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Sample records for compact hemielliptic dielectric

  1. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  2. Transparent all-dielectric gradient index waveplates with compact profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Ballesteros, G. C.; Mateo-Segura, C.

    2016-09-01

    Purely dielectric waveplates overcome problems typically associated with metals, e.g., corrosion. However, they are often bulky and/or lossy, substantially reducing their applicability. As the operating frequency shifts towards lower frequencies where compactness is a sought after quality, these problems become even more severe. In this letter, we theoretically demonstrate how to combine axially varying gradient index materials with form birefringence to realize nearly transparent and compact dielectric waveplates. The waveplate is subsequently studied considering a discrete distribution of indexes of refraction. Our results indicate that the number of discretization levels required to perform as the continuous gradient index case is small, which would simplify significantly the fabrication process. As an example, a 0.65 λ -thick quarterplate with less than 0.1 dB insertion loss at ˜34 GHz is designed and compared with full-wave simulations, proving an excellent agreement.

  3. Compact Dielectric-Rod White-Light Delay Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    Optical delay lines of a proposed type would be made from rods of such dielectric materials as calcium fluoride, fused silica, or sapphire. These would offer advantages over prior optical delay lines, as summarized below. Optical delay lines are key components of opto-electronic microwave oscillators, narrow-band opto-electronic microwave filters, evanescent-field optical biochemical detectors, and some Fourier-Transform spectrum analyzers. Heretofore, optical delay lines used in such applications have been of two types: resonators and coiled long optical fibers, both of which have disadvantages: Resonators are compact, but excitation must be provided by narrow-band lasers. Wide-band (including noisy) laser light cannot be coupled efficiently to narrow-band resonators. When light is coupled into a narrowband resonator from a source of reasonably high power, a significant amount of optical energy circulates within the resonator, causing nonlinear loss and significant noise. Typically, a coil-type optical delay line is made of fused-silica fiber, which exhibits fundamental loss. To overcome the limit imposed by the optical loss in fused silica, it would be necessary to use fibers having crystalline cores. Although space is saved by winding fibers into coils, fiber-coil delay lines are still inconveniently bulky. The proposed compact dielectric-rod delay lines would exploit the special class of non-diffracting light beams that are denoted Bessel beams because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have large values of angular momentum. They can be generated with the help of whispering-gallery-mode optical resonators, as described, for example, in "Simplified Generation of High-Angular-Momentum Light Beams" (NPO-42965) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 3 (March 2007), page 8a. In a delay line according to the proposal, the dielectric rod would be dimensioned to function as a multimode

  4. Exact off-resonance near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic 2-D lenses illuminated by plane waves.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2009-02-01

    The near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic lenses made of rexolite and isotropic quartz and illuminated by E- and H-polarized plane waves are studied. Variations in the focal domain size, shape, and location are reported versus the angle of incidence of the incoming wave. The problem is solved numerically in a two-dimensional formulation. The accuracy of results is guaranteed by using a highly efficient numerical algorithm based on the combination of the Muller boundary integral equations, the method of analytical regularization, and the trigonometric Galerkin discretization scheme. The analysis fully accounts for the finite size of the lens as well as its curvature and thus can be considered as a reference solution for other electromagnetic solvers. Moreover, the trusted description of the focusing ability of a finite-size hemielliptic lens can be useful in the design of antenna receivers.

  5. A compact railgun accelerator for millimeter-sized dielectric solid armatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Sakharov, V. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.; Rozov, S. I.

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-sized dielectric solid armatures have been accelerated in a compact railgun system. It is shown that application of an external pulsed magnetic field can solve the problem of catastrophic erosion of electrodes at the initial stage and accelerate small armatures up to a velocity of about 6 km/s.

  6. Compact microwave lamp having a tuning block and a dielectric located in a lamp cavity

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, James E.

    2000-01-01

    A microwave lamp having a compact structure utilizing a coupling slot which has a dielectric member extending therethrough and a tuning block adjoining the coupling slot. A non-conventional waveguide is used which has about the width of a WR-284 waveguide and about the length of a WR-340 waveguide.

  7. Geometry influence on the transmission spectra of dielectric single layers of spheres with different compactness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andueza, A.; Echeverría, R.; Morales, P.; Sevilla, J.

    2010-06-01

    The transmission of spectra of different dielectric spheres single layer arrangements has been measured. High dielectric permittivity (ɛ =7) spheres of several millimeters of diameter were used to build the samples whose transmission was measured in the microwave range. The behavior of lattices arranged in square and triangular geometries have been compared in a number of different compactness cases. The same patterns measured have also been calculated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Spectra from different geometrical arrangements of the same compactness (measured with the same filling fraction value) are very similar in some cases. Based on the level of similarity we propose three compactness regions. The high compactness region, where the structure effect is important, presents spectra clearly different for the two geometries. In a medium compactness region spectra are almost identical, suggesting a dominant effect of single sphere effects. Finally, in the low compactness region, the spectra from the two geometrical configurations diverge again as the Bragg diffraction values are approached.

  8. Development of compact slip detection sensor using dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-young; Hwang, Do-Yeon; Kim, Baek-chul; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a resistance tactile sensor that can detect a slip on the surface of sensor structure. The presented sensor device has fingerprint-like structures that are similar with the role of the humans finger print. The resistance slip sensor that the novel developed uses acrylo-nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) as a dielectric substrate and graphene as an electrode material. We can measure the slip as the structure of sensor makes a deformation and it changes the resistance through forming a new conductive route. To manufacture our sensor, we developed a new imprint process. By using this process, we can produce sensor with micro unit structure. To verify effectiveness of the proposed slip detection, experiment using prototype of resistance slip sensor is conducted with an algorithm to detect slip and slip is successfully detected. We will discuss the slip detection properties.

  9. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  10. Remote estimation of dielectric permittivity of lunar surface regolith using compact polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Porwal, A.; Dhingra, S.; De, S.; Venkataraman, G.

    2015-12-01

    A new model has been developed to estimate the dielectric permittivity of the lunar surface regolith using S-band hybrid compact polarimetric SAR data obtained from Mini-RF aboard LRO. The surface regolith is modeled as a random medium consisting of elementary ellipsoidal particles smaller than the incident wavelength of S-band. The data, available in the form of Stokes vector, are used to derive a coherency matrix, under the reflection symmetry condition, whose elements are used to calculate the particle anisotropy parameter. Since the anisotropy is bounded by the dielectric permittivity, its relationship with the latter is used for the required estimation. The method is applied to compute the dielectric permittivity of Apollo 17 landing site in Taurus-Littrow valley and to a part of Sinus Iridum. The estimated mean dielectric permittivity values (2.87 ± 0.31) and (3.04 ± 0.31), respectively, are consistent with the previous estimates. The dielectric permittivity values have also been used to discern different units of regolith in both the regions. The advantage of our model is that it does not require any a priori knowledge about the density or composition of the regolith. The available data in the form of Stokes parameters are sufficient for the computation. The model predicts a thin layer of low density, porous fine grained dust on the lunar surface.

  11. A Compact Linac for Proton Therapy Based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Mackie, T R; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y -; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Reckwerdt, P J; Schmidt, R; Pearson, D; Flynn, R W; Matthews, D; Purdy, J

    2007-10-29

    A novel compact CT-guided intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) system is described. The system is being designed to deliver fast IMPT so that larger target volumes and motion management can be accomplished. The system will be ideal for large and complex target volumes in young patients. The basis of the design is the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DWA uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The IMPT planning system will optimize delivery characteristics. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. Feasibility tests of an optimization system for selecting the position, energy, intensity and spot size for a collection of spots comprising the treatment are underway. A prototype is being designed and concept designs of the envelope and environmental needs of the unit are beginning. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT RADIOGRAPHY ACCELERATOR USING DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; McCarrick, J; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2005-06-02

    We are developing an inexpensive compact accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. Design characteristics are an 8 MeV endpoint energy, 2 kA beam current, a cell gradient of approximately 3 MV/m (for an overall accelerator length is 2-3 m), and <$1/Volt capital costs. Such designs have been made possible with the development of high specific energy dielectrics (>10J/cm{sup 3}), specialized transmission line designs and multi-gap laser triggered low jitter (<1 ns) gas switches. In this geometry, the pulse forming lines, switches, and insulator/beam pipe are fully integrated within each cell to form a compact, stand-alone, stackable unit. We detail our research and modeling to date, recent high voltage test results, and the integration concept of the cells into a radiographic system.

  13. Development of a compact cylindrical reaction cavity for a microwave dielectric heating system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsik; Kim, Kwangsoo

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a compact reaction cavity for a microwave-assisted synthesis system. The microwave dielectric heating is a key technology to improve synthesizing yield, however, the large size of the microwave generation and reaction parts in an all-in-one system is a major obstacle when applying the technique to various systems, of which the installation space is limited. For this particular problem, a compact stand-alone cylindrical reaction cavity was developed in the current study. A microwave excited from a monopole probe, which is inserted into the side of the cavity, is transferred to a reaction mixture through the upper hole of the cavity. The cavity is miniaturized by filling it with an alumina ceramic dielectric. Fine-tuning of the resonance frequency becomes available by controlling the length of the inserted screw between the probe and the upper hole. The physical properties of the cavity were simulated using high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) and the produced cavity was tested using an Agilent E8357A network analyzer. The test results show that the developed cavity is able to send enough energy to various solvents.

  14. Evolutionary optimization of compact dielectric lens for farfield sub-wavelength imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of conventional optical lenses is limited by diffraction. For decades researchers have made various attempts to beat the diffraction limit and realize subwavelength imaging. Here we present the approach to design modified solid immersion lenses that deliver the subwavelength information of objects into the far field, yielding magnified images. The lens is composed of an isotropic dielectric core and anisotropic or isotropic dielectric matching layers. It is designed by combining a transformation optics forward design with an inverse design scheme, where an evolutionary optimization procedure is applied to find the material parameters for the matching layers. Notably, the total radius of the lens is only 2.5 wavelengths and the resolution can reach λ/6. Compared to previous approaches based on the simple discretized approximation of a coordinate transformation design, our method allows for much more precise recovery of the information of objects, especially for those with asymmetric shapes. It allows for the far-field subwavelength imaging at optical frequencies with compact dielectric devices. PMID:26017657

  15. Compact double-p slotted inset-fed microstrip patch antenna on high dielectric substrate.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Mahadi, W N L; Latef, T A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compact sized inset-fed rectangular microstrip patch antenna embedded with double-P slots. The proposed antenna has been designed and fabricated on ceramic-PTFE composite material substrate of high dielectric constant value. The measurement results from the fabricated prototype of the antenna show -10 dB reflection coefficient bandwidths of 200 MHz and 300 MHz with center resonant frequency of 1.5 GHz and 4 GHz, respectively. The fabricated antenna has attained gains of 3.52 dBi with 81% radiation efficiency and 5.72 dBi with 87% radiation efficiency for lower band and upper band, respectively. The measured E- and H-plane radiation patterns are also presented for better understanding. Good agreement between the simulation and measurement results and consistent radiation patterns make the proposed antenna suitable for GPS and C-band applications.

  16. High-speed, compact, adaptive lenses using in-line transparent dielectric elastomer actuator membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M.; Clarke, David R.

    2013-04-01

    Electrically tunable adaptive lenses provide several advantages over traditional lens assemblies in terms of compactness, speed, efficiency, and flexibility. We present an elastomer-liquid lens system which makes use of an in-line, transparent electroactive polymer actuator. The lens has two liquid-filled cavities enclosed within two frames, with two passive outer elastomer membranes and an internal transparent electroactive membrane. Advantages of the lens design over existing systems include large apertures, flexibility in choosing the starting lens curvature, and electrode encapsulation with a dielectric liquid. A lens power change up to 40 diopters, corresponding to focal length variation up to 300%, was recorded during actuation, with a response time on the order of tens of milliseconds.

  17. Compact double-p slotted inset-fed microstrip patch antenna on high dielectric substrate.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Mahadi, W N L; Latef, T A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compact sized inset-fed rectangular microstrip patch antenna embedded with double-P slots. The proposed antenna has been designed and fabricated on ceramic-PTFE composite material substrate of high dielectric constant value. The measurement results from the fabricated prototype of the antenna show -10 dB reflection coefficient bandwidths of 200 MHz and 300 MHz with center resonant frequency of 1.5 GHz and 4 GHz, respectively. The fabricated antenna has attained gains of 3.52 dBi with 81% radiation efficiency and 5.72 dBi with 87% radiation efficiency for lower band and upper band, respectively. The measured E- and H-plane radiation patterns are also presented for better understanding. Good agreement between the simulation and measurement results and consistent radiation patterns make the proposed antenna suitable for GPS and C-band applications. PMID:25165750

  18. A compact, low-loss, tunable phase shifter on defect mitigated dielectrics up to 40 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orloff, Nathan; Long, Christian; Lu, Xifeng; Nair, Hari; Dawley, Natalie; Schlom, Darrell; Booth, James

    With the emergence of the internet-of-things and increased connectivity of modern commerce, consumers have driven demand for wireless spectrum beyond current capacity and infrastructure capabilities. One way the telecommunications industry is addressing this problem is by pushing front-end electronics to higher frequencies, introducing carrier aggregation schemes, and developing spectrum-sharing techniques. Some of these solutions require frequency agile components that are vastly different from what is in today's marketplace. Perhaps the most basic and ubiquitous component in front-end electronics is the phase shifter. Phase shifters are particularly important for compact beam-forming antennas that may soon appear in commercial technology. Here, we demonstrate a compact, tunable phase shifter with very low insertion loss up to 40 GHz on a defect mitigated tunable dielectric. We demonstrate performance compared to barium-doped strontium titanate phase shifters. Such phase shifters could potentially meet the stringent size and performance characteristics demanded by telecommunications industry, readily facilitating massive multiple-input multiple-output antennas in the next-generation of mobile handsets.

  19. Laboratory measurements of dielectric properties of compact and granular materials, in relation with Rosetta mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Y.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Encrenaz, P.; Gheudin, M.; Ciarletti, V.; Gulkis, S.; Jambon, A.; Ruffié, G.; Prigent, C.

    2012-04-01

    different sizes distributions (i.e. surface to volume ratios), and possibly porosities. Dielectric constant determination at 190 GHz typically suggests that the real part of dielectric constant slowly increases with grain size: 2.86 ± 0.06, 2.96 ± 0.02 and 3.13 ± 0.05 for sizes respectively lower than 50 µm, between 50 and 160 µm and between 160 and 355 µm. Additional series of measurements on compact and granular samples of meteoritic analogues, such as carbonaceous chondrites are also to take place. [1] Gulkis et al. , Space Sci. Rev., 128, 561-597, 2007. [2] Kofman et al. , Space Sci. Rev., 128, 413-432, 2007. [3] Gulkis et al. , Space. Sci. Rev., 58, 1077-1087, 2010. [4] Gulkis et al. , Space. Sci. Rev., doi: 10.1016/j.pss.2011.12.004, 2011. [5] Levasseur-Regourd et al. , Planet. Space Sci., 57, 221-228, 2009. [6] McFadden et al., 40th LPSC, 2887, 2009. [7] Brouet el al. , EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting, p. 1083, 2011.

  20. A compact 300 kV solid-state high-voltage nanosecond generator for dielectric wall accelerator.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yi; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang; Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Jun; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-05-01

    Compact solid-state system is the main development trend in pulsed power technologies. A compact solid-state high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator with output voltage of 300 kV amplitude, 10 ns duration (FWHM), and 3 ns rise-time was designed for a dielectric wall accelerator. The generator is stacked by 15 planar-plate Blumlein pulse forming lines (PFL). Each Blumlein PFL consists of two solid-state planar transmission lines, a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch, and a laser diode trigger. The key components of the generator and the experimental results are reported in this paper. PMID:26026561

  1. A compact 300 kV solid-state high-voltage nanosecond generator for dielectric wall accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yi; Xia, Liansheng Zhang, Huang; Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Jun; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-05-15

    Compact solid-state system is the main development trend in pulsed power technologies. A compact solid-state high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator with output voltage of 300 kV amplitude, 10 ns duration (FWHM), and 3 ns rise-time was designed for a dielectric wall accelerator. The generator is stacked by 15 planar-plate Blumlein pulse forming lines (PFL). Each Blumlein PFL consists of two solid-state planar transmission lines, a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch, and a laser diode trigger. The key components of the generator and the experimental results are reported in this paper.

  2. A compact 300 kV solid-state high-voltage nanosecond generator for dielectric wall accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yi; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang; Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Jun; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-05-01

    Compact solid-state system is the main development trend in pulsed power technologies. A compact solid-state high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator with output voltage of 300 kV amplitude, 10 ns duration (FWHM), and 3 ns rise-time was designed for a dielectric wall accelerator. The generator is stacked by 15 planar-plate Blumlein pulse forming lines (PFL). Each Blumlein PFL consists of two solid-state planar transmission lines, a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch, and a laser diode trigger. The key components of the generator and the experimental results are reported in this paper.

  3. Compact Double-P Slotted Inset-Fed Microstrip Patch Antenna on High Dielectric Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, M. R.; Islam, M. T.; Habib Ullah, M.; Mahadi, W. N. L.; Latef, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compact sized inset-fed rectangular microstrip patch antenna embedded with double-P slots. The proposed antenna has been designed and fabricated on ceramic-PTFE composite material substrate of high dielectric constant value. The measurement results from the fabricated prototype of the antenna show −10 dB reflection coefficient bandwidths of 200 MHz and 300 MHz with center resonant frequency of 1.5 GHz and 4 GHz, respectively. The fabricated antenna has attained gains of 3.52 dBi with 81% radiation efficiency and 5.72 dBi with 87% radiation efficiency for lower band and upper band, respectively. The measured E- and H-plane radiation patterns are also presented for better understanding. Good agreement between the simulation and measurement results and consistent radiation patterns make the proposed antenna suitable for GPS and C-band applications. PMID:25165750

  4. Development of a Compact Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator at 11.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    This paper presents a progress report on the development of a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the Magnicon Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The accelerator will be powered by an 11.4-GHz magnicon amplifier that provides up to 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator includes a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures of up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Euclid Techlabs, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone rf testing at NRL at accelerating gradients up to 15 MV/m. The first stage of the accelerator, including the 5-MeV injector, has recently begun operation, and initial operation of the complete dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  5. Assessment of in-situ compaction degree of HMA pavement surface layers using GPR and novel dielectric properties-based algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Fokion

    2015-04-01

    Field compaction of asphalt pavements is ultimately conducted to achieve layer(s) with suitable mechanical stability. However, the achieved degree of compaction has a significant influence on the performance of asphalt pavements. Providing all desirable mixture design characteristics without adequate compaction could lead to premature permanent deformation, excessive aging, and moisture damage; these distresses reduce the useful life of asphalt pavements. Hence, proper construction of an asphalt pavement is necessary to develop a long lasting roadway that will help minimize future maintenance. This goal is achieved by verifying and confirming that design specifications, in this case density specifications are met through the use of Quality Assurance (QA) practices. With respect to in-situ compaction degree of hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavement surface layers, nearly all agencies specify either cored samples or nuclear/ non nuclear density gauges to provide density measurement of the constructed pavement. Typically, a small number of spot tests (with either cores or nuclear gauges) are run and a judgment about the density level of the entire roadway is made based on the results of this spot testing. Unfortunately, density measurement from a small number of spots may not be representative of the density of the pavement mat. Hence, full coverage evaluation of compaction quality of the pavement mat is needed. The Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), as a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) technique, is an example of a non-intrusive technique that favors over the methods mentioned above for assessing compaction quality of asphalt pavements, since it allows measurement of all mat areas. Further, research studies in recent years have shown promising results with respect to its capability, coupled with the use of novel algorithms based on the dielectric properties of HMA, to predict the in-situ field density. In view of the above, field experimental surveys were conducted to assess the

  6. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  7. Dielectric siphons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.; Perry, M. P.; Melcher, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The normally weak polarization force density, exerted on insulating dielectric liquids by a nonuniform electric field, is enhanced if high pressures are used. The nonuniform electric field acts as an elastic ?wall' to contain and guide the dielectric fluid. A general theory for these electrohydrodynamic (EHD) conduits has been developed. An illustrative example of the EHD conduits is the dielectric siphon consisting of two U-shaped electrodes held adjacent to each other by insulating nylon screws.

  8. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  9. Trends of microwave dielectric materials for antenna application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulong, T. A. T.; Osman, R. A. M.; Idris, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid development of a modern microwave communication system requires a high quality microwave dielectric ceramic material to be used as mobile and satellite communication. High permittivity of dielectric ceramics leads to fabrication of compact device for electronic components. Dielectric ceramics which used for microwave applications required three important parameters such as high or appropriate permittivity (ɛr), high quality factor (Q f ≥ 5000GH z) and good temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (τf). This paper review of various dielectric ceramic materials used as microwave dielectric materials and related parameters for antenna applications.

  10. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  11. STATUS OF THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Carroll, J; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-04-22

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system is capable of accelerating any charge to mass ratio particle. Applications of high gradient proton and electron versions of this accelerator will be discussed. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  12. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  13. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  14. Dielectric metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Jason

    While plasmonics metasurfaces have seen much development over the past several years, they still face throughput limitations due to ohmic losses. On the other hand, dielectric resonators and associated metasurfaces can eliminate the issue of ohmic loss while still providing the freedom to engineer the optical properties of the composite. In this talk, I will present our recent efforts to harness this freedom using metasurfaces formed from silicon and fabricated using CMOS-compatible techniques. Operating in the telecommunications band, I will discuss how we have used this platform to realize a number of novel functionalities including wavefront control, near-perfect reflection, and high quality factor resonances. In many cases the optical performance of these silicon-based metasurfaces can surpass their plasmonic counterparts. Furthermore, for some cases the surfaces are more amenable to large-area fabrication techniques.

  15. Mechanically Tunable Dielectric Resonator Metasurfaces at Visible Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Gutruf, Philipp; Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2016-01-26

    Devices that manipulate light represent the future of information processing. Flat optics and structures with subwavelength periodic features (metasurfaces) provide compact and efficient solutions. The key bottleneck is efficiency, and replacing metallic resonators with dielectric resonators has been shown to significantly enhance performance. To extend the functionalities of dielectric metasurfaces to real-world optical applications, the ability to tune their properties becomes important. In this article, we present a mechanically tunable all-dielectric metasurface. This is composed of an array of dielectric resonators embedded in an elastomeric matrix. The optical response of the structure under a uniaxial strain is analyzed by mechanical-electromagnetic co-simulations. It is experimentally demonstrated that the metasurface exhibits remarkable resonance shifts. Analysis using a Lagrangian model reveals that strain modulates the near-field mutual interaction between resonant dielectric elements. The ability to control and alter inter-resonator coupling will position dielectric metasurfaces as functional elements of reconfigurable optical devices.

  16. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  17. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  18. Compact Radiative Control Structures for Millimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari D.; Chuss, David T.; Chervenak, James A.; Henry, Ross M.; Moseley, s. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested compact radiative control structures, including antireflection coatings and resonant absorbers, for millimeter through submillimeter wave astronomy. The antireflection coatings consist of micromachined single crystal silicon dielectric sub-wavelength honeycombs. The effective dielectric constant of the structures is set by the honeycomb cell geometry. The resonant absorbers consist of pieces of solid single crystal silicon substrate and thin phosphorus implanted regions whose sheet resistance is tailored to maximize absorption by the structure. We present an implantation model that can be used to predict the ion energy and dose required for obtaining a target implant layer sheet resistance. A neutral density filter, a hybrid of a silicon dielectric honeycomb with an implanted region, has also been fabricated with this basic approach. These radiative control structures are scalable and compatible for use large focal plane detector arrays.

  19. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  20. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  1. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  2. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  3. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  4. Dielectric properties of aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Keene, L.E.; Latorre, V.R. )

    1993-07-01

    We have measured the real (dielectric constant) and imaginary (loss factor) components of the complex relative permittivity at 298 [degree]K using microwave frequencies (2, 10, and 18--40 GHz), for bulk SiO[sub 2]-aerogels and for two types of organic aerogels, resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) and melamine-formaldehyde (MF). Measured dielectric constants are found to vary linearly between values of 1.0 and 2.0 for aerogel densities from 10 to 500 kg/m[sup 3]. For the same range of densities, the measured loss tangents vary linearly between values of 2[times]10[sup [minus]4] and 7[times]10[sup [minus]2]. The observed linearity of the dielectric properties with density in aerogels at microwave frequencies shows that their dielectric behavior is more gas-like than solid-like. The dielectric properties of aerogels are shown to be significantly affected by the adsorbed water internal to the bulk material. For example, water accounts for 7% of the dielectric constant and 70% of the loss at microwave frequencies for silica aerogels. Because of their very high porosity, even with the water content, the aerogels are among the few materials exhibiting such low dielectric properties. Our measurements show that aerogels with greater than 99% porosity have dielectric constants less than 1.03; these are the lowest values ever reported for a bulk solid material.

  5. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  6. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-03-14

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  7. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  8. Gigavolt-per-Meter Wakefields in Annular Dielectric Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Brendan Donald

    A wakefield accelerator uses a medium capable of sustaining appropriate electric fields to transfer energy from a drive beam to a witness beam. Examples of such systems include electron beam driven plasma wakefields, laser driven plasma wakefields and electron beam driven dielectric wakefield structures. Dielectrics and plasmas are of particular interest because they are capable of maintaining electric fields on the order of GV/m and in the case of plasmas upwards of TV/m. These systems provide a significant step beyond current radiofrequency accelerating structures capable of peak electric fields on the order of 100 MV/m and average effective electric fields of 20 MV/m. Furthermore, beam driven dielectric structures produce a wakefield which is phase synchronous with the beam, these structures do not suffer from transit time or dephasing effects. In the case of dielectric wakefield accelerators, the structures under study in this publication, the modes generated by the driving beam are in the terahertz (THz) regime. Thus development of dielectric wakefield accelerators is seen as a path to smaller, more compact accelerating systems and as a means to generate THz radiation. Here we demonstrate a beam-driven dielectric wakefield accelerating structure that produces sustained fields of 1.35 GV/m for many hundreds of thousands of drive beam pulses. In addition we show beam-driven dielectric structures have the potential to produce single mode, high spectral purity THZ radiation of unprecedented energy scale.

  9. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  10. Multipactor experiment on a dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Rex Beach, III

    2001-12-01

    Multipactor is an electron multiplication process, or electron avalanche, that occurs on metallic and dielectric surfaces in the presence of rf microwave fields. Just as a rock avalanche only needs one rock to cause a larger slide of destruction, one electron under multipactor conditions can cause a tremendous amount of damage to electrical components. Multipactor is a nuisance that can cause excessive noise in communication satellites and radar, and damage to vacuum windows in particle accelerators. Single-surface multipactor on dielectrics is responsible for poor transmission properties of vacuum windows and can eventually lead to vacuum window failure. The repercussions of multipactor affect a wide range of people. For example, a civilian placing a call on a cell phone, or a captain dependent on radar for his ship's safety could both be affected by multipactor. In order to combat this expensive annoyance, a unique experiment to investigate single-surface multipactor on a dielectric surface was developed and tested. The motivation of this thesis is to introduce a novel experiment for multipactor that is designed to verify theoretical calculations and explore the physics behind the phenomenon. The compact apparatus consists of a small brass microwave cavity in a high vacuum system. Most single-surface multipactor experiments consist of a large resonant ring wave guide with a MW power supply. This experiment is the first to utilize a high Q resonant cavity and kW-level power supply to create multipactor on a dielectric surface. The small brass resonant cavity has an inner length of 9.154 cm with an inner diameter of 9.045 cm. A pulsed, variable frequency microwave source at ˜2.4 GHz, 2 kW peak excites the TE111 mode with a strong electric field parallel to a dielectric plate (˜0.2 cm thickness) that is inserted at the mid-plane of the cavity. The microwave pulses from the power supply are monitored by calibrated microwave diodes. These calibrated diodes along

  11. Peristaltic pump made of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Peter; Matysek, Marc; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    The functional principle of peristaltic motion is inspired by the pattern in which hollow organs move. The technology of dielectric elastomer actuators provides the possibility to design a very compact peristaltic pump. The geometries of the whole pump and the actuator elements have been determined by numerical simulations of the mechanical behaviour and the fluid dynamics. With eight independent actuators the pumping channel is self-sealing and there is no need for any valves. The first generation of this pump is able to generate flow rates up to 0.36 μl/min.

  12. Tunable lenses using transparent dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M; Clarke, David R

    2013-04-01

    Focus tunable, adaptive lenses provide several advantages over traditional lens assemblies in terms of compactness, cost, efficiency, and flexibility. To further improve the simplicity and compact nature of adaptive lenses, we present an elastomer-liquid lens system which makes use of an inline, transparent electroactive polymer actuator. The lens requires only a minimal number of components: a frame, a passive membrane, a dielectric elastomer actuator membrane, and a clear liquid. The focal length variation was recorded to be greater than 100% with this system, responding in less than one second. Through the analysis of membrane deformation within geometrical constraints, it is shown that by selecting appropriate lens dimensions, even larger focusing dynamic ranges can be achieved. PMID:23571956

  13. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  14. Dielectric elastomer actuators for adaptive photonic microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Marcus; Schröder, Henning; Marx, Sebastian; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Various applications in the field of photonic microsystems for Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) were shown with this research. DEA belong to the class of Electro Active Polymers (EAP) and have the potential to substitute common technologies like piezoelectric actuators. DEAs offers several advantages like compact and variable shapes, large actuation ranges and cost efficient production processes that have to be emphasized. For the market of adaptive photonic microsystems especially area actuators are very suitable. They can be used e.g. as tuneable lens, mirror or grating component and tool for optical fiber alignment. These area actuators have a similar structure like a capacitor. They consist of three layers, two electrode layers on top and bottom and one dielectric layer in the center. The dielectric layer is made of a deformable and prestretched elastomer film. When applying a voltage between both electrode layers the thickness of the dielectric film is compressed and the actuator is displaced in the plane. The use of material compositions like a polymer matrix with graphite, carbon nano particles or carbon nano tubes as well as thin metal films for the electrodes were studied. The paper presents results on suitable dielectric and electrode materials, actuator geometries and respective adaptive photonic components. The manufacturing process of area actuators is described in detail. As a basic size of the area actuators (20 × 20) mm2 were chosen. Onto the produced area actuators polymer lenses or mirrors were assembled. The deflection of the optical beam path is calculated with optical simulations and measured at the prepared adaptive optical components. Static actuations of about +/-15 μm are achieved when applying a voltage of 200 V. Also the function of a tuneable beam splitter is demonstrated to show further applications.

  15. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  16. Alternate film dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C. . Neutron Devices Dept.); Harris, J.O.; Martinez, J.I. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents data on polymeric dielectric films evaluated to support the design of high-energy-density capacitors. Evaluated materials include polycarbonate (two sources), polyphenylene sulfide, polyvinylidene fluoride, polyethermide (three sources), polyimide (four sources), polyethersulfone, and polyetherether ketone. A polyester was evaluated as the control material since many of our prior designs utilized this dielectric. The film evaluations were based on dielectric constant and dissipation factor variation as a function of temperature from {minus}55{degree}C to 300{degree}C, as well as dielectric breakdown strength. Additionally, film/foil capacitors in a dry, wrap-and-fill configuration were fabricated and tested to determine insulation resistance, breakdown voltage, and radiation hardness. Results will be presented for all the evaluations based on the several criteria. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Dielectric cavity relativistic magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    An alteration in the structure of the A6 relativistic magnetron is proposed, which introduces an extra degree of freedom to its design and enhances many of its quality factors. This modification involves the partial filling of the cavities of the device with a low-loss dielectric material. The operation of a dielectric-filled A6 is simulated; the results indicate single-mode operation at the desired π mode and a substantially cleaner rf spectrum.

  18. Dielectric spectroscopy in agrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skierucha, W.; Wilczek, A.; Szypłowska, A.

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents scientific foundation and some examples of agrophysical applications of dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The aim of agrophysics is to apply physical methods and techniques for studies of materials and processes which occur in agriculture. Dielectric spectroscopy, which describes the dielectric properties of a sample as a function of frequency, may be successfully used for examinations of properties of various materials. Possible test materials may include agrophysical objects such as soil, fruit, vegetables, intermediate and final products of the food industry, grain, oils, etc. Dielectric spectroscopy techniques enable non-destructive and non-invasive measurements of the agricultural materials, therefore providing tools for rapid evaluation of their water content and quality. There is a limited number of research in the field of dielectric spectroscopy of agricultural objects, which is caused by the relatively high cost of the respective measurement equipment. With the fast development of modern technology, especially in high frequency applications, dielectric spectroscopy has great potential of expansion in agrophysics, both in cognitive and utilitarian aspects.

  19. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  20. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    PubMed

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  1. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  2. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Dielectric exchange-force effect on the rupture force of adsorbed bilayers of self-assembled surfactant films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2001-05-01

    We measured and formulated dielectric exchange forces between adsorbed layers of self-assembled surfactant films and atomic-force microscope tips in water. The dielectric exchange-force model is in agreement with the observation that the surfactant-layer rupture forces (tip-applied force necessary to obtain tip/substrate contact) are smaller in the thickest layers, where the compactness of the adsorbed film results in the smallest values of the dielectric permittivity. Within experimental accuracy, a dielectric permittivity value of ˜4 for bilayers and of ˜36 for monolayers is found.

  4. Compact gas-insulated transformer. Fourteenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Objective is to develop a compact, more efficient, quieter transformer which does not rely on mineral oil insulation. Compressed SF/sub 6/ is used as the external insulation and polymer film as the insulation between turns. A separate liquid cooling system is also provided. This document reports progress made in design, mechanical, dielectric, short circuit, thermal, materials, prototype, accessories, commercialization, and system studies. (DLC)

  5. Superdirective dielectric nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnok, Alexander E.; Simovski, Constantin R.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce the novel concept of superdirective nanoantennas based on the excitation of higher-order magnetic multipole moments in subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles. Our superdirective nanoantenna is a small Si nanosphere containing a notch, and is excited by a dipole located within the notch. In addition to extraordinary directivity, this nanoantenna demonstrates efficient radiation steering at the nanoscale, resulting from the subwavelength sensitivity of the beam radiation direction to variation of the source position inside the notch. We compare our dielectric nanoantenna with a plasmonic nanoantenna of similar geometry, and reveal that the nanoantenna's high directivity in the regime of transmission is not associated with strong localization of near fields in the regime of reception. Likewise, the absence of hot spots inside the nanoantenna leads to low dissipation in the radiation regime, so that our dielectric nanoantenna has significantly smaller losses and high radiation efficiency of up to 70%.

