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Sample records for compact miniature mmic

  1. Compact, Miniature MMIC Receiver Modules for an MMIC Array Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Cooperrider, Joelle T.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; ODwyer, Ian J.; Weinreb, Sander; Custodero, Brian; Owen, Heahter; Grainge, Keith; Church, Sarah; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2009-01-01

    A single-pixel prototype of a W-band detector module with a digital back-end was developed to serve as a building block for large focal-plane arrays of monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) detectors. The module uses low-noise amplifiers, diode-based mixers, and a WR10 waveguide input with a coaxial local oscillator. State-of-the-art InP HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) MMIC amplifiers at the front end provide approximately 40 dB of gain. The measured noise temperature of the module, at an ambient temperature of 300 K, was found to be as low as 450 K at 95 GHz. The modules will be used to develop multiple instruments for astrophysics radio telescopes, both on the ground and in space. The prototype is being used by Stanford University to characterize noise performance at cryogenic temperatures. The goal is to achieve a 30-50 K noise temperature around 90 GHz when cooled to a 20 K ambient temperature. Further developments include characterization of the IF in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signals as a function of frequency to check amplitude and phase; replacing the InP low-noise amplifiers with state-of-the-art 35-nm-gate-length NGC low-noise amplifiers; interfacing the front-end module with a digital back-end spectrometer; and developing a scheme for local oscillator and IF distribution in a future array. While this MMIC is being developed for use in radio astronomy, it has the potential for use in other industries. Applications include automotive radar (both transmitters and receivers), communication links, radar systems for collision avoidance, production monitors, ground-penetrating sensors, and wireless personal networks.

  2. Compact, Single-Stage MMIC InP HEMT Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukala, David; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Deal, W. R.; Mei, Gerry; Radisic, Vesna; Lai, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A monolithic micro - wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) singlestage amplifier containing an InP-based high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) plus coplanar-waveguide (CPW) transmission lines for impedance matching and input and output coupling, all in a highly miniaturized layout as needed for high performance at operating frequencies of hundreds of gigahertz is described.

  3. Miniature MMIC Low Mass/Power Radiometer Modules for the 180 GHz GeoSTAR Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Tanner, Alan; Pukala, David; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Lim, Boon; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and demonstrated miniature 180 GHz Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) radiometer modules that have low noise temperature, low mass and low power consumption. These modules will enable the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) of the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) Mission for atmospheric temperature and humidity profiling. The GeoSTAR instrument has an array of hundreds of receivers. Technology that was developed included Indium Phosphide (InP) MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and second harmonic MMIC mixers and I-Q mixers, surface mount Multi-Chip Module (MCM) packages at 180 GHz, and interferometric array at 180 GHz. A complete MMIC chip set for the 180 GHz receiver modules (LNAs and I-Q Second harmonic mixer) was developed. The MMIC LNAs had more than 50% lower noise temperature (NT=300K) than previous state-of-art and MMIC I-Q mixers demonstrated low LO power (3 dBm). Two lots of MMIC wafers were processed with very high DC transconductance of up to 2800 mS/mm for the 35 nm gate length devices. Based on these MMICs a 180 GHz Multichip Module was developed that had a factor of 100 lower mass/volume (16x18x4.5 mm3, 3g) than previous generation 180 GHz receivers.

  4. Enabling compact MMIC-based frontends for millimeter-wave imaging radar and radiometry at 94 and 210 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallfass, Ingmar; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Kuri, Michael; Riessle, Markus; Zink, Martin; Massler, Hermann; Schlechtweg, Michael; Ambacher, Oliver

    2008-10-01

    We report on MMIC-based analog frontend components for imaging radar and radiometry at high millimeter-wave frequencies. The MMICs are realized in our metamorphic HEMT technology. In W-band, the focus is on analog frontends with multi-pixel capability. A compact four-channel receiver module based on four single-chip heterodyne receiver MMICs achieves a noise figure of 4.2 dB and a conversion gain of 7 dB. A W-band five-to-one switch MMIC with less than 3.5 dB insertion loss addresses four antenna ports and uses an integrated reference termination for pixel normalization. Both components operate in a frequency range from 75 to 100 GHz, making them suitable for broadband imaging systems with high geometrical resolution. After an overview of MMIC amplifier performance over the entire millimeter-wave frequency range, we present a chip set for imaging radar at 210 GHz, comprising linear and frequency-translating circuits.

  5. Miniature X-band GaAs MMIC analog and bi-phase modulators for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Ali, Fazal

    1992-01-01

    The design concepts, analyses, and the development of GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) linear-phase and digital modulators for the next generation of spaceborne communications systems are summarized. The design approach uses a very compact lumped-element, quadrature hybrid, and MESFET-varactors to provide low-loss and well-controlled phase performance for deep-space transponder (DST) applications. The measured results of the MESFET-diode show a capacitance range of 2:1 under reverse bias, and a Q of 38 at 10 GHz. Three cascaded sections of hybrid-coupled reflection phase shifters have been modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band (8415 +/- 50 MHz) DST phase modulator with +/-2.5 radians of peak phase deviation.

  6. Design, fabrication and deployment of a miniaturized spectrometer radiometer based on MMIC technology for tropospheric water vapor profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturbide-Sanchez, Flavio

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and deployment of the Compact Microwave Radiometer for Humidity profiling (CMR-H). The CMR-H is a new and innovative spectrometer radiometer that is based on monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology and is designed for tropospheric water vapor profiling. The CMR-H simultaneously measures microwave emission at four optimally-selected frequency channels near the 22.235 GHz water vapor absorption line, constituting a new set of frequencies for the retrieval of the water vapor profile. State-of-the-art water vapor radiometers either measure at additional channels with redundant information or perform multi-frequency measurements sequentially. The fabrication of the CMR-H demonstrates the capability of MMIC technology to reduce substantially the operational power consumption and size of the RF and IF sections. Those sections comprise much of the mass and volume of current microwave receivers for remote sensing, except in the case of large antennas. The use of the compact box-horn array antenna in the CMR-H demonstrates its capability to reduce the mass and volume of microwave radiometers, while maintaining similar performance to that of commonly-used, bulky horn antennas. Due to its low mass, low volume, low power consumption, fabrication complexity and cost, the CMR-H represents a technological improvement in the design of microwave radiometers for atmospheric water vapor observations. The field test and validation of the CMR-H described in this work focuses on comparisons of measurements during two field experiments from the CMR-H and a state-of-the-art microwave radiometer, which measures only in a volume subtended by the zenith-pointing antenna's beam pattern. In contrast, the CMR-H is designed to perform volumetric scans and to function correctly as a node in a network of radiometers. Mass production of radiometers based on the CMR-H design is expected to enable the

  7. Compact Miniaturized Antenna for 210 MHz RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Chun, Kue

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulation of a miniaturized square-ring antenna. The miniaturized antenna, with overall dimensions of approximately one tenth of a wavelength (0.1 ), was designed to operate at around 210 MHz, and was intended for radio-frequency identification (RFID) application. One unique feature of the design is the use of a parasitic element to improve the performance and impedance matching of the antenna. The use of parasitic elements to enhance the gain and bandwidth of patch antennas has been demonstrated and reported in the literature, but such use has never been applied to miniaturized antennas. In this work, we will present simulation results and discuss design parameters and their impact on the antenna performance.

  8. Miniature Differential Mobility Analyzer for Compact Field-Portable Spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chaolong; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    A low-flow miniature differential mobility analyzer (mDMA) has been developed for compact field-portable mobility spectrometers to classify the submicrometer aerosol. The mDMA was designed for an ultra-low aerosol flow rate of 0.05 L/min. At a sheath flow rate of 0.2 L/min, the mDMA's upper size limit was estimated to be about 921 nm. The mDMA has a classification zone of 2.54 cm long, an outer diameter of 2.54 cm, and an inner diameter of 1.778 cm. The design allows low-cost fabrication and easy assembly. Tandem DMA (TDMA) measurements were carried out to evaluate the performance of the mDMA. Its transfer function was described using Stolzenburg's model. The experimentally measured transfer function shows close agreement with the theory. The transmission efficiency was comparable to that of the Knutson-Whitby DMA for particles in the range of 10-1000 nm. The mobility resolution was comparable to that of the TSI 3085 nanoDMA at the same aerosol flow rate. The design features and performance of the mDMA make it suitable for compact field portable mobility size spectrometers for measurement of nanoparticles and submicrometer aerosol.

  9. 180-GHz I-Q Second Harmonic Resistive Mixer MMIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    An indium phosphide MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) mixer was developed, processed, and tested in the NGC 35-nm-gate-length HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) process. This innovation is very compact in size and operates with very low LO power. Because it is a resistive mixer, this innovation does not require DC power. This is an enabling technology for the miniature receiver modules for the GeoSTAR instrument, which is the only viable option for the NRC decadal study mission PATH.

  10. A comparison of MESFET and HEMT MMIC technologies using a compact Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swirhun, S.; Geddes, J.; Sokolov, Vladimir; Bosch, D.; Gawronski, M.; Anholt, R.

    1991-07-01

    To compare the capability of MESFET and HEMT technologies for monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) implementation we have fabricated and tested discrete field-effect transistors (FETs) and a novel Ka-band monolithic voltage controlled oscillator (VCO). We implemented the circuit with three different active devices: moderate- and high-doped ion-implanted MESFETs (metal-semiconductor FETs) and AlGaAs/GaAs HEMTs (high electron mobility transistors). A comparison of the measured oscillator phase-noise and an independent comparison of the temperature dependence of MESFET and HEMT RF equivalent circuits yields two general guidelines: MESFETs are preferred over HEMTs for applications requiring low phase-noise and temperature insensitive operation.

  11. Ultra-compact chiral metamaterial with negative refractive index based on miniaturized structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minhua; Song, Jian; Wu, Fei

    2017-03-01

    An ultra-compact chiral metamaterial with thin thickness and small unit cells is proposed. Echelon meandered conjugated gammadions are introduced into the planar miniaturized design. In particular, the ratio between period (p) and resonant wavelength (λ) is as small as 1/10.8 in experiment. Negative refractive indexes for circularly polarized waves are demonstrated and the effective parameters are retrieved. The effects of the length of the swing arms, number of folded lines and dielectric layer thickness on the optical activity have also been investigated. This miniaturized structure has great potential application in electronic and photonic devices with small size and integration.

  12. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Suzette M; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A; Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C

    2013-12-18

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems.

  13. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Suzette M.; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25392561

  14. Frequency scaling with miniature COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortais, Pascal; André, Thomas; Angot, Julien; Bouat, Sophie; Jacob, Josua; Lamy, Thierry; Sole, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    We will present recent basic developments about possible extension of the COMIC (for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) devices up to 5.8 GHz in place of the present 2.45 GHz operation [P. Sortais, T. Lamy, J. Médard, J. Angot, L. Latrasse, and T. Thuillier, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B314 (2010)]. New applications associating multiple COMIC devices for thin film deposition will be described and we will explain why an increase of the current density delivered by each individual ion source could lead to the increase of the deposition rate. For this purpose, we will present results of about two devices working at 5.8 GHz. The first one is a tiny ion source, the world smallest microwave ion source, exactly similar to COMIC but operating at 5.8 GHz with a quarter wave cavity structure and a few watts microwave power consumption. We will show that the frequency scaling effect is effective inside such small machines. The second one is a more ambitious ion source designed around a three quarter wave structure that works with a few tens of watts at 5.8 GHz.

  15. A compact, sub-Hertz linewidth 729 nm laser for a miniaturized 40Ca+ optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Junjuan; Cao, Jian; Cui, Kaifeng; Wang, Shaomao; Zhang, Ping; Yuan, Jinbo; Chao, Sijia; Shu, Hualin; Huang, Xueren

    2017-01-01

    We present a compact, sub-Hertz 729 nm laser for a miniaturized 40Ca+ single-ion optical clock. An external cavity diode laser is frequency-stabilized to a horizontally mounted, vibration-insensitive and high-fineness ultra-low-expansion (ULE) cavity with Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) method. The laser linewidth is measured to be about 0.9 Hz from a heterodyne beat note with the other 729 nm laser. After removing the linear drift of about 0.1 Hz/s, the fractional frequency instability is less than 2 × 10 - 15 (1 100 s). This compact, ultra-stable laser system with a volume about 0.1 m3 excluding the electronics has been employed into a miniaturized 40Ca+ single-ion optical clock. The clock frequency instability has been measured to be 3.4×10-14/τ1/2 (1 10,000 s) with a 729 nm laser probe pulse time of 20 ms.

  16. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuechler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F.

    2012-09-15

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 A at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T= 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360 Degree-Sign .

  17. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction.

    PubMed

    Küchler, R; Bauer, T; Brando, M; Steglich, F

    2012-09-01

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 Å at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T = 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360°.

  18. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 Å at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T = 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360°.

  19. SiPM arrays and miniaturized readout electronics for compact gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, N.; Imando, T. Ait; Nagai, A.; Pinot, L.; Puill, V.; Callier, S.; Janvier, B.; Esnault, C.; Verdier, M.-A.; Raux, L.; Vandenbussche, V.; Charon, Y.; Menard, L.

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the design and features of a very compact and light gamma camera based on SiPM arrays and miniaturized readout electronics dedicated to tumor localization during radio-guided cancer surgery. This gamma camera, called MAGICS, is composed of four (2×2) photo-detection elementary modules coupled to an inorganic scintillator. The 256 channels photo-detection system covers a sensitive area of 54×53 m2. Each elementary module is based on four (2×2) SiPM monolithic arrays, each array consisting of 16 SiPM photo-sensors (4×4) with 3×3 mm2 sensitive area, coupled to a miniaturized readout electronics and a dedicated ASIC. The overall dimensions of the electronics fit the size of the detector, enabling to assemble side-by-side several elementary modules in a close-packed arrangement. The preliminary performances of the system are very encouraging, showing an energy resolution of 9.8% and a spatial resolution of less than 1 mm at 122 keV.

  20. A miniature continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator with compact shielded superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Jean-Marc; Cain, Benjamin M.; Timbie, Peter T.

    2004-10-01

    Cryogenic detectors for astrophysics depend on cryocoolers capable of achieving temperatures below ~ 100 mK. In order to provide continuous cooling at 50 mK for space or laboratory applications, we are designing a miniature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (MADR) anchored at a reservoir at 5 K. Continuous cooling is obtained by the use of several paramagnetic pills placed in series with heat switches. All operations are fully electronic and this technology can be adapted fairly easily for a wide range of temperatures and cooling powers. We are focusing on reducing the size and mass of the cooler. For that purpose we have developed and tested magnetoresistive heat switches based on single crystals of tungsten. Several superconducting magnets are required for this cooler and we have designed and manufactured compact magnets. A special focus has been put on the reduction of parasitic magnetic fields in the cold stage, while minimizing the mass of the shields. A prototype continuous MADR, using magnetoresistive heat switches, small paramagnetic pills and compact magnets has been tested. A design of MADR that will provide ~ 5 uW of continuous cooling down to 50 mK is described.

  1. MMIC technology for advanced space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, A. N.; Connolly, D. J.; Anzic, G.

    1984-01-01

    The current NASA program for 20 and 30 GHz monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology is reviewed. The advantages of MMIC are discussed. Millimeter wavelength MMIC applications and technology for communications systems are discussed. Passive and active MMIC compatible components for millimeter wavelength applications are investigated. The cost of a millimeter wavelength MMIC's is projected.

  2. Development of a 150 GHz MMIC module prototype for large-scale CMB radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy M.; Sieth, Matthew; Church, Sarah E.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Soria, Mary; Gaier, Todd C.; Van Winkle, Dan; Tantawi, Sami

    2010-07-01

    A prototype heterodyne amplifier module has been designed for operation from 140 to 170 GHz using Monolithic Millimeter- Wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) low noise InP High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. In the last few decades, astronomical instruments have made state-of-the-art measurements operating over the frequency range of 5-100 GHz, using HEMT amplifiers that offer low noise, low power dissipation, high reliability, and inherently wide bandwidths. Recent advances in low-noise MMIC amplifiers, coupled with industry-driven advances in high frequency signal interconnects and in the miniaturization and integration of many standard components, have improved the frequency range and scalability of receiver modules that are sensitive to a wide (20-25%) simultaneous bandwidth. HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already starting to be manufactured around 100 GHz, but the advances in technology should make it possible to develop receiver modules with even higher operation frequency - up to 200 GHz. This paper discusses the design of a compact, scalable module centered on the 150 GHz atmospheric window using components known to operate well at these frequencies. Arrays equipped with hundreds of these modules can be optimized for many different astrophysical measurement techniques, including spectroscopy and interferometry.

