: a co-spatial origin of the activity for the radio and γ-ray emission, suggesting that the origin of the seed photons for the high-energy γ-ray emission is within the jet.

  4. How Accessible Are Extragalactic And Radio Data From Journal Tables?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    2006-08-01

    The current situation of public accessibility of tabular data contained in publications is reviewed, including access from sources like astronomical data centers, preprint servers, and electronic journals. I find that despite the enormous increase, during the last decade, of data stored at the data center (s), the current coverage of articles with tabular data on at least 100 objects is near 50 per cent only, albeit with a (not too strong) trend for better coverage of larger tabular data sets. In parallel to the collection at the established data centers, and partly as a necessity for my own research, I have collected since 1989 the tabular data from over 2100 publications, half of these concerned with radio observations, the other half with extragalactic objects in general. Tables from about 460 publications were recovered by myself by means of optical character recognition (OCR). Tables from only about half of the 2100 articles are available from either the CDS or CATS (cats.sao.ru) catalogue collections. Based on my active exploitation of electronic tabular data I conclude that both, object databases like NED and SIMBAD, as well as catalogue browsers like Vizier and CATS, complement each other, and that further human resources are required to achieve a better coverage of published extragalactic dataaccessible from the internet, e.g. as an important part of the Virtual Observatory project.

  5. A self-similar model for extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christian R.; Alexander, Paul

    1997-03-01

    An analytical model for extragalactic radio sources with pressure-confined jets is presented. We show that the properties of the bow shock and of the gas surrounding these objects force the sources to grow in a self-similar way provided the density in the external atmosphere falls less steeply than 1/d^2. Results from observations and numerical simulations are used to develop a self-consistent model for the large-scale structure of FRII objects. The jets in these sources are shown to be stable against turbulence for the observed properties of FRIIs and the divide between FRI and FRII objects in jet power is reproduced. The overall dynamics of a source are derived as a function of time and depend on the external density, the jet power and the scaleheight of the external atmosphere. Derived dynamical ages are consistent with observed spectral ages.

  6. Flux-density-spectral-index relation of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Dickey, J.

    1973-01-01

    We have analyzed the spectral-index distribution of extragalactic radio sources and its variation with flux density and survey frequency. We find that the effect of K-correction on this variation (which if observed could imply that these sources are at cosmological distances) is small compared with observational uncertainties and other effects. We also derive a form for the intrinsic spectral distribution (assuming it to be independent of redshift and luminosity) which consists of two Gaussians with median spectral indices of about 0.8 and 0.4 and with dispersion of 0.25 and 0.4, respectively. The first class of sources is found in low-frequency surveys. The second class, consisting of only a few percent of all sources, appears in high-frequency surveys and has spectra-index distributions similar to sources identified with quasars.

  7. Predicting Changes in the Radio Emission Fluxes of Extragalactic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, A. L.; Ryabov, M. I.; Donskikh, G. I.

    2016-06-01

    Data from long-term monitoring with the 26-m University of Michigan radio telescope at a frequency of 14.5 GHz (1974-2011) is used to predict changes in the radio emission fluxes from the extragalactic sources 3C273, 3C120, 3C345, 3C446, 3C454.3, OJ287, OT081, and BLLac. The predictions are based on data on the major periods of variability and their durations obtained by wavelet analysis. The radio emission fluxes from the sources 3C345, 3C446, and 3C454.3, which have complicated variabilities, are predicted using an autoregression linear prediction method. This yields a forecast of the flux variations extending up to 5 years. Harmonic prediction is used for another group of sources, BLLac, OJ287, and OT081, with rapid variability. This approach yielded forecasts extending 4-9 years. For the sources 3C273 and 3C120, which have stable long periods, the harmonic method was also used and yielded a forecast extending up to 16 years. The reliability of the prediction was confirmed by independent observational data from the MOJAVE program for 2011-2015.

  8. Short-duration Radio Bursts with Apparent Extragalactic Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Hilaire, P.; Benz, A. O.; Monstein, C.

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the longest yet undertaken search for apparently extragalactic radio bursts at the Bleien Radio Observatory covering 21,000 hr (898 days). The data were searched for events of less than 50 ms FWHM duration showing a ν-2 drift in the spectrogram characteristic of the delay of radio waves in plasma. We have found five cases suggesting dispersion measures between 350 and 400 cm-3 pc while searching in the range of 75-2000 cm-3 pc. Four of the five events occurred between 10:27 and 11:24 a.m. local civil time. The only exception occurred at night with the full Moon in the beam. It was an event that poorly fits plasma dispersion, but had the characteristics of a solar Type III burst. However, we were not able to confirm that it was a lunar reflection. All events were observed with a log-periodic dipole within 6800 hr, but none with a more directional horn antenna observing the rest of the time. These properties suggest a terrestrial origin of the "peryton" type reported before. However, the cause of these events remains ambiguous.

  9. Short-duration radio bursts with apparent extragalactic dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Hilaire, P.; Benz, A. O.; Monstein, C.

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the longest yet undertaken search for apparently extragalactic radio bursts at the Bleien Radio Observatory covering 21,000 hr (898 days). The data were searched for events of less than 50 ms FWHM duration showing a ν{sup –2} drift in the spectrogram characteristic of the delay of radio waves in plasma. We have found five cases suggesting dispersion measures between 350 and 400 cm{sup –3} pc while searching in the range of 75-2000 cm{sup –3} pc. Four of the five events occurred between 10:27 and 11:24 a.m. local civil time. The only exception occurred at night with the full Moon in the beam. It was an event that poorly fits plasma dispersion, but had the characteristics of a solar Type III burst. However, we were not able to confirm that it was a lunar reflection. All events were observed with a log-periodic dipole within 6800 hr, but none with a more directional horn antenna observing the rest of the time. These properties suggest a terrestrial origin of the 'peryton' type reported before. However, the cause of these events remains ambiguous.

  10. SUPERB - A SUrvey for Pulsars & Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Evan; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Eatough, Ralph; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Jankowski, Fabian; Caleb, Manisha; Lyon, Robert; Morello, Vincent; Bhandari, Shivani

    2014-10-01

    SUPERB is a large-scale survey for pulsars and extragalactic radio bursts. It will uses optimised GPU codes to search for pulsars and fast radio bursts (FRBs), making discoveries in real time. Handling our data as it comes in is essential for the SKA Phase I era so this work applies directly to the high-data rates of next generation telescopes. The pulsars discovered will enable studies of the interstellar medium, allow us to more accurately constrain the MSP luminosity function (which informs estimates of the SKA yield of MSPs), tests of theories of gravity and several will contribute to the precision timing projects of the PPTA. The FRBs discovered will have much more associated information than all previous detections. Firstly the discovery lag will be ~1 second, rather than months/years. The Parkes observations will be shadowed by the Molonglo telescope to allow, for the first time, localisation of FRBs, and a host of optical and high-energy telescopes will then be triggered as appropriate. This is key for identifying FRB host galaxies, so as to solve the mystery of their progenitors. The survey will discover ~20 MSPs, ~100 slower pulsars and ~10 FRBs.

  11. SUPERB - A SUrvey for Pulsars & Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Evan; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Eatough, Ralph; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Jankowski, Fabian; Caleb, Manisha; Lyon, Robert; Morello, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    SUPERB is a large-scale survey for pulsars and extragalactic radio bursts. It will use highly optimised GPU codes to search for pulsars and fast radio bursts (FRBs), making discoveries in real time. Handling our data as it comes in is essential for the SKA Phase I era so this work applies directly to the high-data rates of next generation telescopes. The pulsars discovered will enable studies of the interstellar medium, allow us to more accurately constrain the MSP luminosity function (which informs estimates of the SKA yield of MSPs), tests of theories of gravity and several will contribute to the precision timing projects of the PPTA. The FRBs discovered will have much more associated information than all previous detections. Firstly the discovery lag will be ~1 second, rather than months/years. The Parkes observations will be shadowed by the Molonglo telescope to allow, for the first time, localisation of FRBs, and a host of optical and high-energy telescopes will then be triggered as appropriate. This is key for identifying FRB host galaxies, so as to solve the mystery of their progenitors. The survey will discover ~20 MSPs, ~100 slower pulsars and ~10 FRBs.

  12. IS THERE AN UNACCOUNTED FOR EXCESS IN THE EXTRAGALACTIC COSMIC RADIO BACKGROUND?

    SciTech Connect

    Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Cowsik, Ramanath E-mail: cowsik@physics.wustl.edu

    2013-10-10

    Analyses of the distribution of absolute brightness temperature over the radio sky have recently led to suggestions that there exists a substantial unexplained extragalactic radio background. Consequently, there have been numerous attempts to place constraints on plausible origins of this 'excess'. We suggest here that this expectation of a large extragalactic background, over and above that contributed by the sources observed in the surveys, is based on an extremely simple geometry adopted to model the Galactic emission and the procedure adopted in the estimation of the extragalactic contribution. In this paper, we derive the extragalactic radio background from wide-field radio images using a more realistic modeling of the Galactic emission and decompose the sky maps at 150, 408, and 1420 MHz into anisotropic Galactic and isotropic extragalactic components. The anisotropic Galactic component is assumed to arise from a highly flattened spheroid representing the thick disk, embedded in a spherical halo, both centered at the Galactic center, along with Galactic sources, filamentary structures, and Galactic loops and spurs. All components are constrained to be positive and the optimization scheme minimizes the sky area occupied by the complex filaments. We show that in contrast with simple modeling of Galactic emission as a plane parallel slab, the more realistic modeling yields estimates for the uniform extragalactic brightness that are consistent with expectations from known extragalactic radio source populations.

  13. Dual Frequency VLBI Monitoring of a Large Sample of Compact Extragalactic Sources at 8 and 32 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Majid, W. A.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Snedeker, L.; García-Miró, C.; Sotuela, I.; Horiuchi, S.

    2012-01-01

    We are carrying out regular monitoring of 400+ compact extragalactic sources using large DSN (Deep Space Network) antennas over intercontinental baselines at 8, and 32 GHz simultaneously. This program provides precision astrometric measurements of AGN compact cores, used to maintain the JPL extragalactic reference frame. In addition to astrometric observables, this program has the potential to provide regular flux density measurements at each of these observing frequencies with precision at the level of 10-20%. Such monitoring of compact radio emission serves as a direct measure of AGN core activity, probing intrinsic jet parameters and providing the opportunity for discriminating between different models of the high-energy emission in these objects by cross-correlating the radio and gamma-ray flux densities. Simultaneous multi-frequency observations will provide high precision spectral information of AGN compact emission regions at the parsec-scale unaffected by the errors often introduced when combining multi-frequency data obtained at different epochs. The spectral index can be used to compare the relativistic electron energy distribution with the photon spectral index seen in gamma-rays. For instance, if Compton up-scattering by the radio synchrotron electron population is the basic process producing the gamma-rays, the spectra in both spectral regions should be directly related. By providing measurements on both East-West and North-South baselines with large antennas and Gbit/s recording capability, our program can probe sources at the 30 mJy flux limit (10-sigma), potentially increasing the sample to a fainter population of sources. In these regards, our program complements well existing northern and southern hemisphere VLBI monitoring programs, by providing flux measurements at 32 GHz, covering a fainter population sample, and by filling the gap for sources in the [-20:-40] degree declination range. Further, our program also provides additional flexibility

  14. The discovery of strong extragalactic polarization using the Parkes Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracewell, Ronald N.

    2002-12-01

    By the end of 1961, interferometry to arc-minute precision in the East-West direction had resolved the compact source at the centre of Centaurus A into two equal components spaced about 5‧ in right ascension and with measured widths. Were they on the dark bar of the associated extragalactic nebula, NGC 5128, and perhaps indicatios of a toroidal source, or were they in the perpendicular direction and on their way out to feed the extended radio source Centaurus A? The 6‧.7 pencil beam of the Parkes Radio Telescope, employed in an unusual scanning mode, was capable of just separating the peaks and resolving the ambiguity in declination. In 1962 April, I carried out the first observations of linear polarization in Centaurus A using the Parkes antenna, and these were soon followed by other observations made by Brian Cooper and Marcus Price and then by Frank Gardner and John Whiteoak. Because the research papers reporting these pioneering observations were not published in chronological order and the dates of the observations and submission of the manuscripts ware not mentioned in them there has been considerable confusion surrounding the discovery history of Centaurus A polarization at Parkes, and this has been compounded by a misleading contemporary newspaper report, uninformed folklore, and conflicting recollectioms printed 30 years after the event. This paper clarifies the situation by presenting a first-hand account of the original observations and associated publications.

  15. High-energy gamma radiation from extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Schlickeiser, R.; Mastichiadis, A.

    1992-01-01

    We propose that the important relationship between 3C 273 and 3C 279, the first two extragalactic sources detected at over 100 MeV energies, is their superluminal nature. In support of this conjecture, we propose a kinematic focusing mechanism, based on Compton scattering of accretion-disk photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons in the jet, that preferentially emits gamma rays in the superluminal direction.

  16. Extragalactic astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    Components of the active extragalactic universe are examined to discover what extragalactic objects exhibit physical processes of the same kind as those thought to be important within the galaxy. Radio galaxies; quasars; bulk ejection from galactic objects such as novae supernovae, and other galactic nuclei; the red shifts of quasars; and the possibility of non-cosmological red shifts are among the topics discussed. It is concluded that the highest energy cosmic rays may have an extragalactic or extragalactic origin.

  17. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Cheung, C. C.

    2007-05-01

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Classical double-lobed radio galaxies are characterized by a single pair of "active" radio lobes. A small subset show an additional pair of lower surface brightness 'wings' of emission, thus forming an overall winged or X-shaped appearance. Two competing mechanisms have been proposed to explain the "winged" morphology. One model posits that these are the remnants left over from a relatively recent merger of a binary supermassive black hole system. Others have argued that they result naturally from strong backflow in a radio jet cocoon expanding into an asymmetric medium. We used available Sloan Digital Sky Survey r-band images of 11 X-shaped sources to measure the host galaxy ellipticities. By analyzing the host galaxy shapes, we trace the surrounding gas distribution. The radio morphologies are compared to the host galaxy parameters to analogize between differing model expectations. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Student Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts from extragalactic radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Marco

    1992-01-01

    It is argued here that the recent BATSE results on the distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) does not require the abandonment of the isolated neutron stars model in which most of the bursts have a magnetospheric origin. It is demonstrated that GRBs may be produced on relatively young radio pulsars residing in galaxies out to a redshift of about 2.5, consistent with the cosmological hypothesis. These sources may therefore be beacons that trace galactic evolution.

  19. Local Circumnuclear Magnetar Solution to Extragalactic Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Connor, Liam

    2015-07-01

    We synthesize the known information about fast radio bursts (FRBs) and radio magnetars, and describe an allowed origin near nuclei of external, but non-cosmological, galaxies. This places them at z\\ll 1, within a few hundred megaparsecs. In this scenario, the high dispersion measure (DM) is dominated by the environment of the FRB, modeled on the known properties of the Milky Way center, whose innermost 100 pc provides 1000 pc cm-3. A radio loud magnetar is known to exist in our galactic center, within ˜2 arcsec of Sgr A*. Based on the polarization, DM, and scattering properties of this known magnetar, we extrapolate its properties to those of Crab-like giant pulses and SGR flares and point out their consistency with observed FRBs. We conclude that galactic center magnetars could be the source of FRBs. This scenario is readily testable with very long baseline interferometry measurements as well as with flux count statistics from large surveys such as CHIME or UTMOST.

  20. BROADBAND RADIO POLARIMETRY AND FARADAY ROTATION OF 563 EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-10

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1′ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  1. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1‧ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  2. The deep diffuse extragalactic radio sky at 1.75 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernstrom, T.; Norris, Ray P.; Scott, Douglas; Wall, J. V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of diffuse extragalactic radio emission at 1.75 GHz from part of the ELAIS-S1 (European Large Area Infrared Space Observatory Survey - South 1) field using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The resulting mosaic is 2.46 deg2, with a roughly constant noise region of 0.61 deg2 used for analysis. The image has a beam size of 150 arcsec × 60 arcsec and instrumental <σn> = (52 ± 5) μJy beam-1. Using point-source models from the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, we subtract the discrete emission in this field for S ≥ 150 μJy beam-1. Comparison of the source-subtracted probability distribution, or P(D), with the predicted distribution from unsubtracted discrete emission and noise, yields an excess of (76 ± 23) μJy beam-1. Taking this as an upper limit on any extended emission, we constrain several models of extended source counts, assuming Ωsource ≤ 2 arcmin. The best-fitting models yield temperatures of the radio background from extended emission of Tb = (10 ± 7) mK, giving an upper limit on the total temperature at 1.75 GHz of (73 ± 10) mK. Further modelling shows that our data are inconsistent with the reported excess temperature of ARCADE2 to a source-count limit of 1 μJy. Our new data close a loop-hole in the previous constraints, because of the possibility of extended emission being resolved out at higher resolution. Additionally, we look at a model of cluster halo emission and two dark matter particle annihilation source-count models, and discuss general constraints on any predicted counts from such sources. Finally, we report the derived integral count at 1.4 GHz using the deepest discrete count plus our new extended-emission limits, providing numbers that can be used for planning future ultradeep surveys.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact radio sources near Galactic center (Pynzar'+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pynzar', A. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Using literature data on approximately 400 compact radio sources detected with the Very Large Array and located in the direction of the Galactic center within 2° of the compact source Sgr A*, 69 sources whose angular sizes are determined by scattering on electron density inhomogeneities were distinguished. Fifty-five of these are extragalactic, two are supercompact HII regions, ten are sources of maser emission, and two are variable Galactic sources. The excess of the apparent angular sizes of maser sources within 2° of the Galactic center above the mean size of objects of this class in other parts of the Galaxy found in many studies cannot be explained purely by the effect of scattering of their radio emission on interstellar plasma inhomogeneities. The angular sizes of these objects are increased due to scattering only within Galactic longitudes of about 0.4° and Galactic latitudes less than 0.1°. The turbulent medium responsible for scattering of radio emission of compact sources in the immediate vicinity of the Galactic center is strongly concentrated toward the compact source Sgr A* at the Galactic center. No extragalactic sources are observed within 0.4° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude of the Galactic center, because of their low brightness due to the superstrong scattering in this region. Data on scatter broadening can be used to study the distribution of turbulent plasma near the Galactic center. (3 data files).

  4. Search for correlated radio and optical events in long-term studies of extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomphrey, R. B.; Smith, A. G.; Leacock, R. J.; Olsson, C. N.; Scott, R. L.; Pollock, J. T.; Edwards, P.; Dent, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    For the first time, long-term records of radio and optical fluxes of a large sample of variable extragalactic sources have been assembled and compared, with linear cross-correlation analysis being used to reinforce the visual comparisons. Only in the case of the BL Lac object OJ 287 is the correlation between radio and optical records strong. In the majority of cases there is no evidence of significant correlation, although nine sources show limited or weak evidence of correlation. The results do not support naive extrapolation of the expanding source model. The general absence of strong correlation between the radio and optical regions has important implications for the energetics of events occurring in such sources.

  5. Bulgarian - Serbian collaboration: CCD observations of visual double and multiple stars and extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetković, Zorica; Pavlović, Rade; Damljanović, Goran; Boeva, Svetlana; Latev, Georgi

    The Serbian-Bulgarian cooperation concerning the study of visual double and multiple stars started in 2004 with CCD observations of such objects, and in 2011 was extended to observations of extragalactic radio sources visible at optical wavelengths. Here we present a brief overview of the most interesting results obtained during our collaboration. Begun as a regional Balkan project, this cooperation in 2012 was continued in the form of a bilateral cooperation between the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources II (Petrov, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, L.

    2014-06-01

    The first VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) observing campaign in 2007 resulted in the detection of 398 targets with the European VLBI Network (EVN; Bourda et al., 2010, cat. J/A+A/520/A113). During the second observing campaign, a subset of 105 sources detected in the previous campaign was observed (Bourda et al., 2011, cat. J/A+A/526/A102). Their positions were derived by Petrov (2011, cat. J/AJ/142/105) and formed the OBRS-1 (Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources) catalog. The remaining sources were observed in the third campaign, called OBRS-2. During the OBRS-2 campaign, there were three observing sessions with 10 VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) stations and 5-6 EVN stations from this list: EFLSBERG, MEDICINA, ONSALA60, YEBES40M, DSS63, HARTRAO, and NOTO. Observations were made on 2010 Mar 23 (session ID gc034a), on 2011 Nov 8 (gc034bcd), and on 2011 Mar 15 (gc034ef). The OBRS-2 catalog presents precise positions of the 295 extragalactic radio sources as well as median correlated flux densities at 8.4 and 2.2GHz at baseline lengths shorter than 900km and at baseline lengths longer than 5000km. (1 data file).

  7. FUELING LOBES OF RADIO GALAXIES: STATISTICAL PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE EXTRAGALACTIC {gamma}-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.

    2011-03-01

    The recent discovery of the {gamma}-ray emission from the lobes of the closest radio galaxy Centaurus A by Fermi implies the presence of high-energy electrons at least up to {gamma} {approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}. These high-energy electrons are required to interpret the observed {gamma}-ray radiation in terms of inverse Compton emission off the cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB), the widely accepted scenario to describe the X-ray emission of radio galaxy lobes. In this Letter, we consider the giant radio lobes of FR II radio galaxies showing that it is possible to maintain electrons at energies {gamma} {approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}, assuming an acceleration scenario (driven by turbulent magnetic fields) that compensates radiative losses. In addition, we consider the contribution to the diffuse extragalactic {gamma}-ray background due to the IC/CMB emission of FR IIs' lobes, showing its relevance in the keV to MeV energy range.

  8. The many facets of extragalactic radio surveys: towards new scientific challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    Radio continuum surveys are a powerful tool to detect large number of objects over a wide range of redshifts and obtain information on the intensity, polarization and distribution properties of radio sources across the sky. They are essential to answer to fundamental questions of modern astrophysics. Radio astronomy is in the midst of a transformation. Developments in high-speed digital signal processing and broad-band optical fibre links between antennas have enabled significant upgrades of the existing radio facilities (e-MERLIN, JVLA, ATCA-CABB, eEVN, APERTIF), and are leading to next-generation radio telescopes (LOFAR, MWA, ASKAP, MeerKAT). All these efforts will ultimately lead to the realization of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which, owing to advances in sensitivity, field-of-view, frequency range and spectral resolution, will yield transformational science in many astrophysical research fields. The purpose of this meeting is to explore new scientific perspectives offered by modern radio surveys, focusing on synergies allowed by multi-frequency, multi-resolution observations. We will bring together researchers working on wide aspects of the physics and evolution of extra-galactic radio sources, from star-forming galaxies to AGNs and clusters of galaxies, including their role as cosmological probes. The organization of this conference has been inspired by the recent celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Northern Cross Radio Telescope in Medicina (BO), whose pioneering B2 and B3 surveys provided a significant contribution to radio astronomical studies for many decades afterwards. The conference was organized by the Istituto di Radioastronomia (INAF), and was held at the CNR Research Area in Bologna, on 20-23 October 2015. This Conference has received support from the following bodies and funding agencies: National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF), ASTRON, RadioNet3 (through the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research

  9. Magnetic Bubble Expansion as an Experimental Model for Extra-Galactic Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan; Zhang, Yue; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) is conducting laboratory experiments to address outstanding nonlinear plasma physics issues related to how magnetic energy and helicity carried by extra-galactic jets interacts with the intergalactic medium to form radio lobe structures. Experiments are being conducted in the 4 meter long, 50 cm diameter HELCAT linear plasma device at UNM. A pulsed magnetized coaxial gun (˜10 kV, ˜100 kA, ˜2 mWb) forms and injects magnetized plasma bubbles perpendicularly into a lower pressure weakly magnetized background plasma formed by a helicon and/or hot cathode source in HELCAT. Ideal MHD simulations show that an MHD shock develops ahead of the bubble as it propagates, and that the bubble develops asymmetries due to the background field [1]. Experimental data from plasma bubble injection into a background plasma, particularly magnetic probe measurements, will be discussed. [4pt] [1] W. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072905 (2008).

  10. JPL 1990-3: A 5-nrad extragalactic source catalog based on combined radio interferometric observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.

    1991-01-01

    A combined analysis merges 17,000 Deep Space Network (DSN) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI) observations with 303,000 observations from the Crustal Dynamics Project (CDP) and the International Radio Interferometric Surveying (IRIS) project. Observations from the Radio Reference Frame Development (RRFD) and Time and Earth Motion Precision Observations (TEMPO) programs through late 1990 form the DSN VLBI data set. The combined analysis yields angular coordinates of extragalactic radio sources with a precision of a few nanoradians, as compared with 5 to 10 nrad precision for coordinates derived in the past solely from DSN data. The improvement in the combined analysis is due to the new Mark III DSN data, as well as to increased statistical strength from the large volume of observations from non-DSN experiments. Such a unified analysis is made possible by recent improvements in parameter estimation software efficiency. The terrestrial reference frame is based on joint VLBI experiments using both DSN and CDP antennas, and on specifying the coordinates of VLBI antennas in a proper geocentric coordinate system by means of Global Positioning System (GPS) collocation of VLBI, LLR, and SLR (Laser Ranging) sites.

  11. ON THE CONNECTION OF THE APPARENT PROPER MOTION AND THE VLBI STRUCTURE OF COMPACT RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Moor, A.; Frey, S.; Lambert, S. B.; Bakos, J. E-mail: frey@sgo.fomi.hu E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au

    2011-06-15

    Many of the compact extragalactic radio sources that are used as fiducial points to define the celestial reference frame are known to have proper motions detectable with long-term geodetic/astrometric very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements. These changes can be as high as several hundred microarcseconds per year for certain objects. When imaged with VLBI at milliarcsecond (mas) angular resolution, these sources (radio-loud active galactic nuclei) typically show structures dominated by a compact, often unresolved 'core' and a one-sided 'jet'. The positional instability of compact radio sources is believed to be connected with changes in their brightness distribution structure. For the first time, we test this assumption in a statistical sense on a large sample rather than on only individual objects. We investigate a sample of 62 radio sources for which reliable long-term time series of astrometric positions as well as detailed 8 GHz VLBI brightness distribution models are available. We compare the characteristic direction of their extended jet structure and the direction of their apparent proper motion. We present our data and analysis method, and conclude that there is indeed a correlation between the two characteristic directions. However, there are cases where the {approx}1-10 mas scale VLBI jet directions are significantly misaligned with respect to the apparent proper motion direction.

  12. Position and morphology of the compact non-thermal radio source at the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcaide, J. M.; Alberdi, A.; Bartel, N.; Clark, T. A.; Corey, B. E.; Elosegui, P.; Gorenstein, M. V.; Guirado, J. C.; Kardashev, N.; Popov, M.

    1992-01-01

    We have determined with VLBI the position of the compact nonthermal radio source at the Galactic Center, commonly referred to as SgrA*, in the J2000.0 reference frame of extragalactic radio sources. We have also determined the size of SgrA* at 1.3, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelengths and found that the apparent size of the source increases proportionally to the observing wavelength squared, as expected from source size broadening by interstellar scattering and as reported previously by other authors. We have also established an upper limit of about 8 mJy at 3.6 cm wavelength for any ultracompact component. The actual size of the source is less than 15 AU. Fourier analysis of our very sensitive 3.6 cm observations of this source shows no significant variations of correlated flux density on time scales from 12 to 700 s.

  13. Magnetic Field Disorder and Faraday Effects on the Polarization of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamee, Mehdi; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnes, Jamie S.; Carretti, Ettore; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Poppi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We present a polarization catalog of 533 extragalactic radio sources that have a 2.3 GHz total intensity above 420 mJy from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey, S-PASS, with corresponding 1.4 GHz polarization information from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, NVSS. We studied the selection effects and found that fractional polarization, π, of radio objects at both wavelengths depends on the spectral index, the source magnetic field disorder, the source size, and depolarization. The relationship between depolarization, spectrum, and size shows that depolarization occurs primarily in the source vicinity. The median {π }2.3 of resolved objects in NVSS is approximately two times larger than that of unresolved sources. Sources with little depolarization are ∼2 times more polarized than both highly depolarized and re-polarized sources. This indicates that intrinsic magnetic field disorder is the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed low fractional polarization of radio sources at high frequencies. We predict that number counts from polarization surveys will be similar at 1.4 GHz and at 2.3 GHz, for fixed sensitivity, although ∼10% of all sources may currently be missing because of strong depolarization. Objects with {π }1.4≈ {π }2.3≥slant 4 % typically have simple Faraday structures, so they are most useful for background samples. Almost half of flat-spectrum (α ≥slant -0.5) and ∼25% of steep-spectrum objects are re-polarized. Steep-spectrum, depolarized sources show a weak negative correlation of depolarization with redshift in the range 0 < z < 2.3. Previous non-detections of redshift evolution are likely due the inclusion of re-polarized sources as well.

  14. Study of interstellar molecular clouds using formaldehyde absorption toward extragalactic radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, E. D.; Andreev, N.; Dieter-Conklin, N.; Goss, W. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present new Very Large Array 6 cm H{sub 2}CO observations toward four extragalactic radio continuum sources (B0212+735, 3C 111, NRAO 150, and BL Lac) to explore the structure of foreground Galactic clouds as revealed by absorption variability. This project adds a new epoch in the monitoring observations of the sources reported by Marscher and collaborators in the mid-1990s. Our new observations confirm the monotonic increase in H{sub 2}CO absorption strength toward NRAO 150. We do not detect significant variability of our 2009 spectra with respect to the 1994 spectra of 3C111, B0212+735, and BL Lac; however, we find significant variability of the 3C111 2009 spectrum with respect to archive observations conducted in 1991 and 1992. Our analysis supports that changes in absorption lines could be caused by chemical and/or geometrical gradients in the foreground clouds and not necessarily by small-scale (∼10 AU) high-density molecular clumps within the clouds.

  15. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets - Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    Current driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur in extragalactic jets for estimated values of the carried currents. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities. The relativistic double-layer-emitted electron and ion beams drive plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  16. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets: Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    For estimated values of the currents carried by extragalactic jets, current-driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities, the relativistic double-layer-emitted electron, and ion beams driving plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  17. Determination of the extragalactic-planetary frame tie from joint analysis of radio interferometric and lunar laser ranging measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Charlot, P.; Finger, M. H.; Williams, J. G.; Sovers, O. J.; Newhall, XX; Standish, E. M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of extragalactic radio sources provide the basis for defining an accurate non-rotating reference frame in terms of angular positions of the sources. Measurements of the distance from the Earth to the Moon and to the inner planets provide the basis for defining an inertial planetary ephemeris reference frame. The relative orientation, or frame tie, between these two reference frames is of interest for combining Earth orientation measurements, for comparing Earth orientation results with theories referred to the mean equator and equinox, and for determining the positions of the planets with respect to the extragalactic reference frame. This work presents an indirect determination of the extragalactic-planetary frame tie from a combined reduction of VLBI and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) observations. For this determination, data acquired by LLR tracking stations since 1969 have been analyzed and combined with 14 years of VLBI data acquired by NASA's Deep Space Network since 1978. The frame tie derived from this joint analysis, with an accuracy of 0.003 sec, is the most accurate determination obtained so far. This result, combined with a determination of the mean ecliptic (defined in the rotating sense), shows that the mean equinox of epoch J2000 is offset from the x-axis of the extragalactic frame adopted by the International Earth Rotation Service for astrometric and geodetic applications by 0.078 sec +/- 0.010 sec along the y-direction and y 0.019 sec +/- 0.001 sec. along the z-direction.

  18. Acceleration of Compact Radio Jets on Sub-parsec Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Zensus, J. Anton

    2016-08-01

    Jets of compact radio sources are highly relativistic and Doppler boosted, making studies of their intrinsic properties difficult. Observed brightness temperatures can be used to study the intrinsic physical properties of relativistic jets, and constrain models of jet formation in the inner jet region. We aim to observationally test such inner jet models. The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) cores of compact radio sources are optically thick at a given frequency. The distance of the core from the central engine is inversely proportional to the frequency. Under the equipartition condition between the magnetic field energy and particle energy densities, the absolute distance of the VLBI core can be predicted. We compiled the brightness temperatures of VLBI cores at various radio frequencies of 2, 8, 15, and 86 GHz. We derive the brightness temperature on sub-parsec scales in the rest frame of the compact radio sources. We find that the brightness temperature increases with increasing distance from the central engine, indicating that the intrinsic jet speed (the Lorentz factor) increases along the jet. This implies that the jets are accelerated in the (sub-)parsec regions from the central engine.

  19. Relativistic blast-wave model for the rapid flux variations of AO 0235+164 and other compact radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    A relativistic blast-wave version of a signal-screen model is developed which can adequately explain the details of the flux-density and structural variations of compact extragalactic radio sources. The relativistic motion implied by flux variations is analyzed with respect to the synchrotron spectrum of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 observed during outbursts, and a signal-screen model for rapidly expanding shells produced by ultrarelativistic blast waves is examined. The approximate observed structure of the blast wave at three stages in its evolution is illustrated, each stage is described, and the model is applied to the flux density outburst in AO 0235+164 observed in late 1975. The results show that a relativistic blast-wave model can in general reproduce the main features of the observed flux variations in compact sources. Some problems with the proposed model are briefly discussed.

  20. UNVEILING EXTRAGALACTIC STAR FORMATION USING RADIO RECOMBINATION LINES: AN EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY PILOT STUDY WITH NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Chomiuk, Laura; Balser, Dana S.; Goss, W. M.; Pisano, D. J. E-mail: kej7a@virginia.edu E-mail: dbalser@nrao.edu E-mail: DJPisano@mail.wvu.edu

    2011-09-20

    Radio recombination lines (RRLs) are powerful, extinction-free diagnostics of the ionized gas in young, star-forming regions. Unfortunately, these lines are difficult to detect in external galaxies. We present the results of Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) observations of the RRL and radio continuum emission at 33 GHz from NGC 253, a nearby nuclear starburst galaxy. We detect the previously unobserved H58{alpha} and H59{alpha} RRLs and make simultaneous sensitive measurements of the continuum. We measure integrated line fluxes of 44.3 {+-} 0.7 W m{sup -2} and 39.9 {+-} 0.8 W m{sup -2} for the H58{alpha} and H59{alpha} lines, respectively. The thermal gas in NGC 253 is kinematically complex with multiple velocity components. We constrain the density of the thermal gas to (1.4-4) x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} and estimate an ionizing photon flux of 1 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}. We use the RRL kinematics and the derived ionizing photon flux to show that the nuclear region of NGC 253 is not gravitationally bound, which is consistent with the outflow of gas inferred from the X-ray and H{alpha} measurements. The line profiles, fluxes, and kinematics of the H58{alpha} and H59{alpha} lines agree with those of RRLs at different frequencies confirming the accuracy of the previous, more difficult, high-frequency observations. We find that the EVLA is an order of magnitude more efficient for extragalactic RRL observations than the Very Large Array. These observations demonstrate both the power of the EVLA and the future potential of extragalactic RRL studies with the EVLA.

  1. Scorpius X-1: The Evolution and Nature of the Twin Compact Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomalont, E. B.; Geldzahler, B. J.; Bradshaw, C. F.

    2001-09-01

    The motion and variability of the radio components in the low-mass X-ray binary system Sco X-1 have been monitored with extensive VLBI imaging at 1.7 and 5.0 GHz over 4 yr, including a 56 hr continuous VLBI observation in 1999 June. We detect one strong and one weak compact radio component, moving in opposite directions from the radio core. Their relative motion and flux densities are consistent with relativistic effects, from which we derive an average component speed of v/c=0.45+/-0.03 at an angle of 44deg+/-6deg to the line of sight. This inclination of the binary orbit suggests a mass of the secondary star that is less than 0.9 Msolar, assuming a neutron star mass of 1.4 Msolar. We suggest that the two moving radio components consist of ultrarelativistic plasma that is produced at a working surface where the energy in dual-opposing beams disrupt. The radio lobe advance velocity is constant over many hours, but differs among lobe-pairs: 0.32c, 0.46c, 0.48c, and 0.57c. A lobe-pair lifetime is less than 2 days, with a new pair formed near the core within a day. The lobe flux has flux density that is variable over a timescale of 1 hr, has a measured minimum size of 1 mas (4×108 km), and is extended perpendicular to its motion. This timescale and size are consistent with an electron radiative lifetime of less than 1 hr. Such a short lifetime can be caused by synchrotron losses if the lobe magnetic field is 300 G or by adiabatic expansion of the electrons as soon as they are produced at the working surface. The lobes also show periods of slow expansion and a steepening radio spectrum. Two of the core flares are correlated with the lobe flares under the assumption that the flares are produced by an energy burst traveling down the beams with a speed greater than 0.95. The radio morphology for Sco X-1 differs from most other Galactic jet sources. Possible reasons for the morphology difference are that Sco X-1 is associated with a neutron star, it is a persistent X

  2. Radiative Efficiency and Content of Extragalactic Radio Sources: Toward a Universal Scaling Relation between Jet Power and Radio Power

    SciTech Connect

    Birzan, L.; McNamara, B. R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Carilli, C. L.; Wise, M. W.

    2008-10-20

    We present an analysis of the energetics and particle content of the lobes of 24 radio galaxies at the cores of cooling clusters. The radio lobes in these systems have created visible cavities in the surrounding hot, X-ray-emitting gas, which allow direct measurement of the mechanical jet power of radio sources over six decades of radio luminosity, independently of the radio properties themselves. We find that jet (cavity) power increases with radio synchrotron power approximately as P{sub jet} {approx} L{sup {beta}}{sub radio}, where 0.35 {<=} {beta} {<=} 0.70 depending on the bandpass of measurement and state of the source. However, the scatter about these relations caused by variations in radiative efficiency spans more than 4 orders of magnitude. A number of factors contribute to this scatter, including aging, entrainment, variations in magnetic field strengths, and the partitioning of energy between electrons and nonradiating heavy particles. After accounting for variations in synchrotron break frequency (age), the scatter is reduced by {approx}50% , yielding the most accurate scaling relation available between the lobe radio power and the jet (cavity) power. Furthermore, we place limits on the magnetic field strengths and particle content of the radio lobes using a variety of X-ray constraints. We find that the lobe magnetic field strengths vary between a few to several tens of microgauss depending on the age and dynamical state of the lobes. If the cavities are maintained in pressure balance with their surroundings and are supported by internal fields and particles in equipartition, the ratio of energy in electrons to heavy particles (k) must vary widely from approximately unity to 4000, consistent with heavy (hadronic) jets.

  3. New method for determining the distances to certain extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.

    1980-01-01

    The structural evolution of variable radio sources is examined in the Hedgehog model. It is shown that the time evolution of the angular separation of two components is described by the ellipse equation.

  4. Lensing of Fast Radio Bursts as a Probe of Compact Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Julian B.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The possibility that part of the dark matter is made of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) remains poorly constrained over a wide range of masses, and especially in the 20 - 100 M⊙ window. We show that strong gravitational lensing of extragalactic fast radio bursts (FRBs) by MACHOs of masses larger than ˜20 M⊙ would result in repeated FRBs with an observable time delay. Strong lensing of a FRB by a lens of mass ML induces two images, separated by a typical time delay ˜few×(ML/30 M⊙) msec . Considering the expected FRB detection rate by upcoming experiments, such as canadian hydrogen intensity mapping experiment (CHIME), of 1 04 FRBs per year, we should observe from tens to hundreds of repeated bursts yearly, if MACHOs in this window make up all the dark matter. A null search for echoes with just 1 04 FRBs would constrain the fraction fDM of dark matter in MACHOs to fDM≲0.08 for ML≳20 M⊙ .

  5. Lensing of Fast Radio Bursts as a Probe of Compact Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Julian B; Kovetz, Ely D; Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-08-26

    The possibility that part of the dark matter is made of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) remains poorly constrained over a wide range of masses, and especially in the 20-100  M_{⊙} window. We show that strong gravitational lensing of extragalactic fast radio bursts (FRBs) by MACHOs of masses larger than ∼20  M_{⊙} would result in repeated FRBs with an observable time delay. Strong lensing of a FRB by a lens of mass M_{L} induces two images, separated by a typical time delay ∼few×(M_{L}/30  M_{⊙})  msec. Considering the expected FRB detection rate by upcoming experiments, such as canadian hydrogen intensity mapping experiment (CHIME), of 10^{4} FRBs per year, we should observe from tens to hundreds of repeated bursts yearly, if MACHOs in this window make up all the dark matter. A null search for echoes with just 10^{4} FRBs would constrain the fraction f_{DM} of dark matter in MACHOs to f_{DM}≲0.08 for M_{L}≳20  M_{⊙}.

  6. Lensing of Fast Radio Bursts as a Probe of Compact Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Julian B; Kovetz, Ely D; Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-08-26

    The possibility that part of the dark matter is made of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) remains poorly constrained over a wide range of masses, and especially in the 20-100  M_{⊙} window. We show that strong gravitational lensing of extragalactic fast radio bursts (FRBs) by MACHOs of masses larger than ∼20  M_{⊙} would result in repeated FRBs with an observable time delay. Strong lensing of a FRB by a lens of mass M_{L} induces two images, separated by a typical time delay ∼few×(M_{L}/30  M_{⊙})  msec. Considering the expected FRB detection rate by upcoming experiments, such as canadian hydrogen intensity mapping experiment (CHIME), of 10^{4} FRBs per year, we should observe from tens to hundreds of repeated bursts yearly, if MACHOs in this window make up all the dark matter. A null search for echoes with just 10^{4} FRBs would constrain the fraction f_{DM} of dark matter in MACHOs to f_{DM}≲0.08 for M_{L}≳20  M_{⊙}. PMID:27610840

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ICRF stars near extragalactic radio sources (Ryl'kov+ 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryl'Kov, V. P.; Narizhnaya, N. V.; Dement'eva, A. A.; Pinigin, G. I.; Maigurova, N. V.; Martinov, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    The compiled catalogue of 231044 stars was created from photographic and CCD observations of position catalogues observed by ground based telescopes. The catalogue destine for optical observations VLBI-ICRS astrometrical extragalactic radiosources (ERS) with telescopes equiped with CCD-cameras. The main purpose of this catalogue is to ensure the reference stars in optics for reducing positions of faint astrometrical ERS 17-22mag relative to more bright reference stars 14-17mag. The catalogue contains 231044 star positions in fields 40'x40' near 240 ERS. More than nine catalogues of stars coordinates were used for compiling the Pul-ERS catalogue. For 69% of stars the proper motions were taken from UCAC3 catalogue to convert the position stars to the common epoch. The number of position measurements for each star varies from one to more than ten records. The inner precision of positions of stars in Pul-ERS is from 4 to 150mas. 159331 stars of the compiled catalogue were identified with stars of the UCAC3. The average internal accuracy of positions on both coordinates is not worse 0.11". (2 data files).

  8. Global VLBI Observations of Weak Extragalactic Radio Sources: Imaging Candidates to Align the VLBI and Gaia Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Charlot, Patrick; Porcas, Richard; Garrington, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames (International Celestial Reference Frame) with the highest accuracy. In this respect, it is found that only 10% of the ICRF sources are suitable to establish this link (70 sources), either because most of the ICRF sources are not bright enough at optical wavelengths or because they show extended radio emission which precludes reaching the highest astrometric accuracy. In order to improve the situation, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of about 450 optically-bright radio sources, typically 20 times weaker than the ICRF sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent 90% detection rate. This paper reports on global VLBI observations carried out in March 2008 to image 105 from the 398 previously detected sources. All sources were successfully imaged, revealing compact VLBI structure for about half of them, which is very promising for the future.

  9. Low Power Compact Radio Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, G.; Taylor, G.B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NRAO, Socorro

    2005-06-30

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution multi-frequency (8 and 22 GHz) VLA images of five low power compact (LPC) radio sources, and phase referenced VLBA images at 1.6 GHz of their nuclear regions. At the VLA resolution we resolve the structure and identify component positions and flux densities. The phase referenced VLBA data at 1.6 GHz reveals flat-spectrum, compact cores (down to a few milliJansky) in four of the five sources. The absolute astrometry provided by the phase referencing allows us to identify the center of activity on the VLA images. Moreover, these data reveal rich structures, including two-sided jets and secondary components. On the basis of the arcsecond scale structures and of the nuclear properties, we rule out the presence of strong relativistic effects in our LPCs, which must be intrinsically small (deprojected linear sizes {approx}< 10 kpc). Fits of continuous injection models reveal break frequencies in the GHz domain, and ages in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} yrs. In LPCs, the outermost edge may be advancing more slowly than in more powerful sources or could even be stationary; some LPCs might also have ceased their activity. In general, the properties of LPCs can be related to a number of reasons, including, but not limited to: youth, frustration, low kinematic power jets, and short-lived activity in the radio.

  10. THE CATALOG OF POSITIONS OF OPTICALLY BRIGHT EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES OBRS-2

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, L.

    2013-07-01

    Future space-borne astrometry missions, such as Gaia, will be able to determine the optical positions of hundreds of quasars with submilliarcsecond accuracies comparable to those achieved in radio by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Comparisons of coordinate systems from space-borne missions and VLBI will be very important, first for investigations of possible systematic errors and second for investigations of possible shifts between centroids of radio and optical emissions in active galactic nuclei. In order to make such a comparison more robust, a program for densification of the grid of radio sources detectable with both VLBI and Gaia was launched in 2006. Program sources are 398 quasars with declinations > - 10 Degree-Sign that are brighter than 18 mag at the V band. The first two observing campaigns were run in 2007-2008. In the third campaign, a set of 291 objects from that list was observed with the VLBA+EVN in 2010-2011 with the primary goal of producing their images with milliarcsecond resolution. In this paper, following the method of absolute astrometry, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these observations. The catalog of positions of 295 target sources, estimates of their correlated flux densities at 2.2 and 8.4 GHz, and their images are presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in a range of 2-200 mas, with a median of 3.2 mas.

  11. Compton Observatory observations of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This task involved the investigation of the emission of clusters of galaxies, particularly those which contain extended radio emission, in the gamma-ray region of the spectrum. Observations were made of several clusters using the Compton Observatory EGRET instrument. For each cluster a measured flux or upper limit on the gamma-ray flux was obtained. In only one case, Abell 2199, was there a significant measured flux. This source is spatially confused with a know blazar in the field of view. The observation is consistent with all emissions being from the blazar.

  12. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan; Milton, Stephen

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  13. Extragalactic Radio Astronomy from an Armchair: Continuum Spectral Shapes of 150 Faint Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Perez, J. N.; Andernach, H.