  6. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  7. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiloucas, Sillas; Blackburn, John

    2013-11-01

    This volume records the 42nd Dielectrics Group Proceedings of the Dielectrics Conference that took place at the University of Reading UK from 10-12 April 2013. The meeting is part of the biennial Dielectrics series of the Dielectrics Group, and formerly Dielectrics Society, and is organised by the Institute of Physics. The conference proceedings showcase some of the diversity and activity of the Dielectrics community worldwide, and bring together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experiences from the Physics, Chemistry and Engineering communities. It is interesting to note some continuing themes such as Insulation/HV Materials, Dielectric Spectroscopy, Dielectric Measurement Techniques and Ferroelectric materials have a growing importance across a range of technologically important areas from the Energy sector to Materials research, Semiconductor and Electronics industries, and Metrology. We would like to thank all of our colleagues and friends in the Dielectrics community who have supported this event by contributing manuscripts and participating in the event. The conference has provided excellent networking opportunities for all delegates. Our thanks go also to our theme chairs: Dr Stephen Dodd (University of Leicester) on Insulation/HV Materials, Professor Darryl Almond (University of Bath) on Dielectric Spectroscopy, Dr John Blackburn (NPL) on Dielectric Measurement Techniques and Professor Anthony R West (University of Sheffield) on Ferroelectric Materials. We would also like to thank the other members of the Technical Programme Committee for their support, and refereeing the submitted manuscripts. Our community would also like to wish a full recovery to our plenary speaker Prof John Fothergill (City University London) who was unexpectedly unable to give his talk as well as thank Professor Alun Vaughan for stepping in and giving an excellent plenary lecture in his place at such very short notice. We are also

  8. Dielectric elastomer generators that stack up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T. G.; Rosset, S.; Anderson, I. A.; Shea, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a soft dielectric elastomer power generator with a volume of less than 1 cm3. The generator is well suited to harvest energy from ambient and from human body motion as it can harvest from low frequency (sub-Hz) motions, and is compact and lightweight. Dielectric elastomers are highly stretchable variable capacitors. Electrical energy is produced when the deformation of a stretched, charged dielectric elastomer is relaxed; like-charges are compressed together and opposite-charges are pushed apart, resulting in an increased voltage. This technology provides an opportunity to produce soft, high energy density generators with unparalleled robustness. Two major issues block this goal: current configurations require rigid frames that maintain the dielectric elastomer in a prestretched state, and high energy densities have come at the expense of short lifetime. This paper presents a self-supporting stacked generator configuration which does not require rigid frames. The generator consists of 48 generator films stacked on top of each other, resulting in a structure that fits within an 11 mm diameter footprint while containing enough active material to produce useful power. To ensure sustainable power production, we also present a mathematical model for designing the electronic control of the generator which optimizes energy production while limiting the electrical stress on the generator below failure limits. When cyclically compressed at 1.6 Hz, our generator produced 1.8 mW of power, which is sufficient for many low-power wireless sensor nodes. This performance compares favorably with similarly scaled electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and electrostatic generators. The generator’s small form factor and ability to harvest useful energy from low frequency motions such as tree swaying or shoe impact provides an opportunity to deliver power to remote wireless sensor nodes or to distributed points in the human body

  9. Dielectric Monitoring of Curing Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Semmel, Marie L.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes preliminary attempts at dielectric monitoring of curing of graphite/epoxy and carbon/phenolic composites. Objective is to develop dielectric monitoring for optimizing curing process and reduce incidence of failures of produced composite structures.

  10. Thermally switchable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

    2013-04-30

    Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

  11. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  12. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  13. Rupture force of adsorbed self-assembled surfactant layers. Effect of the dielectric exchange force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2001-08-01

    The tip applied force necessary to obtain tip/substrate contact, i.e., rupture force between adsorbed layers of self-assembled surfactant films and atomic force microscope (AFM) tips in water has been measured. A substantial contribution of this rupture force is due to the dielectric exchange force (DEF). The DEF model is in agreement with the observation that the surfactant layer rupture forces are smaller in the thickest layers, where the compactness of the adsorbed film results in the smallest values of the dielectric permittivity. Within experimental accuracy a dielectric permittivity value of ˜4 for bilayers and of ˜36 for monolayers is found.

  14. Dielectric spectroscopy of monatomic alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baida, A. A.; Rudakov, A. V.; Agaev, S. G.

    2013-04-01

    The frequency dependences of permittivity ɛ( f) and dielectric loss tanδ( f) of monatomic alcohols are measured in range of frequencies f from 0.025 to 1000 kHz. Dielectric relaxation is observed in the investigated frequency range. Empirical correlation equations describing the relationships between the dielectric characteristics and physicochemical properties of monatomic alcohols are obtained.

  15. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  16. Compact turbidity meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  17. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, L.D.

    1996-12-10

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. 5 figs.

  18. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made.

  19. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, T. J.

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  20. Dielectric elastomer memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas G.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio P.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2011-04-01

    Life shows us that the distribution of intelligence throughout flexible muscular networks is a highly successful solution to a wide range of challenges, for example: human hearts, octopi, or even starfish. Recreating this success in engineered systems requires soft actuator technologies with embedded sensing and intelligence. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator(s) (DEA) are promising due to their large stresses and strains, as well as quiet flexible multimodal operation. Recently dielectric elastomer devices were presented with built in sensor, driver, and logic capability enabled by a new concept called the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES). DES use electrode piezoresistivity to control the charge on DEA and enable the distribution of intelligence throughout a DEA device. In this paper we advance the capabilities of DES further to form volatile memory elements. A set reset flip-flop with inverted reset line was developed based on DES and DEA. With a 3200V supply the flip-flop behaved appropriately and demonstrated the creation of dielectric elastomer memory capable of changing state in response to 1 second long set and reset pulses. This memory opens up applications such as oscillator, de-bounce, timing, and sequential logic circuits; all of which could be distributed throughout biomimetic actuator arrays. Future work will include miniaturisation to improve response speed, implementation into more complex circuits, and investigation of longer lasting and more sensitive switching materials.

  1. ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Carazo, V; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Guse, S; Harris, J R; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Paul, A C; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Schmidt, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sitaraman, S; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2009-06-11

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve {approx}10 MV/m gradients for 10s of nanoseconds pulses and to {approx}100 MV/m gradients for {approx}1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We detail the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  2. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  3. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  4. Temperature switchable polymer dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ross Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Materials with switchable states are desirable in many areas of science and technology. The ability to thermally transform a dielectric material to a conductive state should allow for the creation of electronics with built-in safety features. Specifically, the non-desirable build-up and discharge of electricity in the event of a fire or over-heating would be averted by utilizing thermo-switchable dielectrics in the capacitors of electrical devices (preventing the capacitors from charging at elevated temperatures). We have designed a series of polymers that effectively switch from a non-conductive to a conductive state. The thermal transition is governed by the stability of the leaving group after it leaves as a free entity. Here, we present the synthesis and characterization of a series of precursor polymers that eliminate to form poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV's).

  5. Temperature switchable polymer dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Kholwadwala, Fenil Manish; Johnson, Ross Stefan; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2010-06-01

    Materials with switchable states are desirable in many areas of science and technology. The ability to thermally transform a dielectric material to a conductive state should allow for the creation of electronics with built-in safety features. Specifically, the non-desirable build-up and discharge of electricity in the event of a fire or over-heating would be averted by utilizing thermo-switchable dielectrics in the capacitors of electrical devices (preventing the capacitors from charging at elevated temperatures). We have designed a series of polymers that effectively switch from a non-conductive to a conductive state. The thermal transition is governed by the stability of the leaving group after it leaves as a free entity. Here, we present the synthesis and characterization of a series of precursor polymers that eliminate to form poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV's).

  6. Compact and stable multibeam fiber injector

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. F., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    A compact and stable 20-beam injector was built for launching laser light into fibers for Fabry Perot velocity measurements of shock-driven surfaces. The fiber injector uses commercial mounts on mini-rails. Dielectric-coated beamsplitters provide accurate amplitude division. Minimal adjustments for stable operation are permitted by the use of a real-time video-viewer. The video system includes a non-linear camera for CW alignment and a linearized camera with a frame grabber for pulsed measurement and analysis. All 20-injection points are displayed on a single monitor. Optical requirements are given for image relay and magnification. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations on high-power are quantified.

  7. All-dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces.

  8. All-dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces.

  9. All-dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces. PMID:26740041

  10. Low-k Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    As CMOS transistors were scaled, interconnects to link them are also shrunk to reduce the line pitches [1-10]. As shown in Fig. 22.1, the interconnect pitches have been shrunk from 180 nm, 140 nm, and 100 nm for 65 [4], 45 [32], and 32 nm nodes [10] LSIs, respectively. To eliminate the interconnect parasitic capacitance, low-k dielectric films which have lower permittivity than the conventional silica (SiO2) dielectrics have been introduced. Figure 22.2 shows the technology trend of the k-value and the deposition process, in which the low-k films are deposited by spin-on-dielectric (SOD) method or plasma-enhanced CVD. In the case of SOD, precursor solution is poured on a rotated wafer, and the precursor film is heated to vaporize the solvent followed by reaction and densification to make a low-k film. In the case of PECVD [36, 42], on the other hand, precursor solution is vaporized with inert carrier gas such as He, and the precursor gas is introduced into PECVD chamber with RF power. The vaporized precursor gas is exited from plasma, depositing a low-k film on a wafer heated in high vacuum. The SOD method is advantageous to decrease the k-value, while PECVD method is superior in the adhesion strength due to the possibility of in-suite plasma surface treatment in vacuum just before the low-k deposition.

  11. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  12. New silicone dielectric elastomers with a high dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Liwu; Fan, Jiumin; Yu, Kai; Liu, Yanju; Shi, Liang; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers (Des) are a type of EAPs with unique electrical properties and mechanical properties: high actuation strains and stresses, fast response times, high efficiency, stability, reliability and durability. The excellent figures of merit possessed by dielectric elastomers make them the most performing materials which can be applied in many domains: biomimetics, aerospace, mechanics, medicals, etc. In this paper, we present a kind of electroactive polymer composites based on silicone Dielectric elastomers with a high dielectric constant. Novel high DEs could be realized by means of a composite approach. By filling an ordinary elastomer (e.g. silicone) with a component of functional ceramic filler having a greater dielectric permittivity, it is possible to obtain a resulting composite showing the fruitful combination of the matrix's advantageous elasticity and the filler's high permittivity. Here we add the ferroelectric relaxor ceramics (mainly BaTiO3) which has high dielectric constant (>3000) to the conventional silicone Dielectric elastomers, to get the dielectric elastomer which can exhibit high elastic energy densities induced by an electric field of about 15 MV/m. Tests of the physical and chemical properties of the dielectric elastomers are conducted, which verify our supposes and offer the experimental data supporting further researches.

  13. Investigation of HMA compactability using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    . Actually, the prediction is not regulated by any standards or specifications, although the practice is considered to be workable. In view of the above, an extensive experiment was carried out in both the laboratory and the field based on a trial asphalt pavement section under construction. In the laboratory, the study focused on the estimation of the density of HMA specimens achieved through three different roller compaction modes (static, vibratory and a combination of both) targeted to simulate field compaction and assess the asphalt mix compactability. In the field, the different compaction modes were successively implemented on three subsections of the trial pavement section. Along each subsection, GPR data was collected in order to determine the new material's dielectric properties and based on that, to predict its density using proper algorithm. Thus, cores were extracted to be used as ground truth data. The comparison of the new asphalt material compactability as obtained from the laboratory specimens, the predictions based on GPR data and the field cores provided useful information that facilitated the selection of the most effective compaction mode yielding the proper compaction degree in the field. This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar."

  14. Status of a Miniature W-Band Dielectric Traveling-Wave Tube Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, Jose; Schwarz, Willi; Duong, Christine; Ceperley, Peter

    2006-10-01

    We will report on the status of the development of a compact W-band dielectric traveling-wave tube (DTWT) amplifier. The DTWT amplifier is based on the interaction between a magnetized electron beam and the fields of a traveling wave inside a very compact dielectric waveguide. A high permittivity dielectric waveguide is used to slow down the wave and replaces helix structures used in conventional traveling-wave tubes. A novel approach in this development is the use of micromachining techniques for the fabrication of the various components of this amplifier. We will present results of RF and beam transport experiments along the W-band DTWT circuit. The DTWT should be capable of producing millimeter-wave radiation for future military battlespace applications.

  15. Compact Nonlinear Yagi-Uda Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y. Z.; Jiang, Li Jun; Sha, Wei E. I.; Lo, Yat Hei; Chew, Weng Cho

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas have demonstrated unprecedented capabilities for manipulating the intensity and direction of light emission over a broad frequency range. The directional beam steering offered by nanoantennas has important applications in areas including microscopy, spectroscopy, quantum computing, and on-chip optical communication. Although both the physical principles and experimental realizations of directional linear nanoantennas has become increasingly mature, angular control of nonlinear radiation using nanoantennas has not been explored yet. Here we propose a novel concept of nonlinear Yagi-Uda nanoantenna to direct second harmonic radiation from a metallic nanosphere. By carefully tuning the spacing and dimensions of two lossless dielectric elements, which function respectively as a compact director and reflector, the second harmonic radiation is deflected 90 degrees with reference to the incident light (pump) direction. This abnormal light-bending phenomenon is due to the constructive and destructive interference between the second harmonic radiation governed by a special selection rule and the induced electric dipolar and magnetic quadrupolar radiation from the two dielectric antenna elements. Simultaneous spectral and spatial isolation of scattered second harmonic waves from incident fundamental waves pave a new way towards nonlinear signal detection and sensing.

  16. Compact Nonlinear Yagi-Uda Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y Z; Jiang, Li Jun; Sha, Wei E I; Lo, Yat Hei; Chew, Weng Cho

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas have demonstrated unprecedented capabilities for manipulating the intensity and direction of light emission over a broad frequency range. The directional beam steering offered by nanoantennas has important applications in areas including microscopy, spectroscopy, quantum computing, and on-chip optical communication. Although both the physical principles and experimental realizations of directional linear nanoantennas has become increasingly mature, angular control of nonlinear radiation using nanoantennas has not been explored yet. Here we propose a novel concept of nonlinear Yagi-Uda nanoantenna to direct second harmonic radiation from a metallic nanosphere. By carefully tuning the spacing and dimensions of two lossless dielectric elements, which function respectively as a compact director and reflector, the second harmonic radiation is deflected 90 degrees with reference to the incident light (pump) direction. This abnormal light-bending phenomenon is due to the constructive and destructive interference between the second harmonic radiation governed by a special selection rule and the induced electric dipolar and magnetic quadrupolar radiation from the two dielectric antenna elements. Simultaneous spectral and spatial isolation of scattered second harmonic waves from incident fundamental waves pave a new way towards nonlinear signal detection and sensing. PMID:26738692

  17. Compact Nonlinear Yagi-Uda Nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y. Z.; Jiang, Li Jun; Sha, Wei E. I.; Lo, Yat Hei; Chew, Weng Cho

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas have demonstrated unprecedented capabilities for manipulating the intensity and direction of light emission over a broad frequency range. The directional beam steering offered by nanoantennas has important applications in areas including microscopy, spectroscopy, quantum computing, and on-chip optical communication. Although both the physical principles and experimental realizations of directional linear nanoantennas has become increasingly mature, angular control of nonlinear radiation using nanoantennas has not been explored yet. Here we propose a novel concept of nonlinear Yagi-Uda nanoantenna to direct second harmonic radiation from a metallic nanosphere. By carefully tuning the spacing and dimensions of two lossless dielectric elements, which function respectively as a compact director and reflector, the second harmonic radiation is deflected 90 degrees with reference to the incident light (pump) direction. This abnormal light-bending phenomenon is due to the constructive and destructive interference between the second harmonic radiation governed by a special selection rule and the induced electric dipolar and magnetic quadrupolar radiation from the two dielectric antenna elements. Simultaneous spectral and spatial isolation of scattered second harmonic waves from incident fundamental waves pave a new way towards nonlinear signal detection and sensing. PMID:26738692

  18. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  19. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  20. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  1. Compact ultradense matter impactors.

    PubMed

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Birrell, Jeremiah

    2013-03-15

    We study interactions of meteorlike compact ultradense objects (CUDO), having nuclear or greater density, with Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System as a possible source of information about novel forms of matter. We study the energy loss in CUDO puncture of the body and discuss differences between regular matter and CUDO impacts.

  2. Square dielectric THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Aflakian, N; Yang, N; LaFave, T; Henderson, R M; O, K K; MacFarlane, D L

    2016-06-27

    A holey cladding dielectric waveguide with square cross section is designed, simulated, fabricated and characterized. The TOPAS waveguide is designed to be single mode across the broad frequency range of 180 GHz to 360 GHz as shown by finite-difference time domain simulation and to robustly support simultaneous TE and TM mode propagation. The square fiber geometry is realized by pulling through a heat distribution made square by appropriate furnace design. The transmitted mode profile is imaged using a vector network analyzer with a pinhole at the receiver module. Good agreement between the measured mode distribution and the calculated mode distribution is demonstrated. PMID:27410645

  3. Low Dielectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Patrick E.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through our current research effort entitled 'Low Dielectric Polymers'. Results are reported in four areas: (1) Development of an alkyne containing a crosslinking agent for 12F-PEK and its analogues; (2) Preparation and evaluation of new silicon- and/or fluorine-containing polymers for low temperature applications; (3) Polymers derived from a new highly fluorinated monomer; and (4) Continued evaluation of the scale-up of the preparation of 6FC11- and 6FC17-PEKs.

  4. Low Dielectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venumbaka, Sreenivasulu R.; Cassidy, Patrick E.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained from research funded through Research Cooperative Agreement No. NCC-1-01033-"Low Dielectric Polymers" (from 5/10/01 through 5/09/02). Results are reported in three of the proposed research areas (Tasks 1-3 in the original proposal): (1) Repeat and confirm the preparation and properties of the new alkyl-substituted PEK, 6HC17-PEK, (2) Prepare and evaluate polymers derived from a highly fluorinated monomer, and (3) Prepare and evaluate new silicon and/or fluorine-containing polymers expected to retain useful properties at low temperature.

  5. Dielectric Properties Of Nanoferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Jankov, Stevan B.; Cvejic, Zeljka N.; Rakic, Srdjan; Srdic, Vladimir

    2007-04-23

    Dielectric properties: permittivity, loss factor, tan delta and ionic conductivity of nanostructured ferrites have been measured. Samples used were nickel, zinc and yttrium doped ferrites mixed in various ratios. The synthesis has been performed using precipitation method and obtained powders were pressed in pellets under varying pressure. X-ray diffractography approach for the refinement of structure and microstructural analysis has been performed. All parameters have been measured in 1 Hz to 100 kHz frequency range and 30 deg. C to 80 deg. C temperature range. Significant improvements in permittivity, loss factor and ionic conductivity comparing to bulk samples have been observed.

  6. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  7. Ultrawideband temperature-dependent dielectric properties of animal liver tissue in the microwave frequency range.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Converse, Mark C; Booske, John H; Hagness, Susan C

    2006-04-01

    The development of ultrawideband (UWB) microwave diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, such as UWB microwave breast cancer detection and hyperthermia treatment, is facilitated by accurate knowledge of the temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of biological tissues. To this end, we characterize the temperature-dependent dielectric properties of a representative tissue type-animal liver-from 0.5 to 20 GHz. Since discrete-frequency linear temperature coefficients are impractical and inappropriate for applications spanning wide frequency and temperature ranges, we propose a novel and compact data representation technique. A single-pole Cole-Cole model is used to fit the dielectric properties data as a function of frequency, and a second-order polynomial is used to fit the Cole-Cole parameters as a function of temperature. This approach permits rapid estimation of tissue dielectric properties at any temperature and frequency.

  8. Experimental study of soil compaction effects on GPR signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Hu, Zhenqi; Zhao, Yanling; Li, Xinju

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical operations may lead to soil compaction hazard in land consolidation projects. Aiming to quantitatively guarantee soil compaction status with ground penetrating radar (GPR), we should clearly understand the relationship between bulk density/penetration resistance (PR) and GPR signals. This research adopted GPR with a central frequency of 500 MHz and the experimental design with laboratory test and outdoor test. Because soil dielectric constant receives combination influence of soil properties, statistical methods were used to analyze the influence of soil bulk density on electromagnetic wave velocity. Significant correlation exists between electromagnetic wave velocity and bulk density, with a partial correlation coefficient of 0.882 and two-tailed significance of 0.020. While soil dielectric constant strongly depends on soil water content, the growing of soil bulk density usually reduces free water content, increases bound water content and finally influences GPR signals. The results also showed that high soil PR value accompanied with low amplitude values of electromagnetic wave and fast decay rate of the amplitude back to noise level. More experimental data would be acquired for accurate quantification between soil compaction and GPR signals with statistic methods in the future research.

  9. Compact Two-Liquid Microfluidic Hyperelastic Capacitive Strain Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanliangzi; Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Applications of liquid metal microfluidic devices include flexible electronics, biomedical devices, and soft robotics. In addition to single channel resistive strain sensors, two channel capacitive sensors have also been developed. However, these capacitive strain sensors have low capacitance with a footprint of about a square centimeter, making strain-output correlation quite complex. To address this issue, we developed a compact two liquid single straight channel capacitive strain sensor with a dielectric liquid sandwiched between two liquid metal electrodes. Formation of the capacitor with a liquid dielectric instead of PDMS enables capacitance increase through selection of high permittivity liquid. Using a custom experimental setup, we show that use of water and glycerol instead of silicone oil in-between the liquid metal electrodes can increase the device capacitance by fivefold. We discuss the effect of channel diameter, dielectric spacing, interfacial meniscus shape, and the liquid flow on device capacitance as well as response to strain. In addition, we discuss the effect of gallium oxide shell formation at the dielectric-liquid metal interface. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  10. Voltage sensor and dielectric material

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2006-10-17

    A voltage sensor is described that consists of an arrangement of impedance elements. The sensor is optimized to provide an output ratio that is substantially immune to changes in voltage, temperature variations or aging. Also disclosed is a material with a large and stable dielectric constant. The dielectric constant can be tailored to vary with position or direction in the material.

  11. Microwave Propagation in Dielectric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment designed to verify quantitatively the effect of a dielectric fluid's dielectric constant on the observed wavelength of microwave radiation propagating through the fluid. The fluid used is castor oil, and results agree with the expected behavior within 5 percent. (Author/CS)

  12. Ferroelectric-dielectric tunable composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Vladimir O.; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava; Iddles, David; Price, Tim

    2006-04-01

    The dielectric response of ferroelectric-dielectric composites is theoretically addressed. Dielectric permittivity, tunability (relative change of the permittivity driven by dc electric field), and loss tangent are evaluated for various composite models. The analytical results for small dielectric concentration and relative tunability are obtained in terms of the traditional electrostatic consideration. The results for large tunability are obtained numerically. A method is proposed for the evaluation of the tunability and loss at large concentrations of the dielectric. The basic idea of the method is to reformulate the effective medium approach in terms of electrical energies stored and dissipated in the composite. The important practical conclusion of the paper is that, for random ferroelectric-dielectric composite, the addition of small amounts of a linear dielectric into the tunable ferroelectric results in an increase of the tunability of the mixture. The loss tangent of such composites is shown to be virtually unaffected by the addition of moderate amounts of the low-loss dielectric. The experimental data for (Ba,Sr)TiO3 based composites are analyzed in terms of the theory developed and shown to be in a reasonable agreement with the theoretical results.

  13. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  14. Compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R/sub 0/ = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R/sub 0/ approx. = 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  16. Super-Compact Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc. produced the portable Farfield-2 laser for field applications that require high power pulsed illumination. The compact design was conceived through research at Goddard Space Flight Center on laser instruments for space missions to carry out geoscience studies of Earth. An exclusive license to the key NASA patent for the compact laser design was assigned to Microcosm. The FarField-2 is ideal for field applications, has low power consumption, does not need water cooling or gas supplies, and produces nearly ideal beam quality. The properties of the laser also make it effective over long distances, which is one reason why NASA developed the technology for laser altimeters that can be toted aboard spacecraft. Applications for the FarField-2 include medicine, biology, and materials science and processing, as well as diamond marking, semiconductor line-cutting, chromosome surgery, and fluorescence microscopy.

  17. Low dielectric polyimide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature resistant polyimide fiber that has a dielectric constant of less than 3 is presented. The fiber was prepared by first reacting 2,2-bis (4-(4aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane with 2,2-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride in an aprotic solvent to form a polyamic acid resin solution. The polyamic acid resin solution is then extruded into a coagulation medium to form polyamic acid fibers. The fibers are thermally cured to their polyimide form. Alternatively, 2,2-bis(4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane is reacted with 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride to form a polyamic acid, and the polyamic acid is chemically converted to its polyimide form. The polyimide is then dissolved in a solvent to form a polyimide resin solution, and the polyimide resin is extruded into a coagulation medium to form a polyimide wet gel filament. In order to obtain polyimide fibers of increased tensile properties, the polyimide wet gel filaments are stretched at elevated temperatures. The tensile properties of the fibers were measured and found to be in the range of standard textile fibers. Polyimide fibers obtained by either method will have a dielectric constant similar to that of the corresponding polymer, viz., less than 3 at 10 GHz.

  18. Plasmonics without negative dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic phenomena are exhibited in light-matter interaction involving materials whose real parts of permittivity functions attain negative values at operating wavelengths. However, such materials usually suffer from dissipative losses, thus limiting the performance of plasmon-based optical devices. Here, we utilize an alternative methodology that mimics a variety of plasmonic phenomena by exploiting the well-known structural dispersion of electromagnetic modes in bounded guided-wave structures filled with only materials with positive permittivity. A key issue in the design of such structures is prevention of mode coupling, which can be achieved by implementing thin metallic wires at proper interfaces. This method, which is more suitable for lower frequencies, allows designers to employ conventional dielectrics and highly conductive metals for which the loss is low at these frequencies, while achieving plasmonic features. We demonstrate, numerically and analytically, that this platform can provide surface plasmon polaritons, local plasmonic resonance, plasmonic cloaking, and epsilon-near-zero-based tunneling using conventional positive-dielectric materials.

  19. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  20. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    Dielectric polymers are widely used in a plurality of applications, such as electrical insulation, dielectric capacitors, and electromechanical actuators. Dielectric polymers with large strain deformations under an electric field are named dielectric elastomers (DE), because of their relative low modulus, high elongation at break, and outstanding resilience. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are superior to traditional transducers as a muscle-like technology: large strains, high energy densities, high coupling efficiency, quiet operation, and light weight. One focus of this dissertation is on the design of DE materials with high performance and easy processing. UV radiation curing of reactive species is studied as a generic synthesis methodology to provide a platform for material scientists to customize their own DE materials. Oligomers/monomers, crosslinkers, and other additives are mixed and cured at appropriate ratios to control the stress-strain response, suppress electromechanical instability of the resulting polymers, and provide stable actuation strains larger than 100% and energy densities higher than 1 J/g. The processing is largely simplified in the new material system by removal of the prestretching step. Multilayer stack actuators with 11% linear strain are demonstrated in a procedure fully compatible with industrial production. A multifunctional DE derivative material, bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP), is invented enabling repeatable rigid-to-rigid deformation without bulky external structures. Bistable actuation allows the polymer actuator to have two distinct states that can support external load without device failure. Plasticizers are used to lower the glass transition temperature to 45 °C. Interpenetrating polymer network structure is established inside the BSEP to suppress electromechanical instability, providing a breakdown field of 194 MV/m and a stable bistable strain as large as 228% with a 97% strain fixity. The application of BSEP

  1. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  2. Compact tunable sub-terahertz oscillators based on Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fengbin; Müller, Franz; Scheller, Thomas; Semenov, Alexei; He, Ming; Fang, Lan; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Klushin, Alexander M.

    2011-04-01

    Essential applications of terahertz technology are urgently in need of compact, tunable solid-state continuous wave radiation sources. However, no satisfactory solution is yet available for the frequency range of up to approximately 1.0 THz. Here, we present coherent radiation from large series arrays of Josephson junctions between 0.1 and 0.25 THz with off-chip radiation power of 7 μW. Niobium junctions oscillate at 4.2 K and the detection has been done at room temperature. The well-known obstacle to impedance matching is overcome by utilizing the excited resonances in the junction substrates serving as dielectric resonator antennae.

  3. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  4. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  5. Maxwell stress on a small dielectric sphere in a dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsyuk, Vitaly V.; Pavlyniuk, Oleg R.

    2015-02-01

    Electrically induced normal pressure and tangential stress at the surface of a small dielectric sphere (or cavity) in a dielectric are calculated using the Minkowski, Einstein-Laub, Abraham, and Lorentz forms of the Maxwell stress tensor. Only the Lorentz tensor is in agreement with the following observations: (1) A spherical cavity in a dielectric transforms into a sharp-edge plate perpendicular to the electric field; (2) a liquid drop placed in a medium with a slightly lower refractive index is stretched along the electric field; and (3) there is a torque on a small birefringent sphere. These phenomena cannot be explained by the conventional theory using the Minkowski stress tensor. For example, the Minkowski stress tensor predicts lateral compression of a spherical cavity in a dielectric.

  6. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  7. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  8. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  9. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  10. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  11. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  12. A compact SADM family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  13. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  14. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  15. Electrolytes near structured dielectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanxin; Jing, Yufei; Solis, Francisco; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Luijten, Erik

    2015-03-01

    The ion distribution in an electrolyte near a dielectric interface has important consequences for numerous applications. To date, most studies have focused on planar interfaces, where, e.g., simulations can take advantage of the image-charge method. However, for surfaces that display structure on the nanoscale, dielectric effects may be significantly different. Here, we investigate such interfaces via a combination of computer simulations and Poisson-Boltzmann theory. We demonstrate how, even for systems with piecewise uniform dielectric constant, surface structure affects the induced polarization charge as well as the ion distribution near the interface, in particular for asymmetric salts. We explore the role of ion concentration, dielectric mismatch and characteristic length scale of the surface structure.

  16. Infrared cubic dielectric resonator metamaterial.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal; Peters, David William; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2010-06-01

    Dielectric resonators are an effective means to realize isotropic, low-loss optical metamaterials. As proof of this concept, a cubic resonator is analytically designed and then tested in the long-wave infrared.

  17. Thermo-switchable polymer dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Kholwadwala, Fenil Manish; Johnson, Ross Stefan; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2010-11-01

    We are interested in utilizing the thermo-switchable properties of precursor poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) polymers to develop capacitor dielectrics that will fail at specific temperatures due to the material irreversibly switching from an insulator to a conducting polymer. By utilizing different leaving groups on the polymer main chain, the temperature at which the polymer transforms into a conductor can be varied over a range of temperatures. Electrical characterization of thin-film capacitors prepared from several precursor PPV polymers indicates that these materials have good dielectric properties until they reach elevated temperatures, at which point conjugation of the polymer backbone effectively disables the device. Here, we present the synthesis, dielectric processing, and electrical characterization of a new thermo-switchable polymer dielectric.

  18. Ultra-compact Marx-type high-voltage generator

    DOEpatents

    Goerz, David A.; Wilson, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    An ultra-compact Marx-type high-voltage generator includes individual high-performance components that are closely coupled and integrated into an extremely compact assembly. In one embodiment, a repetitively-switched, ultra-compact Marx generator includes low-profile, annular-shaped, high-voltage, ceramic capacitors with contoured edges and coplanar extended electrodes used for primary energy storage; low-profile, low-inductance, high-voltage, pressurized gas switches with compact gas envelopes suitably designed to be integrated with the annular capacitors; feed-forward, high-voltage, ceramic capacitors attached across successive switch-capacitor-switch stages to couple the necessary energy forward to sufficiently overvoltage the spark gap of the next in-line switch; optimally shaped electrodes and insulator surfaces to reduce electric field stresses in the weakest regions where dissimilar materials meet, and to spread the fields more evenly throughout the dielectric materials, allowing them to operate closer to their intrinsic breakdown levels; and uses manufacturing and assembly methods to integrate the capacitors and switches into stages that can be arranged into a low-profile Marx generator.

  19. Interconnect Between a Waveguide and a Dielectric Waveguide Comprising an Impedance Matched Dielectric Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrossas, Emmanuel (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Chahat, Nacer (Inventor); Tang, Adrian J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A lens for interconnecting a metallic waveguide with a dielectric waveguide is provided. The lens may be coupled a metallic waveguide and a dielectric waveguide, and minimize a signal loss between the metallic waveguide and the dielectric waveguide.

  20. Dielectric properties of marsh vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetkova, Tatiana D.; Suslyaev, Valentin I.; Shcheglova, Anna S.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is devoted to the measurement of the dielectric properties of mosses and lichens in the frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz. Subjects of this research were three species of march vegetation - moss (Dicranum polysetum Michx), groundcedar (Diphasiastrum complanatum (L.) Holub) and lichen (Cladonia stellaris). Samples of vegetation were collected in Tomsk region, Western Siberia, Russia. Complex dielectric permittivity was measured in coaxial section by Agilent Technologies vector network analyzer E8363B. Green samples was measured for some moisture contents from 100% to 3-5 % during a natural drying. The measurements were performed at room temperature, which remained within 21 ÷ 23 ° C. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant for the three species of marsh vegetation differ markedly. Different parts of the complex permittivity dependency on moisture were fitted by line for all frequency points. Two break point were observed corresponding to the transition of water in the vegetation in various phase states. The complex permittivity spectra of water in the vegetation allow determining the most likely corresponding dielectric model of water in the vegetation by the method of hypothesis testing. It is the Debye's model. Parameters of Debye's model were obtained by numerical methods for all of three states of water. This enables to calculate the dielectric constant of water at any frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz and to find the parameters of the dielectric model of the vegetation.

  1. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  2. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  5. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  6. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  7. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bočarov, Viktor; Čermák, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  10. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  11. Compact reactor design automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassersharif, Bahram; Gaeta, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual compact reactor design automation experiment was performed using the real-time expert system G2. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the utility of an expert system in design; in particular, reactor design. The experiment consisted of the automation and integration of two design phases: reactor neutronic design and fuel pin design. The utility of this approach is shown using simple examples of formulating rules to ensure design parameter consistency between the two design phases. The ability of G2 to communicate with external programs even across networks provides the system with the capability of supplementing the knowledge processing features with conventional canned programs with possible applications for realistic iterative design tools.

  12. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  13. Dielectric and permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Using the unabridged Maxwell equations (including vectors D, E and H) new effects in collisionless plasmas are uncovered. In a steady state, it is found that spatially varying energy density of the electric field (E perpendicular) orthogonal to B produces electric current leading, under certain conditions, to the relationship P perpendicular+B(2)/8 pi-epsilon E perpendicular(2)/8 pi = constant, where epsilon is the dielectric constant of the plasma for fields orthogonal to B. In steady state quasi-two-dimensional flows in plasmas, a general relationship between the components of electric field parallel and perpendicular to B is found. These effects are significant in goephysical and astrophysical plasmas. The general conditions for a steady state in collisionless plasma are deduced. With time variations in a plasma, slow compared to ion-gyroperiod, there is a general current, (j*), which includes the well-known polarisation current, given by J*=d/dt (ExM)+(PxB)xB B(-2) where M and P are the magnetization and polarization vectors respectively.

  14. Metal-dielectric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Metal direlectric surface interactions and dielectric films on metal substrates were investigated. Since interfacial interaction depends so heavily on the nature of the surfaces, analytical surface tools such as Auger emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field ion microscopy were used to assist in surface and interfacial characterization. The results indicate that with metals contacting certain glasses in the clean state interfacial, bonding produces fractures in the glasses while when a film such as water is present, fractures occur in the metal near the interface. Friction forces were used to measure the interfacial bond strengths. Studies with metals contacting polymers using field ion microscopy revealed that strong bonding forces could develop being between a metal and polymer surface with polymer transferring to the metal surface in various ways depending upon the forces applied to the surface in contact. With the deposition of refractory carbides, silicides and borides onto metal and alloy substrates the presence of oxides at the interface or active gases in the deposition plasma were shown to alter interfacial properties and chemistry. Auger ion depth profile analysis indicated the chemical composition at the interface and this could be related to the mechanical, friction, and wear behavior of the coating.

  15. Dielectric optical invisibility cloaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J.; Tamma, V. A.; Park, W.; Summers, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, metamaterial cloaks for the microwave frequency range have been designed using transformative optics design techniques and experimentally demonstrated. The design of these structures requires extreme values of permittivity and permeability within the device, which has been accomplished by the use of resonating metal elements. However, these elements severely limit the operating frequency range of the cloak due to their non-ideal dispersion properties at optical frequencies. In this paper we present designs to implement a simpler demonstration of cloaking, the carpet cloak, in which a curved reflective surface is compressed into a flat reflective surface, effectively shielding objects behind the curve from view with respect to the incoming radiation source. This approach eliminates the need for metallic resonant elements. These structures can now be fabricated using only high index dielectric materials by the use of electron beam lithography and standard cleanroom technologies. The design method, simulation analysis, device fabrication, and near field optical microscopy (NSOM) characterization results are presented for devices designed to operate in the 1400-1600nm wavelength range. Improvements to device performance by the deposition/infiltration of linear, and potentially non-linear optical materials, were investigated.