  3. Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Lau, Judy M.; Sieth, Matthew M.; VanWinkle, Daniel; Tantawi, Sami

    2011-01-01

    HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already starting to be manufactured at 100 GHz, but the advances in technology should make it possible to develop receiver modules with even greater operation frequency up to 200 GHz. A prototype heterodyne amplifier module has been developed for operation from 140 to 170 GHz using monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) low-noise InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. The compact, scalable module is centered on the 150-GHz atmospheric window using components known to operate well at these frequencies. Arrays equipped with hundreds of these modules can be optimized for many different astrophysical measurement techniques, including spectroscopy and interferometry. This module is a heterodyne receiver module that is extremely compact, and makes use of 35-nm InP HEMT technology, and which has been shown to have excellent noise temperatures when cooled cryogenically to 30 K. This reduction in system noise over prior art has been demonstrated in commercial mixers (uncooled) at frequencies of 160-180 GHz. The module is expected to achieve a system noise temperature of 60 K when cooled. An MMIC amplifier module has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of expanding heterodyne amplifier technology to the 140 to 170-GHz frequency range for astronomical observations. The miniaturization of many standard components and the refinement of RF interconnect technology have cleared the way to mass-production of heterodyne amplifier receivers, making it a feasible technology for many large-population arrays. This work furthers the recent research efforts in compact coherent receiver modules, including the development of the Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) modules centered at 40 and 90 GHz, and the production of heterodyne module prototypes at 90 GHz.

  4. A miniaturized compact open-loop RFOG with demodulation signal compensation technique to suppress intensity modulation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Diqing; Mao, Jianmin; Li, Qiang; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-01-01

    A miniaturized compact open-loop resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) prototype with main body size of about 10.4 cm×10.4 cm×5.2 cm is reported, and a demodulation signal compensation technique is proposed, aiming to suppress the drift arising from accompanying intensity modulation induced by semiconductor laser diode (LD). The scheme of how to establish this miniaturized RFOG prototype is specifically stated. The linear relationship between the first-harmonic and second-harmonic demodulated signals respectively for the two counter propagating beams in the resonator is verified by theory and experiment, and based on this relationship, the demodulation signal compensation technique by monitoring the second-harmonic demodulated signal is described in detail. With this compensation technique, the gyro output stability under 1°/s rotation rate is effectively improved from 0.12°/s to 0.03°/s, and especially, an about 0.36°/s peak-to-peak fluctuation due to tuning current reset is significantly suppressed. A long term bias stability of about 4.5°/h in 1 h for such a small-sized RFOG prototype is demonstrated, which is of the same magnitude as that of currently reported large-sized RFOG systems utilizing LD as the laser source as well.

  5. MMIC packaging with Waffleline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. W.; Ellis, T. T.; Schineller, E. R.

    1990-06-01

    The design principle of Waffleline, a patented MMIC packaging technology, is discussed, and several recent applications are described and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and photographs. Standard Waffleline is a foil-covered waffle-iron-like grid with dielectric-coated signal and power wires running in the channels and foil-removed holes for mounting prepackaged chips or chip carriers. With spacing of 50 mils between center conductors, this material is applicable at frequencies up to 40 GHz; EHF devices require Waffleline with 25-mil spacing. Applications characterized include a subassembly for a man-transportable SHF satellite-communication terminal, a transmitter driver for a high-power TWT, and a 60-GHz receiver front end (including an integrated monolithic microstrip antenna, a low-noise amplifier, a mixer, and an IF amplifier in a 0.25-inch-thick 1.6-inch-diameter package). The high package density and relatively low cost of Waffleline are emphasized.

  6. Miniature fiber optic loop subcomponent for compact sensors and dense routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillham, Frederick J.; Stowe, David W.; Ouellette, Thomas R.; Pryshlak, Adrian P.

    1999-05-01

    Fiber optic data links and embedded sensors, such as Fabry- Perot and Mach-Zehnders, are important elements in smart structure architectures. Unfortunately, one problem with optical fiber is the inherent limit through which fibers and cables can be looped. A revolutionary, patented technology has been developed which overcomes this problem. Based on processing the fiber into low loss miniature bends, it permits routing the fiber to difficult areas, and minimizing the size of sensors and components. The minimum bend diameter for singlemode fiber is typically over two inches in diameter, to avoid light attenuation and limit stresses which could prematurely break the fiber. With the new miniature bend technology, bend diameters as small as 1 mm are readily achieved. One embodiment is a sub-component with standard singlemode fiber formed into a 180 degree bend and packaged in a glass tube only 1.5 mm OD X 8 mm long, Figure 1. Measured insertion loss is less than 0.2 dB from 1260 nm to 1680 nm. A final processing step which anneals the fiber into the eventual curvature, reduces the internal stress, thereby resulting in long life expectancy with robust immunity to external loading. This paper addresses the optical and physical performance of the sub-component. Particular attention is paid to attenuation spectra, polarization dependent loss, reflectance, thermal cycle, damp heat, and shock tests. Applications are presented which employs the bend technology. Concatenating right angle bends into a 'wire harness' demonstrates the ability to route fiber through a smart engine or satellite structure. Miniature optical coils are proposed for sensors and expansion joints.

  7. A miniature Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (miniMART) as a compact breaking wave analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, M. Dale; Deane, Grant; Collins, Douglas B.; Cappa, Christopher; Bertram, Timothy; Dommer, Abigail; Schill, Steven; Forestieri, Sara; Survilo, Mathew

    2016-09-01

    In order to understand the processes governing the production of marine aerosols, repeatable, controlled methods for their generation are required. A new system, the miniature Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (miniMART), has been designed after the success of the original MART system, to approximate a small oceanic spilling breaker by producing an evolving bubble plume and surface foam patch. The smaller tank utilizes an intermittently plunging jet of water produced by a rotating water wheel, into an approximately 6 L reservoir to simulate bubble plume and foam formation and generate aerosols. This system produces bubble plumes characteristic of small whitecaps without the large external pump inherent in the original MART design. Without the pump it is possible to easily culture delicate planktonic and microbial communities in the bulk water during experiments while continuously producing aerosols for study. However, due to the reduced volume and smaller plunging jet, the absolute numbers of particles generated are approximately an order of magnitude less than in the original MART design.

  8. MMICs with Radial Probe Transitions to Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Pukala, David; Soria, Mary; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Radisic, Vesna; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents an update on the innovation reported in Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. To recapitulate: To enable operation or testing of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), it is necessary to mount the MMIC in a waveguide package that typically has cross-sectional waveguide dimensions of the order of a few hundred microns. A radial probe transition between an MMIC operating at 340 GHz and a waveguide had been designed (but not yet built and tested) to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that would include the MMIC. The radial probe could readily be integrated with an MMIC amplifier because the design provided for fabrication of the transition on a substrate of the same material (InP) and thickness (50 m) typical of substrates of MMICs that can operate above 300 GHz. As illustrated in the updated document by drawings, photographs, and plots of test data, the concept has now been realized by designing, fabricating, and testing several MMIC/radial- probe integrated-circuit chips and designing and fabricating a waveguide package to contain each chip.

  9. MMIC Replacement for Gunn Diode Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Thomas W.; Porterfield, David

    2011-01-01

    An all-solid-state replacement for high-frequency Gunn diode oscillators (GDOs) has been proposed for use in NASA s millimeter- and submillimeter-wave sensing instruments. Highly developed microwave oscillators are used to achieve a low-noise and highly stable reference signal in the 10-40-GHz band. Compact amplifiers and high-power frequency multipliers extend the signal to the 100-500-GHz band with minimal added phase noise and output power sufficient for NASA missions. This technology can achieve improved output power and frequency agility, while maintaining phase noise and stability comparable to other GDOs. Additional developments of the technology include: a frequency quadrupler to 145 GHz with 18 percent efficiency and 15 percent fixed tuned bandwidth; frequency doublers featuring 124, 240, and 480 GHz; an integrated 874-GHz subharmonic mixer with a mixer noise temperature of 3,000 K DSB (double sideband) and mixer conversion loss of 11.8 dB DSB; a high-efficiency frequency tripler design with peak output power of 23 mW and 14 mW, and efficiency of 16 and 13 percent, respectively; millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers to the 30-40 GHz band with high DC power efficiency; and an 874-GHz radiometer suitable for airborne observation with state-of-the-art sensitivity at room temperature and less than 5 W of total power consumption.

  10. Waveguide Transition for Submillimeter-Wave MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Kevin M.; Deal, William R.; Radisic, Vesna; Mei, Xiaobing; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    An integrated waveguide-to-MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) chip operating in the 300-GHz range is designed to operate well on high-permittivity semiconductor substrates typical for an MMIC amplifier, and allows a wider MMIC substrate to be used, enabling integration with larger MMICs (power amplifiers). The waveguide-to- CBCPW (conductor-backed coplanar waveguide) transition topology is based on an integrated dipole placed in the E-plane of the waveguide module. It demonstrates low loss and good impedance matching. Measurement and simulation demonstrate that the loss of the transition and waveguide loss is less than 1-dB over a 340-to-380-GHz bandwidth. A transition is inserted along the propagation direction of the waveguide. This transition uses a planar dipole aligned with the maximum E-field of the TE10 waveguide mode as an inter face between the waveguide and the MMIC. Mode conversion between the coplanar striplines (CPS) that feed the dipole and the CBCPW transmission line is accomplished using a simple air-bridge structure. The bottom side ground plane is truncated at the same reference as the top-side ground plane, leaving the end of the MMIC suspended in air.

  11. MMIC DHBT Common-Base Amplifier for 172 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack; Wei, Yun; Dahlstrom, Mttias; Urteaga, Miguel; Rodwell, Mark; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Schlecht, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a single-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier in which the gain element is a double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) connected in common-base configuration. This amplifier, which has been demonstrated to function well at a frequency of 172 GHz, is part of a continuing effort to develop compact, efficient amplifiers for scientific instrumentation, wide-band communication systems, and radar systems that will operate at frequencies up to and beyond 180 GHz. The transistor is fabricated from a layered structure formed by molecular beam epitaxy in the InP/InGaAs material system. A highly doped InGaAs base layer and a collector layer are fabricated from the layered structure in a triple mesa process. The transistor includes two separate emitter fingers, each having dimensions of 0.8 by 12 m. The common-base configuration was chosen for its high maximum stable gain in the frequency band of interest. The input-matching network is designed for high bandwidth. The output of the transistor is matched to a load line for maximum saturated output power under large-signal conditions, rather than being matched for maximum gain under small-signal conditions. In a test at a frequency of 172 GHz, the amplifier was found to generate an output power of 7.5 mW, with approximately 5 dB of large-signal gain (see Figure 2). Moreover, the amplifier exhibited a peak small-signal gain of 7 dB at a frequency of 176 GHz. This performance of this MMIC single-stage amplifier containing only a single transistor represents a significant advance in the state of the art, in that it rivals the 170-GHz performance of a prior MMIC three-stage, four-transistor amplifier. [The prior amplifier was reported in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 49.] This amplifier is the first heterojunction- bipolar-transistor (HBT) amplifier built for medium power operation in this

  12. Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design by John E. Penn ARL-TR-6237 October 2012...Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design John E. Penn Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  13. Differential InP HEMT MMIC Amplifiers Embedded in Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Schlecht, Erich; Samoska, Lorene

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifiers of a type now being developed for operation at frequencies of hundreds of gigahertz contain InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) in a differential configuration. The differential configuration makes it possible to obtain gains greater than those of amplifiers having the single-ended configuration. To reduce losses associated with packaging, the MMIC chips are designed integrally with, and embedded in, waveguide packages, with the additional benefit that the packages are compact enough to fit into phased transmitting and/or receiving antenna arrays. Differential configurations (which are inherently balanced) have been used to extend the upper limits of operating frequencies of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) amplifiers to the microwave range but, until now, have not been applied in millimeter- wave amplifier circuits. Baluns have traditionally been used to transform from single-ended to balanced configurations, but baluns tend to be lossy. Instead of baluns, finlines are used to effect this transformation in the present line of development. Finlines have been used extensively to drive millimeter- wave mixers in balanced configurations. In the present extension of the finline balancing concept, finline transitions are integrated onto the affected MMICs (see figure). The differential configuration creates a virtual ground within each pair of InP HEMT gate fingers, eliminating the need for inductive vias to ground. Elimination of these vias greatly reduces parasitic components of current and the associated losses within an amplifier, thereby enabling more nearly complete utilization of the full performance of each transistor. The differential configuration offers the additional benefit of multiplying (relative to the single-ended configuration) the input and output impedances of each transistor by a factor of four, so that it is possible to use large transistors that would otherwise have

  14. MMIC Package for Millimeter Wave Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bharj, Sarjit Singh; Yuan, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Princeton Microwave Technology has successfully demonstrated the transfer of technology for the MMIC package. During this contract the package design was licensed from Hughes Aircraft Company for manufacture within the U.S. A major effort was directed towards characterization of the ceramic material for its dielectric constant and loss tangent properties. After selection of a ceramic tape, the high temperature co-fired ceramic package was manufactured in the U.S. by Microcircuit Packaging of America, Inc. Microwave measurements of the MMIC package were conducted by an intercontinental microwave test fixture. The package demonstrated a typical insertion loss of 0.5 dB per transition up to 32 Ghz and a return loss of better than 15 db. The performance of the package has been demonstrated from 2 to 30 Ghz by assembling three different MMIC amplifiers. Two of the MMIC amplifiers were designed for the 26 Ghz to 30 Ghz operation while the third MMIC was a distributed amplifier from 2 to 26.5 Ghz. The measured gain of the amplifier is consistent with the device data. The package costs are substantially lower than comparable packages available commercially. Typically the price difference is greater than a factor of three. The package cost is well under $5.00 for a quantity of 10,000 pieces.

  15. Terahertz MMICs and Antenna-in-Package Technology at 300 GHz for KIOSK Download System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Takuro; Kosugi, Toshihiko; Song, Ho-Jin; Hamada, Hiroshi; El Moutaouakil, Amine; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Matsuzaki, Hideaki; Yaita, Makoto; Kagami, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Toward the realization of ultra-fast wireless communications systems, the inherent broad bandwidth of the terahertz (THz) band is attracting attention, especially for short-range instant download applications. In this paper, we present our recent progress on InP-based THz MMICs and packaging techniques based on low-temperature co-fibered ceramic (LTCC) technology. The transmitter MMICs are based on 80-nm InP-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Using the transmitter packaged in an E-plane split-block waveguide and compact lens receiver packaged in LTCC multilayered substrates, we tested wireless data transmission up to 27 Gbps with the simple amplitude key shifting (ASK) modulation scheme. We also present several THz antenna-in-packaging solutions based on substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) technology. A vertical hollow (VH) SIW was applied to a compact medium-gain SIW antenna and low-loss interconnection integrated in LTCC multi-layer substrates. The size of the LTCC antennas with 15-dBi gain is less than 0.1 cm3. For feeding the antenna, we investigated an LTCC-integrated transition and polyimide transition to LTCC VH SIWs. These transitions exhibit around 1-dB estimated loss at 300 GHz and more than 35 GHz bandwidth with 10-dB return loss. The proposed package solutions make antennas and interconnections easy to integrate in a compact LTCC package with an MMIC chip for practical applications.

  16. The potential impact of MMICs on future satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Vernon E.

    1988-01-01

    This is the Final Report representing the results of a 17-month study on the future trends and requirements of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMIC) for space communication applications. Specifically this report identifies potential space communication applications of MMICs, assesses the impact of MMIC on the classes of systems that were identified, determines the present status and probable 10-year growth in capability of required MMIC and competing technologies, identifies the applications most likely to benefit from further MMIC development and presents recommendations for NASA development activities to address the needs of these applications.