    1994-08-01

    We have used all available radio-source surveys to construct the continuum spectra for sources in an area of 5 by 10 degrees near the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP), previously observed at 2.7 GHz with the Effelsberg telescope. Most of the surveys are of similar angular resolution (~3 to 5 arcmin) and cover a wide range of frequencies from 38 MHz to 5 GHz. We have developed a cross-identification algorithm that takes into account the dependence of source structure on observing frequency. This improved the number of true matches between the source catalogues. Spectra for 229 sources with flux measurements at two or more frequencies were constructed. For 124 of these we found data at four or more frequencies, allowing us to classify their spectral shape. In our rather faint sample (S_2.7GHz > 20 mJy) we find the fraction of sources with spectral curvature to be much lower than in samples of stronger sources previously studied by other authors. Preliminary optical identifications are being drawn from the digitized versions of the first Palomar Sky Survey prepared at STScI.

  14. Using Space Telescope to tie the HIPPARCOS and extragalactic reference frames together

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemenway, P. D.; Duncombe, R. L.; Jefferys, W. H.; Shelus, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations will be made to tie the HIPPARCOS Instrumental System (HIS) to extragalactic objects, to determine the overall rotation of the HIS with respect to a set of extragalactic objects; to compare the HIS to an accurate radio reference frame; and to look for motions in the optical centroids of compact extragalactic objects at the level of 0.001 arcseconds per year. About 75 radio sources and extragalactic objects will be chosen from the initial group of 414 pairs. The egos will have their positions and proper motions determined relative to the HIPPARCOS Input Catalog stars. The candidate stars are being screened by ground based speckle interferometry to select a final set.

  15. Extragalactic continuum sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtaoja, E.

    1989-09-01

    As with most other high-frequency radio telescopes, continuum work occupies only a small fraction - currently about 5% - of SEST's total time. The importance of these observations in increasing our understanding of quasars and other extragalactic sources is, however, large.

  16. Morphology of high-luminosity compact radio sources.

    PubMed Central

    Zensus, J A; Krichbaum, T P; Lobanov, A P

    1995-01-01

    High-dynamic range imaging and monitoring with very-long-baseline interferometry reveal a rich morphology of luminous flat-spectrum radio sources. One-sided core-jet structures abound, and superluminal motion is frequently measured. In a few cases, both distinct moving features and diffuse underlying jet emission can be detected. Superluminal motion seen in such sources is typically complex, on curved trajectories or ridge lines, and with variable component velocities, including stationary features. The curved trajectories seen can be modeled by helical motion within the underlying jet flow. The very-long-baseline interferometry properties of the superluminal features in the jet of 3C 345 and other similar sources can be explained by models invoking the emission from shocks, at least within the vicinity of the compact core. Inverse-Compton calculations, constrained by x-ray observations, yield realistic estimates for the physical conditions in the parsec-scale jet. There is evidence for a transition region in this source beyond which other factors (e.g., plasma interactions and nonsynchrotron radiation processes) may become prominent. Multifrequency and polarization imaging (especially at high frequencies) are emerging as critical tools in testing model predictions. PMID:11607595

  17. Morphology of high-luminosity compact radio sources.

    PubMed

    Zensus, J A; Krichbaum, T P; Lobanov, A P

    1995-12-01

    High-dynamic range imaging and monitoring with very-long-baseline interferometry reveal a rich morphology of luminous flat-spectrum radio sources. One-sided core-jet structures abound, and superluminal motion is frequently measured. In a few cases, both distinct moving features and diffuse underlying jet emission can be detected. Superluminal motion seen in such sources is typically complex, on curved trajectories or ridge lines, and with variable component velocities, including stationary features. The curved trajectories seen can be modeled by helical motion within the underlying jet flow. The very-long-baseline interferometry properties of the superluminal features in the jet of 3C 345 and other similar sources can be explained by models invoking the emission from shocks, at least within the vicinity of the compact core. Inverse-Compton calculations, constrained by x-ray observations, yield realistic estimates for the physical conditions in the parsec-scale jet. There is evidence for a transition region in this source beyond which other factors (e.g., plasma interactions and nonsynchrotron radiation processes) may become prominent. Multifrequency and polarization imaging (especially at high frequencies) are emerging as critical tools in testing model predictions.

  18. The compact radio structure of radio-loud NLS1 galaxies and the relationship to CSS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, M.; Chen, Y.; Komossa, S.; Yuan, W.; Shen, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are thought to be young AGNs with relatively small black hole masses and high accretion rates. Radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s) are very special, because some of them show blazar-like characteristics, while others resemble compact steep-spectrum sources. Relativistic jets were shown to exist in a few RLNLS1s based on VLBI observations and confirmed by the gamma-ray flaring of some of them. These properties may possibly be contrary to typical radio-loud AGNs, in light of the low black-hole masses, and high accretion rates. We present the compact radio structure of fourteen RLNLS1 galaxies from Very Long Baseline Array observations at 5 GHz in 2013. Although all these sources are very radio-loud with {R > 100}, their jet properties are diverse, in terms of their milli-arcsecond (mas) scale (pc scale) morphology and their overall radio spectral shape. The core brightness temperatures of our sources are significantly lower than those of blazars, therefore, the beaming effect is generally not significant in our sources, compared to blazars. This implies that the bulk jet speed may likely be low in our sources. The relationship between RLNLS1s and compact steep-spectrum sources, and the implications on jet formation are discussed based on the pc-scale jet properties.

  19. COLA. III. RADIO DETECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN COMPACT MODERATE LUMINOSITY INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, R.; Conway, J. E.; Aalto, S.; Appleton, P. N.; Norris, R. P.; Pihlstroem, Y. M.; Kewley, L. J.

    2010-09-01

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11.01} L{sub sun}) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores ({approx}10{sup 21} W Hz{sup -1}) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whose VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.

  20. Possible production of high-energy gamma rays from proton acceleration in the extragalactic radio source markarian 501

    PubMed

    Mannheim

    1998-01-30

    The active galaxy Markarian 501 was discovered with air-Cerenkov telescopes at photon energies of 10 tera-electron volts. Such high energies may indicate that the gamma rays from Markarian 501 are due to the acceleration of protons rather than electrons. Furthermore, the observed absence of gamma ray attenuation due to electron-positron pair production in collisions with cosmic infrared photons implies a limit of 2 to 4 nanowatts per square meter per steradian for the energy flux of an extragalactic infrared radiation background at a wavelength of 25 micrometers. This limit provides important clues about the epoch of galaxy formation.

  1. On the nature of bright compact radio sources at z>4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Rocco; Frey, Sándor; Cseh, Dávid; Müller, Cornelia; Paragi, Zsolt; Falcke, Heino; Gabányi, Krisztina É.; Gurvits, Leonid I.; An, Tao; Titov, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    High-redshift radio-loud quasars are used to, among other things, test the predictions of cosmological models, set constraints on black hole growth in the early universe and understand galaxy evolution. Prior to this paper, 20 extragalactic radio sources at redshifts above 4.5 have been imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Here we report on observations of an additional ten z > 4.5 sources at 1.7 and 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN), thereby increasing the number of imaged sources by 50 per cent. Combining our newly observed sources with those from the literature, we create a substantial sample of 30 z > 4.5 VLBI sources, allowing us to study the nature of these objects. Using spectral indices, variability and brightness temperatures, we conclude that of the 27 sources with sufficient information to classify, the radio emission from one source is from star formation, 13 are flat-spectrum radio quasars and 13 are steep-spectrum sources. We also argue that the steep-spectrum sources are off-axis (unbeamed) radio sources with rest-frame self-absorption peaks at or below GHz frequencies and that these sources can be classified as gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and megahertz peaked-spectrum (MPS) sources.

  2. Discovery of a compact radio component in the center of supernova 1986J.

    PubMed

    Bietenholz, Michael F; Bartel, Norbert; Rupen, Michael P

    2004-06-25

    Very-long-baseline interferometry observations have revealed a bright, compact radio component near the center of the expanding shell of supernova 1986J. The component, not present in earlier images, has an inverted radio spectrum different from that of the shell. Such an inversion has not been seen in the spectrum of any other supernova. The new component is likely radio emission associated either with accretion onto a black hole or with the nebula formed around an energetic young neutron star in the center of SN 1986J, which would directly link either a black hole or a neutron star to a modern supernova.

  3. Extragalactic jets as probes of distant clusters of galaxies and the clusters occupied by bent radio AGN (COBRA) survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Wing, Joshua D.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Golden-Marx, Emmet; Brodwin, Mark; Douglass, E. M.; Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    We are conducting a large survey of distant clusters of galaxies using radio sources with bent jets and lobes as tracers. These radio sources are driven by AGN and achieve their bent morphologies through interaction with the surrounding gas found in clusters of galaxies. Based on low-redshift studies, these types of sources can be used to identify clusters very efficiently. We present initial results from our survey of 653 bent-double radio sources with optical hosts too faint to appear in the SDSS. The sample was observed in the infrared with Spitzer, and it has revealed ~200 distant clusters or proto-clusters in the redshift range z ~ 0.7 - 3.0. The sample of bent-doubles contains both quasars and radio galaxies enabling us to study both radiative and kinetic mode feedback in cluster and group environments at a wide range of redshifts.

  4. First Detections of Compact AGN-triggered Radio Cores in RQ AGNs in the ECDFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandoni, I.; Maini, A.; Norris, R. P.; Giovannini, G.; Spitler, L. R.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism triggering the radio emission in Radio-Quiet (RQ) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), found to be a relevant component of the faint radio population in deep fields, is hotly debated. Most RQ AGNs are unresolved or barely resolved at a few arcsec scale, comparable to the host galaxy size. RQ AGNs have also been found to share many properties with Star Forming Galaxies (SFG). They have similar radio luminosities and similar optical- /infrared-to-radio flux ratios. Their radio luminosity functions show similar evolutionary trends, and their host galaxies have similar colours, optical morphologies and stellar masses. For all these reasons it was concluded that the radio emission in such RQ AGNs is mainly triggered by star formation (SF). However in the local Universe (z<0.5) it is well known that both AGN and SF processes can contribute to the total radio emission in RQ AGNs (see e.g., Seyfert 2 galaxies), and there is growing evidence that composite SF/AGN systems are common at mid to high redshift (z>1-2). We used the Australian Long Baseline Array to observe a number of RQ AGNs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), and we detected compact, high-surface-brightness radio cores in some of them. Our pilot study shows that at least some of the sources classified as radio quiet contain an AGN that can contribute significantly (~50% or more) to the total radio emission. This is a first direct evidence of the presence of such AGN-triggered radio emission in RQ AGNs at cosmological redshifts.

  5. VLBI Observations of Gamma-Ray-Quiet AGN: Comparing Radio Core Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Murphy, D. W.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Costa, M. E.; McCulloch, P.; Edwards, P. G.; Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; King, E. A.; Jones, D. L.; Preston, R. A.; Meier, D. L.; van Ommen, T. D.; Nicolson, G. D.; Quick, J. F. H.

    1998-01-01

    We present VLBI and Australia Telescope Compact Array images, and derive source frame radio-core brightness temperatures for three prominent, flat-spectrum extragalactic radio sources, notable because they have not been detected as gamma-ray sources with the EGRET instrument.

  6. JVLA observations of IC 348 SW: Compact radio sources and their nature

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Palau, Aina E-mail: l.zapata@crya.unam.mx

    2014-07-20

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, 7 of which are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797, we detect a double radio source at its center, separated by ∼3''. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  7. Jets, hotspots and lobes: what X-ray observations tell us about extra-galactic radio sources.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Martin J

    2005-12-15

    The brightest and most numerous discrete radio sources in the sky, radio galaxies and quasars, are powered by twin jets of plasma which emerge at relativistic speeds from very small regions at the centre of large elliptical galaxies, powered by mass infall on to supermassive black holes. The jets can carry material out to very large distances (millions of light years) where it forms balloon-like lobes. Until recently it has been impossible to make definite statements about the energy or the nature of the matter supplied by the jets, or the dynamics of the lobes as they expand into the external medium. This has meant that crucial questions about the generation of radio sources and their effect on their environment have gone unanswered. The situation has been revolutionized by the launch at the start of this decade of a new generation of X-ray observatories, Chandra and XMM-Newton. In this article, I explain why observations with these instruments have made such a difference, what we have learned as a result and why the community remains divided on some important features of the interpretation of the data.

  8. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  9. Understanding soft gamma-ray repeaters in the context of the extragalactic radio pulsar origin of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Marco

    1993-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) may be neutron stars undergoing structural adjustments that produce transient gamma-ray events. A unified scenario is proposed in which young radio pulsars are responsible for SGRs and classical GRB sources. The radiative emission associated with a pulsar 'glitch' is seen as a GRB or an SGR event depending on the direction of our line of sight. Burst spectra, energetics, and statistics of GRBs and SGRs are discussed. It is shown that classical GRB spectra arise from Compton upscattering by charges accelerated along the viewing direction and SGR burst spectra are due to the thermalization of Alfven wave energy away from this direction. If crustal adjustments occur within the first 50,000 years of a pulsar's lifetime, the model predicts two SGR sources within the galaxy, in agreement with current observations.

  10. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  11. Do the compact radio sources in NGC 253 and M82 fade over time?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, James S.; Antonucci, Robert R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 has been observed at a third epoch at 6 cm, and a second epoch at 3.6 cm, using the highest resolution configuration of the Very Large Array (VLA). Over a total time span of 4 yr between 1987 and 1991, no new compact radio sources have appeared. The flux density limit ranges from 3 mJy (3 times the power of Cas A) for most of the main body of the source to approximately 0.3 mJy off the diffuse source surrounding the nucleus. Furthermore, there is no evidence for significant source fading over 4 yr, in contrast to the result reported by Kronberg & Sramek (1985) for M82. More recent data suggest that, except for the strongest source in that galaxy, the compact radio sources in M82 may not be fading after all. If this suggestion proves correct, supernova rates of 0.2-0.3/yr in M82, estimated based on the assumed source fading, are incorrect. More accurate limits on source fading indicate that the current rate of production of radio supernovae in M82 is no greater than 0.1/yr, while that in NGC 253 is no greater than 0.25/yr.

  12. The Compact Steep-Spectrum and Gigahertz Peaked-Spectrum Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.

    1998-05-01

    I review the radio to X-ray properties of gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources, the current hypotheses for their origin, and their use to constrain the evolution of powerful radio galaxies. The GPS and CSS sources are compact, powerful radio sources with well-defined peaks in their radio spectra (near 1 GHz in the GPS and near 100 MHz in the CSS). The GPS sources are entirely contained within the extent of the narrow-line region (<~1 kpc), while the CSS sources are contained entirely within the host galaxy (<~15 kpc). The peaks in the spectra are probably due to synchrotron self-absorption, though free-free absorption through an inhomogeneous screen may also play a role. The turnover frequency varies with linear size l as nu_m~l^-0.65, suggesting a simple physical relationship between these parameters. The radio morphologies are strikingly like those of the large-scale classical doubles, though some sources can have very distorted morphologies suggestive of interactions. Radio polarization tends to be low, and in some cases the Faraday rotation measures can be extremely large. The IR properties are consistent with stellar populations and active galactic nucleus (AGN) bolometric luminosity similar to that of the 3CR classical doubles. The optical host galaxy properties (absolute magnitude, Hubble diagram, evidence for interaction) are consistent with those of the 3CR classical doubles. CSS sources at all redshifts exhibit high surface brightness optical light (most likely emission-line gas) that is aligned with the radio axis. The optical emission-line properties suggest (1) interaction of the radio source with the emission-line gas and (2) the presence of dust toward the emission-line regions. X-ray observations of high-redshift GPS quasars and a couple of GPS galaxies suggest the presence of significant columns of gas toward the nuclei. Searches for cold gas in the host galaxies have revealed large amounts of molecular gas and

  13. The Extragalactic Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Donahue, Megan; Panagia, Nino

    1997-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Early history of the distance scale problem, S. van den Bergh; Cosmology: From Hubble to HST, M. S. Turner; Age constraints nucleocosmochronology, J. Truran; The ages of globular clusters, P. Demarque; The linearity of the Hubble flow M. Postman; Gravitational lensing and the extragalactic distance scale, R. D. Blandford andT . Kundic; Using the cosmic microwave background to constrain the Hubble constant A. Lasenby and T M. Jones; Cepheids as distance indicators, N. R. Tanvir; The I-band Tully-Fisher relation and the Hubble constant, R. Giovanell; The calibration of type 1a supernovae as standard candles, A. Saha; Focusing in on the Hubble constant, G. A. Tammann & M. Federspiel; Interim report on the calibration of the Tully-Fisher relation in the HST Key Project to measure the Hubble constant, J. Mould et al.; Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the extragalactic distance scale, W. L. Freedman, B. F. Madore and T R. C. Kennicutt; Novae as distance indicators, M. Livio; Verifying the planetary nebula luminosity function method, G. H. Jacoby; On the possible use of radio supernovae for distance determinations, K. W. Weiler et al.; Post-AGB stars as standard candles, H. Bond; Helium core flash at the tip of the red giant branch: a population II distance indicator, B. F. Madore, W. L. Freedman and T S. Sakai; Globular clusters as distance indicators, B. C. Whitmore; Detached eclipsing binaries as primary distance and age indicators, B. Paczynski; Light echoes: geometric measurement of galaxy distances, W. B. Sparks; The SBF survey of galaxy distances J. L. Tonry; Extragalactic distance scales: The long and short of it, V. Trimble.

  14. Compact Radio Sources and Jet-driven AGN Feedback in the Early Universe: Constraints from Integral-Field Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvadba, N H; Lehnert, M D; De Breuck, C; Gilbert, A; van Breugel, W

    2007-07-05

    To investigate the impact of radio jets during the formation epoch of their massive host galaxies, we present an analysis of two massive, log M{sub stellar}/M{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} 10.6 and 11.3, compact radio galaxies at z = 3.5, TNJ0205+2242 and TNJ0121+1320. Their small radio sizes (R {le} 10 kpc) are most likely a sign of youth. In particular, we compare their radio properties and gas dynamics with those in well extended radio galaxies at high redshift, which show strong evidence for powerful, jet-driven outflows of significant gas masses (M {approx} 10{sup 9-10} M{sub {circle_dot}}). Our analysis combines rest-frame optical integral-field spectroscopy obtained with SINFONI on the VLT with existing radio imaging, CO(4-3) emission line spectra, and rest-frame UV longslit spectroscopy. [OIII]{lambda}5007 line emission is compact in both galaxies and lies within the region defined by the radio lobes. For TNJ0205+2242, the Ly{alpha} profile narrows significantly outside the jet radius, indicating the presence of a quiescent halo. TNJ0121+1320 has two components at a projected relative distance of {approx}10 kpc and a velocity offset of {approx}300 km s{sup -1}, measured from the [OIII]{lambda}5007 velocity map. This suggests that the fainter component is orbiting around the more massive, radio-loud galaxy. If motions are gravitational, this implies a dynamical mass of 2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} for the radio-loud component. The dynamical mass, molecular gas mass measured from the CO line emission, and radio luminosity of these two compact radio galaxies imply that compact radio sources may well develop large-scale, energetic outflows as observed in extended radio galaxies, with the potential of removing significant fractions of the ISM from the host galaxy. The absence of luminous emission line gas extending beyond the radio emission in these sources agrees with the observed timescales and outflow rates in extended radio galaxies, and adds further

  15. Occultation of compact radio sources by the ion tail of Halley's Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alurkar, S. K.; Bhonsle, R. V.; Sharma, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Enhancements of scintillations of the compact radio sources PKS 2314+03 and 1827-360 were observed at 103 MHz and 408 MHz during 18-21 December 1985 and on 29 March 1986, respectively, when the plasma tail of Halley's Comet swept across them. At 103 MHz the RMS plasma density variation along the tail was 10 and 3.3/cu cm at 0.12 AU and 0.18 AU, respectively, as measured from the comet's position. At 408 MHz it was 1.9/cu cm at 0.036 AU. Comparison of results of these two sets of observations is presented.

  16. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a compact radio galaxy at z = 2.390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, Rogier; Mathis, Douglas F.; Keel, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The radio galaxy with the highest redshift in the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey, 53W002, is described and examined in terms of UV profile in relation to an early-type galaxy. The HST WFC images have a resolution of 0.2 arcsec FWHM, and the I- and V-band structures are assessed. The source is elongated in a manner similar to the Ly alpha cloud in V, and the structure is highly compact in I. The present object with a young starburst has very high central UV surface brightnesses relative to nearby luminous early-type galaxies, while the light profiles are similar. The data are concluded to suggest that 53W002 is a young galaxy that has a regular light profile at z = 2.390 even though it has been forming stars since not more than about 0.5 Gyr before z = 2.390. Such a scenario is consistent with concurrent dynamical collapse and star formation in the compact radio galaxy.

  17. Optical variability of extragalactic objects used to tie the HIPPARCOS reference frame to an extragalactic system using Hubble space telescope observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozyan, Elizabeth P.; Hemenway, Paul D.; Argue, A. Noel

    1990-01-01

    Observations of a set of 89 extragalactic objects (EGOs) will be made with the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensors and Planetary Camera in order to link the HIPPARCOS Instrumental System to an extragalactic coordinate system. Most of the sources chosen for observation contain compact radio sources and stellarlike nuclei; 65 percent are optical variables beyond a 0.2 mag limit. To ensure proper exposure times, accurate mean magnitudes are necessary. In many cases, the average magnitudes listed in the literature were not adequate. The literature was searched for all relevant photometric information for the EGOs, and photometric parameters were derived, including mean magnitude, maximum range, and timescale of variability. This paper presents the results of that search and the parameters derived. The results will allow exposure times to be estimated such that an observed magnitude different from the tabular magnitude by 0.5 mag in either direction will not degrade the astrometric centering ability on a Planetary Camera CCD frame.

  18. Radio Continuum and H I Study of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, S.; Kantharia, N. G.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2011-02-01

    The multifrequency radio continuum and 21 cm H I observations of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069, and I Zw 97, using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) are presented here. Radio continuum emission at 610 MHz and 325 MHz is detected from all the observed galaxies whereas only a few are detected at 240 MHz. In our sample, three galaxies (Mrk 104, Mrk 108, and Mrk 1039) are members of groups and two galaxies (Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97) are isolated galaxies. The radio emission from Mrk 104 and Mrk 108 is seen to encompass the entire optical galaxy whereas the radio emission from Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069, and I Zw 97 is confined to massive H II regions. This, we suggest, indicates that the star formation in the latter group of galaxies has recently been triggered and that the environment in which the galaxy is evolving plays a role. Star formation rates (SFRs) calculated from 610 MHz emission are in the range 0.01-0.1 M sun yr-1 this is similar to the SFR obtained for individual star-forming regions in BCDs. The integrated radio spectra of four galaxies are modeled over the frequency range where data is available. We find that two of the galaxies, Mrk 1069 and Mrk 1039, show a turnover at low frequencies, which is well fitted by free-free absorption whereas the other two galaxies, Mrk 104 and Mrk 108, show a power law at the lowest GMRT frequencies. The flatter spectrum, localized star formation, and radio continuum in isolated galaxies lend support to stochastic self-propagating star formation. The H I observations of four galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, and Mrk 1069, show extended disks as large as ~1.1-6 times the optical size. All the observed BCDs (except Mrk 104) show rotating disk with a half power width of ~50-124 km s-1. Solid body rotation is common in our sample. We note that the tidal dwarf origin is possible for two of the BCDs in our sample.

  19. Structure and evolution of the compact radio source in NGC 1275.

    PubMed

    Romney, J D; Benson, J M; Dhawan, V; Kellermann, K I; Vermeulen, R C; Walker, R C

    1995-12-01

    Investigations of the fine-scale structure in the compact nucleus of the radio source 3C 84 in NGC 1275 (New General Catalogue number) are reported. Structural monitoring observations beginning as early as 1976, and continuing to the present, revealed subluminal motions in a jet-like relatively diffuse region extending away from a flat-spectrum core. A counterjet feature was discovered in 1993, and very recent nearly simultaneous studies have detected the same feature at five frequencies ranging from 5 to 43 GHz. The counterjet exhibits a strong low-frequency cutoff, giving this region of the source an inverted spectrum. The observations are consistent with a physical model in which the cutoff arises from free-free absorption in a volume that surrounds the core but obscures only the counterjet feature. If such a model is confirmed, very-long-baseline radio interferometry observations can then be used to probe the accretion region, outside the radio jet, on parsec scales.

  20. Structure and evolution of the compact radio source in NGC 1275.

    PubMed Central

    Romney, J D; Benson, J M; Dhawan, V; Kellermann, K I; Vermeulen, R C; Walker, R C

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of the fine-scale structure in the compact nucleus of the radio source 3C 84 in NGC 1275 (New General Catalogue number) are reported. Structural monitoring observations beginning as early as 1976, and continuing to the present, revealed subluminal motions in a jet-like relatively diffuse region extending away from a flat-spectrum core. A counterjet feature was discovered in 1993, and very recent nearly simultaneous studies have detected the same feature at five frequencies ranging from 5 to 43 GHz. The counterjet exhibits a strong low-frequency cutoff, giving this region of the source an inverted spectrum. The observations are consistent with a physical model in which the cutoff arises from free-free absorption in a volume that surrounds the core but obscures only the counterjet feature. If such a model is confirmed, very-long-baseline radio interferometry observations can then be used to probe the accretion region, outside the radio jet, on parsec scales. PMID:11607597

  1. Radio flares of compact binary mergers: the effect of non-trivial outflow geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-10-01

    The next generation gravitational waves (GW) detectors are most sensitive to GW emitted by compact (neutron star/black hole) binary mergers. If one of those is a neutron star the merger will also emit electromagnetic radiation via three possible channels: gamma-ray bursts and their (possibly orphan) afterglows, Li-Paczynski Macronovae and radio flares. This accompanying electromagnetic radiation is vitally important in confirming the GW detections. It could also reveal a wealth of information regarding the merger and will open a window towards multimessenger astronomy. Identifying and characterizing these counterparts is therefore of utmost importance. In this work, we explore late time radio flares emitted by the dynamically ejected outflows. We build upon previous work and consider the effect of the outflow's non-trivial geometry. Using an approximate method, we estimate the radio light-curves for several ejected matter distributions obtained in numerical simulations. Our method provides an upper limit to the effect of non-sphericity. Together with the spherical estimates, the resulting light curves bound the actual signal. We find that while non-spherical geometries can in principle lead to an enhanced emission, in most cases they result in an increase in the time-scale compared with a corresponding spherical configuration. This would weaken somewhat these signals and might decrease the detection prospects.

  2. Very-long-baseline radio interferometry surveys of the compact structure in active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P N

    1995-01-01

    Very-long-baseline radio interferometry (VLBI) imaging surveys have been undertaken since the late 1970s. The sample sizes were initially limited to a few tens of objects but the snapshot technique has now allowed samples containing almost 200 sources to be studied. The overwhelming majority of powerful compact sources are asymmetric corejects of one form or another, most of which exhibit apparent superluminal motion. However 5-10% of powerful flat-spectrum sources are 100-parsec (pc)-scale compact symmetric objects; these appear to form a continuum with the 1-kpc-scale double-lobed compact steep-spectrum sources, which make up 15-20% of lower frequency samples. It is likely that these sub-galactic-size symmetric sources are the precursors to the large-scale classical double sources. There is a surprising peak around 90 degrees in the histogram of misalignments between the dominant source axes on parsec and kiloparsec scales; this seems to be associated with sources exhibiting a high degree of relativistic beaming. VLBI snapshot surveys have great cosmological potential via measurements of both proper motion and angular size vs. redshift as well as searches for gravitational "millilensing." PMID:11607594

  3. A compact radio frequency quadrupole for ion bunching in the WITCH experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traykov, E.; Beck, M.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Delahaye, P.; De Leebeeck, V.; Friedag, P.; Herlert, A.; Geeraert, N.; Heirman, W.; Lønne, P.-I.; Mader, J.; Roccia, S.; Soti, G.; Tandecki, M.; Timmermans, M.; Thiboud, J.; Van Gorp, S.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, C.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2011-08-01

    During the last several years the WITCH (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) experimental setup at ISOLDE has undergone various upgrades aiming at improvement of general performance. An essential innovation, a compact Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion cooler and buncher device, was designed and successfully commissioned as a part of the off-line tuning system of WITCH. The RFQ is coupled to the existing surface ionization ion source providing high intensity ion bunches (up to 107 ions per bunch) towards the pulsed drift tube and the Penning traps of WITCH. This achievement allows for loading and tuning of the Penning traps in the domain of space charge limits and grants off-line operation independently of the REX-ISOLDE ion source. The current upgrade allows for a more thorough and frequent testing with bunched stable ion beams of high intensities, which will be used for studying various systematic effects involved in experiments with radioactive ions.

  4. Cardassian Expansion: Constraints from Compact Radio Source Angular Size versus Redshift Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zong-Hong; Fujimoto, Masa-Katsu

    2002-12-01

    The ``Cardassian Expansion Scenario'' was recently proposed by Freese & Lewis as an alternative to a cosmological constant in explaining the current accelerating universe. In this paper we investigate observational constraints on this scenario from recent measurements of the angular size of high-z compact radio sources compiled by Gurvits and coworkers. We show that the allowed intervals for n and zeq, the two parameters of the Cardassian model, are heavily dependent on the value of the mean projected linear size l. However, the best fit to the current angular size data prefers the conventional flat Λ cold dark matter model to this Cardassian expansion proposal, though the latter is cosmologically credible and compatible with the Θ-z diagram for some values of l.

  5. Development of a radio-astrometric catalog by means of very long baseline interferometry observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanselow, J. L.; Sovers, O. J.; Thomas, J. B.; Bletzacker, F. R.; Kearns, T. J.; Cohen, E. J.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Rogstad, D. H.; Skjerve, L. J.; Young, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been developing a radio-astrometric catalogue for use in the application of radio interferometry to interplanetary navigation and geodesy. The catalogue consists of approximately 100 compact extragalactic radio sources whose relative positions have formal uncertainties of the order of 0.01 arcsec. The sources cover nearly all of the celestial sphere above -40 deg declination. By using the optical counterparts of many of these radio sources, this radio reference frame has been tied to the FK4 optical system with a global accuracy of approximately 0.1 arcsec. This paper describes the status of this work.

  6. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  7. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: 24 and 43 GHz Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Ed B.; Gordon, David; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Ma, Chopo; Naudet, Charles J.; Sovers, Ojars J.; Zhang, Li-Wei D.

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-band) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  8. Young Neutron Stars in Extragalactic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Nathan; Lorimer, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are compact remnants of stellar cores left behind by supernova explosions. They spin rapidly and emit electromagnetic radiation from their magnetic poles, and gradually lose rotational energy. This project tests and expands upon a previous prediction by Perna et al. for the initial spin rates of neutron stars by attempting to model the x-ray emission from extragalactic supernovae. A computer simulation generated a set of pulsars of known initial rotational periods, magnetic field strengths, and ages, and will calculate the expected x-ray luminosities from the known relationship between magnetic field strengths, slow-down rates, and radio luminosities. This experiment expanded upon the original research by incorporating variability in the angle between the magnetic and rotational axes of each pulsar as well as the braking index value, which in the original publication were kept constant. This examines the effect of the angle on pulsars’ x-ray luminosities. The simulated x-ray luminosities were compared to the known x-ray luminosities of known supernova explosions, which served as an upper limit to determine the highest possible initial rotation speeds. Funding was provided through the WVU Summer Undergraduate Research Program.

  9. A review of decametric radio astronomy - Instruments and science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Cane, H. V.

    1987-01-01

    The techniques and instruments used in Galactic and extragalactic radio astronomy at dkm wavelengths are surveyed, and typical results are summarized. Consideration is given to the large specialized phased arrays used for early surveys, the use of wideband elements to increase frequency agility, experimental VLBI observations, and limitations on ground-based observations below about 10 MHz (where the proposed LF Space Array, with resolution 0.5-5 arcmin, could make a major contribution). Observations discussed cover the Galactic center, the Galactic background radiation, SNRs, compact Galactic sources, the ISM, and large extragalactic sources.

  10. mJIVE-20: A survey for compact mJy radio objects with the very long baseline array

    SciTech Connect

    Deller, A. T.; Middelberg, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present the description and early results of the mJy Imaging VLBA Exploration at 20 cm (mJIVE-20). mJIVE-20 is a large project on the Very Long Baseline Array which is systematically inspecting a large sample of mJy radio sources, pre-selected from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) survey made with the Very Large Array, to identify any compact emission that may be present. The survey is being undertaken using filler time on the VLBA, which utilizes short segments scheduled in bad weather and/or with a reduced number of antennas, during which no highly rated science projects can be scheduled. The newly available multifield capability of the VLBA makes it possible for us to inspect of the order of 100 sources per hour of observing time with a 6.75σ detection sensitivity of approximately 1 mJy beam{sup –1}. The results of the mJIVE-20 survey are made publicly available as soon as the data are calibrated. After 18 months of observing, over 20,000 FIRST sources have been inspected, with 4336 very long baseline interferometry detections. These initial results suggest that within the range 1-200 mJy, fainter sources are somewhat more likely to be dominated by a very compact component than brighter sources. Over half of all arcsecond-scale mJy radio sources contain a compact component, although the fraction of sources that are dominated by milliarcsecond scale structure (where the majority of the arcsecond scale flux is recovered in the mJIVE-20 image) is smaller at around 30%-35%, increasing toward lower flux densities. Significant differences are seen depending on the optical classification of the source. Radio sources with a stellar/point-like counterpart in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are more likely to be detected overall, but this detection likelihood appears to be independent of the arcsecond-scale radio flux density. The trend toward higher radio compactness for fainter sources is confined to sources that are not detected in SDSS

  11. Estimating extragalactic Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, N.; Junklewitz, H.; Greiner, M.; Enßlin, T. A.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goobar, A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratley, L.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Stil, J. M.; Vacca, V.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations for extragalactic sources. The analysis is done for several different scenarios, for which we consider the error bars of different subsets of the data to accurately describe the observational uncertainties. By comparing the results, we argue that a split that singles out only data near the Galactic poles is the most robust approach. We find that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly

  12. The Extragalactic Ferment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the efforts which have been accomplished in extragalactic astronomy (the study of bodies and systems beyond the Milky Way) since 1929. Some of the most perplexing problems of extragalactic astronomy such as the missing mass of the galaxies are also discussed. (HM)

  13. An energy-efficient and compact clustering scheme with temporary support nodes for cognitive radio sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman; Choi, Dongmin; Chung, Ilyong

    2014-01-01

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network whose sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio capability. Clustering is one of the most challenging issues in CRSNs, as all sensor nodes, including the cluster head, have to use the same frequency band in order to form a cluster. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous channels in cognitive radio, it is difficult for sensor nodes to find a cluster head. This paper proposes a novel energy-efficient and compact clustering scheme named clustering with temporary support nodes (CENTRE). CENTRE efficiently achieves a compact cluster formation by adopting two-phase cluster formation with fixed duration. By introducing a novel concept of temporary support nodes to improve the cluster formation, the proposed scheme enables sensor nodes in a network to find a cluster head efficiently. The performance study shows that not only is the clustering process efficient and compact but it also results in remarkable energy savings that prolong the overall network lifetime. In addition, the proposed scheme decreases both the clustering overhead and the average distance between cluster heads and their members. PMID:25116905

  14. An Energy-Efficient and Compact Clustering Scheme with Temporary Support Nodes for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman; Choi, Dongmin; Chung, Ilyong

    2014-01-01

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network whose sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio capability. Clustering is one of the most challenging issues in CRSNs, as all sensor nodes, including the cluster head, have to use the same frequency band in order to form a cluster. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous channels in cognitive radio, it is difficult for sensor nodes to find a cluster head. This paper proposes a novel energy-efficient and compact clustering scheme named clustering with temporary support nodes (CENTRE). CENTRE efficiently achieves a compact cluster formation by adopting two-phase cluster formation with fixed duration. By introducing a novel concept of temporary support nodes to improve the cluster formation, the proposed scheme enables sensor nodes in a network to find a cluster head efficiently. The performance study shows that not only is the clustering process efficient and compact but it also results in remarkable energy savings that prolong the overall network lifetime. In addition, the proposed scheme decreases both the clustering overhead and the average distance between cluster heads and their members. PMID:25116905

  15. An energy-efficient and compact clustering scheme with temporary support nodes for cognitive radio sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman; Choi, Dongmin; Chung, Ilyong

    2014-08-11

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network whose sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio capability. Clustering is one of the most challenging issues in CRSNs, as all sensor nodes, including the cluster head, have to use the same frequency band in order to form a cluster. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous channels in cognitive radio, it is difficult for sensor nodes to find a cluster head. This paper proposes a novel energy-efficient and compact clustering scheme named clustering with temporary support nodes (CENTRE). CENTRE efficiently achieves a compact cluster formation by adopting two-phase cluster formation with fixed duration. By introducing a novel concept of temporary support nodes to improve the cluster formation, the proposed scheme enables sensor nodes in a network to find a cluster head efficiently. The performance study shows that not only is the clustering process efficient and compact but it also results in remarkable energy savings that prolong the overall network lifetime. In addition, the proposed scheme decreases both the clustering overhead and the average distance between cluster heads and their members.

  16. Fermi/LAT Observations of Swift/BAT Seyfert Galaxies: On the Contribution of Radio-Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei to the Extragalactic gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Davis, David S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the analysis of 2.1 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data on 491 Seyfert galaxies detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey. Only the two nearest objects, NGC 1068 and NGC 4945, which were identified in the Fermi first year catalog, are detected. Using Swift/BAT and radio 20 cm fluxes, we define a new radio-loudness parameter R(sub X,BAT) where radio-loud objects have logR(sub X,BAT) > -4.7. Based on this parameter, only radio-loud sources are detected by Fermi/LAT. An upper limit to the flux of the undetected sources is derived to be approx.2x10(exp -11) photons/sq cm/s, approximately seven times lower than the observed flux of NGC 1068. Assuming a median redshift of 0.031, this implies an upper limit to the gamma-ray (1-100 GeV) luminosity of < approx.3x10(exp 41) erg/s. In addition, we identified 120 new Fermi/LAT sources near the Swift/BAT Seyfert galaxies with significant Fermi/LAT detections. A majority of these objects do not have Swift/BAT counterparts, but their possible optical counterparts include blazars, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and quasars.

  17. FERMI/LAT OBSERVATIONS OF SWIFT/BAT SEYFERT GALAXIES: ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI TO THE EXTRAGALACTIC {gamma}-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Stacy H.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Davis, David S.

    2011-12-01

    We present the analysis of 2.1 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data on 491 Seyfert galaxies detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey. Only the two nearest objects, NGC 1068 and NGC 4945, which were identified in the Fermi first year catalog, are detected. Using Swift/BAT and radio 20 cm fluxes, we define a new radio-loudness parameter R{sub X,BAT} where radio-loud objects have log R{sub X,BAT} > -4.7. Based on this parameter, only radio-loud sources are detected by Fermi/LAT. An upper limit to the flux of the undetected sources is derived to be {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, approximately seven times lower than the observed flux of NGC 1068. Assuming a median redshift of 0.031, this implies an upper limit to the {gamma}-ray (1-100 GeV) luminosity of {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}. In addition, we identified 120 new Fermi/LAT sources near the Swift/BAT Seyfert galaxies with significant Fermi/LAT detections. A majority of these objects do not have Swift/BAT counterparts, but their possible optical counterparts include blazars, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and quasars.

  18. Bidirectional motion observed in the compact symmetric object 1946+708.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G B; Vermeulen, R C; Pearson, T J

    1995-01-01

    We present the first direct measurements of bidirectional motions in an extragalactic radio jet. The radio source 1946+708 is a compact symmetric object with striking S-symmetry identified with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.101. From observations 2 years apart we have determined the velocities of four compact components in the jet, the fastest of which has an apparent velocity of 1.09 h-1c. By pairing up the components, assuming they were simultaneously ejected in opposite directions, we derive a 1 lower limit on the Hubble constant, H0 > 42 km.s-1.Mpc-1. PMID:11607603

  19. Radio-optical scrutiny of compact AGN: correlations between properties of pc-scale jets and optical nuclear emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshakian, T. G.; Torrealba, J.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Ros, E.; Lister, M. L.; Cruz-González, I.; Zensus, J. A.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We study the correlations between the VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) radio emission at 15 GHz, extended emission at 151 MHz, and optical nuclear emission at 5100 Å for a complete sample of 135 compact jets. Methods: We use the partial Kendall's tau correlation analysis to check the link between radio properties of parsec-scale jets and optical nuclear luminosities of host active galactic nuclei (AGN). Results: We find a significant positive correlation for 99 quasars between optical nuclear luminosities and total radio (VLBA) luminosities of unresolved cores at 15 GHz originated at milliarcseconds scales. For 18 BL Lacs, the optical continuum emission correlates with the radio emission of the jet at 15 GHz. We suggest that the radio and optical emission are beamed and originate in the innermost part of the sub-parsec-scale jet in quasars. Analysis of the relation between the apparent speed of the jet and the optical nuclear luminosity at 5100 Å supports the relativistic beaming model for the optical emission generated in the jet, and allows the peak values of the intrinsic optical luminosity of the jet and its Lorentz factor to be estimated for the populations of quasars (2×1020 W Hz-1 and γ = 52), BL Lacs (9×1021 W Hz-1 and γ = 20), and radio galaxies (1.5×1021 W Hz-1 and γ = 9). The radio-loudness of quasars (the ratio of 15 GHz flux density and optical nuclear flux at 5100 Å) is found to increase at high redshifts, which is interpreted as progressively higher Doppler factors in radio regime compared to those in optical. A strong positive correlation is found between the intrinsic kinetic power of the jet (measured from the flux density at 151 MHz) and the apparent luminosities of the total and the unresolved core emission of the jet at 15 GHz. This correlation is interpreted in terms of an intrinsically more luminous parsec-scale jet producing more luminous extended structure, which is detectable at low radio frequencies, 151 MHz. A possibility

  20. AGN ACTIVITY AND THE MISALIGNED HOT ISM IN THE COMPACT RADIO ELLIPTICAL NGC 4278

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Wang Junfeng; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Kim, Dong-Woo; Brassington, Nicola J.; Gallagher, John S.; Trinchieri, Ginevra; Zezas, Andreas

    2012-10-20

    The analysis of a deep (579 ks) Chandra ACIS pointing of the elliptical galaxy NGC 4278, which hosts a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) and compact radio emission, allowed us to detect extended emission from hot gas out to a radius of {approx}5 kpc, with 0.5-8 keV luminosity of 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. The emission is elongated in the NE-SW direction, misaligned with respect to the stellar body, and aligned with the ionized gas and with the Spitzer IRAC 8 {mu}m non-stellar emission. The nuclear X-ray luminosity decreased by a factor of {approx}18 since the first Chandra observation in 2005, a dimming that enabled the detection of hot gas even at the position of the nucleus. The gas shows a significantly larger temperature (kT = 0.75 keV) in both the projected and deprojected profiles in the inner {approx}300 pc than in the surrounding region, where it stays at {approx}0.3 keV, a value lower than expected from standard gas heating assumptions. The nuclear X-ray emission is consistent with that of a low radiative efficiency accretion flow, accreting mass at a rate close to the Bondi rate; estimates of the power of the nuclear jets require that the accretion rate is not largely reduced with respect to the Bondi rate. Among possible origins for the central large hot gas temperature, such as gravitational heating from the central massive black hole and a recent AGN outburst, interaction with the nuclear jets seems more likely, especially if the latter remain confined, and heat the nuclear region frequently. The unusual hot gas distribution on the galactic scale could be due to the accreting cold gas triggering the cooling of the hot phase, a process also contributing to the observed line emission from ionized gas, and to the hot gas temperature being lower than expected; alternatively, the latter could be due to the efficiency of the Type Ia supernova heating that is lower than usually adopted.

  1. 86 GHz VLBI survey of Ultra compact radio emission in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan Nair, Dhanya; Lobanov, Andrei; Ros, Eduardo; Krichbaum, Thomas; Zensus, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations at 86 GHz reach a resolution of about 50 μas and sample the scales as small as 10 ^{3} - 10 ^{4} Schwartzchild radii of the central black hole in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), and uncover the jet regions where acceleration and collimation of the relativistic flow takes place. The high resolution millimetre VLBI studies makes it possible to look deeper into the core and inner jets of AGN which is invisible at centimetre and longer wavelengths due to self absorption or free-free absorption by the torus. We have done a large global VLBI survey of 162 unique ultra compact radio sources at 86 GHz (˜3 mm) conducted in 2010 - 2011. All the sources were detected and imaged; increasing by a factor of ˜2, the total number of AGN ever imaged with VLBI at 86 GHz. The survey data attained a baseline sensitivity of 0.1 Jy and the image sensitivity of 5 mJy/beam. We have used Gaussian model fitting to represent the structure of the observed sources and to estimate the flux densities and sizes of the core and jet components. The model fitting yields estimates of the brightness temperature (T _{b}) of the VLBI bright core (base) of the jet and inner jet components of AGN, taking into account the resolution limits of the data at 3 mm.The brightness temperatures of the VLBI cores peak at ˜10 ^{11} K. We have applied a basic population model with a single value of intrinsic brightness temperature,T _{o}, in order to reproduce the observed distribution of T _{b}. Our data are consistent with a population of sources that have T _{o} ˜(1-7)×10 ^{11} K in the VLBI cores and T _{o} ≤ 5 ×10 ^{10} K in the jets. We also find a correlation between the brightness temperatures obtained from the model fits with estimates of the brightness temperature limits made directly from the visibility data. For objects with sufficient structural detail detected, we investigated the effect of adiabatic energy losses on the evolution of

  2. Detection of a Compact Radio Source near the Center of a Gravitational Lens: Quasar Image or Galactic Core?

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, M V; Shapiro, I I; Cohen, N L; Corey, B E; Falco, E E; Marcaide, J M; Rogers, A E; Whitney, A R; Porcas, R W; Preston, R A; Rius, A

    1983-01-01

    By use of a new, very sensitive interferometric system, a faint, compact radio source has been detected near the center of the galaxy that acts as the main part of a gravitational lens. This lens forms two previously discovered images of the quasar Q09S7+561, which lies in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major. The newly detected source has a core smaller than 0.002 arc second in diameter with a flux density of 0.6 +/- 0.1 millijansky at the 13-centimeter wavelength of the radio observations. This source could be the predicted third image of the transparent gravitational lens, the central core of the galaxy, or some combination of the two. It is not yet possible to choose reliably between these alternatives.