  16. Coupled dipole plasmonics of nanoantennas in discontinuous, complex dielectric environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forcherio, Gregory T.; Blake, Phillip; Seeram, Manoj; DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional metamaterials support both plasmonic and coupled lattice (Fano) resonant modes that together could enhance optoelectronics. Descriptions for plasmon excitation in Fano resonant lattices in non-vacuum environments typically use idealized, homogeneous matrices due to computational expense and limitations of common approaches. This work described both localized and coupled resonance activity of two-dimensional, square lattices of gold (Au) nanospheres (NS) in discontinuous, complex dielectric media using compact synthesis of discrete and coupled dipole approximations. This multi-scale approach supported attribution of experimentally observed spectral resonance energy and bandwidth to interactions between metal and dielectric substrate(s) supporting the lattices. Effective polarizabilities of single AuNS, either in vacuo or supported by glass and/or indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, were obtained with discrete dipole approximation (DDA). This showed plasmon energy transport varied with type of substrate: glass increased scattering, while ITO increased absorption and energy confinement. Far-field lattice interactions between AuNS with/without substrates were computed by coupled dipole approximation (CDA) using effective polarizabilities. This showed glass enhanced diffractive features (e.g., coupled lattice resonance), while ITO supported plasmon modes. This compact, multiscale approach to describe metasurfaces in complex environments could accelerate their development and application.

  17. Resonance breakdown of dielectric resonator antennas on ground plane at visible frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Zou, Longfang; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) are promising elements for constructing the next generation of efficient and compact optical devices. Their efficient light manipulation capability underpinned by electric and magnetic resonances at visible frequencies is appealing for optical metasurfaces with various functions such as anomalous re ection, polarization conversion and surface plasmon coupling. To realize these functions, the resonance properties of the individual DRA elements are of critical importance. In this paper, we study the resonance breakdown of nanoscale cylindrical DRAs on metallic substrates. By gradually increasing the relative permittivity of DRAs on a metallic ground plane from low to high values, we observe two types of resonance breakdown and on that basis we can define a permittivity range for efficient resonance. More specifically, the resonance breakdown occuring at low DRA permittivities is a result of weak confinement and excessive radiation loss. The resonance breakdown at high DRA permittivities is a result of an elevated plasmonic loss at the metal- dielectric interface when the negative permittivity of the metal and the positive permittivity of the dielectric material have matched in their absolute values. The latter breakdown can be avoided by inserting a thin dielectric spacer with a low permittivity between the metal and dielectric. This study suggests important considerations for designing dielectric resonator metasurfaces at the visible frequencies.

  18. Compaction-based VLSI layout

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiao-Ming.

    1989-01-01

    Generally speaking, a compaction based VLSI layout system consists of two major parts: (1) a symbolic editor which maintains explicit connectivity and structural information about the circuit; (2) a compactor which translates the high level description of a circuit to the detailed layout needed for fabrication and tries to make as compact a layout as Possible without violating any design rules. Instead of developing a complete compaction based VLSI layout system, this thesis presents some theoretical concepts and several new compaction techniques, such as scan line based approach, which can either cooperate with a symbolic editor to form a layout system or work as a post-process step to improve the results obtained by an existing layout system. Also, some compaction related problems are solved and proposed. Based on the special property of channel routing, the author presents a geometric method for channel compaction. For a given channel routing topology, the minimum channel height is always achieved with the incorporation of sliding contacts and automatically inserting necessary jogs. The geometric compaction approach is then generalized and applied to compact the entire VLSI chip at the building-block level. With a systematic way of automatic jog insertion, he proves that under the given layout topology and design rules, the lower bound of one dimensional compaction with automatic jog insertion is achieved by the geometric compaction algorithm. A new simultaneous two-dimensional compaction algorithm is developed primarily for placement refinement of building-block layout. The algorithm is based on a set of defined graph operations on a mixed adjacency graph for a given placement. The mixed-adjacency graph can be updated efficiently if the placement is represented by tiles in the geometric domain.

  19. Methods and apparatus for vertical coupling from dielectric waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Yaacobi, Ami; Cordova, Brad Gilbert

    2014-06-17

    A frequency-chirped nano-antenna provides efficient sub-wavelength vertical emission from a dielectric waveguide. In one example, this nano-antenna includes a set of plasmonic dipoles on the opposite side of a SiYV.sub.4 waveguide from a ground plane. The resulting structure, which is less than half a wavelength long, emits a broadband beam (e.g., >300 nm) that can be coupled into an optical fiber. In some embodiments, a diffractive optical element with unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material collimates the broadband beam for higher coupling efficiency. In some cases, a negative lens element between the nano-antenna and the diffractive optical element accelerates the emitted beam's divergence (and improves coupling efficiency), allowing for more compact packaging. Like the diffractive optical element, the negative lens element includes unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material that can be designed to compensate for aberrations in the beam emitted by the nano-antenna.

  20. A comparison of different powder compaction processes adopted for synthesis of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, M. L. V.; Bhanu Prasad, V. V.; James, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Barium zirconium titanate, Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized using high energy ball milling. The calcined powders were compacted adopting two different approaches viz. the conventional uniaxial pressing and cold-isostatic pressing (CIP) and the compacts were sintered at 1350 °C. A single phase perovskite structure was observed in both cases. BZT ceramics compacted using CIP technique exhibited enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties compared to ceramics compacted by uniaxial pressing. The polarization current peaks have been used in this paper as an experimental evidence to prove the existence of ferroelectricity in the BZT ceramics under study. The peak polarization current was found to be ~700% higher in case of cold iso-statically compacted ceramics. Similarly electric field induces strain showed a maximum strain ( S max) of 0.08% at an electric field of 28 kV/cm. The dielectric and ferroelectric properties observed are comparable to single crystals of the same material.

  1. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  2. The Meaning of a Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  3. Alternate capacitor dielectric film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C.

    1990-08-01

    New high-temperature, high-energy density, and high-radiation tolerant capacitor applications require the evaluation of alternate dielectric materials. Evaluation work was performed at GE Neutron Devices (GEND) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque. US Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for capacitor function and environments are unique, and the representations included in this report do not constitute an endorsement of any material or manufacturer. This report presents data on polymeric dielectric films evaluated to support the design of new high-energy density capacitors. Materials which were evaluated include polycarbonate (two sources), polyphenylene sulfide, polyvinylidene fluoride, polyetherimide (three sources), polyimide (four sources), polyethersulfone, and polyetherether ketone. A polyester was evaluated as the control material since many prior designs utilized this dielectric. The film evaluations were based on dielectric constant and dissipation factor variation as a function of temperature ({minus}55{degree}C to 300{degree}C) as well as dielectric breakdown strength. Additionally, film/foil capacitors in a dry wrap-and-fill configuration were fabricated and tested to determine insulation resistance, breakdown voltage, and radiation hardness. Results are given for all evaluations. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Whispering gallery mode nanodisk resonator based on layered metal-dielectric waveguide.

    PubMed

    Lou, Fei; Yan, Min; Thylen, Lars; Qiu, Min; Wosinski, Lech

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes a layered metal-dielectric waveguide consisting of a stack of alternating metal and dielectric films which enables an ultracompact mode confinement. The properties of whispering gallery modes supported by disk resonators based on such waveguides are investigated for achieving a large Purcell factor. We show that by stacking three layers of 10 nm thick silver with two layers of 50 nm dielectric layers (of refractive index n) in sequence, the disk radius can be as small as 61 nm ∼λ(0)/(7n) and the mode volume is only 0.0175(λ(0)/(2n))(3). When operating at 40 K, the cavity's Q-factor can be ~670; Purcell factor can be as large as 2.3×10(4), which is more than five times larger than that achievable in a metal-dielectric-metal disk cavity in the same condition. When more dielectric layers with smaller thicknesses are used, even more compact confinement can be achieved. For example, the radius of a cavity consisting of seven dielectric-layer waveguide can be shrunk down to λ(0)/(13.5n), corresponding to a mode volume of 0.005λ(0)/(2n))(3), and Purcell factor can be enhanced to 7.3×10(4) at 40 K. The influence of parameters like thicknesses of dielectric and metal films, cavity size, and number of dielectric layers is also comprehensively studied. The proposed waveguide and nanodisk cavity provide an alternative for ultracompact light confinement, and can find applications where a strong light-matter interaction is necessary.

  5. Analysis of dielectric-filled waveguide coupling to plasmas in the ICRF

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.T.; Lee, J.L.; Scharer, J.; Vernon, R.J.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric-filled waveguides may be advantageous for heating reactor-grade tokamak plasmas, due to their compactness and power-handling capability. The authors present a theoretical analysis of coax excitation and plasma impedance for a dielectric-filled rectangular waveguide. The plasma reflection coefficient is obtained by matching plasma and waveguide fields at the interface. The numerical results show that the reflection coefficients can be made small by careful tailoring of the waveguide dimensions to the density profile for heating at the second or third harmonic of deuterium. They present a scattering matrix approach for the design of a coaxial feed to match the waveguide in the presence of a wide range of plasma loading. For a waveguide filled with a high permittivity dielectric, a shorted probe gives better coupling than an open-ended probe.

  6. Sensing Based on Fano-Type Resonance Response of All-Dielectric Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Semouchkina, Elena; Duan, Ran; Semouchkin, George; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    A new sensing approach utilizing Mie resonances in metamaterial arrays composed of dielectric resonators is proposed. These arrays were found to exhibit specific, extremely high-Q factor (up to 15,000) resonances at frequencies corresponding to the lower edge of the array second transmission band. The observed resonances possessed with features typical for Fano resonances (FRs), which were initially revealed in atomic processes and recently detected in macro-structures, where they resulted from interference between local resonances and a continuum of background waves. Our studies demonstrate that frequencies and strength of Fano-type resonances in all-dielectric arrays are defined by interaction between local Mie resonances and Fabry-Perot oscillations of Bloch eigenmodes that makes possible controlling the resonance responses by changing array arrangements. The opportunity for obtaining high-Q responses in compact arrays is investigated and promising designs for sensing the dielectric properties of analytes in the ambient are proposed. PMID:25905701

  7. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  9. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  10. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  11. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  12. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  13. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  14. USDA/ARS and dielectric properties research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of the research is presented, including RF dielectric heating for seed treatment, insect control, product conditioning, and moisture and quality sensing applications, equipment used, dielectric properties measurement techniques, broad- frequency- range data obtained, and research results...

  15. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  16. Dielectric Properties of Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Young, J. A.; Simpson, J. O.; Farmer, B. L.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular modeling and dielectric measurements are being used to identify mechanisms governing piezoelectric behavior in polyimides such as dipole orientation during poling, as well as degree of piezoelectricity achievable. Molecular modeling on polyimides containing pendant, polar nitrile (CN) groups has been completed to determine their remanent polarization. Experimental investigation of their dielectric properties evaluated as a function of temperature and frequency has substantiated numerical predictions. With this information in hand, we are then able to suggest changes in the molecular structures, which will then improve upon the piezoelectric response.

  17. Analysis of rib dielectric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagli, N.; Fonstad, C. G.

    1985-04-01

    It is noted in the present analysis of rib dielectric waveguides on the basis of a mode-matching technique that, when the constituent slab guides support only one guided mode, the cutoff condition for the higher-order modes is the same as the result yielded by the effective dielectric constant method. When the rib region is thick enough to support two guided slab modes, however, the cutoff conditions are significantly different. Universal design curves are obtained for this case, and the results obtained are compared with the Marcatili (1974) theory for such structures.

  18. Microwave dielectric properties of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Carrie M.; Subramanyam, Guru; Grote, James G.; Hopkins, F. Kenneth; Brott, Lawrence L.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2006-09-01

    A new capacitive test structure is used to characterize biopolymers at microwave frequencies. The new test structure is comprised of a parallel plate capacitor, combined with coplanar waveguide-based input and output feed lines. This allows microwave measurements to be taken easily under an applied DC electric field. The microwave dielectric properties are characterized for two biopolymer thin films: a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based film and a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based film. These bio-dielectric thin-films are compared with a standard commercial polymer thin film, poly[Bisphenol A carbonate-co-4,4'(3,3,5-trimethyl cyclohexylidene) diphenol], or amorphous polycarbonate (APC).

  19. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  20. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  1. Dielectric material degradation monitoring of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ronald E.; Houser, Nicole M.; Lavoie, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    It is a known phenomenon that some dielectric materials used to construct plasma actuators degrade during operation. However, the rate at which this process occurs, to what extent, as well as a method to monitor is yet to be established. In this experimental study, it is shown that electrical measurements can be used to monitor changes in the material of the plasma actuators. The procedure we introduce for monitoring the actuators follows from the work of Kriegseis, Grundmann, and Tropea [Kriegseis et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 013305 (2011)], who used Lissajous figures to measure actuator power consumption and capacitance. In the present study, we quantify changes in both the power consumption and capacitance of the actuators over long operating durations. It is shown that the increase in the effective capacitance of the actuator is related to degradation (thinning) of the dielectric layer, which is accompanied by an increase in actuator power consumption. For actuators constructed from layers of Kapton® polyimide tape, these changes are self-limiting. Although the polyimide film degrades relatively quickly, the underlying adhesive layer appears to remain intact. Over time, the effective capacitance was found to increase by up to 36%, 25%, and 11% for actuators constructed with 2, 3, and 4 layers of Kapton tape, respectively. A method is presented to prevent erosion of the Kapton dielectric layer using a coating of Polydimethylsiloxane oil. It is shown the application of this treatment can delay the onset of degradation of the Kapton dielectric material.

  2. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  3. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  5. Cellulose Triacetate Dielectric Films For Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Jow, T. Richard

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose triacetate investigated for use as dielectric material in high-energy-density capacitors for pulsed-electrical-power systems. Films of cellulose triacetate metalized on one or both sides for use as substrates for electrodes and/or as dielectrics between electrodes in capacitors. Used without metalization as simple dielectric films. Advantages include high breakdown strength and self-healing capability.

  6. X-band dielectric loaded RF driven accelerator structures: Theoretical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng

    An important area of application of high-power radio frequency (RF) and microwave sources is particle acceleration. A major challenge for the current worldwide research and development effort in linear accelerator is the search for a compact and affordable very-high-energy accelerator technology for the next generation supercolliders. It has been recognized for sometime that dielectric loaded accelerator structures are attractive candidates for the next generation very-high-energy linear accelerators, because they possess several distinct advantages over conventional metallic iris- loaded accelerator structures. However, some fundamental issues, such as RF breakdown in the dielectric, Joule heating, and vacuum properties of dielectric materials, are still the subjects of intense investigation, requiring the validation by experiments conducted at high power levels. An X-band traveling-wave accelerator based on dielectric-lined waveguide has been designed and constructed. Numerical calculation, bench measurements, and 3-D electromagnetic field simulation of this dielectric loaded accelerator are presented. One critical technical problem in constructing such dielectric loaded accelerator is efficient coupling of RF power into the dielectric-lined circular waveguide. A coupling scheme has been arrived at by empirical methods. Field distribution in this coupling configuration has been studied by numerical simulation. In the conventional iris-loaded accelerator structures, the peak surface electric field E s is in general found to be at least a factor of 2 higher than the axial acceleration field Ea. Because the peak surface electric field causes electric breakdown of the structure, it represents a direct limitation on the maximum acceleration gradient that can be obtained. A novel hybrid dielectric-iris-loaded periodic accelerator structure is proposed to utilize the advantages of both dielectric-lined waveguides and conventional iris-loaded structures. Numerical

  7. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  8. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  9. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-28

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  10. Mesoscale Simulations of Powder Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya.; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  11. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  12. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  13. Scattering from Thin Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectric properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T is sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes (T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  14. Counteracting Gravitation In Dielectric Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E.; Jackson, Henry W.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Force of gravity in variety of dielectric liquids counteracted by imposing suitably contoured electric fields. Technique makes possible to perform, on Earth, variety of experiments previously performed only in outer space and at great cost. Also used similarly in outer space to generate sort of artificial gravitation.

  15. Compact Optoelectronic Compass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Carl

    2004-01-01

    A compact optoelectronic sensor unit measures the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky. The data acquired by this chip are processed in an external processor to estimate the relative orientation of the axis of rotation of the Earth. Hence, the combination of this chip and the external processor finds the direction of true North relative to the chip: in other words, the combination acts as a solar compass. If the compass is further combined with a clock, then the combination can be used to establish a threeaxis inertial coordinate system. If, in addition, an auxiliary sensor measures the local vertical direction, then the resulting system can determine the geographic position. This chip and the software used in the processor are based mostly on the same design and operation as those of the unit described in Micro Sun Sensor for Spacecraft (NPO-30867) elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Like the unit described in that article, this unit includes a small multiple-pinhole camera comprising a micromachined mask containing a rectangular array of microscopic pinholes mounted a short distance in front of an image detector of the active-pixel sensor (APS) type (see figure). Further as in the other unit, the digitized output of the APS in this chip is processed to compute the centroids of the pinhole Sun images on the APS. Then the direction to the Sun, relative to the compass chip, is computed from the positions of the centroids (just like a sundial). In the operation of this chip, one is interested not only in the instantaneous direction to the Sun but also in the apparent path traced out by the direction to the Sun as a result of rotation of the Earth during an observation interval (during which the Sun sensor must remain stationary with respect to the Earth). The apparent path of the Sun across the sky is projected on a sphere. The axis of rotation of the Earth lies at the center of the projected circle on the sphere surface. Hence, true North (not magnetic

  16. Dielectric breakdown model for composite materials.

    PubMed

    Peruani, F; Solovey, G; Irurzun, I M; Mola, E E; Marzocca, A; Vicente, J L

    2003-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of dielectric breakdown in composite materials. The dielectric breakdown model was generalized to describe dielectric breakdown patterns in conductor-loaded composites. Conducting particles are distributed at random in the insulating matrix, and the dielectric breakdown propagates according to new rules to take into account electrical properties and particle size. Dielectric breakdown patterns are characterized by their fractal dimension D and the parameters of the Weibull distribution. Studies are carried out as a function of the fraction of conducting inhomogeneities, p. The fractal dimension D of electrical trees approaches the fractal dimension of a percolation cluster when the fraction of conducting particles approximates the percolation limit. PMID:16241318

  17. Directional Oscillations, Concentrations, and Compensated Compactness via Microlocal Compactness Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler, Filip

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces microlocal compactness forms (MCFs) as a new tool to study oscillations and concentrations in L p -bounded sequences of functions. Decisively, MCFs retain information about the location, value distribution, and direction of oscillations and concentrations, thus extending at the same time the theories of (generalized) Young measures and H-measures. In L p -spaces oscillations and concentrations precisely discriminate between weak and strong compactness, and thus MCFs allow one to quantify the difference in compactness. The definition of MCFs involves a Fourier variable, whereby differential constraints on the functions in the sequence can also be investigated easily—a distinct advantage over Young measure theory. Furthermore, pointwise restrictions are reflected in the MCF as well, paving the way for applications to Tartar's framework of compensated compactness; consequently, we establish a new weak-to-strong compactness theorem in a "geometric" way. After developing several aspects of the abstract theory, we consider three applications; for lamination microstructures, the hierarchy of oscillations is reflected in the MCF. The directional information retained in an MCF is harnessed in the relaxation theory for anisotropic integral functionals. Finally, we indicate how the theory pertains to the study of propagation of singularities in certain systems of PDEs. The proofs combine measure theory, Young measures, and harmonic analysis.

  18. Fluorescence Spectroscopy with Metal-Dielectric Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Szmacinski, Henryk; Ray, Krishanu; Descrovi, Emiliano; Ricciardi, Serena; Zhang, Douguo; Chen, Junxue; Huo, Yiping; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a hybrid metal-dielectric waveguide structures (MDWs) with numerous potential applications in the biosciences. These structures consist of a thin metal film coated with a dielectric layer. Depending on the thickness of the dielectric layer, the modes can be localized near the metal, within the dielectric, or at the top surface of the dielectric. The optical modes in a metal-dielectric waveguide can have either S (TE) or P (TM) polarization. The dielectric spacer avoids the quenching, which usually occurs for fluorophores within about 5 nm from the metal. Additionally, the resonances display a sharp angular dependence and can exhibit several hundred-fold increases in intensity (E2) at the silica-air interface relative to the incident intensity. Fluorophores placed on top of the silica layer couple efficiently with the metal, resulting in a sharp angular distribution of emission through the metal and down from the bottom of the structure. This coupling occurs over large distances to several hundred nm away from the metal and was found to be consistent with simulations of the reflectivity of the metal-dielectric waveguides. Remarkably, for some silica thicknesses, the emission is almost completely coupled through the structure with little free-space emission away from the metal-dielectric waveguide. The efficiency of fluorophore coupling is related to the quality of the resonant modes sustained by the metal-dielectric waveguide, resulting in coupling of most of the emission through the metal into the underlying glass substrates. Metal-dielectric waveguides also provide a method to resolve the emission from surface-bound fluorophores from the bulk-phase fluorophores. Metal-dielectric waveguides are simple to fabricate for large surface areas, the resonance wavelength can be adjusted by the dielectric thickness, and the silica surface is suitable for coupling to biomolecules. Metal-dielectric waveguides can have numerous applications in diagnostics and high

  19. Two-phase mixed media dielectric with macro dielectric beads for enhancing resistivity and breakdown strength

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, Steven; Meyer, Glenn A; Tang, Vincent; Guethlein, Gary

    2014-06-10

    A two-phase mixed media insulator having a dielectric fluid filling the interstices between macro-sized dielectric beads packed into a confined volume, so that the packed dielectric beads inhibit electro-hydrodynamically driven current flows of the dielectric liquid and thereby increase the resistivity and breakdown strength of the two-phase insulator over the dielectric liquid alone. In addition, an electrical apparatus incorporates the two-phase mixed media insulator to insulate between electrical components of different electrical potentials. And a method of electrically insulating between electrical components of different electrical potentials fills a confined volume between the electrical components with the two-phase dielectric composite, so that the macro dielectric beads are packed in the confined volume and interstices formed between the macro dielectric beads are filled with the dielectric liquid.

  20. Tailoring dielectric properties of ferroelectric-dielectric multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kesim, M. T.; Zhang, J.; Cole, M. W.; Misirlioglu, I. B.

    2014-01-13

    We develop a nonlinear thermodynamic model for multilayer ferroelectric heterostructures that takes into account electrostatic and electromechanical interactions between layers. We concentrate on the effect of relative layer fractions and in-plane thermal stresses on dielectric properties of Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3}-, BaTiO{sub 3}-, and PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PZT)-SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) multilayers on Si and c-sapphire. We show that dielectric properties of such multilayers can be significantly enhanced by tailoring the growth/processing temperature and the STO layer fraction. Our computations show that large tunabilities (∼90% at 400 kV/cm) are possible in carefully designed barium strontium titanate-STO and PZT-STO even on Si for which there exist substantially large in-plane strains.

  1. Scattering by dielectric circular cylinders in a dielectric slab.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Fabrizio; Pajewski, Lara; Ponti, Cristina; Schettini, Giuseppe

    2010-04-01

    An analytical-numerical technique for the solution of the plane-wave scattering problem by a set of dielectric cylinders embedded in a dielectric slab is presented. Scattered fields are expressed by means of expansions into cylindrical functions, and the concept of plane-wave spectrum of a cylindrical function is employed to define reflection and transmission through the planar interfaces. Multiple reflection phenomena due to the presence of a layered geometry are taken into account. Solutions can be obtained for both TM and TE polarizations and for near- and far-field regions. The numerical approach is described and the method is validated by comparison with examples given in the literature, with very good agreement. Results are presented for the scattering by a finite grid of three cylinders embedded in a slab.

  2. Dielectric breakdown of cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, U; Pilwat, G; Riemann, F

    1974-11-01

    With human and bovine red blood cells and Escherichia coli B, dielectric breakdown of cell membranes could be demonstrated using a Coulter Counter (AEG-Telefunken, Ulm, West Germany) with a hydrodynamic focusing orifice. In making measurements of the size distributions of red blood cells and bacteria versus increasing electric field strength and plotting the pulse heights versus the electric field strength, a sharp bend in the otherwise linear curve is observed due to the dielectric breakdown of the membranes. Solution of Laplace's equation for the electric field generated yields a value of about 1.6 V for the membrane potential at which dielectric breakdown occurs with modal volumes of red blood cells and bacteria. The same value is also calculated for red blood cells by applying the capacitor spring model of Crowley (1973. Biophys. J. 13:711). The corresponding electric field strength generated in the membrane at breakdown is of the order of 4 . 10(6) V/cm and, therefore, comparable with the breakdown voltages for bilayers of most oils. The critical detector voltage for breakdown depends on the volume of the cells. The volume-dependence predicted by Laplace theory with the assumption that the potential generated across the membrane is independent of volume, could be verified experimentally. Due to dielectric breakdown the red blood cells lose hemoglobin completely. This phenomenon was used to study dielectric breakdown of red blood cells in a homogeneous electric field between two flat platinum electrodes. The electric field was applied by discharging a high voltage storage capacitor via a spark gap. The calculated value of the membrane potential generated to produce dielectric breakdown in the homogeneous field is of the same order as found by means of the Coulter Counter. This indicates that mechanical rupture of the red blood cells by the hydrodynamic forces in the orifice of the Coulter Counter could also be excluded as a hemolysing mechanism. The detector

  3. Optical Transmission Properties of Dielectric Aperture Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao

    Optical detection devices such as optical biosensors and optical spectrometers are widely used in many applications for the functions of measurements, inspections and analysis. Due to the large dimension of prisms and gratings, the traditional optical devices normally occupy a large space with complicated components. Since cheaper and smaller optical devices are always in demand, miniaturization has been kept going for years. Thanks to recent fabrication advances, nanophotonic devices such as semiconductor laser chips have been growing in number and diversity. However, the optical biosensor chips and the optical spectrometer chips are seldom reported in the literature. For the reason of improving system integration, the study of ultra-compact, low-cost, high-performance and easy-alignment optical biosensors and optical spectrometers are imperative. This thesis is an endeavor in these two subjects and will present our research work on studying the optical transmission properties of dielectric aperture arrays and developing new optical biosensors and optical spectrometers. The first half of the thesis demonstrates that the optical phase shift associated with the surface plasmon (SP) assisted extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) in nano-hole arrays fabricated in a metal film has a strong dependence on the material refractive index value in close proximity to the holes. A novel refractive index sensor based on detecting the EOT phase shift is proposed by building a model. This device readily provides a 2-D biosensor array platform for non-labeled real-time detection of a variety of organic and biological molecules in a sensor chip format, which leads to a high packing density, minimal analyte volumes, and a large number of parallel channels while facilitating high resolution imaging and supporting a large space-bandwidth product (SBP). Simulation (FDTD Solutions, Lumerical Solutions Inc) results indicate an achievable sensitivity limit of 4.37x10-9 refractive index

  4. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  5. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  6. Boron Nitride Nanotube Mat as a Low- k Dielectric Material with Relative Dielectric Constant Ranging from 1.0 to 1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xinghua; Wang, Daojun; Chung, D. D. L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports that a boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) mat containing air and 1.4 vol.% BNNTs is a low- k dielectric material for microelectronic packaging, exhibiting relative dielectric constant of 1.0 to 1.1 (50 Hz to 2 MHz) and elastic modulus of 10 MPa. The mat is prepared by compacting BNNTs at 5.8 kPa. This paper also presents measurements of the dielectric properties of BNNTs (mostly multiwalled). The relative dielectric constant of the BNNT solid in the mat decreases with increasing frequency, with attractively low values ranging from 3.0 to 6.2; the alternating-current (AC) electrical conductivity increases with increasing frequency, with attractively low values ranging from 10-10 S/m to 10-6 S/m and an approximately linear relationship between log conductivity and log frequency. The specific contact capacitance of the interface between BNNTs and the electrical contact decreases with increasing frequency, with attractively high values ranging from 1.6 μF/m2 to 2.3 μF/m2. The AC electrical resistivity of the BNNT-contact interface decreases with increasing frequency, with high values ranging from 0.14 MΩ cm2 to 440 MΩ cm2.

  7. Applications of high dielectric materials in high field magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Kristina Noel

    At high magnetic fields, radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of components all contribute to losses in conventional RF MRI coil designs. The hypothesis tested here is that these problems can be combated by the use of high permittivity ceramic materials at high fields. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in compact structures at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study NMR probes were constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) and 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) using inductively fed CaTiO3 (relative permittivity of 156-166) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonators. The designs showed the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore, which accommodates the sample. The 600 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. The 900 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value of 940 and shows Q performance five times better than Alderman-Grant and loop-gap resonators of similar dimensions. High resolution images were acquired of an excised mouse spinal cord (25 microm 3) and an excised rat soleus muscle (20 microm3). The spatial distribution of electromagnetic fields within the human body can be tailored using external dielectric materials. Here, a new material is introduced with high dielectric constant and low background MRI signal. The material is based upon metal titanates, which can be made into geometrically formable suspensions in de-ionized water. The suspension's material properties are

  8. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  9. Optimized multilayer dielectric mirror coatings for gravitational wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agresti, Juri; Castaldi, Giuseppe; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Pierro, Vincenzo; Pinto, Innocenzo M.

    2006-08-01

    The limit sensitivity of interferometric gravitational wave antennas is set by the thermal noise in the dielectric mirror coatings. These are currently made of alternating quarter-wavelength high/low index material layers with low mechanical losses. The quarter-wavelength design yields the maximum reflectivity for a fixed number of layers, but not the lowest noise for a prescribed reflectivity. This motivated our recent investigation of optimal thickness configurations, which guarantee the lowest thermal noise for a targeted reflectivity. This communication provides a compact overview of our results, involving nonperiodic genetically-engineered and truncated periodically-layered configurations. Possible implications for the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) are discussed.

  10. Dielectric covered microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Lisa M.

    1988-11-01

    Microstrip antennas have many properties that make them suitable for airborne and satellite communications systems. These antennas are low in cost and lightweight. For these reasons, Rome Air Development Center is interested in verifying and augmenting existing design models for these antennas. The theory and results are presented for modeling microstrip antennas that are covered with a sheet of dielectric material. There are several reasons for designing a microstrip antenna covered with a dielectric material. This configuration would allow the modeling of antennas with an integrated radome. A cover layer could possibly be used to support a polarizer; to mount additional antenna elements on top of the cover layer to provide bandwidth enhancements; or to be used as a dual frequency antenna.

  11. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  12. Optical response of oxide dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Bishop, A. R.

    2003-10-01

    The optical response of oxide dielectrics is calculated by using a combination of self-consistent phonon theory together with results obtained from exactly solving a nonlinear electron-phonon interaction model in the continuum limit. The model is based on the unusual oxygen ion polarizability which induces multiphonon density-density interactions. The damping of optic modes together with an increase in oscillator strength and the development of line shape anomalies with decreasing temperature, is obtained in agreement with experimental data. Unusual mass dependences of optic modes are observed, and the origin of the damping of these phonon modes is identified. The results may provide a fundamental understanding of sum rule violations observed in many dielectrics.

  13. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  14. Compaction Stress in Fine Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, A.J.; Kenkre, V.M.; Pease, E.A.; Scott, J.E.

    1999-04-01

    A vexing feature in granular materials compaction is density extrema interior to a compacted shape. Such inhomogeneities can lead to weaknesses and loss of dimensional control in ceramic parts, unpredictable dissolution of pharmaceuticals, and undesirable stress concentration in load-bearing soil. As an example, the centerline density in a cylindrical compact often does not decrease monotonically from the pressure source but exhibits local maxima and minima. Two lines of thought in the literature predict, respectively, diffusive and wavelike propagation of stress. Here, a general memory function approach has been formulated that unifies these previous treatments as special cases; by analyzing a convenient intermediate case, the telegrapher's equation, one sees that local density maxima arise via semidiffusive stress waves reflecting from the die walls and adding constructively at the centerline.

  15. Compact electron acceleration and bunch compression in THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Fallahi, Arya; Kärtner, Franz X

    2013-04-22

    We numerically investigate the acceleration and bunch compression capabilities of 20 mJ, 0.6 THz-centered coherent terahertz pulses in optimized metallic dielectric-loaded cylindrical waveguides. In particular, we theoretically demonstrate the acceleration of 1.6 pC and 16 pC electron bunches from 1 MeV to 10 MeV over an interaction distance of 20mm, the compression of a 1.6 pC 1 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 2 fs (50 times compression) over an interaction distance of about 18mm, and the compression of a 1.6 pC 10 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 1.61 fs (62 times) over an interaction distance of 42 cm. The obtained results show the promise of coherent THz pulses in realizing compact electron acceleration and bunch compression schemes. PMID:23609686

  16. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    2000-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  17. Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a dielectric elastomer composite material comprising a plurality of elastomer-coated electrodes arranged in an assembly. Embodiments of the invention provide improved force output over prior DEs by producing thinner spacing between electrode surfaces. This is accomplished by coating electrodes directly with uncured elastomer in liquid form and then assembling a finished component (which may be termed an actuator) from coated electrode components.

  18. Electrical conduction in polymer dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotts, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The use of polymer dielectrics with moderate resistivities could reduce or eliminate problems associated with spacecraft charging. The processes responsible for conduction and the properties of electroactive polymers are reviewed, and correlations drawn between molecular structure and electrical conductivity. These structure-property relationships led to the development of several new electroactive polymer compositions and the identification of several systems that have the requisite thermal, mechanical, environmental and electrical properties for use in spacecraft.

  19. Compact Low Frequency Radio Antenna

    DOEpatents

    Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2008-11-11

    An antenna is disclosed that comprises a pair of conductive, orthogonal arches and a pair of conductive annular sector plates, wherein adjacent legs of each arch are fastened to one of the annular sector plates and the opposite adjacent pair of legs is fastened to the remaining annular sector plate. The entire antenna structure is spaced apart from a conductive ground plane by a thin dielectric medium. The antenna is driven by a feed conduit passing through the conductive ground plane and dielectric medium and attached to one of the annular sector plates, wherein the two orthogonal arched act as a pair of crossed dipole elements. This arrangement of elements provides a radiation pattern that is largely omni-directional above the horizon.

  20. High-gradient compact linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter.

  1. High-gradient compact linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Carder, Bruce M.

    1998-01-01

    A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter.

  2. High-gradient compact linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Carder, B.M.

    1998-05-26

    A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter. 10 figs.

  3. Microwave dielectric spectrum of rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bengal, T.; East, J.; Dobson, M. C.; Garvin, J.; Evans, D.

    1988-01-01

    A combination of several measurement techniques was used to investigate the dielectric properties of 80 rock samples in the microwave region. The real part of the dielectric constant, epsilon', was measured in 0.1 GHz steps from 0.5 to 18 GHz, and the imaginary part, epsilon'', was measured at five frequencies extending between 1.6 and 16 GHz. In addition to the dielectric measurements, the bulk density was measured for all the samples and the bulk chemical composition was determined for 56 of the samples. The study shows that epsilon' is frequency-dependent over the 0.5 to 18 GHz range for all rock samples, and that the bulk density rho accounts for about 50 percent of the observed variance of epsilon'. For individual rock types (by genesis), about 90 percent of the observed variance may be explained by the combination of density and the fractional contents of SiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, and TiO2. For the loss factor epsilon'', it was not possible to establish statistically significant relationships between it and the measured properties of the rock samples (density and chemical composition).

  4. Dielectric decrement effects in electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figliuzzi, Bruno; Chan, Wai Hong Ronald; Buie, Cullen; Moran, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the nonlinear phenomena that occur in the electric double layer (EDL) that forms at charged surfaces is a key issue in electrokinetics. In recent studies, Nakayama and Andelman [J. Chem. Physics 2015] Hatlo et al. [EPL 2012], and Zhao and Zhai [JFM 2013] demonstrated that dielectric decrement significantly influences the ionic concentration in the electric double layer (EDL) at high zeta potential, leading to the formation of a condensed layer near the particle's surface. In this presentation, we apply the dielectric decrement model to study two archetypal problems in electrokinetics, namely the electrophoresis of particles with fixed surface charges and the electrophoresis of ideally polarizable particles. Our aim is to rely on numerical simulations to incorporate nonlinear effects including crowding effects due to the finite size of ions, dielectric decrement in the EDL, surface conduction, concentration polarization and advection in the bulk solution. In parallel, we derive a simplified composite layer model that enables us to obtain analytical estimates of the physical quantities involved in the physical description of the problem.