  17. Multiple Differential-Amplifier MMICs Embedded in Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Schlecht, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Compact amplifier assemblies of a type now being developed for operation at frequencies of hundreds of gigahertz comprise multiple amplifier units in parallel arrangements to increase power and/or cascade arrangements to increase gains. Each amplifier unit is a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) implementation of a pair of amplifiers in differential (in contradistinction to single-ended) configuration. Heretofore, in cascading amplifiers to increase gain, it has been common practice to interconnect the amplifiers by use of wires and/or thin films on substrates. This practice has not yielded satisfactory results at frequencies greater than 200 Hz, in each case, for either or both of two reasons: Wire bonds introduce large discontinuities. Because the interconnections are typically tens of wavelengths long, any impedance mismatches give rise to ripples in the gain-vs.-frequency response, which degrade the performance of the cascade.

  18. A compact, continuous-wave terahertz source based on a quantum-cascade laser and a miniature cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Richter, H; Greiner-Bär, M; Pavlov, S G; Semenov, A D; Wienold, M; Schrottke, L; Giehler, M; Hey, R; Grahn, H T; Hübers, H-W

    2010-05-10

    We report on the development of a compact, easy-to-use terahertz radiation source, which combines a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) operating at 3.1 THz with a compact, low-input-power Stirling cooler. The QCL, which is based on a two-miniband design, has been developed for high output and low electrical pump power. The amount of generated heat complies with the nominal cooling capacity of the Stirling cooler of 7 W at 65 K with 240 W of electrical input power. Special care has been taken to achieve a good thermal coupling between the QCL and the cold finger of the cooler. The whole system weighs less than 15 kg including the cooler and power supplies. The maximum output power is 8 mW at 3.1 THz. With an appropriate optical beam shaping, the emission profile of the laser is fundamental Gaussian. The applicability of the system is demonstrated by imaging and molecular-spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology for space communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Denis J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Future communications satellites are likely to use gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology in most, if not all, communications payload subsystems. Multiple-scanning-beam antenna systems are expected to use GaAs MMIC's to increase functional capability, to reduce volume, weight, and cost, and to greatly improve system reliability. RF and IF matrix switch technology based on GaAs MMIC's is also being developed for these reasons. MMIC technology, including gigabit-rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, offers substantial advantages in power consumption and weight over silicon technologies for high-throughput, on-board baseband processor systems. For the more distant future pseudomorphic indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other advanced III-V materials offer the possibility of MMIC subsystems well up into the millimeter wavelength region. All of these technology elements are in NASA's MMIC program. Their status is reviewed.

  20. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology for space communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Denis J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Future communications satellites are likely to use gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology in most, if not all, communications payload subsystems. Multiple-scanning-beam antenna systems are expected to use GaAs MMICs to increase functional capability, to reduce volume, weight, and cost, and to greatly improve system reliability. RF and IF matrix switch technology based on GaAs MMICs is also being developed for these reasons. MMIC technology, including gigabit-rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, offers substantial advantages in power consumption and weight over silicon technologies for high-throughput, on-board baseband processor systems. For the more distant future pseudomorphic indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other advanced III-V materials offer the possibility of MMIC subsystems well up into the millimeter wavelength region. All of these technology elements are in NASA's MMIC program. Their status is reviewed.

  1. Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2007-01-01

    A radial probe transition between a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) and a waveguide has been designed for operation at frequency of 340 GHz and to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that includes the MMIC. Integrated radial probe transitions like this one are expected to be essential components of future MMIC amplifiers operating at frequencies above 200 GHz. While MMIC amplifiers for this frequency range have not yet been widely used because they have only recently been developed, there are numerous potential applications for them-- especially in scientific instruments, test equipment, radar, and millimeter-wave imaging systems for detecting hidden weapons.

  2. Tests of Low-Noise MMIC Amplifier Module at 290 to 340 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Deal, William; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents data from tests of a low-noise amplifier module operating in the frequency range from 290 to 340 GHz said to be the highest-frequency low-noise, solid-state amplifier ever developed. The module comprised a three-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier integrated with radial probe MMIC/waveguide transitions and contained in a compact waveguide package, all according to the concepts described in the immediately preceding article and in the referenced prior article, "Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide" (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. The tests included measurements by the Y-factor method, in which noise figures are measured repeatedly with an input noise source alternating between an "on" (hot-load) condition and an "off" (cold-load) condition. (The Y factor is defined as the ratio between the "on" and "off" noise power levels.) The test results showed that, among other things, the module exhibited a minimum noise figure of about 8.7 dB at 325 GHz and that the gain at that frequency under the bias conditions that produced the minimum noise figure was between about 9 and 10 dB.

  3. Millimeter wave band ultra wideband transmitter MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Jin; Rolland, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new millimeter-wave (MMW) ultra wideband (UWB) transmitter MMIC which has been developed in an OMMIC 0.1 μm GaAs PHEMT foundry process (ft = 100 GHz) for 22-29 GHz vehicular radar systems. The transmitter is composed of an MMW negative resistance oscillator (NRO), a power amplifier (PA), and two UWB pulse generators (PGs). In order to convert the UWB pulse signal to MMW frequency and reduce the total power consumption, the MMW NRO is driven by one of the UWB pulse generators and the power amplifier is triggered by another UWB pulse generator. The main advantages of this transmitter are: new design, simple architecture, high-precision distance measurements, infinite ON/OFF switch ratio, and low power consumption. The total power consumption of the transmitter MMIC is 218 mW with a peak output power of 5.5 dBm at 27 GHz.

  4. MMIC Amplifiers for 90 to 130 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Bryerton, Eric; Morgan, Matt; Boyd, T.; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes two monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier chips optimized to function in the frequency range of 90 to 130 GHz, covering nearly all of F-band (90 - 140 GHz). These amplifiers were designed specifically for local-oscillator units in astronomical radio telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). They could also be readily adapted for use in electronic test equipment, automotive radar systems, and communications systems that operate between 90 and 130 GHz.

  5. Towards Terahertz MMIC Amplifiers: Present Status and Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation surveys the fastest Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) amplifiers to date; summarize previous solid state power amp results to date; reviews examples of MMICs, reviews Power vs. Gate periphery and frequency; Summarizes previous LNA results to date; reviews Noise figure results and trends toward higher frequency

  6. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  7. Ka-band MMIC arrays for ACTS Aero Terminal Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, C.; Zakrajsek, R.; Lee, R.; Turtle, J.

    1992-01-01

    An antenna system consisting of three experimental Ka-band active arrays using GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification is presented. The MMIC arrays are to be demonstrated in the ACTS Aeronautical Terminal Experiment, planned for early 1994. The experiment is outlined, with emphasis on a description of the antenna system. Attention is given to the way in which proof-of-concept MMIC arrays featuring three different state-of-the-art approaches to Ka-band MMIC insertion are being incorporated into an experimental aircraft terminal for the demonstration of an aircraft-to-satellite link, providing a basis for follow-on MMIC array development.

  8. 164-GHz MMIC HEMT Frequency Doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi; Morgan, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    A monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) has been developed as a prototype of improved frequency doublers for generating signals at frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Signal sources that operate in this frequency range are needed for a variety of applications, notably including general radiometry and, more specifically, radiometric remote sensing of the atmosphere. Heretofore, it has been common practice to use passive (diode-based) frequency multipliers to obtain frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Unfortunately, diode-based frequency multipliers are plagued by high DC power consumption and low conversion efficiency. Moreover, multiplier diodes are not easily integrated with such other multiplier-circuit components as amplifiers and oscillators. The goals of developing the present MMIC HEMT frequency doubler were (1) to utilize the HEMT as an amplifier to increase conversion efficiency (more precisely, to reduce conversion loss), thereby increasing the output power for a given DC power consumption or, equivalently, reducing the DC power consumption for a given output power; and (2) to provide for the integration of amplifier and oscillator components on the same chip. The MMIC frequency doubler (see Figure 1) contains an AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMT biased at pinch-off to make it function as a class-B amplifier (meaning that it conducts in half-cycle pulses). Grounded coplanar waveguides (GCPWs) are used as impedance-matching transmission lines. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. Another combination of GCPWs also serves both as a low-pass filter to suppress undesired oscillations at frequencies below 60 GHz and as a DC blocker. Large decoupling capacitors and epitaxial resistors are added in the drain and gate lines to suppress bias oscillations. At the output terminal, the fundamental frequency is suppressed by a quarter-wave open stub, which presents

  9. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  10. Cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC Heterodyne Receiver Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy; Sieth, Matt; Church, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC heterodyne receiver module has demonstrated a system noise temperature of 100 K or less at 166 GHz. This module builds upon work previously described in Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation (NPO-47664), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 8 (August 2011), p. 27. In the original module, the local oscillator signal was saturating the MMIC low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) with power. In order to suppress the local oscillator signal from reaching the MMIC LNAs, the W-band (75 110 GHz) signal had to be filtered out before reaching 140 170 GHz. A bandpass filter was developed to cover 120 170 GHz, using microstrip parallel-coupled lines to achieve the desired filter bandwidth, and ensure that the unwanted W-band local oscillator signal would be sufficiently suppressed. With the new bandpass filter, the entire receiver can work over the 140 180-GHz band, with a minimum system noise temperature of 460 K at 166 GHz. The module was tested cryogenically at 20 K ambient temperature, and it was found that the receiver had a noise temperature of 100 K over an 8-GHz bandwidth. The receiver module now includes a microstrip bandpass filter, which was designed to have a 3-dB bandwidth of approximately 120-170 GHz. The filter was fabricated on a 3-mil-thick alumina substrate. The filter design was based on a W-band filter design made at JPL and used in the QUIET (Q/U Imaging ExperimenT) radiometer modules. The W-band filter was scaled for a new center frequency of 150 GHz, and the microstrip segments were changed accordingly. Also, to decrease the bandwidth of the resulting scaled design, the center gaps between the microstrip lines were increased (by four micrometers in length) compared to the gaps near the edges. The use of the 150-GHz bandpass filter has enabled the receiver module to function well at room temperature. The system noise temperature was measured to be less than 600 K (at room temperature) from 154 to 168 GHz

  11. Ka-band MMIC microstrip array for high rate communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Raquet, C. A.; Tolleson, J. B.; Sanzgiri, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    In a recent technology assessment of alternative communication systems for the space exploration initiative (SEI), Ka-band (18 to 40 GHz) communication technology was identified to meet the mission requirements of telecommunication, navigation, and information management. Compared to the lower frequency bands, Ka-band antennas offer higher gain and broader bandwidths; thus, they are more suitable for high data rate communications. Over the years, NASA has played an important role in monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array technology development, and currently, has an ongoing contract with Texas Instrument (TI) to develop a modular Ka-band MMIC microstrip subarray (NAS3-25718). The TI contract emphasizes MMIC integration technology development and stipulates using existing MMIC devices to minimize the array development cost. The objective of this paper is to present array component technologies and integration techniques used to construct the subarray modules.

  12. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Frequency Doublers - 2nd Pass Correction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Frequency Doublers—2nd Pass Correction by John E. Penn ARL-TN-0580 September 2013...September 2013 Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Frequency Doublers—2nd Pass Correction John E. Penn Sensors and Electron...COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Frequency Doublers–2nd Pass Correction 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  13. MMIC linear-phase and digital modulators for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Ali, Fazal

    1991-01-01

    The design concepts, analyses, and development of GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) linear-phase and digital modulators for the next generation of space-borne communications systems are summarized. The design approach uses a compact lumped element quadrature hybrid and Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFET)-varactors to provide low loss and well-controlled phase performance for deep space transponder (DST) applications. The measured results of the MESFET-diode show a capacitance range of 2:1 under reverse bias, and a Q of 38 at 10 GHz. Three cascaded sections of hybrid-coupled reflection phase shifters were modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band (8415 +/- 50 MHz) DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation. The modulator will accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry and ranging data, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 8 +/- 0.5 dB. The MMIC digital modulator is designed to provide greater than 10 Mb/s of bi-phase modulation at X-band.

  14. The potential impact of MMICs on future satellite communications: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Vernon E.

    1988-01-01

    This Executive Summary presents the results of a 17-month study on the future trends and requirments for Monolithic Microwave Integrated circuits (MMIC) for space communication application. Specifically this report identifies potential space communication applications of MMICs, assesses the impact of MMIC on the classes of systems that were identified, determines the present status and probable 10-year growth in capability of required MMIC and competing technologies, identifies the applications most likely to benefit from further MMIC development, and presents recommendations for NASA development activities to address the needs of these applications.

  15. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottenger, Warren

    1995-01-01

    The broad objective of this program was to demonstrate a proof of concept insertion of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) device technology into an innovative (tile architecture) active phased array antenna application supporting advanced EHF communication systems. Ka-band MMIC arrays have long been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in close proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments.

  16. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottenger, Warren

    1995-06-01

    The broad objective of this program was to demonstrate a proof of concept insertion of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) device technology into an innovative (tile architecture) active phased array antenna application supporting advanced EHF communication systems. Ka-band MMIC arrays have long been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in close proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments.

  17. 155- and 213-GHz AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMT MMIC oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, Steven E.; Kormanyos, Brian K.; Jelloian, Linda M.; Matloubian, Mehran; Brown, April S.; Larson, Lawrence E.; Nguyen, Loi D.; Thompson, Mark A.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1995-01-01

    We report on the design and measurement of monolithic 155- and 213-GHz quasi-optical oscillators using AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMTs (high-electron mobility transistors). These results are believed to be the highest frequency three-terminal oscillators reported to date. The indium concentration in the channel was 80% for high sheet charge and mobility. The HEMT gates were fabricated with self-aligned sub-tenth-micrometer electron-beam techniques to achieve gate lengths on the order of 50 nm and drain-source spacing of 0.25 micron. Planar antennas were integrated into the fabrication process resulting in a compact and efficient quasi-optical Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) oscillator.

  18. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  19. Update on Waveguide-Embedded Differential MMIC Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Schleht, Erich

    2010-01-01

    There is an update on the subject matter of Differential InP HEMT MMIC Amplifiers Embedded in Waveguides (NPO-42857) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 9 (September 2009), page 35. To recapitulate: Monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifiers of a type now being developed for operation at frequencies of hundreds of gigahertz contain InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) in a differential configuration. The MMICs are designed integrally with, and embedded in, waveguide packages. The instant work does not mention InP HEMTs but otherwise reiterates part of the subject matter of the cited prior article, with emphasis on the following salient points: An MMIC is mounted in the electric-field plane ("E-plane") of a waveguide and includes a finline transition to each differential-amplifier stage. The differential configuration creates a virtual ground within each pair of transistor-gate fingers, eliminating the need for external radio-frequency grounding. This work concludes by describing a single-stage differential submillimeter-wave amplifier packaged in a rectangular waveguide and summarizing results of tests of this amplifier at frequencies of 220 and 305 GHz.

  20. Low-Noise MMIC Amplifiers for 120 to 180 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukala, David; Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro; Bayuk, Brian; Grundbacher, Ron; Oliver, Patricia; Cavus, Abdullah; Liu, Po-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifiers capable of providing useful amounts of gain over the frequency range from 120 to 180 GHz have been developed as prototype low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) to be incorporated into instruments for sensing cosmic microwave background radiation. There are also potential uses for such LNAs in electronic test equipment, passive millimeter- wave imaging systems, radar receivers, communication receivers, and systems for detecting hidden weapons. The main advantage afforded by these MMIC LNAs, relative to prior MMIC LNAs, is that their coverage of the 120-to-180-GHz frequency band makes them suitable for reuse in a wider variety of applications without need to redesign them. Each of these MMIC amplifiers includes InP transistors and coplanar waveguide circuitry on a 50- mthick chip (see Figure 1). Coplanar waveguide transmission lines are used for both applying DC bias and matching of input and output impedances of each transistor stage. Via holes are incorporated between top and bottom ground planes to suppress propagation of electromagnetic modes in the substrate. On the basis of computational simulations, each of these amplifiers was expected to operate with a small-signal gain of 14 dB and a noise figure of 4.3 dB. At the time of writing this article, measurements of noise figures had not been reported, but on-chip measurements had shown gains approaching their simulated values (see Figure 2).