  3. A Boosting Approach for the Detection of Faint Compact Sources in Wide Field Aperture Synthesis Radio Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent, A.; Peracaula, M.; Lladó, X.; Freixenet, J.; Sánchez-Sutil, J. R.; Paredes, J. M.; Martí, J.

    2010-12-01

    Several thresholding techniques have been proposed so far in order to perform faint compact source detection in wide field interferometric radio images. Due to their low intensity/noise ratio, some objects can be easily missed by these automatic detection methods. In this paper we present a novel approach to overcome this problem. Our proposal is based on using local features extracted from a bank of filters. These features provide a description of different types of faint source structures. Our approach performs an initial training step in order to automatically learn and select the most salient features, which are then used in a Boosting classifier to perform the detection. The validity of our method is demonstrated using 19 images that compose a 2.5°×2.5° radio mosaic, obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, centered on the MGRO J2019+37 peak of gamma emission at the Cygnus region. A comparison with two previously published radio catalogues of this region (task SAD of AIPS and SExtractor) is also provided.

  4. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-15

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  5. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-01

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz. PMID:26628171

  6. The impact of compact radio sources on their host galaxies: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C.

    2016-02-01

    I review the observational evidence that CSS/GPS radio sources have a significant impact on the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly on the kpc-scales of the galaxy bulges. Starting with an overview of the observational evidence for jet-cloud interactions and warm ionised outflows in CSS/GPS sources, I then consider the challenges involved in quantifying the feedback effect of the warm outflows in terms of their mass outflow rates and kinetic powers. For the best-observed cases it is shown that the warm outflows may have a major negative feedback effect in the very central regions, but probably lack the power to heat and eject the full cool ISM contents of the host galaxies. In contrast, the recently-discovered neutral and molecular outflows are more massive and powerful and therefore carry more destructive potential. However, the feedback effect of such outflows is not necessarily negative: there is now clear observational evidence that the molecular outflows are formed as the hot, compressed gas cools behind fast shocks driven into the ISM by the relativistic jets. The natural endpoint of this process is the formation of stars. Therefore, jet-induced star formation may be a significant process in CSS/GPS radio galaxies. Finally, I discuss whether CSS/GPS sources are ``imposters'' in flux-limited radio samples, due the flux boosting of the radio sources by strong jet-cloud interactions in the early stages of radio source evolution.

  7. High Resolution Rapid Response Observations of Compact Radio Sources with the Ceduna Hobart Interferometer (CHI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Jay M.; Lovell, James E. J.; Ojha, Roopesh; Kadler, Matthias; Dickey, John M.; Edwards, Philip G.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Frequent, simultaneous observations across the electromagnetic spectrum are essential to the study of a range of astrophysical phenomena including Active Galactic Nuclei. A key tool of such studies is the ability to observe an object when it flares i.e. exhibits a rapid and significant increase in its flux density. Aims. We describe the specific observational procedures and the calibration techniques that have been developed and tested to create a single baseline radio interferometer. that can rapidly observe a flaring object. This is the only facility that is dedicated to rapid high resolution radio observations of an object south of -30 degrees declination. An immediate application is to provide rapid contemporaneous radio coverage of AGN flaring at y-ray frequencies detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods. A single baseline interferometer was formed with radio telescopes in Hobart, Tasmania and Ceduna, South Australia. A software correlator was set up at the University of Tasmania to correlate these data. Results. Measurements of the flux densities of flaring objects can be made using our observing strategy within half an hour of a triggering event. These observations can be calibrated with amplitude errors better than 20%. Lower limits to the brightness temperatures of the sources can also be calculated using CHI. Key words. instrumentation:interferometers - galaxies:active - galaxies:jets - galaxies:nuclei quasars:general gamma rays:galaxies- 1.

  8. ISO observations of a sample of Compact Steep Spectrum and GHz Peaked Spectrum radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, C.; Pozzi, F.; Fanti, R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.; Bremer, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Falcke, H.; de Graauw, T.; Marecki, A.; Miley, G.; Rottgering, H.; Schilizzi, R. T.; Snellen, I.; Spencer, R. E.; Stanghellini, C.

    2000-06-01

    We present results from observations obtained with ISOPHOT, on board the ISO satellite, of a representative sample of seventeen CSS/GPS radio galaxies and of a control sample of sixteen extended radio galaxies spanning similar ranges in redshift (0.2 <= z <= 0.8) and radio luminosity (P_{2.7 GHz} >= 1026 W/Hz). The observations have been performed at lambda = 60, 90, 174 and 200 mu m. The original purpose of these observations was to check whether CSS/GPS sources are associated with very gas rich galaxies, as required by the scenario in which the growth of the radio source is inhibited by the dense medium of the host galaxy. Unfortunately the resulting performance of ISOPHOT was worse than expected. As a consequence, the detection limit at 60mu m is similar to that obtained previously with IRAS but better than that at 90mu m. Seven of the CSS/GPS sources have detections >= 3sigma at one or more wavelengths, one of which is detected at >= 5sigma . For the comparison sample five objects have detections >= 3sigma one of which is at >= 5sigma . By co-adding the data we have obtained average flux densities at the four wavelengths. We found no evidence that the FIR luminosities of the CSS/GPS sources are significantly different from those of the extended objects and therefore there is not any support for CSS/GPS sources being objects ``frustrated" by an abnormally dense ambient medium. The two samples were then combined, providing FIR information on a new sample of radio galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We compare this information with what previously known from IRAS and discuss the average properties of radio galaxies in the redshift range 0.2 - 0.8. The FIR emission cannot be accounted for by extrapolation of the synchrotron radio spectrum and we attribute it to thermal dust emission. The average FIR luminosity is >= 6 x 1011 Lsun. Over the observed frequency range the infrared spectrum can be described by a power law with spectral index alpha =~ 1.0 +/- 0

  9. HORIZON-SCALE LEPTON ACCELERATION IN JETS: EXPLAINING THE COMPACT RADIO EMISSION IN M87

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2015-08-10

    It has now become clear that the radio jet in the giant elliptical galaxy M87 must turn on very close to the black hole. This implies the efficient acceleration of leptons within the jet at scales much smaller than feasible by the typical dissipative events usually invoked to explain jet synchrotron emission. Here we show that the stagnation surface, the separatrix between material that falls back into the black hole and material that is accelerated outward forming the jet, is a natural site of pair formation and particle acceleration. This occurs via an inverse Compton pair catastrophe driven by unscreened electric fields within the charge-starved region about the stagnation surface and substantially amplified by a post-gap cascade. For typical estimates of the jet properties in M87, we find excellent quantitive agreement between the predicted relativistic lepton densities and those required by recent high-frequency radio observations of M87. This mechanism fails to adequately fill a putative jet from Sagittarius A{sup *} with relativistic leptons, which may explain the lack of an obvious radio jet in the Galactic center. Finally, this process implies a relationship between the kinetic jet power and the gamma-ray luminosity of blazars, produced during the post-gap cascade.

  10. Extragalactic Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Neill, James D.

    2005-03-01

    SALT is uniquely poised to make major inroads in the study of extragalactic cataclysmic variables (CVs) - novae and dwarf novae. The ability to search an external galaxy for erupting CVs night after night, for months at a time, AND to obtain confirmatory spectra within a night of discovery is unique and invaluable. We present several examples of multi-week to multi-month searches for extragalactic CVs with 1 to 4 meter-class telescopes. In particular, we have detected the first erupting dwarf novae in the LMC and placed a lower limit on the number of CVs in that galaxy. We have also observed the Local Group dwarf ellipticals M32 and NGC 205 in their entirety every clear night over a 4.5 month interval. In this survey we discovered one nova each in M32 and NGC 205, far more than previous nova surveys led us to expect. A similar search in M81 again reveals more novae than expected, and demonstrates, conclusively, that novae are predominantly a bulge population in spiral galaxies. Finally we report the detection of intergalactic tramp novae in the Fornax cluster, and emphasize that these are valuable tracers of stars stripped from their hosts during galaxy harassment. The insights gained during these preliminary studies illustrate how valuable SALT campaigns on extragalactic CVs will be.

  11. BROADBAND JET EMISSION IN YOUNG AND POWERFUL RADIO SOURCES: THE CASE OF THE COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM QUASAR 3C 186

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Giulia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Celotti, Annalisa

    2012-04-20

    We present the X-ray analysis of a deep ({approx}200 ks) Chandra observation of the compact steep spectrum radio-loud quasar 3C 186 (z = 1.06) and investigate the contribution of the unresolved radio jet to the total X-ray emission. The spectral analysis is not conclusive on the origin of the bulk of the X-ray emission. In order to examine the jet contribution to the X-ray flux, we model the quasar spectral energy distribution, adopting several scenarios for the jet emission. For the values of the main physical parameters favored by the observables, a dominant role of the jet emission in the X-ray band is ruled out when a single-zone (leptonic) scenario is adopted, even including the contribution of the external photon fields as seed photons for inverse Compton emission. We then consider a structured jet, with the blazar component that-although not directly visible in the X-ray band-provides an intense field of seed synchrotron photons Compton-scattered by electrons in a mildly relativistic knot. In this case, the whole X-ray emission can be accounted for if we assume a blazar luminosity within the range observed from flat spectrum radio quasars. The X-ray radiative efficiency of such a (structured) jet is intimately related to the presence of a complex velocity structure. The jet emission can provide a significant contribution in X-rays if it decelerates within the host galaxy on kiloparsec scales. We discuss the implications of this model in terms of jet dynamics and interaction with the ambient medium.

  12. Columbia/Einstein observations of extragalactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, W. H. M.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of the analysis of data from observations of extragalactic objects with the imaging proportional counter on board the Einstein Observatory. Surveys of normal galaxies, radio galaxies, active galaxies, quasars and BL Lacs, and clusters of galaxies were studied in order to improve the understanding of the origin of the Milky Way Galaxy.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The population of compact radio sources in ONC (Forbrich+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

    2016-08-01

    The observations were carried out with the Karl G. Jansky VLA of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory on 2012 September 30, October 2-5 under project code SD630. Data were taken using the VLA's C-band (4-8GHz) receivers in full polarization mode, with two 1GHz basebands centered at 4.736 and 7.336GHz to provide a good baseline for source spectral index determination. Apart from the first epoch, the field was simultaneously observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Mostly of interest for variability information, these data will be presented as part of a follow-up paper. (1 data file).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 86GHz VLBI survey of compact radio sources (Lobanov+ 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov; A. P.; Krichbaum; T. P.; Graham; D. A.; Witzel; A.; Kraus; A.; Zensus; J. A.; Britzen; S.; Greve; A.; Grewing; M.

    2000-10-01

    File table1 contains the list of observed sources, providing the source coordinates (J2000) and redshift, detection status, type, optical magnitude, and brightness temperature of the radio emission. File table4 contains the description of the VLBI data, and provide the observed total and correlated flux densities, the parameters of single gaussian component model fits, and the parameters of hybrid images of the observed sources. File table5 contains multicomponent model fits for the sources with detected extended structures and the brightness temperatures derived from these model fits. (3 data files).

  15. X-RAYS FROM A RADIO-LOUD COMPACT BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASAR 1045+352 AND THE NATURE OF OUTFLOWS IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Katarzynski, Krzysztof; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2009-11-10

    We present new results on X-ray properties of radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and focus on broadband spectral properties of a high-ionization BAL (HiBAL) compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio-loud quasar 1045+352. This HiBAL quasar has a very complex radio morphology indicating either strong interactions between a radio jet and the surrounding interstellar medium or a possible re-start of the jet activity. We detected 1045+352 quasar in a short 5 ksec Chandra ACIS-S observation. We applied theoretical models to explain spectral energy distribution of 1045+352 and argue that non-thermal, inverse-Compton (IC) emission from the innermost parts of the radio jet can account for a large fraction of the observed X-ray emission. In our analysis, we also consider a scenario in which the observed X-ray emission from radio-loud BAL quasars can be a sum of IC jet X-ray emission and optically thin corona X-ray emission. We compiled a sample of radio-loud BAL quasars that were observed in X-rays to date and report no correlation between their X-ray and radio luminosity. However, the radio-loud BAL quasars show a large range of X-ray luminosities and absorption columns. This is consistent with the results obtained earlier for radio-quiet BAL quasars and may indicate an orientation effect in BAL quasars or more complex dependence between X-ray emission, radio emission, and an orientation based on the radio morphology.

  16. The compact radio structure of the high-redshift quasar OQ172

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Gu, M.; Gurvits, L. I.

    2016-02-01

    The GHz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) quasar OQ172 (J1445+0958) has an extremely high rest-frame rotation measure (RM > 20 000 rad m-2) and an RM gradient in its inner nucleus. Its jet observed with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is strongly bent along an arc spanning > 100 pc. Near infrared (NIR) spectra reveal an unusually large [O III] line width which suggests a large mass within the NLR and/or strong interactions between the emerging jet and the dense material therein. We present our VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) and Multi-frequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observation of the GPS quasar OQ172. The observations will help us to explore the VLBI radio properties and to better understand the circumnuclear environment of OQ172.

  17. The BL LAC phenomenon: X-ray observations of transition objects and determination of the x-ray spectrum of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities related to two ROSAT investigations: (1) x-ray properties of radio galaxies thought to contain BL Lac type nuclei; and (2) x-ray spectra of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources. The following papers describing the research are provided as attachments: Multiple X-ray Emission Components in Low Power Radio Galaxies; New X-ray Results on Radio Galaxies; Analysis Techniques for a Multiwavelength Study of Radio Galaxies; Separation of X-ray Emission Components in Radio Galaxies; X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies and Quasars; Extended and Compact X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies; and X-ray Spectra of a Complete Sample of Extragalactic Core-dominated Radio Sources.

  18. A sample of small-sized compact steep-spectrum radio sources: VLBI images and VLA polarization at 5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallacasa, D.; Orienti, M.; Fanti, C.; Fanti, R.; Stanghellini, C.

    2013-07-01

    Global Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations at 5 GHz have been performed to study the source morphology in 10 compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources selected from the Peacock & Wall catalogue with the aim of finding asymmetric structures produced by the interaction with the ambient medium. The combination of these data and earlier 1.7-GHz observations allows the study of the spectral index distribution across the source structure and the unambiguous determination of the nature of each component. In seven sources we detected the core component with a flat or inverted spectrum. In six sources the radio emission has a two-sided morphology and comes mainly from steep-spectrum extended structures, like lobes, jets and hotspots. Only one source, 0319+121, has a one-sided core-jet structure. In three out of the six sources with a two-sided structure the flux density arising from the lobes is asymmetric, and the brightest lobe is the one closest to the core, suggesting that the jets are expanding in an inhomogeneous ambient medium which may influence the source growth. The interaction between the jet and the environment may slow down the source expansion and enhance the luminosity due to severe radiative losses, likely producing an excess of CSS radio sources in flux density limited samples. The lobes of the other three asymmetric sources have a brighter-when-farther behaviour, in agreement with what is expected by projection and relativistic effects. Simultaneous Very Large Array observations carried out to investigate the polarization properties of the targets detected significant polarized emission (˜5.5 per cent) only from the quasar 0319+121.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact radio sources within 30" of Sgr A* (Yusef-Zadeh+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Bushouse, H.; Schodel, R.; Wardle, M.; Cotton, W.; Roberts, D. A.; Nogueras-Lara, F.; Gallego-Cano, E.

    2016-04-01

    We obtained two sets of A-array observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The first set of observations of the stellar cluster at the Galactic center were obtained on 2011 July 8-9 and 2011 August 31-September 1 at 44GHz (program 11A-224). Further details of these first-epoch observations are given in Yusef-Zadeh et al. (2014ApJ...792L...1Y). We reobserved the region within 30" of Sgr A* on 2014 February 21, again using the VLA in its A-configuration at 44GHz. We also carried out A-array observations (program 14A-232) in the Ka (9mm) band on 2014 March 9 at 34.5GHz. We searched for NIR counterparts to compact radio sources using high-angular resolution AOs assisted imaging observations acquired with the VLT/NACO (NAos-COnica). A Ks-band (central wavelength 2.18um) image was obtained in a rectangular dither pattern on 2012 September 12. L'-band (3.8um) observations were obtained during various observing runs between 2012 June and September. (1 data file).

  20. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures.

    PubMed

    Pshirkov, M S; Tinyakov, P G; Urban, F R

    2016-05-13

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields. PMID:27232014

  1. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures.

    PubMed

    Pshirkov, M S; Tinyakov, P G; Urban, F R

    2016-05-13

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  2. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Tinyakov, P. G.; Urban, F. R.

    2016-05-01

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2 σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  3. Probing the intergalactic medium with fast radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Z.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Neill, J. D.; Juric, M.

    2014-12-10

    The recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs), presumably of extragalactic origin, have the potential to become a powerful probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM). We point out a few such potential applications. We provide expressions for the dispersion measure and rotation measure as a function of redshift, and we discuss the sensitivity of these measures to the He II reionization and the IGM magnetic field. Finally, we calculate the microlensing effect from an isolated, extragalactic stellar-mass compact object on the FRB spectrum. The time delays between the two lensing images will induce constructive and destructive interference, leaving a specific imprint on the spectra of FRBs. With a high all-sky rate, a large statistical sample of FRBs is expected to make these applications feasible.

  4. Ground-based astrometry with the ASPHO: optical-radio reference systems connection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, V. A. F.; Leister, N. V.; Poppe, P. C. R.; Brito, A. A.; Mattos, L.

    2003-11-01

    Precise positions and proper motions of optical counterparts of radiostars are needed in order to determine a direct link between the radio reference frame (VLBI - Very long Baseline Interferometry) and the ground-based optical reference frame (based on fundamental stars) (Poma & Zanzu 1991, Kovalevsky 1990, Walter et al. 1990). The basic problems are concerning with the optical-radio systems connection and the quick deterioration that he Hipparcos system is subjected. Thus, there is a request of exact and systematic observations with the instruments in the Earth (Kovalevsky 1990). Radiostars are suitable intermediaries for linking optical stellar reference frame to the quasi-inertial radio reference frame (RRF) represented by compact extragalactic radio sources. With the goal of the connection radio-optical reference frames the observational programme has included a total of 36 radiostars.

  5. CARPARC - Carina Parkes-ATCA Radio Continuum Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kate; Gaensler, Bryan; Voronkov, Maxim; Rathborne, Jill; Garay, Guido; Green, Anne; Robishaw, Timothy; Smith, Nathan; Reiter, Megan

    2011-04-01

    Our plan is to map the entire Carina Nebula over a frequency range of 1-3 GHz in total intensity continuum and in linear polarization with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We will also digitize the existing 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz single-dish Parkes datasets so they can serve as zero spacings data for the new ATCA observations. The result will be radio continuum images of the entire Carina Nebula at 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz with the highest angular resolution to-date and sensitive enough to detect compact emission associated with massive young stars. We will be able to measure Faraday rotation and depolarisation toward extragalactic radio sources behind the nebula. These new measurements will allow us to make the first determinations of the ordered and turbulent field strengths in the Carina Nebula.

  6. CARPARC - Carina Parkes-ATCA Radio Continuum Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kate; Gaensler, Bryan; Voronkov, Maxim; Rathborne, Jill; Burton, Michael; Garay, Guido; Green, Anne; Breen, Shari; Robishaw, Timothy; Smith, Nathan; Reiter, Megan

    2011-10-01

    Our plan is to map the entire Carina Nebula over a frequency range of 1-3 GHz in total intensity continuum and in linear polarization with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We will also digitize the existing 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz single-dish Parkes datasets so they can serve as zero spacings data for the new ATCA observations. The result will be radio continuum images of the entire Carina Nebula at 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz with the highest angular resolution to-date and sensitive enough to detect compact emission associated with massive young stars. We will be able to measure Faraday rotation and depolarisation toward extragalactic radio sources behind the nebula. These new measurements will allow us to make the first determinations of the ordered and turbulent field strengths in the Carina Nebula.

  7. Compact steep-spectrum sources as the parent population of flat-spectrum radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berton, M.; Caccianiga, A.; Foschini, L.; Peterson, B. M.; Mathur, S.; Terreran, G.; Ciroi, S.; Congiu, E.; Cracco, V.; Frezzato, M.; La Mura, G.; Rafanelli, P.

    2016-06-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are an interesting subclass of active galactic nuclei (AGN), which tipically does not exhibit any strong radio emission. Seven percent of them, though, are radio-loud and often show a flat radio-spectrum (F-NLS1s). This, along to the detection of γ-ray emission coming from them, is usually interpreted as a sign of a relativistic beamed jet oriented along the line of sight. An important aspect of these AGN that must be understood is the nature of their parent population, in other words how do they appear when observed under different angles. In the recent literature it has been proposed that a specific class of radio-galaxies, compact-steep sources (CSS) classified as high excitation radio galaxies (HERG), can represent the parent population of F-NLS1s. To test this hypothesis in a quantitative way,in this paper we analyzed the only two statistically complete samples of CSS/HERGs and F-NLS1s available in the literature. We derived the black hole mass and Eddington ratio distributions, and we built for the first time the radio luminosity function of F-NLS1s. Finally, we applied a relativistic beaming model to the luminosity function of CSS/HERGs, and compared the result with the observed function of F-NLS1s. We found that compact steep-spectrum sources are valid parent candidates and that F-NLS1s, when observed with a different inclination, might actually appear as CSS/HERGs.

  8. MARBLE (Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometry for Baseline Length Evaluation): Development of a Compact VLBI System for Calibrating GNSS and Electronic Distance Measurement Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, R.; Ishii, A.; Takiguchi, H.; Kimura, M.; Sekido, M.; Takefuji, K.; Ujihara, H.; Hanado, Y.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kurihara, S.; Kokado, K.; Kawabata, R.; Nozawa, K.; Mukai, Y.; Kuroda, J.; Ishihara, M.; Matsuzaka, S.

    2012-12-01

    We are developing a compact VLBI system with a 1.6-m diameter aperture dish in order to provide reference baseline lengths for calibration. The reference baselines are used to validate surveying instruments such as GPS and EDM and is maintained by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The compact VLBI system will be installed at both ends of the reference baseline. Since the system is not sensitive enough to detect fringes between the two small dishes, we have designed a new observation concept including one large dish station. We can detect two group delays between each compact VLBI system and the large dish station based on conventional VLBI measurement. A group delay between the two compact dishes can be indirectly calculated using a simple equation. We named the idea "Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometry for Baseline Length Evaluation", or MARBLE system. The compact VLBI system is easy transportable and consists of the compact dish, a new wide-band front-end system, azimuth and elevation drive units, an IF down-converter unit, an antenna control unit (ACU), a counterweight, and a monument pillar. Each drive unit is equipped with a zero-backlash harmonic drive gearing component. A monument pillar is designed to mount typical geodetic GNSS antennas easily and an offset between the GNSS antenna reference point. The location of the azimuth-elevation crossing point of the VLBI system is precisely determined with an uncertainty of less than 0.2 mm. We have carried out seven geodetic VLBI experiments on the Kashima-Tsukuba baseline (about 54 km) using the two prototypes of the compact VLBI system between December 2009 and December 2010. The average baseline length and repeatability of the experiments is 54184874.0 ± 2.4 mm. The results are well consistent with those obtained by GPS measurements. In addition, we are now planning to use the compact VLBI system for precise time and frequency comparison between separated locations.

  9. Very Large Array and Jansky Very Large Array observations of the compact radio sources in M8

    SciTech Connect

    Masqué, Josep M.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Dzib, Sergio

    2014-12-10

    We analyze high-resolution Very Large Array continuum observations of the M8 region carried out at several epochs that span a period of 30 yr. Our maps reveal two compact sources. One is associated with Her 36 SE, a possible companion of the O7 luminous massive star Her 36, and the other is associated with G5.97–1.17, whose proplyd nature was previously established. Using the analyzed data, we do not find significant time variability in any of these sources. The derived spectral index of ≥0.1 for Her 36 SE, the marginal offset of the radio emission with the previous infrared detection, and the associated X-ray emission previously reported suggest the presence of an unresolved interaction region between the strong winds of Her 36 and Her 36 SE. This region would contribute non-thermal contamination to the global wind emission of Her 36, flattening its spectral index. On the other hand, the emission of G5.97–1.17 can also be explained by a mixture of thermal and non-thermal emission components, with different relative contributions of both emission mechanisms along the proplyd. We argue that the shock created by the photo-evaporation flow of the proplyd with the collimated stellar wind of Her 36 accelerates charged particles in G5.97–1.17, producing considerable synchrotron emission. On the contrary, an electron density enhancement at the southwest of G5.97–1.17 makes the thermal emission dominant over this region.

  10. EXTRAGALACTIC CS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bayet, E.; Viti, S.; Aladro, R.; MartIn, S.; MartIn-Pintado, J.

    2009-12-10

    We present a coherent and homogeneous multi-line study of the CS molecule in nearby (D < 10 Mpc) galaxies. We include, from the literature, all the available observations from the J = 1-0 to the J = 7-6 transitions toward NGC 253, NGC 1068, IC 342, Henize 2-10, M 82, the Antennae Galaxies, and M 83. We have, for the first time, detected the CS(7-6) line in NGC 253, M 82 (both in the northeast and southwest molecular lobes), NGC 4038, M 83 and tentatively in NGC 1068, IC 342, and Henize 2-10. We use the CS molecule as a tracer of the densest gas component of the interstellar medium in extragalactic star-forming regions, following previous theoretical and observational studies by Bayet et al. In this first paper out of a series, we analyze the CS data sample under both local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE (large velocity gradient) approximations. We show that except for M 83 and Overlap (a shifted gas-rich position from the nucleus NGC 4039 in the Antennae Galaxies), the observations in NGC 253, IC 342, M 82-NE, M 82-SW, and NGC 4038 are not well reproduced by a single set of gas component properties and that, at least, two gas components are required. For each gas component, we provide estimates of the corresponding kinetic temperature, total CS column density, and gas density.

  11. Extragalactic Star Clusters: Speculations on the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S.; Grebel, E. K.

    We discuss the future possibilities for extragalactic star cluster research with the expected new ground-based and space-based telescopes and instrumentation. Significant gains are expected due to improved angular resolution, sensitivity, and area coverage particularly in the infrared and radio, accompanied by progress in evolutionary and dynamical modelling. Improvements in angular resolution are anticipated, especially through new adaptive optics systems (e.g., Keck, Gemini, VLT), and interferometry (e.g., Keck, VLT, LBT, ALMA, SMA, SkA), and space instrumentation (e.g., Chandra, NGST), enabling studies even of deeply embedded, forming extragalactic star clusters. Tidal disruption of Galactic clusters becomes observable through wide-area surveys such as the SDSS, VISTA, PRIME, including proper motion measurements through high-resolution imaging (e.g., HST, LBT, SIM, GAIA). Sensitive new optical and infrared spectrographs (e.g., HET, SALT, GranTeCan, Magellan, Keck, VLT, CELT, OWL, NGST) will push kinematic and abundance studies to new limits, allowing us detailed comparisons with model predictions. One important wavelength range for the study of young, massive star clusters, the far UV, appears to be neglected by future planned instrumentation.

  12. The IRAS view of the extragalactic sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Houck, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The IR-observable characteristics of the extragalactic sky are reviewed, summarizing the results of recent studies based on the IRAS survey, which covers over 96 percent of the sky to about 500 mJy at 12, 25, and 60 microns and to about 1.5 Jy at 100 microns. The numerical and morphological data are described; possible mechanisms for the IR emission are discussed; and the object classes are considered separately. Consideration is given to spiral and disk galaxies, barred and ring galaxies, irregular and dwarf galaxies, blue compact galaxies, elliptical and S0 galaxies, AGN observations (BL Lacs and OVV quasars, Seyfert galaxies, and quasars), highly luminous IR galaxies, and the cosmological implications of the IRAS findings. Diagrams, graphs, and tables are provided.

  13. AN X-RAY COOLING-CORE CLUSTER SURROUNDING A LOW-POWER COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCE 1321+045

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Siemiginowska, A.; Labiano, A.

    2013-07-20

    We discovered an X-ray cluster in a Chandra observation of the compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio source 1321+045 (z = 0.263). CSS sources are thought to be young radio objects at the beginning of their evolution and can potentially test the cluster heating process. 1321+045 is a relatively low-luminosity source and its morphology consists of two radio lobes on the opposite sides of a radio core with no evidence for jets or hotspots. The optical emission line ratios are consistent with an interstellar medium dominated by active galactic nucleus photoionization with a small contribution from star formation, and no contributions from shocks. Based on these ratios, we classify 1321+045 as a low excitation galaxy (LEG) and suggest that its radioactivity is in a coasting phase. The X-ray emission associated with the radio source is detected with 36.1 {+-} 8.3 counts, but the origin of this emission is highly uncertain. The current X-ray image of the cluster does not show any signatures of a radio source impact on the cluster medium. Chandra detects the cluster emission at >3{sigma} level out to {approx}60'' (240 kpc). We obtain the best-fit beta model parameters of the surface brightness profile of {beta} = 0.58 {+-} 0.2 and a core radius of 9.4{sup +1.1}{sub -0.9} arcsec. The average temperature of the cluster is equal to kT = 4.4{sup +0.5}{sub -0.3} keV, with a temperature and cooling profile indicative of a cooling core. We measure the cluster luminosity L{sub (0.5-2{sub keV)}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} and mass 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun}.

  14. Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experimental Investigation Using a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui; Liu, Wei; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    The poster will first discuss the construction and improved design of a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun. The plasma gun is used for experimental studies of magnetic bubble expansion into a lower pressure background plasma, which as a model for extragalactic radio lobes and solar coronal mass ejections. In this experiment, the plasma bubble's density, electron temperature, and propagation speed are measured by using a multiple-tipped langmuir probe. Also a three axis B-dot probe array is used to measure the magnetic field in three dimensions during the expansion process. In this poster experiment setup and data will be provided. Finally the comparison with the simulation result will be made.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact steep spectrum new sample (Kunert-Bajraszewska+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Gawronski, M. P.; Labiano, A.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2013-08-01

    Using the final release of FIRST, combined with the Green Bank 6-cm (GB6) survey at 4.85GHz, we looked for unresolved, isolated sources, that is, more compact than the FIRST beam (5.4-arcsec), and surrounded by an empty field (we adopted 1-arcmin as the radius of that field). We required that the redshifts of the objects identified with radio sources were known, and we extracted these from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) Extragalactic Data base (NED) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). (3 data files).

  16. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  17. EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2012-09-20

    We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

  18. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  19. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  20. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB.

  1. A-3 scientific results - extragalactic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the HEAO A-3 experiment are summarized. Specific contributions of the experiment to extragalactic astronomy are emphasized. The discovery of relatively condensed X-ray emission in the cores of those clusters of galaxies which are dominated by a giant elliptical or cD galaxy, the discovery of extended X-ray emitting plasma in groups of galaxies, and the demonstration that BL Lac objects are a class of X-ray sources are among the topics discussed.

  2. Application of disturbance observer-based control in low-level radio-frequency system in a compact energy recovery linac at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Omet, Mathieu; Sigit, Basuki Wibowo

    2015-09-01

    A disturbance observer (DOB)-based control for a digital low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) system in a compact energy recovery linac (cERL) at KEK has been developed. The motivation for this control approach is to compensate for or suppress the disturbance signal in the rf system such as beam loading, power supply ripples, and microphonics. Disturbance signals in specified frequency ranges were observed and reconstructed accurately in the field-programmable gate array and were then removed in the feedforward model in real time. The key component in this DOB controller is a disturbance observer, which includes the inverse mathematical model of the rf plant. In this paper, we have designed a DOB control-based approach in order to improve the LLRF system performance in disturbance rejection. We have confirmed this approach in the cERL beam commissioning.

  3. IUE observations of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boksenberg, A.; Snijders, M. A. J.; Wilson, R.; Benvenuti, P.; Clavell, J.; Macchetto, F.; Penston, M.; Boggess, A.; Gull, T. R.; Gondhalekar, P.

    1978-01-01

    During the commissioning phase of IUE several extragalactic objects were observed spectrally at low dispersion in the UV range lambda lambda 1150-3200: the Seyfert galaxies NGC4151 and NGC1068, the QSO 3C273, the BL Lacertae object B2 1101+38, the giant elliptical galaxy M87 and the spiral galaxy M81. The results obtained are presented and a preliminary analysis given for all six objects, discussing the continuous spectrum, extinction, emission line spectrum and absorption line spectrum, where possible for each case. Several new or confirmatory astrophysical results are obtained.

  4. Cosmological evolution of compact AGN at 15 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshakian, T. G.; Ros, E.; Zensus, J. A.

    2006-11-01

    Aims. We study the uniformity of the distribution of compact flat-spectrum active galactic nuclei (AGN) on the sky and the evolution of their relativistic jets with cosmic epoch. Methods: .A complete sample of compact extragalactic radio sources at 2 cm (15 GHz) was recently compiled to conduct the MOJAVE (Monitoring Of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) program (Lister & Homan 2005, AJ, 130, 1389). The MOJAVE sample comprises 133 radio-loud flat-spectrum AGN with compact relativistic outflows detected at parsec scales. We use a two-point angular correlation function to test the isotropy of the distribution of radio sources on the sky. The generalized and banded versions of V/V_max statistic are used to investigate the cosmological evolution of compact AGN. Results: .The survey sources are distributed uniformly on the sky. The source counts of compact AGN shows that the MOJAVE sample represents a flux-limited complete sample. Analysis of the population of flat-spectrum quasars of the sample reveals that the pc-scale jets of quasars have intrinsic luminosities in the range between 1024 W Hz-1 and 1027 {W Hz-1} and Lorentz factors distributed between 3⪉γ ⪉30. We find that the apparent speed (or Lorentz factor) of jets evolves with redshift, increasing from z˜0 to z˜1 and then falling at higher redshifts (z˜2.5) by a factor of 2.5. The evolution of apparent speeds does not affect significantly the evolution of the beamed luminosity function of quasars, which is most likely to be dependent on the evolution of radio luminosity. Furthermore, the beamed radio luminosity function suggests that the intrinsic luminosity function of quasars has a double power-law form: it is flat at low luminosities and steep at high luminosities. There is a positive evolution of quasars at low redshifts (z<0.5) and strong negative evolution at redshifts >1.7 with space density decline up to z˜2.5. This implies that the powerful jets were more populous at redshifts between 0.5 and 1

  5. A review of connected element radio interferometry directed at establishing an almost internal reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of connected element radio interferometry towards establishing an accurate grid of positions of extragalactic radio sources is reviewed. Many of the problems being encountered are, in general, also faced by very long baseline interferometry.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Monitoring compact radio sources at 2.5 + 8.2GHz (Lazio+, 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. J. W.; Waltman, E. B.; Ghigo, F. D.; Fiedler, R. L.; Foster, R. S.; Johnston, K. J.

    2002-01-01

    We present light curves for 149 sources monitored with the Green Bank Interferometer. The light curves are at two radio frequencies (approximately 2.5 and 8.2GHz) and range from 3 to 15yr in length, covering the interval 1979-1996, and have a typical sampling of one flux density measurement every 2 days. Observations were made on a 2.4km baseline. Dual circular polarization was recorded over a 35MHz bandwidth at two frequencies in the S and X frequency bands. Until 1989 August (1989.7), the frequencies were 2.7GHz (S band) and 8.1GHz (X band); in 1989 September cryogenic receivers were installed, and the frequencies changed to 2.25GHz (S band) and 8.3GHz (X band). (2 data files).

  7. GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey I: A low-frequency extragalactic catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley-Walker, N.; Callingham, J. R.; Hancock, P. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hindson, L.; Kapińska, A. D.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Murphy, T.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lenc, E.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Ekers, R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Greenhill, L.; Hazelton, B. J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    Using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA1 LOW) precursor located in Western Australia, we have completed the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, and present the resulting extragalactic catalogue, utilising the first year of observations. The catalogue covers 24,402 square degrees, over declinations south of +30° and Galactic latitudes outside 10° of the Galactic plane, excluding some areas such as the Magellanic Clouds. It contains 307,456 radio sources with 20 separate flux density measurements across 72-231 MHz, selected from a time- and frequency- integrated image centred at 200 MHz, with a resolution of ≈2'. Over the catalogued region, we estimate that the catalogue is 90 % complete at 170 mJy, and 50 % complete at 55 mJy, and large areas are complete at even lower flux density levels. Its reliability is 99.97 % above the detection threshold of 5σ, which itself is typically 50 mJy. These observations constitute the widest fractional bandwidth and largest sky area survey at radio frequencies to date, and calibrate the low frequency flux density scale of the southern sky to better than 10 %. This paper presents details of the flagging, imaging, mosaicking, and source extraction/characterisation, as well as estimates of the completeness and reliability. All source measurements and images are available online★. This is the first in a series of publications describing the GLEAM survey results.

  8. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now, it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalactic astronomers, irrespective of their favourite electromagnetic band(s), and even stellar astronomers might find it somewhat gratifying.

  9. Supergiant pulses from extragalactic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Wasserman, Ira

    2016-03-01

    We consider radio bursts that originate from extragalactic neutron stars (NSs) by addressing three questions about source distances. What are the physical limitations on coherent radiation at GHz frequencies? Do they permit detection at cosmological distances? How many bursts per NS are needed to produce the inferred burst rate ˜103-104sky-1 d-1? The burst rate is comparable to the NS formation rate in a Hubble volume, requiring only one per NS if they are bright enough. Radiation physics suggests a closer population, requiring more bursts per NS and increasing the chances for repeats. Bursts comprise sub-ns, coherent shot pulses superposed incoherently to produce ms-duration ˜1 Jy amplitudes; each shot pulse can be much weaker than 1 Jy, placing less restrictive requirements on the emission process. None the less, single shot pulses are similar to the extreme, unresolved (<0.4 ns) MJy shot pulse seen from the Crab pulsar, consistent with coherent curvature radiation emitted near the light cylinder by an almost neutral clump with net charge ˜± 1021e and total energy ≳ 1023 erg. Bursts from Gpc distances require incoherent superposition of {˜ } 10^{12}d_Gpc^2 shot pulses or a total energy ≳ 10^{35} d_Gpc^2 erg. The energy reservoir near the light cylinder limits the detection distance to ≲ few × 100 Mpc for a fluence ˜1 Jy ms unless conditions are more extreme than for the Crab pulsar, such as in magnetars. We discuss contributions to dispersion measures from galaxy clusters and we propose tests for the overall picture presented.

  10. Gravitational-wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Thomas; Kanner, Jonah; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-07-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors.

  11. On the variability of extragalactic sources in the decimeter range and their correlation with galactic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapirovskaya, N. Y.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that all of the extragalactic radio sources presently known are variable in the decimeter range (lambda or = 30 cm) and are projected on the large continuum radio structure of the galaxy: loops, spurs, ridges. Probability that coordinates could coincide is or = 10 to the minus 7 power. The variations in the intensity are explained by scintillations (regime of focusing radiation) on the large-scale irregularities of electron density in the medium of loops, spurs and ridges with the dimension a magnitude of approximately 10 to the 13th power cm. A correlation of the characteristics of radiation of the sources with their position relative to the galactic loop is considered. Based on the known experimental data, it is shown that the angle of scattering of extragalactic radiation and the dispersion measures of pulsars projecting on the loops is considerably larger than those of the sources lying outside the loops.

  12. Locating the "Missing" Baryons with Extragalactic Dispersion Measure Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Thornton and coworkers confirmed a class of millisecond radio bursts likely of extragalactic origin that is well-suited for estimating dispersion measures (DMs). We calculate the probability distribution of DM(z) in different models for how the cosmic baryons are distributed (both analytically and with cosmological simulations). We show that the distribution of DM is quite sensitive to whether the "missing" baryons lie around the virial radius of 1011-1013 M ⊙ halos or further out, which is not easily constrained with other observational techniques. The intrinsic contribution to DM from each source could complicate studies of the extragalactic contribution. This difficulty is avoided by stacking based on the impact parameter to foreground galaxies. We show that a stacking analysis using a sample of ~100 DM measurements from arcminute-localized, z >~ 0.5 sources would place interesting constraints at 0.2-2 halo virial radii on the baryonic mass profile surrounding different galaxy types. Conveniently for intergalactic studies, sightlines that intersect intervening galactic disks should be easily identified owing to scattering. A detectable level of scattering may also result from turbulence in the circumgalactic medium.

  13. VLA observations of a complete sample of extragalactic X-ray sources. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R.; Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Maccacaro, T.

    1983-01-01

    A complete sample of 35 X-ray selected sources found with the Einstein Observatory has been observed with the Very Large Array at 6 cm to investigate the relationship between radio and X-ray emission in extragalactic objects. Detections include three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), two clusters or groups of galaxies, two individual galaxies, and two BL Lac objects. The frequency of radio emission in X-ray selected AGNs is compared with that of optically selected quasars using the integral radio-optical luminosity function. The result suggests that the probability for X-ray selected quasars to be radio sources is higher than for those optically selected. No obvious correlation is found in the sample between the richness of X-ray luminosity of the cluster and the presence of a galaxy with radio luminosity at 5 GHz larger than 10 to the 30th ergs/s/Hz.

  14. Automated Searches for Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnley, M. J.

    2005-06-01

    Classical novae (CNe) are interacting binary systems in which the white dwarf undergoes unpredictable explosive outbursts. The energy of a nova outburst is only surpassed by that of gamma-ray bursts, supernovae and a small number of luminous blue variables. However, the outbursts of CNe are far more common than any of these other stars. Due to their brightness and occurrence in both Population I and Population II systems, novae are potentially important as extragalactic distance indicators and tools in the exploration of binary star evolution in galaxies. The POINT-AGAPE survey is an optical search for gravitational micro-lensing events towards the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As well as micro-lensing, the survey is sensitive to many different classes of variable stars and transients, including CNe. In this work we describe the automated detection and selection pipeline used to identify M31 CNe and we present the resulting catalogue of 20 strong CN candidates observed over three seasons. The CNe we discover are observed both in the M31 bulge region as well as over a wide area of the M31 disc. Nine of the CNe are caught during the final rise phase (which is often missed in Galactic novae) and all are well sampled in at least two colours. The excellent light-curve coverage has allowed us to detect and classify CNe over a wide range of speed classes, from very fast to very slow. Among the light curves is, for example, a moderately fast CN exhibiting entry into a deep transition minimum, followed by its final decline. We have also observed in detail a very slow CN which faded by only 0.01 mag day^{-1} over a 150 day period. The CN catalogue constitutes a uniquely well-sampled and objectively-selected data set with which to study the statistical properties of CNe in M31. As a by-product, we have detected other interesting variable objects, including one of the longest period and most luminous Mira variables. An analysis of the MMRD relationship in M31 was performed using the

  15. A NEW RESULT ON THE ORIGIN OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ming; Wang Jiancheng

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we repeatedly use the method of image stacking to study the origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) at GeV bands, and find that the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters (FIRST) sources undetected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope can contribute about (56 {+-} 6)% of the EGB. Because FIRST is a flux-limited sample of radio sources with incompleteness at the faint limit, we consider that point sources, including blazars, non-blazar active galactic nuclei, and starburst galaxies, could produce a much larger fraction of the EGB.

  16. Compact Low Frequency Radio Antenna

    DOEpatents

    Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2008-11-11

    An antenna is disclosed that comprises a pair of conductive, orthogonal arches and a pair of conductive annular sector plates, wherein adjacent legs of each arch are fastened to one of the annular sector plates and the opposite adjacent pair of legs is fastened to the remaining annular sector plate. The entire antenna structure is spaced apart from a conductive ground plane by a thin dielectric medium. The antenna is driven by a feed conduit passing through the conductive ground plane and dielectric medium and attached to one of the annular sector plates, wherein the two orthogonal arched act as a pair of crossed dipole elements. This arrangement of elements provides a radiation pattern that is largely omni-directional above the horizon.

  17. Very-Long-Baseline Radio Interferometry: The Mark III System for Geodesy, Astrometry, and Aperture Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, A E; Cappallo, R J; Hinteregger, H F; Levine, J I; Nesman, E F; Webber, J C; Whitney, A R; Clark, T A; Ma, C; Ryan, J; Corey, B E; Counselman, C C; Herring, T A; Shapiro, I I; Knight, C A; Shaffer, D B; Vandenberg, N R; Lacasse, R; Mauzy, R; Rayhrer, B; Schupler, B R; Pigg, J C

    1983-01-01

    The Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system allows recording and later processing of up to 112 megabits per second from each radio telescope of an interferometer array. For astrometric and geodetic measurements, signals from two radio-frequency bands (2.2 to 2.3 and 8.2 to 8.6 gigahertz) are sampled and recorded simultaneously at all antenna sites. From these dual-band recordings the relative group delays of signals arriving at each pair of sites can be corrected for the contributions due to the ionosphere. For many radio sources for which the signals are sufficiently intense, these group delays can be determined with uncertainties under 50 picoseconds. Relative positions of widely separated antennas and celestial coordinates of radio sources have been determined from such measurements with 1 standard deviation uncertainties of about 5 centimeters and 3 milliseconds of arc, respectively. Sample results are given for the lengths of baselines between three antennas in the United States and three in Europe as well as for the arc lengths between the positions of six extragalactic radio sources. There is no significant evidence of change in any of these quantities. For mapping the brightness distribution of such compact radio sources, signals of a given polarization, or of pairs of orthogonal polarizations, can be recorded in up to 28 contiguous bands each nearly 2 megahertz wide. The ability to record large bandwidths and to link together many large radio telescopes allows detection and study of compact sources with flux densities under 1 millijansky.

  18. Blazar Duty-Cycle at Gamma-Ray Frequecies: Constraints From Extragalactic Background Radiation And Prospects for AGILE And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Pittori, Carlotta; Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Giommi, Paolo

    2011-11-29

    We take into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic {gamma}-ray background to estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of WMAP Blazars, in order to be detectable by AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments. For the nominal sensitivity values of both instruments, we identify a subset of sources which can in principle be detectable also in a steady state without over-predicting the extragalactic background. This work is based on the results of a recently derived Blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys.