  5. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  6. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  7. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  8. Dielectric elastomer vibrissal system for active tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Andrew T.; Pearson, Martin J.; Pipe, Anthony G.; Welsby, Jason; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    Rodents are able to dexterously navigate confined and unlit environments by extracting spatial and textural information with their whiskers (or vibrissae). Vibrissal-based active touch is suited to a variety of applications where vision is occluded, such as search-and-rescue operations in collapsed buildings. In this paper, a compact dielectric elastomer vibrissal system (DEVS) is described that mimics the vibrissal follicle-sinus complex (FSC) found in rodents. Like the vibrissal FSC, the DEVS encapsulates all sensitive mechanoreceptors at the root of a passive whisker within an antagonistic muscular system. Typically, rats actively whisk arrays of macro-vibrissae with amplitudes of up to +/-25°. It is demonstrated that these properties can be replicated by exploiting the characteristic large actuation strains and passive compliance of dielectric elastomers. A prototype DEVS is developed using VHB 4905 and embedded strain gauges bonded to the root of a tapered whisker. The DEVS is demonstrated to produce a maximum rotational output of +/-22.8°. An electro-mechanical model of the DEVS is derived, which incorporates a hyperelastic material model and Euler- Bernoulli beam equations. The model is shown to predict experimental measurements of whisking stroke amplitude and whisker deflection.

  9. Dielectric relaxation of α -tocopherol acetate (vitamin E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Maslanka, S.; Ziolo, J.; Paluch, M.; McGrath, K. J.; Roland, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric loss spectra are reported for α -tocopherol acetate (an isomer of vitamin E) in the supercooled and glassy states. The α -relaxation times, τα , measured over a 190° range of temperatures, T , at pressures, P , up to 400MPa can be expressed as a single function of TV3.9 ( V is specific volume, measured herein as a function of T and P ). At ambient pressure, there is no dynamic crossover over eight decades of measured τα . The relaxation spectra above the glass transition temperature Tg show ionic conductivity and an excess wing on the high-frequency flank of the α -relaxation loss peak. Temperature-pressure superpositioning is valid for the α process; moreover, the peak shape is constant (stretch exponent equal to 0.65). However, application of pressure changes the shape of the dielectric spectrum at higher frequencies due to the shift of the excess wing to form a resolved peak. Additionally, another relaxation process, absent at atmospheric pressure, emerges on the high-frequency side of the α -process. We propose that this new peak reflects a more compact conformation of the α -tocopherol acetate molecule. Drawing on the coupling model, the experimentally determined relaxation times, activation energy, and activation volume for the Johari-Goldstein process are compared to values calculated from the properties of the α relaxation. The agreement is generally satisfactory, at least for T

  10. Dielectric relaxation of alpha -tocopherol acetate (vitamin E).

    PubMed

    Kaminski, K; Maslanka, S; Ziolo, J; Paluch, M; McGrath, K J; Roland, C M

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric loss spectra are reported for alpha -tocopherol acetate (an isomer of vitamin E) in the supercooled and glassy states. The alpha -relaxation times, tau_{alpha} , measured over a 190 degrees range of temperatures, T , at pressures, P , up to 400MPa can be expressed as a single function of TV3.9 ( V is specific volume, measured herein as a function of T and P ). At ambient pressure, there is no dynamic crossover over eight decades of measured tau_{alpha} . The relaxation spectra above the glass transition temperature T_{g} show ionic conductivity and an excess wing on the high-frequency flank of the alpha -relaxation loss peak. Temperature-pressure superpositioning is valid for the alpha process; moreover, the peak shape is constant (stretch exponent equal to 0.65). However, application of pressure changes the shape of the dielectric spectrum at higher frequencies due to the shift of the excess wing to form a resolved peak. Additionally, another relaxation process, absent at atmospheric pressure, emerges on the high-frequency side of the alpha -process. We propose that this new peak reflects a more compact conformation of the alpha -tocopherol acetate molecule. Drawing on the coupling model, the experimentally determined relaxation times, activation energy, and activation volume for the Johari-Goldstein process are compared to values calculated from the properties of the alpha relaxation. The agreement is generally satisfactory, at least for T

  11. Dielectric constant of water in the interface.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ∼5 to 18 Å.

  12. Dielectric relaxation of high-k oxides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dispersion of high-k dielectrics was observed and classified into two parts: extrinsic cause and intrinsic cause. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant (dielectric relaxation), that is the intrinsic frequency dispersion, could not be characterized before considering the effects of extrinsic frequency dispersion. Several mathematical models were discussed to describe the dielectric relaxation of high-k dielectrics. For the physical mechanism, dielectric relaxation was found to be related to the degree of polarization, which depended on the structure of the high-k material. It was attributed to the enhancement of the correlations among polar nanodomain. The effect of grain size for the high-k materials' structure mainly originated from higher surface stress in smaller grain due to its higher concentration of grain boundary. PMID:24180696

  13. Exploring Strategies for High Dielectric Constant and Low Loss Polymer Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei

    Polymer dielectrics having high dielectric constant, high temperature capability, and low loss are attractive for a broad range of applications such as film capacitors, gate dielectrics, artificial muscles, and electrocaloric cooling. Unfortunately, it is generally observed that higher polarization or dielectric constant tends to cause significantly enhanced dielectric loss. It is therefore highly desired that the fundamental physics of all types of polarization and loss mechanisms be thoroughly understood for dielectric polymers. In this presentation, we intend to explore advantages and disadvantages for different types of polarization. Among a number of approaches, dipolar polarization is promising for high dielectric constant and low loss polymer dielectrics, if the dipolar relaxation peak can be pushed to above the gigahertz range. In particular, dipolar glass, paraelectric, and relaxor ferroelectric polymers are discussed for the dipolar polarization approach. This work is supported by NSF Polymers Program (DMR-1402733).

  14. Exploring Strategies for High Dielectric Constant and Low Loss Polymer Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei

    2014-11-01

    Polymer dielectrics having high dielectric constant, high temperature capability, and low loss are attractive for a broad range of applications such as film capacitors, gate dielectrics, artificial muscles, and electrocaloric cooling. Unfortunately, it is generally observed that higher polarization or dielectric constant tends to cause significantly enhanced dielectric loss. It is therefore highly desired that the fundamental physics of all types of polarization and loss mechanisms be thoroughly understood for dielectric polymers. In this Perspective, we intend to explore advantages and disadvantages for different types of polarization. Among a number of approaches, dipolar polarization is promising for high dielectric constant and low loss polymer dielectrics, if the dipolar relaxation peak can be pushed to above the gigahertz range. In particular, dipolar glass, paraelectric, and relaxor ferroelectric polymers are discussed for the dipolar polarization approach.

  15. Dielectric behavior of semiconductors at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, Jai N.

    1992-01-01

    A cylindrical microwave resonant cavity in TE(011) (Transverse Electric) mode is used to study the dielectric relaxation in germanium and silicon. The samples of these semiconductors are used to perturb the electric field in the cavity, and Slater's perturbation equations are used to calculate the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The dielectric loss of germanium and silicon is studied at different temperatures, and Debye's equations are used to calculate the relaxation time at these temperatures.

  16. A microwave dielectric resonant oscillatory circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigov, A. S.; Shvartsburg, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Bias currents in a thin dielectric nonconducting torus are investigated, and the resonant mode of excitation of these currents is established. The similarity of the frequency spectrum of such a dielectric element to the spectra of a classical Thomson oscillatory circuit and a metamaterial with negative permittivity is demonstrated. The resonant frequency of electromagnetic oscillations of the ring dielectric circuit and magnetic and electric fields of such a circuit under resonant excitation are determined.

  17. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  18. Generalized high order compact methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.; Kominiarczuk, Jakub

    2010-09-01

    The fundamental ideas of the high order compact method are combined with the generalized finite difference method. The result is a finite difference method that works on unstructured, nonuniform grids, and is more accurate than one would classically expect from the number of grid points employed.

  19. Upwind Compact Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I.

    1985-07-01

    It was shown by Ciment, Leventhal, and Weinberg ( J. Comput. Phys.28 (1978), 135) that the standard compact finite difference scheme may break down in convection dominated problems. An upwinding of the method, which maintains the fourth order accuracy, is suggested and favorable numerical results are found for a number of test problems.

  20. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  1. Mesoscale simulations of powder compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-06-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to experimental match compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show evidence of hard-to-explain reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line, which have also been observed in the experiments. We found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations, since 2D results tend to underpredict stress levels for high-porosity powders regardless of material properties. We developed a process to extract macroscale information for the simulation which can be directly used in calibration of continuum model for heterogeneous media.

  2. Properties of dynamically compacted WIPP salt

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, N.S.; Hansen, F.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1996-07-01

    Dynamic compaction of mine-run salt is being investigated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), where compacted salt is being considered for repository sealing applications. One large-scale and two intermediate-scale dynamic compaction demonstrations were conducted. Initial fractional densities of the compacted salt range form 0.85 to 0.90, and permeabilities vary. Dynamically-compacted specimens were further consolidated in the laboratory by application of hydrostatic pressure. Permeability as a function of density was determined, and consolidation microprocesses were studied. Experimental results, in conjunction with modeling results, indicate that the compacted salt will function as a viable seal material.

  3. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0dielectric layer is disposed on the back surface of the portion of the substrate. A semiconductor layer is disposed on the silicon oxynitride dielectric layer.

  4. Computationally efficient dielectric calculations of molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Kathleen A.; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Arias, T. A.

    2015-06-07

    The microscopic dielectric response is a key quantity for electronic materials such as organic semiconductors. Calculations of this response for molecular crystals are currently either expensive or rely on extreme simplifications such as multipole expansions which lack microscopic detail. We present an alternate approach using a microscopic analogue of the Clausius-Mossotti equation, which constructs the dielectric response of a crystal from an eigenvalue decomposition of the dielectric response of individual molecules. This method can potentially be used to examine the effects of defects, disorder, and surfaces on the dielectric properties of molecular solids.

  5. Dielectric particle injector for material processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for use as an electrostatic particle or droplet injector is disclosed which is capable of injecting dielectric particles or droplets. The device operates by first charging the dielectric particles or droplets using ultraviolet light induced photoelectrons from a low work function material plate supporting the dielectric particles or droplets, and then ejecting the charged particles or droplets from the plate by utilizing an electrostatic force. The ejected particles or droplets are mostly negatively charged in the preferred embodiment; however, in an alternate embodiment, an ion source is used instead of ultraviolet light to eject positively charged dielectric particles or droplets.

  6. Techniques for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectrics and dielectric properties of materials are defined generally, and methods for measuring dielectric properties of agricultural products are described for several frequency ranges from audio frequencies through microwave frequencies. These include measurement with impedance and admittance...

  7. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    . New schemes for compact accelerators: laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators; dielectric laser accelerators; THz accelerators. Latest results for compact accelerators. Target design and staging of advanced accelerators. Advanced injection and phase space manipulation techniques. Novel diagnostics: single-shot measurement of sub-fs bunch duration; measurement of ultra-low emittance. Generation and characterization of incoherent radiation: betatron and undulator radiation; Thomson/Compton scattering sources, novel THz sources. Generation and characterization of coherent radiation. Novel FEL simulation techniques. Advances in simulations of novel accelerators: simulations of injection and acceleration processes; simulations of coherent and incoherent radiation sources; start-to-end simulations of fifth generation light sources. Novel undulator schemes. Novel laser drivers for laser-driven accelerators: high-repetition rate laser systems; high wall-plug efficiency systems. Applications of compact accelerators: imaging; radiography; medical applications; electron diffraction and microscopy. Please submit your article by 15 May 2014 (expected web publication: winter 2014); submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue.

  8. Dielectric strength of parylene HT

    SciTech Connect

    Diaham, S. Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Khazaka, R.; Tenailleau, C.

    2014-02-07

    The dielectric strength of parylene HT (PA-HT) films was studied at room temperature in a wide thickness range from 500 nm to 50 μm and was correlated with nano- and microstructure analyses. X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy have revealed an enhancement of crystallization and spherulites development, respectively, with increasing the material thickness (d). Moreover, a critical thickness d{sub C} (between 5 and 10 μm) is identified corresponding to the beginning of spherulite developments in the films. Two distinct behaviors of the dielectric strength (F{sub B}) appear in the thickness range. For d ≥ d{sub C}, PA-HT films exhibit a decrease in the breakdown field following a negative slope (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup −0.4}), while for d < d{sub C}, it increases with increasing the thickness (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup 0.3}). An optimal thickness d{sub optim} ∼ 5 μm corresponding to a maximum dielectric strength (F{sub B} ∼ 10 MV/cm) is obtained. A model of spherulite development in PA-HT films with increasing the thickness is proposed. The decrease in F{sub B} above d{sub C} is explained by the spherulites development, whereas its increase below d{sub C} is induced by the crystallites growth. An annealing of the material shows both an enhancement of F{sub B} and an increase of the crystallites and spherulites dimensions, whatever the thickness. The breakdown field becomes thickness-independent below d{sub C} showing a strong influence of the nano-scale structural parameters. On the contrary, both nano- and micro-scale structural parameters appear as influent on F{sub B} for d ≥ d{sub C}.

  9. Dielectric cure monitoring: Preliminary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B. E.; Semmel, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been conducted on two types of dielectric cure monitoring systems employing both epoxy resins and phenolic composites. An Audrey System was used for 23 cure monitoring runs with very limited success. Nine complete cure monitoring runs have been investigated using a Micromet System. Two additional measurements were performed to investigate the Micromet's sensitivity to water absorption in a post-cure carbon-phenolic material. While further work is needed to determine data significance, the Micromet system appears to show promise as a feedback control device during processing.

  10. Inhibiting electro-thermal breakdown of acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators by dielectric gel coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is very localized; a spark and a pinhole (puncture) in dielectric ends up with short-circuit. This letter shows that prevention of electrothermal breakdown helps defer failure of DEAs even with conductive-grease electrodes. Dielectric gel encapsulation or coating (Dow Corning 3-4170) helps protect acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905), making it thermally more stable and delaying its thermal oxidation (burn) from 218 °C to 300 °C. Dielectric-gel-coated acrylic DEAs can withstand higher local leak-induced heating and thus achieve higher dielectric strengths than non-coated DEAs do.

  11. Fabrication and Dielectric Properties of Lead-Free Inorganic Particles-Epoxy Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobune, Masafumi; Takasaki, Keiko; Yazawa, Tetsuo

    2006-09-01

    Inorganic-organic composites with a 0-3 connectivity are fabricated from inorganic particles with a high relative permittivity (\\varepsilonr) and a low dielectric loss (\\tanδ), and epoxy resin. The compacted powder obtained by pulverizing BaZrO3-BaTiO3-Ba(Fe1/2Ta1/2)O3 (BZTFT) ceramics has 1/12th the \\varepsilonr and 72 times the \\tanδ of the ceramics. On the basis of the relationship between \\varepsilonr and BZTFT filler content, the experimental values of the composites are determined to be in good agreement with theoretical values calculated by following Nielsen’s complex rule in the filler content range of 50-80 vol %. The temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of BZTFT powder/epoxy resin (90/10, v/v) composites measured at different frequencies suggests that the temperature characteristics of the present materials correspond to the Z8T characteristics [Z8T; Electronic Industries Association (EIA) standard: Δ C/C25 {\\degC} is expressed as a rate of change within +22 and -33% in the temperature range from 10 to 150 °C] when represented by the temperature characteristics of surface-mounted capacitors. It is shown that the effect of the vacuum drying of the filler on the dielectric properties of the composites is larger than that of the silane coupling treatment and that the dielectric properties can be improved synergistically by performing both treatments.

  12. Design criteria for warm temperature dielectric superconducting dc cables: Impact of co-pole magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, P. M.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Gregory, B.; Eckroad, S. W.

    2008-02-01

    HTSC dc superconducting cables are under consideration for a variety of applications ranging from bi-directional interties between regional ac grids ("back-to-backs"), internal connection within, and out-feeds from, low voltage solar or wind farm generators, and up to multi-gigawatt transmission trunks linking remote nuclear clusters to urban load centers. In every instance, there are two principal design choices - coaxial, or "cold temperature dielectric; and mono-axial, also termed "warm temperature dielectric." In the former, both poles may be serviced by concentric conductors in the same physical package, separated by insulation held at the temperature necessary for superconducting operation, and in the latter, the poles are contained in two separate cables of more or less conventional design, each holding a cryostat enclosing the superconductor surrounded by a dielectric material at ambient temperature. Both have "pluses and minuses." CTD has the advantage of compactness, but requires a cryogenic dielectric, whereas WTD is simpler to manufacture and less costly overall as well. However, depending on the dimensional separation of the two poles and their containment infrastructure, WTD can experience considerable outward compressive physical forces and some reduction in critical state properties due to interpenetration of their respective magnetic fields. Recent progress in introducing homogeneous pinning in YBCO coated conductors could considerably ameliorate this latter issue, and thus the WTD design could engage a range of applications formerly out of reach of BSCCO tapes. We will examine these two issues in detail.

  13. Preliminary investigation of an improved metal-dielectric cathode for magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoping Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Jun; Fan, Yuwei; Li, Zhiqiang

    2015-02-15

    In order to explore the cathode with good repetition quality for the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillators, an improved metal-dielectric cathode is proposed and investigated experimentally. The cathode is designed to be step-like shape, and thin copper plated boards are periodically and compactly arrayed on the surface of the cathode base, which ensures the uniformity of the electrons emitted from the cusps of the copper plated boards. According to the numerical simulation results, the step-like shape is beneficial to convert the kinetic energy of the magnetic insulating current partially and enhance the beam-wave interaction efficiency. Finally, a preliminary experiment of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with the improved metal-dielectric cathode is carried out. A high power microwave (HPM) with an average power of 1.95 GW is generated from the MILO, with an efficiency of 13.5%. Under the same experiment condition, the output power and main frequency with the presented cathode are almost the same to those with the velvet cathode. Apart from that, metal-dielectric cathode has the merits of small outgassing and long lifetime, and all of these make the improved metal-dielectric cathode significantly promising for the MILO repetition operation.

  14. Plasma treatment of polymer dielectric films to improve capacitive energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yializis, A.; Binder, M.; Mammone, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Demand for compact instrumentation, portable field equipment, and new electromagnetic weapons is creating a need for new dielectric materials with higher energy storage capabilities. Recognizing the need for higher energy storage capacitors, the Army Research Lab at Fort Monmouth, NJ, initiated a program a year ago to investigate potential methods for increasing the dielectric strength of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) film, which is the highest energy density material commercially available today. Treatment of small area PVDF films in a CF4/O2 plasma showed that the dielectric strength of PVDF films can be increased by as much as 20 percent when treated in a 96 percent CF4/4 percent O2 plasma. This 44 percent increase in energy storage of a PVDF capacitor is significant considering that the treatment can be implemented in a conventional metallizing chamber, with minimum capital investment. The data shows that improved breakdown strength may be unique to PVDF film and the particular CF4/O2 gas mixture, because PVDF film treated with 100 percent CF4, 100 percent O2, Ar gas plasma, and electron irradiation shows no improvement in breakdown strength. Other data presented includes dissipation factor, dielectric constant, and surface tension measurements.

  15. Preliminary investigation of an improved metal-dielectric cathode for magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Jun; Fan, Yuwei; Li, Zhiqiang

    2015-02-01

    In order to explore the cathode with good repetition quality for the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillators, an improved metal-dielectric cathode is proposed and investigated experimentally. The cathode is designed to be step-like shape, and thin copper plated boards are periodically and compactly arrayed on the surface of the cathode base, which ensures the uniformity of the electrons emitted from the cusps of the copper plated boards. According to the numerical simulation results, the step-like shape is beneficial to convert the kinetic energy of the magnetic insulating current partially and enhance the beam-wave interaction efficiency. Finally, a preliminary experiment of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with the improved metal-dielectric cathode is carried out. A high power microwave (HPM) with an average power of 1.95 GW is generated from the MILO, with an efficiency of 13.5%. Under the same experiment condition, the output power and main frequency with the presented cathode are almost the same to those with the velvet cathode. Apart from that, metal-dielectric cathode has the merits of small outgassing and long lifetime, and all of these make the improved metal-dielectric cathode significantly promising for the MILO repetition operation.

  16. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  17. Crosslinked polymeric dielectric materials and electronic devices incorporating same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Tobin J. (Inventor); Facchetti, Antonio (Inventor); Wang, Zhiming (Inventor); Choi, Hyuk-Jin (Inventor); Suh, legal representative, Nae-Jeong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Solution-processable dielectric materials are provided, along with precursor compositions and processes for preparing the same. Composites and electronic devices including the dielectric materials also are provided.

  18. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  19. A simple method for reducing inevitable dielectric loss in high-permittivity dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, F. B.; Yu, L.; Mazurek, P.; Skov, A. L.

    2016-07-01

    Commercial viability of dielectric elastomers (DEs) is currently limited by a few obstacles, including high driving voltages (in the kV range). Driving voltage can be lowered by either decreasing the Young’s modulus or increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers, or a combination thereof. A decrease in the Young’s modulus, however, is often accompanied by a loss in mechanical stability, whereas increases in dielectric permittivity are usually followed by a large increase in dielectric loss followed by a decrease in breakdown strength and thereby the lifetime of the DE. A new soft elastomer matrix, with high dielectric permittivity and a low Young’s modulus, aligned with no loss of mechanical stability, was prepared through the use of commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil mixed into a tough commercial liquid silicone rubber silicone elastomer. The addition of chloropropyl-functional silicone oil in concentrations up to 30 phr was found to improve the properties of the silicone elastomer significantly, as dielectric permittivity increased to 4.4, dielectric breakdown increased up to 25% and dielectric losses were reduced. The chloropropyl-functional silicone oil also decreased the dielectric losses of an elastomer containing dielectric permittivity-enhancing TiO2 fillers. Commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil thus constitutes a facile method for improved silicone DEs, with very low dielectric losses.

  20. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber. PMID:22129008

  1. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber.

  2. 7 CFR 51.582 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.582 Fairly compact. Fairly compact means that the branches on the... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.582 Section 51.582 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  3. 7 CFR 51.572 - Compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.572 Compact. Compact means that the branches on the stalk are fairly... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compact. 51.572 Section 51.572 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  4. 7 CFR 51.572 - Compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.572 Compact. Compact means that the branches on the stalk are fairly... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compact. 51.572 Section 51.572 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  5. 7 CFR 51.582 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.582 Fairly compact. Fairly compact means that the branches on the... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.582 Section 51.582 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  6. Crystalline Silicon Dielectrics for Superconducting Qubit Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hover, David; Peng, Weina; Sendelbach, Steven; Eriksson, Mark; McDermott, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Superconducting qubit energy relaxation times are limited by microwave loss induced by a continuum of two-level state (TLS) defects in the dielectric materials of the circuit. State-of-the-art phase qubit circuits employ a micron-scale Josephson junction shunted by an external capacitor. In this case, the qubit T1 time is directly proportional to the quality factor (Q) of the capacitor dielectric. The amorphous capacitor dielectrics that have been used to date display intrinsic Q of order 10^3 to 10^4. Shunt capacitors with a Q of 10^6 are required to extend qubit T1 times well into the microsecond range. Crystalline dielectric materials are an attractive candidate for qubit capacitor dielectrics, due to the extremely low density of TLS defects. However, the robust integration of crystalline dielectrics with superconducting qubit circuits remains a challenge. Here we describe a novel approach to the realization of high-Q crystalline capacitor dielectrics for superconducting qubit circuits. The capacitor dielectric is a crystalline silicon nanomembrane. We discuss characterization of crystalline silicon capacitors with low-power microwave transport measurements at millikelvin temperatures. In addition, we report progress on integrating the crystalline capacitor process with Josephson qubit fabrication.

  7. Polycarbonate based three-phase nanocomposite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Three-phase polycarbonate (PC) matrix nanocomposites are prepared using the solution method. One of the nanocomposite fillers is dielectric and the other is conducting. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as the dielectric filler. The conducting fillers, nano-Cu and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), are used to make two different nanocomposites, MWCNT–PZT–PC and Cu–PZT–PC. The prepared nanocomposites are characterized using density measurement, x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Percolation is absent in both three-phase nanocomposites within the study’s concentration window of conducting fillers. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites are evaluated using a precision impedance analyser. The dielectric constant of the Cu–PZT–PC nanocomposite increases to 14 (a dissipation factor of 0.17), whereas in the case of the MWCNT–PZT–PC nanocomposite it increases to 8.5 (a dissipation factor of 0.002). The melting point of both nanocomposites decreases with respect to the control PC. The frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature (room temperature to 200 °C) dependence of the dielectric constant and dissipation factor are examined. For the Cu–PZT–PC nanocomposites, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency, whereas in the case of the MWCNT–PZT–PC nanocomposites the dielectric constant is almost constant. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor exhibit a slight temperature dependence.

  8. Motion of a Cylindrical Dielectric Boundary.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo; White, Michael; Zhou, Shenggao

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between geometry and electrostatics contributes significantly to hydrophobic interactions of biomolecules in an aqueous solution. With an implicit solvent, such a system can be described macroscopically by the dielectric boundary that separates the high-dielectric solvent from low-dielectric solutes. This work concerns the motion of a model cylindrical dielectric boundary as the steepest descent of a free-energy functional that consists of both the surface and electrostatic energies. The effective dielectric boundary force is defined and an explicit formula of the force is obtained. It is found that such a force always points from the solvent region to solute region. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a lower dielectric, the motion of the dielectric boundary is initially driven dominantly by the surface force but is then driven inward quickly to the cylindrical axis by both the surface and electrostatic forces. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a higher dielectric, the competition between the geometrical and electrostatic contributions leads to the existence of equilibrium boundaries that are circular cylinders. Linear stability analysis is presented to show that such an equilibrium is only stable for a perturbation with a wavenumber larger than a critical value. Numerical simulations are reported for both of the cases, confirming the analysis on the role of each component of the driving force. Implications of the mathematical findings to the understanding of charged molecular systems are discussed.

  9. Dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Lakhwant; Awasthi, A.M.; Lochab, S.P.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The present article reports the effect of gamma irradiation on the dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica. • Dielectric and electrical relaxations have been analyzed in the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and Cole–Cole formalisms. • The frequency dependent electrical conductivity has been rationalized using Johnsher’s universal power law. • The experimentally measured electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted using Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation function. - Abstract: In the present research, the dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica was studied in the frequency range of 0.1 Hz–10 MHz and temperature range of 653–853 K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The dielectric constants (ϵ′ and ϵ′′) are found to be high for gamma irradiated muscovite mica as compared to the pristine sample. The frequency dependence of the imaginary part of complex electric modulus (M′′) and dc conductivity data conforms Arrhenius law with single value of activation energy for pristine sample and two values of activation energy for gamma irradiated mica sample. The experimentally assessed electric modulus and conductivity information have been interpreted by the Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation explanation. Using the Cole–Cole framework, an analysis of real and imaginary characters of the electric modulus for pristine and gamma irradiated sample was executed which reflects the non-Debye relaxation mechanism.

  10. Dielectric Loss Measurements on Raw Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanje, J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment used to study dielectric properties of materials. Values of the dielectric loss tangent can be determined at low frequencies from Lissajous figures formed on an oscilloscope. Some mineral rock specimens show Debye-type relaxation peaks at frequencies in the region of 1 to 500 Hz. (Author/DS)

  11. Dielectric spectroscopy of watermelons for quality sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Stuart O.; Guo, Wen-chuan; Trabelsi, Samir; Kays, Stanley J.

    2007-07-01

    Dielectric properties of four small-sized watermelon cultivars, grown and harvested to provide a range of maturities, were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe and an impedance analyser over the frequency range from 10 MHz to 1.8 GHz. Probe measurements were made on the external surface of the melons and also on tissue samples from the edible internal tissue. Moisture content and soluble solids content (SSC) were measured for internal tissue samples, and SSC (sweetness) was used as the quality factor for correlation with the dielectric properties. Individual dielectric constant and loss factor correlations with SSC were low, but a high correlation was obtained between the SSC and permittivity from a complex-plane plot of dielectric constant and loss factor, each divided by SSC. However, SSC prediction from the dielectric properties by this relationship was not as high as expected (coefficient of determination about 0.4). Permittivity data (dielectric constant and loss factor) for the melons are presented graphically to show their relationships with frequency for the four melon cultivars and for external surface and internal tissue measurements. A dielectric relaxation for the external surface measurements, which may be attributable to a combination of bound water, Maxwell-Wagner, molecular cluster or ion-related effects, is also illustrated. Coefficients of determination for complex-plane plots, moisture content and SSC relationship, and penetration depth are also shown graphically. Further studies are needed for determining the practicality of sensing melon quality from their dielectric properties.

  12. Polycarbonate based three-phase nanocomposite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Three-phase polycarbonate (PC) matrix nanocomposites are prepared using the solution method. One of the nanocomposite fillers is dielectric and the other is conducting. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as the dielectric filler. The conducting fillers, nano-Cu and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), are used to make two different nanocomposites, MWCNT-PZT-PC and Cu-PZT-PC. The prepared nanocomposites are characterized using density measurement, x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Percolation is absent in both three-phase nanocomposites within the study’s concentration window of conducting fillers. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites are evaluated using a precision impedance analyser. The dielectric constant of the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposite increases to 14 (a dissipation factor of 0.17), whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposite it increases to 8.5 (a dissipation factor of 0.002). The melting point of both nanocomposites decreases with respect to the control PC. The frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature (room temperature to 200 °C) dependence of the dielectric constant and dissipation factor are examined. For the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposites, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency, whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposites the dielectric constant is almost constant. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor exhibit a slight temperature dependence.

  13. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  14. Low-profile high-voltage compact gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D.A.; Wilson, M.J.; Speer, R.D.

    1997-06-30

    This paper discusses the development and testing of a low-profile, high-voltage, spark-gap switch designed to be closely coupled with other components into an integrated high-energy pulsed-power source. The switch is designed to operate at 100 kV using SF6 gas pressurized to less than 0.7 MPa. The volume of the switch cavity region is less than 1.5 cm3, and the field stress along the gas-dielectric interface is as high as 130 kV/cm. The dielectric switch body has a low profile that is only I -cm tall at its greatest extent and nominally 2-mm thick over most of its area. This design achieves a very low inductance of less than 5 nH, but results in field stresses exceeding 500 kV/cm in the dielectric material. Field modeling was done to determine the appropriate shape for the highly stressed insulator and electrodes, and special manufacturing techniques were employed to mitigate the usual mechanisms that induce breakdown and failure in solid dielectrics. Static breakdown tests verified that the switch operates satisfactorily at 100 kV levels. The unit has been characterized with different shaped electrodes having nominal gap spacings of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 mm. The relationship between self-break voltage and operating pressure agrees well with published data on gas properties, accounting for the field enhancements of the electrode shapes being used. Capacitor discharge tests in a low inductance test fixture exhibited peak currents up to 25 kA with characteristic frequencies of the ringdown circuit ranging from 10 to 20 MHz. The ringdown waveforms and scaling of measured parameters agree well with circuit modeling of the switch and test fixture. Repetitive operation has been demonstrated at moderate rep-rates up to 15 Hz, limited by the power supply being used. Preliminary tests to evaluate lifetime of the compact switch assembly have been encouraging. In one case, after more than 7,000 high-current ringdown tests with approximately 30 C of total charge transferred, the

  15. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  16. Compact torus studies: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1987-06-01

    The compact torus (CT) device has been proposed for use in some applications which are of interest in Laboratory programs in the areas of pulsed power and inertial confinement fusion. These applications involve compression and acceleration of CT plasmas. The RACE (Ring Accelerator Experiment) experimental program at Livermore has been initiated to study these applications. The work reported here involves studies of plasma physics and other aspects of these compact torus applications. The studies conducted identify specific problem areas associated with the CT device and examine these areas in some detail. This report contains studies of three particular problem areas of the CT applications. These three areas are: the general nonlinear properties of the CT as a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium, particle simulation of the compression of the CT, with a focus on the non-MHD effects, and nonlinear RF interaction problems in the CT.

  17. Numerically optimized structures for dielectric asymmetric dual-grating laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Aimidula, A.; Bake, M. A.; Wan, F.; Xie, B. S.; Welsch, C. P.; Xia, G.; Mete, O.; Uesaka, M.; Matsumura, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Koyama, K.

    2014-02-15

    Optical scale dielectric structures are promising candidates to realize future compact, low cost particle accelerators, since they can sustain high acceleration gradients in the range of GeV/m. Here, we present numerical simulation results for a dielectric asymmetric dual-grating accelerator. It was found that the asymmetric dual-grating structures can efficiently modify the laser field to synchronize it with relativistic electrons, therefore increasing the average acceleration gradient by ∼10% in comparison to symmetric structures. The optimum pillar height which was determined by simulation agrees well with that estimated analytically. The effect of the initial kinetic energy of injected electrons on the acceleration gradient is also discussed. Finally, the required laser parameters were calculated analytically and a suitable laser is proposed as energy source.

  18. Laser acceleration and deflection of 963 keV electrons with a silicon dielectric structure

    DOE PAGES

    Leedle, Kenneth J.; Pease, R. Fabian; Byer, Robert L.; Harris, James S.

    2015-02-12

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultrasmall and ultrafast science, but their size and cost have prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives such as the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a 5 nJ, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and suboptical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercialmore » lasers and subfemtosecond electron beam experiments.« less

  19. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  20. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  1. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  2. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  3. COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-06-01

    COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

  4. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  5. 78 FR 61384 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  6. 76 FR 20044 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  7. 75 FR 62568 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  8. 75 FR 17161 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... purpose of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact)....

  9. Random phase approximation correlation energy using a compact representation for linear response functions: application to solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaoui, Fawzi; Rocca, Dario

    2016-01-01

    A new approach was recently presented to compute correlation energies within the random phase approximation using Lanczos chains and an optimal basis set (Rocca 2014 J. Chem. Phys. 140 18A501). This novel method avoids the explicit calculation of conduction states and represents linear response functions on a compact auxiliary basis set obtained from the diagonalization of an approximate dielectric matrix that contains only the kinetic energy contribution. Here, we extend this formalism, originally implemented for molecular systems, to treat periodic solids. In particular, the approximate dielectric matrix used to build the auxiliary basis set is generalized to avoid unphysical negative gaps, that make the model inefficient. The numerical convergence of the method is discussed and the accuracy is demonstrated considering a set including three covalently bonded (C, Si, and SiC) and three weakly bonded (Ne, Ar, and Kr) solids.

  10. Microwave dielectric properties of boreal forest trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, G.; Ahern, F.; Brown, J.

    1993-01-01

    The knowledge of vegetation dielectric behavior is important in studying the scattering properties of the vegetation canopy and radar backscatter modelling. Until now, a limited number of studies have been published on the dielectric properties in the boreal forest context. This paper presents the results of the dielectric constant as a function of depth in the trunks of two common boreal forest species: black spruce and trembling aspen, obtained from field measurements. The microwave penetration depth for the two species is estimated at C, L, and P bands and used to derive the equivalent dielectric constant for the trunk as a whole. The backscatter modelling is carried out in the case of black spruce and the results are compared with the JPL AIRSAR data. The sensitivity of the backscatter coefficient to the dielectric constant is also examined.

  11. Dielectric properties and electronic applications of aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-07-01

    Among their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibits unusual dielectric properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, our measurements of the dielectric constants and loss tangents for several aerogel varieties at microwave frequencies show that they both vary linearly with the aerogel density, indicating that the dielectric behavior of aerogels is more gas-like than solid-like. We have also measured the dielectric strength of silica aerogels and find that they are better than ceramics for high voltage insulation. The low dielectric constants and loss tangents of aerogels, along with their controllable thermal expansion properties, make them desirable materials for use as thin films in high speed integrated digital and microwave circuitry.

  12. Dielectric ridge waveguide gas laser apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaria, A.J.; Bridges, W.

    1989-03-14

    A dielectric ridged waveguide flowing gas laser apparatus is described, comprising in combination; a dielectric substrate having a predetermined number of the grooves formed theron, the grooves extending along the longitudinal axis of the dielectric substrate, an electrically conductive member in parallel alignment with the grooved side of the dielectric substrate such that an air gasp is formed therebetween the air gap containing an active laser gas medium, electrically conductive strips disposed on the outside of the dielectric substrate forming electrodes, the conductive strips being aligned with the grooves and having the same length and width as the grooves, and an excitation source connected between the conductive member and the conductive strips, to provide lasing in the ridged waveguide.