  1. Ka-Band MMIC Subarray Technology Program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottinger, W.

    1995-01-01

    Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) arrays have been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in closed proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the 'tile' array packaging architecture at EHF via the insertion of 1990 MMIC technology into a functional tile array or subarray module. The means test of this objective was to demonstrate and deliver to NASA a minimum of two 4 x 4 (16 radiating element) subarray modules operating in a transmit mode at 29.6 GHz. Available (1990) MMIC technology was chosen to focus the program effort on the novel interconnect schemes and packaging requirements rather than focusing on MMIC development. Major technical achievements of this program include the successful integration of two 4 x 4 subarray modules into a single antenna array. This 32 element array demonstrates a transmit EIRP of over 300 watts yielding an effective directive power gain in excess of 55 dB at 29.63 GHz. The array has been actively used as the transmit link in airborne/terrestrial mobile communication experiments accomplished via the ACTS satellite launched in August 1993.

  2. Ka-band MMIC subarray technology program (Ka-Mist)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, W.

    1995-09-01

    Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) arrays have been considered as having high potential for increasing the capability of space, aircraft, and land mobile communication systems in terms of scan performance, data rate, link margin, and flexibility while offering a significant reduction in size, weight, and power consumption. Insertion of MMIC technology into antenna systems, particularly at millimeter wave frequencies using low power and low noise amplifiers in closed proximity to the radiating elements, offers a significant improvement in the array transmit efficiency, receive system noise figure, and overall array reliability. Application of active array technology also leads to the use of advanced beamforming techniques that can improve beam agility, diversity, and adaptivity to complex signal environments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the 'tile' array packaging architecture at EHF via the insertion of 1990 MMIC technology into a functional tile array or subarray module. The means test of this objective was to demonstrate and deliver to NASA a minimum of two 4 x 4 (16 radiating element) subarray modules operating in a transmit mode at 29.6 GHz. Available (1990) MMIC technology was chosen to focus the program effort on the novel interconnect schemes and packaging requirements rather than focusing on MMIC development. Major technical achievements of this program include the successful integration of two 4 x 4 subarray modules into a single antenna array. This 32 element array demonstrates a transmit EIRP of over 300 watts yielding an effective directive power gain in excess of 55 dB at 29.63 GHz. The array has been actively used as the transmit link in airborne/terrestrial mobile communication experiments accomplished via the ACTS satellite launched in August 1993.

  3. Miniature Laser Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert; Brown, Andy

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a miniature laser magnetometer (MLM) that will measure the scalar magnitude and vector components of near-Earth magnetic fields. The MLM incorporates a number of technical innovations to achieve high-accuracy and high-resolution performance while significantly reducing the size of the laser-pumped helium magnetometer for use on small satellites and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). and electronics sections that has the capability of measuring both the scalar magnetic field magnitude and the vector magnetic field components. Further more, the high-accuracy scalar measurements are used to calibrate and correct the vector component measurements in order to achieve superior vector accuracy and stability. The correction algorithm applied to the vector components for calibration and the same cell for vector and scalar measurements are major innovations. The separate sensor and electronics section of the MLM instrument allow the sensor to be installed on a boom or otherwise located away from electronics and other noisy magnetic components. The MLM s miniaturization will be accomplished through the use of advanced miniaturized components and packaging methods for the MLM sensor and electronics. The MLM conceptual design includes three key innovations. The first is a new non-magnetic laser package that will allow the placement of the laser pump source near the helium cell sensing elements. The second innovation is the design of compact, nested, triaxial Braunbek coils used in the vector measurements that reduce the coil size by a factor of two compared to existing Helmholtz coils with similar field-generation performance. The third innovation is a compact sensor design that reduces the sensor volume by a factor of eight compared to MLM s predecessor.

  4. Miniature Earthmover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    International Machinery Corporation (IMC) developed a miniature earthmover, the 1/8 scale Caterpillar D11N Track-type Tractor, with trademark product approval and manufacturing/marketing license from Caterpillar, Inc. Through Marshall Space Flight Center assistance, the company has acquired infrared remote control technology, originally developed for space exploration. The technology is necessary for exports because of varying restrictions on radio frequency in foreign countries. The Cat D11N weighs only 340 pounds and has the world's first miniature industrial internal combustion engine. The earthmover's uses include mining, construction and demolition work, and hazardous environment work. IMC also has designs of various products for military use and other Caterpillar replicas.

  5. InP MMIC Chip Set for Power Sources Covering 80-170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    We will present a Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chip set which provides high output-power sources for driving diode frequency multipliers into the terahertz range. The chip set was fabricated at HRL Laboratories using a 0.1-micrometer gate-length InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process, and features transistors with an f(sub max) above 600 GHz. The HRL InP HEMT process has already demonstrated amplifiers in the 60-200 GHz range. In this paper, these high frequency HEMTs form the basis for power sources up to 170 GHz. A number of state-of-the-art InP HEMT MMICs will be presented. These include voltage-controlled and fixed-tuned oscillators, power amplifiers, and an active doubler. We will first discuss an 80 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator with 5 GHz of tunability and at least 17 mW of output power, as well as a 120 GHz oscillator providing 7 mW of output power. In addition, we will present results of a power amplifier which covers the full WRIO waveguide band (75-110 GHz), and provides 40-50 mW of output power. Furthermore, we will present an active doubler at 164 GHz providing 8% bandwidth, 3 mW of output power, and an unprecedented 2 dB of conversion loss for an InP HEMT MMIC at this frequency. Finally, we will demonstrate a power amplifier to cover 140-170 GHz with 15-25 mW of output power and 8 dB gain. These components can form a power source in the 155-165 GHz range by cascading the 80 GHz oscillator, W-band power amplifier, 164 GHz active doubler and final 140-170 GHz power amplifier for a stable, compact local oscillator subsystem, which could be used for atmospheric science or astrophysics radiometers.

  6. Monolithic optical integrated control circuitry for GaAs MMIC-based phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Ponchak, G. E.; Kascak, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) show promise in phased-array antenna applications for future space communications systems. Their efficient usage will depend on the control of amplitude and phase signals for each MMIC element in the phased array and in the low-loss radiofrequency feed. For a phased array contining several MMIC elements a complex system is required to control and feed each element. The characteristics of GaAs MMIC's for 20/30-GHz phased-array systems are discussed. The optical/MMIC interface and the desired characteristics of optical integrated circuits (OIC's) for such an interface are described. Anticipated fabrication considerations for eventual full monolithic integration of optical integrated circuits with MMIC's on a GaAs substrate are presented.

  7. A design concept for an MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Smetana, Jerry; Acosta, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka proposed design, which concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required.

  8. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  9. MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Ngo, Catherine; Janke, Paul; Hu, Ming; Micovic, Miro

    2003-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier that features high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) as gain elements is reviewed. This amplifier is designed to operate in the frequency range of 140 to 170 GHz, which contains spectral lines of several atmospheric molecular species plus subharmonics of other such spectral lines. Hence, this amplifier could serve as a prototype of amplifiers to be incorporated into heterodyne radiometers used in atmospheric science. The original intended purpose served by this amplifier is to boost the signal generated by a previously developed 164-GHz MMIC HEMT doubler and drive a 164-to-328-GHz doubler to provide a few milliwatts of power at 328 GHz.

  10. Ultra-Low-Noise W-Band MMIC Detector Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Van Vinkle, Dan; Tantawi, Sami; Fox, John; Church, Sarah E.; Lau, Jusy M.; Sieth, Matthew M.; Voll, Patricia E.; Bryerton, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) receiver can be used as a building block for next-generation radio astronomy instruments that are scalable to hundreds or thousands of pixels. W-band (75-110 GHz) low-noise receivers are needed for radio astronomy interferometers and spectrometers, and can be used in missile radar and security imagers. These receivers need to be designed to be mass-producible to increase the sensitivity of the instrument. This innovation is a prototyped single-sideband MMIC receiver that has all the receiver front-end functionality in one small and planar module. The planar module is easy to assemble in volume and does not require tuning of individual receivers. This makes this design low-cost in large volumes.

  11. Microwave characteristics of GaAs MMIC integratable optical detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, Paul C.; Hill, Scott M.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1989-01-01

    Interdigitated photoconductive detectors were fabricated on microwave device structures, making them easily integratable with Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMIC). Detector responsivity as high as 2.5 A/W and an external quantum efficiency of 3.81 were measured. Response speed was nearly independent of electrode geometry, and all detectors had usable response at frequencies to 6 GHz. A small signal model of the detectors based on microwave measurements was also developed.

  12. Fast bias dependent device models for CAD of MMICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Tom T.; Tayrani, Reza

    1995-02-01

    Fast and accurate physics-based models for High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) and Metal-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MESFETs) suitable for computer-aided design of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) are described. These models are incorporated into Microwave Harmonica(sup trademark) to enable the prediction of device IV characteristics and nonlinear performance, as well as bias dependent equivalent circuit parameters from device geometry and material profile.

  13. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  14. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. R.; MacConochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1980-10-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  15. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  16. Special Component Designs for Differential-Amplifier MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Special designs of two types of electronic components transistors and transmission lines have been conceived to optimize the performances of these components as parts of waveguide-embedded differential-amplifier monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) of the type described in the immediately preceding article. These designs address the following two issues, the combination of which is unique to these particular MMICs: Each MMIC includes a differential double-strip transmission line that typically has an impedance between 60 and 100 W. However, for purposes of matching of impedances, transmission lines having lower impedances are also needed. The transistors in each MMIC are, more specifically, one or more pair(s) of InP-based high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). Heretofore, it has been common practice to fabricate each such pair as a single device configured in the side-to-side electrode sequence source/gate/drain/gate/source. This configuration enables low-inductance source grounding from the sides of the device. However, this configuration is not suitable for differential operation, in which it is necessary to drive the gates differentially and to feed the output from the drain electrodes differentially. The special transmission-line design provides for three conductors, instead of two, in places where lower impedance is needed. The third conductor is a metal strip placed underneath the differential double-strip transmission line. The third conductor increases the capacitance per unit length of the transmission line by such an amount as to reduce the impedance to between 5 and 15 W. In the special HEMT-pair design, the side-to-side electrode sequence is changed to drain/gate/source/gate/ drain. In addition, the size of the source is reduced significantly, relative to corresponding sizes in prior designs. This reduction is justified by the fact that, by virtue of the differential configuration, the device has an internal virtual ground, and

  17. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Phased Array Demonstrated With ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) arrays developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rome Laboratory were demonstrated in aeronautical terminals and in mobile or fixed Earth terminals linked with NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four K/Ka-band experimental arrays were demonstrated between May 1994 and May 1995. Each array had GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The 30-GHz transmit array used in uplinks to ACTS was developed by Lewis and Texas Instruments. The three 20-GHz receive arrays used in downlinks from ACTS were developed in cooperation with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force integrated-circuit, active-phased-array development contracts with the Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Four demonstrations, each related to an application of high interest to both commercial and Department of Defense organizations, were conducted. The location, type of link, and the data rate achieved for each of the applications is shown. In one demonstration-- an aeronautical terminal experiment called AERO-X--a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the Lewis Learjet and ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice links (and in one case, interactive video links as well) between ACTS and an Army high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV, or "humvee"). In the fourth demonstration, the array was on a fixed mount and was electronically steered toward ACTS. Lewis served as project manager for all demonstrations and as overall system integrator. Lewis engineers developed the array system including a controller for open-loop tracking of ACTS during flight and HMMWV motion, as well as a laptop data display and recording system used in all demonstrations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory supported the AERO-X program, providing elements of the ACTS Mobile Terminal. The successful

  18. Optical techniques to feed and control GaAs MMIC modules for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Anzic, G.; Kunath, R. R.; Connolly, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A complex signal distribution system is required to feed and control GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) for phased array antenna applications above 20 GHz. Each MMIC module will require one or more RF lines, one or more bias voltage lines, and digital lines to provide a minimum of 10 bits of combined phase and gain control information. In a closely spaced array, the routing of these multiple lines presents difficult topology problems as well as a high probability of signal interference. To overcome GaAs MMIC phased array signal distribution problems optical fibers interconnected to monolithically integrated optical components with GaAs MMIC array elements are proposed as a solution. System architecture considerations using optical fibers are described. The analog and digital optical links to respectively feed and control MMIC elements are analyzed. It is concluded that a fiber optic network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but higher power will be required.

  19. Miniaturized optical wavelength sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Helen Ling-Ning

    Recently semiconductor processing technology has been applied to the miniaturization of optical wavelength sensors. Compact sensors enable new applications such as integrated diode-laser wavelength monitors and frequency lockers, portable chemical and biological detection, and portable and adaptive hyperspectral imaging arrays. Small sensing systems have trade-offs between resolution, operating range, throughput, multiplexing and complexity. We have developed a new wavelength sensing architecture that balances these parameters for applications involving hyperspectral imaging spectrometer arrays. In this thesis we discuss and demonstrate two new wavelength-sensing architectures whose single-pixel designs can easily be extended into spectrometer arrays. The first class of devices is based on sampling a standing wave. These devices are based on measuring the wavelength-dependent period of optical standing waves formed by the interference of forward and reflected waves at a mirror. We fabricated two different devices based on this principle. The first device is a wavelength monitor, which measures the wavelength and power of a monochromatic source. The second device is a spectrometer that can also act as a selective spectral coherence sensor. The spectrometer contains a large displacement piston-motion MEMS mirror and a thin GaAs photodiode flip-chip bonded to a quartz substrate. The performance of this spectrometer is similar to that of a Michelson in resolution, operating range, throughput and multiplexing but with the added advantages of fewer components and one-dimensional architecture. The second class of devices is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect. The Talbot effect occurs when a periodic object is illuminated with a spatially coherent wave. Periodically spaced self-images are formed behind the object. The spacing of the self-images is proportional to wavelength of the incident light. We discuss and demonstrate how this effect can be used for spectroscopy

  20. 80-GHz MMIC HEMT Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi

    2003-01-01

    A voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) that operates in the frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz has been constructed in the form of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). This circuit is a prototype of electronically tunable signal sources in the 75-to-110-GHz range, needed for communication, imaging, and automotive radar applications, among others. This oscillator (see Figure 1) includes two AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMTs. One HEMT serves mainly as an oscillator gain element. The other HEMT serves mainly as a varactor for controlling the frequency: the frequency-control element is its gate-to-source capacitance, which is varied by changing its gate supply voltage. The gain HEMT is biased for class-A operation (meaning that current is conducted throughout the oscillation cycle). Grounded coplanar waveguides are used as impedance-matching transmission lines, the input and output matching being chosen to sustain oscillation and maximize output power. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. A high density of vias is necessary for suppressing a parallel-plate electromagnetic mode that is undesired because it can propagate energy into the MMIC substrate. Previous attempts at constructing HEMT-based oscillators yielded circuits with relatively low levels of output power and narrow tuning ranges. For example, one HEMT VCO reported in the literature had an output power of 7 dBm (.5 mW) and a tuning range 2-GHz wide centered approximately at a nominal frequency of 77 GHz. In contrast, as shown in Figure 2, the present MMIC HEMT VCO puts out a power of 12.5 dBm (.18 mW) or more over the 6-GHz-wide frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz

  1. MMIC-calibrated probing by CW electrooptic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quang, D.; Erasme, Didier; Huyart, Bernard

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes an electrooptic probing technique using a cw semiconductor-laser beam associated with a fast photodetector. Besides its simplicity, this technique presents some advantages over the sampling one thanks to the presence of a Fabry-Perot effect, namely an enhancement of the electrooptic interaction and a simple solution to the calibration problem. The good validity of the calibration method allows the application of this technique to S-parameter measurements. The S-parameter determination, in modulus and in phase, of an industrial MMIC by the electrooptic method is reported and compared with direct network analyzer measurements.

  2. Design of a KA-Band Image Rejection Sub-Harmonic Down-Converter MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yang, Tao; Yang, Ziqiang

    2010-12-01

    A Ka band image rejection sub-harmonic down-converter monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) is proposed. It contains a radio frequency (RF) amplifier, a broadband Lange coupler and two balanced mixers with two compact Marchand Baluns. The converter is fabricated by a commercial GaAs 0.2 μm pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) process, the size of which is 1.5 mm × 2 mm. Moreover, an improved nonlinear stability analysis method is presented in this paper. Based on the auxiliary generator (AG) technology, the method can analyze the nonlinear stability of circuits under the terminal impedance mismatched condition by setting the terminal load impedances as optimized variables. This method is applied to the sub-harmonic down-converter and is validated by the simulation and experiment. Experimental results show that from 30 GHz to 40 GHz, the conversion loss (CL) of the converter is less than 10 dB, and the image refection ratio (IMRR) is more than 15 dB.