  19. HET Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, Allen W.; Coelho, E. A.; Misselt, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    We are currently involved in a multifaceted campaign to study extragalactic novae in the optical and IR using a variety of instruments: The Mount Laguna 1m, the Steward 2.3m, and the Liverpool 2m telescopes for optical imaging, the Hobbey-Eberly Telescope (HET) for optical spectroscopy, and the Spitzer Space Telescope for IR photometry and spectroscopy. Here, we report the initial results from our program of spectroscopic observations obtained with the LRS on the HET. Thus far, we have obtained spectra of three novae: Nova M31-2006#9 (ATEL 887), Nova M32-2006#1 (CBET 591), and Nova M33-2006#1 (CBET 655), which were taken on 24-Sep-2006 UT, 30-Sep-2006 UT, and 02-Oct-2006 UT, approximately 6, 65, and 4 days post discovery, for the three novae respectively. The spectra of Nova M31-2006#9 and Nova M33-2006#1 revealed prominent Balmer (FWHM 1600 km/s) and Fe II emission lines typical of the "Fe II" class in the classification system of Williams (1992 AJ, 104, 725). The spectrum of Nova M32-2006#1, which was obtained much longer after eruption, showed strong H-alpha (FWHM 1300 km/s), along with weaker H-beta, Fe II, and [N II] 5755, indicating that this nova is also a member of the Fe II class, and that it had entered the nebular phase at the time of our observations. In addition to these three novae, we also attempted to obtain a spectrum of Nova M31-2006#7 (CBET 615) on 23-Sep-2006 UT, approximately three weeks after discovery. However, by the time of our observations, the nova had faded to invisibility. An 1800s integration at the reported position reveled no trace of the nova. It is likely that this optical transient was an unusually fast nova, possibly of the "He/N" class. This work is being supported in part by NSF grant AST-0607682.

  20. Antiparticles in the extragalactic cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    It may be possible to account for a previously puzzling feature - a bump in the energy range 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 15th power - of the cosmic ray spectrum by hypothesizing a primary extragalactic origin for the bulk of the observed cosmic ray antiprotons, although such an explanation is not unique. In this model, most of the cosmic rays above 10 to the 15th power eV are extragalactic. A method is described of testing this hypothesis experimentally.

  1. Extragalactic astronomy: The universe beyond our galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, K. C.

    1976-01-01

    This single-topic brochure is for high school physical science teachers to use in introducing students to extragalactic astronomy. The material is presented in three parts: the fundamental content of extragalactic astronomy; modern discoveries delineated in greater detail; and a summary of the earlier discussions within the structure of the Big-Bang Theory of evolution. Each of the three sections is followed by student exercises (activities, laboratory projects, and questions-and-answers). The unit close with a glossary which explains unfamilar terms used in the text and a collection of teacher aids (literature references and audiovisual materials for utilization in further study).

  2. Recurrent Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jamrozy, Marek; Konar, Chiranjib; Machalski, Jerzy; Mack, Karl-Heinz; Saikia, Dhruba; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U.

    2007-10-15

    One of the outstanding issues concerning extragalactic radio sources is the total duration of their active phase and the possible existence of duty cycles of their nuclear activity. A duty cycle can be recognized if there is a mechanism which preserves the information of past activity for a sufficiently long time after a new activity has started up. If a new cycle starts before the radio lobes created during a former activity period have faded, we can recognize this by the observations of a young radio source embedded in an old relic structure.

  3. Long term monitoring of extragalactic sources in the framework of the Gaia ESA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TARIS, François

    2015-08-01

    The Gaia astrometric mission of the European Space Agency has been launched the 19th December 2013. It will provide an astrometric catalogue of 500.000 extragalactic sources that could be the basis of a new optical reference frame after the Hipparcos satellite one. On the other hand, the current International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) is based on the observations of extragalactic sources at radio wavelength. The astrometric coordinates of sources in these two reference systems will have roughly the same uncertainty. It is then mandatory to observe a set of common targets at both optical and radio wavelength to link the ICRF with what could be called the GCRF (Gaia Celestial Reference Frame).This poster presents the set of optical telescopes used to observe the targets chosen for the link of the two reference systems.It also presents some results obtained with the Lomb-Scargle method and CLEAN algorithm applied to optical magnitude monitoring of extragalactic sources suitable for the GCRF-ICRF link. These two methods allow to show that some periodic (or quasi-periodic) phenomena could be present and could be at the origin of the observed light curves. This could have an important impact on the photocenter's position of a particular target which is relevant for the link of the reference systems.

  4. Extragalactic Astronomy: The Universe Beyond Our Galaxy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Kenneth Charles

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The material is presented in three parts: one section provides the fundamental content of extragalactic astronomy, another section discusses modern discoveries in…

  5. The isotropic radio background revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Lineros, Roberto A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky.

  6. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  7. Time-dependent Magnetohydrodynamic Self-similar Extragalactic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.; Serbeto, A.

    2007-04-01

    Extragalactic jets are visualized as dynamic eruptive events modeled by time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The jet structure comes from the temporally self-similar solutions in two-dimensional axisymmetric spherical geometry. The two-dimensional magnetic field is solved in the finite plasma pressure regime, or finite-β regime, and it is described by an equation where plasma pressure plays the role of an eigenvalue. This allows a structure of magnetic lobes in space, among which the polar axis lobe is strongly peaked in intensity and collimated in angular spread compared to the others. For this reason, the polar lobe overwhelms the other lobes, and a jet structure naturally arises in the polar direction. Furthermore, within each magnetic lobe in space, there are small secondary regions with closed two-dimensional field lines embedded along this primary lobe. In these embedded magnetic toroids, plasma pressure and mass density are accordingly much higher. These are termed secondary plasmoids. The magnetic field lines in these secondary plasmoids circle in alternating sequence such that adjacent plasmoids have opposite field lines. In particular, along the polar primary lobe, such periodic plasmoid structure happens to be compatible with radio observations in which islands of high radio intensities are mapped.

  8. The Astronomical Low Frequency Array: A Proposed Explorer Mission for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.; Allen, R.; Basart, J.; Bastian, T.; Bougeret, J. L.; Dennison, B.; Desch, M.; Dwarakanath, K.; Erickson, W.; Finley, D.; Kaiser, M.; Kassim, N.; Kuiper, T.; MacDowall, R.; Mahoney, M.; Perley, R.; Preston, R.; Reiner, M.; Rodriguez, P.; Stone, R.; Unwin, S.; Weiler, K.; Woan, G.; Woo, R.

    1999-01-01

    A radio interferometer array in space providing high dynamic range images with unprecedented angular resolution over the broad frequency range from 0.030 - 30 MHz will open new vistas in solar, terrestial, galactic, and extragalactic astrophysics.

  9. Precision Geodesy via Radio Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hinteregger, H F; Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Ergas, R A; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Moran, J M; Clark, T A; Burke, B F

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, involving observations of extragalactic radio sources, were performed in 1969 to determine the vector separations between antenna sites in Massachusetts and West Virginia. The 845.130-kilometer baseline was estimated from two separate experiments. The results agreed with each other to within 2 meters in all three components and with a special geodetic survey to within 2 meters in length; the differences in baseline direction as determined by the survey and by interferometry corresponded to discrepancies of about 5 meters. The experiments also yielded positions for nine extragalactic radio sources, most to within 1 arc second, and allowed the hydrogen maser clocks at the two sites to be synchronized a posteriori with an uncertainty of only a few nanoseconds.

  10. Polarised radio sources : a study of luminosity, redshift and flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Julie Kristen

    2011-05-01

    Results of deep polarisation imaging at 1.4 GHz with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the DRAO Planck Deep Fields project are presented. This deep extragalactic field covers 15.16 deg2 centred at a2000 = 16h14m and d2000 = 54560, has an angular resolution of 4200-6200 at the field centre, and reaches a sensitivity of 55 mJy beam-1 in Stokes I and 45 mJy beam-1 in Stokes Q and U. There are 958 radio sources in Stokes I of which 136 are detected in polarisation. The Euclidean-normalized polarised differential source counts are determined down to 400 mJy. These counts indicate that sources have a higher percentage polarisation at fainter Stokes I flux density levels than for brighter sources. The majority of the polarised sources are steep-spectrum objects with a mean spectral index of -0.77, and there is no correlation between fractional polarisation and spectral index. Of the polarised sources, 77% show structure at the arc-second scale whereas only 38% of the sources with no detectable polarisation show such structure. This indicates that polarised sources tend to have structure at arcsecond scales and that the polarised emission is most likely not beamed. This confirms that the polarised radio sources tend to be lobe-dominated radio galaxies. The median percentage polarisation for resolved sources is 6.8%, while it is 4.4% for compact objects. Radio sources in the DRAO deep field have been matched with the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey of the European Large Area ISO Survey North 1 field. In the redshift range of 0.04 < z < 3.2, there are 429 radio sources with redshifts of which 69 are polarised. Infrared colour analysis of the radio sample shows that the majority of polarised sources are elliptical galaxies with an embedded active galactic nucleus. High resolution imaging shows that FRIs are more highly polarised than FRIIs, which are seen to populate the polarized source counts at fainter flux density levels. There is no

  11. HET Spectra of Three Recent Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Coelho, E. A.; Misselt, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Quimby, R.

    2006-10-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observations (4280Å - 7280Å) obtained with the HET of three extragalactic novae: Nova M31 2006 No. 9 (ATEL #887), Nova M32 2006 No. 1 (CBET #591), and Nova M33 2006 No. 1 (CBET #655). The spectra were obtained on 24 Sep 2006 UT, 30 Sep 2006 UT, and 02 Oct 2006 UT, corresponding to approximately 6, 65, and 4 days post discovery, for the three novae respectively.

  12. Extragalactic Diffuse Interstellar Bands: A Universal Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, M. A.

    2014-02-01

    The first extragalactic diffuse interstellar band (DIB) detections were of λ4430 in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) in the 1960s and 70s. Driven mainly by the increased sensitivity afforded by 8-10 m-class telescopes, the last 13 years have witnessed an explosion of DIB discoveries throughout the nearby and distant universe. This review focuses on the history of extragalactic DIB studies, including some of the important results that have come out of this field, and looks to the future for what can be learned about DIBs in external galaxies with the next generation of large telescopes. So far, DIBs have been observed in the Magellanic Clouds, starburst galaxies, DLAs, and nearby (<=30 Mpc distant) spiral galaxies, and are found to be ubiquitous in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) of extragalactic environments wherever dust is present. Important results include the finding that DIB carriers are significantly more closely related to dust than to neutral hydrogen, and that the λ6283 DIB tends to be anomalously weak in low-metallicity sightlines.

  13. Aligning VLBI and Gaia Extragalactic Celestial Reference Frames: source selection scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Charlot, Patrick; Collioud, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The European space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical celestial reference frame based on Quasi Stellar Objects. Accordingly, by 2020, two extragalactic celestial reference frames will coexist: the VLBI frame (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) in the radio domain, currently adopted by the IAU as the fundamental one, and the Gaia frame determined from direct optical observations of quasars by the satellite.For consistency between optical and radio positions of any celestial targets, it will be fundamental to align the Gaia and VLBI frames with the highest accuracy. This issue is also important in the framework of astrophysics, for example to probe properly the jets properties and the physics of the Active Galactic Nuclei.In this paper, based on the ICRF2 catalogue (International Celestial Reference Frame) and specific dedicated VLBI projects (e.g. designed to observe additional weaker extragalactic radio sources), we will discuss the selection of the VLBI-Gaia transfer sources, present our initiatives to reach this alignment, review the status of the various projects in question and draw plans for the future.

  14. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Bootes Field. VLBA Imaging And Optical Identifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J.M.; Taylor, Greg B.; Rector, T.A.; Myers, S.T.; Fassnacht, C.D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-06-13

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Booetes field. These 76 sources were selected from the FIRST catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5'' resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3'' at 1.4 GHz. Fifty-five of these faint radio sources were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On VLA scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NVSS catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Thirty of the faint radio sources, or 39{sub -7}{sup +9}%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 {sigma} {approx} 2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Eight VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically-obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  15. The Bonn contribution to the extragalactic link of the HIPPARCOS proper motion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, H.-J.; Brosche, P.; Odenkirchen, M.

    1997-05-01

    In order to calibrate the proper motions of the Hipparcos astrometry satellite, our group has measured accurate absolute proper motions of Hipparcos stars in small fields around optically bright extragalactic radio sources or bright galaxies with star-like features. In addition, we also use fields where relative proper motions are calibrated by measurements of large numbers of stars and galaxies on wide-field plates. The median internal accuracy of our relative proper motions, based on photographic plates with epoch differences up to 100 years (typically 70 years), is 1.0 milliarcsec/year (mas/a), while the calibration to an inertial system in each of the 13 fields has a median uncertainty of 1.3 mas/a. We compute the rotation from the Hipparcos proper motions (median internal errors \\e{0.9}{mas/a}) to the extragalactic reference frame represented by our absolute proper motions, using 88 stars in common. The three components of the angular velocity vector have internal errors of 0.3 mas/a. Our rotation solution has been used together with those of independent groups for the extragalactic calibration of the Hipparcos proper motion system (\\cite[Kovalevsky et al. 1996)]{kova96}. It compares favourably with the adopted mean solution. Based on observations made with the ESA Hipparcos satellite.

  16. SCORPIO: a deep survey of radio emission from the stellar life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Cavallaro, F.; Cerrigone, L.

    2015-11-01

    Radio emission has been detected in a broad variety of stellar objects from all stages of stellar evolution. However, most of our knowledge originates from targeted observations of small samples, which are strongly biased to sources which are peculiar at other wavelengths. In order to tackle this problem we have conducted a deep 1.4 GHz survey by using the Australian Telescope Compact Array, with a net bandwidth of 1.7 GHz (1.4-3.1 GHz) , following the same observing setup as that used for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey project, this time choosing a region more appropriate for stellar work. In this paper, the Stellar Continuum Originating from Radio Physics In Ourgalaxy (SCORPIO) project is presented as well as results from the pilot experiment. The achieved rms is 30 μJy and the angular resolution ˜10 arcsec. 614 point-like sources have been extracted just from the pilot field. Only 34 of them are classified in SIMBAD or the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. About 80 per cent of the extracted sources are reported in one of the inspected catalogues and 50 per cent of them appears to belong to a reddened stellar/Galactic population. However, the evaluation of extragalactic contaminants is very difficult without further investigations. Interesting results have been obtained for extended radio sources that fall in the SCORPIO field. Many roundish-like structures (indicated as bubbles in the following) have been found, some of which are classified at other wavelengths. However, for all of these sources, our project has provided us with images of unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution.

  17. Components of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Venters, Tonia M.

    2011-01-01

    We present new theoretical estimates of the relative contributions of unresolved blazars and star-forming galaxies to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) and discuss constraints on the contributions from alternative mechanisms such as dark matter annihilation and truly diffuse gamma-ray production. We find that the Fermi source count data do not rule out a scenario in which the EGB is dominated by emission from unresolved blazars, though unresolved star-forming galaxies may also contribute significantly to the background, within order-of-magnitude uncertainties. In addition, we find that the spectrum of the unresolved star-forming galaxy contribution cannot explain the EGB spectrum found by EGRET at energies between 50 and 200 MeV, whereas the spectrum of unresolved flat spectrum radio quasars, when accounting for the energy-dependent effects of source confusion, could be consistent with the combined spectrum of the low-energy EGRET EGB measurements and the Fermi-Large Area Telescope EGB measurements.

  18. Extragalactic cosmic rays and their signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.

    2014-01-01

    The signatures of UHE proton propagation through CMB radiation are pair-production dip and GZK cutoff. The visible manifestations of these two spectral features are ankle, which is intrinsic part of the dip, beginning of GZK cutoff in the differential spectrum and E in integral spectrum. Observed practically in all experiments since 1963, the ankle is usually interpreted as a feature caused by transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. Using the mass composition measured by HiRes, Telescope Array and Auger detectors at energy (1-3) EeV, calculated anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays at these energies, and the elongation curves we strongly argue against the interpretation of the ankle given above. The transition must occur at lower energy, most probably at the second knee as the dip model predicts. The other prediction of the dip model, the shape of the dip, is well confirmed by HiRes, Telescope Array (TA), AGASA and Yakutsk detectors, and, after recalibration of energies, by Auger detector. Predicted beginning of GZK cutoff and E agree well with HiRes and TA data. However, directly measured mass composition remains a puzzle. While HiRes and TA detectors observe the proton-dominated mass composition, as required by the dip model, the data of Auger detector strongly evidence for nuclei mass composition becoming progressively heavier at energy higher than 4 EeV and reaching Iron at energy about 35 EeV. The Auger-based scenario is consistent with another interpretation of the ankle at energy Ea≈4 EeV as transition from extragalactic protons to extragalactic nuclei. The heavy-nuclei dominance at higher energies may be provided by low-energy of acceleration for protons Epmax∼4 EeV and rigidity-dependent EAmax=ZEpmax for nuclei. The highest energy suppression may be explained as nuclei-photodisintegration cutoff.

  19. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  20. Radio source evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucho, M.

    2016-02-01

    Baldwin (1982) wrote that {``the distribution of sources in the radio luminosity, P, overall physical size, D, diagram''} could be considered as {``the radio astronomer's H-R diagram''}. However, unlike the case of stars, not only the intrinsic properties of the jets, but also those of the host galaxy and the intergalactic medium are relevant to explain the evolutionary tracks of radio radio sources. In this contribution I review the current status of our understanding of the evolution of radio sources from a theoretical and numerical perspective, using the P-D diagram as a framework. An excess of compact (linear size {≤ 10} kpc) sources could be explained by low-power jets being decelerated within the host galaxy, as shown by recent numerical simulations. Finally, I discuss the possible tracks that radio sources may follow within this diagram, and the physical processes that can explain the different tracks.

  1. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES IN THE 3CR CATALOG: X-RAY EMISSION FROM NUCLEI, JETS, AND HOTSPOTS IN THE CHANDRA ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Wilkes, B. J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J.; Liuzzo, E.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R.; Tremblay, G. R.; Baum, S. A.; O’Dea, C. P.

    2015-09-15

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all Third Cambridge catalog extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have already been published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the Very Large Array archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample, a comparison between the Chandra and radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium for 15 galaxy clusters.

  2. Deep VLA Images of the HH 124 IRS Radio Cluster and Its Surroundings, and a New Determination of the Distance to NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Galli, Phillip

    2014-06-01

    We present new deep (σ ~ 6 μJy) radio images of the HH 124 IRS radio cluster at 4.8 and 7.5 GHz. We detect a total of 50 radio sources, most of them compact. Variability and spectral indices were analyzed in order to determine the nature of the sources and of their radio emission. A proper motion study was also performed for several of these radio sources using previously reported radio observations. Our analysis shows that 11 radio sources can be associated with Galactic objects, most of them probably young stars. Interestingly, 8 of these sources are in an area less than 1 arcmin2 in size. The importance of such compact clusters resides in that all of its members can be observed in a single pointing with most telescopes and are, therefore, ideal for multi-wavelength studies of variability. Another 4 of the detected sources are clearly extragalactic. Finally, we propose from statistical arguments that out of the remaining sources, about 10 are Galactic, but our study does not allow us to identify which of the sources fall in that specific category. The relatively large proper motions observed for the sources in HH 124 IRS suggest that this region is located at about 400 pc from the Sun. This is significantly smaller than the ~800-900 pc distance usually assigned to the nearby open cluster NGC 2264 with which HH 124 is thought to be associated. However, a reanalysis of the Hipparcos parallaxes for members of NGC 2264, a convergent point approach, and a kinematic analysis all argue in favor of a distance of the order of 400 pc for NGC 2264 as well.

  3. Deep VLA images of the HH 124 IRS radio cluster and its surroundings, and a new determination of the distance to NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Galli, Phillip

    2014-06-20

    We present new deep (σ ∼ 6 μJy) radio images of the HH 124 IRS radio cluster at 4.8 and 7.5 GHz. We detect a total of 50 radio sources, most of them compact. Variability and spectral indices were analyzed in order to determine the nature of the sources and of their radio emission. A proper motion study was also performed for several of these radio sources using previously reported radio observations. Our analysis shows that 11 radio sources can be associated with Galactic objects, most of them probably young stars. Interestingly, 8 of these sources are in an area less than 1 arcmin{sup 2} in size. The importance of such compact clusters resides in that all of its members can be observed in a single pointing with most telescopes and are, therefore, ideal for multi-wavelength studies of variability. Another 4 of the detected sources are clearly extragalactic. Finally, we propose from statistical arguments that out of the remaining sources, about 10 are Galactic, but our study does not allow us to identify which of the sources fall in that specific category. The relatively large proper motions observed for the sources in HH 124 IRS suggest that this region is located at about 400 pc from the Sun. This is significantly smaller than the ∼800-900 pc distance usually assigned to the nearby open cluster NGC 2264 with which HH 124 is thought to be associated. However, a reanalysis of the Hipparcos parallaxes for members of NGC 2264, a convergent point approach, and a kinematic analysis all argue in favor of a distance of the order of 400 pc for NGC 2264 as well.

  4. A NEW METHOD FOR MEASURING EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshii, Yuzuru; Minezaki, Takeo; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Koshida, Shintaro; Peterson, Bruce A.

    2014-03-20

    We have pioneered a new method for the measurement of extragalactic distances. This method uses the time lag between variations in the short wavelength and long wavelength light from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), based on a quantitative physical model of dust reverberation that relates the time lag to the absolute luminosity of the AGN. We use the large homogeneous data set from intensive monitoring observations in optical and near-infrared wavelength bands with the dedicated 2 m MAGNUM telescope to obtain the distances to 17 AGNs in the redshift range z = 0.0024 to z = 0.0353. These distance measurements are compared with distances measured using Cepheid variable stars, and are used to infer that H {sub 0} = 73 ± 3 (random) km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. The systematic error in H {sub 0} is examined, and the uncertainty in the size distribution of dust grains is the largest source of the systematic error, which is much reduced for a sample of AGNs for which their parameter values in the model of dust reverberation are individually measured. This AGN time lag method can be used beyond 30 Mpc, the farthest distance reached by extragalactic Cepheids, and can be extended to high-redshift quasi-stellar objects.

  5. A CHANDRA SNAPSHOT SURVEY FOR 3C RADIO GALAXIES WITH REDSHIFTS BETWEEN 0.3 AND 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Tremblay, G. R.; Liuzzo, E.; Bonafede, A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper contains an analysis of short Chandra observations of 19 3C sources with redshifts between 0.3 and 0.5 not previously observed in the X-rays. This sample is part of a project to obtain Chandra data for all of the extragalactic sources in the 3C catalog. Nuclear X-ray intensities as well as any X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots, hotspots, or lobes have been measured in three energy bands: soft, medium, and hard. Standard X-ray spectral analysis for the four brightest nuclei has also been performed. X-ray emission was detected for all the nuclei of the radio sources in the current sample with the exception of 3C 435A. There is one compact steep spectrum source while all the others are FR II radio galaxies. X-ray emission from two galaxy clusters (3C 19 and 3C 320), from six hotspots in four radio galaxies (3C 16, 3C 19, 3C 268.2, 3C 313), and extended X-ray emission on kiloparsec scales in 3C 187 and 3C 313, has been detected.

  6. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  7. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  8. Determining the extragalactic extinction law with SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelman, Ido; Brosch, Noah; Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Buckley, David A. H.; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Hashimoto, Yas; Loaring, Nicola; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Still, Martin; Sefako, Ramotholo; Väisänen, Petri

    2008-11-01

    We present CCD imaging observations of early-type galaxies with dark lanes obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) during its performance-verification phase. The observations were performed in six spectral bands that span the spectral range from the near-ultraviolet atmospheric cut-off to the near-infrared. We derive the extinction law by the extragalactic dust in the dark lanes in the spectral range 1.11 < λ-1 < 2.94μm-1 by fitting model galaxies to the unextinguished parts of the image, and subtracting from these the actual images. This procedure allows the derivation, with reasonably high signal-to-noise ratio, of the extinction in each spectral band we used for each resolution element of the image. We also introduce an alternative method to derive the extinction values by comparing various colour-index maps under the assumption of negligible intrinsic colour gradients in these galaxies. We than compare the results obtained using these two methods. We compare the total-to-selective extinction derived for these galaxies with previously obtained results and with similar extinction values of Milky Way dust to derive conclusions about the properties of extragalactic dust in different objects and conditions. We find that the extinction curves run parallel to the Galactic extinction curve, which implies that the properties of dust in the extragalactic environment are similar to those of the Milky Way, despite our original expectations. The ratio of the total V-band extinction to the selective extinction between the V and B bands is derived for each galaxy with an average of 2.82 +/- 0.38, compared to a canonical value of 3.1 for the Milky Way. The similar values imply that galaxies with well-defined dark lanes have characteristic dust grain sizes similar to those of Galactic dust. We use total optical extinction values to estimate the dust mass for each galaxy, compare these with dust masses derived from IRAS measurements, and find them in the

  9. A compact 10 kW, 476 MHz solid state radio frequency amplifier for pre-buncher cavity of free electron laser injector linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mohania, Praveen; Mahawar, Ashish; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-09-15

    A 10 kW, 476 MHz, 0.1% duty cycle solid state RF amplifier system for driving sub-harmonic, pre-buncher cavity of IR-FEL injector LINAC, has been developed at RRCAT. The 10 kW power is achieved by combining output of eight 1400 W amplifier modules using 8-way planar corporate combiner. The solid state amplifier modules have been developed using 50 V RF LDMOS transistors which although meant for push-pull operation are being used in single ended configuration with matching circuit developed on a thin (25 mils), high dielectric constant (9.7), low loss microwave laminate with an aim to have a compact structure. Ease of fabrication, modularity, small size, and low cost are the important features of this design which could be used as a template for low duty cycle medium to high pulsed power UHF amplifier system.

  10. HIPPARCOS Extragalactic Link: the Potsdam Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirte, S.; Schilbach, E.; Scholz, R.-D.

    1997-08-01

    The Potsdam group was involved in the link of the Hipparcos proper motion system to an extragalactic reference system. Absolute proper motions were derived from measurements of photographic plates taken mainly with the Tautenburg Schmidt telescope (134/200/400 cm). In 24 fields included in different Potsdam proper motion programmes and well distributed over the northern sky, 360 Hipparcos stars were measured. In each field of about 10 square degrees a large number of galaxies was used for the link. Detailed investigations showed that the proper motion determination of bright stars is affected by systematic magnitude dependent errors. Therefore, only the 256 stars with B >= 9.0 were used to determine the spin parameters of the Hipparcos system. The accuracy of our final results is 0.5 mas/yr for all three spin parameters. The results are in good agreement with the VLBI link parameters and the synthesized solution by Kovalevsky et al. (1997).

  11. Radio Jet Feedback and Star Formation in Heavily Obscured, Hyperluminous Quasars at Redshifts ∼ 0.5–3. I. ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lacy, M.; Kimball, A. E.; Blain, A.; Whittle, M.; Wilkes, B.; Stern, D.; Condon, J.; Kim, M.; Assef, R. J.; Tsai, C.-W.; Efstathiou, A.; Jones, S.; Eisenhardt, P.; Bridge, C.; Wu, J.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Jones, K.; Jarrett, T.; Smith, R.

    2015-11-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm (345 GHz) data for 49 high-redshift (0.47 < z < 2.85), luminous (11.7\\lt {log}({L}{{bol}}/{L}ȯ )\\lt 14.2) radio-powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs), obtained to constrain cool dust emission from starbursts concurrent with highly obscured radiative-mode black hole (BH) accretion in massive galaxies that possess a small radio jet. The sample was selected from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with extremely steep (red) mid-infrared colors and with compact radio emission from NVSS/FIRST. Twenty-six sources are detected at 870 μm, and we find that the sample has large mid- to far-infrared luminosity ratios, consistent with a dominant and highly obscured quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7\\lt {log}({P}\\text{3.0 GHz}/{{{W}} {Hz}}-1)\\lt 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 < log(MBH/M⊙) < 10.2. The rest-frame 1–5 μm spectral energy distributions are very similar to the “Hot DOGs” (hot dust-obscured galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estimated for the ALMA-detected sources are 9.9 < log (MISM/M⊙) < 11.75 assuming a dust temperature of 30 K. The cool dust emission is consistent with star formation rates reaching several thousand M⊙ yr‑1, depending on the assumed dust temperature, but we cannot rule out the alternative that the AGN powers all the emission in some cases. Our best constrained source has radiative transfer solutions with approximately equal contributions from an obscured AGN and a young (10–15 Myr) compact starburst.

  12. Radio Jet Feedback and Star Formation in Heavily Obscured, Hyperluminous Quasars at Redshifts ˜ 0.5-3. I. ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lacy, M.; Kimball, A. E.; Blain, A.; Whittle, M.; Wilkes, B.; Stern, D.; Condon, J.; Kim, M.; Assef, R. J.; Tsai, C.-W.; Efstathiou, A.; Jones, S.; Eisenhardt, P.; Bridge, C.; Wu, J.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Jones, K.; Jarrett, T.; Smith, R.

    2015-11-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm (345 GHz) data for 49 high-redshift (0.47 < z < 2.85), luminous (11.7\\lt {log}({L}{{bol}}/{L}⊙ )\\lt 14.2) radio-powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs), obtained to constrain cool dust emission from starbursts concurrent with highly obscured radiative-mode black hole (BH) accretion in massive galaxies that possess a small radio jet. The sample was selected from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with extremely steep (red) mid-infrared colors and with compact radio emission from NVSS/FIRST. Twenty-six sources are detected at 870 μm, and we find that the sample has large mid- to far-infrared luminosity ratios, consistent with a dominant and highly obscured quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7\\lt {log}({P}\\text{3.0 GHz}/{{{W}} {Hz}}-1)\\lt 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 < log(MBH/M⊙) < 10.2. The rest-frame 1-5 μm spectral energy distributions are very similar to the “Hot DOGs” (hot dust-obscured galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estimated for the ALMA-detected sources are 9.9 < log (MISM/M⊙) < 11.75 assuming a dust temperature of 30 K. The cool dust emission is consistent with star formation rates reaching several thousand M⊙ yr-1, depending on the assumed dust temperature, but we cannot rule out the alternative that the AGN powers all the emission in some cases. Our best constrained source has radiative transfer solutions with approximately equal contributions from an obscured AGN and a young (10-15 Myr) compact starburst.

  13. The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey: HerMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, S.J.; Bock, J.; Altieri, B.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Babbedge, T.; Beelen, A.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Boselli, A.; Bridge, C.; Brisbin, D; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Cirasuolo, M.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Dwek, E.; Levenson, L.; Nguyen, H. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, HerMES, is a legacy program designed to map a set of nested fields totalling approx. 380 deg(exp 2). Fields range in size from 0.01 to approx. 20 deg (exp 2), using Herschel-SPIRE (at 250, 350 and 500 micron), and Herschel-PACS (at 100 and 160 micron), with an additional wider component of 270 deg. (exp. 2) with SPIRE alone. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the re-processed optical and ultra-violet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multi-wavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The survey will detect of order 100,000 galaxies at 5-sigma in some of the best studied fields in the sky. Additionally, HerMES is closely coordinated with the PACS Evolutionary Probe survey. Making maximum use of the full spectrum of ancillary data, from radio to X-ray wavelengths, it is designed to: facilitate redshift determination; rapidly identify unusual objects; and understand the relationships between thermal emission from dust and other processes. Scientific questions HerMES will be used to answer include: the total infrared emission of galaxies; the evolution of the luminosity function; the clustering properties of dusty galaxies; and the properties of populations of galaxies which lie below the confusion limit through lensing and statistical techniques. This paper defines the survey observations and data products, outlines the primary scientific goals of the HerMES team, and reviews some of the early results.

  14. THE SPITZER ARCHIVAL FAR-INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Hanish, D. J.; Capak, P.; Teplitz, H. I.; Desai, V.; Armus, L.; Brinkworth, C.; Brooke, T.; Colbert, J.; Fadda, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Edwards, L.; Frayer, D.; Huynh, M.; Lacy, M.; Murphy, E.; Scarlata, C.; Shenoy, S.

    2015-03-15

    We present the Spitzer Archival Far-InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SAFIRES). This program produces refined mosaics and source lists for all far-infrared (FIR) extragalactic data taken during the more than six years of the cryogenic operation of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The SAFIRES products consist of FIR data in two wavelength bands (70 and 160 μm) across approximately 180 square degrees of sky, with source lists containing far-infrared fluxes for almost 40,000 extragalactic point sources. Thus, SAFIRES provides a large, robust archival far-infrared data set suitable for many scientific goals.

  15. Thirty Years of Extragalactic H II Region Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, D. R.

    2002-02-01

    I review a small part of the past thirty years of studies of extragalactic H II regions. Comparing a review of available results in 1975 to what we know today, we see a enormous increase in our knowledge of physical conditions and abundances in extragalactic H II regions, chemical evolution of galaxies, and the primordial helium fraction. Manuel Peimbert and Silvia Torres-Peimbert have made pioneering contributions to this field. Here I outline the progress in understanding extragalactic H II regions and highlight the Peimberts' contributions.

  16. Weak and compact radio emission in early massive star formation regions: an ionized jet toward G11.11–0.12P1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; McCoy, M.; Kurtz, S.; Loinard, L.; Carrasco-González, C.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Araya, E. D.; Cesaroni, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    We report 1.3 cm and 6 cm continuum observations toward the massive proto-stellar candidate G11.11–0.12P1 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We detect a string of four unresolved radio continuum sources coincident with the mid-infrared source in G11P1. The continuum sources have positive spectral indices consistent with a thermal (free-free) ionized jet. The most likely origins of the ionized gas are shocks due to the interaction of a stellar wind with the surrounding high-density material. We also present NIR United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) archival data that show an extended structure detected only at K band (2.2 μm), which is oriented perpendicular to the jet, and that may be scattered light from a circumstellar disk around the massive protostar. Our observations plus the UKIRT archival data thus provide new evidence that a disk/jet system is present in the massive proto-stellar candidate located in the G11.11–0.12P1 core.

  17. Radio astronomers, X-ray astronomers and the space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longair, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    The use of the Space Telescope and the study of objects in the radio and X-ray wavebands, particularly extragalactic objects, are discussed. The scientific objectives of a number of projects which involve observations with the Space Telescope are described.

  18. A selection of AKARI FIS BSC extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, G.; Tóth, L. V.; Balázs, L. G.; Zahorecz, S.; Bagoly, Z.; Horváth, I.; Rácz, I. I.; Nagy, A.

    The point sources in the Bright Source Catalogue (BSC) of the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) were classified based on their far-IR and mid-IR fluxes and colours using Quadratic Discriminant Analysis method (QDA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The reliability of our results show that we can successfully separate galactic and extragalactic AKARI point sources in the multidimensional space of fluxes and colours. However, differentiating among the extragalactic sub-types needs further information.

  19. 30 Years of Extragalactic H II Region Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, D.

    2000-11-01

    The study of extragalactic H II regions has provided key data on ISM abundan ces in star-forming galaxies, and on the properties and physical mechanisms associated with starbursts. Manuel Peimbert and Silvia Torres-Peimbert were early pioneers in obtaining high-quality on physical conditions in extragalactic H II regions. In this review I will highlight their contributions to the field and our present-day understanding of giant H II regions and starbursts.

  20. The MHz-peaked radio spectrum of the unusual γ-ray source PMN J1603-4904

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, C.; Burd, P. R.; Schulz, R.; Coppejans, R.; Falcke, H.; Intema, H.; Kadler, M.; Krauß, F.; Ojha, R.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The majority of bright extragalactic γ-ray sources are blazars. Only a few radio galaxies have been detected by Fermi/LAT. Recently, the GHz-peaked spectrum source PKS 1718-649 was confirmed to be γ-ray bright, providing further evidence for the existence of a population of γ-ray loud, compact radio galaxies. A spectral turnover in the radio spectrum in the MHz to GHz range is a characteristic feature of these objects, which are thought to be young due to their small linear sizes. The multiwavelength properties of the γ-ray source PMN J1603-4904 suggest that it is a member of this source class. Aims: The known radio spectrum of PMN J1603-4904 can be described by a power law above 1 GHz. Using observations from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 150, 325, and 610 MHz, we investigate the behavior of the spectrum at lower frequencies to search for a low-frequency turnover. Methods: Data from the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR) catalog and archival GMRT observations were used to construct the first MHz to GHz spectrum of PMN J1603-4904. Results: We detect a low-frequency turnover of the spectrum and measure the peak position at about 490 MHz (rest-frame), which, using the known relation of peak frequency and linear size, translates into a maximum linear source size of ~1.4 kpc. Conclusions: The detection of the MHz peak indicates that PMN J1603-4904 is part of this population of radio galaxies with turnover frequencies in the MHz to GHz regime. Therefore it can be considered the second confirmed object of this kind detected in γ-rays. Establishing this γ-ray source class will help to investigate the γ-ray production sites and to test broadband emission models.

  1. The VLBA Fast Radio Transient Experiment: Progress and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayth, Randall B.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Majid, Walid A.; Thompson, David R.; Tingay, Steven J.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-04-01

    Motivated by recent discoveries of isolated, dispersed radio pulses of possible extragalactic origin, we are performing a commensal search for short-duration (ms) continuum radio pulses using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The geographically separated antennæ of the VLBA make the system robust to local RFI and allow events to be verified and localised on the sky with milli-arcsec accuracy. We report sky coverage and detection limits from the experiment to date.

  2. The peculiar radio source M17 JVLA 35

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, L. F.; Carrasco-González, C.; Montes, G.; Tapia, M.

    2014-07-01

    M17 JVLA 35 is a radio source detected in projection against the M17 H II region. In recent observations, its spectrum between 4.96 and 8.46 GHz was found to be positive and very steep, with α ≥ 2.9 ± 0.6 (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup α}). Here we present Very Large Array observations made in the 18.5 to 36.5 GHz region that indicate a spectral turnover at ∼13 GHz and a negative spectral index (α ≅ –2.0) at higher frequencies. The spectrum is consistent with that of an extragalactic high frequency peaker (HFP). However, M17 JVLA 35 has an angular size of ∼0.''5 at 8.46 GHz, while HFPs have extremely compact, milliarcsecond dimensions. We discuss other possible models for the spectrum of the source and do not find them feasible. Finally, we propose that M17 JVLA 35 is indeed an HFP but that its angular size becomes broadened by plasma scattering as its radiation travels across M17. If our interpretation is correct, accurate measurements of the angular size of M17 JVLA 35 across the centimeter range should reveal the expected ν{sup –2} dependence.

  3. Jet emission in young radio sources: A Fermi large area telescope gamma-ray view

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kelly, B. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Celotti, A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (≲10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ∼10{sup 46}-10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1} depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ∼4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L {sub jet,} {sub kin}/L {sub disk} > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (≲ 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  4. Jet Emission in Young Radio Sources: A Fermi Large Area Telescope Gamma-Ray View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kelly, B. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Celotti, A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (lsim10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ~1046-1048 erg s-1 depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ~4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L jet, kin/L disk > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (lsim 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  5. RadioAstron space VLBI imaging of polarized radio emission in the high-redshift quasar 0642+449 at 1.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. P.; Gómez, J. L.; Bruni, G.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Anderson, J.; Bach, U.; Kraus, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Voytsik, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Polarization of radio emission in extragalactic jets at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution holds important clues for understanding the structure of the magnetic field in the inner regions of the jets and in close vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the centers of active galaxies. Aims: Space VLBI observations provide a unique tool for polarimetric imaging at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution and studying the properties of magnetic field in active galactic nuclei on scales of less than 104 gravitational radii. Methods: A space VLBI observation of high-redshift quasar TXS 0642+449 (OH 471), made at a wavelength of 18 cm (frequency of 1.6 GHz) as part of the early science programme (ESP) of the RadioAstron mission, is used here to test the polarimetric performance of the orbiting Space Radio Telescope (SRT) employed by the mission, to establish a methodology for making full Stokes polarimetry with space VLBI at 1.6 GHz, and to study the polarized emission in the target object on sub-milliarcsecond scales. Results: Polarization leakage of the SRT at 18 cm is found to be within 9% in amplitude, demonstrating the feasibility of high fidelity polarization imaging with RadioAstron at this wavelength. A polarimetric image of 0642+449 with a resolution of 0.8 mas (signifying an ~4 times improvement over ground VLBI observations at the same wavelength) is obtained. The image shows a compact core-jet structure with low (≈2%) polarization and predominantly transverse magnetic field in the nuclear region. The VLBI data also uncover a complex structure of the nuclear region, with two prominent features possibly corresponding to the jet base and a strong recollimation shock. The maximum brightness temperature at the jet base can be as high as 4 × 1013 K.

  6. Extragalactic Fields Optimized for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter; Rigaut, Francois; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Brinchmann, Jarle; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Mellier, Yannick; McCracken, Henry Joy; Hudelot, Patrick; Monet, David

    2011-03-01

    In this article we present the coordinates of 67 55' × 55' patches of sky that have the rare combination of both high stellar surface density (>=0.5 arcmin-2 with 13 < R < 16.5 mag) and low extinction (E(B - V)<=0.1). These fields are ideal for adaptive-optics-based follow-up of extragalactic targets. One region of sky, situated near Baade's Window, contains most of the patches we have identified. Our optimal field, centered at R.A.: 7h24m3s, decl.: -1°27'15'', has an additional advantage of being accessible from both hemispheres. We propose a figure of merit for quantifying real-world adaptive optics performance and use this to analyze the performance of multiconjugate adaptive optics in these fields. We also compare our results with those that would be obtained in existing deep fields. In some cases adaptive optics observations undertaken in the fields given in this article would be orders of magnitude more efficient than equivalent observations undertaken in existing deep fields.

  7. The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS): Survey Definition and Goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauduit, J.-C.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Surace, J. A.; Jarvis, M.; Oliver, S.; Maraston, C.; Vaccari, M.; Marchetti, L.; Zeimann, G.; Gonzáles-Solares, E. A.; Pforr, J.; Petric, A. O.; Henriques, B.; Thomas, P. A.; Afonso, J.; Rettura, A.; Wilson, G.; Falder, J. T.; Geach, J. E.; Huynh, M.; Norris, R. P.; Seymour, N.; Richards, G. T.; Stanford, S. A.; Alexander, D. M.; Becker, R. H.; Best, P. N.; Bizzocchi, L.; Bonfield, D.; Castro, N.; Cava, A.; Chapman, S.; Christopher, N.; Clements, D. L.; Covone, G.; Dubois, N.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dyke, E.; Edge, A.; Ferguson, H. C.; Foucaud, S.; Franceschini, A.; Gal, R. R.; Grant, J. K.; Grossi, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hickey, S.; Hodge, J. A.; Huang, J.-S.; Ivison, R. J.; Kim, M.; LeFevre, O.; Lehnert, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lubin, L. M.; McLure, R. J.; Messias, H.; Martínez-Sansigre, A.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Nielsen, D. M.; Ouchi, M.; Parish, G.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pierre, M.; Rawlings, S.; Readhead, A.; Ridgway, S. E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Romer, A. K.; Rosebloom, I. G.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Sajina, A.; Simpson, C. J.; Smail, I.; Squires, G. K.; Stevens, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Trichas, M.; Urrutia, T.; van Kampen, E.; Verma, A.; Xu, C. K.

    2012-07-01

    We present the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 deg2 medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the postcryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ≈2 μJy (AB = 23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (ELAIS-N1, ELAIS-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra Deep Field South, and XMM-LSS). SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z ~ 5 to the present day and is the first extragalactic survey that is both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z gsim 1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter, and radio wavelengths to provide an unprecedented view of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. In this article, we discuss the SERVS survey design, the data processing flow from image reduction and mosaicking to catalogs, and coverage of ancillary data from other surveys in the SERVS fields. We also highlight a variety of early science results from the survey. Since this article was published online on 4 August 2012, corrections have been made. An erratum appears in the October 2012 issue of the journal. The current online version was corrected on 10 October 2012.

  8. ANATOMY OF HELICAL EXTRAGALACTIC JETS: THE CASE OF S5 0836+710

    SciTech Connect

    Perucho, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Lobanov, A. P.; Hardee, P. E.; Agudo, I.

    2012-04-10

    Helical structures are common in extragalactic jets. They are usually attributed in the literature to periodical phenomena in the source (e.g., precession). In this work, we use very long baseline interferometry data of the radio jet in the quasar S5 0836+710 and hypothesize that the ridgeline of helical jets like this corresponds to a pressure maximum in the jet and assume that the helically twisted pressure maximum is the result of a helical wave pattern. For our study, we use observations of the jet in S5 0836+710 at different frequencies and epochs. The results show that the structures observed are physical and not generated artificially by the observing arrays. Our hypothesis that the observed intensity ridgeline can correspond to a helically twisted pressure maximum is confirmed by our observational tests. This interpretation allows us to explain jet misalignment between parsec and kiloparsec scales when the viewing angle is small, and also brings us to the conclusion that high-frequency observations may show only a small region of the jet flow concentrated around the maximum pressure ridgeline observed at low frequencies. Our work provides a potential explanation for the apparent transversal superluminal speeds observed in several extragalactic jets by means of transversal shift of an apparent core position with time.

  9. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  10. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, B.; López-Caniego, M.; Perley, R. A.; Stevens, J.; Butler, B. J.; Rocha, G.; Walter, B.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite’s annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus, Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated Very Large Array (VLA) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1%-2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 2%-3% ± 1.0% below Planck values with an uncertainty of +/- 1.0%; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 5%-6% ± 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  11. THE CENTAURUS A ULTRAHIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY EXCESS AND THE LOCAL EXTRAGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Yueksel, Hasan; Kronberg, Philipp P.; Stanev, Todor; Kistler, Matthew D.

    2012-10-10

    The ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) anisotropies discovered by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide the potential to finally address both the particle origins and properties of the nearby extragalactic magnetic field (EGMF). We examine the implications of the excess of {approx}10{sup 20} eV events around the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A. We find that, if Cen A is the source of these cosmic rays, the angular distribution of events constrains the EGMF strength within several Mpc of the Milky Way to {approx}> 20 nG for an assumed primary proton composition. Our conclusions suggest that either the observed excess is a statistical anomaly or the local EGMF is stronger than conventionally thought. We discuss several implications, including UHECR scattering from more distant sources, time delays from transient sources, and the possibility of using magnetic lensing signatures to attain tighter constraints.

  12. The Infrared-Gamma-Ray Connection: A WISE View of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.

    2016-08-01

    Using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey, we discovered that the nonthermal infrared (IR) emission of blazars, the largest known population of extragalactic γ-ray sources, has peculiar spectral properties. In this work, we confirm and strengthen our previous analyses using the latest available releases of both the WISE and the Fermi source catalogs. We also show that there is a tight correlation between the mid-IR colors and the γ-ray spectral index of Fermi blazars. We name this correlation the infrared-γ-ray connection. We discuss how this connection links both the emitted powers and the spectral shapes of particles accelerated in jets arising from blazars over 10 decades in energy. Based on this evidence, we argue that the infrared-γ-ray connection is stronger than the well-known radio-γ-ray connection.