  13. Dielectric breakdown of additively manufactured polymeric materials

    DOE PAGES

    Monzel, W. Jacob; Hoff, Brad W.; Maestas, Sabrina S.; French, David M.; Hayden, Steven C.

    2016-01-11

    Dielectric strength testing of selected Polyjet-printed polymer plastics was performed in accordance with ASTM D149. This dielectric strength data is compared to manufacturer-provided dielectric strength data for selected plastics printed using the stereolithography (SLA), fused deposition modeling (FDM), and selective laser sintering (SLS) methods. Tested Polyjet samples demonstrated dielectric strengths as high as 47.5 kV/mm for a 0.5 mm thick sample and 32.1 kV/mm for a 1.0 mm sample. As a result, the dielectric strength of the additively manufactured plastics evaluated as part of this study was lower than the majority of non-printed plastics by at least 15% (with themore » exception of polycarbonate).« less

  14. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  15. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  16. Unified compaction curve model for tensile strength of tablets made by roller compaction and direct compression.

    PubMed

    Farber, Leon; Hapgood, Karen P; Michaels, James N; Fu, Xi-Young; Meyer, Robert; Johnson, Mary-Ann; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    A model that describes the relationship between roller-compaction conditions and tablet strength is proposed. The model assumes that compaction is cumulative during roller compaction and subsequent granule compaction, and compact strength (ribbon and tablet) is generated irreversibly as if strength is controlled by plastic deformation of primary particles only. Roller-compaction is treated as a compaction step where the macroscopic ribbon strength is subsequently destroyed in milling. This loss in strength is irreversible and tablets compressed from the resulting granulation are weaker than those compressed by direct compression at the same compression force. Roller-compacted ribbons were produced at a range of roll forces for three formulations and subsequently milled and compacted into tablets. Once the total compaction history is taken in account, the compaction behavior of the uncompacted blends and the roller-compacted granules ultimately follow a single master compaction curve--a unified compaction curve (UCC). The model successfully described the compaction behavior of DC grade starch and formulations of lactose monohydrate with 50% or more microcrystalline cellulose, and may be more generally applicable to systems containing significant proportions of any plastically deforming material, including MCC and starch. PMID:17689211

  17. Plasmonic-dielectric systems for high-order dispersionless slow or stopped subwavelength light.

    PubMed

    Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, J D; Soljacić, Marin

    2009-07-24

    A material platform of multilayered surface-plasmon-dielectric-polariton systems is introduced, along with a new physical mechanism enabling simultaneous cancellation of group-velocity and attenuation dispersion to extremely high orders for subwavelength light of any small positive, negative, or zero group velocity. These dispersion-free systems could have significant impact on the development of nanophotonics, e.g., in the design of efficient and very compact delay lines and active devices. The same dispersion-manipulation mechanism can be employed to tailor at will exotic slow-light dispersion relations.

  18. Efficient localization of terahertz waves within a gradient dielectric-filled metallic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Ju, Dongquan; Jiang, Yongyuan

    2014-12-01

    We proposed a gradient dielectric-filled metallic grating to spatially localize wide-band terahertz waves at different locations for different frequencies. The dispersion relations for terahertz waves propagating along gratings with different filling-depths were developed under the first-order approximation based on the spoof surface plasmon theory. The structure can localize terahertz waves at the frequency regime from 0.7 to 1.3 THz, as the filling-depth H gradually increases from 0 to 50 µm. By filling with active media such as nematic liquid crystals, the trapping location can be effectively tuned, providing potential to realize controllable and compact integrated THz devices.

  19. Instability of relativistic electron-beam-dielectric system as a mechanism for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling-Bao; Du, Chao-Hai; Liu, Pu-Kun; Xiao, Liu

    2007-11-01

    The dispersion relation of relativistic rectilinear electron beam propagating along a guide magnetic field in a dielectric is investigated by cold fluid model. In such a system, due to anomalous Doppler effect, the instability occurs when the electron velocity exceeds the wave phase velocity. The growth rate and spatial growth rate are studied analytically and the nonlinear saturated efficiency is given analytically for the first time. Numerical results show that the saturated efficiency approaches about 10%-30%. The distinctive interaction mechanism is promising for the design of a new kind of compact high-power microwave generation devices.

  20. Aluminum nanoparticle/acrylate copolymer nanocomposites for dielectric elastomers with high dielectric constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei; Zhang, Suki N.; Niu, Xiaofan; Liu, Chao; Pei, Qibing

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers are useful for large-strain actuation and energy harvesting. Their application has been limited by their low dielectric constants and consequently high driving voltage. Various fillers with high dielectric constants have been incorporated into different elastomer systems to improve the actuation strain, force output and energy density of the compliant actuators and generators. However, agglomeration may happen in these nanocomposites, resulting in a decrease of dielectric strength, an increase of leakage current, and in many instances the degree of enhancement of the dielectric constant. In this work, we investigated aluminum nanoparticles as nanofillers for acrylate copolymers. This metallic nanoparticle was chosen because the availability of free electrons could potentially provide an infinite value of dielectric constant as opposed to dielectric materials including ferroelectric nanocrystals. Moreover, aluminum nanoparticles have a self-passivated oxide shell effectively preventing the formation of conductive path. The surfaces of the aluminum nanoparticles were functionalized with methacrylate groups to assist the uniform dispersion in organic solutions and additionally enable copolymerization with acrylate copolymer matrix during bulk polymerization, and thus to suppress large range drifting of the nanoparticles. The resulting Al nanoparticle-acrylate copolymer nanocomposites were found to exhibit higher dielectric constant and increased stiffness. The leakage current under high electric fields were significantly lower than nanocomposites synthesized without proper nanoparticle surface modification. The dielectric strengths of the composites were comparable with the pristine polymers. In dielectric actuation evaluation, the actuation force output and energy specific work density were enhanced in the nanocomposites compared to the pristine copolymer.

  1. Shortcut to adiabaticity in full-wave optics for ultra-compact waveguide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Valle, Giuseppe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Longhi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    We extend the concept of shortcuts to adiabaticity to full-wave optics and provide an application to the design of an ultra-compact waveguide junction. In particular, we introduce a procedure allowing one to synthesize a purely dielectric optical potential that precisely compensates for non-adiabatic losses of the transverse electric fundamental mode in any (sufficiently regular) two-dimensional waveguide junction. Our results are corroborated by finite-element method numerical simulations in a Pöschl–Teller waveguide mode expander.

  2. Droplet sensing using small and compact high-Q planar resonator based on impedance matching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Jo; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing feasibility of the proposed high-Q resonator using a phosphate-buffered saline droplet at microwave frequencies. In the experimental results, the resonant frequency, signal level, and Q-factor of the S21-parameter with and without a 1-μl droplet were changed to about 230 MHz, 32 dB, and 1500, respectively. The resonator system was found to be suitable for droplet sensing with a small volume due to its small and compact scheme. This resonator system is expected to play an important role in droplet sensing with different dielectric constants.

  3. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2009: Measurement Analysis and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alun; Williams, Graham

    2009-07-01

    The conference Dielectrics 2009: Measurements, Analysis and Applications represents a significant milestone in the evolution of dielectrics research in the UK. It is reasonable to state that the academic study of dielectrics has led to many fundamental advances and that dielectric materials underpin the modern world in devices ranging from field effect transistors, which operate at extremely high fields, albeit low voltages, to the high voltage plants that provide the energy that powers our economy. The origins of the Dielectrics Group of the Institute of Physics (IOP), which organized this conference, can be traced directly back to the early 1960s, when Professor Mansel Davies was conducting research into the dielectric relaxation behaviour of polar liquids and solids at The Edward Davies Chemical Laboratories of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. He was already well-known internationally for his studies of molecular structure and bonding of small molecules, using infra-red-spectroscopy, and of the physical properties of hydrogen-bonded liquids and solids, using thermodynamic methods. Dielectric spectroscopy was a fairly new area for him and he realized that opportunities for scientists in the UK to gather together and discuss their research in this developing area of physical chemistry/chemical physics were very limited. He conceived the idea of forming a Dielectrics Discussion Group (DDG), which would act as a meeting point and provide a platform for dielectrics research in the UK and beyond and, as a result, a two-day Meeting was convened in the spring of 1968 at Gregynog Hall of the University of Wales, near Newtown, Montgomeryshire. It was organized by Mansel Davies, Alun Price and Graham Williams, all physical chemists from the UCW, Aberystwyth. Fifty scientists attended, being a mix of physical chemists, theoretical chemists, physicists, electrical engineers, polymer and materials scientists, all from the UK, except Dr Brendan Scaife of Trinity

  4. Extending applications of dielectric elastomer artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Seiki; Waki, Mikio; Kornbluh, Roy; Pelrine, Ron

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated high energy density and high strains as well as high electromechanical efficiency and fast speeds of response. These properties, combined with their projected low cost make them attractive for a variety of actuator applications including linear actuators, diaphragm pumps, rotary motors, and haptic displays. Dielectric elastomers have also been shown to offer high energy density, high efficiency, and large strains when operated as generators. Dielectric elastomers have reached a stage of development where standardized products can be applied to new applications. In some cases, dielectric elastomer devices are improvements over existing devices. In other cases, however, dielectric elastomers can enable new types of devices that cannot be made with existing technologies, such as new types of loudspeakers and power generating devices. A new dipole loudspeaker system was developed using a commercially available push-pull diaphragm configuration. This same transducer configuration was used to develop a new power generating system. This generator system enables a power generation of 0.06 to 0.12 W by manually displacing the device by 5 to 6 mm once a second. By introducing a voltage step-down conversion circuit, the device was able to power wireless communications, allowing the control of devices separated by a distance of a few meters. These two devices are examples of the new applications that are enabled as the dielectric elastomer technology commercially emerges. Future improvements to dielectric elastomers could enable new capabilities in clean electrical power generation from ocean waves, for example.

  5. Dielectric Heaters for Testing Spacecraft Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert; Bitteker, Leo; Godfroy, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A document proposes the development of radio-frequency-(RF)-driven dielectric heaters for non-nuclear thermal testing of the cores of nuclear-fission reactors for spacecraft. Like the electrical-resistance heaters used heretofore for such testing, the dielectric heaters would be inserted in the reactors in place of nuclear fuel rods. A typical heater according to the proposal would consist of a rod of lossy dielectric material sized and shaped like a fuel rod and containing an electrically conductive rod along its center line. Exploiting the dielectric loss mechanism that is usually considered a nuisance in other applications, an RF signal, typically at a frequency .50 MHz and an amplitude between 2 and 5 kV, would be applied to the central conductor to heat the dielectric material. The main advantage of the proposal is that the wiring needed for the RF dielectric heating would be simpler and easier to fabricate than is the wiring needed for resistance heating. In some applications, it might be possible to eliminate all heater wiring and, instead, beam the RF heating power into the dielectric rods from external antennas.

  6. Microwave dielectric behavior of vegetation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrayes, Mohamed A.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave dielectric behavior of vegetation was examined through the development of theoretical models involving dielectric dispersion by both bound and free water and supported by extensive dielectric measurements conducted over a wide range of conditions. The experimental data were acquired using an open-ended coaxial probe that was developed for sensing the dielectric constant of thin layers of materials, such as leaves, from measurements of the complex reflection coefficient using a network analyzer. The probe system was successfully used to record the spectral variation of the dielectric constant over a wide frequency range extending from 0.5 to 20.4 GHz at numerous temperatures between -40 to +40 C. The vegetation samples were measured over a wide range of moisture conditions. To model the dielectric spectrum of the bound water component of the water included in vegetation, dielectric measurements were made for several sucrose-water solutions as analogs for the situation in vegetation. The results were used in conjunction with the experimental data for leaves to determine some of the constant coefficients in the theoretical models. Two models, both of which provide good fit to the data, are proposed.

  7. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  8. A Compact 5.5 GHz Band-Rejected UWB Antenna Using Complementary Split Ring Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. M.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    A band-removal property employing microwave frequencies using complementary split ring resonators (CSRRs) is applied to design a compact UWB antenna wishing for the rejection of some frequency band, which is meanwhile exercised by the existing wireless applications. The reported antenna comprises optimization of a circular radiating patch, in which slotted complementary SRRs are implanted. It is printed on low dielectric FR4 substrate material fed by a partial ground plane and a microstrip line. Validated results exhibit that the reported antenna shows a wide bandwidth covering from 3.45 to more than 12 GHz, with a compact dimension of 22 × 26 mm2, and VSWR < 2, observing band elimination of 5.5 GHz WLAN band. PMID:24971379

  9. A compact 5.5 GHz band-rejected UWB antenna using complementary split ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Islam, M M; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2014-01-01

    A band-removal property employing microwave frequencies using complementary split ring resonators (CSRRs) is applied to design a compact UWB antenna wishing for the rejection of some frequency band, which is meanwhile exercised by the existing wireless applications. The reported antenna comprises optimization of a circular radiating patch, in which slotted complementary SRRs are implanted. It is printed on low dielectric FR4 substrate material fed by a partial ground plane and a microstrip line. Validated results exhibit that the reported antenna shows a wide bandwidth covering from 3.45 to more than 12 GHz, with a compact dimension of 22 × 26 mm(2), and VSWR < 2, observing band elimination of 5.5 GHz WLAN band. PMID:24971379

  10. Compaction of Space Mission Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.

    2004-01-01

    The current solid waste management system employed on the International Space Station (ISS) consists of compaction, storage, and disposal. Wastes such plastic food packaging and trash are compacted manually and wrapped in duct tape footballs by the astronauts. Much of the waste is simply loaded either into the empty Russian Progress vehicle for destruction on reentry or into Shuttle for return to Earth. This manual method is wasteful of crew time and does not transition well to far term missions. Different wastes onboard spacecraft vary considerably in their characteristics and in the appropriate method of management. In advanced life support systems for far term missions, recovery of resources such as water from the wastes becomes important. However waste such as plastic food packaging, which constitutes a large fraction of solid waste (roughly 21% on ISS, more on long duration missions), contains minimal recoverable resource. The appropriate management of plastic waste is waste stabilization and volume minimization rather than resource recovery. This paper describes work that has begun at Ames Research Center on development of a heat melt compactor that can be used on near term and future missions, that can minimize crew interaction, and that can handle wastes with a significant plastic composition. The heat melt compactor takes advantage of the low melting point of plastics to compact plastic materials using a combination of heat and pressure. The US Navy has demonstrated successful development of a similar unit for shipboard application. Ames is building upon the basic approach demonstrated by the Navy to develop an advanced heat melt type compactor for space mission type wastes.

  11. Two Piece Compaction Die Design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Ethan N

    2010-03-01

    Compaction dies used to create europium oxide and tantalum control plates were modeled using ANSYS 11.0. Two-piece designs were considered in order to make the dies easier to assemble than the five-piece dies that were previously used. The two areas of concern were the stresses at the interior corner of the die cavity and the distortion of the cavity wall due to the interference fit between the two pieces and the pressure exerted on the die during the compaction process. A successful die design would have stresses less than the yield stress of the material and a maximum wall distortion on the order of 0.0001 in. Design factors that were investigated include the inner corner radius, the value of the interference fit, the compaction force, the size of the cavity, and the outer radius and geometry of the outer ring. The results show that for the europium oxide die, a 0.01 in. diameter wire can be used to create the cavity, leading to a 0.0055 in. radius corner, if the radial interference fit is 0.003 in. For the tantalum die, the same wire can be used with a radial interference fit of 0.001 in. Also, for the europium oxide die with a 0.003 in. interference fit, it is possible to use a wire with a diameter of 0.006 in. for the wire burning process. Adding a 10% safety factor to the compaction force tends to lead to conservative estimates of the stresses but not for the wall distortion. However, when the 10% safety factor is removed, the wall distortion is not affected enough to discard the design. Finally, regarding the europium oxide die, when the cavity walls are increased by 0.002 in. per side or the outer ring is made to the same geometry as the tantalum die, all the stresses and wall distortions are within the desired range. Thus, the recommendation is to use a 0.006 in. diameter wire and a 0.003 in. interference fit for the europium oxide die and a 0.01 in. diameter wire and a 0.001 in. interference fit for the tantalum die. The dies can also be made to have the

  12. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  13. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  14. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  15. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  16. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  17. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  18. Dielectric constants of soils at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, F. E.; Williams, D.

    1972-01-01

    A knowledge of the complex dielectric constant of soils is essential in the interpretation of microwave airborne radiometer data of the earth's surface. Measurements were made at 37 GHz on various soils from the Phoenix, Ariz., area. Extensive data have been obtained for dry soil and soil with water content in the range from 0.6 to 35 percent by dry weight. Measurements were made in a two arm microwave bridge and results were corrected for reflections at the sample interfaces by solution of the parallel dielectric plate problem. The maximum dielectric constants are about a factor of 3 lower than those reported for similar soils at X-band frequencies.

  19. Dielectric gas mixtures containing sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Chathan M.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically insulating gaseous media of unexpectedly high dielectric strength comprised of mixtures of two or more dielectric gases are disclosed wherein the dielectric strength of at least one gas in each mixture increases at less than a linear rate with increasing pressure and the mixture gases are present in such proportions that the sum of their electrical discharge voltages at their respective partial pressures exceeds the electrical discharge voltage of each individual gas at the same temperature and pressure as that of the mixture.

  20. Antenna dielectric sealing process characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, M.L.; Yerganian, S.S.

    1994-04-01

    An antenna assembly experienced leak test failures during TMS testing. The leaks were occurring between the dielectric and housing. The antenna assembly dielectric is sealed into a nickel-plated aluminum housing using a tin catalyzed condensation cure silicone (RTV). In preparation for sealing, the dielectric and housing are chemically cleaned and then plasma cleaned. The surfaces to be sealed are primed, RTV is applied, and the RTV is cured in a humidity chamber. This report is an evaluation of the production process and includes FEM analysis and process characterization and control (PC&C) data.

  1. Dielectric characterization of a nonlinear optical material.

    PubMed

    Lunkenheimer, P; Krohns, S; Gemander, F; Schmahl, W W; Loidl, A

    2014-01-01

    Batisite was reported to be a nonlinear optical material showing second harmonic generation. Using dielectric spectroscopy and polarization measurements, we provide a thorough investigation of the dielectric and charge-transport properties of this material. Batisite shows the typical characteristics of a linear lossy dielectric. No evidence for ferro- or antiferroelectric polarization is found. As the second-harmonic generation observed in batisite points to a non-centrosymmetric structure, this material is piezoelectric, but most likely not ferroelectric. In addition, we found evidence for hopping charge transport of localized charge carriers and a relaxational process at low temperatures. PMID:25109553

  2. Study of dielectric relaxation process in nanocomposite of Li{sub 2}O−SiO{sub 2} nanoglass-CuO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dhriti Ranjan Chakravorty, Dipankar

    2014-04-24

    Dielectric behaviour of a nanocomposite consisting of 23Li{sub 2}O⋅77SiO{sub 2} nanoglass within the pores of compacted CuO nanoparticles was studied. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity of the material were measured over the temperature range 313 to 363 K. The results indicated a relaxation behaviour. The data were explained by a space charge polarization model developed in the case of a laminar conductor. The activation energy of the relaxation process was in close agreement with that of lithium ion conduction in the nanoglass.

  3. Incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Boesenberg, J.S.; Britt, D.T.; Rovers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2010-01-22

    We document the size distributions and locations of voids present within five highly porous equilibrated ordinary chondrites using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) and helium pycnometry. We found total porosities ranging from {approx}10 to 20% within these chondrites, and with {mu}CT we show that up to 64% of the void space is located within intergranular voids within the rock. Given the low (S1-S2) shock stages of the samples and the large voids between mineral grains, we conclude that these samples experienced unusually low amounts of compaction and shock loading throughout their entire post accretionary history. With Fe metal and FeS metal abundances and grain size distributions, we show that these chondrites formed naturally with greater than average porosities prior to parent body metamorphism. These materials were not 'fluffed' on their parent body by impact-related regolith gardening or events caused by seismic vibrations. Samples of all three chemical types of ordinary chondrites (LL, L, H) are represented in this study and we conclude that incomplete compaction is common within the asteroid belt.

  4. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  5. Manufacturability of compact synchrotron mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Gary M.

    1997-11-01

    While many of the government funded research communities over the years have put their faith and money into increasingly larger synchrotrons, such as Spring8 in Japan, and the APS in the United States, a viable market appears to exist for smaller scale, research and commercial grade, compact synchrotrons. These smaller, and less expensive machines, provide the research and industrial communities with synchrotron radiation beamline access at a portion of the cost of their larger and more powerful counterparts. A compact synchrotron, such as the Aurora-2D, designed and built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. of japan (SHI), is a small footprint synchrotron capable of sustaining 20 beamlines. Coupled with a Microtron injector, with 150 MeV of injection energy, an entire facility fits within a 27 meter [88.5 ft] square floorplan. The system, controlled by 2 personal computers, is capable of producing 700 MeV electron energy and 300 mA stored current. Recently, an Aurora-2D synchrotron was purchased from SHI by the University of Hiroshima. The Rocketdyne Albuquerque Operations Beamline Optics Group was approached by SHI with a request to supply a group of 16 beamline mirrors for this machine. These mirrors were sufficient to supply 3 beamlines for the Hiroshima machine. This paper will address engineering issues which arose during the design and manufacturing of these mirrors.

  6. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred; Lewis, Irwin Charles

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counterelectrode.

  7. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  8. A compact THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sešek, Aleksander; Å vigelj, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is the development of a compact low cost imaging THz system, usable for observation of the objects near to the system and also for stand-off detection. The performance of the system remains at the high standard of more expensive and bulkiest system on the market. It is easy to operate as it is not dependent on any fine mechanical adjustments. As it is compact and it consumes low power, also a portable system was developed for stand-off detection of concealed objects under textile or inside packages. These requirements rule out all optical systems like Time Domain Spectroscopy systems which need fine optical component positioning and requires a large amount of time to perform a scan and the image capture pixel-by-pixel. They are also almost not suitable for stand-off detection due to low output power. In the paper the antenna - bolometer sensor microstructure is presented and the THz system described. Analysis and design guidelines for the bolometer itself are discussed. The measurement results for both near and stand-off THz imaging are also presented.

  9. Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik Teoman Turgut, O.

    2013-12-15

    A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: •Schrödinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. •Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. •Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. •Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

  10. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  11. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  12. Cold compaction of water ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; McKinnon, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrostatic compaction of granulated water ice was measured in laboratory experiments at temperatures 77 K to 120 K. We performed step-wise hydrostatic pressurization tests on 5 samples to maximum pressures P of 150 MPa, using relatively tight (0.18-0.25 mm) and broad (0.25-2.0 mm) starting grain-size distributions. Compaction change of volume is highly nonlinear in P, typical for brittle, granular materials. No time-dependent creep occurred on the lab time scale. Significant residual porosity (???0.10) remains even at highest P. Examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals a random configuration of fractures and broad distribution of grain sizes, again consistent with brittle behavior. Residual porosity appears as smaller, well-supported micropores between ice fragments. Over the interior pressures found in smaller midsize icy satellites and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), substantial porosity can be sustained over solar system history in the absence of significant heating and resultant sintering. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Dense and Homogeneous Compaction of Fine Ceramic and Metallic Powders: High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki Y.

    2008-02-15

    High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process (HCP) is a variation of colloidal compacting method, in which the powders sediment under huge centrifugal force. Compacting mechanism of HCP differs from conventional colloidal process such as slip casting. The unique compacting mechanism of HCP leads to a number of characteristics such as a higher compacting speed, wide applicability for net shape formation, flawless microstructure of the green compacts, etc. However, HCP also has several deteriorative characteristics that must be overcome to fully realize this process' full potential.

  14. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  15. Dielectric relaxation studies of ion diffusion into low-k dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Archana; Shaw, Thomas; Liniger, Eric; Chen, Fen; Grill, Alfred; Borja, Juan; Bonilla, Griselda; Plawsky, Joel; Heinz, Tony; Laibowitz, Robert

    2014-03-01

    High speed interconnects in advanced integrated circuits require ultra-low-k dielectrics to reduce the RC time constant. Reduction of the dielectric constant in these films is typically achieved via incorporation of nanopores in materials containing silicon, carbon, oxygen and hydrogen (SiCOH). Trap states build-up as dielectric breakdown is approached and increased leakage is observed. To understand the mechanism of breakdown we study nanoporous SiCOH films of k=2.4 to 2.7 primarily using dielectric relaxation. Dielectric films, in the thickness range of 40 nm, are incorporated into interwoven capacitor structures. To quantify dielectric relaxation in the pre-breakdown regime, capacitance and dielectric losses are determined as a function of frequency and temperature. Through these dielectric measurements, we have obtained activation energies in the range of 0.1-0.2 eV for humidified and annealed capacitors; and 0.9-1.2 eV for copper ion incursion into the dielectric. We also deduce a charge center density of 1015/cm3. Our measurements provide an estimate of the impurity content and changes in activation energy with annealing and other fabrication parameters.

  16. A modified field model of waveguide reflection dielectric resonator for microwave measurements of dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Jyh

    2008-02-01

    A modified electromagnetic field model of a waveguide reflection dielectric resonator is suggested for measurements of dielectric properties of the homogeneous and isotropic medium in the microwave frequencies. Reflection signal is measured for the calculations of dielectric properties. A dielectric rod sample is put inside of a rectangular cavity made by a microwave waveguide. The sample's dielectric constant and loss tangent are computed from the unloaded quality factor and the resonant frequency of the TE01δ mode as well as the structure dimensions. For first time, this waveguide reflection dielectric resonator is applied on dielectric constant measurement. A modified field model of the waveguide reflection resonator is developed from the Itoh-Rudokas model [IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. MTT-25, 52 (1977)] of the parallel-plate dielectric resonator. This modification is justified by the dramatic improvement in the accuracy of dielectric constant measurements. The main merit of this field model is that it provides very simple electromagnetic field expressions of this TE01δ field mode. In addition, accuracies of various methods for calculating the power factor and conducting loss, which have never been given before, will be investigated in this article.

  17. Identification of Structural Relaxation in the Dielectric Response of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Kisliuk, Alexander; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Gainaru, Catalin

    2016-06-01

    One century ago pioneering dielectric results obtained for water and n -alcohols triggered the advent of molecular rotation diffusion theory considered by Debye to describe the primary dielectric absorption in these liquids. Comparing dielectric, viscoelastic, and light scattering results, we unambiguously demonstrate that the structural relaxation appears only as a high-frequency shoulder in the dielectric spectra of water. In contrast, the main dielectric peak is related to a supramolecular structure, analogous to the Debye-like peak observed in monoalcohols.

  18. Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

  19. Thermoluminescence and dielectric response of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Sukhnandan Singh, Surinder Singh, Lakhwant; Lochab, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    The effect of gamma radiation dose on the thermoluminescence (TL) and dielectric properties of muscovite mica was studied. TL glow curves exhibited a single peak around 141 {sup 0}C and its activation energy was estimated to be about 0.89 eV. Different dielectric parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity have been calculated in both pristine and gamma irradiated samples. These dielectric parameters have been studied as a function of irradiation dose.

  20. Computation of Dielectric Response in Molecular Solids for High Capacitance Organic Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Henry M; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2016-09-20

    The dielectric response of a material is central to numerous processes spanning the fields of chemistry, materials science, biology, and physics. Despite this broad importance across these disciplines, describing the dielectric environment of a molecular system at the level of first-principles theory and computation remains a great challenge and is of importance to understand the behavior of existing systems as well as to guide the design and synthetic realization of new ones. Furthermore, with recent advances in molecular electronics, nanotechnology, and molecular biology, it has become necessary to predict the dielectric properties of molecular systems that are often difficult or impossible to measure experimentally. In these scenarios, it is would be highly desirable to be able to determine dielectric response through efficient, accurate, and chemically informative calculations. A good example of where theoretical modeling of dielectric response would be valuable is in the development of high-capacitance organic gate dielectrics for unconventional electronics such as those that could be fabricated by high-throughput printing techniques. Gate dielectrics are fundamental components of all transistor-based logic circuitry, and the combination high dielectric constant and nanoscopic thickness (i.e., high capacitance) is essential to achieving high switching speeds and low power consumption. Molecule-based dielectrics offer the promise of cheap, flexible, and mass producible electronics when used in conjunction with unconventional organic or inorganic semiconducting materials to fabricate organic field effect transistors (OFETs). The molecular dielectrics developed to date typically have limited dielectric response, which results in low capacitances, translating into poor performance of the resulting OFETs. Furthermore, the development of better performing dielectric materials has been hindered by the current highly empirical and labor-intensive pace of synthetic

  1. Computation of Dielectric Response in Molecular Solids for High Capacitance Organic Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Henry M; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2016-09-20

    The dielectric response of a material is central to numerous processes spanning the fields of chemistry, materials science, biology, and physics. Despite this broad importance across these disciplines, describing the dielectric environment of a molecular system at the level of first-principles theory and computation remains a great challenge and is of importance to understand the behavior of existing systems as well as to guide the design and synthetic realization of new ones. Furthermore, with recent advances in molecular electronics, nanotechnology, and molecular biology, it has become necessary to predict the dielectric properties of molecular systems that are often difficult or impossible to measure experimentally. In these scenarios, it is would be highly desirable to be able to determine dielectric response through efficient, accurate, and chemically informative calculations. A good example of where theoretical modeling of dielectric response would be valuable is in the development of high-capacitance organic gate dielectrics for unconventional electronics such as those that could be fabricated by high-throughput printing techniques. Gate dielectrics are fundamental components of all transistor-based logic circuitry, and the combination high dielectric constant and nanoscopic thickness (i.e., high capacitance) is essential to achieving high switching speeds and low power consumption. Molecule-based dielectrics offer the promise of cheap, flexible, and mass producible electronics when used in conjunction with unconventional organic or inorganic semiconducting materials to fabricate organic field effect transistors (OFETs). The molecular dielectrics developed to date typically have limited dielectric response, which results in low capacitances, translating into poor performance of the resulting OFETs. Furthermore, the development of better performing dielectric materials has been hindered by the current highly empirical and labor-intensive pace of synthetic

  2. Microscopic versus macroscopic calculation of dielectric nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, M.; Kliem, H.

    2008-12-01

    The issue of nanodielectrics has recently become an important field of interest. The term describes nanometric dielectrics, i. e. dielectric materials with structural dimensions typically smaller than 100 run. In contrast to the behaviour of a bulk material the nanodielectrics can behave completely different. With shrinking dimensions the surface or rather boundary effects outweigh the volume effects. This leads to a different observable physics at the nanoscale. A crucial point is the question whether a continuum model for the calculation of dielectric properties is still applicable for these nanomaterials. In order to answer this question we simulated dielectric nanospheres with a microscopic local field method and compared the results to the macroscopic mean field theory.

  3. Kerr effect in multilayer dielectric coatings.

    PubMed

    Fedulova, Elena; Trubetskov, Michael; Amotchkina, Tatiana; Fritsch, Kilian; Baum, Peter; Pronin, Oleg; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-09-19

    We report the utilization of the optical Kerr effect in multilayer dielectric coatings, previously discussed only theoretically. We present the design and realization of multilayer dielectric optical structures with layer-specific Kerr nonlinearities, which permit tailoring of the intensity-dependent effects. The modulation depth in reflectance reaches up to 6% for the demonstrated examples of dielectric nonlinear multilayer coatings. We show that the nonlinearity is based on the optical Kerr effect, with the recovery time faster than the laser pulse envelope of 1 ps. Due to high flexibility in design, the reported dielectric nonlinear multilayer coatings have the potential to open hitherto unprecedented possibilities in nonlinear optics and ultrafast laser applications. PMID:27661917

  4. New electrode materials for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Lam, Tuling; Biggs, James; Hu, Liangbing; Yu, Zhibin; Ha, Soonmok; Xi, Dongjuan; Senesky, Matthew K.; Grüner, George; Pei, Qibing

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators exert strain due to an applied electric field. With advantageous properties such as high efficiency and their light weight, these actuators are attractive for a variety of applications ranging from biomimetic robots, medical prosthetics to conventional pumps and valves. The performance and reliability however, are limited by dielectric breakdown which occurs primarily from localized defects inherently present in the polymer film during actuation. These defects lead to electric arcing, causing a short circuit that shuts down the entire actuator and can lead to actuator failure at fields significantly lower than the intrinsic strength of the material. This limitation is particularly a problem in actuators using large-area films. Our recent studies have shown that the gap between the strength of the intrinsic material and the strength of large-area actuators can be reduced by electrically isolating defects in the dielectric film. As a result, the performance and reliability of dielectric elastomers actuators can be substantially improved.

  5. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  6. Rapid Sintering of Nano-Diamond Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, A.; Nauyoks, S; Zerda, T; Zaporozhets, O

    2009-01-01

    Diamond compacts were sintered from nano-size diamond crystals at high pressure, 8 GPa, and temperature above 1500 degrees C for very short times ranging from 5 to 11 s. Structure and mechanical properties of the compacts have been characterized. Although we have not completely avoided graphitization of diamonds, the amount of graphite produced was low, less than 2%, and despite relatively high porosity, the compacts were characterized by high hardness, bulk and Young moduli.

  7. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  8. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  9. Low-loss coupling to dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, C. P.; Bradshaw, E. S.; Trew, R. J.; Hefner, B. B., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    A compilation is presented of experimental observations and arguments concerning the use of dielectric resonators in applications requiring both tight coupling (beta greater than 10) and high unloaded Q, such as low loss bandpass filters. The microstrip coupled dielectric resonator is the primary focus, but an alternative coupling technique is discussed and comparatively evaluated. It is concluded that coupling factors as large as 65 are achievable.

  10. Composite Dielectric Materials for Electrical Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.

    1999-04-25

    Composites that consist of a dielectric host containing a particulate conductor as a second phase are of interest for electrical switching applications. Such composites are "smart" materials that can function as either voltage or current limiters, and the difference in fimction depends largely upon whether the dielectric is filled to below or above the percolation threshold. It also is possible to combine current and voltage limiting in a single composite to make a "super-smart" material.

  11. Coaxial configuration of the dielectric Cherenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Gavate, E.P.; Fisher, A. . Dept. of Physics); Main, W.G. . Lab. for Plasma Research)

    1990-10-01

    The linearized Lorentz force, continuity equation, and Maxwell's equations are used to calculate the system dispersion relation for a coaxial configuration of the dielectric Cherenkov maser. The system consists of two coaxial conductors lined with dielectric and an annular relativistic electron beam, which propagates between the two liners. Using the linearized dispersion relation, the growth rate for the beam-TM{sub on} waveguide mode instability is calculated in the strong-coupling tenuous beam limit.

  12. Method of casting patterned dielectric structures

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2001-01-01

    A pattern of dielectric structures are formed directly on a substrate in a single step using sol-gel chemistry and molding procedures. The resulting dielectric structures are useful in vacuum applications for electronic devices. Porous, lightweight structures having a high aspect ratio that are suitable for use as spacers between the faceplate and baseplate of a field emission display can be manufactured using this method.