  3. Miniature Microwave Frequency Multiplexers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-31

    lumped elements and active transversal elements. The combina- tion of lumped and transversal elements provides performance superior to that of a filter ...3-2 4.0 DIPLEXER DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE ....................... 4-1 4.1 Lumped/Transversal Filter Structure .............. 4-1 5.0...6.3 Summary .......................................... 6-7 3 APPENDIX A A NOVEL MMIC ACTIVE FILTER WITH LUMPED AND TRANSVERSAL ELEMENT

  4. Miniature Latching Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. David; Benson, Glendon M.

    2008-01-01

    A miniature latching valve has been invented to satisfy a need for an electrically controllable on/off pneumatic valve that is lightweight and compact and remains in the most recently commanded open or closed state when power is not supplied. The valve includes a poppet that is moved into or out of contact with a seat to effect closure or opening, respectively, of the flow path. Motion of the poppet is initiated by electrical heating of one of two opposing pairs of nickel/titanium shape-memory alloy (SMA) wires above their transition temperature: heated wires contract to their remembered length, applying tension to pull the poppet toward or away from the seat. A latch consisting mainly of a bistable Belleville washer (a conical spring) made of a hardened stainless steel operates between two stable positions corresponding to the fully closed or fully open state, holding the poppet in one of these positions when power is not applied to either pair of SMA wires. To obtain maximum actuation force and displacement, the SMA wires must be kept in tension. The mounting fixtures at the ends of the wires must support large tensile stresses without creating stress concentrations that would limit the fatigue lives of the wires. An earlier design provided for each wire to be crimped in a conical opening with a conical steel ferrule that was swaged into the opening to produce a large, uniformly distributed holding force. In a subsequent design, the conical ferrule was replaced with a larger crimped cylindrical ferrule depicted in the figure. A major problem in designing the valve was to protect the SMA wires from a bake-out temperature of 300 C. The problem was solved by incorporating the SMA wires into an actuator module that is inserted into a barrel of the valve body and is held in place by miniature clip rings.

  5. V-band pseudomorphic HEMT MMIC phased array components for space communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, G. L.; Pao, C. K.; Wu, C. S.; Hu, M.; Downey, Alan N.

    1992-08-01

    Recent advances in pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (PMHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology have made it the preferred candidate for high performance millimeter-wave components for phased array applications. The development of V-band PMHEMT/MMIC components including power amplifiers and phase shifters is described. For the single-stage MMIC power amplifier employing a 200 micron PMHEMT, we achieved 151.4 mW output power (757.0 mW/mm) with 1.8 dB associated gain and 26.4 percent power-added efficiency at 60 GHz. A two-stage MMIC amplifier utilizing the same devices demonstrated small-signal gain as high as 15 dB at 58 GHz. And, for the phase shifter, a four-bit phase shifter with less than 8 dB insertion loss from 61 to 63 GHz was measured.

  6. Miniaturized autonomous robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hidenori; Fukuda, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Many projects developing the miniaturized autonomous robot have been carried out in the whole world. This paper deals with our challenges developing a miniaturized autonomous robot. The miniaturized autonomous robot is defined as the miniaturized closed-loop system with micro processor, microactuators and microsensors. We have developed the micro autonomous robotic system (MARS) consisting of the microprocessor, microsensors, microactuators, communication units and batteries. The MARS controls itself by the downloaded program supplied through the IR communication system. In this paper, we demonstrate several performance of the MARS, and discuss the properties of the miniaturized autonomous robot.

  7. Handheld interface for miniature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunny; Samson, Scott A.; Farmer, Andrew; Smith, Matthew C.; Fries, David; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2005-02-01

    Miniaturization of laboratory sensors has been enabled by continued evolution of technology. Field portable systems are often desired, because they reduce sample handling, provide rapid feedback capability, and enhance convenience. Fieldable sensor systems should include a method for initiating the analysis, storing and displaying the results, while consuming minimal power and being compact and portable. Low cost will allow widespread usage of these systems. In this paper, we discuss a reconfigurable Personal Data Assistant (PDA) based control and data collection system for use with miniature sensors. The system is based on the Handspring visor PDA and a custom designed motherboard, which connects directly to the PDA microprocessor. The PDA provides a convenient and low cost graphical user interface, moderate processing capability, and integrated battery power. The low power motherboard provides the voltage levels, data collection, and input/output (I/O) capabilities required by many MEMS and miniature sensors. These capabilities are relayed to connectors, where an application specific daughterboard is attached. In this paper, two applications are demonstrated. First, a handheld nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) detection sensor consisting of a heated and optical fluorescence detection system is discussed. Second, an electrostatically actuated MEMS micro mirror controller is realized.

  8. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  9. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  10. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.

    1990-06-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  11. Optical detectors for GaAs MMIC integration: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optic links are being considered to transmit digital and analog signals in phased array antenna feed networks in space communications systems. The radiating elements in these arrays will be GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) in numbers ranging from a few hundred to several thousand. If such optical interconnects are to be practical it appears essential that the associated components, including detectors, be monolithically integrated on the same chip as the microwave circuitry. The general issue of monolithic integration of microwave and optoelectronic components is addressed from the point of view of fabrication technology and compatibility. Particular attention is given to the fabrication technology of various types of GaAs optical detectors that are designed to operate at a wavelength of 830 nm.

  12. Optical detectors for GaAs MMIC integration - Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optic links are being considered to transmit digital and analog signals in phased array antenna feed networks in space communications systems. The radiating elements in these arrays will be GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) in numbers ranging from a few hundred to several thousand. If such optical interconnects are to be practical it appears essential that the associated components, including detectors, be monolithically integrated on the same chip as the microwave circuitry. The general issue of monolithic integration of microwave and optoelectronic components is addressed from the point of view of fabrication technology and compatibility. Particular attention is given to the fabrication technology of various types of GaAs optical detectors that are designed to operate at a wavelength of 830 nm.

  13. Miniature propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John G.

    1992-07-01

    Miniature solenoid valves, check valves and a hydrazine gas generator typify the miniaturization used in the liquid propulsion system for the Army Light Weight Exo-Atmospheric Projectile (LEAP). The pressure control subsystem uses a solenoid valve weighing 24 grams to control flow of helium to pressurize the propellant tanks. The attitude control subsystem uses a gas generator weighing 71 grams to produce decomposed hydrazine as the gaseous propellant for miniature 1 lbf ACS thrusters weighing 5.4 grams. The successful use of these miniature components in development tests and a hover test of the LEAP is described.

  14. Miniaturized biological and electrochemical fuel cells: challenges and applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Ghobadian, Sasan; Goodrich, Payton J; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2013-09-14

    This paper discusses the fundamentals and developments of miniaturized fuel cells, both biological and electrochemical. An overview of microfluidic fuel cells, miniaturized microbial fuel cells, enzymatic biofuel cells, and implanted biofuel cells in an attempt to provide green energy and to power implanted microdevices is provided. Also, the challenges and applications of each type of fuel cell are discussed in detail. Most recent developments in fuel cell technologies such as novel catalysts, compact designs, and fabrication methods are reviewed.

  15. MMIC antenna technology development in the 30/20 gigahertz band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, J.; Kascak, T. J.; Alexovich, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a progress summary of NASA's efforts in developing 20 and 30 GHz GaAs MMIC devices and an advanced satellite communications antenna system using these devices. In the interest of preserving resources such as frequency spectrum and orbital space the antenna system is being developed with multiple fixed spot beams and multiple scanning spot beams. NASA set high goals for the MMIC development to pushc GaAs technology. These goals and the main features of the MMIC devices are discussed. Some packaging and characterization considerations are also discussed. The 20 GHz transmit antenna and 30 GHz receive antenna are being developed separately. The approach selected is to perform contractual configuration studies, purchase a 20-GHz experimental antenna system (EAS) and perform in-house evaluation. The features and key specifications of the EAS are discussed. Additional supporting technologies such as effects of coupling on modest sized arrays, MMIC matching techniques, in-house analytical capability, wideband and dual frequency microstrip patch array development, and MMIC packaging techniques are described. Some plans for future are also discussed.

  16. MMIC antenna technology development in the 30/20 gigahertz band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, J.; Kascak, T. J.; Alexovich, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a progress summary of NASA's efforts in developing 20 and 30 GHz GaAs MMIC devices and an advanced satellite communications antenna system using these devices. In the interest of preserving resources such as frequency spectrum and orbital space the antenna system is being developed with multiple fixed spot beams and multiple scanning spot beams. NASA set high goals for the MMIC development to push GaAs technology. These goals and the main features of the MMIC devices are discussed. Some packaging and characterization considerations are also discussed. The 20 GHz transmit antenna and 30 GHz receive antenna are being developed separately. The approach selected is to perform contractual configuration studies, purchase a 20-GHz experimental antenna system (EAS) and perform in-house evaluation. The features and key specifications of the EAS are discussed. Additional supporting technologies such as effects of coupling on modest sized arrays, MMIC matching techniques, in-house analytical capability, wideband and dual frequency microstrip patch array development, and MMIC packaging techniques are described. Some plans for future work are also discussed.

  17. Custom chipset and compact module design for a 75-110 GHz laboratory signal source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Matthew A.; Boyd, Tod A.; Castro, Jason J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the development and characterization of a compact, full-waveguide bandwidth (WR-10) signal source for general-purpose testing of mm-wave components. The monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based multichip module is designed for compactness and ease-of-use, especially in size-constrained test sets such as a wafer probe station. It takes as input a cm-wave continuous-wave (CW) reference and provides a factor of three frequency multiplication as well as amplification, output power adjustment, and in situ output power monitoring. It utilizes a number of custom MMIC chips such as a Schottky-diode limiter and a broadband mm-wave detector, both designed explicitly for this module, as well as custom millimeter-wave multipliers and amplifiers reported in previous papers.

  18. Simulation and measurement of a Ka-band HTS MMIC Josephson junction mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Pegrum, Colin; Du, Jia; Guo, Yingjie Jay

    2017-01-01

    We report modeling and simulation results for a Ka band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) Josephson junction mixer. A Verilog-A model of a Josephson junction is established and imported into the system simulator to realize a full HTS MMIC circuit simulation containing the HTS passive circuit models. Impedance matching optimization between the junction and passive devices is investigated. Junction DC I-V characteristics, current and local oscillator bias conditions and mixing performance are simulated and compared with the experimental results. Good agreement is obtained between the simulation and measurement results.

  19. Beyond G-band : a 235 GHz InP MMIC amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Douglas; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, A. K.; Lee, Karen; Lai, Richard; Grundbacher, Ronald; Liu, Po-Hsin; Raja, Rohit

    2005-01-01

    We present results on an InP monolithic millimeter- wave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier having 10-dB gain at 235 GHz. We designed this circuit and fabricated the chip in Northrop Grumman Space Technology's (NGST) 0.07- m InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process. Using a WR3 (220-325 GHz) waveguide vector network analyzer system interfaced to waveguide wafer probes, we measured this chip on-wafer for -parameters. To our knowledge, this is the first time a WR3 waveguide on-wafer measurement system has been used to measure gain in a MMIC amplifier above 230 GHz.

  20. Compact, low power consumption methane sensor based on a novel miniature multipass gas cell and a CW, room temperature interband cascade laser emitting at 3.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Gluszek, Aleksander K.; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-02-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)-based methane sensor, employing a miniature dense-pattern multi-pass gas cell (MPGC) and a continuous wave, room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL), is reported. The optical integration based on an advanced folded optical path design and an efficient ICL control system with appropriate electrical power management results in a methane sensor with a small footprint (32 × 20 × 17 cm3) and low-power consumption (6W). The direct absorption measurement strategy allows absolute quantitative assessments without any calibration. Polynomial and least-squares fit algorithms are employed to remove the baseline of the spectral scan and retrieve CH4 concentrations, respectively. An Allan-Werle deviation analysis shows that the measurement precision can reach 1.4 ppb for a 60 s averaging time. Continuous measurements lasting seven days were performed to demonstrate the stability and robustness of the reported methane sensor.

  1. Microwave/mm wave magnetics and MMIC compatibility (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J. D.

    1987-04-01

    Ferrite devices can be loosely classified into three different categories, namely: control components using polycrystalline ferrites, tunable filters and oscillators using YIG spheres, and devices based on epitaxial YIG or ferrite films. Ferrite control components such as circulators, isolators, and switches are used in almost all microwave and millimeter wave systems. Tunable YIG sphere devices see more limited use in radar and EW systems, and microwave test equipment while epitaxial YIG devices have yet to make a significant systems impact. GaAs chips for phased array modules are under development by several companies for both radar and EW applications. The GaAs chips can contain small signal and power gain, phase shifters, filters, mixers, and switches. The modules are usually designed, however, with discrete circulators or isolators which are often significantly larger than the MMIC chips. Further reduction in module size and cost will require the design of the module without nonreciprocal components, or the development of ferrite devices which are more compatible with the size, bandwidth, and fabrication of the GaAs device. Integration of nonreciprocal ferrite components on the GaAs chip could have a large impact but presents a significant challenge both in terms of processing compatibility between the ferrite and the GaAs and in terms of cost. The impact in the areas of tunable YIG filters and oscillators and MSW devices are smaller but, fortunately, so are the difficulties. Here the YIG films or spheres, or hexagonal ferrite films can be laid on the GaAs substrate thus forming a hybrid device. Having integrated the ferrite with the GaAs it is necessary to consider the magnetic bias field requirement. Bias fields are not required in latching devices and can be minimized in other devices by use of hexagonal ferrite films with their large anisotropy fields. It may even be possible to integrate a permanent magnet film onto the GaAs chip.

  2. Influence of ion-implanted profiles on the performance of GaAs MESFET's and MMIC amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlidis, D.; Cazaux, J.L.; Graffeuil, J.

    1988-04-01

    The RF small-signal performance of GaAs MESFET's and MMIC amplifiers as a function of various ion-implanted profiles is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Implantation energy, dose, and recess depth influence are theoretically analyzed with the help of a specially developed device simulator. The performance of MMIC amplifiers processed with various energies, doses, recess depths, and bias conditions is discussed and compared to experimental characteristics. Some criteria are finally proposed for the choice of implantation conditions and process in order to optimize the characteristics of ion-implanted FET's and to realize process-tolerant MMIC amplifiers.

  3. MMIC Amplifier Produces Gain of 10 dB at 235 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Douglas; Fung, King Man; Lee, Karen; Samoska, Lorene; Wells, Mary; Gaier, Todd; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Grundbacher, Ronald; Lai, Richard; Raja, Rohit; Liu, Po-Hsin

    2007-01-01

    The first solid-state amplifier capable of producing gain at a frequency >215 GHz has been demonstrated. This amplifier was fabricated as a monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) chip containing InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) of 0.07 micron gate length on a 50- m-thick InP substrate.

  4. A W-Band MMIC Radar System for Remote Detection of Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Ayhan, Serdal; Scherr, Steffen; Massler, Hermann; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver; Zwick, Thomas; Kallfass, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    In medical and personal health systems for vital sign monitoring, contact-free remote detection is favourable compared to wired solutions. For example, they help to avoid severe pain, which is involved when a patient with burned skin has to be examined. Continuous wave (CW) radar systems have proven to be good candidates for this purpose. In this paper a monolithic millimetre-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) based CW radar system operating in the W-band (75-110 GHz) at 96 GHz is presented. The MMIC components are custom-built and make use of 100 nm metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). The radar system is employing a frequency multiplier-by-twelve MMIC and a receiver MMIC both packaged in split-block modules. They allow for the determination of respiration and heartbeat frequency of a human target sitting in 1 m distance. The analysis of the measured data is carried out in time and frequency domain and each approach is shown to have its advantages and drawbacks.