  13. The grand unified photon spectrum: A coherent view of the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressell, M. Ted; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) at wavelengths from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp -24) cm is presented in a coherent fashion. Each wavelength region, from the radio to ultra-high energy photons and cosmic rays, is treated both separately and as part of the grand unified photon spectrum (GUPS). A discussion of, and references to, the relevant literature for each wavelength region is included. This review should provide a useful tool for those interested in diffuse backgrounds, the epoch of galaxy formation, astrophysical/cosmological constraints to particle properties, exotic early Universe processes, and many other astrophysical and cosmological enterprises. As a worked example, researchers derive the cosmological constraints to an unstable-neutrino spies (with arbitrary branching ratio to a radiative decay mode) that follow from the GUPS.

  14. The Imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Schady, P.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Guirec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Perkins, J. S.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL isimportant to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z approx. 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  15. A catalogue of AKARI FIS BSC extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Toth, L. Viktor; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos

    2015-08-01

    We combined photometric data of about 70 thousand point sources from the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor Bright Source Catalogue with AllWISE catalogue data to identify galaxies. We used Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) to classify our sources. The classification was based on a 6D parameter space that contained AKARI [F65/F90], [F90/F140], [F140/F160] and WISE W1-W2 colours along with WISE W1 magnitudes and AKARI [F140] flux values. Sources were classified into 3 main objects types: YSO candidates, evolved stars and galaxies. The training samples were SIMBAD entries of the input point sources wherever an associated SIMBAD object was found within a 30 arcsecond search radius. The QDA resulted more than 5000 AKARI galaxy candidate sources. The selection was tested cross-correlating our AKARI extragalactic catalogue with the Revised IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (RIFSCz). A very good match was found. A further classification attempt was also made to differentiate between extragalactic subtypes using Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The results of the various methods showed that we can confidently separate cirrus dominated objects (type 1 of RIFSCz). Some of our “galaxy candidate” sources are associated with 2MASS extended objects, and listed in the NASA Extragalactic Database so far without clear proofs of their extragalactic nature. Examples will be presented in our poster. Finally other AKARI extragalactic catalogues will be also compared to our statistical selection.

  16. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Extragalactic Sources at 148 GHz in the 2008 Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marriage, T. A.; Juin, J. B.; Lin, Y. T.; Marsden, D.; Nolta, M. R.; Partridge, B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, P.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Barrientos, L. F.; Battistelli, E. S.; Bond, J. R.; Brown, B.; Burger, B.; Chervenak, J.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Dunkley, J.; Dunner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fisher, R. P.; Fowler, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report on extragalactic sources detected in a 455 square-degree map of the southern sky made with data at a frequency of 148 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope 2008 observing season. We provide a catalog of 157 sources with flux densities spanning two orders of magnitude: from 15 mJy to 1500 mJy. Comparison to other catalogs shows that 98% of the ACT detections correspond to sources detected at lower radio frequencies. Three of the sources appear to be associated with the brightest cluster galaxies of low redshift X-ray selected galaxy clusters. Estimates of the radio to mm-wave spectral indices and differential counts of the sources further bolster the hypothesis that they are nearly all radio sources, and that their emission is not dominated by re-emission from warm dust. In a bright (> 50 mJy) 148 GHz-selected sample with complete cross-identifications from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey, we observe an average steepening of the spectra between .5, 20, and 148 GHz with median spectral indices of alp[ha (sub 5-20) = -0.07 +/- 0.06, alpha (sub 20-148) -0.39 +/- 0.04, and alpha (sub 5-148) = -0.20 +/- 0.03. When the measured spectral indices are taken into account, the 148 GHz differential source counts are consistent with previous measurements at 30 GHz in the context of a source count model dominated by radio sources. Extrapolating with an appropriately rescaled model for the radio source counts, the Poisson contribution to the spatial power spectrum from synchrotron-dominated sources with flux density less than 20 mJy is C(sup Sync) = (2.8 +/- 0.3) x 1O (exp-6) micro K(exp 2).

  17. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES AT 148 GHz IN THE 2008 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Marriage, Tobias A.; Lin Yenting; Das, Sudeep; Juin, Jean Baptiste; Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Marsden, Danica; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Nolta, Michael R.; Bond, John R.; Partridge, Bruce; Ade, Peter A. R.; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce; Appel, John William; Brown, Ben; Chervenak, Jay

    2011-04-20

    We report on extragalactic sources detected in a 455 deg{sup 2} map of the southern sky made with data at a frequency of 148 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) 2008 observing season. We provide a catalog of 157 sources with flux densities spanning two orders of magnitude: from 15 mJy to 1500 mJy. Comparison to other catalogs shows that 98% of the ACT detections correspond to sources detected at lower radio frequencies. Three of the sources appear to be associated with the brightest cluster galaxies of low-redshift X-ray-selected galaxy clusters. Estimates of the radio to millimeter-wave spectral indices and differential counts of the sources further bolster the hypothesis that they are nearly all radio sources, and that their emission is not dominated by re-emission from warm dust. In a bright (>50 mJy) 148 GHz selected sample with complete cross-identifications from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey, we observe an average steepening of the spectra between 5, 20, and 148 GHz with median spectral indices of {alpha}{sub 5-20} = -0.07 {+-} 0.06, {alpha}{sub 20-148} = -0.39 {+-} 0.04, and {alpha}{sub 5-148} = -0.20 {+-} 0.03. When the measured spectral indices are taken into account, the 148 GHz differential source counts are consistent with previous measurements at 30 GHz in the context of a source count model dominated by radio sources. Extrapolating with an appropriately rescaled model for the radio source counts, the Poisson contribution to the spatial power spectrum from synchrotron-dominated sources with flux density less than 20 mJy is C {sup Sync} = (2.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}{mu}K{sup 2}.

  18. Localising fast radio bursts and other transients using interferometric arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrocka, M.; Stappers, B.; Wilkinson, P.

    2015-07-01

    A new population of sources emitting fast and bright transient radio bursts (FRBs) has recently been identified. Their observed high dispersion measures suggests an extragalactic origin, and accurately determining their positions and distances will provide an opportunity to study the magneto-ionic properties of the intergalactic medium. So far, FRBs have all been found using large dishes equipped with multi-pixel arrays. While these dishes are well-suited to discovering transient sources, they are poor at providing accurate localisations. A 2D snapshot image of the sky, made with a correlation interferometer array, can accurately localise many compact radio sources simultaneously. However, the required time resolution and the need to detect them in real time makes this currently impractical. In a beam-forming approach many narrow tied-array beams (TABs) are produced and the advantages of single dishes and interferometers can be combined. We present a proof-of-concept analysis of a new non-imaging method that utilises the additional spectral and comparative spatial information obtained from multiply overlapping TABs to estimate a transient source location with up to arcsecond accuracy in almost real time. We demonstrate this for a variety of interferometric configurations, that is LOFAR and MeerKAT, and show that the estimated angular position may be sufficient for identifying a host galaxy or other related object, without reference to other simultaneous or follow-up observations. In cases where the position is less accurately determined, we can still significantly reduce the area that needs to be searched for associated emission at other wavelengths and from potential host galaxies.

  19. Fast Radio Bursts: The Search for Their Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke Spolaor, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio signals whose swept-frequency signals indicate a non-local origin.FRB science has been building rapidly since the first discovery of an FRB in 2007; proof of an FRB population in 2013 (Thornton et al.) was quickly followed by further evidence of their likely, although not yet definite, extragalactic origin (e.g. Kulkarni et al. 2014, Burke-Spolaor & Bannister 2014). Until recently, only circumstantial evidence allowed statements on what progenitors FRBs might arise from, and whether they are local, Galactic, or extragalactic. However, we are now able to detect FRB events in real-time, and have the capability to detect FRBs with radio interferometers. This has opened up the possibility to understand their origins through arcsecond localization and the identification of multi-wavelength counterparts. I will describe what we currently know about FRBs, and the status of the FRB hunt for their enigmatic origins.

  20. AGN content of X-ray, IR and radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a number of surveys and identification works related to X-ray, IR and radio sources and searched for extragalactic ones. Among them, most interesting are Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Starburst (SB) Galaxies. Some 4500 AGN have been revealed from ROSAT BSC and FSC sources, and many more are hidden ones; those showing evidence of activity but with no emission lines in optical wavelengths. We estimated AGN content of X-ray sources as 52.9%. IR sources contain thousands of SBs, and most important are those having signs of interaction and/or merging. We have carried out optical identifications of IRAS point sources, and 1278 IR galaxies have been revealed, including LIRGs and ULIRGs. We have also combined IRAS PSC and FSC catalogs and compiled its extragalactic sample, which allowed to estimate AGN content among IR sources as 23.7%. Extragalactic radio sources contain bright galaxies, AGN and SBs. We have studied the border between AGN and normal galaxies by radio/optical flux ratios to establish which objects may be attributed to AGN based on radio properties. Interestingly, absolute majority of objects associated with both X-ray and radio sources are AGN.

  1. The case for antiparticles in the extragalactic cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The presence of an excess of low-energy antiprotons in the primary cosmic radiation has given rise to several possible explanations, some of which involve exotic processes such as mini-black holes and extragalactic antiparticles. The latter possibility is considered, and it is shown that there are interesting implications for the cosmic radiation at higher energies. Indeed, it may be possible to account for a previously puzzling feature of the cosmic ray spectrum (a 'bump' in the range between 10 to the 14th and 10 to the 15th eV) by hypothesizing a primary extragalactic origin for the bulk of the observed cosmic ray antiprotons, although such an explanation is not unique. In this model, most of the cosmic rays above 10 to the 15th eV are extragalactic. A method of testing this hypothesis experimentally is described.

  2. Extragalactic OH megamasers in strong IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottinelli, L.; Dennefeld, H.; Gouguenheim, L.; Martin, J. M.; Paturel, G.; Lesqueren, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    From the OH and HI survey of the strongest far infrared IRAS sources, 3 new powerful OH megamasers were discovered in Arp 143, IRAS 1510+0724 and in the uncatalogued IRAS source, IRAS 17208-0014. The HI line, the OH 1667 and 1665 MHz main lines and the 21 cm continuum observations were made with Nancy radio telescope. The optical spectra and images were obtained at the European Southern Observatory. The spectra are displayed in figures together with the main IR and OH properties of the 8 megamasers detected up to now, including IC 4553, NGC 3690 and Mrk 231, Mrk 273 and III ZW35.

  3. The case for antiparticles in the extragalactic cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The presence of an excess of low energy antiprotons in the primary cosmic radiation has given rise to a number of possible explanations. The possibility that these are extragalactic in origin is considered and it is shown that there are interesting implications for the bulk of the cosmic radiation at higher energies. In particular, it may be possible to account for a previously puzzling feature, a bump in the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the energy range 10(14) to 10(15) eV, with this primary extragalactic origin hypothesis. A method for testing this hypothesis experimentally is also described.

  4. Radio Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  5. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  6. Radio astrometry from the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    An array of three radio telescopes on the Moon, separated by 100-1000 km, could measure the positions of compact radio sources 50-100 times more accurately than can be done on Earth. These measurements would form an all-sky reference frame of extreme precision (5-10 micro-arcsec) and stability, with applications to the dynamics of the solar system, our galaxy, and nearby galaxies.

  7. Probing the gas content of radio galaxies through H I absorption stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2014-09-01

    Using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we carried out shallow H i absorption observations of a flux-selected (S1.4 GHz > 50 mJy) sample of 93 radio active galactic nuclei (AGN), which have available SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) redshifts between 0.02 < z < 0.23. Our main goal is to study the gas properties of radio sources down to S1.4 GHz flux densities not systematically explored before using, for the first time, stacking of absorption spectra of extragalactic H i. Despite the shallow observations, we obtained a direct detection rate of ~29%, comparable with deeper studies of radio galaxies. Furthermore, detections are found at every S1.4 GHz flux level, showing that H i absorption detections are not biased toward brighter sources. The stacked profiles of detections and non-detections reveal a clear dichotomy in the presence of H i, with the 27 detections showing an average peak τ = 0.02 corresponding to N(H i) ~(7.4 ± 0.2) × 1018 (Tspin/cf) cm-2, while the 66 non-detections remain undetected upon stacking with a peak optical depth upper limit τ < 0.002 corresponding to N(H i) < (2.26 ± 0.06) × 1017 (Tspin/cf) cm-2 (using a FWHM of 62 kms-1, derived from the mean width of the detections). Separating the sample into compact and extended radio sources increases the detection rate, optical depth, and FWHM for the compact sample. The dichotomy for the stacked profiles of detections and non-detections still holds between these two groups of objects. We argue that orientation effects connected to a disk-like distribution of the H i can be partly responsible for the dichotomy that we see in our sample. However, orientation effects alone cannot explain all the observational results, and some of our galaxies must be genuinely depleted of cold gas. A fraction of the compact sources in the sample are confirmed by previous studies as likely young radio sources (compact steep spectrum and gigahertz peaked spectrum sources). These show an even higher

  8. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  9. On the extragalactic origin of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Teller, E.

    1984-11-02

    A theory to explain the origin of extragalactic gamma ray bursts is presented. Collisions of black dwarf and neutron stars with a subsequent fragmentation of the dwarf producing relativistic particle accelerations toward the neutron star and a resulting turbulent flow of material at the neutron star surface is postulated. (DWL)

  10. CENTAURUS A: THE EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCE OF COSMIC RAYS WITH ENERGIES ABOVE THE KNEE

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, Peter L.; De Souza, Vitor E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br

    2012-02-10

    The origin of cosmic rays at all energies is still uncertain. In this paper, we present and explore an astrophysical scenario to produce cosmic rays with energy ranging from below 10{sup 15} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} eV. We show here that just our Galaxy and the radio galaxy Cen A, each with their own galactic cosmic-ray particles but with those from the radio galaxy pushed up in energy by a relativistic shock in the jet emanating from the active black hole, are sufficient to describe the most recent data in the PeV to near ZeV energy range. Data are available over this entire energy range from the KASCADE, KASCADE-Grande, and Pierre Auger Observatory experiments. The energy spectrum calculated here correctly reproduces the measured spectrum beyond the knee and, contrary to widely held expectations, no other extragalactic source population is required to explain the data even at energies far below the general cutoff expected at 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV, the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min turnoff due to interaction with the cosmological microwave background. We present several predictions for the source population, the cosmic-ray composition, and the propagation to Earth which can be tested in the near future.

  11. Optical imaging of southern extragalactic fields with multiwavelength coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Mark; Oliver, Seb; Jarvis, Matt; Norris, Ray; Lonsdale, Carol; Wilson, Gillian; Maraston, Claudia; Middelberg, Enno; Farrah, Duncan; Surace, Jason; Pforr, Janine; van Kampen, Eelco; Vaccari, Mattia; Ridgway, Susan; Mauduit, Jean-Christophe

    2010-08-01

    We propose to use the CTIO mosaic camera to image two southern fields, ES1 and CDFS, which have been targeted for study by near- through far-infrared surveys (with the ESO VISTA telescope, Spitzer and Herschel) and radio surveys with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Australian SKA pathfinder. These data will allow us to study the buildup of stellar mass in massive galaxies over a wide range of cosmic environments, compare obscured and unobscured star formation rates in high-z galaxies, and identify high redshift quasars. Our survey will extensively leverage previous observations by CTIO/Mosaic and ESO/WFI. Our specific goals are (1) to complete imaging in r and i to 24.2 and 23.2 (Vega) over the whole area of the fields studied by Spitzer and Herschel, and (2) to obtain deeper r and i-band data (to 25.0 and 24.0) in the center of ES1 to complement deep surveys by VISTA and warm Spitzer, and where deep data at shorter wavelengths exists from ESO.

  12. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  13. Exploring Extragalactic Emission: The Hα Dot Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampalli, Rayna; Salzer, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The Hα Dot Survey was established as a result of finding point sources of strong line emission in the data obtained for the ALFALFA Hα Survey (Van Sistine et al. 2015). In the latter survey, broad-band R and narrow-band Hα filters were used to examine target galaxies from the ALFALFA blind HI survey (Giovanelli et al. 2005, Haynes et al. 2011). In the process of reducing the ALFALFA Hα Survey data the "Hα Dots" were discovered (Kellar et al. 2008, 2012). Using specialized image analysis tools, a large population of dots has already been detected in the more than 1500 ALFALFA Hα narrow-band images taken with the 0.9m WIYN and 2.1m KPNO telescopes. Follow-up spectra of over 200 Hα Dots discovered from the 0.9m images reveal that these objects are a mix of nearby low-luminosity star-forming galaxies, compact starbursts and Seyfert 2 galaxies at intermediate redshifts, and high-redshift QSOs. Here we present the first list of Hα Dots detected using 2.1m telescope data. The 2.1m images yield a sample of Dots that average almost two magnitudes fainter than those detected with the 0.9m. The current REU project is designed to characterize the set of Hα Dots detected in the deeper 2.1m telescope images, while the broad goals of the Hα Dot Survey include the desire to understand better the chemical evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. This project was supported in part by the NSF REU grant 1358980, by the Maria Mitchell Association (Nantucket, MA), and by the Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium.

  14. Photographic photometry of compact extragalactic objects Optical variability of the quasar 3C 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadzhanyants, M. K.; Belokon, E. T.; Denisenko, N. S.; Semenova, E. V.

    1985-08-01

    The results of 11-years photographic observations of optical variability of the quasar 3C 345 are presented. A flare with a timescale of the order of one year, similar to those of 1967 and 1971, was observed in 1982. From a comparison of the obtained series of observations with those of the Rosemary Hill Observatory, a conclusion is drawn on the absence of systematic variability at a timescale of 5 - 20 hours exceeding 0m.2 in magnitude.

  15. Photographic photometry of compact extragalactic objects Optical variability of the quasar 3C 345

    SciTech Connect

    Babadzhaniants, M.K.; Belokon, E.T.; Denisenko, N.S.; Semenova, E.V.

    1985-08-01

    An 11-yr (1973-1983) program of photographic observations at the Leningrad Byurakan station is reported, tracing the optical variability of the quasar 3C 345. A roughly 1-yr flare resembling those of 1967 and 1971 occurred in 1982. Comparison with the concurrent observations at Rosemary Hill, Florida, shows no appreciable systematic B-band fluctuations on time scales of 5-20 h. 10 references.

  16. Statistical techniques for detecting the intergalactic magnetic field from large samples of extragalactic Faraday rotation data

    SciTech Connect

    Akahori, Takuya; Gaensler, B. M.; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: bryan.gaensler@sydney.edu.au

    2014-08-01

    Rotation measure (RM) grids of extragalactic radio sources have been widely used for studying cosmic magnetism. However, their potential for exploring the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is unclear, since other Faraday-rotation media such as the radio source itself, intervening galaxies, and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy are all significant contributors. We study statistical techniques for discriminating the Faraday rotation of filaments from other sources of Faraday rotation in future large-scale surveys of radio polarization. We consider a 30° × 30° field of view toward the south Galactic pole, while varying the number of sources detected in both present and future observations. We select sources located at high redshifts and toward which depolarization and optical absorption systems are not observed so as to reduce the RM contributions from the sources and intervening galaxies. It is found that a high-pass filter can satisfactorily reduce the RM contribution from the Galaxy since the angular scale of this component toward high Galactic latitudes would be much larger than that expected for the IGMF. Present observations do not yet provide a sufficient source density to be able to estimate the RM of filaments. However, from the proposed approach with forthcoming surveys, we predict significant residuals of RM that should be ascribable to filaments. The predicted structure of the IGMF down to scales of 0.°1 should be observable with data from the Square Kilometre Array, if we achieve selections of sources toward which sightlines do not contain intervening galaxies and RM errors are less than a few rad m{sup –2}.

  17. A radio view of high-energy emitting AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Robert Frank

    2016-07-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are among the most energetic objects in the Universe. These galaxies that are dominated in part or even throughout the electromagnetic spectrum by emission from their central, compact region. AGNs are extensively studied by multi-wavelength observations. In the standard picture, the main driver of an AGN is a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in its centre that is surrounded by an accretion disk. Perpendicular to the disk, in the vicinity of highly magnetized SMBH relativistic outflows of plasma, so-called jets, can form on either side that can reach far beyond the host galaxy. Only about 10% of all AGNs are dominated by emission from these jets due to relativistic beaming effects and these so-called blazars dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray sky. It is commonly accepted that the low-energy emission (radio to UV/X-ray) is due to synchrotron emission from the jet. The high-energy emission is considered to stem from inverse-Compton scattering of photons on the jet particles, but different sources for these photons are discussed (internal or external to the AGN) and other models for the high-energy emission have also been proposed. The nature of the high-energy emission is strongly linked to the location of the emission region in the jet which requires a detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of jets. Radio observations especially using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) provide the best way to gain direct information on the intrinsic properties of jets down to sub-pc scales, close to their formation region. In this thesis, I focus on the properties of three different AGNs, IC 310, PKS2004-447, and 3C 111 that belong to the small non-blazar population of gamma-ray-loud AGNs. I study them in detail with a variety of radio astronomical instruments with respect to their high-energy emission and in the context of the large monitoring programmes MOJAVE (Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments) and

  18. Diffuse Gamma Rays Galactic and Extragalactic Diffuse Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Reimer, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Diffuse gamma rays consist of several components: truly diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, the extragalactic background, whose origin is not firmly established yet, and the contribution from unresolved and faint Galactic point sources. One approach to unravel these components is to study the diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, which traces the interactions of high energy particles with interstellar gas and radiation fields. Because of its origin such emission is potentially able to reveal much about the sources and propagation of cosmic rays. The extragalactic background, if reliably determined, can be used in cosmological and blazar studies. Studying the derived average spectrum of faint Galactic sources may be able to give a clue to the nature of the emitting objects.

  19. ALMA's First Insights into the Submillimeter/millimeter Extragalactic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    As Early Science observations begin, ALMA is poised to investigate the dusty and molecular extragalactic Universe, from our nearest neighbors to the first galaxies. I will present prospects and early results for extragalactic studies from ALMA's first observing campaigns. Even its current Early Science mode, ALMA will achieve unprecedented sensitivity, frequency range and angular resolution. This will allow it to image the detailed kinematics of molecular flows in nearby AGN cores, resolve individual star-forming structures in other galaxies, and constrain the dynamics of the interstellar medium in cataclysmic mergers of the sort that trigger starbursts and quasars shortly after the epoch of re-ionization. I will demonstrate these fantastic capabilities by showing highlights from the first Early Science and Science Verification observations, including imaging of the nearby major mergers NGC 3256 and the Antennae.

  20. Axion-Like particles from extragalactic High Energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J.; Meyer, M.; Montanino, D.

    2016-05-01

    Background radiation fields (such as Extragalactic Background Light, EBL, or Cosmic Microwave Background, CMB) pervade the Universe. Above a certain energy any gamma ray flux emitted by an extragalactic source should be attenuated by the process γ+ γ(bgk) → e + + e - pair production. We have considered a scenario in which the photons are partly converted into light Axion Like Particles (ALPs) in the local magnetic field of an (extragalactic) source. Then, while the unconverted fraction of photons undergo absorption, the ALP component travel to our galaxy where is converted back to photons by the galactic magnetic field resulting in a sort of cosmic light shining through wall effect. In particular, we have considered two scenarios: 1) conversion in the turbulent magnetic field inside a galaxy cluster; and 2) conversion of photons in the coherent magnetic field at parsec scales in a Blazar jet. Afterwards, we have also analyzed mock data coming from a hypothetical Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) array with characteristics similar to the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and we have investigated the dependence of the sensitivity to detect a gamma ray excess on the magnetic field parameters.

  1. Constraints on axions from the extragalactic background light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overduin, J. M.; Wesson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the effect of dark matter in the form of multi-eV axions on the extragalactic background light. Our treatment differs from that of other workers in that we assume axions to be clustered in Galactic halos, with nonzero velocity dispersions. We also approach the problem in a fully general relativistic manner, treating the axion halos as luminous elements of a pressure-free perfect fluid in a standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We find that the ultraviolet extragalactic background light places a firm upper limit of 9 eV on the axion rest energy, and that this drops to 4 eV for the simplest axion models, all but closing the multi-eV axion window (which begins at 3 eV). These results are close to earlier upper limits of 5 and 8 eV derived from the extragalactic background by Turner and Ressell, respectively. Although our methods differ somewhat from theirs, our findings support their conclusion that axions, if they exist, are likely to have rest energies well below the eV range.

  2. Neutrinos from flat-spectrum radio quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannheim, K.; Stanev, T.; Biermann, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GRO observation (Hartman et al., 1992) of a very strong flux of gamma rays with an energy index close to 2 from the distant quasar 3C279 and other extragalactic flat-spectrum radio sources is in very good agreement with models that advocate the important role of very high energy protons and nuclei in the energy transport in AGN. Protons and nuclei cool by interactions on the nonthermal fields in the nuclear jet of the AGN and generate gamma ray and neutrino fluxes. Ultra high energy neutrinos could be observed with sensitive air shower experiments in outbursts as powerful as the one seen by GRO.

  3. FANATIC: an SIS radiometer for radio astronomy from 660 to 695 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. I.; Schuster, K.-F.; Genzel, R.; Plathner, B.; Gundlach, K.-H.

    1994-09-01

    FANATIC is a compact radiometer optimized for radio astronomy from about 660 to 695 GHz (lambda 455 - 432 micron). We observed a large number of molecular and atomic spectral lines from galactic and extragalactic sources during FANATIC's first run on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in early March 1994. Double sideband receiver temperatures during observations were about 800 K (25 h nu/k). The heart of the receiver is a two-junction Nb/AlO(x)/Nb SIS array fed by a sandwiched V-antenna. The junction array and antenna are fabricated together at IRAM's Grenoble SIS laboratory. Each junction has a normal resistance of Rn approximately 10 Ohm, an area of approximately 2 sq micron, an individual radial stub circuit to resonate the capacitance, and a lambda/4 transformer to match to the antenna. The solid-state local oscillator is a mm-wave Gunn oscillator followed by a doubler and tripler. The LO diplexer is a Martin-Puplett interferometer, which insures that there is always abundant LO power for operation and speedy tuning. The receiver and telescope coupling optics, LO, dewar, and calibration system fit on an 0.6 x 0.8 m optical breadboard.

  4. FANATIC: An SIS Radiometer for Radio Astronomy in the 660-690 GHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. I.; Schuster, K.-F.; Gundlach, K.-H.; Plathner, B.

    1994-05-01

    FANATIC is a compact radiometer optimized for radio astronomy from about 660 to 690 GHz (455-435 micron). We observed a large number of molecular and atomic spectral lines from galactic and extragalactic sources during FANATIC's first run on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in early March 1994. Double sideband receiver temperatures during observations were about 800 K (25 hv/k). The heart of the receiver is a two-junction Nb/AlOx/Nb SIS array fed by a sandwiched V-Antenna. The junction array and antenna are fabricated together at IRAM's Grenoble SIS laboratory. Each junction has a normal resistance of Rn~10 ohm, an area of ~2 um^2 , an individual radial stub circuit to resonate the capacitance, and a 1/4-wavelength transformer to match to the antenna. The solid-state local oscillator is a mm-wave Gunn oscillator followed by a doubler and tripler. The LO diplexer is a Martin-Puplett interferometer, which insures that there is always abundant LO power for operation and speedy tuning. The receiver and telescope coupling optics, LO, dewar, and calibration system fit on an 0.6 x 0.8 m optical breadboard.

  5. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  6. The galactic position dependence of fast radio bursts and the discovery of FRB011025

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Bannister, Keith W.

    2014-09-01

    We report the detection of a dispersed fast radio burst (FRB) in archival intermediate-latitude Parkes Radio Telescope data. The burst appears to be of the same physical origin as the four purported extragalactic FRBs reported by Thornton et al. This burst's arrival time precedes the Thornton et al. bursts by 10 years. We consider that this survey, and many other archival low-latitude (|gb| < 30°) pulsar surveys, have been searched for FRBs but produced fewer detections than the comparatively brief Thornton et al. search. Such a rate dependence on Galactic position could provide critical supporting evidence for an extragalactic origin for FRBs. To test this, we form an analytic expression to account for Galactic position and survey setup in FRB rate predictions. Employing a sky temperature, scattering, and dispersion model of the Milky Way, we compute the expected number of FRBs if they are isotropically distributed on the sky with respect to the Galactic position (i.e., local), and if they are of extragalactic origin. We demonstrate that the relative detection rates reject a local origin with a confidence of 99.96% (∼3.6σ). The extragalactic predictions provide a better agreement; however, there are still strong discrepancies with the low-latitude detection rate at a confidence of 99.69% (∼2.9σ). However, for the extragalactic population, the differences in predicted versus detected population may be accounted for by a number of factors, which we discuss.

  7. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations.

  8. A radio optical reference frame. I - Precise radio source positions determined by Mark III VLBI - Observations from 1979 to 1988 and a tie to the FK5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Shaffer, D. B.; De Vegt, C.; Johnston, K. J.; Russell, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Observations from 600 Mark III VLBI experiments from 1979 to 1988, resulting in 237,681 acceptable pairs of group delay and phase delay rate observations, have been used to derive positions of 182 extragalactic radio sources with typical formal standard errors less than 1 mas. The sources are distributed fairly evenly above delta = -30 deg, and 70 sources have delta greater than 0 deg. Analysis with different troposphere models, as well as internal and external comparisons, indicates that a coordinate frame defined by this set of radio sources should be reliable at the 1 mas level. The right ascension zero point of this reference frame has been aligned with the FK5 by using the optical positions of 28 extragalactic radio sources whose positions are on the FK5 system. Because of known defects in the knowledge of astronomical constants, daily nutation offsets in longitude and obliquity were determined relative to an arbitrary reference day in the set of experiments.

  9. Radio sociology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, George W., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    A work was conducted, using radio telemetry, to locate a migrating, radio-tagged, sharp-shinned hawk. The hawk was monitored through the noise radiation it created. The hawk was found. During this study, it was found that the concentration of population corresponds with areas of increased noise temperature. Through this study, a bigger study was planned. The study would involved the relationship between a place's radiation signature and its other attributes, such as economic type, population, geographic concentration. The method of radio sociology would be used to track the sources of radio noise.

  10. Rotation Measures of Extragalactic Sources behind the Southern Galactic Plane: New Insights into the Large-Scale Magnetic Field of the Inner Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Haverkorn, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Bizunok, N. S.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Dickey, J. M.; Green, A. J.

    2007-07-01

    We present new Faraday rotation measures (RMs) for 148 extragalactic radio sources behind the southern Galactic plane (253deg<=l<=356deg, |b|<=1.5deg), and use these data in combination with published data to probe the large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic field. We show that the magnitudes of these RMs oscillate with longitude in a manner that correlates with the locations of the Galactic spiral arms. The observed pattern in RMs requires the presence of at least one large-scale magnetic reversal in the fourth Galactic quadrant, located between the Sagittarius-Carina and Scutum-Crux spiral arms. To quantitatively compare our measurements to other recent studies, we consider all available extragalactic and pulsar RMs in the region we have surveyed, and jointly fit these data to simple models in which the large-scale field follows the spiral arms. In the best-fitting model, the magnetic field in the fourth Galactic quadrant is directed clockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (as viewed from the north Galactic pole), but is oriented counterclockwise in the Scutum-Crux arm. This contrasts with recent analyses of pulsar RMs alone, in which the fourth-quadrant field was presumed to be directed counterclockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. Also in contrast to recent pulsar RM studies, our joint modeling of pulsar and extragalactic RMs demonstrates that large numbers of large-scale magnetic field reversals are not required to account for observations.

  11. Radio-planetary from tie from Phobos-2 VLBI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, C. E.; Iijima, B. A.; Kroger, P. M.; Folkner, W. M.; Edwards, C. D.

    1994-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to improve the knowledge of the relative orientation (the 'frame tie') of the planetary ephemeris reference frame used in deep navigation and a second reference frame that is defined by the coordinates of a set of extragalactic radio sources, VLBI observations of the Soviet Phobos-2 spacecraft and nearby (in angle) radio sources were obtained at two epochs in 1989, shortly after the spacecraft entered orbit about Mars. The frame tie is an important systematic error source affecting both interplanetary navigation and the process of improving the theory of the Earth's orientation. The data from a single Phobos-2 VLBI session measure one component of the direction vector from Earth to Mars in the frame of the extragalactic radio sources (the 'radio frame'). The radio frame has been shown to be stable and internally consistent with an accuracy of 5 nrad. The planetary ephemeris reference frame has an internal consistency of approximately 15 nrad. The planetary and radio source reference frames were aligned prior to 1989 and measurements of occulations of the radio source 3C273 by the Moon. The Phobos-2 VLBI measurements provide improvement in the accuracy of two of the three angles describing a general rotation between the planetary and radio reference frames. A complete set of measurements is not available because data acquisition was terminated prematurely by loss of spacecraft. The analysis of the two Phobos-2 VLBI data sets indicates that, in the directions of the two rotation components determined by these data, the JPL planetary ephemeris DE200 is aligned with the radio frame as adopted by the International Earth Rotation Service within an accuracy of 20-40 nrad, depending on direction. The limiting errors in the solutions for these offsets are spacecraft trajectory (20 nrad), instrumental biases (19 nrad), and dependence of quasar coordinates on observing frequency (24 nrad).

  12. The new class of FR 0 radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, R. D.; Capetti, A.; Giovannini, G.

    2016-02-01

    Are the FRI and FRII radio galaxies representative of the radio-loud (RL) AGN population in the local Universe? Recent studies on the local low-luminosity radio sources cast lights on an emerging population of compact radio galaxies which lack extended radio emission. In a pilot JVLA project, we study the high-resolution images of a small but representative sample of this population. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc. We find that these RL AGN live in red massive early-type galaxies, with large black hole masses (≳ 108 M⊙), and spectroscopically classified as Low Excitation Galaxies, all characteristics typical of FRI radio galaxies which they also share the same nuclear luminosity with. However, they are more core dominated (by a factor of ˜ 30) than FRIs and show a clear deficit of extended radio emission. We call these sources ``FR0'' to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission. A posteriori, other compact radio sources found in the literature fulfill the requirements for a FR0 classification. Hence, the emerging FR0 population appears to be the dominant radio class of the local Universe. Considering their properties we speculate on their possible origins and the possible cosmological scenarios they imply.

  13. Analysis and Visualization of Multiwavelength Spectral Energy Distributions in the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Madore, Barry F.; Bennett, Judy; Corwin, Harold; Helou, George; Kelly, Anne; Schmitz, Marion; Skiff, Brian

    2002-12-01

    The NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED,http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/) currently contains over 4.5 million photometric measurements covering the electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays through radio wavelengths for objects that are being cross-correlated among major sky surveys (e.g., SDSS, 2MASS, IRAS, NVSS, FIRST) and thousands of smaller, but unique and important, catalogs and journal articles. The ability to retrieve photometric data (including uncertainties, aperture information, and references) and display spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for individual objects has been available in NED for six years. In this paper we summarize recent enhancements that enable construction of large panchromatic data sets to facilitate multi-dimensional photometric analysis. The database can now be queried for samples of objects that meet flux constraints at any wavelength(e.g., objects with any available 20cm flux, or objects with fν10μm] > 5.0Jy). The ability to utilize criteria involving flux ratios (e.g., objects with fν[20cm]/fν[60μm] > 0.5) is under development. Such queries can be jointly combined with additional constraints on sky area, redshifts, object types, or sample membership, and the data are output with consistent physical units required for comparative analysis. Some results derived from fused photometric data in NED are presented to highlight the large number and diversity of available SEDs.

  14. Deriving the Global Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field from Faraday Rotation Measures of Extragalactic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Tinyakov, P. G.; Kronberg, P. P.; Newton-McGee, K. J.

    2011-09-01

    We made use of the two latest sets of rotation measures (RMs) of extragalactic radio sources, namely the NRAO VLA Sky Survey rotation measures catalog and a compilation by Kronberg and Newton-McGee, to infer the global structure of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF). We have checked that these two data sets are mutually consistent. Given the existence of clear patterns in the all-sky RM distributions we considered GMF models consisting of two components: disk (spiral or ring) and halo. The parameters of these components were determined by fitting different model field geometries to the observed RMs. We found that the model consisting of a symmetric (with respect to the Galactic plane) spiral disk and antisymmetric halo fits the data best and reproduces the observed distribution of RMs over the sky very well. We confirm that ring disk models are disfavored. Our results favor small pitch angles around ~ - 5° and an increased vertical scale of electron distribution, in agreement with some recent studies. Based on our fits, we select two benchmark models suitable for studies of cosmic ray propagation, including cosmic rays at ultrahigh energies.

  15. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  16. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  17. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Niell, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the DSN in support of Radio and Radar Astronomy Operations during September through December 1980 are described. Emphasis is on a report of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel: that of VLBI observations of the energetic galactic object SS-433.

  18. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  19. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Gulkis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio astronomy operations during the first quarter of 1981 are reported. Results of the use of a low noise maser are presented, as well as updates in DSN support of experiments sanctioned by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel.

  20. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  1. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  2. Radio Brightness Temperatures and Angular Dimensions of Recently Predicted Vl-Bi Small-Scale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Muestro que analisis recientes publicados de fuentes de radio galacticas y extragalacticas predicen estructuras en pequera escala en fuentes de radio extendidas, remanentes de supernova, vientos protoestelares, nubes moleculares, distorsiones del fondo de 3 K, enanas blancas magnetizadas, estrellas de tipo tardio y el Sol. Discuto las temperatu- ras de brillo de radio de estas estructuras y sus ditnensiones. Muestro que estas estructuras son detectables con las sensibilidades actuales de VLBI (o en el futuro cercano). ABSTRACT. I show that recently published analysis of galactic and extragalactic radio sources make predictions of small-scale structures in extended radio sources, supernovae remnants, protostellar winds, molecu- lar clouds, distortions of the 3 K background, magnetized white dwarf binaries, late-type stars and the sun. I discuss the radio brightness temperatures of these structures and their dimensions. I show that these structures are detectable with present (or near future) VLBI sensitivities. : RADIO SOURCES-EXTENDED

  3. DENSITY OF WARM IONIZED GAS NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: LOW RADIO FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subhashis

    2013-08-10

    We have observed the Galactic center (GC) region at 0.154 and 0.255 GHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. A total of 62 compact likely extragalactic (EG) sources are detected. Their scattering sizes decrease linearly with increasing angular distance from the GC up to about 1 Degree-Sign . The apparent scattering sizes of the sources are more than an order of magnitude less than predicted earlier by the NE2001 model of Galactic electron distribution within 359. Degree-Sign 5 < l < 0. Degree-Sign 5 and -0. Degree-Sign 5 < b < 0. Degree-Sign 5 (Hyperstrong Scattering Region) of the Galaxy. High free-free optical depths ({tau}) are observed toward most of the extended non-thermal sources within 0. Degree-Sign 6 from the GC. Significant variation of {tau} indicates that the absorbing medium is patchy at an angular scale of {approx}10' and n{sub e} is {approx}10 cm{sup -3}, which matches the NE2001 model. This model predicts the EG sources to be resolved out from 1.4 GHz interferometric surveys. However, out of 10 EG sources expected in the region, 8 likely EG are present in the 1.4 GHz catalog. Ionized interfaces of dense molecular clouds to the ambient medium are most likely responsible for strong scattering and low radio frequency absorption. However, dense GC clouds traced by CS J = 1-0 emission are found to have a narrow distribution of {approx}0. Degree-Sign 2 across the Galactic plane. Angular distribution of most EG sources seen through the so-called Hyperstrong Scattering Region are random in b, and typically {approx}7 out of 10 sources will not be seen through the dense molecular clouds, which explains why most of them are not scatter broadened at 1.4 GHz.

  4. Space distribution of extragalactic sources - Cosmology versus evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavaliere, A.; Maccacaro, T.

    1990-01-01

    Alternative cosmologies have been recurrently invoked to explain in terms of global spacetime structure the apparent large increase, with increasing redshift, in the average luminosity of active galactic nuclei. These models interestingly seek to avoid the complexities of the canonical interpretation in terms of intrinsic population evolutions in a Friedmann universe. However, a problem of consistency for these cosmologies is pointed out, since they have to include also other classes of extragalactic sources, such as clusters of galaxies and BL Lac objects, for which there is preliminary evidence of a different behavior.

  5. A Extragalactic Spectral Survey Of The SSA22 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saez, Cristian; Lehmer, B.; Bauer, F. E.; Stern, D.; Gonzales, A.; Harrison, F.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present the VLT VIMOS MOS and Keck DEIMOS spectra of ~300 new extragalactic sources in the field of the high redshift ( 3.09) proto-cluster SSA22. The objective is to get a more complete multi-wavelength catalog of the SSA22 field. We compare our results with the current spectroscopic surveys on the sky area of SSA22. Additionally, we analyze the emission and spacial distribution of the Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) and the X-ray sources with new template-matched spectroscopic redshifts.

  6. A search for the near-infrared extragalactic background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Akiba, M.; Murakami, H.

    1988-09-01

    The diffuse celestial light at 1 - 5 μm was observed over a large portion of the sky including the Galactic pole with a rocket-borne infrared telescope cooled by solid nitrogen. After subtracting the foreground components, there still remains an appreciable amount of isotropic diffuse radiation with complex spectral feature. A part of this isotropic radiation may be contaminated by the environmental emission due to rocket engine exhaust; however, the 2.2 μm data is free from contamination and possibly attributed to an extragalactic origin.

  7. Cosmological tests and the evolution of extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, V. V.; Raikov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The results of several cosmographic tests of the standard ΛCDM model taking into account evolution and a "tired-light" model without evolution are compared. Physical tests and observations of the microwave background are also considered. Arguments supporting each of these models are presented. The general conclusion is that it is not possible to unambiguously identify a preferred cosmological model based on the currently available observational data. The nature of the redshift of spectral lines emitted by extragalactic objects is discussed. Possibilities for further studies are also briefly noted.

  8. Spectroscopic limits to an extragalactic far-ultraviolet background.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Hurwitz, M; Bowyer, S

    1991-10-01

    We use a spectrum of the lowest intensity diffuse far-ultraviolet background obtained from a series of observations in a number of celestial view directions to constrain the properties of the extragalactic FUV background. The mean continuum level, IEG = 280 +/- 35 photons cm-2 s-1 angstrom-1 sr-1, was obtained in a direction with very low H I column density, and this represents a firm upper limit to any extragalactic background in the 1400-1900 angstroms band. Previous work has demonstrated that the far-ultraviolet background includes (depending on a view direction) contributions from dust-scattered Galactic light, high-ionization emission lines, two-photon emission from H II, H2 fluorescence, and the integrated light of spiral galaxies. We find no evidence in the spectrum of line or continuum features that would signify additional extragalactic components. Motivated by the observation of steep BJ and U number count distributions, we have made a detailed comparison of galaxy evolution models to optical and UV data. We find that the observations are difficult to reconcile with a dominant contribution from unclustered, starburst galaxies at low redshifts. Our measurement rules out large ionizing fluxes at z = 0, but cannot strongly constrain the QSO background light, which is expected to be 0.5%-4% of IEG. We present improved limits on radiative lifetimes of massive neutrinos. We demonstrated with a simple model that IGM radiation is unlikely to make a significant contribution to IEG. Since dust scattering could produce a significant part of the continuum in this lowest intensity spectrum, we carried out a series of tests to evaluate this possibility. We find that the spectrum of a nearby target with higher NH I, when corrected for H2 fluorescence, is very similar to the spectrum obtained in the low H I view direction. This is evidence that the majority of the continuum observed at low NH I is also dust reflection, indicating either the existence of a hitherto

  9. Extragalactic infrared backgrounds polarization, and universal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Melchiorri, F.; Moreno, G. )

    1989-05-01

    A model is developed in which the submillimeter excess recently measured in a rocket experiment is explained as emission from extragalactic dust heated by Population III stars. The linear polarization expected in such a background if a universal magnetic field (UMF) is present in the universe is calculated. This is compared with existing polarization upper limits in order to get information about the UMF. For a wide range of the important parameters, the present strength of the magnetic field should be lower than 5 x 10 to the -10th G. 26 refs.

  10. Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron; Wilson, Thomas L.

    ``Radio Telescopes" starts with a brief historical introduction from Jansky's1931 discovery of radio emission from the Milky Way through the development ofradio telescope dishes and arrays to aperture synthesis imaging. It includessufficient basics of electromagnetic radiation to provide some understanding of thedesign and operation of radio telescopes. The criteria such as frequencyrange, sensitivity, survey speed, angular resolution, and field of view thatdetermine the design of radio telescopes are introduced. Because it is soeasy to manipulate the electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies, radiotelescopes have evolved into many different forms, sometimes with "wire"structures tuned to specific wavelengths, which look very different from anykind of classical telescope. To assist astronomers more familiar with otherwavelength domains, the appendix A.1. includes a comparison of radioand optical terminology. Some of the different types of radio telescopesincluding the filled aperture dishes, electronically steered phased arrays, andaperture synthesis radio telescopes are discussed, and there is a sectioncomparing the differences between dishes and arrays. Some of the morerecent developments including hierarchical beam forming, phased arrayfeeds, mosaicing, rotation measure synthesis, digital receivers, and longbaseline interferometers are included. The problem of increasing radiofrequency interference is discussed, and some possible mitigation strategies areoutlined.

  11. Radio detections of southern ultracool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Ravi, V.; Hobbs, G.; Lo, K.; Ward, C.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of a volume-limited survey using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for transient and quiescent radio emission from 15 Southern hemisphere ultracool dwarfs. We detect radio emission from 2MASSW J0004348-404405 increasing the number of radio loud ultracool dwarfs to 22. We also observe radio emission from 2MASS J10481463-3956062 and 2MASSI J0339352-352544, two sources with previous radio detections. The radio emission from the three detected sources shows no variability or flare emission. Modelling this quiescent emission we find that it is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission from a magnetosphere with an emitting region radius of (1-2)R*, magnetic field inclination 20°-80°, field strength ˜10-200 G, and power-law electron density ˜104-108 cm-3. Additionally, we place upper limits on four ultracool dwarfs with no previous radio observations. This increases the number of ultracool dwarfs studied at radio frequencies to 222. Analysing general trends of the radio emission for this sample of 15 sources, we find that the radio activity increases for later spectral types and more rapidly rotating objects. Furthermore, comparing the ratio of the radio to X-ray luminosities for these sources, we find 2MASS J10481463-3956062 and 2MASSI J0339352-352544 violate the Güdel-Benz relation by more than two orders of magnitude.

  12. Millijansky radio variability in SDSS stripe 82

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, J. A.; Becker, R. H.; White, R. L.; Richards, G. T.