  13. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2009: Measurement Analysis and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alun; Williams, Graham

    2009-07-01

    The conference Dielectrics 2009: Measurements, Analysis and Applications represents a significant milestone in the evolution of dielectrics research in the UK. It is reasonable to state that the academic study of dielectrics has led to many fundamental advances and that dielectric materials underpin the modern world in devices ranging from field effect transistors, which operate at extremely high fields, albeit low voltages, to the high voltage plants that provide the energy that powers our economy. The origins of the Dielectrics Group of the Institute of Physics (IOP), which organized this conference, can be traced directly back to the early 1960s, when Professor Mansel Davies was conducting research into the dielectric relaxation behaviour of polar liquids and solids at The Edward Davies Chemical Laboratories of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. He was already well-known internationally for his studies of molecular structure and bonding of small molecules, using infra-red-spectroscopy, and of the physical properties of hydrogen-bonded liquids and solids, using thermodynamic methods. Dielectric spectroscopy was a fairly new area for him and he realized that opportunities for scientists in the UK to gather together and discuss their research in this developing area of physical chemistry/chemical physics were very limited. He conceived the idea of forming a Dielectrics Discussion Group (DDG), which would act as a meeting point and provide a platform for dielectrics research in the UK and beyond and, as a result, a two-day Meeting was convened in the spring of 1968 at Gregynog Hall of the University of Wales, near Newtown, Montgomeryshire. It was organized by Mansel Davies, Alun Price and Graham Williams, all physical chemists from the UCW, Aberystwyth. Fifty scientists attended, being a mix of physical chemists, theoretical chemists, physicists, electrical engineers, polymer and materials scientists, all from the UK, except Dr Brendan Scaife of Trinity

  14. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Gibbons, Brady J.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Park, Bae Ho

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  15. Dielectric Characterization of Costal Cartilage Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Michael W.; Sabuncu, Ahmet Can; Beskok, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Chondrocytes respond to biomechanical and bioelectrochemical stimuli by secreting appropriate extracellular matrix proteins that enables the tissue to withstand the large forces it experiences. Although biomechanical aspects of cartilage are well described, little is known of the bioelectrochemical responses. The focus of this study is to identify bioelectrical characteristics of human costal cartilage cells using dielectric spectroscopy. Methods Dielectric spectroscopy allows non-invasive probing of biological cells. An in house computer program is developed to extract dielectric properties of human costal cartilage cells from raw cell suspension impedance data measured by a microfluidic device. The dielectric properties of chondrocytes are compared with other cell types in order to comparatively assess the electrical nature of chondrocytes. Results The results suggest that electrical cell membrane characteristics of chondrocyte cells are close to cardiomyoblast cells, cells known to possess an array of active ion channels. The blocking effect of the non-specific ion channel blocker gadolinium is tested on chondrocytes with a significant reduction in both membrane capacitance and conductance. Conclusions We have utilized a microfluidic chamber to mimic biomechanical events through changes in bioelectrochemistry and described the dielectric properties of chondrocytes to be closer to cells derived from electrically excitably tissues General significance and interest The studydescribes dielectric characterization of human costal chondrocyte cells using physical tools, where results and methodology can be used to identify potential anomalies in bioelectrochemical responses that may lead to cartilage disorders. PMID:24016606

  16. Dielectric loss against piezoelectric power harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junrui; Shu-Hung Chung, Henry; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2014-09-01

    Piezoelectricity is one of the most popular electromechanical transduction mechanisms for constructing kinetic energy harvesting systems. When a standard energy harvesting (SEH) interface circuit, i.e., bridge rectifier plus filter capacitor, is utilized for collecting piezoelectric power, the previous literature showed that the power conversion can be well predicted without much consideration for the effect of dielectric loss. Yet, as the conversion power gets higher by adopting power-boosting interface circuits, such as synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI), the neglect of dielectric loss might give rise to deviation in harvested power estimation. Given the continuous progress on power-boosting interface circuits, the role of dielectric loss in practical piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) systems should receive attention with better evaluation. Based on the integrated equivalent impedance network model, this fast track communication provides a comprehensive study on the susceptibility of harvested power in PEH systems under different conditions. It shows that, dielectric loss always counteracts piezoelectric power harvesting by causing charge leakage across piezoelectric capacitance. In particular, taking corresponding ideal lossless cases as references, the counteractive effect might be aggravated under one of the five conditions: larger dielectric loss tangent, lower vibration frequency, further away from resonance, weaker electromechanical coupling, or using power-boosting interface circuit. These relationships are valuable for the study of PEH systems, as they not only help explain the role of dielectric loss in piezoelectric power harvesting, but also add complementary insights for material, structure, excitation, and circuit considerations towards holistic evaluation and design for practical PEH systems.

  17. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian; Ignat, Mircea

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  18. Diffractive coherence in multilayer dielectric gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Feit, M.D.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D.; Britten, J.A.; Li, Lifeng

    1995-05-26

    Successful operation of large-scale high-power lasers, such as those in use and planned at LLNL and elsewhere, require optical elements that can withstand extremely high fluences without suffering damage. Of particular concern are dielectric diffraction gratings used for beam sampling and pulse compression. Laser induced damage to bulk dielectric material originates with coupling of the electric field of the radiation to bound electrons, proceeding through a succession of mechanisms that couple the electron kinetic energy to lattice energy and ultimately to macroscopic structural changes (e.g. melting). The constructive interference that is responsible for the diffractive behavior of a grating or the reflective properties of a multilayer dielectric stack can enhance the electric field above values that would occur in unstructured homogeneous material. Much work has been done to model damage to bulk matter. The presence of nonuniform electric fields, resulting from diffractive coherence, has the potential to affect damage thresholds and requires more elaborate theory. We shall discuss aspects of work directed towards understanding the influence of dielectric structures upon damage, with particular emphasis on computations and interpretation of electric fields within dielectric gratings and multilayer dielectric stacks, noting particularly the interference effects that occur in these structures.

  19. Dielectric Properties of Low-Level Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    L. E. Lagos; M. A. Ebadian

    1998-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to develop a data collection containing values for the dielectric properties of various low-level liquid waste (LLLW) simulants measured as a function of frequency, temperature, and composition. The investigation was motivated by current interest in the use of microwave processing for the treatment of radioactive waste. A large volume of transuranic liquid and sludge produced by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) during the production of nuclear fiel bars is stored at several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites around the United States. Waste storage and disposal space is scarce, expensive, and must be minimized. Thus, several DOE sites are pursuing the use of microwave heating as a means of achieving volume reduction and solidification of low-level liquid wastes. It is important to know which microwave frequencies should be employed tc achieve the most efficient processing at a range of different temperatures. The dielectric properties of the LLLW simulants can be utilized to determine the optimum frequencies for use with a particular LLLW or with other LLLWS of similar composition. Furthermore, nonlinear thermal processes, such as thermal runaway, which occur in the material being treated cannot be modeled without a knowledge of the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties. Often, this data does not exist; however, when it does, only very limited data near room temperature are available. The data collection generated in this study can be used to predict the behavior of a variety of microwave thermal treatment technologies, which have the potential of substantially reducing the volume of the LLLWS that are currently stored at many DOE sites. This information should help the users of the microwave reduction and solidification technology to optimize microwave processes used in the treatment of LLLW. The microwave reduction and solidification technology has clear advantages over other methods of reducing LLLWS. These

  20. A compact versatile femtosecond spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, V.; Johnson, E.; Schellenberg, P.; Parson, W.; Windeler, R.

    2002-12-01

    A compact apparatus for femtosecond pump-probe experiments is described. The apparatus is based on a cavity-dumped titanium:sapphire laser. Probe pulses are generated by focusing weak (˜1 nJ) pulses into a microstructure fiber that produces broadband continuum pulses with high efficiency. With the pump pulses compressed and probe pulses uncompressed, the rise time of the pump-probe signals is <100 fs. The 830 nm pump pulses are also frequency doubled to generate light for excitation at 415 nm. The versatility of the spectrometer is demonstrated by exciting molecules at either 830 or 415 nm, and probing at wavelengths ranging from 500 to 950 nm. Some results on the green fluorescent protein are presented.

  1. A Compact Wakefield Measurement Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2015-10-01

    The conceptual design of a compact, photoinjector-based, facility for high precision measurements of wakefields is presented. This work is motivated by the need for a thorough understanding of beam induced wakefield effects for any future linear collider. We propose to use a high brightness photoinjector to generate (approximately) a 2 nC, 2 mm-mrad drive beam at 20 MeV to excite wakefields and a second photoinjector to generate a 5 MeV, variably delayed, trailing witness beam to probe both the longitudinal and transverse wakefields in the structure under test. Initial estimates show that we can detect a minimum measurable dipole transverse wake function of 0.1 V/pC/m/mm and a minimum measurable monopole longitudinal wake function of 2.5 V/pC/m. Simulations results for the high brightness photoinjector, calculations of the facility's wakefield measurement resolution, and the facility layout are presented.

  2. Compact anti-radon facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  3. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  4. Compact hybrid particulate collector (COHPAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method for retrofit filtering of particulates in a flue gas from a combustion source having an existing conventional electrostatic precipitator connected thereto and a smoke stack connected to the precipitator. It comprises: removing at least one discharge electrode and collecting electrode from within the housing of the electrostatic precipitator; attaching a tubesheet within the housing; supporting a compact baghouse filter within the separate filter section by the tubesheet; whereby the remaining discharge electrodes and corresponding collecting electrodes in the electrostatis precipitator serve to remove a majority of particulates form the flue gas and impart a residual charge on remaining particulates discharged to the separate filter section, and the remaining particulates are collected by the baghouse filter before the residual electric charge substantially dissipates.

  5. Compact Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2009-04-01

    ): In this paper we present design considerations, thermal and optical modeling results, and device performance for a ruggedized, compact laser transmitter that utilizes a room temperature quantum cascade (QC) laser source. The QC laser transmitter is intended for portable mid-infrared (3-12 µm) spectroscopy applications, where the atmospheric transmission window is relatively free of water vapor interference and where the molecular rotational vibration absorption features can be used to detect and uniquely identify chemical compounds of interest. Initial QC laser-based sensor development efforts were constrained by the complications of cryogenic operation. However, improvements in both QC laser designs and fabrication processes have provided room-temperature devices that now enable significant miniaturization and integration potential for national security, environmental monitoring, atmospheric science, and industrial safety applications.

  6. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 {mu}s pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity.

  7. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Methane Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-09-01

    With the large amount of nature gas discovery every year, there is an increasing interest on modification of methane. The fact that methane is gaseous makes it less economic and efficient than liquid fuel. Here we propose a new way of converting methane from gas phase to liquid phase. Dielectric barrier discharge is used to treat methane and nitrogen mixture bubbles inside of liquid fuel. Nitrogen is here to help activate methane into an excited state, then it is possible for the excited molecules to react with other liquid hydrocarbon. Gaseous methane is converted in to liquid phase when excited methane replace a hydrogen and add onto the carbon chain. In this study some preliminary experiments is done to verify this hypothesis. There is equivalent weight increases with methane and nitrogen mixture discharging in diesel when compare to only nitrogen discharging in diesel. The same experiment have also been done with gas mixture discharged in 1-methylnaphthalene. And FTIR analysis of the after treatment hydrocarbon liquid all indicates that there is an increasing in C-H bond concentration and a decreasing in phenyl ring structure.

  8. Laser produced nanocavities in dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallo, Ludovic; Bourgeade, Antoine; Mezel, Candice; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Gamaly, Eugene

    2006-10-01

    Tight focusing of the laser pulses opens a possibility to modify the properties of transparent materials and create high-density memories and photonic crystals. It was demonstrated recently [1,2] a formation of sub-wavelength holes by focusing a 100 ns, 100 fs laser pulses inside samples of sapphir and glass. This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of the interaction of sub-ps laser pulses with transparent dielectrics. It contains two parts : a 2D model of the laser energy deposition, based on the solution of full Maxwell equations coupled to a ionisation model accounting for the multiphotonic and avalanche ionisation, and the 3-body recombination. The second part presents the 2D hydrodynamic simulations of the shock wave propagation and the cavity formation with initial conditions provided by 2D absorption model. It is shown that the cavity parameters are very sensitive to the properties of the EOS in the phase transition domain. [1] E.G. Gamaly, S. Juodkazis, K. Nishimura, H. Misawa, B. Luther-Davies, L. Hallo, Ph. Nicola"i, V. T. Tikhonchuk, Phys. Rev. B 73, 214101 (2006). [2] S. Juodkazis, K. Nishimura, S. Tanaka, H. Misawa, E.G. Gamaly, B. Luther-Davies, L. Hallo, Ph. Nicola"i, V. T. Tikhonchuk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 166101 (2006).

  9. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  10. Ductile compaction in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    Silicic magmas typically outgas through connected pore and crack networks with a high gas permeability without the need for decoupled movement of pores in the melt. It is the efficiency with which this process can occur which governs the pressure in the pore network. However, such a connected coupled network is generally mechanically unstable and will relax until volume equilibrium when the pores become smaller and isolated. Consequently, gas permeability can be reduced during densification. Cycles of outgassing events recorded in gas monitoring data show that permeable flow of volatiles is often transient, which is interpreted to reflect magma densification and the closing of pore-networks. Understanding the timescale over which this densification process occurs is critical to refining conduit models that seek to predict the pressure evolution in a pore-network leading to eruptions. We conduct uniaxial compaction experiments to parameterize non-linear creep and relaxation processes that occur in magmas with total pore fractions 0.2-0.85. We analyze our results by applying both viscous sintering and viscoelastic deformation theory to test the applicability of currently accepted models to flow dynamics in the uppermost conduit involving highly porous magmas. We show that purely ductile compaction can occur rapidly and that pore networks can close over timescales analogous to the inter-eruptive periods observed during classic cyclic eruptions such as those at Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, in 1997. At upper-conduit axial stresses (0.1-5 MPa) and magmatic temperatures (830-900 oC), we show that magmas can evolve to porosities analogous to dome lavas erupted at the same volcano. Such dramatic densification events over relatively short timescales and in the absence of brittle deformation show that permeable flow will be inhibited at upper conduit levels. We therefore propose that outgassing is a key feature at many silicic volcanoes and should be incorporated into

  11. Conceptual Design of Dielectric Accelerating Structures for Intense Neutron and Monochromatic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Blanovsky, Anatoly

    2004-12-07

    Bright compact photon sources, which utilize electron beam interaction with periodic structures, may benefit a broad range of medical, industrial and scientific applications. A class of dielectric-loaded periodic structures for hard and soft X-ray production has been proposed that would provide a high accelerating gradient when excited by an external RF and/or primary electron beam. Target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which an additional electric field compensates for lost beam energy in internal targets, have been shown to provide the necessary means to drive a high flux subcritical reactor (HFSR) for nuclear waste transmutation. The TDA may also be suitable for positron and nuclear isomer production, X-ray lithography and monochromatic computer tomography. One of the early assumptions of the theory of dielectric wake-field acceleration was that, in electrodynamics, the vector potential was proportional to the scalar potential. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed phenomena, a layered compound separated by a Van der Waals gap and a compact energy source based on fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector. The FEC is a high-voltage power source that directly converts the kinetic energy of the fission fragments into electrical potential of about 2MV.

  12. Fruit and Vegetable Quality Assessment via Dielectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    El Khaled, Dalia; Novas, Nuria; Gazquez, Jose A.; Garcia, Rosa M.; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost. This fact enhances the possibility of improving the quality of horticultural products, leading towards healthier consumption of fruits and vegetables. A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose. Moreover, a focused study of dielectric spectroscopy and advanced dielectric sensing is a highly interesting topic. This review explains the dielectric property basics and classifies the dielectric spectroscopy measurement techniques. It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions. An in-depth definition of dielectric spectroscopy and its usefulness in the electric characterization of food materials is presented, along with the various sensor techniques used for dielectric measurements. The collective data are tabulated in a summary of the dielectric findings in horticultural field investigations, which will facilitate more advanced and focused explorations in the future. PMID:26131680

  13. Fruit and Vegetable Quality Assessment via Dielectric Sensing.

    PubMed

    El Khaled, Dalia; Novas, Nuria; Gazquez, Jose A; Garcia, Rosa M; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2015-06-29

    The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost. This fact enhances the possibility of improving the quality of horticultural products, leading towards healthier consumption of fruits and vegetables. A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose. Moreover, a focused study of dielectric spectroscopy and advanced dielectric sensing is a highly interesting topic. This review explains the dielectric property basics and classifies the dielectric spectroscopy measurement techniques. It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions. An in-depth definition of dielectric spectroscopy and its usefulness in the electric characterization of food materials is presented, along with the various sensor techniques used for dielectric measurements. The collective data are tabulated in a summary of the dielectric findings in horticultural field investigations, which will facilitate more advanced and focused explorations in the future.

  14. Fruit and Vegetable Quality Assessment via Dielectric Sensing.

    PubMed

    El Khaled, Dalia; Novas, Nuria; Gazquez, Jose A; Garcia, Rosa M; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost. This fact enhances the possibility of improving the quality of horticultural products, leading towards healthier consumption of fruits and vegetables. A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose. Moreover, a focused study of dielectric spectroscopy and advanced dielectric sensing is a highly interesting topic. This review explains the dielectric property basics and classifies the dielectric spectroscopy measurement techniques. It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions. An in-depth definition of dielectric spectroscopy and its usefulness in the electric characterization of food materials is presented, along with the various sensor techniques used for dielectric measurements. The collective data are tabulated in a summary of the dielectric findings in horticultural field investigations, which will facilitate more advanced and focused explorations in the future. PMID:26131680

  15. Graphene encapsulated rubber latex composites with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and low percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Liqun; Liu, Suting; Zan, Xiaoqing; Nishi, Toshio; Ning, Nanying

    2014-09-15

    A dielectric composite with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and low percolation threshold was prepared by using the combined strategy of encapsulating of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS) on carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR) latex particles and the in situ thermal reduction in GONS at a moderate temperature. The encapsulation of GONS on XNBR latex particles was mainly realized via the hydrogen bonding interactions between GONS and XNBR during latex mixing. A segregated graphene network was obtained at a low content of thermally reduced graphene (TRG), resulting in a low percolation threshold (0.25 vol.%). The dielectric constant at 100 Hz obviously increased from 23 for pure XNBR to 2211 and 5542 for the composite with 0.5 vol.% and 0.75 vol.% of TRG, respectively. The dielectric loss of the composites retained at a low value (less than 1.5). Meanwhile, the elastic modulus only slightly increased with the presence of 0.1-0.5 vol.% of TRG, keeping the good flexibility of the dielectric composites. This study provides a simple, low-cost and effective method to prepare high performance dielectric composites, facilitating the wide application of dielectric materials.

  16. Temperature and Moisture Dependent Dielectric Properties of Legume Flours Associated with Dielectric Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric property data are important in developing thermal treatments using radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) energy and essential to estimate the heating uniformity in electromagnetic fields. Dielectric properties of flour samples from four legumes (chickpea, green pea, lentil, and soybean)...

  17. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.; Kinkead, Allen K.; Gai Wei; Power, John G.; Konecny, Richard; Jing Chunguang; Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, Ralph W.; Bruce, Robert L.; Lewis, David III

    2004-12-07

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the StanFord Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron injector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  18. Development of a 20-MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.G.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R.W.; Bruce, R.L.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lewis, D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /LET Corp., Washington /Argonne /SLAC /Tsinghua U., Beijing

    2005-06-22

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron inector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx} 8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRl, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  19. Polarization-tuned Dynamic Color Filters Incorporating a Dielectric-loaded Aluminum Nanowire Array

    PubMed Central

    Raj Shrestha, Vivek; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured spectral filters enabling dynamic color-tuning are saliently attractive for implementing ultra-compact color displays and imaging devices. Realization of polarization-induced dynamic color-tuning via one-dimensional periodic nanostructures is highly challenging due to the absence of plasmonic resonances for transverse-electric polarization. Here we demonstrate highly efficient dynamic subtractive color filters incorporating a dielectric-loaded aluminum nanowire array, providing a continuum of customized color according to the incident polarization. Dynamic color filtering was realized relying on selective suppression in transmission spectra via plasmonic resonance at a metal-dielectric interface and guided-mode resonance for a metal-clad dielectric waveguide, each occurring at their characteristic wavelengths for transverse-magnetic and electric polarizations, respectively. A broad palette of colors, including cyan, magenta, and yellow, has been attained with high transmission beyond 80%, by tailoring the period of the nanowire array and the incident polarization. Thanks to low cost, high durability, and mass producibility of the aluminum adopted for the proposed devices, they are anticipated to be diversely applied to color displays, holographic imaging, information encoding, and anti-counterfeiting. PMID:26211625

  20. Polarization-tuned Dynamic Color Filters Incorporating a Dielectric-loaded Aluminum Nanowire Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj Shrestha, Vivek; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured spectral filters enabling dynamic color-tuning are saliently attractive for implementing ultra-compact color displays and imaging devices. Realization of polarization-induced dynamic color-tuning via one-dimensional periodic nanostructures is highly challenging due to the absence of plasmonic resonances for transverse-electric polarization. Here we demonstrate highly efficient dynamic subtractive color filters incorporating a dielectric-loaded aluminum nanowire array, providing a continuum of customized color according to the incident polarization. Dynamic color filtering was realized relying on selective suppression in transmission spectra via plasmonic resonance at a metal-dielectric interface and guided-mode resonance for a metal-clad dielectric waveguide, each occurring at their characteristic wavelengths for transverse-magnetic and electric polarizations, respectively. A broad palette of colors, including cyan, magenta, and yellow, has been attained with high transmission beyond 80%, by tailoring the period of the nanowire array and the incident polarization. Thanks to low cost, high durability, and mass producibility of the aluminum adopted for the proposed devices, they are anticipated to be diversely applied to color displays, holographic imaging, information encoding, and anti-counterfeiting.

  1. Parametric generation of energetic short mid-infrared pulses for dielectric laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandel, S.; Xu, G.; Yin, Y.; Jovanovic, I.

    2014-12-01

    Laser-driven high-gradient electron acceleration in dielectric photonic structures is an enabling technology for compact and robust sources of tunable monochromatic x-rays. Such advanced x-ray sources are sought in medical imaging, security, industrial, and scientific applications. The use of long-wavelength pulses can mitigate the problem of laser-induced breakdown in dielectric structures at high optical intensities, relax the structure fabrication requirements, and allow greater pulse energy to be injected into the structure. We report on the design and construction of a simple and robust, short-pulse parametric source operating at a center wavelength 5 μm, to be used as a pump for a dielectric photonic structure for laser-driven acceleration. The source is based on a two-stage parametric downconversion design, consisting of a β-BaB2O4-based 2.05 μm optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a ZnGeP2-based 5 μm OPA. The 2.05 μm OPA is presently pumped by a standard Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplified laser, which will be replaced with direct laser pumping at wavelengths \\gt 2 μ m in the future. The design and performance of the constructed short-pulse mid-infrared source are described. The demonstrated architecture is also of interest for use in other applications, such as high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse production.

  2. Dielectric effect on electric fields in the vicinity of the metal-vacuum-dielectric junction.

    PubMed

    Chung, M S; Mayer, A; Miskovsky, N M; Weiss, B L; Cutler, P H

    2013-09-01

    The dielectric effect was theoretically investigated in order to describe the electric field in the vicinity of a junction of a metal, dielectric, and vacuum. The assumption of two-dimensional symmetry of the junction leads to a simple analytic form and to a systematic numerical calculation for the field. The electric field obtained for the triple junction was found to be enhanced or reduced according to a certain criterion determined by the contact angles and dielectric constant. Further numerical calculations of the dielectric effect show that an electric field can experience a larger enhancement or reduction for a quadruple junction than that achieved for the triple junction. It was also found that even though it changes slowly in comparison with the shape effect, the dielectric effect was noticeably large over the entire range of the shape change.

  3. Achieving all-dielectric left-handed metamaterials via single-sized dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhuo; Du, Bai; Xia, Song; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Qu, Shaobo

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate that using single-sized dielectric resonators, all-dielectric left-handed metamaterial (LHM) can be achieved in the C-band microwave regime. The single-sized rectangular resonator, operating under higher-order resonant modes, possesses electric and magnetic responses simultaneously, leading to the double-negative resonance behavior. We find that the electric/magnetic resonance can be enhanced by elongating the size of the rectangular resonators along the electric field direction. It is shown that polarization currents in dielectric resonators are the same as conduction currents in cut-wire pairs. Experiments were carried out to verify the designed all-dielectric LHM. The proposed method provides a convenient route to all-dielectric LHMs.

  4. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  5. Strength of field compacted clayey embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Lovell, C. W.

    1982-02-01

    The shearing behavior of a plastic Indiana clay (St. Croix) was studied for both laboratory and field compaction. This interim report deals with the field compacted phase. The strength tests were performed by unconsolidated undrained (UU) and saturated consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxials. These were run at various confining pressures to approximate the end of construction and long term conditions at several embankment depths.

  6. The non-compact Weyl equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doikou, Anastasia; Ioannidou, Theodora

    2011-04-01

    A non-compact version of the Weyl equation is proposed, based on the infinite dimensional spin zero representation of the mathfrak{s}{mathfrak{l}_2} algebra. Solutions of the aforementioned equation are obtained in terms of the Kummer functions. In this context, we discuss the ADHMN approach in order to construct the corresponding non-compact BPS monopoles.

  7. Extracting surface wave-coupled emission with subsurface dielectric gratings.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dong; Zhang, Douguo; Chen, Yikai; Zhu, Liangfu; Han, Lu; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2014-08-01

    Conventional surface plasmons (SPs) or Bloch surface waves (BSWs) have a wave vector exceeding that of light in vacuum, and, therefore, the surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) or Bloch surface wave-coupled emission (BSWCE) cannot escape from the corresponding structures. With the aid of a high-refractive-index prism or an oil-immersion objective, the SPCE or BSWCE can be coupled into free space. But the large volumes of the prism and objective are certainly unfavorable for miniaturization of the optical systems or inconvenient for applications such as the optical displays. Here we experimentally demonstrate a new method to extract the SPCE or BSWCE with a subsurface dielectric grating. The experimental results verify that the chip-like substrate with two decorated sides can bring out the directional fluorescence emission in free space. The emitting direction and emitting patterns can be tuned by the period size and dimensionality of the gratings. Our work provides a new strategy to realize free-space directional fluorescence emission at a very low cost and compact configuration, which has potential applications in fluorescence-based sensing, imaging, light-emitting diodes, optical displays, and other near-field optical devices.

  8. Flexible dielectric elastomer actuators for wearable human-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Biggs, James; Srinivasan, Mandayam

    2006-03-01

    Wearable dielectric elastomer actuators have the potential to enable new technologies, such as tactile feedback gloves for virtual reality, and to improve existing devices, such as automatic blood pressure cuffs. They are potentially lighter, quieter, thinner, simpler, and cheaper than pneumatic and hydraulic systems now used to make compliant, actuated interfaces with the human body. Achieving good performance without using a rigid frame to prestrain the actuator is a fundamental challenge in using these actuators on body. To answer this challenge, a new type of fiber-prestrained composite actuator was developed. Equations that facilitate design of the actuator are presented, along with FE analysis, material tests, and experimental results from prototypes. Bending stiffness of the actuator material was found to be comparable to textiles used in clothing, confirming wearability. Two roll-to-roll machines are also presented that permit manufacture of this material in bulk as a modular, compact, prestressed composite that can be cut, stacked, and staggered, in order to build up actuators for a range of desired forces and displacements. The electromechanical properties of single- layered actuators manufactured by this method were measured (N=5). At non-damaging voltages, blocking force ranged from 3,7-5,0 gram per centimeter of actuator width, with linear strains of 20,0-30%. Driving the actuators to breakdown produced maximum force of 8,3-10 gram/cm, and actuation strain in excess 30%. Using this actuator, a prototype tactile display was constructed and demonstrated.

  9. Extracting surface wave-coupled emission with subsurface dielectric gratings

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Dong; Zhang, Douguo; Chen, Yikai; Zhu, Liangfu; Han, Lu; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional surface plasmons (SPs) or Bloch surface waves (BSWs) have a wave vector exceeding that of light in vacuum, and, therefore, the surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) or Bloch surface wave-coupled emission (BSWCE) cannot escape from the corresponding structures. With the aid of a high-refractive-index prism or an oil-immersion objective, the SPCE or BSWCE can be coupled into free space. But the large volumes of the prism and objective are certainly unfavorable for miniaturization of the optical systems or inconvenient for applications such as the optical displays. Here we experimentally demonstrate a new method to extract the SPCE or BSWCE with a subsurface dielectric grating. The experimental results verify that the chip-like substrate with two decorated sides can bring out the directional fluorescence emission in free space. The emitting direction and emitting patterns can be tuned by the period size and dimensionality of the gratings. Our work provides a new strategy to realize free-space directional fluorescence emission at a very low cost and compact configuration, which has potential applications in fluorescence-based sensing, imaging, light-emitting diodes, optical displays, and other near-field optical devices. PMID:25078172

  10. Nanoactuators Based on Electrostatic Forces on Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2005-01-01

    Nanoactuators of a proposed type would exploit the forces exerted by electric fields on dielectric materials. As used here, "nanoactuators" includes motors, manipulators, and other active mechanisms that have dimensions of the order of nanometers and/or are designed to manipulate objects that have dimensions of the order of nanometers. The underlying physical principle can be described most simply in terms of the example of a square parallel-plate capacitor in which a square dielectric plate is inserted part way into the gap between the electrode plates (see Figure Typically, the force is small from our macroscopic human perspective. The above equation shows that the force depends on the ratio between the capacitor dimensions but does not depend on the size. In other words, the force remains the same if the capacitor and the dielectric slab are shrunk to nanometer dimensions. At the same time, the masses of all components are proportional to third power of their linear dimensions. Therefore the force-to-mass ratio (and, consequently, the acceleration that can be imparted to the dielectric slab) is much larger at the nanoscale than at the macroscopic scale. The proposed actuators would exploit this effect. The upper part of Figure 2 depicts a simple linear actuator based on a parallel- plate capacitor similar to Figure 1. In this case, the upper electrode plate would be split into two parts (A and B) and the dielectric slab would be slightly longer than plate A or B. The actuator would be operated in a cycle. During the first half cycle, plate B would be grounded to the lower plate and plate A would be charged to a potential, V, with respect to the lower plate, causing the dielectric slab to be pulled under plate A. During the second half cycle, plate A would be grounded and plate B would be charged to potential V, causing the dielectric slab to be pulled under plate B. The back-and-forth motion caused by alternation of the voltages on plates A and B could be used

  11. Compact atmospheric pressure plasma self-resonant drive circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, V. J.; Anghel, S. D.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on compact solid-state self-resonant drive circuits that are specifically designed to drive an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge of small volume (0.5 cm3). The atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) device can be operated with helium, argon or a mixture of both. Equivalent electrical models of the self-resonant drive circuits and discharge are developed and used to estimate the plasma impedance, plasma power density, current density or electron number density of three APP devices. These parameters and the kinetic gas temperature are dependent on the self-resonant frequency of the APP device. For a fixed switching frequency and APP device geometry, the plasma parameters are controlled by adjusting the dc voltage at the primary coil and the gas flow rate. The resonant frequency is controlled by the selection of the switching power transistor and means of step-up voltage transformation (ferrite core, flyback transformer, or Tesla coil). The flyback transformer operates in the tens of kHz, the ferrite core in the hundreds of kHz and Tesla coil in the MHz range. Embedded within this work is the principle of frequency pulling which is exemplified in the flyback transformer circuit that utilizes a pickup coil for feedback control of the switching frequency.

  12. Accelerating Dielectrics Design Using Thinking Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramprasad, R.

    2013-03-01

    High energy density capacitors are required for several pulsed power and energy storage applications, including food preservation, nuclear test simulations, electric propulsion of ships and hybrid electric vehicles. The maximum electrostatic energy that can be stored in a capacitor dielectric is proportional to its dielectric constant and the square of its breakdown field. The current standard material for capacitive energy storage is polypropylene which has a large breakdown field but low dielectric constant. We are involved in a search for new classes of polymers superior to polypropylene using first principles computations combined with statistical and machine learning methods. Essential to this search are schemes to efficiently compute the dielectric constant of polymers and the intrinsic dielectric breakdown field, as well as methods to determine the stable structures of new classes of polymers and strategies to efficiently navigate through the polymer chemical space offered by the periodic table. These methodologies have been combined with statistical learning paradigms in order to make property predictions rapidly, and promising classes of polymeric systems for energy storage applications have been identified. This work is being supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Evaluation of high temperature capacitor dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Myers, Ira T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate four candidate materials for high temperature capacitor dielectric applications. The materials investigated were polybenzimidazole polymer and three aramid papers: Voltex 450, Nomex 410, and Nomex M 418, an aramid paper containing 50 percent mica. The samples were heat treated for six hours at 60 C and the direct current and 60 Hz alternating current breakdown voltages of both dry and impregnated samples were obtained in a temperature range of 20 to 250 C. The samples were also characterized in terms of their dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity over this temperature range with an electrical stress of 60 Hz, 50 V/mil present. Additional measurements are underway to determine the volume resistivity, thermal shrinkage, and weight loss of the materials. Preliminary data indicate that the heat treatment of the films slightly improves the dielectric properties with no influence on their breakdown behavior. Impregnation of the samples leads to significant increases in both alternating and direct current breakdown strength. The results are discussed and conclusions made concerning their suitability as high temperature capacitor dielectrics.

  14. Microwave dielectric properties of plant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Jedlicka, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Three waveguide transmission systems covering the 1-2, 3.5-6.5, and 7.5-8.5 GHZ bands were used to measure the dielectric properties of vegetation material as a function of moisture content and microwave frequency. The materials measured included, primarily, the leaves and stalks of corn and wheat. Dielectric measurements also were made of the liquid included in the vegetation material after it was extracted from the vegetation by mechanical means. The extracted liquids were found to have an equivalent NaCl salinity of about 10 per mil, which can have a significant effect on the dielectric loss at frequencies below 5 GHz. The results of attempts to model the dielectric constant of the vegetatioon-water mixture in terms of the dielectric constants and volume fractions of its constituent parts (i.e., bulk vegetation, air, bound water, and free water) are discussed. Additionally, measurements of the temporal variations in the total attenuation at 10.2 GHz are presented for a corn canopy and a soybean canopy.

  15. Dielectric Genome of van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kirsten; Latini, Simone; Thygesen, Kristian S

    2015-07-01

    Vertical stacking of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, has recently lead to a new class of materials known as van der Waals heterostructures (vdWHs) with unique and highly tunable electronic properties. Ab initio calculations should in principle provide a powerful tool for modeling and guiding the design of vdWHs, but in their traditional form such calculations are only feasible for commensurable structures with a few layers. Here we show that the dielectric properties of realistic, incommensurable vdWHs comprising hundreds of layers can be efficiently calculated using a multiscale approach where the dielectric functions of the individual layers (the dielectric building blocks) are computed ab initio and coupled together via the long-range Coulomb interaction. We use the method to illustrate the 2D-3D transition of the dielectric function of multilayer MoS2 crystals, the hybridization of quantum plasmons in thick graphene/hBN heterostructures, and to demonstrate the intricate effect of substrate screening on the non-Rydberg exciton series in supported WS2. The dielectric building blocks for a variety of 2D crystals are available in an open database together with the software for solving the coupled electrodynamic equations.

  16. Harnessing Quantum Interference in Molecular Dielectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Bergfield, Justin P; Heitzer, Henry M; Van Dyck, Colin; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2015-06-23

    We investigate the relationship between dielectric response and charge transport in molecule-based materials operating in the quantum coherent regime. We find that quantum interference affects these observables differently, for instance, allowing current passing through certain materials to be reduced by orders of magnitude without affecting dielectric behavior (or band gap). As an example, we utilize ab initio electronic structure theory to calculate conductance and dielectric constants of cross-conjugated anthraquinone (AQ)-based and linearly conjugated anthracene (AC)-based materials. In spite of having nearly equal fundamental gaps, electrode bonding configurations, and molecular dimensions, we find a ∼1.7 order of magnitude (∼50-fold) reduction in the conductance of the AQ-based material relative to the AC-based material, a value in close agreement with recent measurements, while the calculated dielectric constants of both materials are nearly identical. From these findings, we propose two molecular materials in which quantum interference is used to reduce leakage currents across a ∼25 Å monolayer gap with dielectric constants larger than 4.5.

  17. Evaluation of high temperature capacitor dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Myers, Ira T.

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate four candidate materials for high temperature capacitor dielectric applications. The materials investigated were polybenzimidazole polymer and three aramid papers: Voltex 450, Nomex 410, and Nomex M 418, an aramid paper containing 50 percent mica. The samples were heat treated for six hours at 60 C and the direct current and 60 Hz alternating current breakdown voltages of both dry and impregnated samples were obtained in a temperature range of 20 to 250 C. The samples were also characterized in terms of their dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity over this temperature range with an electrical stress of 60 Hz, 50 V/mil present. Additional measurements are underway to determine the volume resistivity, thermal shrinkage, and weight loss of the materials. Preliminary data indicate that the heat treatment of the films slightly improves the dielectric properties with no influence on their breakdown behavior. Impregnation of the samples leads to significant increases in both alternating and direct current breakdown strength. The results are discussed and conclusions made concerning their suitability as high temperature capacitor dielectrics.