  5. Miniature Incandescent Lamps as Fiber-Optic Light Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret; Collura, Joe; Helvajian, Henry; Pocha, Michael; Meyer, Glenn; McConaghy, Charles F.; Olsen, Barry L.

    2008-01-01

    Miniature incandescent lamps of a special type have been invented to satisfy a need for compact, rapid-response, rugged, broadband, power-efficient, fiber-optic-coupled light sources for diverse purposes that could include calibrating spectrometers, interrogating optical sensors, spot illumination, and spot heating.

  6. Reducing Unsteady Loads on a Piggyback Miniature Submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John

    2009-01-01

    A small, simple fixture has been found to be highly effective in reducing destructive unsteady hydrodynamic loads on a miniature submarine that is attached in piggyback fashion to the top of a larger, nuclear-powered, host submarine. The fixture, denoted compact ramp, can be installed with minimal structural modification, and the use of it does not entail any change in submarine operations.

  7. Miniaturization of planar horn motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-04-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of a stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2×2×2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of 3 × 3 × 0.2 cm.

  8. Miniaturization of Planar Horn Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2x2x2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of3 x 3x 0.2 cm.

  9. Recent Advances In Cryogenic Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Low Noise Amplifiers For Astrophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Church, S.; Cleary, K.; Gaier, T.; Gawande, R.; Kangaslahti, P.; Lawrence, C.; Readhead, A.; Reeves, R.; Seiffert, M.; Sieth, M.; Varonen, M.; Voll, P.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we discuss advances in high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low noise amplifier (LNA) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuits (MMICs) for use as front end amplifiers in ultra-low noise receivers. Applications include focal plane arrays for studying the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation and foreground separation, receiver arrays for molecular spectroscopy, and high redshift CO surveys for probing the epoch of reionization. Recent results and a summary of best indium phosphide (InP) low noise amplifier data will be presented. Cryogenic MMIC LNAs using state-of-the-art InP technology have achieved record performance, and have advantages over other detectors in the 30-300 GHz range. InP MMIC LNAs operate at room temperature and may achieve near-optimum performance at 20K, a temperature readily achieved with modern cryo-coolers. In addition, wide-bandwidth LNAs are suitable for heterodyne applications as well as direct detector applications. Recent results include Ka-band MMICs with 15K noise temperature performance, and Q-Band MMICs with on-wafer measured cryogenic noise of 12K at 38 GHz. In addition, W-Band amplifiers with 25K noise temperature at 95 GHz will be presented, as well as wide-band LNAs with noise temperature below 45K up to 116 GHz. At higher frequencies, we will discuss progress on MMIC LNAs and receiver modules in G-Band (140-220 GHz), where our group has achieved less than 60K receiver noise temperature at 166 GHz. We will address extending the high performance of these MMIC LNAs to even higher frequencies for spectroscopic surveys, and make projections on future performance given current trends. These MMIC amplifiers can play a key role in future ground-based and space-based instruments for astrophysical observations.

  10. Novel miniaturised wideband baluns for MIC and MMIC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Smith, D.

    1993-06-01

    Very compact novel planar broadband baluns are described. Each balun consists of two Lange couplers. Less than 0.3 dB and 2.5 deg for the amplitude and phase balances, respectively, have been measured over the 1.0-2.2 GHz bandwidth for a microstrip balun. As compared with other reported baluns, these baluns are simpler, more compact, easier to design, and fabricated on only one side of the substrate. They are thus very attractive for microwave integrated and monolithic integrated circuit applications.

  11. Chemistry "en Miniature"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesky, Herbert W.

    1997-04-01

    By using the video camera projector system we are improving the techniques which are employed in various schools. This is an important reason for employing "Chemistry en Miniature", as this method provides a new means of demonstrating chemical experiments in a lecture hall.

  12. Miniature Robotic Spacecraft for Inspecting Other Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven; Abbott, Larry; Duran, Steve; Goode, Robert; Howard, Nathan; Jochim, David; Rickman, Steve; Straube, Tim; Studak, Bill; Wagenknecht, Jennifer; Lemke, Matthew; Wade, Randall; Wheeler, Scott; Baggerman, Clinton

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the Miniature Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)-- a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. The Mini AERCam is a successor to the AERCam Sprint -- a prior miniature robotic inspection spacecraft that was demonstrated in a space-shuttle flight experiment in 1997. The prototype of the Mini AERCam is a demonstration unit having approximately the form and function of a flight system. The Mini AERCam is approximately spherical with a diameter of about 7.5 in. (.19 cm) and a weight of about 10 lb (.4.5 kg), yet it has significant additional capabilities, relative to the 14-in. (36-cm), 35-lb (16-kg) AERCam Sprint. The Mini AERCam includes miniaturized avionics, instrumentation, communications, navigation, imaging, power, and propulsion subsystems, including two digital video cameras and a high-resolution still camera. The Mini AERCam is designed for either remote piloting or supervised autonomous operations, including station keeping and point-to-point maneuvering. The prototype has been tested on an air-bearing table and in a hardware-in-the-loop orbital simulation of the dynamics of maneuvering in proximity to the International Space Station.

  13. Dual-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for Microwave Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Aguilar, Suzette M.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a miniaturized, dual-band patch antenna array element that is designed for use in a 3-D microwave tomography system for breast imaging. Dual-band operation is achieved by manipulating the fundamental resonant mode of the patch antenna and one of its higher-order modes. Miniaturization and tuning of the resonant frequencies are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in a compact, dual-band antenna with symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at both bands of operation. The performance of the antenna in a biocompatible immersion medium is verified experimentally. PMID:21866218

  14. APS-Workshop on Characterization of MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) Devices for Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, Jerry (Editor); Mittra, Raj (Editor); Laprade, Nick; Edward, Bryan; Zaghloul, Amir

    1987-01-01

    The IEEE AP-S ADCOM is attempting to expand its educational, tutorial and information exchange activities as a further benefit to all members. To this end, ADCOM will be forming specialized workshops on topics of interest to its members. The first such workshop on Characterization and Packaging of MMIC Devices for Array Antennas was conceived. The workshop took place on June 13, 1986 as part of the 1986 International Symposium sponsored by IEEE AP-S and URSI in Philadelphia, PA, June 9-13, 1986. The workshop was formed to foster the interchange of ideas among MMIC device users and to provide a forum to collect and focus information among engineers experienced and interested in the topic. After brief presentations by the panelists and comments from attendees on several subtopics, the group was divided into working committees. Each committee evaluated and made recommendations on one of the subtopics.

  15. Ka-Band SiGe Receiver Front-End MMIC for Transponder Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, Jaikrishna; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Hashemi, Hassein; Aflatouni, Firooz

    2010-01-01

    A fully integrated, front-end Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) was developed that houses an LNA (low noise amplifier) stage, a down-conversion stage, and output buffer amplifiers. The MMIC design employs a two-step quadrature down-conversion architecture, illustrated in the figure, which results in improved quality of the down-converted IF quadrature signals. This is due to the improved sensitivity of this architecture to amplitude and phase mismatches in the quadrature down-conversion process. Current sharing results in reduced power consumption, while 3D-coupled inductors reduce the chip area. Improved noise figure is expected over previous SiGe-based, frontend designs

  16. A W-band integrated power module using MMIC MESFET power amplifiers and varactor doublers

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Chen, Seng Woon; Pande, K. ); Rice, P.D. )

    1993-12-01

    A high-performance integrated power module using U-band MMIC MESFET power amplifiers in conjunction with W-band MMIC high efficiency varactor doublers has been developed for millimeter-wave system applications. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and performance of this W-band integrated power module. Measured results of the complete integrated power module show an output power of 90 mW with an overall associated gain of 29.5 dB at 94 GHz. A saturated power of over 95 mW was also achieved. These results represent the highest reported power and gain at W-band using MESFET and varactor frequency doubling technologies. This integrated power module is suitable for the future 94 GHz missile seeker applications.

  17. Miniaturized low-cost digital holographic interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalkiewicz, Aneta; Kujawinska, Małgorzata; Marc, Paweł; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    2006-04-01

    Digital holography (DH) and digital holographic interferometry (DHI) are very useful, robust, full-field visualization and measurement techniques applied for small objects, especially in the field of bioengineering and microelements system testing. Nowadays CCD/CMOS detectors and microlasers allow to build miniaturized and compact digital holographic head. Various approaches to develop DH/DHI systems including a variety of optical and mechanical solutions have been made. The main recent requirements for holocamera design include compactness, insensitivity to vibrations environmental changes and with good quality of output data. Other requirement is the ability to build a low-cost and robust system for sensing applications. In our paper, we propose a design of miniaturized holo-camera head with fibre optics light delivery system and remote data read-out. The opto-mechanical architecture allows out-of-plane and shape measurements of diffuse and reflective surfaces. The possible data capture schemes and software for enhanced quality numerical reconstruction of complex objects are discussed and the optimized methodology is determined. Also real-time optoelectronic hologram reconstruction is demonstrated on the base of remote data delivery to liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator. The performance of the system is tested on the resolution amplitude test and master sphere, while engineering objects in the experiments are static and dynamic microelements.

  18. Miniaturized Environmental Monitoring Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Freidhoff

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the Mass Spectrograph on a Chip (MSOC) program is the development of a miniature, multi-species gas sensor fabricated using silicon micromachining technology which will be orders of magnitude smaller and lower power consumption than a conventional mass spectrometer. The sensing and discrimination of this gas sensor are based on an ionic mass spectrograph, using magnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The fields cause a spatial separation of the ions according to their respective mass-to-charge ratio. The fabrication of this device involves the combination of microelectronics with micromechanically built sensors and, ultimately, vacuum pumps. The prototype of a chemical sensor would revolutionize the method of performing environmental monitoring for both commercial and government applications. The portable unit decided upon was the miniaturized gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector, referred to as a GC/MS in the analytical marketplace.

  19. Miniaturization in Biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    The use of biocatalysts for the production of both consumer goods and building blocks for chemical synthesis is consistently gaining relevance. A significant contribution for recent advances towards further implementation of enzymes and whole cells is related to the developments in miniature reactor technology and insights into flow behavior. Due to the high level of parallelization and reduced requirements of chemicals, intensive screening of biocatalysts and process variables has become more feasible and reproducibility of the bioconversion processes has been substantially improved. The present work aims to provide an overview of the applications of miniaturized reactors in bioconversion processes, considering multi-well plates and microfluidic devices, update information on the engineering characterization of the hardware used, and present perspective developments in this area of research. PMID:20479988

  20. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  1. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  2. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Zuppero, Anthony C.

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  3. Miniature Airflow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature flow-angle and airspeed sensor quickly mounted on light aircraft wing with two-sided tape since conventional sensors are restricted to large aircraft. Sensor operates as free-trailing wind vane selfalineing in airstream through two independent axes. Vane attached to wing surface through hollow mounting boom that fits on mounting plate attached to wing with two-sided neoprene-foam tape. Method shown strong enough for loads of low-speed flight.

  4. Miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation for in situ measurements: micro gas chromatography coupled with miniature quadrupole array and paul ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, P.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M.; Orient, O.

    2002-01-01

    Miniaturized chemical instrumentation is needed for in situ measurements in planetary exploration and other spaceflight applications where factors such as reduction in payload requirements and enhanced robustness are important. In response to this need, we are 'continuing to develop miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation which combines chemical separations by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) to provide positive identification of chemical compounds in complex mixtures of gases, such as those found in the International Space Station's cabin atmosphere. Our design approach utilizes micro gas chromatography components coupled with either a miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array (QMSA) or compact, high-resolution Paul ion trap.

  5. Miniaturizing RFID for magnamosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Chen, Shijie; Kish, Shad; Loh, Lokkee; Zhang, Junmin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Kwiat, Dillon; Harrison, Michael; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Anastomosis is a common surgical procedure using staples or sutures in an open or laparoscopic surgery. A more effective and much less invasive alternative is to apply the mechanical pressure on the tissue over a few days [1]. Since the pressure is produced by the attractive force between two permanent magnets, the procedure is called magnamosis[1]. To ensure the two magnets are perfectly aligned during the surgery, a miniaturized batteryless Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) tag is developed to wirelessly telemeter the status of a pressure sensitive mechanical switch. Using the multi-layer circular spiral coil design, the diameter of the RFID tag is shrunk to 10, 15, 19 and 27 mm to support the magnamosis for children as well as adults. With the impedance matching network, the operating distance of these four RFID tags are longer than 10 cm in a 20 × 22 cm(2) area, even when the tag's normal direction is 45° off the antenna's normal direction. Measurement results also indicate that there is no noticeable degradation on the operating distance when the tag is immersed in saline or placed next to the rare-earth magnet. The miniaturized RFID tag presented in this paper is able to support the magnamosis and other medical applications that require the miniaturized RFID tag.

  6. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  7. Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    The design, simulation, and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide two-way branch-line hybrid unequal power combiner (with port impedances matched to that of a standard WR-28 waveguide) has been created to combine input signals, which are in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The measured combining efficiency is 92.9 percent at the center frequency of 32.05 GHz. This circuit is efficacious in combining the unequal output power from two Ka-band GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) with high efficiency. The component parts include the branch-line hybrid-based power combiner and the MMIC-based PAs. A two-way branch-line hybrid is a four-port device with all ports matched; power entering port 1 is divided in phase, and into the ratio 2:1 between ports 3 and 4. No power is coupled to port 2. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on GaAs that operates at microwave frequencies, and performs the function of signal amplification. The power combiner is designed to operate over the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, which is NASA's deep space frequency band. The power combiner would have an output return loss better than 20 dB. Isolation between the output port and the isolated port is greater than 25 dB. Isolation between the two input ports is greater than 25 dB. The combining efficiency would be greater than 90 percent when the ratio of the two input power levels is two. The power combiner is machined from aluminum with E-plane split-block arrangement, and has excellent reliability. The flexibility of this design allows the combiner to be customized for combining the power from MMIC PAs with an arbitrary power output ratio. In addition, it allows combining a low-power GaAs MMIC with a high-power GaN MMIC. The arbitrary

  8. Miniature electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Casper, Robert F.

    1976-01-01

    A miniature coaxial cable electrical connector includes an annular compressible gasket in a receptacle member, the gasket having a generally triangular cross section resiliently engaging and encircling a conically tapered outer surface of a plug member to create an elongated current leakage path at their interface; means for preventing rotation of the plug relative to the receptacle; a metal sleeve forming a portion of the receptacle and encircling the plug member when interconnected; and a split ring in the plug having outwardly and rearwardly projecting fingers spaced from and encircling a portion of a coaxial cable and engageable with the metal sleeve to interlock the receptacle and plug.

  9. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  10. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOEpatents

    Umbarger, C. John; Wolf, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  11. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  12. High torque miniature rotary actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes the design and the development of a miniature rotary actuator (36 mm diameter by 100 mm length) used in spacecraft mechanisms requiring high torques and/or ultra-fine step resolution. This actuator lends itself to applications requiring high torque but with strict volume limitations which challenge the use of conventional rotary actuators. The design challenge was to develop a lightweight (less than 500 grams), very compact, high bandwidth, low power, thermally stable rotary actuator capable of producing torques in excess of 50 N.m and step resolutions as fine as 0.003 degrees. To achieve a relatively high torsional stiffness in excess of 1000 Nm/radian, the design utilizes a combination of harmonic drive and multistage planetary gearing. The unique design feature of this actuator that contributes to its light weight and extremely precise motion capability is a redundant stepper motor driving the output through a multistage reducing gearbox. The rotary actuator is powered by a high reliability space-rated stepper motor designed and constructed by Moog, Inc. The motor is a three-phase stepper motor of 15 degree step angle, producing twenty-four full steps per revolution. Since micro-stepping is not used in the design, and un-powered holding torque is exhibited at every commanded step, the rotary actuator is capable of reacting to torques as high as 35 Nm by holding position with the power off. The output is driven through a gear transmission having a total train ratio of 5120:1, resulting in a resolution of 0.003 degrees output rotation per motor step. The modular design of the multi-stage output transmission makes possible the addition of designs having different output parameters, such as lower torque and higher output speed capability. Some examples of an actuator family based on this growth capability will be presented in the paper.