    2013-06-01

    We report on a blind survey for extragalactic radio variability that was carried out by comparing two epochs of data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters survey with a third epoch from a new 1.4 GHz survey of SDSS Stripe 82. The three epochs are spaced seven years apart and have an overlapping area of 60 deg{sup 2}. We uncover 89 variable sources down to the millijansky level, 75 of which are newly identified, and we find no evidence for transient phenomena. This new sample of variable sources allows us to infer an upper limit to the mean characteristic timescale of active galactic nucleus radio variability of 14 yr. We find that only 1% of extragalactic sources have fractional variability f {sub var} > 3, while 44% of Galactic sources vary by this much. The variable sample contains a larger fraction of quasars than a comparable non-variable control sample, though the majority of the variable sources appear to be extended galaxies in the optical. This implies that either quasars are not the dominant contributor to the variability of the sample, or that the deep optical data allow us to detect the host galaxies of some low-z quasars. We use the new, higher resolution data to report on the morphology of the variable sources. Finally, we show that the fraction of sources that are variable remains constant or increases at low flux densities. This may imply that next generation radio surveys with telescopes like Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder and MeerKAT will see a constant or even increasing fraction of variable sources down into the sub-millijansky regime.

  13. Millijansky Radio Variability in SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, J. A.; Becker, R. H.; White, R. L.; Richards, G. T.

    2013-06-01

    We report on a blind survey for extragalactic radio variability that was carried out by comparing two epochs of data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters survey with a third epoch from a new 1.4 GHz survey of SDSS Stripe 82. The three epochs are spaced seven years apart and have an overlapping area of 60 deg2. We uncover 89 variable sources down to the millijansky level, 75 of which are newly identified, and we find no evidence for transient phenomena. This new sample of variable sources allows us to infer an upper limit to the mean characteristic timescale of active galactic nucleus radio variability of 14 yr. We find that only 1% of extragalactic sources have fractional variability f var > 3, while 44% of Galactic sources vary by this much. The variable sample contains a larger fraction of quasars than a comparable non-variable control sample, though the majority of the variable sources appear to be extended galaxies in the optical. This implies that either quasars are not the dominant contributor to the variability of the sample, or that the deep optical data allow us to detect the host galaxies of some low-z quasars. We use the new, higher resolution data to report on the morphology of the variable sources. Finally, we show that the fraction of sources that are variable remains constant or increases at low flux densities. This may imply that next generation radio surveys with telescopes like Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder and MeerKAT will see a constant or even increasing fraction of variable sources down into the sub-millijansky regime.

  14. The radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247: The hot spots of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chernikov, P. A.

    2013-06-01

    The physical conditions in the radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247 are studied assuming that the low-frequency spectral turnovers are due to synchrotron self-absorption. The physical parameters of the radio sources are estimated using a technique based on a nonuniform synchrotron source model. It is shown that the magnetic-field distributions in the dominant compact components of these radio sources are strongly inhomogeneous. The magnetic fields at the center of the sources are B ˜ 10-1 G, and the fields are two to three orders of magnitude weaker at the periphery. The magnetic field averaged over the compact component is B ˜ 10-3 G, and the density of relativistic electrons is n e ˜ 10-3 cm-3. Assuming that there is equipartition of the energies of the magnetic field and relativistic particles, averaged over the source, < E H > = < E e > ˜ 10-7-10-6 erg cm-3. The energy density of the magnetic field exceeds that of the relativistic electrons at the centers of the radio sources. The derived parameters of CTA 21 and OF+247 are close to those of the hot spots in the radio galaxy Cygnus A. On this basis, it is suggested that CTA 21 and OF+247 are radio galaxies at an early stage of their evolution, when the hot spots (dominant compact radio components) have appeared, and the radio lobes (weak extended components) are still being formed.

  15. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  16. Limits on the extragalactic background light in the Fermi era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Manuel; Raue, Martin; Mazin, Daniel; Horns, Dieter

    2012-12-01

    Very high energy (VHE, energy >~ 100 GeV) γ-rays from cosmological sources are attenuated due to the interaction with photons of the extragalactic background light (EBL) in the ultraviolet to infrared wavelength bands. The EBL, thus, leaves an imprint on the observed energy spectra of these objects. In the last four years, the number of extragalactic VHE sources discovered with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), such as MAGIC, H.E.S.S., and VERITAS, has doubled. Furthermore, the measurements with the Fermi satellite brought new insights into the intrinsic spectra of the sources at GeV energies. Here, we present upper limits on the EBL intensity that are derived by considering the most extensive VHE source sample ever used in this context. This is accomplished by constructing a large number of generic EBL shapes and combining spectral information from Fermi and IACTs together with minimal assumptions about the source physics at high and very high gamma-ray energies. In addition to previous studies, the evolution of the EBL with redshift is accounted for and the possibility of the formation of an electromagnetic cascade and the implications on the upper limits are explored. The EBL density at z = 0 is constrained over more than two orders of magnitude in wavelength, i.e., between 0.4 and 100 μm. The resulting upper limits constitute the strongest ever reported over such a broad wavelength range.

  17. Energy spectrum of extragalactic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of Monte Carlo electron photon cascade calculations for propagation of gamma rays through regions of extragalactic space containing no magnetic field are given. These calculations then provide upper limits to the expected flux from extragalactic sources. Since gamma rays in the 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 17th power eV energy range are of interest, interactions of electrons and photons with the 3 K microwave background radiation are considered. To obtain an upper limit to the expected gamma ray flux from sources, the intergalactic field is assumed to be so low that it can be ignored. Interactions with photons of the near-infrared background radiation are not considered here although these will have important implications for gamma rays below 10 to the 14th power eV if the near infrared background radiation is universal. Interaction lengths of electrons and photons in the microwave background radiation at a temperature of 2.96 K were calculated and are given.

  18. The Astronomy Workshop Extragalactic: Web Tools for Use by Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes-Gehrke, Melissa N.; Bolatto, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomy Workshop Extragalactic (http://carma.astro.umd.edu/AWE) is a collection of interactive web tools that were developed for use in undergraduate and high school classes and by the general public. The focus of the tools is on concepts encountered in extragalactic astronomy, which are typically quite difficult for students to understand. Current tools explore Olbers' Paradox; the appearance of galaxies in different wavelengths of light; the Doppler Effect; cosmological redshift; gravitational lensing; Hubble's Law; cosmological parameters; and measuring masses of black holes by observing stellar orbits. The tools have been developed by undergraduate students under our supervision and we are planning to continue to add more tools. This project was inspired by the Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) by Doug Hamilton which has web tools exploring more general astronomical concepts. We would like to thank the NSF for support through the CAREER grant NSF-AST0955836, and the Research Corporation for Science Advancement for a Cottrell Scholar award.

  19. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  20. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  1. The evolution of the radio SED of high-z powerful radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouart, G.

    2016-08-01

    The SKA_LOW pathfinder MWA (Murchison Wide Array) executed the first all-sky radio survey in the 80-230MHz range, revealing more than 300000 extragalactic sources. Combined with data up to 20GHz, we build exquisite radio SEDs (>~30 data-points) of a sample of a well-known sample of 70 high redshift radio galaxies (the HeRGE sample: L_3GHz restframe > 10^26 W/Hz and z>1). The synchrotron emission is composed of the core, jet and the lobe emission, providing insight on the direct vicinity of the galaxy and the accretion properties of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Combined with our previous multi-wavelength campaign from optical to submm (including VLT, Keck, HST, Spitzer, Herschel, SCUBA, LABOCA, and more recently ALMA), providing information on the host galaxy, we now investigate simultaneously the mechanical (from radio) and radiative (from IR) of the SMBH hosted in these progenitors of our local massive galaxies. I will present the results from our radio SED fitting and discuss the connection with our previous results in term of radio loud AGN evolution at the peak of activity in the Universe.

  2. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  3. Panchromatic Views of Large-Scale Extragalactic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-06-01

    Highlights of recent observations of extended jets in AGN are presented. Specifically, we discuss new spectral constraints enabled by Spitzer, studies of the highest-redshift (z{approx}4) radio/X-ray quasar jets, and a new VLBA detection of superluminal motion in the M87 jet associated with a recent dramatic X-ray outburst. Expanding on the title, inverse Compton emission from extended radio lobes is considered and a testable prediction for the gamma-ray emission in one exemplary example is presented. Prospects for future studies with ALMA and low-frequency radio interferometers are briefly described.

  4. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 4 OF 6, Newb, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH-FIXED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  5. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 4 OF 6, Newb, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  6. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-D Part 6 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  7. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-A Part 3 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  8. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-C Part 5 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  9. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 6 OF 6, Newd, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  10. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 5 OF 6, Newc, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH-FIXED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  11. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 5 OF 6, Newc, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  12. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 6 OF 6, Newd, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH - Fixed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  13. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-B Part 4 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  14. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 3 OF 6, Newa, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  15. Evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    A nonparametric procedure for determination of the evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects and use of this for prediction of expected redshift and luminosity distribution of objects is described. The relation between this statistical evolution of the population and their physical evolution, such as the variation with cosmological epoch of their luminosity and formation rate is presented. This procedure when applied to a sample of optically selected quasars with redshifts less than two shows that the luminosity function evolves more strongly for higher luminosities, indicating a larger quasar activity at earlier epochs and a more rapid evolution of the objects during their higher luminosity phases. It is also shown that absence of many quasars at redshifts greater than three implies slowing down of this evolution in the conventional cosmological models, perhaps indicating that this is near the epoch of the birth of the quasar (and galaxies).

  16. On Testing the Equivalence Principle with Extragalactic Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi

    2016-04-01

    An interesting test of Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP) relies on the observed lag in the arrival times of photons emitted from extragalactic transient sources. Attributing the lag between photons of different energies to the gravitational potential of the Milky Way (MW), several authors derive new constraints on deviations from EEP. It is shown here that potential fluctuations from the large-scale structure are at least two orders of magnitude larger than the gravitational potential of the MW. Combined with the larger distances, for sources at redshift z≳ 0.5 the rms of the contribution from these fluctuations exceeds the MW by more than four orders of magnitude. We provide actual constraints for several objects based on a statistical calculation of the large-scale fluctuations in the standard ΛCDM cosmological model.

  17. An extragalactic spectroscopic survey of the SSA22 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saez, C.; Lehmer, B. D.; Bauer, F. E.; Stern, D.; Gonzales, A.; Rreza, I.; Alexander, D. M.; Matsuda, Y.; Geach, J. E.; Harrison, F. A.; Hayashino, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present Very Large Telescope VIMOS, Keck DEIMOS and Keck LRIS multi-object spectra of 367 sources in the field of the z ≈ 3.09 protocluster SSA22. Sources are spectroscopically classified via template matching, allowing new identifications for 206 extragalactic sources, including 36 z > 2 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) and Lyman α emitters (LAEs), eight protocluster members, and 94 X-ray sources from the ˜400 ks Chandra deep survey of SSA22. Additionally, in the area covered by our study, we have increased by ≈4, 13, and 6 times the number of reliable redshifts of sources at 1.0 < z < 2.0, at z > 3.4, and with X-ray emission, respectively. We compare our results with past spectroscopic surveys of SSA22 to investigate the completeness of the LBGs and the X-ray properties of the new spectroscopically classified sources in the SSA22 field.

  18. THE EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCE DATABASE: COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Bradley A.; Tully, R. Brent; Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J.; Makarov, Dmitry I.; Makarova, Lidia

    2009-08-15

    The color-magnitude diagrams/tip of the red giant branch (CMDs/TRGB) section of the Extragalactic Distance Database contains a compilation of observations of nearby galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope. Approximately 250 (and increasing) galaxies in the Local Volume have CMDs and the stellar photometry tables used to produce them available through the Web. Various stellar populations that make up a galaxy are visible in the CMDs, but our primary purpose for collecting and analyzing these galaxy images is to measure the TRGB in each. We can estimate the distance to a galaxy by using stars at the TRGB as standard candles. In this paper, we describe the process of constructing the CMDs and make the results available to the public.

  19. The evolution of cocoons surrounding light, extragalactic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cioffi, Denis F.; Blondin, John M.

    1992-01-01

    If the mass density of supersonic, collimated material is less than that of the surrounding medium, a so-called light jet will be enveloped by a cocoon of overpressured shocked gas. Hydrodynamical simulations are used to understand the evolution of the cocoon. The cocoon's evolution is also compared to a simple analytic theory. To reconcile the theory with the simulations, the growth of the jet head must be taken into account. The overpressured cocoon stage exists for a relatively short astronomical time, after which only the region of the cocoon near the jet head remains overpressured. The spatial distribution of the optical emission often observed in distant extragalactic jet systems can be explained with this improved understanding of cocoon evolution.

  20. The Wide Area VISTA Extra-Galactic Survey (WAVES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J.; Meyer, M.; Power, C.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Baldry, I. K.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.

    The "Wide Area VISTA Extra-galactic Survey" (WAVES) is a 4MOST Consortium Design Reference Survey which will use the VISTA/4MOST facility to spectroscopically survey ˜ 2 million galaxies to r AB < 22 mag. WAVES consists of two interlocking galaxy surveys ("WAVES-Deep" and "WAVES-Wide"), providing the next two steps beyond the highly successful 1M galaxy Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 250k Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. WAVES will enable an unprecedented study of the distribution and evolution of mass, energy, and structures extending from 1-kpc dwarf galaxies in the local void to the morphologies of 200-Mpc filaments at z ˜ 1. A key aim of both surveys will be to compare comprehensive empirical observations of the spatial properties of galaxies, groups, and filaments, against state-of-the-art numerical simulations to distinguish between various Dark Matter models.

  1. Extragalactic plus Galactic Model for IceCube Neutrino Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Andrea; Vissani, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The hypothesis that high-energy cosmic neutrinos are power law distributed is critically analyzed. We propose a model with two components that better explains the observations. The extragalactic component of the high-energy neutrino flux has a canonical {E}ν -2 spectrum while the galactic component has a {E}ν -2.7 spectrum; both of them are significant. This model has several implications, which can be tested by IceCube and ANTARES over the next several years. Moreover, the existence of a diffuse component, close to the Galactic plane and that yields (20–30)% of IceCube’s events, is interesting for the future km3 neutrino telescopes located in the Northern Hemisphere and for gamma-ray telescopes aiming to measure events up to a few 100 TeV from the southern sky.

  2. Remnant radio galaxies in the LOFAR Lockman Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienza, Marisa; Godfrey, Leith; Morganti, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    I will present recent 150-MHz deep observations performed with the Low-frequency Array (LOFAR) of the well-known extragalactic region of the Lockman Hole. Thanks to its high sensitivity and resolution this data allows us to perform new studies of the radio loud AGN population at low radio frequencies. In particular, we conducted a systematic search of remnant radio galaxies, which represent the final "dying" phase of the radio galaxy evolution, when the jets have switched off. This class of sources is best to investigate the life-cycle of radio loud AGN as well as to quantify the role of radio AGN feedback. Indeed, the modelling of their radio spectrum provides constraints on the time-scales of activity and quiescence of the radio source and on its energy output. For a long time there have been claims that deep low-frequency surveys would have enhanced the detection of this class of sources, which are usually rare in flux limited samples.With our search, we thus intend to provide good statistics on the detection and properties of remnant radio galaxies. To avoid selection biases towards any specific class of objects we used both morphological and spectral selection criteria. To do this we combined the LOFAR data with publicly available surveys at other frequencies as well as dedicated deep observations. We find that the fraction of candidate remnant sources is < 6-8% of the entire radio source population and is dominated by steep spectrum sources. To better understand the observed fraction we developed mock catalogues of the radio sky population based on radio galaxy evolution models. These models are used to constrain the main mechanisms contributing to the source luminosity evolution i.e. adiabatic expansion, radiative losses, as well as to make predictions on their fraction in flux limited samples.

  3. Comptonization Processes in Galactic and Extragalactic High Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-12-01

    I review the principal radiation mechanisms which can be responsible for the production of high energy emission of Galactic and extragalactic sources. The spectral properties of Comptonization processes are studied. I present a rigorous treatment of the problem in terms of the Boltzmann kinetic equation formalism. I also overview the different exact and approximate analytical and numerical techniques which decouple the photon transport in six dimensions to that in the configuration space and in energy space separately. CGRO, RXTE, SAX, XMM and CHANDRA observations of Galactic black hole, neutron star systems, and Seyfert nuclei show that their spectra can be fitted by thermal Comptonization models in the hard state, and two components in the soft state. In the latter case, these components show a blackbody like spectrum with the color temperature which is a fraction of keV and tens of eV for Galactic and extragalactic sources, respectively, and an extended power-law with spectral index between 1 and 2 (in the neutron star systems in their soft state this power-law component is not detected). I give arguments for an explanation of these two types of spectral states in the framework of the thermal and bulk motion Comptonization processes. Furthermore I demonstrate that the change of X-ray spectra during the soft-hard transition is related to the temperature of the bulk inflow. In other words the effect of the bulk Comptonization compared to thermal one is getting stronger when the plasma temperature drops below 10 keV. It is clear that the spectra emerging from the converging inflow are inevitable stamp of black hole sources where the strong gravitational field dominates the pressure forces.

  4. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  5. The History of Radio Astronomy and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory: Evolution Toward Big Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malphrus, Benjamin Kevin

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the sequence of events that led to the establishment of the NRAO, the construction and development of instrumentation and the contributions and discovery events and to relate the significance of these events to the evolution of the sciences of radio astronomy and cosmology. After an overview of the resources, a brief discussion of the early days of the science is given to set the stage for an examination of events that led to the establishment of the NRAO. The developmental and construction phases of the major instruments including the 85-foot Tatel telescope, the 300-foot telescope, the 140-foot telescope, and the Green Bank lnterferometer are examined. The technical evolution of these instruments is traced and their relevance to scientific programs and discovery events is discussed. The history is told in narrative format that is interspersed with technical and scientific explanations. Through the use of original data technical and scientific information of historical concern is provided to elucidate major developments and events. An interpretive discussion of selected programs, events and technological developments that epitomize the contributions of the NRAO to the science of radio astronomy is provided. Scientific programs conducted with the NRAO instruments that were significant to galactic and extragalactic astronomy are presented. NRAO research programs presented include continuum and source surveys, mapping, a high precision verification of general relativity, and SETI programs. Cosmic phenomena investigated in these programs include galactic and extragalactic HI and HII, emission nebula, supernova remnants, cosmic masers, giant molecular clouds, radio stars, normal and radio galaxies, and quasars. Modern NRAO instruments including the VLA and VLBA and their scientific programs are presented in the final chapter as well as plans for future NRAO instruments such as the GBT.

  6. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  7. Search for gamma-rays from M31 and other extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Gibbs, K.; Gorham, P. W.; Lamb, R. C.; Liebing, D. F.; Porter, N. A.; Stenger, V. J.; Weeles, T. C.

    1985-01-01

    Although the existence of fluxes of gamma-rays of energies 10 to the 12th power eV is now established for galactic sources, the detection of such gamma-rays from extragalactic sources has yet to be independently confirmed in any case. The detection and confirmation of such energetic photons is of great astrophysical importance in the study of production mechanisms for cosmic rays, and other high energy processes in extragalactic objects. Observations of m31 are discussed. It is reported as a 10 to the 12th power eV gamma-ray source. Flux limits on a number of other extragalactic objects chosen for study are given.

  8. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.

  9. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields. PMID:20360067

  10. Scientific instrumentation of the Radio-Astronomy-Explorer-2 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.; Kaiser, M. L.; Novaco, J. C.; Grena, F. R.; Weber, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The instrumentation of the RAE-2 spacecraft is described. The instruments include a pair of long travelling-wave antennas, a 37-m dipole, two radiometers making one frequency scan every 144 sec, and two rapid-sampling total-power burst receivers which cover the range from 0.025 to 13.1 MHz in 32 discrete steps. Effects of terrestrial noise on RAE-1 and RAE-2 observations are discussed, and it is noted that RAE-2 is uniquely capable of observing repeated lunar occultations of strong radio sources at very low frequencies. Some observational programs are briefly noted, including observations of the galactic background distribution, measurements of lunar occultations of solar radio bursts, and searches for more radio sources among the planets, galactic objects, and extragalactic sources.

  11. Sixty Years in radio astronomy: A tribute to Bruce Slee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    2005-06-01

    Bruce Slee is one of the pioneers of radio astronomy. After recording solar emission during World War II, he joined what was then the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research's Division of Radiophysics in Sydney, Australia, and went on to make important contributions to Solar System, Galactic and extra-galactic astronomy. Since his retirement, in 1989, he has continued his research as an Honorary Fellow of the Australia Telescope National Facility. Now in his early 80s, Bruce Slee is one of the few radio astronomy pioneers of the 1940s who is still actively contributing to astrophysics. This issue of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage (JAH2), and the two that will follow it, are a tribute to this quietly-spoken scientist and his remarkable 60-year involvement in radio astronomy.

  12. Peculiar galaxies and radio sources.

    PubMed

    Arp, H

    1966-03-11

    Pairs of radio sources which are separated by from 2 degrees to 6 degrees on the sky have been investigated. In a number of cases peculiar galaxies have been found approximately midway along a line joining the two radio sources. The central peculiar galaxies belong mainly to a certain class in the recently compiled Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies. Among the radio sources so far associated with the peculiar galaxies are at least five known quasars. These quasars are indicated to be not at cosmological distances (that is, red shifts not caused by expansion of the universe) because the central peculiar galaxies are only at distances of 10 to 100 megaparsecs. The absolute magnitudes of these quasars are indicated to be in the range of brightness of normal galaxies and downward. Some of the radio sources which have been found to be associated with peculiar galaxies are galaxies themselves. It is therefore implied that ejection of material took place within or near the parent peculiar galaxies with speeds between 10(2) and 10(4) kilometers per second. After traveling for times of the order of 10(7) to 10(9) years, the luminous matter (galaxies) and radio sources (plasma) have reached their observed separations from the central peculiar galaxy. The large red shifts measured for the quasars would seem to be either (i) gravitational, (ii) collapse velocities of clouds of material falling toward the center of these compact galaxies, or (iii) some as yet unknown cause.

  13. Review of Space VLBI RadioAstron studies of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Kovalev, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    Space VLBI offers an unrivalled resolution in studies of the AGN phenomena. Since 2011, the Russia-led SVLBI mission RadioAstron conducts observations at 92, 18, 6 and 1.3 cm with baselines an order of magnitude longer than the Earth diameter, therefore offering an order of magnitude "sharper" view at the brightest radio sources than achieved with Earth-based VLBI systems. In our presentation we will review the current status of the RadioAstron's scientific programme. Over the first 4.5 years of the in-orbit operations, the mission achieved successful VLBI detections of extragalactic continuum radio sources at all four observing bands. To date, detections on SVLBI baselines have been obtained for more than 150 AGN's at projected baselines up to 350 000 km (about 28 Earth diameters, ED). The highest resolution achieved is 14 microarcscends from 1.3 cm observations. RadioAstron is an international project; it conducts observations with up to 30 Earth-based radio telescopes located on different continents. We will review results of total intensity and polarisation imaging with extreme angular resolution of blazars and nearby active galaxies. We will also discuss typical and maximum brightness temperatures of blazar cores from the AGN Survey obtained with RadioAstron. Physical implications for the AGN jets formation, magnetic field and emission mechanism will be discussed on the basis of the results obtained to date.

  14. Kinetic Alfven Waves and the Depletion of the Thermal Population in Extragalactic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafelice, L. C.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Chorros Extragalacticos (CE) y Fuentes Radio Extendidas (FRE) son locales de ricos y complejos procesos de plasma magnetizado. Recien tes observaciones indican que esas fuentes son estructuradas en filamen tos. Nos concentramos aqui en el analisis de dos problemas: 1) el prob[e ma de injecci6n,queespropuesto porlas teorias de aceleraci6n de p ? las en plasmas de CE e FRE, que necesitan partfculas que ya tengan ener gfas moderadamente relativisticas para que los procesos de Fermi sean efectivos; y 2) la reciente evidencia observacional de la ausencia de partfculas termicas en CE. El presente modelo pone en evidencia que ambos problemas estan 1ntimamente relacionados uno con el otro. Jafelice y Opher (1987a) (Astrophys. Space Sci. 137, 303) muestram que es espera da una abundante generaci6n de olas Alf cineticas (OAC) en CE y FRE. En el presente trabajo estudiamos Ia cadena de procesos: a) OAC aceleran electrons termicos al largo del campo magnetico de fondo producien- do electrones supratermicos fugitivos; b) que generan olas Langmuir; y c) las cuales por su vez aceleran una fraccion de los electrones fugi- tivos hasta energias moderadamente relativfsticas. Mostramos que supo - niendo que no haya otra fuente de poblaci6n termica a no ser la , la secuencia de procesos arriba puede encargarse delconsumo de los elec- trones termicos en una escala de tiempo %< que el tiempo de vida de la fuente. ABSTRACT: Extragalactic Jets (EJ) and Extended Radio Sources (ERS) are sites of rich and complex magnetized plasma processes.Recent observa - tions indicate that these sources are filamentary structured. We concentrate here on the analysis of two problems:i) the injection problem, faced by theories of particle acceleration in EJ and ERS plasmas, which need particles with already moderately relativistic energies for the Fer mi processes `to be effective; and 2) the recent observational evidence of the abscence of thermal particles within EJ. The present model makes

  15. IONIZED OUTFLOWS FROM COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan; Kewley, Lisa E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Massive outflows are known to exist, in the form of extended emission-line regions (EELRs), around about one-third of powerful FR II radio sources. We investigate the origin of these EELRs by studying the emission-line regions around compact-steep-spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies that are younger (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} yr old) versions of the FR II radio galaxies. We have searched for and analyzed the emission-line regions around 11 CSS sources by taking integral field spectra using Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini North. We fit the [O III] {lambda}5007 line and present the velocity maps for each detected emission-line region. We find, in most cases, that the emission-line regions have multi-component velocity structures with different velocity dispersions and/or flux distributions for each component. The velocity gradients of the emission-line gas are mostly well aligned with the radio axis, suggesting a direct causal link between the outflowing gas and the radio jets. The complex velocity structure may be a result of different driving mechanisms related to the onset of the radio jets. We also present the results from the line-ratio diagnostics we used to analyze the ionization mechanism of the extended gas, which supports the scenario where the emission-line regions are ionized by a combination of active galactic nucleus radiation and shock excitation.

  16. The MWA GLEAM 4 Jy sample; a new large, bright radio source sample at 151 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. A.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Seymour, N.; White, S. V.; Murphy, T.; Salder, E. M.; Callingham, J. R.; Hunstead, R. W.; Hughes, J.; Wall, J. V.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapinska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2015-10-01

    This paper outlines how the new GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA Survey (GLEAM, Wayth et al. 2015), observed by the Murchison Widefield Array covering the frequency range 72 - 231 MHz, allows identification of a new large, complete, sample of more than 2000 bright extragalactic radio sources selected at 151 MHz. With a flux density limit of 4 Jy this sample is significantly larger than the canonical fully-complete sample, 3CRR (Laing, Riley & Longair 1983). In analysing this small bright subset of the GLEAM survey we are also providing a first- user check of the GLEAM catalogue ahead of its public release (Hurley-Walker et al. in prep). Whilst significant work remains to fully characterise our new bright source sample, in time it will provide important constraints to evolutionary behaviour, across a wide redshift and intrinsic radio power range, as well as being highly complementary to results from targeted, small area surveys.

  17. The X-ray log N-log S relation. [background radiation in extragalactic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, Elihu

    1989-01-01

    Results from various surveys are reviewed as regards X-ray source counts at high galactic latitudes and the luminosity functions determined for extragalactic sources. Constraints on the associated log N-log S relation provided by the extragalactic X-ray background are emphasized in terms of its spatial fluctuations and spectrum as well as absolute flux level. The large number of sources required for this background suggests that there is not a sharp boundary in the redshift distribution of visible matter.

  18. POLARIZED RADIO SOURCES: A STUDY OF LUMINOSITY, REDSHIFT, AND INFRARED COLORS

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Julie K.; George, Samuel J.; Taylor, A. Russ; Stil, Jeroen M.; Kothes, Roland; Scott, Douglas

    2011-05-20

    The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Deep Field polarization study has been matched with the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic Survey of the European Large Area Infrared Space Observatory Survey North 1 field. We have used Very Large Array observations with a total intensity rms of 87 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} to match SWIRE counterparts to the radio sources. Infrared color analysis of our radio sample shows that the majority of polarized sources are elliptical galaxies with an embedded active galactic nucleus. Using available redshift catalogs, we found 429 radio sources of which 69 are polarized with redshifts in the range of 0.04 < z < 3.2. We find no correlation between redshift and percentage polarization for our sample. However, for polarized radio sources, we find a weak correlation between increasing percentage polarization and decreasing luminosity.

  19. THE RADIO PROPERTIES OF RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES ON PARSEC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Minfeng; Chen, Yongjun; Shen, Zhiqiang; Komossa, S.; Zensus, J. A.; Yuan, Weimin; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Zhou, Hongyan

    2015-11-15

    We present the detection of the compact radio structures of 14 radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies from Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 5 GHz performed in 2013. While 50% of the sources of our sample show a compact core only, the remaining 50% exhibit a core-jet structure. The measured brightness temperatures of the cores range from 10{sup 8.4} to 10{sup 11.4} K with a median value of 10{sup 10.1} K, indicating that the radio emission is from non-thermal jets, and that, likely, most sources are not strongly beamed, thus implying a low jet speed in these radio-loud NLS1 galaxies. In combination with archival data taken at multiple frequencies, we find that seven sources show flat or even inverted radio spectra, while steep spectra are revealed in the remaining seven objects. Although all of these sources are very radio-loud with R > 100, their jet properties are diverse in terms of their milliarcsecond (mas) scale (parsec scale) morphology and their overall radio spectral shape. The evidence for slow jet speeds (i.e., less relativistic jets), in combination with the low kinetic/radio power, may offer an explanation for the compact VLBA radio structure in most sources. The mildly relativistic jets in these high accretion rate systems are consistent with a scenario where jets are accelerated from the hot corona above the disk by the magnetic field and the radiation force of the accretion disk. Alternatively, a low jet bulk velocity can be explained by low spin in the Blandford–Znajek mechanism.

  20. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  1. Modeling Extragalactic Extinction through Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Alberto; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Aresu, Giambattista

    2016-09-01

    We analyze extragalactic extinction profiles derived through gamma-ray burst afterglows, using a dust model specifically constructed on the assumption that dust grains are not immutable but respond, time-dependently, to the local physics. Such a model includes core-mantle spherical particles of mixed chemical composition (silicate core, sp2, and sp3 carbonaceous layers), and an additional molecular component in the form of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We fit most of the observed extinction profiles. Failures occur for lines of sight, presenting remarkable rises blueward of the bump. We find a tendency for the carbon chemical structure to become more aliphatic with the galactic activity, and to some extent with increasing redshifts. Moreover, the contribution of the molecular component to the total extinction is more important in younger objects. The results of the fitting procedure (either successes and failures) may be naturally interpreted through an evolutionary prescription based on the carbon cycle in the interstellar medium of galaxies.

  2. Gamma ray astrophysics, the extragalactic background light, and new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Very high energy gamma-rays are expected to be absorbed by the extragalactic background light over cosmological distances via the process of electron-positron pair production. However, recent observations of cosmologically distant emitters by ground based gamma-ray telescopes might be indicative of a higher-than-expected degree of transparency of the universe. One mechanism to explain this observation is the oscillation between photons and axion-like-particles (ALPs). Here we explore this possibility, focusing on photon-ALP conversion in the magnetic fields in and round gamma-ray sources and in the magnetic field of the Milky Way, where some fraction of the ALP flux is converted back into photons. We show that this mechanism can be efficient in allowed regions of the ALP parameter space, as well as in typical configurations of the Galactic Magnetic Field. As case example, we consider the spectrum observed from a HESS source. We also discuss features of this scenario which could be used to distinguish it from standard or other exotic models.

  3. A model for extremely powerful extragalactic water masers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ying-Cheng; Alcock, C.

    1988-08-01

    The reasons for the differences between extremely powerful extragalatic water masers (EPEWMs) and strong Galactic H/sub 2/O masers are discussed. This model quite successfully explains many important characteristics of EPEWMs; the rapid time variations, the broad range and random velocity distribution, the extremely high luminosities, the various heights or widths of features in spectra, the strong infrared radiation from the galaxies, how an active nucleus contributes to an EPEWM, how some parts of EPEWMs producing strong features are pumped, why this pump mechanism can work, and why EPEWMs are different from strong Galactic H/sub 2/O masers. Recent observations of extragalactic water masers which have extremely high luminosities raise the possibility that the stimulated emission rate in the maser emission line in these regions is much higher than in Galactic masers. It is possible that the local stimulated emission rate exceeds the local bandwidth for the radiation. In this case the standard expression relating the photon emission rate to the profile averaged mean intensity does not apply. A new expression for the photon emission rate is derived.

  4. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  5. Exploring the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Kramer, Michael; Bhat, Ramesh; Kulkarni, S. R.; Keller, Stefan; Champion, David; Flynn, Chris; Kasliwal, Mansi

    2014-10-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond bursts that are broadly evidenced to arise from extragalactic, but yet unknown, progenitors. They have presented a true mystery in that so far no progenitor theory can adequately account for their observed properties. We request observations that will glean basic information on FRB progenitors. Our observations will execute a specific test of whether FRBs originate in nearby galaxies. We have also designed our target field and time request to enable a thorough exploration of optical counterparts before, during, and after any detected FRB episode. Additionally, with a number depending on the typical distance to FRBs, our observations will raise the running list of total FRB discoveries by 10-60%.

  6. The new class of FR0 radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.

    2016-08-01

    I present my recent project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population. In previous works (Baldi & Capetti 2009, 2010) we provide evidences of an emerging population of compact radio galaxies which lack of extended radio emission. In a pilot JVLA project, we observe a small but representative sub-sample of this population. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc. We find that these radio-loud AGN live in red massive early-type galaxies, with large black hole masses ( 10^{8} solar mass), and spectroscopically classified as Low Excitation Galaxies, all characteristics typical of FRI radio galaxies which they also share the same nuclear luminosity with. However, they are more core dominated (by a factor of 30) than FRIs and show a clear deficit of extended radio emission. We call these sources 'FR0' to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission (Baldi et al 2015). The emerging FR0 population appears to be the dominant radio class of the local Universe. Considering their properties I peculate their possible origins and the possible cosmological scenarios they imply.

  7. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  8. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-04-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10{sup 3} pc cm{sup –3}. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  9. The infrared properties of the GPS and CSS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, C. P.

    2016-02-01

    I review the results of three Spitzer studies of GHz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies. The luminosity of the IR continuum and the high ionization lines confirm that some GPS/CSS can have central engines which are similar to those of the extended powerful radio sources. This is consistent with the hypothesis that some GPS/CSS can evolve to become the large-scale sources. Warm H_2 is common in the GPS/CSS sources consistent with feedback via jet-ISM interaction. The GPS/CSS seem to have higher star formation rates than typical (2JY + 3CRR) radio sources. This should be confirmed with a larger sample. If compact sources interact with dense, clumpy star forming clouds and if the interaction with the dense medium sufficiently enhances the radio power, these star forming galaxies with enhanced radio emission will be selected for the current bright samples of GPS and CSS sources. This will increase the number of GPS and CSS sources which are observed to be forming stars. If radio sources have longer lives and/or star formation is more common in large radio galaxies, the need for a new population of star forming compact sources with enhanced radio emission is reduced.

  10. Synergy with new radio facilities: from LOFAR to SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, R.

    2016-06-01

    A number of new radio telescopes are coming on-line paving the way to the Square Kilometre Array. Their new capabilities, e.g. large field of view, broad instantaneous band and fast response, offer new possibilities for the science. I will briefly give an overview of the facilities that are becoming available. Many of them have open time and some are planning large surveys that will be made available to the entire astronomical community, providing an important legacy. I will then focus on some of the results obtained with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) on topics where a strong synergy with XMM is (or should be) present. In particular, I will focus on pulsars (e.g. fast switching mode pulsars) and accreting systems among the galactic objects. For the extragalactic objects, the combination radio/X-ray is key for understanding the energetics and, therefore, the impact that radio AGN have on their surroundings. I will in particular focus on results from observations of radio galaxies and clusters. Fast response to transient objects in the radio sky is also receiving a lot of attention with LOFAR (and other radio telescopes).

  11. A Search for Fast Radio Bursts in GALFACTS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Tyler; Salter, Christopher J.; Ghosh, Tapasi

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are transient radio sources whose high dispersion measures suggest they are of extra-galactic origin. They are particularly difficult to detect because, unlike other fast radio transients, they are non-recurring events. At present, 11 such bursts have been detected, 10 by the Parkes Radio Telescope and one by Arecibo Observatory. The G-ALFA Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS) is the highest resolution, full-Stokes, radio-continuum survey of the foreground sky. The Arecibo radio telescope is the largest single-aperture telescope in the world, offering the superior point-source sensitivity necessary to detect additional FRBs. GALFACTS utilizes Arecibo's ALFA receiver, an L-band 7-beam feed array, to produce a high-time (1 ms), low-spectral (MHz) resolution (HTLS) data stream between 1225 and 1525 MHz. We used ``Red_Transient", a robust search pipeline developed by A.A. Deshpande, to de-disperse the HTLS data with the intention of detecting FRBs in the ~30% of the total sky surveyed by GALFACTS. Concurrently, the student produced a similar search pipeline to calibrate HTLS data and validate detections by ``Red_Transient". Here, we present the results of initial processing runs on the first several days of GALFACTS observations. Currently, no FRB detections have been found. However, the detection of pulses from the known pulsar J1916+1312 indicates that ``Red_Transient" is capable of detecting fast transient signals present in the data stream.

  12. The local radio-galaxy population at 20 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Elaine M.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Mauch, Tom; Murphy, Tara

    2014-02-01

    We have made the first detailed study of the high-frequency radio-source population in the local Universe, using a sample of 202 radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey identified with galaxies from the 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). The AT20G-6dFGS galaxies have a median redshift of z = 0.058 and span a wide range in radio luminosity, allowing us to make the first measurement of the local radio luminosity function at 20 GHz. Our sample includes some classical Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) and FR II radio galaxies, but most of the AT20G-6dFGS galaxies host compact (FR 0) radio active galactic nuclei which appear to lack extended radio emission even at lower frequencies. Most of these FR 0 sources show no evidence for relativistic beaming, and the FR 0 class appears to be a mixed population which includes young compact steep-spectrum and gigahertz peaked-spectrum radio galaxies. We see a strong dichotomy in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies of FR I and FR II radio sources, with the FR I systems found almost exclusively in WISE `early-type' galaxies and the FR II radio sources in WISE `late-type' galaxies. The host galaxies of the flat- and steep-spectrum radio sources have a similar distribution in both K-band luminosity and WISE colours, though galaxies with flat-spectrum sources are more likely to show weak emission lines in their optical spectra. We conclude that these flat-spectrum and steep-spectrum radio sources mainly represent different stages in radio-galaxy evolution, rather than beamed and unbeamed radio-source populations.

  13. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  14. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Patten, Brian M.

    1991-01-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals.

  15. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  16. RADIO ALTIMETERS

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A radio ranging device is described which utilizes a superregenerative oscillator having alternate sending and receiving phases with an intervening ranging interval between said phases, means for varying said ranging interval, means responsive to an on-range noise reduction condition for stopping said means for varying the ranging interval and indicating means coupled to the ranging interval varying means and calibrated in accordance with one-half the product of the ranging interval times the velocity of light whereby the range is indicated.

  17. Analysis of the Capability and Limitations of Relativistic Gravity Measurements Using Radio Astronomy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Counselman, C. C., III

    1975-01-01

    The uses of radar observations of planets and very-long-baseline radio interferometric observations of extragalactic objects to test theories of gravitation are described in detail with special emphasis on sources of error. The accuracy achievable in these tests with data already obtained, can be summarized in terms of: retardation of signal propagation (radar), deflection of radio waves (interferometry), advance of planetary perihelia (radar), gravitational quadrupole moment of sun (radar), and time variation of gravitational constant (radar). The analyses completed to date have yielded no significant disagreement with the predictions of general relativity.

  18. Determining the extragalactic extinction law with SALT - II. Additional sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelman, Ido; Brosch, Noah; Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Väisänen, Petri; Buckley, David A. H.; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Gulbis, Amanda; Hashimoto, Yas; Loaring, Nicola; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Sefako, Ramotholo

    2010-12-01

    We present new results from an ongoing programme to study the dust extragalactic extinction law in E/S0 galaxies with dust lanes with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) during its performance verification phase. The wavelength dependence of the dust extinction for seven galaxies is derived in six spectral bands ranging from the near-ultraviolet atmospheric cut-off to the near-infrared. The derivation of an extinction law is performed by fitting model galaxies to the unextinguished parts of the image in each spectral band, and subtracting from these the actual images. We compare our results with the derived extinction law in the Galaxy and find them to run parallel to the Galactic extinction curve with a mean total-to-selective extinction value of RV = 2.71 +/- 0.43. We use total optical extinction values to estimate the dust mass for each galaxy, compare these with dust masses derived from IRAS measurements, and find them to range from 104 to 107 Msolar. We study the case of the well-known dust-lane galaxy NGC2685 for which Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (HST/WFPC2) data are available to test the dust distribution on different scales. Our results imply a scale-free dust distribution across the dust lanes, at least within ~1arcsec (~60 pc) regions. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). E-mail: ido@wise.tau.ac.il (IF); noah@wise.tau.ac.il (NB); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK); petri@saao.ac.za (PV); dibnob@saao.ac.za (DAHB); dod@saao.ac.za (DO); amanda@saao.ac.za (AG); hashimot@ntnu.edu.tw (YH); nsl@saao.ac.za (NL); erc@saao.ac.za (ER-C); rrs@saao.ac.za (RS)

  19. The Optical Extragalactic Background Light: Revisions and Further Comments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Rebecca A.

    2007-09-01

    We revise the measurements in our previous work of foreground zodiacal light (ZL) and diffuse Galactic light (DGL) that were used to measure the extragalactic background light (EBL). These changes result in a decrease of 8 and an increase of 0.3 in units of 10-9 ergs s-1 cm-2 sr-1 Å-1 (``cgs'' units) in the ZL and DGL flux, respectively. We therefore obtain revised values for the EBL of 6+/-4, 10+/-5, and 7+/-4 cgs in the HST WFPC2 U (F300W), V (F555W), and I (F814W) bands, respectively, from sources fainter than mV~23 AB mag. The revisions are dominated by the details of the tropospheric scattering models used to measure the ZL. We discuss these results in the context of faint number counts and diffuse EBL measurements at other wavelengths. In particular, we note that unless the slope of the galaxy counts increases beyond mV~30 AB mag, unresolved sources will contribute <0.2 cgs, which is far below the uncertainties achievable for any diffuse EBL measurement in the foreseeable future. Therefore, the best constraints on faint sources come from the resolved sources themselves. As in our earlier work, models are still required to derive the bolometric EBL (0.1-1000 μm) due to uncertainties in the mid-infrared consequently, our previous discussions of the bolometric EBL are not affected by the revisions presented here. Finally, we discuss the nature of the extended point-spread function (PSF) of ground-based telescopes and its impact on surface brightness measurements. In particular, we show that the slope and amplitude of extended PSFs vary considerably between telescopes and with time. We find no conclusive, single cause of extended PSFs, although atmospheric scattering is ruled out.

  20. Star Formation History, Dust Attenuation, and Extragalactic Background Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2015-05-01

    At any given epoch, the extragalactic background light (EBL) carries imprints of integrated star formation activities in the universe until that epoch. On the other hand, in order to estimate the EBL when direct observations are not possible, one requires an accurate estimation of the star formation rate density (SFRD) and the dust attenuation ({{A}ν }) in galaxies. Here, we present a “progressive fitting method” that determines the global average SFRD(z) and {{A}ν }(z) for any given extinction curve by using the available multiwavelength, multiepoch galaxy luminosity function measurements. Using the available observations, we determine the best-fit combinations of SFRD(z) and {{A}ν }(z), in a simple fitting form, up to z∼ 8 for five well-known extinction curves. We find, irrespective of the extinction curve used, the z at which the SFRD(z) peaks is higher than the z above which {{A}ν }(z) begins to decline. For each case, we compute the EBL from ultraviolet to the far-infrared regime and the optical depth ({{τ }γ }) encountered by the high-energy γ-rays due to pair production upon collisions with these EBL photons. We compare these with measurements of the local EBL, γ-ray horizon, and {{τ }γ } measurements using Fermi-Large Area Telescope. All these and the comparison of independent SFRD(z) and {{A}ν }(z) measurements from the literature with our predictions favor an extinction curve similar to that of the Large Magellanic Cloud Supershell.

  1. The Real Impact of Extragalactic Jets on Their Environments: Measuring the Advance Speed of Hotspots with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen

    2014-10-01

    We propose moderately deep imaging of two nearby radio galaxies, M87 and Pictor A, in which the terminal shock of the jet as it impacts the IGM (aka 'hotspot') has previously been imaged in the optical with HST. The primary goal of this program is to leverage the 20 year imaging baselines afforded by Hubble archival data and state-of-the-art precision astrometry in order to measure, for the first time, the proper motions of a terminal shock/hotspot. This is the most direct method of constraining the velocity of the working surface, and when combined with existing multi-wavelength data, yields an estimate of the momentum carried by the jet, an important, but difficult-to-measure physical characteristic necessary for understanding the impact of extragalactic jets on their hosts and environments. In addition, the proposed imaging will allow us to study the inner kpc-scale jets of M87 and Pictor A, as well as the counter-jet and counter-hotspot of Pictor A.

  2. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC HALO MAGNETIC FIELD USING ROTATION MEASURES OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES TOWARD THE OUTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Brown, J. C.; Van Eck, C. L.; Stil, J. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Haverkorn, M.; Kronberg, P. P.; Shukurov, A.

    2012-08-10

    We present a study of the Milky Way disk and halo magnetic field, determined from observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) toward 641 polarized extragalactic radio sources in the Galactic longitude range 100 Degree-Sign -117 Degree-Sign , within 30 Degree-Sign of the Galactic plane. For |b| < 15 Degree-Sign , we observe a symmetric RM distribution about the Galactic plane. This is consistent with a disk field in the Perseus arm of even parity across the Galactic mid-plane. In the range 15 Degree-Sign < |b| < 30 Degree-Sign , we find median RMs of -15 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} and -62 {+-} 5 rad m{sup -2} in the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres, respectively. If the RM distribution is a signature of the large-scale field parallel to the Galactic plane, then this suggests that the halo magnetic field toward the outer Galaxy does not reverse direction across the mid-plane. The variation of RM as a function of Galactic latitude in this longitude range is such that RMs become more negative at larger |b|. This is consistent with an azimuthal magnetic field of strength 2 {mu}G (7 {mu}G) at a height 0.8-2 kpc above (below) the Galactic plane between the local and the Perseus spiral arm. We propose that the Milky Way could possess spiral-like halo magnetic fields similar to those observed in M51.