  18. Calculation of the dielectric properties of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, G. E.; Farid, Behnam

    1992-12-01

    We report on numerical calculations of the dynamical dielectric function in silicon, using a continued-fraction expansion of the polarizability and a recently proposed representation of the inverse dielectric function in terms of plasmonlike excitations. A number of important technical refinements to further improve the computational efficiency of the method are introduced, making the ab initio calculation of the full energy dependence of the dielectric function comparable in cost to calculation of its static value. Physical results include the observation of previously unresolved features in the random-phase approximated dielectric function and its inverse within the framework of density-functional theory in the local-density approximation, which may be accessible to experiment. We discuss the dispersion of plasmon energies in silicon along the Λ and Δ directions and find improved agreement with experiment compared to earlier calculations. We also present quantitative evidence indicating the degree of violation of the Johnson f-sum rule for the dielectric function due to the nonlocality of the one-electron potential used in the underlying band-structure calculations.

  19. Dynamic compaction of granular materials

    PubMed Central

    Favrie, N.; Gavrilyuk, S.

    2013-01-01

    An Eulerian hyperbolic multiphase flow model for dynamic and irreversible compaction of granular materials is constructed. The reversible model is first constructed on the basis of the classical Hertz theory. The irreversible model is then derived in accordance with the following two basic principles. First, the entropy inequality is satisfied by the model. Second, the corresponding ‘intergranular stress’ coming from elastic energy owing to contact between grains decreases in time (the granular media behave as Maxwell-type materials). The irreversible model admits an equilibrium state corresponding to von Mises-type yield limit. The yield limit depends on the volume fraction of the solid. The sound velocity at the yield surface is smaller than that in the reversible model. The last one is smaller than the sound velocity in the irreversible model. Such an embedded model structure assures a thermodynamically correct formulation of the model of granular materials. The model is validated on quasi-static experiments on loading–unloading cycles. The experimentally observed hysteresis phenomena were numerically confirmed with a good accuracy by the proposed model. PMID:24353466

  20. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector.

  1. Compact drilling and sample system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Petercsak, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The Compact Drilling and Sample System (CDSS) was developed to drill into terrestrial, cometary, and asteroid material in a cryogenic, vacuum environment in order to acquire subsurface samples. Although drills were used by the Apollo astronauts some 20 years ago, this drill is a fraction of the mass and power and operates completely autonomously, able to drill, acquire, transport, dock, and release sample containers in science instruments. The CDSS has incorporated into its control system the ability to gather science data about the material being drilled by measuring drilling rate per force applied and torque. This drill will be able to optimize rotation and thrust in order to achieve the highest drilling rate possible in any given sample. The drill can be commanded to drill at a specified force, so that force imparted on the rover or lander is limited. This paper will discuss the cryo dc brush motors, carbide gears, cryogenic lubrication, quick-release interchangeable sampling drill bits, percussion drilling and the control system developed to achieve autonomous, cryogenic, vacuum, lightweight drilling.

  2. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  3. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector. PMID:27417510

  4. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  5. Novel Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic Material System Composed of Dielectrics with Different Dielectric Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Sadaaki; Adachi, Hiroshige; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Sugimoto, Yasutaka; Takada, Takahiro

    2013-09-01

    We found that the co-firing low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) materials of different dielectric constants (ɛr) with Cu wiring is achievable using a novel, original design. It was confirmed that the dielectric characteristics of the dielectrics designed in this study are very suitable for the use of the dielectrics in electronic components such as filters mounted in high-speed radio communication equipment. The dielectric constants of the lower- and higher-dielectric-coefficient materials were 8.1 and 44.5, respectively, which are sufficiently effective for downsizing LTCC components. Observing the co-fired interface, it was confirmed that excellent co-firing conditions resulted in no mechanical defects such as delamination or cracks. On the basis of the results of wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry (WDX) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), it was confirmed that co-firing with minimal interdiffusion was realized using the same glass for both dielectrics. It is concluded that the materials developed are good for co-firing in terms of the mechanical defects and interdiffusion that appear in them.

  6. Spectroscopic Investigations of Amorphous Complex Dielectric Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad

    1989-03-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A discussion of general properties of three systems of dielectric films i.e. MoO_3 and the mixed oxide systems MoO_3/In _2O_3 and MoO_3/SiO is presented. Composition, film thickness, substrate deposition temperature and annealing, all have a substantial effect on the structure and various properties of the films. General properties of these three systems of dielectric films include analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, U.V/VIS and infra-red spectroscopy including the Fourier transform technique, electrical properties both D.C and A.C at both low and high fields, and electron paramagnetic resonance. A comprehensive comparison of all the results is carried out in a correlated manner and some new ideas are presented on an established semiconducting/dielectric material. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  7. Dielectric elastomer actuators for facial expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have the advantage of mimicking the salient feature of life: movements in response to stimuli. In this paper we explore application of dielectric elastomer actuators to artificial muscles. These artificial muscles can mimic natural masseter to control jaw movements, which are key components in facial expressions especially during talking and singing activities. This paper investigates optimal design of the dielectric elastomer actuator. It is found that the actuator with embedded plastic fibers can avert electromechanical instability and can greatly improve its actuation. Two actuators are then installed in a robotic skull to drive jaw movements, mimicking the masseters in a human jaw. Experiments show that the maximum vertical displacement of the robotic jaw, driven by artificial muscles, is comparable to that of the natural human jaw during speech activities. Theoretical simulations are conducted to analyze the performance of the actuator, which is quantitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  8. Magnetic and dielectric properties of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Pearce, G. W.; Olhoeft, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Dielectric properties of lunar soil and rock samples showed a systematic character when careful precautions were taken to ensure there was no moisture present during measurement. The dielectric constant (K) above 100,000 Hz was directly dependent on density according to the formula K = (1.93 + or - 0.17) to the rho power where rho is the density in g/cc. The dielectric loss tangent was only slightly dependent on density and had values less than 0.005 for typical soils and 0.005 to 0.03 for typical rocks. The loss tangent appeared to be directly related to the metallic ilmenite content. It was shown that magnetic properties of lunar samples can be used to study the distribution of metallic and ferrous iron which shows systematic variations from soil type to soil type. Other magnetic characteristics can be used to determine the distribution of grain sizes.

  9. Radiation pressure on a dielectric wedge.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis; Moloney, Jerome

    2005-03-21

    The force of electromagnetic radiation on a dielectric medium may be derived by a direct application of the Lorentz law of classical electrodynamics. While the light's electric field acts upon the (induced) bound charges in the medium, its magnetic field exerts a force on the bound currents. We use the example of a wedge-shaped solid dielectric, immersed in a transparent liquid and illuminated at Brewster's angle, to demonstrate that the linear momentum of the electromagnetic field within dielectrics has neither the Minkowski nor the Abraham form; rather, the correct expression for momentum density has equal contributions from both. The time rate of change of the incident momentum thus expressed is equal to the force exerted on the wedge plus that experienced by the surrounding liquid.

  10. Pulsed dielectric spectroscopy of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmer, R.; Schiener, B.; Hemberger, J.; Chamberlin, R. V.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed dielectric spectroscopy is introduced as a technique for selectively emphasizing specific components of the non-exponential dielectric response of matter. Samples studied include supercooled liquid propanol, propylene carbonate, and poly(lauryl-methacrylate). It is shown that particular sequences of pulses can be used to emphasize the fast response regime, to produce a cross-over or memory effect, or to eliminate the response of selected components. Furthermore, for materials characterized by broad distributions of relaxation times, the technique facilitates the investigation of a relatively narrow band from that distribution. It is also shown that the time domain spectroscopy can be combined with conventional frequency domain techniques to provide the characterization of dielectric response over an extraordinarily broad spectral range.

  11. Plasma-filled dielectric Cherenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Kosai, H.; Garate, E.P.; Fisher, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-12-01

    The effect of a background plasma on a dielectric Cherenkov maser is examined by solving the linearized, beam-plasma, dielectric-lined waveguide dispersion relation. The results indicate that introduction of the background plasma can produce a higher spatial growth rate for the beam-waveguide instability and can reduce the electric field at the dielectric surface when compared to the system with no background plasma present. Also, it is found that for some sets of waveguide parameters, the TM{sub On} electromagnetic modes can propagate frequencies that are below the background plasma frequency in the system. These modes have a finite cut-off frequency and are different from the Trivelpiece-Gould modes for the system.

  12. Single-photon propagation through dielectric bandgaps.

    PubMed

    Borjemscaia, Natalia; Polyakov, Sergey V; Lett, Paul D; Migdall, Alan

    2010-02-01

    Theoretical models of photon traversal through quarter-wave dielectric stack barriers that arise due to Bragg reflection predict the saturation of the propagation time with the barrier length, known as the Hartman effect. This saturation is sensitive to the addition of single dielectric layers, varying significantly from sub-luminal to apparently super-luminal and vice versa. Our research tests the suitability of photonic bandgaps as an optical model for the tunneling process. Of particular importance is our observation of subtle structural changes in dielectric stacks drastically affecting photon traversal times, allowing for apparent sub- and super-luminal effects. We also introduce a simple model to link HOM visibility to wavepacket distortion that allows us to exclude this as a possible cause of the loss of contrast in the barrier penetration process. PMID:20174056

  13. Tuneable dielectric films having low electrical losses

    DOEpatents

    Dimos, Duane Brian; Schwartz, Robert William; Raymond, Mark Victor; Al-Shareef, Husam Niman; Mueller, Carl; Galt, David

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for forming dielectric thin films having substantially reduced electrical losses at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies relative to conventional dielectric thin films. The reduction in losses is realized by dramatically increasing the grain sizes of the dielectric films, thereby minimizing intergranular scattering of the microwave signal due to grain boundaries and point defects. The increase in grain size is realized by heating the film to a temperature at which the grains experience regrowth. The grain size of the films can be further increased by first depositing the films with an excess of one of the compoents, such that a highly mobile grain boundary phase is formed.

  14. Tailorable Dielectric Material with Complex Permittivity Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon Mark (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A dielectric material includes a network of nanosubstrates, such as but not limited to nanotubes, nanosheets, or other nanomaterials or nanostructures, a polymer base material or matrix, and nanoparticles constructed at least partially of an elemental metal. The network has a predetermined nanosubstrate loading percentage by weight with respect to a total weight of the dielectric material, and a preferential or predetermined longitudinal alignment with respect to an orientation of an incident electrical field. A method of forming the dielectric material includes depositing the metal-based nanoparticles onto the nanosubstrates and subsequently mixing these with a polymer matrix. Once mixed, alignment can be achieved by melt extrusion or a similar mechanical shearing process. Alignment of the nanosubstrate may be in horizontal or vertical direction with respect to the orientation of an incident electrical field.

  15. Studies on metal-dielectric plasmonic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Chettiar, Uday K.; Liu, Zhengtong; Thoreson, Mark D.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Drachev, Vladimir P.; Pack, Michael Vern; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Nyga, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of light with nanostructured metal leads to a number of fascinating phenomena, including plasmon oscillations that can be harnessed for a variety of cutting-edge applications. Plasmon oscillation modes are the collective oscillation of free electrons in metals under incident light. Previously, surface plasmon modes have been used for communication, sensing, nonlinear optics and novel physics studies. In this report, we describe the scientific research completed on metal-dielectric plasmonic films accomplished during a multi-year Purdue Excellence in Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. A variety of plasmonic structures, from random 2D metal-dielectric films to 3D composite metal-dielectric films, have been studied in this research for applications such as surface-enhanced Raman sensing, tunable superlenses with resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, enhanced molecular absorption, infrared obscurants, and other real-world applications.

  16. A compaction front in North Sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Dysthe, D. K.; Hartz, E. H.; Jamtveit, B.

    2012-04-01

    North Sea chalk from 18 wells shows a pronounced porosity drop, from ˜20% to less than 10% over a compaction front of less than 300 m. The position of the compaction frontis independent of stratigraphic position, temperature, and actual depth, but closely tied to an effective stress of ˜17 MPa. These observations require a strongly nonlinear rheology with a marked increase in compaction rate at a specific effective stress. Grain-scale observations demonstrate that the compaction front coincides with marked grain coarsening and recrystallization of fossils and fossil fragments. We propose that this nonlinear rheology is caused by stress-driven failure of the larger pores and the associated generation of reactive surface area by subcritical crack propagation away from these pores. Before the onset of this instability, compaction by pressure solution is slowed down by the inhibitory effect of organic compounds associated with the fossils. Although the compaction mechanism is mainly by pressure solution, the rheological response to burial may still be dominantly plastic and controlled by the (fracturing controlled) rate of exposure of reactive surface area. The nonlinear compaction of chalk has significant implications for the evolution of petroleum systems in the central North Sea, both with respect to sea-floor subsidence above hydrocarbon-producing chalk reservoirs and for the formation of low-porosity pressure seals within the chalk.

  17. A compaction front in North Sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Dysthe, D. K.; Hartz, E. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Yarushina, V. M.; Jamtveit, B.

    2011-11-01

    North Sea chalk from 18 wells shows a pronounced porosity drop, from ˜20% to less than 10% over a compaction front of less than 300 m. The position of the compaction front is independent of stratigraphic position, temperature, and actual depth, but closely tied to an effective stress (load stress minus fluid pressure) of ˜17 MPa. These observations require a strongly nonlinear rheology with a marked increase in compaction rate at a specific effective stress. Grain-scale observations demonstrate that the compaction front coincides with marked grain coarsening and recrystallization of fossils and fossil fragments. We propose that this nonlinear rheology is caused by stress-driven failure of the larger pores and the associated generation of reactive surface area by subcritical crack propagation away from these pores. Before the onset of this instability, compaction by pressure solution is slowed down by the inhibitory effect of organic compounds associated with the fossils. Although the compaction mechanism is mainly by pressure solution, the rheological response to burial may still be dominantly plastic and controlled by the (fracturing controlled) rate of exposure of reactive surface area. The nonlinear compaction of chalk has significant implications for the evolution of petroleum systems in the central North Sea, both with respect to sea-floor subsidence above hydrocarbon-producing chalk reservoirs and for the formation of low-porosity pressure seals within the chalk.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of compact formation; compaction, unloading, and ejection. I. Design and development of a compaction calorimeter and mechanical and thermal energy determinations of powder compaction.

    PubMed

    DeCrosta, M T; Schwartz, J B; Wigent, R J; Marshall, K

    2000-03-30

    The aim of this investigation was to determine and evaluate the thermodynamic properties, i.e. heat, work, and internal energy change, of the compaction process by developing a 'Compaction Calorimeter'. Compaction of common excipients and acetaminophen was performed by a double-ended, constant-strain tableting waveform utilizing an instrumented 'Compaction Simulator.' A constant-strain waveform provides a specific quantity of applied compaction work. A calorimeter, built around the dies, used a metal oxide thermistor to measure the temperature of the system. A resolution of 0.0001 degrees C with a sampling time of 5 s was used to monitor the temperature. An aluminum die within a plastic insulating die, in conjunction with fiberglass punches, comprised the calorimeter. Mechanical (work) and thermal (heat) calibrations of the elastic punch deformation were performed. An energy correction method was outlined to account for system heat effects and mechanical work of the punches. Compaction simulator transducers measured upper and lower punch forces and displacements. Measurements of the effective heat capacity of the samples were performed utilizing an electrical resistance heater. Specific heat capacities of the samples were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The calibration techniques were utilized to determine heat, work, and the change in internal energies of powder compaction. Future publications will address the thermodynamic evaluation of the tablet sub-processes of unloading and ejection. PMID:10722955

  19. The classification of 2 -compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Kasper K. S.; Grodal, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We prove that any connected 2 -compact group is classified by its 2 -adic root datum, and in particular the exotic 2 -compact group operatorname{DI}(4) , constructed by Dwyer-Wilkerson, is the only simple 2 -compact group not arising as the 2 -completion of a compact connected Lie group. Combined with our earlier work with Mo/ller and Viruel for p odd, this establishes the full classification of p -compact groups, stating that, up to isomorphism, there is a one-to-one correspondence between connected p -compact groups and root data over the p -adic integers. As a consequence we prove the maximal torus conjecture, giving a one-to-one correspondence between compact Lie groups and finite loop spaces admitting a maximal torus. Our proof is a general induction on the dimension of the group, which works for all primes. It refines the Andersen-Grodal-Mo/ller-Viruel methods by incorporating the theory of root data over the p -adic integers, as developed by Dwyer-Wilkerson and the authors. Furthermore we devise a different way of dealing with the rigidification problem by utilizing obstruction groups calculated by Jackowski-McClure-Oliver in the early 1990s.

  20. Method for fabrication of crack-free ceramic dielectric films

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Beihai; Narayanan, Manoj; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Chao, Sheng; Liu, Shanshan

    2016-05-31

    The invention provides a process for forming crack-free dielectric films on a substrate. The process comprises the application of a dielectric precursor layer of a thickness from about 0.3 .mu.m to about 1.0 .mu.m to a substrate. The deposition is followed by low temperature heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization step for each layer. The deposition, heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization are repeated until the dielectric film forms an overall thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m and providing a final crystallization treatment to form a thick dielectric film. The process provides a thick crack-free dielectric film on a substrate, the dielectric forming a dense thick crack-free dielectric having an overall dielectric thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m.

  1. Method for fabrication of crack-free ceramic dielectric films

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Chao, Sheng; Liu, Shanshan; Narayanan, Manoj

    2014-02-11

    The invention provides a process for forming crack-free dielectric films on a substrate. The process comprise the application of a dielectric precursor layer of a thickness from about 0.3 .mu.m to about 1.0 .mu.m to a substrate. The deposition is followed by low temperature heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization step for each layer. The deposition, heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization are repeated until the dielectric film forms an overall thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m and providing a final crystallization treatment to form a thick dielectric film. Also provided was a thick crack-free dielectric film on a substrate, the dielectric forming a dense thick crack-free dielectric having an overall dielectric thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m.

  2. Polyamide 66 as a Cryogenic Dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Messman, Jamie M; Aytug, Tolga

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in superconductor and cryogenic technologies enable novel power apparatus, \\eg, cables, transformers, fault current limiters, generators, \\etc, with better device characteristics than their conventional counterparts. In these applications electrical insulation materials play an important role in system weight, footprint (size), and voltage level. The trend in the electrical insulation material selection has been to adapt or to employ conventional insulation materials to these new systems. However, at low temperatures, thermal contraction and loss of mechanical strength in many materials make them unsuitable for superconducting power applications. In this paper, a widely used commercial material was characterized as a potential cryogenic dielectric. The material is used in ``oven bag'' a heat-resistant polyamide (nylon) used in cooking (produced by Reynolds\\textregistered, Richmond, VA, USA). It is first characterized by Fourier transform infrared and x-ray diffraction techniques and determined to be composed of polyamide 66 (PA66) polymer. Secondly the complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength of the PA66 films are investigated. The dielectric data are then compared with data reported in the literature. A comparison of dielectric strength with a widely used high-temperature superconductor electrical insulation material, polypropylene-laminated paper (PPLP\\texttrademark\\ a product of Sumitomo Electric Industries, Japan), is provided. It is observed that the statistical analysis of the PA66 films yields 1\\% failure probability at $127\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$; this value is approximately $46\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$ higher than PPLP\\texttrademark. It is concluded that PA66 may be a good candidate for cryogenic applications. Finally, a summary of dielectric properties of some of the commercial tape insulation materials and various polymers is also provided.

  3. Microporous polyimide films for reduced dielectric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, R.S.; Aubert, J.H.; McNamara, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    With all the advances in the microelectronics industry, a limiting factor to computer chip speed and size is becoming the dielectric constant of the interlayer insulating materials. Dielectric constants of these layers have been reduced in going from inorganic to organic type materials. A further reduction in dielectric constant, coupled with better mechanical properties are still required for these types of materials. The authors have developed a technique involving spincoating in conjunction with a thermodynamic process called {open_quotes}Non-solvent Induced Phase Separation{close_quotes} (NSIPS) to create microporous polyimide films that exhibit both a lower dielectric constant and better stress reduction properties compared to their solid film counterparts. In this technique, the authors spincoat a soluble polyimide solution in 1,3-dimethoxybenzene solvent onto a silicon wafer, and then immediately submerse the {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} polymer film into a non-solvent bath, typically toluene. Phase separation of the polymer occurs on a micron size scale and the resulting microporous structure becomes locked in by the high glass transition temperature of the polyimide. The authors have determined the factors affecting the film morphology, thickness, pore size, and percent porosity; these factors include the polymer concentration, spin speed, and the type of non-solvent used. The different morphologies obtained for the varying non-solvents are explained in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation and diffusion, using an idealized ternary phase diagram. One particular film having a porosity of 68%, thickness of 22 microns and pore size of 1.4 microns had a measured dielectric constant of 1.88 and dielectric loss of 0.002. Stress measurements indicated that the microporous film reduced surface stress on the wafer by more than a factor of 10 when compared to the analogous solid polyimide film.

  4. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  5. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  6. Dielectric barrier discharge image processing by Photoshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifang; Li, Xuechen; Yin, Zengqian; Zhang, Qingli

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, the filamentary pattern of dielectric barrier discharge has been processed by using Photoshop, the coordinates of each filament can also be obtained. By using Photoshop two different ways have been used to analyze the spatial order of the pattern formation in dielectric barrier discharge. The results show that the distance of the neighbor filaments at U equals 14 kV and d equals 0.9 mm is about 1.8 mm. In the scope of the experimental error, the results from the two different methods are similar.

  7. Square wave analysis of dielectric rectangular waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabas, Deepender; Sharma, Jigyasa; Raghava, N. S.; De, Asok

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, rectangular wave guides have been analyzed using a square wave incidence which can be used for digital communicat ion techniques . The E 1/mnmode of propagation is solved using Eigen functions taking transverse propagation constant in different regions of dielectric waveguide and then the characteristic equations have been derived. The characteristic equations are solved graphically by mode matching inside and outside fields of waveguide. The normalized propagation constant so obtained, for square wave incidence is compared with the sinusoidal wave obtained by Marcatili method and other methods. The results match fairly well at frequencies near the cut-off of dielectric waveguide.

  8. Design of nonradiative dielectric waveguide filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, T.; Kuroki, F.; Nishida, S.

    1984-12-01

    An efficient design technique of nonradiative dielectric waveguide filters for use at millimeter wavelengths is developed. Filter structures considered here are a gap-coupled type and an alternating-width type. According to present theory, 3-pole, 0.1-dB Chebyshev ripple bandpass filters with a 2-percent bandwidth at a center frequency of 49.5 GHz were designed and fabricated with Teflon dielectric. Calculated and measured filter responses agree quite well, and excess insertion losses are found to be as small as 0.3 dB for both types of the fabricated filter circuits.

  9. Dielectric resonators in phase-control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, Iu. M.; Loskutov, V. Iu.; Savel'Ev, A. V.

    1987-07-01

    The paper describes the design and analysis of dielectric-resonator microwave phase-shifters with good electrical properties and weight/size parameters. A reflection-type phase-shifter with a dielectric resonator has been constructed for an active phased array; the phase-shifter provides for both discrete and continuous changes of phase from 0 to 360 deg; the direct phase-shifter loss amounts to 0.5 dB. It is concluded that the proposed device can successfully compete with integrated p-i-n and semiconductor diode devices.

  10. Method for producing high dielectric strength microvalves

    DOEpatents

    Kirby, Brian J.; Reichmuth, David S.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2006-04-04

    A microvalve having a cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, polymer monolith for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. The microvalve contains a porous fluorinated polymer monolithic element whose pores are filled with an electrically insulating, high dielectric strength fluid, typically a perfluorinated liquid. This combination provides a microvalve that combines high dielectric strength with extremely low electrical conductivity. These microvalves have been shown to have resistivities of at least 100 G.OMEGA. and are compatible with solvents such as water at a pH between 2.7 and 9.0, 1-1 propanol, acetonitrile, and acetone.

  11. DIELECTRIC-LOADED WAVE-GUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Mullett, L.B.

    1957-04-23

    This patent presents a particular arrangement for delectric loading of a wave-guide carrying an electromagnetic wave in the E or TM mode of at least the second order, to reduce the power dissipated as the result of conduction loss in the wave-guide walls. To achieve this desirabie result, the effective dielectric constants in the radial direction of adjacent coaxial tubular regions bounded approximateiy by successive nodai surfaces within the electromagnetic field are of two different values alternating in the radial direction, the intermost and outermost regions being of the lower value, and the dielectric constants between nodes are uniform.

  12. Dispersion analysis with inverse dielectric function modelling.

    PubMed

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate how dispersion analysis can profit from the use of a Lorentz-type description of the inverse dielectric function. In particular at higher angles of incidence, reflectance spectra using p-polarized light are dominated by bands from modes that have their transition moments perpendicular to the surface. Accordingly, the spectra increasingly resemble inverse dielectric functions. A corresponding description can therefore eliminate the complex dependencies of the dispersion parameters, allow their determination and facilitate a more accurate description of the optical properties of single crystals.

  13. Dispersion analysis with inverse dielectric function modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G.; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate how dispersion analysis can profit from the use of a Lorentz-type description of the inverse dielectric function. In particular at higher angles of incidence, reflectance spectra using p-polarized light are dominated by bands from modes that have their transition moments perpendicular to the surface. Accordingly, the spectra increasingly resemble inverse dielectric functions. A corresponding description can therefore eliminate the complex dependencies of the dispersion parameters, allow their determination and facilitate a more accurate description of the optical properties of single crystals.

  14. The Influence of Dielectric Decrement on Electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Zhai, Shengjie

    2013-06-01

    We treat the dielectric decrement induced by excess ion polarization as a source of ion specificity and explore its impact on electrokinetics. We employ a modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations accounting for the dielectric decrement. The dielectric decrement is determined by the excess ion polarization parameter α and when α = 0 the standard PNP model is recovered. Our model shows that ions saturate at large zeta potentials (ζ). Because of ion saturation, a condensed counterion layer forms adjacent to the charged surface, introducing a new length scale, the thickness of the condensed layer (lc ). For the electro-osmotic mobility, the dielectric decrement weakens the electro-osmotic flow owing to the decrease of the dielectric permittivity. At large ζ, when α ≠ 0, the electro-osmotic mobility is found to be proportional to ζ/2, in contrast to ζ predicted by the standard PNP model. This is attributed to ion saturation at large ζ. In terms of the electrophoretic mobility Me , we carry out both an asymptotic analysis in the thin-double-layer limit and solve the full modified PNP model to compute Me . Our analysis reveals that the impact of the dielectric decrement is intriguing. At small and moderate ζ, the dielectric decrement decreases Me with an increasing α. At large ζ, it is well known that the surface conduction becomes significant and plays an important role in determining Me . It is observed that the dielectric decrement effectively reduces the surface conduction. Hence in stark contrast, Me increases as α increases. Our predictions of the contrast dependence of the mobility on α at different zeta potentials qualitatively agree with experimental results on the dependence of the mobility among ions and provide a possible explanation for such ion specificity. Finally, the comparisons between the thin-double-layer asymptotic analysis and the full simulations of the modified PNP model suggest that at large ζ the validity of the thin

  15. Dielectric detection by an electromagnetic cavity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherall, James C.; Beckley, Howard F.; Gatto, Joseph A.

    2004-09-01

    A method to screen for flammable and explosive materials in bottles by electromagnetic measurement is described. The technique makes use of an aluminum cavity having strong electromagnetic resonances in the radio wave band. An object inserted into the cavity changes the internal field configuration, and causes small, but measurable shifts in the resonant frequencies. The response depends on the electrical permittivity, or dielectric constant, of the material. By measuring the frequency change of many different cavity modes, the dielectric constant of the perturbing object can be inferred independently of the object's size and shape. We demonstrate the detection of materials in bottles using an experimental device.

  16. Thin film dielectric microstrip kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Sank, Daniel; McHugh, Sean; Lucero, Erik A.; Merrill, Andrew; Gao, Jiansong; Pappas, David; Moore, David; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-03-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors, or MKIDs, are a type of low temperature detector that exhibit intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing at microwave frequencies. We present the first theory and measurements on a MKID based on a microstrip transmission line resonator. A complete characterization of the dielectric loss and noise properties of these resonators is performed, and agrees well with the derived theory. A competitive noise equivalent power of 5×10-17 W Hz-1/2 at 10 Hz has been demonstrated. The resonators exhibit the highest quality factors known in a microstrip resonator with a deposited thin film dielectric.

  17. Frequency-dependent dielectric response model for polyimide-poly(vinilydenefluoride) multilayered dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lillo, Luigi; Bergamini, Andrea; Albino Carnelli, Dario; Ermanni, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    A physical model for the frequency-dependent dielectric response of multilayered structures is reported. Two frequency regimes defined by the relative permittivities and volume resistivities of the layers have been analytically identified and experimentally investigated on a structure consisting of polyimide and poly(vinilydenefluoride) layers. The relative permittivity follows an effective medium model at high frequency while showing a dependence on the volume resistivity at low frequency. In this regime, relative permittivities exceeding those expected from effective medium model are recorded. These findings provide insights into inhomogeneous dielectrics behavior for the development of high energy density dielectric films.

  18. Dielectric torque and orientation dynamics of liquid crystals with dielectric dispersion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y; Shiyanovskii, S V; Golovin, A B; Lavrentovich, O D

    2005-08-19

    We demonstrate that the finite rate of dielectric relaxation in liquid crystals which has been ignored previously causes profound effects in the fast dielectric reorientation of the director. We propose a theory of dielectric response in which the electric displacement depends not only on the present (as in the standard theory) but also on the past values of electric field and director. We design an experiment with a dual-frequency nematic in which the standard "instantaneous" model and our model predict effects of opposite signs; the experimental data support the latter model.

  19. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  20. Compacting a Kentucky coal for quality logs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Li, Z.; Mao, S.

    1999-07-01

    A Kentucky coal was found more difficult to be compacted into large size strong logs. Study showed that compaction parameters affecting the strength of compacted coal logs could be categorized into three groups. The first group is coal inherent properties such as elasticity and coefficient of friction, the second group is machine properties such as mold geometry, and the third group is the coal mixture preparation parameters such as particle size distribution. Theoretical analysis showed that an appropriate backpressure can reduce surface cracks occurring during ejection. This has been confirmed by the experiments conducted.

  1. A new analytical threshold voltage model for symmetrical double-gate MOSFETs with high- k gate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, T. K.; Chen, M. L.

    2007-03-01

    Based on the fully two-dimensional (2D) Poisson's solution in both silicon film and insulator layer, a compact and analytical threshold voltage model, which accounts for the fringing field effect of the short channel symmetrical double-gate (SDG) MOSFETs, has been developed. Exploiting the new model, a concerned analysis combining FIBL-enhanced short-channel effects and high- k gate dielectrics assess their overall impact on SDG MOSFET's scaling. It is found that for the same equivalent oxide thickness, the gate insulator with high- k dielectric constant which keeps a great characteristic length allows less design space than SiO 2 to sustain the same FIBL induced threshold voltage degradation.

  2. Measurements of the phase shift on reflection for low-order infrared Fabry-Perot interferometer dielectric stack mirrors.

    PubMed

    Mielke, S L; Ryan, R E; Hilgeman, T; Lesyna, L; Madonna, R G; Van Nostrand, W C

    1997-11-01

    A simple technique based on a Fizeau interferometer to measure the absolute phase shift on reflection for a Fabry-Perot interferometer dielectric stack mirror is described. Excellent agreement between the measured and predicted phase shift on reflection was found. Also described are the salient features of low-order Fabry-Perot interferometers and the demonstration of a near ideal low-order (1-10) Fabry-Perot interferometer through minimizing the phase dispersion on reflection of the dielectric stack. This near ideal performance of a low-order Fabry-Perot interferometer should enable several applications such as compact spectral imagers for solid and gas detection. The large free spectral range of such systems combined with an active control system will also allow simple interactive tuning of wavelength agile laser sources such as CO(2) lasers, external cavity diode lasers, and optical parametric oscillators.

  3. Polarity-dependent dielectric torque in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mingxia; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2008-06-13

    The dielectric dispersion in the uniaxial nematic liquid crystals affects the switching dynamics of the director, as the dielectric torque is determined by not only the present values of the electric field and director but also by their past values. We demonstrate that this "dielectric memory" leads to an unusual contribution to the dielectric torque that is linear in the present field and thus polarity sensitive. This torque can be used to accelerate the "switch-off" phase of director dynamics.

  4. Fundamental Insight on Developing Low Dielectric Constant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. O.; SaintClair, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    Thermally stable, durable, insulative polyimides are in great demand for the fabrication of microelectronic devices. In this investigation dielectric and optical properties have been studied for several series of aromatic polyimides. The effect of polarizability, fluorine content, and free volume on dielectric constant was examined. In general, minimizing polarizability, maximizing free volume and fluorination all lowered dielectric constants in the polyimides studied.

  5. On the dielectric heating of dual-frequency liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chien-Hui; Wu, Benjamin; Wang, Haiying; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a non-contact birefringence probing method for studying the dielectric heating-induced temperature rise of dual-frequency liquid crystals (DFLCs). The dielectric heating effects of three DFLC mixtures are investigated quantitatively. By properly choosing the molecular structures, the dielectric heating effect can be minimized while keeping other desirable physical properties uncompromised.

  6. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Popovic, Milorad; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  7. Use of material dielectric properties for agricultural applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of materials for applications in agriculture are reviewed, and research findings on use of dielectric heating of materials and on sensing of product moisture content and other quality factors are discussed. Dielectric heating applications, include treatment of seed...

  8. Norbornylene-based polymer systems for dielectric applications

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2012-07-17

    A capacitor having at least one electrode pair being separated by a dielectric component, with the dielectric component being made of a polymer such as a norbornylene-containing polymer with a dielectric constant greater than 3 and a dissipation factor less than 0.1 where the capacitor has an operating temperature greater than 100.degree. C. and less than 170.degree. C.

  9. Electrode/Dielectric Strip For High-Energy-Density Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved unitary electrode/dielectric strip serves as winding in high-energy-density capacitor in pulsed power supply. Offers combination of qualities essential for high energy density: high permittivity of dielectric layers, thinness, and high resistance to breakdown of dielectric at high electric fields. Capacitors with strip material not impregnated with liquid.

  10. Static and dynamic effects of chirality in dielectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakes, R. S.

    2016-09-01

    Chiral dielectrics are considered from the perspective of continuum representations of spatial heterogeneity. Static effects in isotropic chiral dielectrics are predicted, provided the electric field has nonzero third spatial derivatives. The effects are compared with static chiral phenomena in Cosserat elastic materials which obey generalized continuum constitutive equations. Dynamic monopole-like magnetic induction is predicted in chiral dielectric media.

  11. Dielectric-Particle Injector For Processing Of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip L.; Gabriel, Stephen B.

    1992-01-01

    Device generates electrically charged particles of solid, or droplets of liquid, fabricated from dielectric material and projects them electrostatically, possibly injecting them into electrostatic-levitation chamber for containerless processing. Dielectric-particle or -droplet injector charges dielectric particles or droplets on zinc plate with photo-electrons generated by ultraviolet illumination, then ejects charged particles or droplets electrostatically from plate.

  12. Deep Compaction Control of Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bałachowski, Lech; Kurek, Norbert

    2015-02-01

    Vibroflotation, vibratory compaction, micro-blasting or heavy tamping are typical improvement methods for the cohesionless deposits of high thickness. The complex mechanism of deep soil compaction is related to void ratio decrease with grain rearrangements, lateral stress increase, prestressing effect of certain number of load cycles, water pressure dissipation, aging and other effects. Calibration chamber based interpretation of CPTU/DMT can be used to take into account vertical and horizontal stress and void ratio effects. Some examples of interpretation of soundings in pre-treated and compacted sands are given. Some acceptance criteria for compaction control are discussed. The improvement factors are analysed including the normalised approach based on the soil behaviour type index.

  13. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  14. Diagnostics for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Stratton; D. Johnson; R. Feder; E. Fredrickson; H. Neilson; H. Takahashi; M. Zarnstorf; M. Cole; P. Goranson; E. Lazarus; B. Nelson

    2003-09-16

    The status of planning of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) diagnostics is presented, with the emphasis on resolution of diagnostics access issues and on diagnostics required for the early phases of operation.