  13. Miniature snapshot multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam; Ashe, Philip R.; Tan, Songsheng

    2011-03-01

    We present a miniature snapshot multispectral imager based on using a monolithic filter array that operates in the short wavelength infrared spectral region and has a number of defense and commercial applications. The system is low-weight, portable with a miniature platform, and requires low power. The imager uses a 4×4 Fabry-Pérot filter array operating from 1487 to 1769 nm with a spectral bandpass ~10 nm. The design of the filters is based on using a shadow mask technique to fabricate an array of Fabry-Pérot etalons with two multilayer dielectric mirrors. The filter array is installed in a commercial handheld InGaAs camera, replacing the imaging lens with a custom designed 4×4 microlens assembly with telecentric imaging performance in each of the 16 subimaging channels. We imaged several indoor and outdoor scenes. The microlens assembly and filter design is quite flexible and can be tailored for any wavelength region from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared, and the spectral bandpass can also be customized to meet sensing requirements. In this paper we discuss the design and characterization of the filter array, the microlens optical assembly, and imager and present imaging results.

  14. Three-Stage InP Submillimeter-Wave MMIC Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukala, David; Samoska, Lorene; Man, King; Gaier, Todd; Deal, William; Lai, Richard; Mei, Gerry; Makishi, Stella

    2008-01-01

    A submillimeter-wave monolithic integrated- circuit (S-MMIC) amplifier has been designed and fabricated using an indium phosphide (InP) 35-nm gate-length high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device, developed at Northrop Grumman Corporation. The HEMT device employs two fingers each 15 micrometers wide. The HEMT wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and make use of a pseudomorphic In0.75Ga0.25As channel, a silicon delta-doping layer as the electron supply, an In0.52Al0.48As buffer layer, and an InP substrate. The three-stage design uses coplanar waveguide topology with a very narrow ground-to-ground spacing of 14 micrometers. Quarter-wave matching transmission lines, on-chip metal-insulator-metal shunt capacitors, series thin-film resistors, and matching stubs were used in the design. Series resistors in the shunt branch arm provide the basic circuit stabilization. The S-MMIC amplifier was measured for S-parameters and found to be centered at 320 GHz with 13-15-dB gain from 300-345 GHz. This chip was developed as part of the DARPA Submillimeter Wave Imaging Focal Plane Technology (SWIFT) program (see figure). Submillimeter-wave amplifiers could enable more sensitive receivers for earth science, planetary remote sensing, and astrophysics telescopes, particularly in radio astronomy, both from the ground and in space. A small atmospheric window at 340 GHz exists and could enable ground-based observations. However, the submillimeter-wave regime (above 300 GHz) is best used for space telescopes as Earth s atmosphere attenuates most of the signal through water and oxygen absorption. Future radio telescopes could make use of S-MMIC amplifiers for wideband, low noise, instantaneous frequency coverage, particularly in the case of heterodyne array receivers.

  15. Ka-band MMIC array system for ACTS aeronautical terminal experiment (Aero-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A.; Zakrajsek, Robert J.; Lee, Richard Q.; Andro, Monty; Turtle, John P.

    1995-01-01

    During the summer of 1994, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Aeronautical Terminal Experiment (Aero-X) was successfully completed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). 4.8 and 9.6 Kbps duplex voice links were established between the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS Link Evaluation Terminal (LET) in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS. The antenna system used in this demonstration was developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and US Air Force experimental arrays using GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The antenna system consisted of three arrays mounted inside the LeRC Learjet, pointing out through the windows. An open loop tracking controller developed by LeRC used information from the aircraft position and attitude sensors to automatically steer the arrays toward ACTS during flight JPL ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) system hardware was used as transceivers both on the aircraft and at the LET. The single 32 element MMIC transmit array developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments has an EIRP of 23.4 dBW at boresight. The two 20 GHz MMIC receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the USAF Rome Laboratory/Electronic System Center, taking advantage of existing USAF array development contracts with Boeing and Martin Marietta. The Boeing array has 23 elements and a G/T of 16/6 db/degK at boresight. The Martin Marietta array has 16 elements and a G/T of 16.1 db/degK at boresight. The three proof-of-concept arrays, the array control system and their integration and operation in the Learjet for Aero-X are described.

  16. Maintenance Management Information and Control System (MMICS). Administrative Boon or Burden.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    AD A145 762 MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION AND CONTROL SYSTEM li MMICS ADMINISTRATIVE BOON OR RtJRDEN(U) LESLEY COLL U L, CAMBRIDOE MA IP MURRAY...monitoring hranch training programs. EVALUAT ION "ETHODOLOGY A questionnaire/survey of orc3nization manar.ers 3nd suoerviscrs will be administered to...Questionnaire 4. Review l i Li terature x 5.Ccllectt t Completed Data J ~ [ 6. Evaluate Findings x xX 7. Prepare , _ _ Conclusions I.......i _ _ _jX x0

  17. Ka-Band Waveguide Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers With Unequal and Arbitrary Power Output Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2009-01-01

    The design, simulation and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 +/- 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide branch-line hybrid unequal power combiner is presented. The manufactured combiner was designed to combine input signals, which are in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The application of the branch-line hybrid for combining two MMIC power amplifiers with output power ratio of two is demonstrated. The measured combining efficiency is approximately 93 percent over the above frequency band.

  18. Ka-Band Waveguide Hybrid Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers with Unequal and Arbitrary Power Output Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2009-01-01

    The design, simulation and characterization of a novel Ka-band (32.05 +/- 0.25 GHz) rectangular waveguide branchline hybrid unequal power combiner is presented. The manufactured combiner was designed to combine input signals, which are nearly in phase and with an amplitude ratio of two. The measured return loss and isolation of the branch-line hybrid are better than 22 and 27 dB, respectively. The application of the branch-line hybrid for combining two monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers with output power ratio of two is demonstrated. The measured combining efficiency is 92.9% at the center frequency of 32.05 GHz.

  19. Wideband bandpass filters employing broadside-coupled microstrip lines for MIC and MMIC applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, M.; Nguyen, C.

    1994-01-01

    Wideband bandpass filters employing half-wavelength broadside-coupled microstrip lines suitable for microwave and mm-wave integrated monolithic integrated circuits (MIC and MMIC) are presented. Several filters have been developed at X-band (8 to 12 GHz) with 1 dB insertion loss. Fair agreement between the measured and calculated results has been observed. The analysis of the broadside-coupled microstrip lines used in the filters, based on the quasi-static spectral domain technique, is also described.

  20. Miniaturized Mid-Infrared Sensor Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Young, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-08-16

    Fundamental vibrational and rotational modes associated with most inorganic and organic molecules are spectroscopically accessible within the mid-infrared (MIR; 3-20 {micro}m) regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The interaction between MIR photons and organic molecules provides particularly sharp transitions, which - despite the wide variety of organic molecules - provide unique MIR absorption spectra reflecting the molecularly characteristic arrangement of chemical bonds within the probed molecules via the frequency position of the associated vibrational and rotational transitions. Given the inherent molecular selectivity and achievable sensitivity, MIR spectroscopy provides an ideal platform for optical sensing applications. Despite this potential, early MIR sensing applications were limited to localized applications due to the size of the involved instrumentation, and limited availability of appropriately compact MIR optical components including light sources, detectors, waveguides, and spectrometers. During the last decades, engineering advances in photonics and optical engineering have facilitated the translation of benchtop-style MIR spectroscopy into miniaturized optical sensing schemes providing a footprint compatible with portable instrumentation requirements for field deployable analytical tools. In this trend article, we will discuss recent advances and future strategies for miniaturizing MIR sensor technology. The Beer-Lambert law implies that achievable limit of detection (LOD) for any optical sensor system improves by increasing the interaction length between photons and target analyte species such as e.g., folding the optical path multiple times as in multi-pass gas phase sensing; however, this governing paradigm naturally leads to an increase in system dimensions. Hence, miniaturization of optical sensing system requires scaling down of each optical component, yet improving the performance of each optical element within a smaller form factor for

  1. Miniature aerosol lidar for automated airborne application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin; Mileti, Gaetano; Makarov, Vladislav S.; Turin, Alexander V.; Morandi, Marco; Santacesaria, Vincenzo

    2000-09-01

    The Russian Mjasishchev 55 (M-55) <> high altitude aircraft is dedicated to atmospheric science research. It carries onboard a set of mutually complementary instruments for in- situ and remote sensing. The Green Miniature Aerosol Lidar (GMAL) has been developed to operate automatically on this platform. It is a short-range, zenith-looking, depolarization elastic-backscatter lidar based on a 532 nm micro-chip Nd-YAG laser. Compact, low-power consuming, it stands in a 27-litre isolating and warmed hermetic box. The device participated successfully to an extended test campaign in Italy during December 1998 and January 1999, and to the APE/THESEO campaign in the Indian Ocean during February-March 1999. It also showed capabilities for unattended measurement of the low troposphere from the ground. Description of the instrument and preliminary results are presented.

  2. A highly miniaturized NDIR methane sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayerden, N. P.; de Graaf, Ger; Enoksson, Peter; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud F.

    2016-04-01

    The increasing demand for handheld systems for absorption spectroscopy has triggered the development of microspectrometers at various wavelength ranges. Several MEMS implementations of the light source, interferometer/optical filter, and detector have already been reported in the literature. However, the size of microspectrometers is still limited by the required absorption path length in the sample gas cell. This paper presents a compact MEMS linear-variable optical filter (LVOF) where the resonator cavity of the filter is also used as a sample gas cell to measure the absorption of methane at 3392nm wavelength. The physical resonator cavity length is elongated 62.2-fold, using multiple reflections from highly reflective Bragg mirrors to achieve a sufficiently long effective optical absorption path. Although the LVOF would in principle enable operation as a robust portable microspectrometer, here it is used in a miniaturized NDIR methane sensor for wavelength selection and calibration.

  3. Miniature fiber optic surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Radan; Brynda, Eduard; Homola, Jiri; Ctyroky, Jiri

    1999-01-01

    A novel design of surface plasmon resonance fiber optic sensor is reported which leads to a compact, highly miniaturized sensing element with excellent sensitivity. The sensing device is based on a side-polished single-mode optical fiber with a thin metal overlayer supporting surface plasmon waves. The strength of interaction between a fiber mode and a surface plasmon wave depends strongly on the refractive index near the sensing surface. Therefore, refractive index changes associated with biospecific interaction between antibodies immobilized on the sensor and antigen molecules can be monitored by measuring light intensity variations. Detection of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) of the concentration of 100 ng/ml has been accomplished using the fiber optic sensor with a matrix of monoclonal antibodies against HRP immobilized on the sensor surface.

  4. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  5. Miniature, ruggedized data collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott; Calcutt, Wade; Knobler, Ron; Jones, Barry; Klug, Robert

    2009-05-01

    McQ has developed a miniaturized, programmable, ruggedized data collector intended for use in weapon testing or data collection exercises that impose severe stresses on devices under test. The recorder is designed to survive these stresses which include acceleration and shock levels up to 100,000 G. The collector acquires and stores up to four channels of signal data to nonvolatile memory for later retrieval by a user. It is small (< 7 in3), light weight (< 1 lb), and can operate from various battery chemistries. A built-in menuing system, accessible via a USB interface, allows the user to configure parameters of the recorder operation, such as channel gain, filtering, and signal offsets, and also to retrieve recorded data for analysis. An overview of the collector, its features, performance, and potential uses, is presented.

  6. Miniaturized fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Flynn, John T.; Pratisto, Hans S.; Niederer, Peter F.

    2003-07-01

    We present a miniaturized version of a fundus camera. The camera is designed for the use in screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). There, but also in other applications a small, light weight, digital camera system can be extremely useful. We present a small wide angle digital camera system. The handpiece is significantly smaller and lighter then in all other systems. The electronics is truly portable fitting in a standard boardcase. The camera is designed to be offered at a compatible price. Data from tests on young rabbits' eyes is presented. The development of the camera system is part of a telemedicine project screening for ROP. Telemedical applications are a perfect application for this camera system using both advantages: the portability as well as the digital image.

  7. Development of Compact Lenses for Micro Four-Thirds System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiwai, Tamotsu; Akita, Hidenori

    In 2010, "The micro SLR Olympus PEN" of Micro Four Thirds standard won double titles of CAMERA GRAND PRIX .The characteristics of Olympus PEN series are high-quality, compact, lightweight, no feeling of burden/stress and easy to take both still images and movies by SLR quality. Especially, the consciousness of compact and lightweight is taken into the series’ entire system including the body and interchangeable lenses. We have developed the interchangeable lenses by aiming ultimate miniaturization for optical and lens-barrel design along with making the miniaturizing compliance of Micro Four Thirds standard useful. In order to create compact and lightweight interchangeable lenses, a number of technical difficulties, such as realization of thinner design by adapting lens-barrel retraction system, lens-barrel with a high degree of accuracy, quick and silent AF, adaptation of special lenses, thorough trimming of weight, had to be overcome in the developmental process. Here we refer to these miniaturization technologies.

  8. Miniature Ion-Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would be fabricated by micromachining. Unlike prior ion-mobility spectrometers, the proposed instrument would not be based on a time-of-flight principle and, consequently, would not have some of the disadvantageous characteristics of prior time-of-flight ion-mobility spectrometers. For example, one of these characteristics is the need for a bulky carrier-gas-feeding subsystem that includes a shutter gate to provide short pulses of gas in order to generate short pulses of ions. For another example, there is need for a complex device to generate pulses of ions from the pulses of gas and the device is capable of ionizing only a fraction of the incoming gas molecules; these characteristics preclude miniaturization. In contrast, the proposed instrument would not require a carrier-gas-feeding subsystem and would include a simple, highly compact device that would ionize all the molecules passing through it. The ionization device in the proposed instrument would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several megavolts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. Ionization (but not avalanche arcing) would occur because the distance between the ionizing electrodes would be less than the mean free path of gas molecules at the operating pressure of instrument. An accelerating grid would be located inside the instrument, downstream from the ionizing membrane. The electric potential applied to this grid would be negative relative to the potential on the inside electrode of the ionizing membrane and would be of a magnitude sufficient to

  9. Progress in GaAs Metamorphic HEMT Technology for Microwave Applications. High Efficiency Ka-Band MHEMT Power MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. M.; Dugas, D.; Chu, K.; Nichols, K.; Duh, K. H.; Fisher, J.; MtPleasant, L.; Xu, D.; Gunter, L.; Vera, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of GaAs metamorphic HEMT (MHEMT) technology for microwave applications. Commercialization has begun, while efforts to further improve performance, manufacturability and reliability continue. We also report the first multi-watt MHEMT MMIC power amplifiers, demonstrating up to 3.2W output power and record power-added efficiency (PAE) at Ka-band.

  10. Design and Analysis of Broad-Band Fixed-Tuned Submillimeter-Waveguide Multipliers using MMIC Style Circuit Topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruston, J.; Kim, M.; Martin, S. C.; Mehdi, I.; Smith, R. P.; Siegel, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    The design and analysis of varactor diode doubler, quadrupler and cascaded doubler circuits for 320 and 640 GHz have been completed. A new approach has been employed to produce a tunerless waveguide mount with a very flexible, frequency scaleable, MMIC style multiplier circuit. The concept, design, predicted performance and measurements on some of the constituent mount elements are presented.

  11. Application of MMIC modules in future multiple beam satellite antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, J.

    1982-01-01

    Multiple beam antenna systems for advanced communication satellites operating in the 30/20 GHz frequency bands (30 GHz uplink, 20 GHz downlink) were developed. Up to twenty 0.3 deg HPBW fixed spot beams and six 0.3 deg HPBW scanning spot beams will be required. Array-fed dual reflector antenna systems in which monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shift and amplifier modules are used with each radiating element of the feed array for beam pointing and power gain were developed. The feasibility of distributed power amplification and beam pointing with MMIC modules in the elements of an array and to develop a data base for future development were demonstrated. The technical discussion centers around the potential advantages of ""monolithic'' antennas for specific applications as compared to systems using high powered TWT's. These include: reduced losses in the beam forming network; advantage of space combining and graceful degradation; dynamic control of beam pointing and illumination contour; and possibilities for cost and weight reduction.