  3. The Effect of Blazar Spectral Breaks on the Blazar Contribution to the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, Tonia M.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki

    2011-01-01

    The spectral shapes of the contributions of different classes of unresolved gamma-ray emitters can provide insight into their relative contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) and the natures of their spectra at GeV energies, We calculate the spectral shapes of the contributions to the EGB arising from BL Lacertae type objects (BL Lacs) and flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) assuming blazar spectra can be described as broken power laws, We fit the resulting total blazar spectral shape to the Fermi Large Area Telescope measurements of the EGB, finding that the best-fit shape reproduces well the shape of the Fermi EGB for various break scenarios. We conclude that a scenario in which the contribution of blazars is dominant cannot be excluded on spectral grounds alone, even if spectral breaks are shown to be common among Fermi blazars. We also find that while the observation of a featureless (within uncertainties) power-law EGB spectrum by Fermi does not necessarily imply a single class of contributing unresolved sources with featureless individual spectra, such an observation and the collective spectra of the separate contributing populations determine the ratios of their contributions. As such, a comparison with studies including blazar gamma-ray luminosity functions could have profound implications for the blazar contribution to the EGB, blazar evolution, and blazar gamma-ray spectra and emission.

  4. Physical mechanisms that shape the morphologies of extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaninetti, L.

    2007-04-01

    In order to find a law characterising the decrease of velocity along a jet, five analytical methods are suggested. The first two simple models examine the variation of velocity in the presence of Newton's or Stoke's resistance. The equation that represents the conservation of the momentum along a pyramidal sector is solved from an analytical point of view (third model). The application of the conservation of the total momentum flux allows us to deduce the velocity of the galaxy as a function of time for classical velocities (fourth model) and relativistic velocities (fifth model). The variation of velocity along the jet combined with an adequate composition of jet precession velocity, rotational velocity of the galaxy, and galaxy velocity dispersion in the cluster allows us to trace the geometrical pattern of the head-tail radio sources. Application of the developed theory/code to the radio galaxies NGC1265, NGC4061, NGC326, and Cygnus A gives the central galaxy's approximate dispersion velocities in the direction perpendicular to the jet. A transition from head-tails to classical double radio galaxies as a function of the increasing jet's mechanical power is introduced.

  5. The Classification of Extragalactic X-ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, D. E.; Massaro, F.; Cheung, C. C.

    2010-07-01

    The overall classification of X-ray jets has clung to that prevalent in the radio: FRI vs. FRO (including quasars). Indeed, the common perception is that X-ray emission from FRI's is synchrotron emission whereas that from FRII's may be IC/CMB and/or synchrotron. Now that we have a sizable collection of sources with detected X-ray emission from jets and hotspots, it seems that a more unbiased study of these objects could yield additional insights on jets and their X-ray emission. The current contribution is a first step in the process of analyzing all of the relevant parameters for each detected component for the sources collected in the XJET website. This initial effort involves measuring the ratio of X-ray to radio fluxes and evaluating correlations with other jet parameters. For single zone synchrotron X-ray emission, we anticipate that larger values of fx/fr should correlate inversely with the average magnetic field strength (if the acceleration process is limited by loss time equals acceleration time). Beamed IC/CMB X-rays should produce larger values of fx/fr for smaller values of the angle between the jet direction and the line of sight but will also be affected by the low frequency radio spectral index.

  6. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  7. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    PubMed

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  8. TRACING MOLECULAR GAS MASS IN EXTREME EXTRAGALACTIC ENVIRONMENTS: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Ming; Xilouris, Emmanuel M.; Kuno, Nario; Lisenfeld, Ute E-mail: padeli@astro.uni-bonn.d E-mail: kuno@nro.nao.ac.j

    2009-12-01

    We present a new observational study of the {sup 12}CO(1-0) line emission as an H{sub 2} gas mass tracer under extreme conditions in extragalactic environments. Our approach is to study the full neutral interstellar medium (H{sub 2}, H I, and dust) of two galaxies whose bulk interstellar medium (ISM) resides in environments that mark (and bracket) the excitation extremes of the ISM conditions found in infrared luminous galaxies, the starburst NGC 3310, and the quiescent spiral NGC 157. Our study maintains a robust statistical notion of the so-called X = N(H{sub 2})/I {sub CO} factor (i.e., a large ensemble of clouds is involved) while exploring its dependence on the very different average ISM conditions prevailing within these two systems. These are constrained by fully sampled {sup 12}CO(3-2) and {sup 12}CO(1-0) observations, at a matched beam resolution of half-power beam width approx15'', obtained with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea (Hawaii) and the 45 m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan, combined with sensitive 850 mum and 450 mum dust emission and H I interferometric images which allow a complete view of all the neutral ISM components. Complementary {sup 12}CO(2-1) observations were obtained with the JCMT toward the center of the two galaxies. We found an X factor varying by a factor of 5 within the spiral galaxy NGC 157 and about two times lower than the Galactic value in NGC 3310. In addition, the dust emission spectrum in NGC 3310 shows a pronounced submillimeter 'excess'. We tried to fit this excess by a cold dust component but very low temperatures were required (T {sub C} approx 5-11 K) with a correspondingly low gas-to-dust mass ratio of approx5-43. We furthermore show that it is not possible to maintain the large quantities of dust required at these low temperatures in this starburst galaxy. Instead, we conclude that the dust properties need to be different from Galactic dust in order to fit the submillimeter

  9. The FIRST radio survey: Panchromatic properties of FIRST radio sources identified in the Boötes and Cetus fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouchefry, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the availability of multi-wavelength optical/infrared information of FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm) radio sources counterparts over ˜9.2 deg2 in the Boötes field and ˜2.4 deg2 in the Cetus field is exploited to infer the physical properties of the faint radio population. The radio sources optically identified have been divided into resolved galaxies and stellar-like objects finding that the faint radio population is mainly composed of early-type galaxies with very red colour (Bw-R˜ 4.6). A total number of 57 counterparts of FIRST radio sources have extremely red colour (R-K≥ 5). Photometric redshift from {Hyperz} implies that the Extremely Red Objects (EROs) counterparts to FIRST radio sources are mostly located in the range z=0.7-2 , with the bulk of the population at z˜ 1. Taking advantage of the near infrared imaging with FLAMEX (FLAMINGOS Extragalactic Infrared Survey), the EROs counterparts to FIRST radio sources are separated into passively-evolving and dusty star-forming galaxies using their {RJK} colours; the relatively blue J-K of these galaxies suggest that most are old elliptical galaxies (18/25) rather than dusty starburst galaxies (7/25). A total of 15 Distant Red Galaxy (DRGs) have been identified as counterparts to FIRST radio sources in the Cetus field and 3 DRGs in the Boötes field with J-K>2.3.

  10. The reproducible radio outbursts of SS Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Altamirano, D.; O'Brien, T. J.; Page, K. L.; Templeton, M. R.; Körding, E. G.; Knigge, C.; Rupen, M. P.; Fender, R. P.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S.; Migliari, S.; Remillard, R. A.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.; Waagen, E. O.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of our intensive radio observing campaign of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its 2010 April outburst. We argue that the observed radio emission was produced by synchrotron emission from a transient radio jet. Comparing the radio light curves from previous and subsequent outbursts of this system (including high-resolution observations from outbursts in 2011 and 2012) shows that the typical long and short outbursts of this system exhibit reproducible radio outbursts that do not vary significantly between outbursts, which is consistent with the similarity of the observed optical, ultraviolet and X-ray light curves. Contemporaneous optical and X-ray observations show that the radio emission appears to have been triggered at the same time as the initial X-ray flare, which occurs as disc material first reaches the boundary layer. This raises the possibility that the boundary region may be involved in jet production in accreting white dwarf systems. Our high spatial resolution monitoring shows that the compact jet remained active throughout the outburst with no radio quenching.

  11. Learning radio astronomy by doing radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo Gallego, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is an educational program that allows high school and undergraduate students to control a 34 meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the internet. High-school teachers who join the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna as an educational resource. Also, teachers are provided with learning activities they can do with their students and focused on the classroom implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. PARTNeR provides students with firsthand experience in radio astronomy science. Thus, remote radio astronomical observations allow students to learn with a first rate scientific equipment the basics of radio astronomy research, aiming to arouse scientific careers and positive attitudes toward science. In this contribution we show the current observational programs and some recent results.

  12. A very low frequency radio astronomy observatory on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, James N.; Smith, Harlan J.

    1988-01-01

    Because of terrestrial ionospheric absorption, very little is known of the radio sky beyond 10 m wavelength. An extremely simple, low cost very low frequency radio telescope is proposed, consisting of a large array of short wires laid on the lunar surface, each wire equipped with an amplifier and a digitizer, and connected to a common computer. The telescope could do simultaneous multifrequency observations of much of the visible sky with high resolution in the 10 to 100 m wavelength range, and with lower resolution in the 100 to 1000 m range. It would explore structure and spectra of galactic and extragalactic point sources, objects, and clouds, and would produce detailed quasi-three-dimensional mapping of interstellar matter within several thousand parsecs of the Sun.

  13. The High Time Resolution Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, D.

    2013-11-01

    Pulsars are laboratories for extreme physics unachievable on Earth. As individual sources and possible orbital companions can be used to study magnetospheric, emission, and superfluid physics, general relativistic effects, and stellar and binary evolution. As populations they exhibit a wide range of sub-types, with parameters varying by many orders of magnitude signifying fundamental differences in their evolutionary history and potential uses. There are currently around 2200 known pulsars in the Milky Way, the Magellanic clouds, and globular clusters, most of which have been discovered with radio survey observations. These observations, as well as being suitable for detecting the repeating signals from pulsars, are well suited for identifying other transient astronomical radio bursts that last just a few milliseconds that either singular in nature, or rarely repeating. Prior to the work of this thesis non-repeating radio transients at extragalactic distances had possibly been discovered, however with just one example status a real astronomical sources was in doubt. Finding more of these sources was a vital to proving they were real and to open up the universe for millisecond-duration radio astronomy. The High Time Resolution Universe survey uses the multibeam receiver on the 64-m Parkes radio telescope to search the whole visible sky for pulsars and transients. The temporal and spectral resolution of the receiver and the digital back-end enable the detection of relatively faint, and distant radio sources. From the Parkes telescope a large portion of the Galactic plane can be seen, a rich hunting ground for radio pulsars of all types, while previously poorly surveyed regions away from the Galactic plane are also covered. I have made a number of pulsar discoveries in the survey, including some rare systems. These include PSR J1226-6208, a possible double neutron star system in a remarkably circular orbit, PSR J1431-471 which is being eclipsed by its companion with

  14. THE LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO CATALOG OF FLAT-SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Giroletti, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2014-07-01

    A well known property of the γ-ray sources detected by Cos-B in the 1970s, by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 1990s, and recently by the Fermi observations is the presence of radio counterparts, particularly for those associated with extragalactic objects. This observational evidence is the basis of the radio-γ-ray connection established for the class of active galactic nuclei known as blazars. In particular, the main spectral property of the radio counterparts associated with γ-ray blazars is that they show a flat spectrum in the GHz frequency range. Our recent analysis dedicated to search blazar-like candidates as potential counterparts for the unidentified γ-ray sources allowed us to extend the radio-γ-ray connection in the MHz regime. We also showed that blazars below 1 GHz maintain flat radio spectra. Thus, on the basis of these new results, we assembled a low-frequency radio catalog of flat-spectrum sources built by combining the radio observations of the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey and of the Westerbork in the southern hemisphere catalog with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky survey (NVSS). This could be used in the future to search for new, unknown blazar-like counterparts of γ-ray sources. First, we found NVSS counterparts of Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio sources, and then we selected flat-spectrum radio sources according to a new spectral criterion, specifically defined for radio observations performed below 1 GHz. We also described the main properties of the catalog listing 28,358 radio sources and their logN-logS distributions. Finally, a comparison with the Green Bank 6 cm radio source catalog was performed to investigate the spectral shape of the low-frequency flat-spectrum radio sources at higher frequencies.

  15. Electromagnetic Cascades of VHE Photons from Blazars and the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venters, Tonia M.

    2009-05-01

    In light of data from very-high--energy (VHE) experiments, we see that VHE photons can be produced in astrophysical sources. Since blazars have been identified as possible producers of VHE photons, many of the sources of VHE photons are extragalactic. However, as VHE photons propagate through the extragalactic background light (EBL), they interact with the soft photons and initiate electromagnetic cascades of lower energy photons and electrons. We investigate the effects of these cascades on the extragalactic gamma-ray background. Specifically, in the case of blazars, the electromagnetic cascades result in a flux suppression at higher energies and a flux enhancement at lower energies. This work was supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

  16. The Fluence and Distance Distributions of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Ravi, V.; Hallinan, G.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish, which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters can be used to infer the index α of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the logN–logF function: α = 1.5 for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint 0.52 < α < 1.0 with 90% confidence. Searches at other facilities with different dish sizes refine the constraint to 0.5 < α < 0.9. Our results favor FRB searches with smaller dishes, because for α < 1 the gain in field of view for a smaller dish is more important than the reduction in sensitivity. Further, our results suggest that (i) FRBs are not standard candles, and (ii) the distribution of distances to the detected FRBs is weighted toward larger distances. If FRBs are extragalactic, these results are consistent with a cosmological population, which would make FRBs excellent probes of the baryonic content and geometry of the universe.

  17. Star formation history, dust correction, and the extragalactic background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2016-01-01

    The intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL) from X-rays to infrared wavelengths is of a fundamental importance to study the physics of the intergalactic medium and the distant γ-ray sources. At any given epoch, it carries an imprint of the integrated cosmic star formation rate and quasar activity till that epoch. The EBL cannot be observed directly because of its low surface brightness beyond the local universe and one has to rely on the theoretical estimates. To obtain the EBL theoretically, one requires an accurate estimate of the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD), and the quasar emissivity. The estimates of SFRD are known to be degenerate with the amount of dust correction. To resolve this degeneracy, we present a novel 'progressive fitting method', which uses observed multi-wavelength and multi-epoch galaxy luminosity function measurements and determines a unique combination of the average SFRD(z) and dust attenuation AFUV(z) in the far ultraviolet band (FUV band; central wavelength~1500 Angstrom) for a given extinction curve. Using this method and the available observations, we determine the combinations of SFRD(z) and AFUV(z) up to z~8 for five well known extinction curves. The comparison with the independent SFRD(z), AFUV(z) and local infrared emissivity measurements from the literature with our predictions favor an extinction curve similar to that of Large Magellanic Cloud Supershell (LMC2). We update the quasar emissivity using the recent quasar luminosity function (QLF) measurements which show a factor of ~2 increase as compared to the previous QLFs at z<2. We show, the EBL estimated using this updated quasar emissivity and the SFRD(z) for LMC2 extinction curve resolves the problem of 'photon underproduction crisis' at low redshift. The EBL consistently reproduces the recent measurements of γ-ray horizon and the pair-production optical depths of γ-rays from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The effect of the updated EBL on the

  18. MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The primary aim of the MACHO Project is to test the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way is made up of objects like brown dwarfs or planets: these objects have come to be known as MACHOs, for MAssive Compact Halo Objects. The signature of these objects is the occasional amplification of the light from extragalactic stars by the gravitational lens effect. The amplification can be large, but events are extremely rare: it is necessary to monitor photometrically several million stars for a period of years in order to obtain a useful detection rate. For this purpose MACHO has a two channel system that employs eight CCDs, mounted on the 50 inch telescope at Mt. Stromlo. The high data rate (several GBytes per night) is accommodated by custom electronics and on-line data reduction. The Project has taken more than 27,000 images with this system since June 1992. Analysis of a subset of these data has yielded databases containing light curves in two colors for 8 million stars in the LMC and 10 million in the bulge of the Milky Way. A search for microlensing has turned up four candidates toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and 45 toward the Galactic Bulge. The web page for data provides links to MACHO Project data portals and various specialized interfaces for viewing or searching the data. (Specialized Interface)

  19. The faint radio AGN population in the spotlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Ruiz, Noelia; Middelberg, Enno

    2016-08-01

    To determine the AGN component in the faint radio population is fundamental in galaxy evolution studies. A relatively easy and direct way to determine which galaxies do have a radio-active AGN is a detection using the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. The goal of this project is to study with statistically relevant numbers the faint radio source population using VLBI observations. To achieve this goal, the project is divided into two parts. In the first part, we have observed ~3000 radio sources in the COSMOS extragalactic field with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.4GHz. We have detected 468 sources. In the second part, we have observed ~200 radio sources in the COSMOS field with extremely high sensitivity using the VLBA together with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4GHz, to explore an even fainter population in the flux density regime of tens of uJy. We are currently calibrating this data. In this overview I will present the survey design, observations, and calibration, along with some first results.

  20. Probing the Extragalactic Background Light in the Fermi-VERITAS-HAWC Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, Elisa; VERITAS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The observed spectra of active galactic nuclei carry the imprint of gamma-ray interactions with the extragalactic background light (EBL). As gamma rays from an extragalactic source travel to the observer, pair production on the EBL plays a role in reprocessing the photons to lower energies, obscuring the intrinsic source spectrum. An overview of recent EBL constraints, which use blazar spectral measurements to constrain the EBL's spectral energy distribution, will be presented. Prospects for future EBL measurements capitalizing on the synergy between the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS and HAWC instruments will be discussed.

  1. A New Determination of the Extragalactic Diffuse X-Ray Background from EGRET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Andrew W.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Reimer, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    We use the GALPROP model for cosmic-ray propagation to obtain a new estimate of the Galactic component of gamma rays, and show that away from the Galactic plane it gives an accurate prediction of the observed EGRET intensities in the energy range 30 MeV - 50 GeV. On this basis we re-evaluate the extragalactic gamma-ray background. We find that for some energies previous work underestimated the Galactic contribution at high latitudes and hence overestimated the background. Our new background spectrum shows a positive curvature similar to that expected for models of the extragalactic emission based on the blazar population.

  2. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  3. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Extragalactic foreground contamination in temperature-based CMB lens reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Stephen J.; Hanson, Duncan; Doré, Olivier E-mail: dhanson@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the effect of unresolved point source contamination on estimates of the CMB lensing potential, from components such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, radio point sources, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. We classify the possible trispectra associated with such source populations, and construct estimators for the amplitude and scale-dependence of several of the major trispectra. We show how to propagate analytical models for these source trispectra to biases for lensing. We also construct a ''source-hardened'' lensing estimator which experiences significantly smaller biases when exposed to unresolved point sources than the standard quadratic lensing estimator. We demonstrate these ideas in practice using the sky simulations of Sehgal et al., for cosmic-variance limited experiments designed to mimic ACT, SPT, and Planck. We find that for radio sources and SZ the bias is significantly reduced, but for CIB it is essentially unchanged. However, by using the high-frequency, all-sky CIB measurements from Planck and Herschel it may be possible to suppress this contribution.

  5. MTI compact electronic meter testing program

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    MTI has completed an extensive test program to ensure a new compact electronic gas meter meets all specifications and standards customarily employed by the U.S. gas industry. Thirty (30) test plans were developed to cover all American National Standards Institute (ANSI) performance requirements. (1) The prototype meters have met or exceeded the ANSI B109.1 standards. (2) The prototype meters have demonstrated the feasibility of GRI`s decision to seek a compact meter for early market entry. (3) Several leading U.S. utilities have participated in sponsoring the project and have expressed keen interest in field testing the compact meter. (4) American Meter Company (AMC), the predominant U.S. meter manufacturer, has participated in the sponsorship and testing of the compact meter and has formed a joint venture with Select Corporation to bring the meter to the U.S. and world-wide marketplace. (5) The meter generates the necessary electronic output for either telephonic or radio based automatic meter reading (AMR). The pre-production meters for the North American market are being fabricated currently by AMC. Following their completion, an extensive field test program will take place. Three hundred units will be installed at ten to fifteen utilities and tested for a period of up to one year.

  6. The lack of large compact symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, `baby' (< 103 yr) and `young' (103-105 yr) radio galaxies have been found and classified, although their numbers are still small (tens). Also, they have many different names, depending on the type of survey and scientific context in which they were found: compact steep spectrum sources (CSS), giga-Hertz peaked spectrum sources (GPS) and compact-medium symmetric objects (C-MSO). The latter have the radio galaxy structure more obvious and correspond to the `babies' (CSOs; < 1 kpc) and `young' (MSOs; 1-15 kpc) radio galaxies. The log-size distribution of CSOs shows a sharp drop at 0.3 kpc. This trend continues through flat-spectrum MSOs (over the full 1-15 kpc size range). In order to find out if this lack of large CSOs and flat-spectrum MSOs is due to poor sampling (lack of surveys that probe efficiently the 0.3-15 kpc size range) and/or has physical meaning (e.g. if the lobes of CSOs expand as they grow and age, they might become CSSs, `disappearing' from the flat-spectrum MSO statistics), we have built a sample of 157 flat-spectrum radio sources with structure on ˜0.3-15 kpc scales. We are using new, archived and published data to produce and inspect hundreds of multi-frequency multi-instrument maps and models. We have already found 13 new secure CSO/MSOs. We expect to uncover ˜30-40 new CSOs and MSOs, most on the 0.3-15 kpc size range, when our project is complete.

  7. Pair cascades in extragalactic jets. 1: Gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandford, R. D.; Levinson, A.

    1995-01-01

    A model of the approximately 0.1-10 GeV gamma-ray jets observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) is developed. It is shown that the soft X-ray background in an active galactic nuclei (AGN) contributes an opacity to pair production and that a gamma-ray photosphere or 'gamma-sphere' can be defined whose radius increases with gamma-ray energy E(sub gamma). It is proposed that the observed gamma-ray emission is due to inverse Compton scattering of the ambient soft X-rays by relativistic pairs accelerated in situ by shock fronts in a relativistic jet. For a wide range of assumed physical conditions, the emission at a given E(sub gamma) originates from near the associated gamma-spheres; emission from below the gamma-sphere initiates a cascade down to the energy where the gamma-rays can escape freely. In this model, the slope of the emergent gamma-ray spectrum is determined by the scattered, soft X-ray spectrum and the variation of the particle acceleration rate with jet radius. In general it is expected that the variation in the gamma-ray flux will be either slower or later at higher energy. It is also shown that the efficiency of conversion of energy from injected high-energy pairs to 0.1-10 GeV gamma-rays is typically high so that the models are radiatively efficient. It is argued that the observed gamma-ray jets are likely to be particle-dominated, though magnetically confined. The gamma-ray spectrum should continue down to an energy approximately 5 MeV emitted from an annihilation radius within which the pair content of the jet is limited by annihilation. This is probably the site of the beamed hard X-ray emission. It is speculated that the relativistic jets associated with radio-loud AGNs are powered electromagnetically by a spinning black hole and that they are collimated by an encircling MHD wind leaving the accretion disk at a slower speed. Powerful FR2 radio sources are formed when the hole spins rapidly and the relativistic

  8. An evolutionary sequence of young radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. D.; Norris, R. P.; Filipović, M. D.; Tothill, N. F. H.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed the faintest sample of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources to date, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We test the hypothesis that GPS and CSS sources are the youngest radio galaxies, place them into an evolutionary sequence along with a number of other young active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates, and search for evidence of the evolving accretion mode and its relationship to star formation. GPS/CSS sources have very small radio jets that have been recently launched from the central supermassive black hole and grow in linear size as they evolve, which means that the linear size of the jets is an excellent indicator of the evolutionary stage of the AGN. We use high-resolution radio observations to determine the linear size of GPS/CSS sources, resolve their jets and observe their small-scale morphologies. We combine this with other multi-wavelength age indicators, including the spectral age, colours, optical spectra, and spectral energy distribution of the host galaxy, in an attempt to assemble all age indicators into a self-consistent model. We observe the most compact sources with Very Large Baseline Interferometry, which reveals their parsec-scale structures, giving us a range of source sizes and allowing us to test what fraction of GPS/CSS sources are young and evolving.

  9. Extragalactic Jets: Some Unanswered Questions and the Prospects for GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R.

    2008-06-01

    An introduction to AGN jets is presented, paying particular attention to general questions that are currently being addressed or are likely to be addressed using imminent observational capabilities in the gamma ray and radio bands. It is argued that it should become possible to locate the sites of radio and gamma ray emission and to define the jet kinematical structure in a far more prescriptive fashion. Astrophysical arguments should then suffice to affirm (or refute) the common presumptions that synchrotron and inverse Compton emission dominate other processes and that the working substance changes from electromagnetic field to a pair plasma to an ionic plasma as the jet propagates away from the central black hole. Our understanding of jet dynamics can also improve through better characterization of the properties of the surrounding medium which should help decide if magnetic pinching is important and lead to more accurate measurements of jet powers, thrusts, discharges and currents. Combining jet and disk observations should test a ``Central Dogma'', namely that intrinsic AGN behavior is mainly dictated by the mass supply rate in units of the Eddington rate and the spin of the hole in units of its maximum allowed value, with the overall scale of power, variation etc determined by the hole mass. The connection between observed jet properties and the physical processes occurring around black holes is likely to remain conjectural for a while, though relevant numerical simulations are improving rapidly. Finally, the environmental impact of jets should become much clearer along with the role of AGN in the co-evolution of their host galaxies.

  10. Dark Matter and Extragalactic Gas Clouds in the NGC 4532/DDO 137 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. L.; Lu, N. Y.; Salpeter, E. E.; Connell, B. M.

    1998-01-01

    H I synthesis mapping of NGC 4532 and DDO 137, a pair of Sm galaxies on the edge of the Virgo cluster, is used to determine rotation curves for each of the galaxies and to resolve the structure and kinematics of three extragalactic H I clouds embedded in an extended envelope of diffuse HI discovered in earlier Arecibo studies of the system.

  11. Compact, low power radio frequency cavity for femtosecond electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lassise, A.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.

    2012-04-15

    Reported here is the design, construction, and characterization of a small, power efficient, tunable dielectric filled cavity for the creation of femtosecond electron bunches in an existing electron microscope without the mandatory use of femtosecond lasers. A 3 GHz pillbox cavity operating in the TM{sub 110} mode was specially designed for chopping the beam of a 30 keV scanning electron microscope. The dielectric material used is ZrTiO{sub 4}, chosen for the high relative permittivity ({epsilon}{sub r}= 37 at 10 GHz) and low loss tangent (tan {delta}= 2 x 10{sup -4}). This allows the cavity radius to be reduced by a factor of six, while the power consumption is reduced by an order of magnitude compared to a vacuum pillbox cavity. These features make this cavity ideal as a module for existing electron microscopes, and an alternative to femtosecond laser systems integrated with electron microscopes.

  12. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  13. Compact turbidity meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  14. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  15. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Seymour, N.; Spitler, L. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hunstead, R.; Intema, H. T.; Marvil, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sirothia, S. K.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B.; Popping, A.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z ≥ 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. Aims: Because of their optical and infrared faintness, it is very challenging to study IFRS at these wavelengths. However, IFRS are relatively bright in the radio regime with 1.4 GHz flux densities of a few to a few tens of mJy. Therefore, the radio regime is the most promising wavelength regime in which to constrain their nature. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. Methods: We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. Results: We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep (α < -0.8; %), but we also find ultra-steep SEDs (α < -1.3; %). In particular, IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least % of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by

  16. TYPE IIb SUPERNOVAE WITH COMPACT AND EXTENDED PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2010-03-01

    The classic example of a Type IIb supernova is SN 1993J, which had a cool extended progenitor surrounded by a dense wind. There is evidence for another category of Type IIb supernova that has a more compact progenitor with a lower density, probably fast, wind. Distinguishing features of the compact category are weak optical emission from the shock heated envelope at early times, nonexistent or very weak H emission in the late nebular phase, rapidly evolving radio emission, rapid expansion of the radio shell, and expected nonthermal as opposed to thermal X-ray emission. Type IIb supernovae that have one or more of these features include SNe 1996cb, 2001ig, 2003bg, 2008ax, and 2008bo. All of these with sufficient radio data (the last four) show evidence for presupernova wind variability. We estimate a progenitor envelope radius {approx}1 x 10{sup 11} cm for SN 2008ax, a value consistent with a compact Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Supernovae in the SN 1993J extended category include SN 2001gd and probably the Cas A supernova. We suggest that the compact Type IIb events be designated Type cIIb and the extended ones Type eIIb. The H envelope mass dividing these categories is {approx}0.1 M {sub sun}.

  17. The GOODS-North Radio Galaxies: On the Origin of the Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, G.; Dickinson, M.; Owen, F.; Daddi, E.; Chary, R.; Bauer, F.; Mobasher, B.; MacDonald, E.; Koekemoer, A.; Pope, A.

    2008-03-01

    We report on a preliminary study concerning the origin of radio emission within radio galaxies at L(1.4GHz)>1E24 W/Hz in the GOODS-N field. In the local universe, Condon et al. (1989) and Yun et al. (2001) have shown that in galaxies with radio luminosities greater than 1× 10^{23} W/Hz the majority of the radio emission originates from a `monster' i.e., an AGN. Using the Chandra 2Msec X-ray image centered on the GOODS-N field and a reprocessed VLA HDF A-array data plus newly acquired VLA B-array data (σ=5.3μJy), we find that radio galaxies (with spectroscopic redshifts; all have z>1) with L(1.4GHz)>1E24 W/Hz typically have an X-ray detection rate of 72% (60% emit hard X-rays suggesting an AGN origin for the radio emission) in contrast to 25% for radio galaxies with L < 1× 10^{23} W/Hz. The ACS images of these L[1.4 GHz] ≥ 1× 10^{24} W/Hz galaxies typically show compact rather than extended galaxy morphology which is generally found for the less luminous radio emitting galaxies but a few appear to be ongoing galaxy mergers. We also present SED fitting for these luminous radio galaxies including Spitzer IRAC & MIPS 24u photometry and 60% show distinct power-law SED indicative of an AGN. Initial results tell us that the X-ray emitting radio galaxy population are generally not submm sources but the few (˜10%) that are SCUBA sources appear to be the small AGN population found by Pope et al. and others.

  18. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame FT0-11, Part 7 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  19. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame BR12-23, Part 2 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  20. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame BR0-11, Part 1 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  1. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 1 OF 6, BR0-11, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  2. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 2 OF 6, BR12-23, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH-FIXED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  3. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 2 OF 6, BR12-23, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  4. Fast radio burst discovered in the Arecibo pulsar ALFA survey

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R. S.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm{sup –3}, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = –0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  5. Galactic and extragalactic contributions to the far-ultraviolet background

    SciTech Connect

    Paresce, F.; McKee, C.F.; Bowyer, S.

    1980-09-01

    Data from the 1350--1550 A bandpass channel of the 2/sup 0/.5 angular resolution extreme-ultraviolet telescope on the Apollo-Soyuz mission have been analyzed for stellar airglow radiation contributions for the galactic latitude range Vertical BarbVertical Bar>30/sup 0/. At intermediate latitudes the resulting diffuse background is found to be correlated with the neutral hydrogen column density as determined by 21 cm radio data. This result, together with the observed anisotropy and mean intensity of the radiation field, is consistent with the hypothesis that scattering of galactic-plane starlight off dust grains having an albedo aapprox. =0.5 and a phase function coefficient gapprox. =0.5 is the primary source of the observed radiation field at the intermediate latitudes. The background intensity near the poles is, however, higher than expected from the H I column density and extinction measurements. Taking into account all sources observed during the mission, we find the energy density of the radiation field at 1440 A in the solar neighborhood to be 7.3 +- 3 x 10/sup -17/ ergs cm/sup -3/ A/sup -1/, a value in rough accordance with recent theoretical expectations.

  6. DARK MATTER SEARCHES IN THE GAMMA-RAY EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND VIA CROSS-CORRELATIONS WITH GALAXY CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Regis, Marco; Fornengo, Nicolao; Xia, Jun-Qing; Branchini, Enzo; Viel, Matteo E-mail: regis@to.infn.it E-mail: xiajq@bnu.edu.cn E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2015-12-15

    We compare the measured angular cross-correlation between the Fermi-Large Area Telescope γ-ray sky and catalogs of extragalactic objects with the expected signal induced by weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter (DM). We include a detailed description of the contribution of astrophysical γ-ray emitters such as blazars, misaligned active galactic nucleus (AGN), and star-forming galaxies, and perform a global fit to the measured cross-correlation. Five catalogs are considered: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-DR6 quasars, Two Micron All Sky Survey galaxies, NRAO VLA Sky Survey radio galaxies, SDSS-DR8 Luminous Red Galaxies, and the SDSS-DR8 main galaxy sample. To model the cross-correlation signal, we use the halo occupation distribution formalism to estimate the number of galaxies of a given catalog in DM halos and their spatial correlation properties. We discuss uncertainties in the predicted cross-correlation signal arising from the DM clustering and WIMP microscopic properties, which set the DM γ-ray emission. The use of different catalogs probing objects at different redshifts significantly reduces, though not completely, the degeneracy among the different γ-ray components. We find that the presence of a significant WIMP DM signal is allowed by the data but not significantly preferred by the fit, although this is mainly due to a degeneracy with the misaligned AGN component. With modest substructure boost, the sensitivity of this method excludes thermal annihilation cross sections at 95% level for WIMP masses up to few tens of GeV. Constraining the low-redshift properties of astrophysical populations with future data will further improve the sensitivity to DM.

  7. The LOFAR search for radio pulsars and fast transients in M 33, M 81, and M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, K.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The radio pulsar and rotating radio transient populations are only known in and near the Milky Way. Investigating such populations in other galaxies requires deep pulsar and transient searches. We performed 4-h radio observations of nearby galaxies M 33, M 81 and M 82 with LOFAR. Aims: Our main purpose was to characterise the bright end of the pulsar population in other galaxies, and compare it to that of the Milky Way. Methods: We searched for extragalactic radio pulsars through a periodic-pulse search, and for sporadic fast radio transients through a single-pulse search. We coherently combined at most 23 LOFAR Core High-Band Antenna (HBA) stations and covered M 33, M 81, and M 82 in their entirety using multiple tied-array beams. Results: No pulsating sources or single pulses were found. We have, therefore established stricter limits on the extragalactic pulsar flux density at lower frequencies than those obtained in previous Arecibo, GBT, and WSRT searches. Conclusions: We conclude that in nearby galaxies M 33, M 81, and M 82 there are no pulsars shining toward Earth with pseudo luminosities greater than a few times that of the brightest pulsars in our Milky Way.

  8. Flat spectrum multicomponent radio sources - Cosmic conspiracy or geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pacholczyk, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Compact radio sources which do not exhibit currently large flux density variations, are often characterized by spectra nearly flat over a wide range of wavelengths. Cotton et al. (1980) recently reported the results of the VLBI multifrequency interferometric and total flux density observations of a typical representative of the flat spectrum class of sources, a BL Lacertae object PKS 0735+178. If 0735+178 is indeed representative of flat spectrum sources, then some mechanism causing the component production and energy loss to be balanced must be operative among this type of radio source to maintain a flat spectrum over at least certain periods of time. This effect is referred to as 'cosmic conspiracy'. It is suggested that the flatness of spectra of this class of radio sources may be related to a specific symmetry in the radio structure, namely, to a predominantly linear, one-dimensional evolution of radio radiating material, rather than spherical, three-dimensional evolution.

  9. GPS/CSS radio sources and their relation to other AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    We are entering a new era of sensitive, large-area and multi-frequency radio surveys that will allow us to identify Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources over a wide range in radio luminosity and study them within the context of the overall radio-source populations to which they belong. ``Classical'' GPS/CSS objects are extremely luminous radio sources with a compact double morphology, commonly thought to represent the earliest stages in the life cycle of powerful radio galaxies (e.g. O'Dea 1998). It is now becoming easier to identify GPS/CSS candidates with much lower radio luminosity - particularly in the nearby Universe. These less powerful objects, with typical 1.4 GHz radio luminosities of 1023 to 1025 W Hz-1, include peaked-spectrum radio sources with a core-jet morphology on parsec scales as well as high-frequency GPS-like peaked components embedded within lower-frequency extended emission. In the latter case, the presence of a young GPS component may not be evident from low-frequency data alone. Many radio galaxies in the local Universe have a compact (FR-0) morphology, and appear to lack extended radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The relationship of these FR-0 objects to the classical GPS/CSS radio sources remains unclear - some of them may represent short-lived episodes of AGN activity that will not lead to an extended FR-1 or FR-2 radio galaxy. Future wide-band radio surveys will shed more light on this - such surveys should ideally be coordinated to cover the full frequency range from 100 MHz to 100 GHz in order to sample all stages of GPS/CSS evolution in an unbiased way.

  10. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  11. High Resolution Radio Imaging of the Merging Galaxies NGC3256 and NGC4194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present new 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of the merging galaxy systems NGC3256 and NGC4194. NGC3256 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 1 in. or approx. 190pc; NGC4194 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 0.3 in. or approx. 50pc. In both systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse radio emission. We detect 65 compact sources in NGC3256 at 6cm and we detect 46 compact sources in NGC4194, both to a limiting luminosity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 18) W/ Hz or approx. 5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Most of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active star forming regions but not with specific optical emission sources. Several compact radio sources in NGC3256 are near positions of compact X-ray sources detected by Lira et al.. In both NGC3256 and NGC4194, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find in NGC3256 approx. 20% have nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) while approx. 80% have nominally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants). In NGC4194, half the compact radio sources have flat spectral indices and half have steep indices. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the number of young massive stars and the associated ionized gas masses. For the steep-spectrum sources, we estimate supernova rates. We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  12. Dominance of outflowing electric currents on decaparsec to kiloparsec scales in extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Gabuzda, Denise C.; Knuettel, Sebastian; Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Coughlan, Colm P.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Helical magnetic fields embedded in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are required by the broad range of theoretical models that advocate for electromagnetic launching of the jets. In most models, the direction of the magnetic field is random, but if the axial field is generated by a Cosmic Battery generated by current in the direction of rotation in the accretion disk, there is a correlation between the directions of the spin of the AGN accretion disk and of the axial field, which leads to a specific direction for the axial electric current, azimuthal magnetic field, and the resulting observed transverse Faraday-rotation (FR) gradient across the jet, due to the systematic change in the line-of-sight magnetic field. Aims: We consider new observational evidence for the presence of a nested helical magnetic-field structure such as would be brought about by the operation of the Cosmic Battery, and make predictions about the expected behavior of transverse FR gradients observed on decaparsec and kiloparsec scales. Methods: We have jointly considered 27 detections of transverse FR gradients on parsec scales, four reports of reversals in the directions of observed transverse FR gradients observed on parsec-decaparsec scales, and five detections of transverse FR gradients on decaparsec-kiloparsec scales, one reported here for the first time. We also consider seven tentative additional examples of transverse FR gradients on kiloparsec scales, based on an initial visual inspection of published Very Large Array FR maps of 85 extragalactic radio sources, for three of which we have carried out quantitative analyses in order to quantitatively estimate the significances of the gradients. Results: The data considered indicate a predominance of transverse FR gradients in the clockwise direction on the sky (i.e., net axial current flowing inward in the jet) on parsec scales and in the counter-clockwise direction on the sky (i.e., net axial current flowing outward

  13. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  14. Highlighting the History of French Radio Astronomy. 6: The Multi-element Grating Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pick, Monique; Steinberg, Jean-Louis; Orchiston, Wayne; Boischot, Andre

    2011-03-01

    After constructing a number of simple antennas for solar work at Nangay field station, during the second half of the 1950s and through into the 1960s radio astronomers from the Paris Observatory (Meudon) erected five different innovative multi-element arrays. Three of these operated at 169 MHz, a fourth at 408 MHz and the fifth array at 9,300 MHz. While all of these radio telescopes were used for solar research, one of the 169 MHz arrays was used mainly for galactic and extra-galactic research. In this paper we discuss these arrays and summarise the science that was achieved with them during this important period in the development of French radio astronomy.

  15. Extragalactic point source statistics measured with the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Joaquin D.

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has surveyed hundreds of square degrees to milli-Jansky levels at 1.4 mm and 2.0 mm. We report here on sources of point- like emission detected in the 1.4 and 2.0 mm bands in an 87 deg 2 field, centered at R.A. 5 h 30 m , decl. -55°, and observed in 2008. Based on the ratio of flux in these two bands, we are able to separate the detected sources into two populations, one consistent with synchrotron emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and one consistent with thermal emission from dust. We present source counts for each population from 11 to 640 mJy at 1.4 mm and from 4.4 to 800 mJy at 2.0 mm. We detect 119 synchrotron-dominated sources and 49 dust-dominated sources at S/N > 4.5 in at least one band. All of the most significantly detected members of the synchrotron-dominated population are associated with sources in previously published radio catalogs and/or in our own long-wavelength follow-up observations. Some of the dust-dominated sources are associated with nearby ( z [Special characters omitted.] 1) galaxies whose dust emission is also detected by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). However, most of the bright, dust-dominated sources have no counterparts in any existing catalog. We argue that these sources represent the rarest, brightest, and possibly strongly-lensed members of the population commonly referred to as sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs). Because these sources are selected at longer wavelengths than in typical SMG surveys, they are expected to have a higher mean redshift distribution than objects currently in the literature, and may provide a new window on galaxy formation in the early universe.

  16. What are the gigahertz peaked-spectrum radio sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Stanghellini, C.

    1991-01-01

    The astrophysical implications of recent radio and optical observations of the powerful compact gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio sources are discussed. Some tentative conclusions are presented and a scenario based on the existing data is suggested. It is argued that the spectrum is due to synchrotron self-absorption, which is assumed as the basis for the present inferences from the radio spectral shape. The finding that some GPS sources have a very narrow spectral shape is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a narrow range of size scales which dominate the radio luminosity. The highly inverted LF radio spectrum is consistent with the hypothesis that the radio source is tightly confined. The conclusion that the radio polarization of these sources is systematically low is consistent either with a very tangled magnetic field or very large Faraday rotation measures. It is suggested that GPS radio sources are formed when the radio plasma is confined on the scale of the narrow-line region by an unusually dense and clumpy ISM. The existing optical spectroscopic results are also consistent with the existence of a dense and dusty nuclear ISM.

  17. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  18. Tomography of the Fermi-LAT γ-Ray Diffuse Extragalactic Signal via Cross Correlations with Galaxy Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing; Cuoco, Alessandro; Branchini, Enzo; Viel, Matteo

    2015-03-01

    Building on our previous cross-correlation analysis (Xia et al. 2011) between the isotropic γ-ray background (IGRB) and different tracers of the large-scale structure of the universe, we update our results using 60 months of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We perform a cross-correlation analysis both in configuration and spherical harmonics space between the IGRB and objects that may trace the astrophysical sources of the IGRB: QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6, the SDSS DR8 Main Galaxy Sample, luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the SDSS catalog, infrared-selected galaxies in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and radio galaxies in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). The benefit of correlating the Fermi-LAT signal with catalogs of objects at various redshifts is to provide tomographic information on the IGRB, which is crucial in separating the various contributions and clarifying its origin. The main result is that, unlike in our previous analysis, we now observe a significant (>3.5σ) cross-correlation signal on angular scales smaller than 1° in the NVSS, 2MASS, and QSO cases and, at lower statistical significance (∼3.0σ), with SDSS galaxies. The signal is stronger in two energy bands, E > 0.5 GeV and E > 1 GeV, but it is also seen at E > 10 GeV. No cross-correlation signal is detected between Fermi data and the LRGs. These results are robust against the choice of the statistical estimator, estimate of errors, map cleaning procedure, and instrumental effects. Finally, we test the hypothesis that the IGRB observed by Fermi-LAT originates from the summed contributions of three types of unresolved extragalactic sources: BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs), flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We find that a model in which the IGRB is mainly produced by SFGs (72-37+23% with 2σ errors), with BL Lacs and FSRQs giving a minor contribution, provides a good fit to

  19. Radio Non-Detection of SN 2016gkg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, S. D.; Kool, E. C.; Stockdale, C. J.; Kotak, R.; Romero-Canizales, C.; Anderson, G.

    2016-09-01

    The Type II SN 2016gkg (ATel #9521, #9528, #9544) in the galaxy NGC 613 has been observed within 3 days of explosion using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 19 GHz on 2016 Sep 23.5 UT. No radio emission was detected at the reported location, to a 3-sigma upper limit of 0.15 milliJy/beam.

  20. Photometric and Kinematic Studies of Extragalactic Globular Cluster Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windschitl-Dowell, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are compact, luminous collections of stars created during the early stages of galaxy formation. As a result, the properties of GC systems provide important clues about the formation, merger history, and structure of their host galaxies. In particular, kinematic studies of GCs can be used to investigate the dark matter distribution in galaxy halos and provide observational evidence that can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation. I will present our study of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055, and show how we used wide-field BVR imaging from the WIYN 3.5-m telescope to detect the GC population and measure the global properties of the system. We quantified the radial distribution of the GC system and total number of GCs in these galaxies and compared the results to those of other galaxies.I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). Using spectra taken with AAT/AAOmega, WIYN/HYDRA, and MMT/Hectospec, I measured the radial velocities of GCs, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and V-band mass-to-light (M/LV) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). I compared our results to mass estimates from other kinematic tracers and also considered them in the context of galaxy formation models. For both galaxies, I found that the M/LV profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of our data. I also looked for evidence of rotation within the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. Finally, I examined the velocity dispersion of each GC system as a function of radius and found kinematic differences between the red, metal-rich and blue, metal-poor GC subpopulations.

  1. Extragalactic Science with the Next Generation of Ground Based TeV {gamma}-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2008-12-24

    The ground based Cherenkov telescope experiments H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS, and the space borne Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope are currently exploring the galactic and extragalactic Universe in {gamma}-rays. At the time of writing this article, a large number of Active Galactic Nuclei have been studied in great detail and the {gamma}-ray observations have had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of jets from these objects. In this contribution, the status of ground based {gamma}-ray observations of AGN and other extragalactic source classes is reviewed as of October, 2008. After discussing source classes that could be detected with next generation ground based experiments like AGIS, CTA, and HAWC, the potential impact of the observations on the fields of high energy astrophysics, structure formation, observational cosmology, and fundamental physics is reviewed. We close with a discussion of the technical requirements that arise from the science drivers.