  15. Ceramic-polymer nanocomposites with increased dielectric permittivity and low dielectric loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Sumit Paul, Joginder; Raina, K. K.; Thakur, N. S.; Kumar, Ravi

    2014-04-24

    The use of lead free materials in device fabrication is very essential from environmental point of view. We have synthesized the lead free ferroelectric polymer nanocomposite films with increased dielectric properties. Lead free bismuth titanate has been used as active ceramic nanofillers having crystallite size 24nm and PVDF as the polymer matrix. Ferroelectric β-phase of the polymer composite films was confirmed by X-ray diffraction pattern. Mapping data confirms the homogeneous dispersion of ceramic particles into the polymer matrix. Frequency dependent dielectric constant increases up to 43.4 at 100Hz, whereas dielectric loss decreases with 7 wt% bismuth titanate loading. This high dielectric constant lead free ferroelectric polymer films can be used for energy density applications.

  16. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp, Michael P.

    2006-05-09

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  17. Dielectric elastomers: generator mode fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Eckerle, Joseph; Jeuck, Philip; Oh, Seajin; Pei, Qibing; Stanford, Scott

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomers have shown great promise as actuator materials. Their advantages in converting mechanical to electrical energy in a generator mode are less well known. If a low voltage charge is placed on a stretched elastomer prior to contraction, the contraction works against the electrostatic field pressure and raises the voltage of the charge, thus generating electrical energy. This paper discusses the fundamentals of dielectric elastomer generators, experimental verification of the phenomenon, practical issues, and potential applications. Acrylic elastomers have demonstrated an estimated 0.4 J/g specific energy density, greater than that of piezoelectric materials. Much higher energy densities, over 1 J/g, are predicted. Conversion efficiency can also be high, theoretically up to 80-90%; the paper discusses the operating conditions and materials required for high efficiency. Practical considerations may limit the specific outputs and efficiencies of dielectric elastomeric generators, tradeoffs between electronics and generator material performance are discussed. Lastly, the paper describes work on potential applications such as an ongoing effort to develop a boot generator based on dielectric elastomers, as well as other applications such as conventional power generators, backpack generators, and wave power applications.

  18. Active tuning of all-dielectric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Jürgen; Staude, Isabelle; Decker, Manuel; Rusak, Evgenia; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2015-04-28

    All-dielectric metasurfaces provide a powerful platform for highly efficient flat optical devices, owing to their strong electric and magnetic dipolar response accompanied by negligible losses at near-infrared frequencies. Here we experimentally demonstrate dynamic tuning of electric and magnetic resonances in all-dielectric silicon nanodisk metasurfaces in the telecom spectral range based on the temperature-dependent refractive-index change of a nematic liquid crystal. We achieve a maximum resonance tuning range of 40 nm and a pronounced change in the transmittance intensity up to a factor of 5. Strongly different tuning rates are observed for the electric and the magnetic response, which allows for dynamically adjusting the spectral mode separation. Furthermore, we experimentally investigate the influence of the anisotropic (temperature-dependent) dielectric environment provided by the liquid crystal on both the electric and magnetic resonances. We demonstrate that the phase transition of the liquid crystal from its nematic to its isotropic phase can be used to break the symmetry of the optical metasurface response. As such, our approach allows for spectral tuning of electric and magnetic resonances of all-dielectric metasurfaces as well as switching of the anisotropy of the optical response of the device.

  19. Transparent Conveyor of Dielectric Liquids or Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mantovani, James G.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of a transparent conveyor of small loose dielectric parti cles or small amounts of dielectric liquids has emerged as an outgro wth of an effort to develop efficient, reliable means of automated re moval of dust from solar cells and from windows of optical instrumen ts. This concept is based on the previously reported concept of an e lectrodynamic screen, according to which a grid-like electric field is established on and near a surface and is moved along the surface p erpendicularly to the grid lines. The resulting electrodynamic force s on loose dielectric particles or dielectric liquid drops in the vic inity would move the particles or drops along the surface. In the or iginal dust-removal application, dust particles would thus be swept out of the affected window area. Other potential applications may occ ur in nanotechnology -- for example, involving mixing of two or more fluids and/or nanoscale particles under optical illumination and/or optical observation.

  20. Dielectric Signatures of Annealing in Glacier Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, R. E.; Stillman, D. E.; MacGregor, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the dielectric spectra of 49 firn and ice samples from ice sheets and glaciers to better understand how differing ice formation and evolution affect electrical properties. The dielectric relaxation of ice is well known and its characteristic frequency increases with the concentration of soluble impurities in the ice lattice. We found that meteoric ice and firn generally possess two such relaxations, indicating distinct crystal populations or zonation. Typically, one population is consistent with that of relatively pure ice, and the other is significantly more impure. However, high temperatures (e.g., temperate ice), long residence times (e.g., ancient ice from Mullins Glacier, Antarctica), or anomalously high impurity concentrations favor the development of a single relaxation. These relationships suggest that annealing causes two dielectrically distinct populations to merge into one population. The dielectric response of temperate ice samples indicates increasing purity with increasing depth, suggesting final rejection of impurities from the lattice. Separately, subglacially frozen samples from the Vostok 5G ice core possess a single relaxation whose variable characteristic frequency likely reflects the composition of the source water. Multi-frequency electrical measurements on cores and in the field can track annealing of glacier ice.

  1. DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD RESONATOR ACCELERATOR MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-06

    Results are presented from experiments, and numerical analysis of wake fields set up by electron bunches passing through a cylindrical or rectangular dielectric-lined structure. These bunches excite many TM-modes, with Ez components of the wake fields sharply localized on the axis of the structure periodically behind the bunches. The experiment with the cylindrical structure, carried out at ATF Brookhaven National Laboratory, used up to three 50 MeV bunches spaced by one wake field period (21 cm) to study the superposition of wake fields by measuring the energy loss of each bunch after it passed through the 53-cm long dielectric element. The millimeter-wave spectrum of radiation excited by the passage of bunches is also studied. Numerical analysis was aimed not only to simulate the behavior of our device, but in general to predict dielectric wake field accelerator performance. It is shown that one needs to match the radius of the cylindrical dielectric channel with the bunch longitudinal rms-length to achieve optimal performance.

  2. Dielectric Elastomer Based "Grippers" for Soft Robotics.

    PubMed

    Shian, Samuel; Bertoldi, Katia; Clarke, David R

    2015-11-18

    The use of few stiff fibers to control the deformation of dielectric elastomer actuators, in particular to break the symmetry of equi-biaxial lateral strain in the absence of prestretch, is demonstrated. Actuators with patterned fibers are shown to evolve into unique shapes upon electrical actuation, enabling novel designs of gripping actuators for soft robotics. PMID:26418227

  3. Multiscale instabilities in soft heterogeneous dielectric elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Rudykh, S.; Bhattacharya, K.; deBotton, G.

    2014-01-01

    The development of instabilities in soft heterogeneous dielectric elastomers is investigated. Motivated by experiments and possible applications, we use in our analysis the physically relevant referential electric field instead of electric displacement. In terms of this variable, a closed form solution is derived for the class of layered neo-Hookean dielectrics. A criterion for the onset of electromechanical multiscale instabilities for the layered composites with anisotropic phases is formulated. A general condition for the onset of the macroscopic instability in soft multiphase dielectrics is introduced. In the example of the layered dielectrics, the essential influence of the microstructure on the onset of instabilities is revealed. We found that: (i) macroscopic instabilities dominate at moderate volume fractions of the stiffer phase, (ii) interface instabilities appear at small volume fractions of the stiffer phase and (iii) instabilities of a finite scale, comparable to the microstructure size, occur at large volume fractions of the stiffer phase. The latest new type of instabilities does not appear in the purely mechanical case and dominates in the region of large volume fractions of the stiff phase. PMID:24511258

  4. Polyvinylidene fluoride film as a capacitor dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dematos, H. V.

    1981-01-01

    Thin strips of polyvinylidene fluoride film (PVDF) with vacuum deposited electrodes were made into capacitors by conventional winding and fabrication techniques. These devices were used to identify and evaluate the performance characteristics offered by the PVDF in metallized film capacitors. Variations in capacitor parameters with temperature and frequence were evaluated and compared with other dielectric films. Their impact on capacitor applications is discussed.

  5. Dielectric Spectroscopy of Watermelons for Sensing Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of four small-sized watermelon varieties, grown and harvested to provide a range of maturities, were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe and impedance analyzer over the frequency range from 10 MHz to 1.8 GHz. Probe measurements were made on the external surface of t...

  6. Optimization of Organotin Polymers for Dielectric Applications.

    PubMed

    Treich, Gregory M; Nasreen, Shamima; Mannodi Kanakkithodi, Arun; Ma, Rui; Tefferi, Mattewos; Flynn, James; Cao, Yang; Ramprasad, Rampi; Sotzing, Gregory A

    2016-08-24

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing wide band gap dielectric materials as the next generation insulators for capacitors, photovoltaic devices, and transistors. Organotin polyesters have shown promise as high dielectric constant, low loss, and high band gap materials. Guided by first-principles calculations from density functional theory (DFT), in line with the emerging codesign concept, the polymer poly(dimethyltin 3,3-dimethylglutarate), p(DMTDMG), was identified as a promising candidate for dielectric applications. Blends and copolymers of poly(dimethyltin suberate), p(DMTSub), and p(DMTDMG) were compared using increasing amounts of p(DMTSub) from 10% to 50% to find a balance between electronic properties and film morphology. DFT calculations were used to gain further insight into the structural and electronic differences between p(DMTSub) and p(DMTDMG). Both blend and copolymer systems showed improved results over the homopolymers with the films having dielectric constants of 6.8 and 6.7 at 10 kHz with losses of 1% and 2% for the blend and copolymer systems, respectively. The energy density of the film measured as a D-E hysteresis loop was 6 J/cc for the copolymer, showing an improvement compared to 4 J/cc for the blend. This improvement is hypothesized to come from a more uniform distribution of diacid repeat units in the copolymer compared to the blend, leading toward improved film quality and subsequently higher energy density. PMID:27467895

  7. A 3M high temperature dielectric film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampl, Edward, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a dielectric film are summarized. Additionally, the film's environmental and chemical properties are listed: low shrinkage to 300 C; moisture insensitive; low outgassing under vacuum; excellent surface qualities--easy metallization of film; flame retardant; and low smoke generation. A series of graphs that display the performance characteristics of the film are also presented.

  8. Optimization of Organotin Polymers for Dielectric Applications.

    PubMed

    Treich, Gregory M; Nasreen, Shamima; Mannodi Kanakkithodi, Arun; Ma, Rui; Tefferi, Mattewos; Flynn, James; Cao, Yang; Ramprasad, Rampi; Sotzing, Gregory A

    2016-08-24

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing wide band gap dielectric materials as the next generation insulators for capacitors, photovoltaic devices, and transistors. Organotin polyesters have shown promise as high dielectric constant, low loss, and high band gap materials. Guided by first-principles calculations from density functional theory (DFT), in line with the emerging codesign concept, the polymer poly(dimethyltin 3,3-dimethylglutarate), p(DMTDMG), was identified as a promising candidate for dielectric applications. Blends and copolymers of poly(dimethyltin suberate), p(DMTSub), and p(DMTDMG) were compared using increasing amounts of p(DMTSub) from 10% to 50% to find a balance between electronic properties and film morphology. DFT calculations were used to gain further insight into the structural and electronic differences between p(DMTSub) and p(DMTDMG). Both blend and copolymer systems showed improved results over the homopolymers with the films having dielectric constants of 6.8 and 6.7 at 10 kHz with losses of 1% and 2% for the blend and copolymer systems, respectively. The energy density of the film measured as a D-E hysteresis loop was 6 J/cc for the copolymer, showing an improvement compared to 4 J/cc for the blend. This improvement is hypothesized to come from a more uniform distribution of diacid repeat units in the copolymer compared to the blend, leading toward improved film quality and subsequently higher energy density.

  9. Bandwidth enhancement of dielectric resonator antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of bandwidth enhancement of dielectric resonator antennas (DRA) using parasitic elements is reported. Substantial bandwidth enhancement for the HE(sub 11delta) mode of the stacked geometry and for the HE(sub 13delta) mode of the coplanar collinear geometry was demonstrated. Excellent radiation patterns for the HE(sub 11delta) mode were also recorded.

  10. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  11. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  12. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    SciTech Connect

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  13. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    and still be able to maintain a stable operation under extreme radioactivity and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. In the following sections, the description is given for the design and performance of this new compact PPAC, for studying the neutron-induced reactions on actinides using DANCE at LANL.

  14. Stylolite compaction and stress models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Ebner, M.; Renard, F.; Toussaint, R.

    2009-04-01

    Stylolites are rough dissolution seams that develop during pressure solution in the Earth's crust. Especially in limestone quarries they exhibit a spectacular roughness with spikes and large columns. They are visible as dark lines of residual clays and other non-dissolvable components in the white limestone. The roughening phenomena seems to be universal since stylolites can also be found in quarzites, mylonites and all kinds of rocks that undergo pressure solution. The genesis of stylolites is not well understood even though they have been used to estimate compaction and to determine the direction of the main compressive stress. We have developed a numerical model to study the dynamic development of the roughness and its dependence on stress. Based on the model we present estimates of finite strain and depth of burial. The numerical stylolites are studied in two ways: the temporal evolution of the roughness on one hand and the fractal characteristics of the roughness on the other hand. In addition we vary the noise in the model and illustrate the importance of the grain size on the roughening process. Surface energies are dominant for small wavelengths and the initial stylolite growth is non-linear and as slow as a diffusive process. However, once a critical wavelength is reached the elastic regime becomes dominant and the growth is still non-linear but not as strong as in the surface energy dominated case. The growth of the roughness speeds up and teeth structures develop. Depending on the system size the growth will reach a third regime where saturation is reached and the roughness stays constant. We will present a scaling law based on these findings that can be used to estimate finite strain from natural stylolites. The roughness of the stylolite itself is self-affine with two different roughness exponents. The switch from one exponent to the other is dependent on stress. We show how stylolites can thus be used as palaeo-stress-gauges. A variation of the

  15. Components of Dielectric Constants of Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izgorodina, Ekaterina I.

    2010-03-01

    In this study ab initio-based methods were used to calculate electronic polarizability and dipole moment of ions comprising ionic liquids [1]. The test set consisted of a number of anions and cations routinely used in the ionic liquid field. As expected, in the first approximation electronic polarizability volume turned out to be proportional to the ion volume, also calculated by means of ab initio theory. For ionic liquid ions this means that their electronic polarizabilities are at least an order of magnitude larger than those of traditional molecular solvents like water and DMSO. On this basis it may seem surprising that most of ionic liquids actually possess modest dielectric constants, falling the narrow range between 10 and 15. The lower than first expected dielectric constants of ionic liquids has been explored in this work via explicit calculations of the electronic and orientation polarization contributions to the dielectric constant using the Clausius-Mossotti equation and the Onsager theory for polar dielectric materials. We determined that the electronic polarization contribution to the dielectric constant was rather small (between 1.9 and 2.2) and comparable to that of traditional molecular solvents. These findings were explained by the interplay between two quantities, increasing electronic polarizability of ions and decreasing number of ions present in the unit volume; although electronic polarizability is usually relatively large for ionic liquid ions, due to their size there are fewer ions present per unit volume (by a factor of 10 compared to traditional molecular solvents). For ionic liquids consisting of ions with zero (e.g. BF4) or negligible (e.g. NTf2) dipole moments the calculated orientation polarization does not contribute enough to account for the whole of the measured values of the dielectric constants. We suggest that in ionic liquids an additional type of polarization, ``ionic polarization'', originating from small movements of the

  16. Analytical solutions of nonlocal Poisson dielectric models with multiple point charges inside a dielectric sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dexuan; Volkmer, Hans W.; Ying, Jinyong

    2016-04-01

    The nonlocal dielectric approach has led to new models and solvers for predicting electrostatics of proteins (or other biomolecules), but how to validate and compare them remains a challenge. To promote such a study, in this paper, two typical nonlocal dielectric models are revisited. Their analytical solutions are then found in the expressions of simple series for a dielectric sphere containing any number of point charges. As a special case, the analytical solution of the corresponding Poisson dielectric model is also derived in simple series, which significantly improves the well known Kirkwood's double series expansion. Furthermore, a convolution of one nonlocal dielectric solution with a commonly used nonlocal kernel function is obtained, along with the reaction parts of these local and nonlocal solutions. To turn these new series solutions into a valuable research tool, they are programed as a free fortran software package, which can input point charge data directly from a protein data bank file. Consequently, different validation tests can be quickly done on different proteins. Finally, a test example for a protein with 488 atomic charges is reported to demonstrate the differences between the local and nonlocal models as well as the importance of using the reaction parts to develop local and nonlocal dielectric solvers.

  17. Effect of vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation on the dielectric constant of low-k organosilicate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Shohet, J. L.; Ryan, E. T.; Nishi, Y.

    2014-11-17

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation is generated during plasma processing in semiconductor fabrications, while the effect of VUV irradiation on the dielectric constant (k value) of low-k materials is still an open question. To clarify this problem, VUV photons with a range of energies were exposed on low-k organosilicate dielectrics (SiCOH) samples at room temperature. Photon energies equal to or larger than 6.0 eV were found to decrease the k value of SiCOH films. VUV photons with lower energies do not have this effect. This shows the need for thermal heating in traditional ultraviolet (UV) curing since UV light sources do not have sufficient energy to change the dielectric constant of SiCOH and additional energy is required from thermal heating. In addition, 6.2 eV photon irradiation was found to be the most effective in decreasing the dielectric constant of low-k organosilicate films. Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy shows that these 6.2 eV VUV exposures removed organic porogens. This contributes to the decrease of the dielectric constant. This information provides the range of VUV photon energies that could decrease the dielectric constant of low-k materials most effectively.

  18. Analytical solutions of nonlocal Poisson dielectric models with multiple point charges inside a dielectric sphere.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dexuan; Volkmer, Hans W; Ying, Jinyong

    2016-04-01

    The nonlocal dielectric approach has led to new models and solvers for predicting electrostatics of proteins (or other biomolecules), but how to validate and compare them remains a challenge. To promote such a study, in this paper, two typical nonlocal dielectric models are revisited. Their analytical solutions are then found in the expressions of simple series for a dielectric sphere containing any number of point charges. As a special case, the analytical solution of the corresponding Poisson dielectric model is also derived in simple series, which significantly improves the well known Kirkwood's double series expansion. Furthermore, a convolution of one nonlocal dielectric solution with a commonly used nonlocal kernel function is obtained, along with the reaction parts of these local and nonlocal solutions. To turn these new series solutions into a valuable research tool, they are programed as a free fortran software package, which can input point charge data directly from a protein data bank file. Consequently, different validation tests can be quickly done on different proteins. Finally, a test example for a protein with 488 atomic charges is reported to demonstrate the differences between the local and nonlocal models as well as the importance of using the reaction parts to develop local and nonlocal dielectric solvers.

  19. Glass tube of high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss for external electrode fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Guangsup; Shin, Myeong-Ju; Jeong, Jong-Mun; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Hong, Byoung-Hee; Koo, Je-Huan; Kim, YunKi; Choi, Eun-Ha; Fechner, Joerg; Letz, Martin; Ott, Franz

    2007-12-01

    A glass tube of aluminosilicate glass, with high dielectric constant K{approx}6.0 and low dielectric loss tan {delta}{approx}8.0x10{sup -4}, was investigated for the external electrode fluorescent lamps (EEFLs) of a dielectric barrier discharge. Compared with conventional EEFLs made out of borosilicate glass tubes with K{approx}(4.9-5.3) and tan {delta}{approx}(2.3-2.4)x10{sup -3}, the efficiency of the aluminosilicate EEFL increases by 15%-25% even at high luminance above 20 000 cd/m{sup 2} and the pinhole stability of the aluminosilicate EEFL also improves remarkably. In a soda-lime glass EEFL with a high dielectric loss tan {delta}{approx}7.0x10{sup -3}, the luminance and pinhole stability deteriorate even with a high dielectric constant K{approx}7.2 at room temperature, because the value of tan {delta} escalates as the temperature on the external electrode increases due to the dielectric heat dissipation.

  20. Analytical solutions of nonlocal Poisson dielectric models with multiple point charges inside a dielectric sphere.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dexuan; Volkmer, Hans W; Ying, Jinyong

    2016-04-01

    The nonlocal dielectric approach has led to new models and solvers for predicting electrostatics of proteins (or other biomolecules), but how to validate and compare them remains a challenge. To promote such a study, in this paper, two typical nonlocal dielectric models are revisited. Their analytical solutions are then found in the expressions of simple series for a dielectric sphere containing any number of point charges. As a special case, the analytical solution of the corresponding Poisson dielectric model is also derived in simple series, which significantly improves the well known Kirkwood's double series expansion. Furthermore, a convolution of one nonlocal dielectric solution with a commonly used nonlocal kernel function is obtained, along with the reaction parts of these local and nonlocal solutions. To turn these new series solutions into a valuable research tool, they are programed as a free fortran software package, which can input point charge data directly from a protein data bank file. Consequently, different validation tests can be quickly done on different proteins. Finally, a test example for a protein with 488 atomic charges is reported to demonstrate the differences between the local and nonlocal models as well as the importance of using the reaction parts to develop local and nonlocal dielectric solvers. PMID:27176425

  1. Conformational preferences of DNA in reduced dielectric environments.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Asli; Sharma, Monika; Varner, Bradley Michael; Fang, Liang; Feig, Michael

    2014-09-18

    The effect of reduced dielectric environments on the conformational sampling of DNA was examined through molecular dynamics simulations. Different dielectric environments were used to model one aspect of cellular environments. Implicit solvent based on the Generalized Born methodology was used to reflect different dielectric environments in the simulations. The simulation results show a tendency of DNA structures to favor noncanonical A-like conformations rather than canonical A- and B-forms as a result of the reduced dielectric environments. The results suggest that the reduced dielectric response in cellular environments may be sufficient to enhance the sampling of A-like DNA structures compared to dilute solvent conditions.

  2. Dielectric analysis of heterogeneous biological tissues based on mixing rule.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Peiguo; Dong, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Dongming; Shi, Xuetao

    2015-01-01

    Thus far, the measurement of dielectric properties of biological tissues has been achieved on the assumption that the biological tissues are homogeneous. In fact, most tissues should be heterogeneous because there are many small structures included in these tissues, such as blood vessel, nerve fiber and so on. When the dielectric properties of these tissues are measured by conventional sensor, the results are not the dielectric properties of tissues but the effective dielectric properties of the mixture. In this paper, the influence of the inclusion in tissues on the measurement of dielectric properties of heterogeneous biological tissues is studied and the analysis of the effective dielectric properties of heterogeneous tissues based on the mixing rule is proposed. When the coaxial probe is used to measure the dielectric properties of tissue, the results are relative to the dielectric properties of inclusion, dielectric properties of background tissue and the effective volume fraction of inclusion. Therefore, the dielectric properties of inclusion could be calculated according to mixing rule, after the effective dielectric properties are measured and the effective volume fraction of inclusion is estimated.

  3. Dielectric analysis of heterogeneous biological tissues based on mixing rule.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Peiguo; Dong, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Dongming; Shi, Xuetao

    2015-01-01

    Thus far, the measurement of dielectric properties of biological tissues has been achieved on the assumption that the biological tissues are homogeneous. In fact, most tissues should be heterogeneous because there are many small structures included in these tissues, such as blood vessel, nerve fiber and so on. When the dielectric properties of these tissues are measured by conventional sensor, the results are not the dielectric properties of tissues but the effective dielectric properties of the mixture. In this paper, the influence of the inclusion in tissues on the measurement of dielectric properties of heterogeneous biological tissues is studied and the analysis of the effective dielectric properties of heterogeneous tissues based on the mixing rule is proposed. When the coaxial probe is used to measure the dielectric properties of tissue, the results are relative to the dielectric properties of inclusion, dielectric properties of background tissue and the effective volume fraction of inclusion. Therefore, the dielectric properties of inclusion could be calculated according to mixing rule, after the effective dielectric properties are measured and the effective volume fraction of inclusion is estimated. PMID:26406034

  4. Inhomogeneous deformation of circular dielectric elastomer: simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling; Ni, Na; Liu, Fan

    2014-03-01

    A variety of possible configurations have been developed to exploit the capabilities of the dielectric elastomers. Circular dielectric actuator is a simple flexible structure that can be used in many areas, for example, it can be employed to adjust the properties of the optical elements. The configurations of circular dielectric actuators range from one active dielectric region to multiple active dielectric regions. When the active dielectric regions subjected to a voltage, they will expand and compress the electrode-less regions. The circular actuator in this work consists of two electrode regions and two electrode-less regions. One electrode-less region is an annular elastomer sandwiched between the inner dielectric circle and the middle dielectric annulus. The other electrode-less region is between the middle dielectric annulus and the rigid frame. We study the properties of the actuator based on the ideal dielectric model and obtain the relationship between the applied voltage and the deformation. Additionally, the inhomogeneous deformation of the circular actuator has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally and a good correlation is achieved. The strategy presented here is generic and can be applied to other circular configurations with multiple regions. The results may contribute to the use of circular dielectric actuators in advance.

  5. Thin-ribbon tapered coupler for dielectric waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.; Otoshi, T. Y.; Shimabukuro, F. I.

    1994-01-01

    A recent discovery shows that a high-dielectric constant, low-loss, solid material can be made into a ribbon-like waveguide structure to yield an attenuation constant of less than 0.02 dB/m for single-mode guidance of millimeter/submillimeter waves. One of the crucial components that must be invented in order to guarantee the low-loss utilization of this dielectric-waveguide guiding system is the excitation coupler. The traditional tapered-to-a-point coupler for a dielectric rod waveguide fails when the dielectric constant of the dielectric waveguide is large. This article presents a new way to design a low-loss coupler for a high- or low-dielectric constant dielectric waveguide for millimeter or submillimeter waves.

  6. Unravelling the anomalous dielectric permittivity of nanoconfined electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Renou, Richard; Szymczyk, Anthony; Ghoufi, Aziz

    2015-04-21

    The dielectric properties of sodium chloride solutions confined in a hydrophilic nanocavity were investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Unlike what is observed in the bulk phase, three dielectric regimes were evidenced, namely an anomalous increase in the dielectric permittivity at low concentrations (with respect to confined pure water), a dielectric plateau at intermediate concentrations and finally a bulk-like behavior for salt concentrations higher than a critical value. It was shown that this peculiar behavior results from the competition between dielectric saturation due to the electric field generated by ions (which tends to lower the dielectric permittivity) and the ion-induced perturbation of pre-oriented water molecules inside the nanocavity which gain some rotational degrees of freedom (entropic contribution) leading to an increase in dipolar fluctuations responsible for the increase in the dielectric permittivity.

  7. Optimization of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, resonance light scattering (RLS) properties of a silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell, based on quasi-static approach and plasmon hybridization theory, are investigated. Scattering spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell has two intense and clearly separated RLS peaks and provides a potential for biosensing based on surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The two RLS peaks in silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell are optimized by tuning the geometrical dimensions. In addition, the optimal geometry is discussed to obtain the high sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. As the silver core radius increases, the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell decreases whereas increasing the middle dielectric thickness increases the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell.

  8. Optimization of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, resonance light scattering (RLS) properties of a silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell, based on quasi-static approach and plasmon hybridization theory, are investigated. Scattering spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell has two intense and clearly separated RLS peaks and provides a potential for biosensing based on surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The two RLS peaks in silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell are optimized by tuning the geometrical dimensions. In addition, the optimal geometry is discussed to obtain the high sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. As the silver core radius increases, the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell decreases whereas increasing the middle dielectric thickness increases the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell.

  9. Roller compaction of moist pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Hung, W-L; Miguélez-Morán, A M; Gururajan, B; Seville, J P K

    2010-05-31

    The compression behaviour of powders during roller compaction is dominated by a number of factors, such as process conditions (roll speed, roll gap, feeding mechanisms and feeding speed) and powder properties (particle size, shape, moisture content). The moisture content affects the powder properties, such as the flowability and cohesion, but it is not clear how the moisture content will influence the powder compression behaviour during roller compaction. In this study, the effect of moisture contents on roller compaction behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH102) was investigated experimentally. MCC samples of different moisture contents were prepared by mixing as-received MCC powder with different amount of water that was sprayed onto the powder bed being agitated in a rotary mixer. The flowability of these samples were evaluated in terms of the poured angle of repose and flow functions. The moist powders were then compacted using the instrumented roller compactor developed at the University of Birmingham. The flow and compression behaviour during roller compaction and the properties of produced ribbons were examined. It has been found that, as the moisture content increases, the flowability of moist MCC powders decreases and the powder becomes more cohesive. As a consequence of non-uniform flow of powder into the compaction zone induced by the friction between powder and side cheek plates, all produced ribbons have a higher density in the middle and lower densities at the edges. For the ribbons made of powders with high moisture contents, different hydration states across the ribbon width were also identified from SEM images. Moreover, it was interesting to find that these ribbons were split into two halves. This is attributed to the reduction in the mechanical strength of moist powder compacts with high moisture contents produced at high compression pressures.

  10. Roller compaction of moist pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Hung, W-L; Miguélez-Morán, A M; Gururajan, B; Seville, J P K

    2010-05-31

    The compression behaviour of powders during roller compaction is dominated by a number of factors, such as process conditions (roll speed, roll gap, feeding mechanisms and feeding speed) and powder properties (particle size, shape, moisture content). The moisture content affects the powder properties, such as the flowability and cohesion, but it is not clear how the moisture content will influence the powder compression behaviour during roller compaction. In this study, the effect of moisture contents on roller compaction behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH102) was investigated experimentally. MCC samples of different moisture contents were prepared by mixing as-received MCC powder with different amount of water that was sprayed onto the powder bed being agitated in a rotary mixer. The flowability of these samples were evaluated in terms of the poured angle of repose and flow functions. The moist powders were then compacted using the instrumented roller compactor developed at the University of Birmingham. The flow and compression behaviour during roller compaction and the properties of produced ribbons were examined. It has been found that, as the moisture content increases, the flowability of moist MCC powders decreases and the powder becomes more cohesive. As a consequence of non-uniform flow of powder into the compaction zone induced by the friction between powder and side cheek plates, all produced ribbons have a higher density in the middle and lower densities at the edges. For the ribbons made of powders with high moisture contents, different hydration states across the ribbon width were also identified from SEM images. Moreover, it was interesting to find that these ribbons were split into two halves. This is attributed to the reduction in the mechanical strength of moist powder compacts with high moisture contents produced at high compression pressures. PMID:20176096

  11. High dielectric constant, low loss, and low percolation threshold dielectric composites based on polyvinylidene fluoride and ferroferric oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lili; Fu, Qiong; Li, Ya; Li, Weiping

    2016-08-01

    Dielectric super-capacitors call the excellent dielectric materials with high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss, both of which are not easy to obtain at the same time. The work synthesized the high aspect ratio and good crystalline ferroferric oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods by the hydrothermal process and used them as the filler to effectively reduce the percolation threshold value. It was found that the composites here based on the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer and these Fe3O4 nanorods exhibited ultra-high dielectric constant (>3000) and very low loss (<0.04) at very low filler fraction (0.35%). It was also proved that the high aspect ratio filler could help to improve the dielectric constant and suppress the dielectric loss in the percolative composites.

  12. Modeling of planetesimal compaction by hot pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, W.; Breuer, D.; Spohn, T.

    2014-07-01

    Compaction of initially porous material prior to melting is an important process that has influenced the interior structure and the thermal evolution of planetesimals in their early history. On one hand, compaction decreases the porosity resulting in a reduction of the radius. On the other hand, the loss of porosity results in an increase of the thermal conductivity of the material and, thus, in a more efficient cooling. Porosity loss by hot pressing is the most efficient process of compaction in planetesimals and can be described by creep flow, which depends on temperature and stress. Hot pressing has been repeatedly modeled using a simplified approach, for which the porosity is gradually reduced in some fixed temperature interval between ~650 K and 700 K [see e.g. 1--3]. This approach neglects the dependence of compaction on stress. In the present study [see 4], we compare this ''parametrized'' method with a self-consistent calculation of porosity loss via a ''creep-related'' approach. We use our thermal evolution model from previous studies [5] to model compaction of an initially porous ordinary chondritic body and consider four basic packings of spherical dust grains (simple cubic, orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and body-centered cubic). Depending on the grain packing, we calculate the effective stress and the associated porosity change via the thermally activated creep flow. For comparison, compaction is also modeled by simply reducing the initial porosity linearly to zero between 650 and 700 K. Since we are interested in thermal metamorphism and not melting, we only consider bodies that experience a maximum temperature below the solidus temperature of the metal phase. For the creep related approach, the temperature interval in which compaction takes place depends strongly on the size of the planetesimal and is not fixed as assumed in the parametrized approach. Depending on the radius, the initial grain size, the activation energy, the initial porosity, and the

  13. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  14. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  15. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  16. Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2013-06-01

    This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  17. Dynamic magnetic compaction of porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-29

    IAP Research began development of the Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) process three years before the CRADA was established. IAP Research had experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of the process, and conducted a basic market survey. IAP identified and opened discussions with industrial partners and established the basic commercial cost structure. The purpose of this CRADA project was to predict and verify optimum pressure vs. time history for the compaction of porous copper and tungsten. LLNL modeled the rapid compaction of powdered material from an initial density of about 30% theoretical maximum to more than 90% theoretical maximum. The compaction simulations were benchmarked against existing data and new data was acquired by IAP Research. The modeling was used to perform parameter studies on the pressure loading time history, initial porosity and temperature. LLNL ran simulations using codes CALE or NITO and compared the simulations with published compaction data and equation of state (EOS) data. This project did not involve the development or modification of software code. CALE and NITO were existing software programs at LLNL. No modification of these programs occurred within the scope of the CRADA effort.

  18. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  19. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David James

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated tremendous potential as high-strain electromechanical transducers for a myriad of novel applications across all engineering disciplines. Because their soft, viscoelastic mechanical properties are similar to those of living tissues, dielectric elastomers have garnered a strong foothold in a plethora of biomedical and biomimetic applications. Dielectric elastomers consist of a sheet of stretched rubber, or elastomer, coated on both sides with compliant electrode materials; application of a voltage generates an electrostatic pressure that deforms the elastomer. They can function as soft generators, sensors, or actuators, and this last function is the focus of this dissertation. Many design configurations are possible, such as stacks, minimum energy structures, interpenetrating polymer networks, shape memory dielectric elastomers, and others; dielectric elastomers are already being applied to many fields of biomedicine. The first part of the original research presented in this dissertation details a PDMS microfluidic system paired with a dielectric elastomer stack actuator of anisotropically prestrained VHB(TM) 4910 (3M(TM)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes. These electroactive microfluidic devices demonstrated active increases in microchannel width when 3 and 4 kV were applied. Fluorescence microscopy also indicated an accompanying increase in channel depth with actuation. The cross-sectional area strains at 3 and 4 kV were approximately 2.9% and 7.4%, respectively. The device was then interfaced with a syringe pump, and the pressure was measured upstream. Linear pressure-flow plots were developed, which showed decreasing fluidic resistance with actuation, from 0.192 psi/(microL/min) at 0 kV, to 0.160 and 0.157 psi/(microL/min) at 3 and 4 kV, respectively. This corresponds to an ~18% drop in fluidic resistance at 4 kV. Active de-clogging was tested in situ with the device by introducing ~50 microm diameter PDMS microbeads and

  20. Tunable THz radiation source from dielectric loaded waveguide excited by nonrelativistic electron bunch trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; He, Zhigang; Lu, Yalin; Huang, Ruixuan; Liu, Weihao; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate a tunable narrow-band THz radiation. In this scheme, a train of laser pulses with THz repetition rate is used to drive a photocathode direct current (DC) gun, leading to the emission of a train of electron bunches. The electron bunch train is subsequently accelerated by the gun field and applied to selectively excite one of the modes in the dielectric loaded waveguide (DLW) structure, which is located downstream the DC gun. Thanks to the tunability of the repetition rate of laser pulses and the gun voltage, a tunable narrow-band THz radiation source can be obtained. This proposed source has the advantages of compactness, robustness and relatively high power.