  2. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2012-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the anisotropy properties of the extragalactic gamma-ray background, through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thus inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that the two extreme cases (zero IGMF and IGMF strong enough to completely isotropize cascade photons) would be separable by ten years of Fermi observations and reasonable model parameters for the gamma-ray background. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  3. Effects of uncertainties in simulations of extragalactic UHECR propagation, using CRPropa and SimProp

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, R. Alves; Vliet, A. van; Boncioli, D.; Di Matteo, A.; Walz, D. E-mail: denise.boncioli@lngs.infn.it E-mail: a.vanvliet@astro.ru.nl

    2015-10-01

    The results of simulations of extragalactic propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have intrinsic uncertainties due to poorly known physical quantities and approximations used in the codes. We quantify the uncertainties in the simulated UHECR spectrum and composition due to different models of extragalactic background light (EBL), different photodisintegration setups, approximations concerning photopion production and the use of different simulation codes. We discuss the results for several representative source scenarios with proton, nitrogen or iron at injection. For this purpose we used SimProp and CRPropa, two publicly available codes for Monte Carlo simulations of UHECR propagation. CRPropa is a detailed and extensive simulation code, while SimProp aims to achieve acceptable results using a simpler code. We show that especially the choices for the EBL model and the photodisintegration setup can have a considerable impact on the simulated UHECR spectrum and composition.

  4. Extragalactic gamma radiation: Use of galaxy counts as a galactic tracer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    A derivation of the extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation with energies above 35 MeV was carried out using galaxy counts as a tracer of galactic matter. The extragalactic radiation has a differential photon number spectrum which may be expressed as a power law with index 2.35 (+0.4, -0.3) and an intensity above 35 MeV of (5.5 + or - 1.3) 0.00001 photons sq cm/s/ster, consistent with previous derivations. Use of a 1/sin of the absolute value of b expression of the galactic component produces a poorer fit, suggesting that the high-latitude galactic gamma-ray production may be dominated by cosmic ray interactions with matter rather than by Compton interactions of cosmic rays with photon fields.

  5. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  6. BLAZAR HALOS AS PROBE FOR EXTRAGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MAXIMAL ACCELERATION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Dolag, K.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Tomas, R.

    2009-09-20

    High-energy photons from blazars interact within tens of kpc with the extragalactic photon background, initiating electromagnetic pair cascades. The charged component of such cascades is deflected by extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs), leading to halos even around initially point-like sources. We calculate the intensity profile of the resulting secondary high-energy photons for different assumptions on the initial source spectrum and the strength of the EGMF, employing also fields found earlier in a constrained simulation of structure formation including magnetohydrodynamics processes. We find that the observation of halos around blazars like Mrk 180 probes an interesting range of EGMF strengths and acceleration models: in particular, blazar halos test if the photon energy spectrum at the source extends beyond {approx}100 TeV and how anisotropic this high-energy component is emitted.

  7. Sharp edges to neutral hydrogen disks in galaxies and the extragalactic radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the very sharp truncation of the neutral hydrogen distribution seen in NGC 3198 (and probably M33) is well modeled as the result of ionization of the atomic gas by the extragalactic radiation field. Below a critical column density of about a few times 10 exp 19/sq cm the gas is dominantly ionized and undetectable in the 21-cm line. It is inferred from the photoionization models that the total disk gas distribution in NGC 3198 is actually fairly axisymmetric. The critical column density for ionization is not a strong function of galaxy mass or mass distribution; thus, all galaxies should show a cutoff at approximately the same column density. Specific models of 3198 suggest that the extragalactic ionizing photon flux is 5000-10,000 photons/sq cm s.

  8. Blazar Gamma-Rays, Shock Acceleration, and the Extragalactic Background Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2007-01-01

    The observed spectra of blazars, their intrinsic emission, and the underlying populations of radiating particles are intimately related. The use of these sources as probes of the extragalactic infrared background, a prospect propelled by recent advances in TeV-band telescopes, soon to be augmented by observations by NASA's upcoming Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), has been a topic of great recent interest. Here, it is demonstrated that if particles in blazar jets are accelerated at relativistic shocks, then GAMMA-ray spectra with indices less than 1.5 can be produced. This, in turn, loosens the upper limits on the near infrared extragalactic background radiation previously proposed. We also show evidence hinting that TeV blazars with flatter spectra have higher intrinsic TeV GAMMA-ray luminosities and we indicate that there may be a correlation of flatness and luminosity with redshift.

  9. Anisotropies of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei diffusing from extragalactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harari, Diego; Mollerach, Silvia; Roulet, Esteban

    2015-09-01

    We obtain the dipolar anisotropies in the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei diffusing from nearby extragalactic sources. We consider mixed-composition scenarios in which different cosmic ray nuclei are accelerated up to the same maximum rigidity, so that E extragalactic turbulent fields as well as the effects of photodisintegrations and other energy losses. Dipolar anisotropies at the level of 5% to 10% at energies ˜10 EeV are predicted for plausible values of the source density and magnetic fields.

  10. First `Winged' and `X'-shaped Radio Source Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.

    2007-01-22

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies (17 from our own census of the literature) show an additional pair of low surface brightness ''wings'', thus forming an overall ''X''-shaped appearance. The origin of the wings in these radio sources is unclear. They may be the result of back-flowing plasma from the currently active radio lobes into an asymmetric medium surrounding the active nucleus, which would make these ideal systems in which to study thermal/non-thermal plasma interactions in extragalactic radio sources. Another possibility is that the wings are the aging radio lobes left over after a (rapid) realignment of the central supermassive black-hole/accretion disk system due perhaps to a merger. Generally, these models are not well tested; with the small number of known examples, previous works focused on detailed case studies of selected sources with little attempt at a systematic study of a large sample. Using the VLA-FIRST survey database, we are compiling a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources for such studies. As a first step toward this goal, an initial sample of 100 new candidate objects of this type are presented in this paper. The search process is described, optical identifications from available literature data, and basic radio data are presented. From the limited resolution FIRST images ({approx} 5''), we can already confidently classify a sufficient number of these objects as having the characteristic wing lengths >80% of the active lobes to more than double the number of known X-shaped radio sources. We have also included as candidates, radio sources with shorter wings (<80% wing to lobe length ratios), or simply ''winged'' sources, as it is probable that projection effects are important. Finally, among the candidates are four quasars (z=0.37 to 0.84), and several have morphologies suggestive of Fanaroff-Riley type-I (low-power) radio galaxies. While followup observations are necessary to confirm these identifications, this

  11. Radio-Quiet Quasars in the VIDEO Survey: Evidence for AGN-powered radio emission below 1 mJy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Sarah; Jarvis, Matt; Haeussler, Boris; Maddox, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the interaction between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation is responsible for the co-evolution of black hole mass with galaxy bulge mass. Therefore studying this interplay is crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The new generation of radio surveys are able to play a key role in this area, as both processes produce radio emission.We use a combination of optical and near-infrared photometry to select a sample of 72 quasars from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) Survey, over 1 deg2. The depth of VIDEO allows us to study very low accretion rates and/or lower-mass black holes. 26% of the candidate quasar sample has been spectroscopically confirmed using the Southern African Large Telescope and the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. We then use a radio-stacking technique to sample below the nominal flux-density threshold of existing Very Large Array data at 1.4 GHz. In agreement with other work, we show that a power-law fit to the radio number counts is inadequate, with an upturn in the counts being observed at these faint luminosities. Previous authors attribute this to an emergent star-forming population. However, by comparing radio emission from our quasars with that from a control sample of galaxies, we suggest that this emission is predominantly caused by accretion activity. Further support for an AGN origin is provided by a comparison of two independent estimates of star formation rate. These findings have important implications for modelling radio populations below 1 mJy, which is necessary for the development of the Square Kilometre Array.

  12. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  13. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  14. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  15. Compact ultradense matter impactors.

    PubMed

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Birrell, Jeremiah

    2013-03-15

    We study interactions of meteorlike compact ultradense objects (CUDO), having nuclear or greater density, with Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System as a possible source of information about novel forms of matter. We study the energy loss in CUDO puncture of the body and discuss differences between regular matter and CUDO impacts.

  16. Extragalactic H 2 regions in the UV: Implications for primeval galaxies and quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Kellogg, W. K.; Terlevich, R.

    1980-01-01

    Three extragalactic regions of rapid star formation with red shifts great enough to separate the L alpha region from geocoronal L alpha were observed with the IUE satellite. Only the low metal abundance object had detectable L alpha emission. L alpha is therefore expected to be weak or absent in collapsed primeval galaxies. The detected object has a L alpha H beta identical to that of quasars.

  17. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jonathan; Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes can scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, in the northern and southern hemispheres. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is to discover bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), we are discovering more than 60% of supernovae with V<17. Since June 2013, we have discovered 224 supernovae, 133 in 2015 alone (as of September 30, 2015). ASAS-SN has also discovered many other interesting extragalactic transients, including the three closest tidal disruption events (TDEs) ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The nearby nature of ASASSN discoveries allows detailed follow-up across a wide wavelength coverage; here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  18. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN Team

    2015-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is a complete survey of bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), and since April 2013 ASAS-SN has discovered over 40 new Type-Ia SNe and over 15 new core collapse SNe, including roughly half of all the SNe currently visible with V<17 mag. ASAS-SN also discovers many other interesting extragalactic transients, the most exciting of which was the recent tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-14ae at ~200 Mpc, the closest TDE ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The brightness of these nearby events allows detailed follow-up at many wavelengths. Here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  19. Stochastic conversions of TeV photons into axion-like particles in extragalactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Montanino, Daniele E-mail: daniele.montanino@le.infn.it

    2009-12-01

    Very-high energy photons emitted by distant cosmic sources are absorbed on the extragalactic background light (EBL) during their propagation. This effect can be characterized in terms of a photon transfer function at Earth. The presence of extragalactic magnetic fields could also induce conversions between very high-energy photons and hypothetical axion-like particles (ALPs). The turbulent structure of the extragalactic magnetic fields would produce a stochastic behaviour in these conversions, leading to a statistical distribution of the photon transfer functions for the different realizations of the random magnetic fields. To characterize this effect, we derive new equations to calculate the mean and the variance of this distribution. We find that, in presence of ALP conversions, the photon transfer functions on different lines of sight could have relevant deviations with respect to the mean value, producing both an enhancement or a suppression in the observable photon flux with respect to the expectations with only absorption. As a consequence, the most striking signature of the mixing with ALPs would be a reconstructed EBL density from TeV photon observations which appears to vary over different directions of the sky: consistent with standard expectations in some regions, but inconsistent in others.

  20. Isotropic extragalactic flux from dark matter annihilations: lessons from interacting dark matter scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moliné, Ángeles; Schewtschenko, Jascha A.; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Bœhm, Céline; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2016-08-01

    The extragalactic γ-ray and neutrino emission may have a contribution from dark matter (DM) annihilations. In the case of discrepancies between observations and standard predictions, one could infer the DM pair annihilation cross section into cosmic rays by studying the shape of the energy spectrum. So far all analyses of the extragalactic DM signal have assumed the standard cosmological model (ΛCDM) as the underlying theory. However, there are alternative DM scenarios where the number of low-mass objects is significantly suppressed. Therefore the characteristics of the γ-ray and neutrino emission in these models may differ from ΛCDM as a result. Here we show that the extragalactic isotropic signal in these alternative models has a similar energy dependence to that in ΛCDM, but the overall normalisation is reduced. The similarities between the energy spectra combined with the flux suppression could lead one to misinterpret possible evidence for models beyond ΛCDM as being due to CDM particles annihilating with a much weaker cross section than expected.

  1. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E. E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  2. Linking GAIA proper motions to the extragalactic reference system by QSO observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilbach, Elena; Scholz, R.-D.

    1995-01-01

    A direct link to an extragalactic reference system is considered as being a principle aim of the global astrometric interferometer for astrophysics (GAIA) mission. The data available from an extragalactic data base and a quasi stellar object (QSO) catalog were used to obtain an estimation of the number of QSO link candidates. The quality of presently available data and the expected accuracy of the extragalactic link are discussed. It is concluded that at least 150 QSO's must be observed by GAIA in order to guarantee an accuracy of better than 1 microarcsec/year for the link. New observations will be needed before the GAIA launch in order to reduce uncertainties in the positions, magnitudes and redshifts for some known quasars. The variability of QSO's with magnitudes near the GAIA observation limit can raise a potential problem. The motions of nearby QSO's are expected to be much smaller than 2 microarcsec/year, and therefore, will not affect the accuracy of the link in the proposed GAIA mission.

  3. Escape model for Galactic cosmic rays and an early extragalactic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacinti, G.; Kachelrieß, M.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2015-04-01

    We show that the cosmic ray (CR) knee can be entirely explained by energy-dependent CR leakage from the Milky Way, with an excellent fit to all existing data. We test this hypothesis calculating the trajectories of individual CRs in the Galactic magnetic field. We find that the CR escape time τesc(E ) exhibits a knee-like structure around E /Z =few×1015 eV for small coherence lengths and strengths of the turbulent magnetic field. The resulting intensities for different groups of nuclei are consistent with the ones determined by KASCADE and KASCADE-Grande, using simple power laws as injection spectra. The transition from Galactic to extragalactic CRs is terminated at ≈2 ×1018 eV , while extragalactic CRs contribute significantly to the subdominant proton flux already for ≳2 ×1016 eV . The natural source of extragalactic CRs in the intermediate energy region up to the ankle are in this model normal and starburst galaxies. The escape model provides a good fit to ln (A ) data; it predicts that the phase of the CR dipole varies strongly in the energy range between 1 ×1017 and 3 ×1018 eV , while our estimate for the dipole magnitude is consistent with observations.

  4. Inhomogeneous extragalactic magnetic fields and the second knee in the cosmic ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kotera, Kumiko; Lemoine, Martin

    2008-01-15

    Various experiments indicate the existence of a second knee around energy E=3x10{sup 17} eV in the cosmic ray spectrum. This feature could be the signature of the end of the galactic component and of the emergence of the extragalactic one, provided that the latter cuts off at low energies. Recent analytical calculations have shown that this cutoff could be a consequence of the existence of extragalactic magnetic fields (Refs. [M. Lemoine, Phys. Rev. D 71, 083007 (2005).][R. Aloisio and V. Berezinsky, Astrophys. J. 625, 249 (2005).]): low energy protons diffuse on extragalactic magnetic fields and cannot reach the observer within a given time. We study the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields on the magnetic horizon, using a new semianalytical propagation code. Our results indicate that, at a fixed value of the volume averaged magnetic field , the amplitude of the low energy cutoff is mainly controlled by the strength of magnetic fields in the voids of the large-scale structure distribution.

  5. HI absorption towards low luminosity radio-loud AGNs of different accretion modes and WISE colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandola, Yogesh; Saikia, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    HI absorption studies of active galaxies enable us to probe their circumnuclear regions and the general interstellar medium, and study the supply of gas which may trigger the nuclear activity. We investigated the detection rate of HI absorption on the nature of radio galaxies based on their emission-line spectra, nature of the host galaxies based on the WISE colours and their radio structure, which may help understand the different accretion modes. The highest detection rate of HI absorption is found in the `late-type' galaxies with WISE infrared colours W2-W3 > 2, which is typical of gas-rich systems, along with a compact radio structure. Almost all the high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) in our sample have W2-W3 > 2. The HI detection rate for low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) with W2-W3 > 2 and compact radio structure is high (~ 71 %). This is similar to compact HERGs with W2-W3 > 2 where, although the numbers are small, all three sources are detected with HI absorption. In HERGs, compact radio structure in the nuclear or circumnuclear region could give rise to absorption by gas in the dusty torus in addition to gas in the interstellar medium. However, higher specific star formation rate (sSFR) for the LERGs with W2-W3 > 2 suggests that HI absorption may be largely due to star-forming gas in their hosts.

  6. THE VLA SURVEY OF CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH. V. EVOLUTION AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SUB-MILLIJANSKY RADIO SOURCES AND THE ISSUE OF RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Padovani, P.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-10

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 {mu}Jy at the field center and redshift {approx}5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1}) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for {approx}30% of the sample and {approx}60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at {approx}< 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A 5-GHz Survey of Radio Sources (Altschuler 1986)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, D. R.

    1999-11-01

    The results of a sensitive radio survey of about 0.04 sr of extragalactic sky in a narrow strip about declination = +33 deg are reported. The measurements were made with the NRAO 91-meter Green Bank telescope at a frequency of 4760 MHz. A catalogue of the 882 sources detected above a flux density of 15 mJy is given. The area surveyed is part of that covered earlier by the NRAO 5-GHz Survey of Faint Sources, Davis (1971). The results will allow an unbiased study of the variability characteristics of sources common to both surveys. (1 data file).

  8. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  9. Interstellar Scintillation and the Radio Counterpart of the Fast Radio Burst FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kazunori; Johnson, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Keane et al. have recently reported the discovery of a new fast radio burst (FRB), FRB 150418, with a promising radio counterpart at 5.5 and 7.5 GHz—a rapidly decaying source, falling from 200-300 μJy to 100 μJy on timescales of ˜6 days. This transient source may be associated with an elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.492, providing the first firm spectroscopic redshift for an FRB and the ability to estimate the density of baryons in the intergalactic medium via the combination of known redshift and radio dispersion of the FRB. An alternative explanation, first suggested by Williams & Berger, is that the identified counterpart may instead be a compact active galactic nucleus (AGN). The putative counterpart’s variation may then instead be extrinsic, caused by refractive scintillation in the ionized interstellar medium of the Milky Way, which would invalidate the association with FRB 150418. We examine this latter explanation in detail and show that the reported observations are consistent with scintillating radio emission from the core of a radio-loud AGN having a brightness temperature T b ≳ 109 K. Using numerical simulations of the expected scattering for the line of sight to FRB 150418, we provide example images and light curves of such an AGN at 5.5 and 7.5 GHz. These results can be compared with continued radio monitoring to conclusively determine the importance of scintillation for the observed radio variability, and they show that scintillation is a critical consideration for continued searches for FRB counterparts at radio wavelengths.

  10. Interstellar Scintillation and the Radio Counterpart of the Fast Radio Burst FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kazunori; Johnson, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Keane et al. have recently reported the discovery of a new fast radio burst (FRB), FRB 150418, with a promising radio counterpart at 5.5 and 7.5 GHz—a rapidly decaying source, falling from 200–300 μJy to 100 μJy on timescales of ˜6 days. This transient source may be associated with an elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.492, providing the first firm spectroscopic redshift for an FRB and the ability to estimate the density of baryons in the intergalactic medium via the combination of known redshift and radio dispersion of the FRB. An alternative explanation, first suggested by Williams & Berger, is that the identified counterpart may instead be a compact active galactic nucleus (AGN). The putative counterpart’s variation may then instead be extrinsic, caused by refractive scintillation in the ionized interstellar medium of the Milky Way, which would invalidate the association with FRB 150418. We examine this latter explanation in detail and show that the reported observations are consistent with scintillating radio emission from the core of a radio-loud AGN having a brightness temperature T b ≳ 109 K. Using numerical simulations of the expected scattering for the line of sight to FRB 150418, we provide example images and light curves of such an AGN at 5.5 and 7.5 GHz. These results can be compared with continued radio monitoring to conclusively determine the importance of scintillation for the observed radio variability, and they show that scintillation is a critical consideration for continued searches for FRB counterparts at radio wavelengths.

  11. Electromagnetic Counterparts of Gravitational Wave Sources: Mergers of Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Atish; Kaplan, David L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Mergers of compact objects are considered prime sources of gravitational waves (GW) and will soon be targets of GW observatories such as the Advanced-LIGO and VIRGO. Finding electromagnetic counterparts of these GW sources will be important to understand their nature. We discuss possible electromagnetic signatures of the mergers. We show that the BH-BH mergers could have luminosities which exceed Eddington luminosity from unity to several orders of magnitude depending on the masses of the merging BHs. As a result these mergers could be explosive, release up to 1051 erg of energy and shine as radio transients. At any given time we expect about a few such transients in the sky at GHz frequencies, which could be detected to be about 300 Mpc. It has also been argued that these radio transients would look alike radio supernovae with comparable detection rates. Multi-band follow-up could, however, distinguish between the mergers and supernovae.

  12. Research in geodesy and geophysics based upon radio-interferometric observations of extragalactic radio sources. Final report, December 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.A.; Davis, J.L.; Gwinn, C.R.; Herring, T.A.; Ryan, J.W.

    1986-10-01

    This report consists of a collection of reprints and preprints. Subjects included: description of Mk-III system for very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI); geodetic results from the Mk-I and Mk-III systems for VLBI; effects of modeling atmospheric propagation on estimates of baseline length and station height; an improved model for the dry propagation delay; corrections to IAU 1980 nutation series based on VLBI data and geophysical interpretation of those corrections; and a review of the contributions of VLBI to geodynamic studies.

  13. Formation of the compact jets in the black hole GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, S.; Aussel, H.; Broderick, J. W.; Chanial, P.; Coriat, M.; Maury, A. J.; Buxton, M. M.; Tomsick, J. A.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Markoff, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Bailyn, C. D.; Brocksopp, C.; Fender, R. P.; Petrucci, P. O.; Cadolle-Bel, M.; Calvelo, D.; Harvey-Smith, L.

    2013-04-01

    Galactic black hole binaries produce powerful outflows which emit over almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we report the first detection with the Herschel observatory of a variable far-infrared source associated with the compact jets of the black hole transient GX 339-4 during the decay of its recent 2010-2011 outburst, after the transition to the hard state. We also outline the results of very sensitive radio observations conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, along with a series of near-infrared, optical (OIR) and X-ray observations, allowing for the first time the re-ignition of the compact jets to be observed over a wide range of wavelengths. The compact jets first turn on at radio frequencies with an optically thin spectrum that later evolves to an optically thick synchrotron emission. An OIR reflare is observed about 10 d after the onset of radio and hard X-ray emission, likely reflecting the necessary time to build up enough density, as well as to have acceleration (e.g. through shocks) along an extended region in the jets. The Herschel measurements are consistent with an extrapolation of the radio inverted power-law spectrum, but they highlight a more complex radio to OIR spectral energy distribution for the jets.

  14. 3C 57 as an atypical radio-loud quasar: implications for the radio-loud/radio-quiet dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.; Marziani, P.; del Olmo, A.; Stirpe, G. M.; Zamfir, S.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Lobe-dominated radio-loud (LD RL) quasars occupy a restricted domain in the 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) parameter space which implies restricted geometry/physics/kinematics for this subclass compared to the radio-quiet (RQ) majority of quasars. We discuss how this restricted domain for the LD RL parent population supports the notion for a RQ-RL dichotomy among type 1 sources. 3C 57 is an atypical RL quasar that shows both uncertain radio morphology and falls in a region of 4DE1 space where RL quasars are rare. We present new radio flux and optical spectroscopic measures designed to verify its atypical optical/UV spectroscopic behaviour and clarify its radio structure. The former data confirms that 3C 57 falls off the 4DE1 quasar `main sequence' with both extreme optical Fe II emission (R_{Fe II} ˜ 1) and a large C IV λ1549 profile blueshift (˜-1500 km s-1). These parameter values are typical of extreme Population A sources which are almost always RQ. New radio measures show no evidence for flux change over a 50+ year time-scale consistent with compact steep-spectrum (or young LD) over core-dominated morphology. In the 4DE1 context where LD RL are usually low L/LEdd quasars, we suggest that 3C 57 is an evolved RL quasar (i.e. large blackhole mass) undergoing a major accretion event leading to a rejuvenation reflected by strong Fe II emission, perhaps indicating significant heavy metal enrichment, high bolometric luminosity for a low-redshift source and resultant unusually high Eddington ratio giving rise to the atypical C IV λ1549.

  15. Dichotomy in the population of young AGN: Optical, radio, and X-ray properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.

    2016-02-01

    There are numerous examples of radio sources with various sizes which surprisingly exhibit very similar morphology. This observational fact helped to create a standard evolutionary model in which young and small radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), called gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) sources and compact steep spectrum (CSS) sources, become large-scale radio objects. However, many details of this evolutionary process are still unclear. We explored evolution scenarios of radio-loud AGN using new radio, optical and X-ray data of so far unstudied low luminosity compact (LLC) sources and we summarize the results in this paper. Our studies show that the evolutionary track is very ``individualized'' although we can mention common factors affecting it. These are interaction with the ambient medium and AGN power. The second feature affects the production of the radio jets which, if they are weak, are more vulnerable for instabilities and disruption. Thus not all GPS and CSS sources will be able to develop large scale morphologies. Many will fade away being middle-aged (105 yr). It seems that only radio strong, high excitation compact AGN can be progenitors of large-scale FR II radio sources.

  16. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  17. Compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R/sub 0/ = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R/sub 0/ approx. = 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  19. Super-Compact Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc. produced the portable Farfield-2 laser for field applications that require high power pulsed illumination. The compact design was conceived through research at Goddard Space Flight Center on laser instruments for space missions to carry out geoscience studies of Earth. An exclusive license to the key NASA patent for the compact laser design was assigned to Microcosm. The FarField-2 is ideal for field applications, has low power consumption, does not need water cooling or gas supplies, and produces nearly ideal beam quality. The properties of the laser also make it effective over long distances, which is one reason why NASA developed the technology for laser altimeters that can be toted aboard spacecraft. Applications for the FarField-2 include medicine, biology, and materials science and processing, as well as diamond marking, semiconductor line-cutting, chromosome surgery, and fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  1. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grueff, G.; Alvito, G.; Ambrosini, R.; Bolli, P.; D'Amico, N.; Maccaferri, A.; Maccaferri, G.; Morsiani, M.; Mureddu, L.; Natale, V.; Olmi, L.; Orfei, A.; Pernechele, C.; Poma, A.; Porceddu, I.; Rossi, L.; Zacchiroli, G.

    We describe the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT), a new general purpose, fully steerable antenna of the National Institute for Astrophysics. The radio telescope is under construction near Cagliari (Sardinia). With its large aperture (64m diameter) and its active surface, SRT is capable of operations up to ˜100GHz, it will contribute significantly to VLBI networks and will represent a powerful single-dish radio telescope for many science fields. The radio telescope has a Gregorian optical configuration with a supplementary beam-waveguide (BWG), which provides additional focal points. The Gregorian surfaces are shaped to minimize the spill-over and standing wave. After the start of the contract for the radio telescope structural and mechanical fabrication in 2003, in the present year the foundation construction will be completed. The schedule foresees the radio telescope inauguration in late 2006.

  2. The TexOx-1000 redshift survey of radio sources I: the TOOT00 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardoulaki, Eleni; Rawlings, Steve; Hill, Gary J.; Mauch, Tom; Inskip, Katherine J.; Riley, Julia; Brand, Kate; Croft, Steve; Willott, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy, near-infrared (mostly K-band) and radio (151-MHz and 1.4-GHz) imaging of the first complete region (TOOT00) of the TexOx-1000 (TOOT) redshift survey of radio sources. The 0.0015-sr (~5 deg2) TOOT00 region is selected from pointed observations of the Cambridge Low-Frequency Survey Telescope at 151 MHz at a flux density limit of ~=100 mJy, approximately five times fainter than the 7C Redshift Survey (7CRS), and contains 47 radio sources. We have obtained 40 spectroscopic redshifts (~85 per cent completeness). Adding redshifts estimated for the seven other cases yields a median redshift zmed ~ 1.25. We find a significant population of objects with Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) like radio structures at radio luminosities above both the low-redshift FRI/II break and the break in the radio luminosity function. The redshift distribution and subpopulations of TOOT00 are broadly consistent with extrapolations from the 7CRS/6CE/3CRR data sets underlying the SKADS Simulated Skies Semi-Empirical Extragalactic Data base, S3-SEX.

  3. Radio emission from dusty galaxies observed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepiak, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Jurusik, W.

    2014-10-01

    We probe radio-infrared correlation for two samples of extragalactic sources from the local Universe from the AKARI All-Sky Catalogue. The first, smaller sample (1053 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue, the AKARI IRC All-Sky Survey Point Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the mid- and far-infrared by AKARI, and at the 1.4 GHz radio frequency by NRAO. The second, larger sample (13,324 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of only the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the far-infrared and radio, without a condition to be detected in the mid-infrared. Additionally, all objects in both samples were identified as galaxies in the NED and/or SIMBAD databases, and a part of them is known to host active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the present analysis, we have restricted our samples only to sources with known redshift z. In this paper, we analyse the far-infrared-radio correlation for both of these samples. We compare the ratio of infrared and radio emission from normal star-forming dusty galaxies and AGNs in both samples. For the smaller sample we obtained =2.14 for AGNs and =2.27 for normal galaxies, while for the larger sample =2.15 for AGNs and =2.22 for normal galaxies. An average value of the slope in both samples is ~2.2, which is consistent with the previous measurements from the literature.

  4. STEM on the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  5. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, K.R.; Willson, R.F.

    1988-05-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star. 18 references.

  6. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.R.; Patten, B.M. Hawaii, University, Honolulu )

    1991-05-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals. 55 refs.

  7. The ``X component'' of the radio background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, T. A.; Pariiskii, Yu. N.; Bursov, N. N.

    2009-01-01

    The recent publication of evidence for a new mechanism producing background radio emission of the Galaxy at centimeter wavelengths (in addition to synchrotron radiation, free—free transitions in ionized gas, and the weak radio emission of standard dust) gave rise to a strong reaction among observers, and requires independent experimental verification. This signal is of special concern in connection with studies of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using new-generation experiments. We have derived independent estimates of the validity of the “spinning-dust” hypothesis (dipole emission of macromolecules) using multi-frequency RATAN-600 observations. Test studies in the Perseus molecular cloud show evidence for anomalous extended emission in the absence of strong radio sources (compact HII regions) that could imitate an anomalous radio spectrum in this region. A statistical analysis at centimeter wavelengths over the Ratan Zenith Field shows that the upper limit for the polarized noise from this new component in the spinning-dust hypothesis is unlikely to exceed 1 µK at wavelengths of 1 cm or shorter on the main scales of the EE mode of Sakharov oscillations. Thus, this emission should not hinder studies of this mode, at least to within several percent of the predicted level of polarization of the CMB emission.

  8. Radio data transmission for SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Enron has used such wireless systems as meteor burst radio, 952 MHz multiple address radio, VSAT and L-band satellite, cellular radio and ACSB radio. The company's experience with meteor burst radio communications is discussed in this paper. It indicates good system reliability and consequently all back-up telephone lines have been removed from sites using this system.

  9. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  10. A revisit of gamma-ray luminosity function and contribution to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background for Fermi FSRQs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2013-05-01

    A clean sample of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) has been provided by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in two years of operation. Based on this sample, we reconstruct the gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) in the framework of the luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE) model, and obtain the best-fitting GLF by comparing the distributions of observed redshifts, luminosities, indexes and source counts with the predicted distribution of the GLF through the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method which constrains the model parameters in an efficient way. Using the best-fitting GLF, we estimate the contribution of Fermi-undetected FSRQs to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB), and find that the contribution of unresolved FSRQs to the EGRB is 10.1 ± 4.7 per cent in the 0.1-100 GeV band. We also study the influence of different bins of redshifts, luminosities and spectral indices on the contribution to EGRB from the unresolved FSRQs, and find that the contributions of unresolved FSRQs in the redshift range of z = 0.0-2.0 and in the gamma-ray luminosity range of 1044-1048 erg s-1 are ˜90 per cent, respectively.

  11. Pilot study of the radio-emitting AGN population: the emerging new class of FR 0 radio-galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Capetti, Alessandro; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, that was unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys. The key questions are related to the origin of their radio-emission and to its connection with the properties of their hosts. We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources, a small but representative subsample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or only slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with the one exception of a hybrid FR I/FR II source extended over ~40 kpc. Thanks to either the new high-resolution maps or to the radio spectra, we isolated the radio core component in most of them. We split the sample into two groups. Four sources have low black hole (BH) masses (mostly ~107 M⊙) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission, and are associated with radio-quiet (RQ) AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud (RL) AGN, which are located in red massive (~1011 M⊙) early-type galaxies, have high BH masses (≳108 M⊙), and are spectroscopically classified as low excitation galaxies (LEG). These are all characteristics typical of FR I radio galaxies. They also lie on the correlation between radio core power and [O III] line luminosity defined by FR Is. However, they are more core-dominated (by a factor of ~30) than FR Is and show a deficit of extended radio emission. We dub these sources "FR 0" to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission, which is their single distinguishing feature with respect to FR Is. The differences in radio properties between FR 0s and FR Is might be ascribed to an evolutionary effect, with the FR 0 sources undergoing rapid intermittency that prevents the growth of large-scale structures. However, this contrasts with the scenario in which low-luminosity radio-galaxies are fed by continuous accretion of gas from

  12. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Chapman, Scott; Pak, Soojong; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ∼25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} – M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  13. The Infrared Medium-Deep Survey. II. How to Trigger Radio AGNs? Hints from their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Chapman, Scott; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-01

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ~25 deg2 and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (Mu - Mr ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  14. The Radio Jet Associated with the Multiple V380 Ori System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Yam, J. Omar; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Anglada, Guillem; Trejo, Alfonso

    2016-10-01

    The giant Herbig–Haro object 222 extends over ∼6‧ in the plane of the sky, with a bow shock morphology. The identification of its exciting source has remained uncertain over the years. A non-thermal radio source located at the core of the shock structure was proposed to be the exciting source. However, Very Large Array studies showed that the radio source has a clear morphology of radio galaxy and a lack of flux variations or proper motions, favoring an extragalactic origin. Recently, an optical–IR study proposed that this giant HH object is driven by the multiple stellar system V380 Ori, located about 23‧ to the SE of HH 222. The exciting sources of HH systems are usually detected as weak free–free emitters at centimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the detection of an elongated radio source associated with the Herbig Be star or with its close infrared companion in the multiple V380 Ori system. This radio source has the characteristics of a thermal radio jet and is aligned with the direction of the giant outflow defined by HH 222 and its suggested counterpart to the SE, HH 1041. We propose that this radio jet traces the origin of the large scale HH outflow. Assuming that the jet arises from the Herbig Be star, the radio luminosity is a few times smaller than the value expected from the radio–bolometric correlation for radio jets, confirming that this is a more evolved object than those used to establish the correlation.

  15. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, Francesco

    2012-08-03

    One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

  16. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR II Radio Galaxy 3C 353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun

    2008-12-24

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4''-wide and 2'-long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  17. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR-II Radio Galaxy 3C353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Siemiginowska, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Swain, M.R.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Goodger, J.L.; Iwasawa, K.; Edwards, P.G.

    2008-06-13

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4-inch wide and 2-feet long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  18. INTEGRAL/IBIS deep extragalactic survey: M81, LMC and 3C 273/Coma fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereminskiy, Ilya A.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Sazonov, Sergey Yu.; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Sunyaev, Rashid A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a deep survey of three extragalactic fields, M81 (exposure of 9.7 Ms), Large Magellanic Cloud (6.8 Ms) and 3C 273/Coma (9.3 Ms), in the hard X-ray (17-60 keV) energy band with the IBIS telescope onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, based on 12 years of observations (2003-2015). The combined survey reaches a 4σ peak sensitivity of 0.18 mCrab (2.6 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2) and sensitivity better than 0.25 and 0.87 mCrab over 10 per cent and 90 per cent of its full area of 4900 deg2, respectively. We have detected in total 147 sources at S/N > 4σ, including 37 sources observed in hard X-rays for the first time. The survey is dominated by extragalactic sources, mostly active galactic nuclei (AGN). The sample of identified sources contains 98 AGN (including 64 Seyfert galaxies, seven low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxies, three X-ray bright optically normal galaxies, 16 blazars and eight AGN of unclear optical class), two galaxy clusters (Coma and Abell 3266), 17 objects located in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (13 high- and two low-mass X-ray binaries and two X-ray pulsars), three Galactic cataclysmic variables, one ultraluminous X-ray source (M82 X-1) and one blended source (SWIFT J1105.7+5854). The nature of 25 sources remains unknown, so that the survey's identification is currently complete at 83 per cent. We have constructed AGN number-flux relations (log N-log S) and calculated AGN number densities in the local Universe for the entire survey and for each of the three extragalactic fields.

  19. Capabilities of the NASA/IPAC extragalactic database in the era of a global virtual observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Madore, Barry F.; Helou, George

    2001-11-01

    We review the capabilities of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED, http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu) for information retrieval and knowledge discovery in the context of a globally distributed virtual observatory. Since it's inception in 1990, NED has provided astronomers world-wide with the results of a systematic cross-correlation of catalogs covering all wavelengths, along with thousands of extragalactic observations culled from published journal articles. NED is continuously being expanded and revised to include new catalogs and published observations, each undergoing a process of cross-identification to capture the current state of knowledge about extragalactic sources in a panchromatic fashion. In addition to assimilating data from the literature, the team in incrementally folding in millions of observations from new large-scale sky surveys such as 2MASS, NVSS, APM, and SDSS. At the time of writing the system contains over 3.3 million unique objects with 4.2 million cross-identifications. We summarize the recent evolution of NED from its initial emphasis on object name-, position-, and literature-based queries into a research environment that also assists statistical data exploration and discovery using large samples of objects. Newer capabilities enable intelligent Web mining of entries in geographically distributed astronomical archives that are indexed by object names and positions in NED, sample building using constraints on redshifts, object types and other parameters, as well as image and spectral archives for targeted or serendipitous discoveries. A pilot study demonstrates how NED is being used in conjunction with linked survey archives to characterize the properties of galaxy classes to form a training set for machine learning algorithms; an initial goal is production of statistical likelihoods that newly discovered sources belong to known classes, represent statistical outliers, or candidates for fundamentally new types of objects. Challenges and

  20. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  1. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  2. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  3. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  4. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  5. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  6. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  7. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958 are…

  8. Writing for Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupper, Marianna S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a 24-hour commercial radio station simulation class project for eighth-grade language arts. Students wrote their own scripts, chose music and were disc jockeys on their own music and talk shows, and prepared news and traffic reports. Guest speakers from actual commercial radio came in to discuss issues such as advertising, censorship,…

  9. Frequencies for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Smith, F G

    1970-10-31

    At present the scope of research in radio astronomy is limited by the allocation of frequencies, some of which have to be shared with other radio services. When the International Telecommunications Union reconsiders all frequency allocations next year, astronomers are hoping for an improvement.

  10. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  11. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  12. Inverse problem for extragalactic transport of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, V.S.; Rogovaya, S.I.; Zirakashvili, V.N. E-mail: rogovaya@izmiran.ru

    2015-03-01

    The energy spectra and composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are changing in a course of propagation in the expanding Universe filled with background radiation. We developed a numerical code for solution of inverse problem for cosmic-ray transport equations that allows the determination of average source spectra of different nuclei from the cosmic ray spectra observed at the Earth. Employing this approach, the injection spectra of protons and Iron nuclei in extragalactic sources are found assuming that only these species are accelerated at the source. The data from the Auger experiment and the combined data from the Telescope Array + HiRes experiments are used to illustrate the method.

  13. Plasma effects on extragalactic ultra-high-energy cosmic ray hadron beams in cosmic voids

    SciTech Connect

    Krakau, S.; Schlickeiser, R. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2014-07-01

    The linear instability of an ultrarelativistic hadron beam (Γ {sub b} ≈ 10{sup 6}) in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium (IGM) is investigated with respect to the excitation of collective electrostatic and aperiodic electromagnetic fluctuations. This analysis is important for the propagation of extragalactic ultrarelativistic cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 15} eV) from their distant sources to Earth. We calculate minimum instability growth times that are orders of magnitude shorter than the cosmic ray propagation time in the IGM. Due to nonlinear effects, especially the modulation instability, the cosmic ray beam stabilizes and can propagate with nearly no energy loss through the IGM.

  14. The extragalactic link. Operational preparations for the Hubble SpaceTelescope observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, P. D.; Benedict, G. F.; Jefferys, W. H.; Shelus, P. J.; Duncombe, R. L.

    The Hipparcos Instrumental Coordinate System will have an unknown overall rotation with respect to a physical non-rotating reference frame. The authors are preparing to make observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (ST) which will tie the Hipparcos Coordinate System (including motions) to extragalactic objects. Froeschlé and Kovalevsky (1982) have shown that such a tie will provide a knowledge of the system rotation at the 0.002 arcsec/year level. Longer time based observations will improve that accuracy over the lifetime of ST.

  15. A powerful bursting radio source towards the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott D; Lazio, T Joseph W; Kassim, Namir E; Ray, Paul S; Markwardt, Craig B; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2005-03-01

    Transient astronomical sources are typically powered by compact objects and usually signify highly explosive or dynamic events. Although high-time-resolution observations are often possible in radio astronomy, they are usually limited to quite narrow fields of view. The dynamic radio sky is therefore poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands in which wide-field instruments routinely detect transient sources. Here we report a transient radio source, GCRT J1745-3009, which was detected during a moderately wide-field monitoring programme of the Galactic Centre region at 0.33 GHz. The characteristics of its bursts are unlike those known for any other class of radio transient. If located in or near the Galactic Centre, its brightness temperature (approximately 10(16) K) and the implied energy density within GCRT J1745-3009 vastly exceed those observed in most other classes of radio astronomical sources, and are consistent with coherent emission processes that are rarely observed. We conclude that it represents a hitherto unknown class of transient radio sources, the first of possibly many new classes that may be discovered by emerging wide-field radio telescopes.

  16. THE COMPLEX NORTH TRANSITION REGION OF CENTAURUS A: RADIO STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Susan G.; Eilek, Jean A.; Owen, Frazer N.

    2015-04-01

    We present deep radio images of the inner ∼50 kpc of Centaurus A, taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at 90 cm. We focus on the Transition Regions between the inner galaxy—including the active nucleus, inner radio lobes, and star-forming disk—and the outer radio lobes. We detect previously unknown extended emission around the Inner Lobes, including radio emission from the star-forming disk. We find that the radio-loud part of the North Transition Region (NTR), known as the North Middle Lobe, is significantly overpressured relative to the surrounding interstellar medium. We see no evidence for a collimated flow from the active galactic nucleus through this region. Our images show that the structure identified by Morganti et al. as a possible large-scale jet appears to be part of a narrow ridge of emission within the broader, diffuse, radio-loud region. This knotty radio ridge is coincident with other striking phenomena: compact X-ray knots, ionized gas filaments, and streams of young stars. Several short-lived phenomena in the NTR, as well as the frequent re-energization required by the Outer Lobes, suggest that energy must be flowing through both Transition Regions at the present epoch. We suggest that the energy flow is in the form of a galactic wind.

  17. A powerful bursting radio source towards the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott D; Lazio, T Joseph W; Kassim, Namir E; Ray, Paul S; Markwardt, Craig B; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2005-03-01

    Transient astronomical sources are typically powered by compact objects and usually signify highly explosive or dynamic events. Although high-time-resolution observations are often possible in radio astronomy, they are usually limited to quite narrow fields of view. The dynamic radio sky is therefore poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands in which wide-field instruments routinely detect transient sources. Here we report a transient radio source, GCRT J1745-3009, which was detected during a moderately wide-field monitoring programme of the Galactic Centre region at 0.33 GHz. The characteristics of its bursts are unlike those known for any other class of radio transient. If located in or near the Galactic Centre, its brightness temperature (approximately 10(16) K) and the implied energy density within GCRT J1745-3009 vastly exceed those observed in most other classes of radio astronomical sources, and are consistent with coherent emission processes that are rarely observed. We conclude that it represents a hitherto unknown class of transient radio sources, the first of possibly many new classes that may be discovered by emerging wide-field radio telescopes. PMID:15744294

  18. Planck 2015 results. XXVI. The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Beichman, C.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources is a list of discrete objects detected in single-frequency maps from the full duration of the Planck mission and supersedes previous versions. It consists of compact sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, detected over the entire sky. Compact sources detected in the lower frequency channels are assigned to the PCCS2, while at higher frequencies they are assigned to one of two subcatalogues, the PCCS2 or PCCS2E, depending on their location on the sky. The first of these (PCCS2) covers most of the sky and allows the user to produce subsamples at higher reliabilities than the target 80% integral reliability of the catalogue. The second (PCCS2E) contains sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections. Both the PCCS2 and PCCS2E include polarization measurements, in the form of polarized flux densities, or upper limits, and orientation angles for all seven polarization-sensitive Planck channels. The improved data-processing of the full-mission maps and their reduced noise levels allow us to increase the number of objects in the catalogue, improving its completeness for the target 80% reliability as compared with the previous versions, the PCCS and the Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC).

  19. ULTRA STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES IN THE LOCKMAN HOLE: SERVS IDENTIFICATIONS AND REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION AT THE FAINTEST RADIO FLUXES

    SciTech Connect

    Afonso, J.; Bizzocchi, L.; Grossi, M.; Messias, H.; Fernandes, C. A. C.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Simpson, C.; Chapman, S.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Rottgering, H.; Norris, R. P.; Dunlop, J.; Best, P.; Pforr, J.; Vaccari, M.; Seymour, N.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; and others

    2011-12-20

    Ultra steep spectrum (USS) radio sources have been successfully used to select powerful radio sources at high redshifts (z {approx}> 2). Typically restricted to large-sky surveys and relatively bright radio flux densities, it has gradually become possible to extend the USS search to sub-mJy levels, thanks to the recent appearance of sensitive low-frequency radio facilities. Here a first detailed analysis of the nature of the faintest USS sources is presented. By using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array radio observations of the Lockman Hole at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz, a sample of 58 USS sources, with 610 MHz integrated fluxes above 100 {mu}Jy, is assembled. Deep infrared data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) are used to reliably identify counterparts for 48 (83%) of these sources, showing an average total magnitude of [3.6]{sub AB} = 19.8 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts for 14 USS sources, together with photometric redshift estimates, improved by the use of the deep SERVS data, for a further 19 objects, show redshifts ranging from z = 0.1 to z = 2.8, peaking at z {approx} 0.6 and tailing off at high redshifts. The remaining 25 USS sources, with no redshift estimate, include the faintest [3.6] magnitudes, with 10 sources undetected at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m (typically [3.6] {approx}> 22-23 mag from local measurements), which suggests the likely existence of higher redshifts among the sub-mJy USS population. The comparison with the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies models indicates that Fanaroff-Riley type I radio sources and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei may constitute the bulk of the faintest USS population, and raises the possibility that the high efficiency of the USS technique for the selection of high-redshift sources remains even at the sub-mJy level.

  20. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.