  12. Miniature Ion Optics Towards a Micro Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ashish

    This PhD dissertation reports the development of miniature ion optics components of a mass spectrometer (MS) with the ultimate goal to lay the foundation for a compact low-power micromachined MS (microMS) for broad-range chemical analysis. Miniaturization of two specific components a) RF ion traps and b) an ion funnel have been investigated and miniature low-power versions of these components have been developed and demonstrated successfully in lab experiments. Power savings, simpler electronics and packaging schemes required to operate the micro-scale RF cylindrical ion traps have been the key motivation driving this research. Microfabricated cylindrical ion traps (microCITs) and arrays in silicon, silicon-on-insulator and stainless steel substrates have been demonstrated and average power of as low as 55 mW for a low mass range (28 to 136 amu) and mass spectra with better than a unit-mass-resolution have been recorded. For the ion funnel miniaturization effort, simple assembly, small form factor and ease of integration have been emphasized. A simplification of the conventional 3D ion funnel design, called the planar ion funnel, has been developed in a single plate and has been tested to demonstrate ion funneling at medium vacuum levels (1E-5 Torr) using DC voltages and power less than 0.5 W. Miniaturization of these components also enables use of other novel ion optics components, packaging and integration, which will allow a new class of microMS architectures amenable for radical miniaturization.

  13. A Laser Interferometric Miniature Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dustin W., PhD.; Baldwin, Patrick C.; Milburn, Howard; Robinson, David

    2011-09-12

    This is the second year of a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract geared towards the development of a new seismic sensor. Ground-based seismic monitoring systems have proven to be very capable in identifying nuclear tests, and can provide somewhat precise information on the location and yield of the explosive device. Making these measurements, however, currently requires very expensive and bulky seismometers that are difficult to deploy in places where they are most needed. A high performance, compact device can enable rapid deployment of large scale arrays, which can in turn be used to provide higher quality data during times of critical need. The use of a laser interferometer-based device has shown considerable promise, while also presenting significant challenges. The greatest strength of this optical readout technique is the ability to decouple the mechanical design from the transducer, thus enabling a miniaturized design that is not accessible with conventional sensing techniques. However, the nonlinearity in the optical response must be accounted for in the sensor output. Previously, we had proposed using a force-feedback approach to position the sensor at a point of maximum linearity. However, it can be shown that the combined nonlinearities of the optical response and the force-feedback curve necessarily results in a significant amount of unwanted noise at low frequencies. Having realized this, we have developed a new approach that eliminates force feedback, allowing the proof mass to move freely at all times. This takes advantage of some advanced optical spatial filtering that was developed at Symphony Acoustics for other types of sensors, and was recently adapted to this work. After processing the signals in real time, the digital output of the device is intrinsically linear, and the sensor can operate at any orientation with the same level of resolution, while instantly adapting to significant changes in orientation. Ultimately, we

  14. The Whole new world of miniature technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-07-01

    In the past ten years, miniaturization of both electrical and mechanical parts has significantly increased. Documentation of the design and production capabilities of miniaturization in the electronics industry is well-defined. Literature on the subject of miniaturization of metal piece parts, however, is hard to find. Some of the current capabilities in the manufacture of miniature metal piece parts or miniature features in larger piece parts are discussed.

  15. Miniature Chemical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew C. R. Pipino

    2004-12-13

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

  16. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  17. Three MMIC Amplifiers for the 120-to-200 GHz Frequency Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Schmitz, Adele

    2009-01-01

    Closely following the development reported in the immediately preceding article, three new monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers that would operate in the 120-to-200-GHz frequency band have been designed and are under construction at this writing. The active devices in these amplifiers are InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). These amplifiers (see figure) are denoted the LSLNA150, the LSA200, and the LSA185, respectively. Like the amplifiers reported in the immediately preceding article, the LSLNA150 (1) is intended to be a prototype of low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) to be incorporated into spaceborne instruments for sensing cosmic microwave background radiation and (2) has potential for terrestrial use in electronic test equipment, passive millimeter-wave imaging systems, radar receivers, communication receivers, and systems for detecting hidden weapons. The HEMTs in this amplifier were fabricated according to 0.08- m design rules of a commercial product line of InP HEMT MMICs at HRL Laboratories, LLC, with a gate geometry of 2 fingers, each 15 m wide. On the basis of computational simulations, this amplifier is designed to afford at least 15 dB of gain, with a noise figure of no more than about 6 dB, at frequencies from 120 to 160 GHz. The measured results of the amplifier are shown next to the chip photo, with a gain of 16 dB at 150 GHz. Noise figure work is ongoing. The LSA200 and the LSA185 are intended to be prototypes of transmitting power amplifiers for use at frequencies between about 180 and about 200 GHz. These amplifiers have also been fabricated according to rules of the aforesaid commercial product line of InP HEMT MMICs, except that the HEMTs in these amplifiers are characterized by a gate geometry of 4 fingers, each 37 m wide. The measured peak performance of the LSA200 is characterized by a gain of about 1.4 dB at a frequency of 190 GHz; the measured peak performance of the LSA185 is characterized by a gain of about 2

  18. Nanocasted synthesis of magnetic mesoporous iron cerium bimetal oxides (MMIC) as an efficient heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst for oxidation of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhipan; Zhang, Yalei; Dai, Chaomeng; Sun, Zhen

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic mesoporous iron cerium bimetal oxides (MMIC) with large surface area and pore volume was synthesized via the hard template approach. This obtained MMIC was easily separated from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field and was proposed as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst for oxidation of As(III). The MMIC presented excellent catalytic activity for the oxidation of As(III), achieving almost complete oxidation of 1000ppb As(III) after 60min and complete removal of arsenic species after 180min with reaction conditions of 0.4g/L catalyst, pH of 3.0 and 0.4mM H2O2. Kinetics analysis showed that arsenic removal followed the pseudo-first order, and the pseudo-first-order rate constants increased from 0.0014min(-1) to 0.0548min(-1) as the H2O2 concentration increased from 0.04mM to 0.4mM. On the basis of the effects of XPS analysis and reactive oxidizing species, As(III) in aqueous solution was mainly oxidized by OH radicals, including the surface-bound OHads generated on the MMIC surface which were involved in Fe(2+) and Ce(3+), and free OHfree generation by soluble iron ions which were released from the MMIC into the bulk solution, and the generated As(V) was finally removed by MMIC through adsorption.

  19. Miniaturized LTCC elliptic-function lowpass filters with side stopbands

    DOE PAGES

    Hsieh, Lung -Hwa; Dai, Steve Xunhu

    2015-05-28

    A compact, high-selectivity, and wide stopband lowpass filter is highly demanded in wireless communication systems to suppress adjacent harmonics and unwanted signals. In this letter, a new miniaturized lowpass filter with elliptic-function frequency response is introduced. The filter is fabricated in multilayer low temperature cofired ceramics. The size of the miniaturized filter is 5.5 × 3.9 × 1.72 mm3. As a result, the measured insertion loss of the filter is better than 0.37 dB from DC to 1.28 GHz and the measured stopband of the filter is great than 22 dB from 2.3 to 7.5 GHz.

  20. Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The most critical component in lidar is its laser scanner, which delivers pulsed or CW laser to target with desirable field of view (FOV). Most existing lidars use a rotating or oscillating mirror for scanning, resulting in several drawbacks. A lidar scanning technology was developed that could achieve very high scanning speed, with an ultra-miniature size and much lighter weight. This technology promises at least a 10x performance improvement in these areas over existing lidar scanners. Features of the proposed ultra-miniature lidar scanner include the ability to make the entire scanner <2 mm in diameter; very high scanning speed (e.g. 5 - 20 kHz, in contrast to several hundred Hz in existing scanners); structure design to meet stringent requirements on size, weight, power, and compactness for various applications; and the scanning speed and FOV can be altered for obtaining high image resolutions of targeted areas and for diversified uses.

  1. Single-Pole Double-Throw MMIC Switches for a Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to reduce the effect of gain and noise instabilities in the RF chain of a microwave radiometer, a Dicke radiometer topology is often used, as in the case of the proposed surface water and ocean topography (SWOT) radiometer instrument. For this topology, a single-pole double-throw (SPDT) microwave switch is needed, which must have low insertion loss at the radiometer channel frequencies to minimize the overall receiver noise figure. Total power radiometers are limited in accuracy due to the continuous variation in gain of the receiver. High-frequency SPDT switches were developed in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) using 75 micron indium phosphide (InP) PIN-diode technology. These switches can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology.

  2. K-Band Power Enbedded Transmission Line (ETL) MMIC Amplifiers for Satellite Communication Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tserng, Hua-Quen; Ketterson, Andrew; Saunier, Paul; McCarty, Larry; Davis, Steve

    1998-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of K-band high-efficiency, linear power pHEMT amplifiers implemented in Embedded Transmission Line (ETL) MMIC configuration with unthinned GaAs substrate and topside grounding are reported. A three-stage amplifier achieved a power-added efficiency of 40.5% with 264 mW output at 20.2 GHz. The linear gain is 28.5 dB with 1-dB gain compression output power of 200 mW and 31% power-added efficiency. The carrier-to-third-order intermodulation ratio is approx. 20 dBc at the 1-dB compression point. A RF functional yield of more than 90% has been achieved.

  3. 94-GHz MMIC CPW low-noise amplifier on InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambrine, Gilles; Hoel, Virginie; Boret, Samuel; Grimbert, Bertrand; Bollaert, Sylvain; Wallart, Xavier; Lepilliet, Sylvie; Cappy, Alain

    1999-12-01

    High performances have been achieved at W-band with a 2- stage, 0.1 micrometers gate-length InGaAs/InAlAs/InP LM-HEMT MMIC low noise amplifier in coplanar technology. To obtain the T- gate profile, we use silicon nitride SixNy technology, which leads to naturally passivated devices. For a drain-to-source current Ids equals 350 mA/mm the devices demonstrate a maximum intrinsic transconductance Gm of 1600 mS/mm and an intrinsic current gain cutoff frequency Fc equals 220 GHz. The extrinsic current gain cut-off frequency Ft is 175 GHz. The LNA shows a minimum noise figure of 3.3 dB with an associated gain of 11.5 dB at 94 GHz.

  4. T/R Multi-Chip MMIC Modules for 150 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Pukala, David M.; Soria, Mary M.; Sadowy, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Modules containing multiple monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) chips have been built as prototypes of transmitting/receiving (T/R) modules for millimeter-wavelength radar systems, including phased-array radar systems to be used for diverse purposes that could include guidance and avoidance of hazards for landing spacecraft, imaging systems for detecting hidden weapons, and hazard-avoidance systems for automobiles. Whereas prior landing radar systems have operated at frequencies around 35 GHz, the integrated circuits in this module operate in a frequency band centered at about 150 GHz. The higher frequency (and, hence, shorter wavelength), is expected to make it possible to obtain finer spatial resolution while also using smaller antennas and thereby reducing the sizes and masses of the affected systems.

  5. Compact vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; Zafalan, I.

    2017-02-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  6. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  7. Miniaturized radioisotope solid state power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Snyder, G. J.; Patel, J.; Herman, J. A.; Caillat, T.; Nesmith, B.; Kolawa, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range from the kilowatt to the milliwatt. Several of these missions call for the development of compact, low weight, long life, rugged power sources capable of delivering a few milliwatts up to a couple of watts while operating in harsh environments. Advanced solid state thermoelectric microdevices combined with radioisotope heat sources and energy storage devices such as capacitors are ideally suited for these applications. By making use of macroscopic film technology, microgenrators operating across relatively small temperature differences can be conceptualized for a variety of high heat flux or low heat flux heat source configurations. Moreover, by shrinking the size of the thermoelements and increasing their number to several thousands in a single structure, these devices can generate high voltages even at low power outputs that are more compatible with electronic components. Because the miniaturization of state-of-the-art thermoelectric module technology based on Bi2Te3 alloys is limited due to mechanical and manufacturing constraints, we are developing novel microdevices using integrated-circuit type fabrication processes, electrochemical deposition techniques and high thermal conductivity substrate materials. One power source concept is based on several thermoelectric microgenerator modules that are tightly integrated with a 1.1W Radioisotope Heater Unit. Such a system could deliver up to 50mW of electrical power in a small lightweight package of approximately 50 to 60g and 30cm3. An even higher degree of miniaturization and high specific power values (mW/mm3) can be obtained when considering the potential use of radioisotope materials for an alpha-voltaic or a hybrid thermoelectric/alpha-voltaic power source. Some of the technical challenges associated with these concepts are discussed in this paper. .

  8. Miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator concept demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.

    High concentration ratio photovoltaic systems for space applications have generally been considered impractical because of perceived difficulties in controlling solar cell temperatures to reasonably low values. A miniaturized concentrator system is now under development which surmounts this objection by providing acceptable solar cell temperatures using purely passive cell cooling methods. An array of identical miniaturized, rigid Cassegrainian optical systems having a low f-number with resulting short dimensions along their optical axes are rigidly mounted into a frame to form a relatively thin concentrator solar array panel. A number of such panels, approximately 1.5 centimeters thick, are wired as an array and are folded against one another for launch in a stowed configuration. Deployment on orbit is similar to the deployment of conventional planar honeycomb panel arrays or flexible blanket arrays. The miniaturized concept was conceived and studied in the 1978-80 time frame. Progress in the feasibility demonstration to date is reported.

  9. A compact semiconductor digital interferometer and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britsky, Oleksander I.; Gorbov, Ivan V.; Petrov, Viacheslav V.; Balagura, Iryna V.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility of using semiconductor laser interferometers to measure displacements at the nanometer scale was demonstrated. The creation principles of miniature digital Michelson interferometers based on semiconductor lasers were proposed. The advanced processing algorithm for the interferometer quadrature signals was designed. It enabled to reduce restrictions on speed of measured movements. A miniature semiconductor digital Michelson interferometer was developed. Designing of the precision temperature stability system for miniature low-cost semiconductor laser with 0.01ºС accuracy enabled to use it for creation of compact interferometer rather than a helium-neon one. Proper firmware and software was designed for the interferometer signals real-time processing and conversion in to respective shifts. In the result the relative displacement between 0-500 mm was measured with a resolution of better than 1 nm. Advantages and disadvantages of practical use of the compact semiconductor digital interferometer in seismometers for the measurement of shifts were shown.

  10. Miniature information displays: primary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-04-01

    Positioned to replace current liquid crystal display technology in many applications, miniature information displays have evolved to provide several truly portable platforms for the world's growing personal computing and communication needs. The technology and functionality of handheld computer and communicator systems has finally surpassed many of the standards that were originally established for desktop systems. In these new consumer electronics, performance, display size, packaging, power consumption, and cost have always been limiting factors for fabricating genuinely portable devices. The rapidly growing miniature information display manufacturing industry is making it possible to bring a wide range of highly anticipated new products to new markets.

  11. Miniature Laser Tracker

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2003-09-09

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  12. Development of a miniature actuator/controller system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Scott P.

    1995-01-01

    Development of new products is often hampered or prevented by the cost and resource commitments required by a traditional engineering approach. Schaeffer Magnetics, Inc. identified the potential need for a miniature incremental actuator with an integrated controller but did not want the development to be subject to the obstacles inherent in the traditional approach. In response a new approach - the Pathfinder Engineering Program (PEP) - was developed to streamline new product generation and improve product quality. The actuator/controller system resulting from implementation of this new procedure is an exceptionally compact and self-contained device with many applications.

  13. Efficient 3M PBS enhancing miniature projection optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Zhisheng; Nevitt, Timothy; Willett, Stephen; Mortenson, Dave; Le, John; McDowell, Erin; Kent, Susan; Wong, Timothy; Beniot, Gilles J.; Ouderkirk, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, 3M has developed a number of mobile projectors, with a goal towards providing the world's smallest, most efficient projection systems. Compact size and efficiency are required characteristics for projection systems used in mobile devices and more lately, in augmented reality systems. In this paper we summarize the main generations of 3M light engine optical designs. We present the optical architectures of four light engines, including the rationale behind the illumination designs and the projection systems. In particular, we describe various configurations relating to the 3M polarizing beam splitter (PBS) which is key to enhanced efficiency of the miniature projection systems.

  14. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  15. Visual thread quality for precision miniature mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-04-01

    Threaded features have eight visual appearance factors which can affect their function in precision miniature mechanisms. The Bendix practice in deburring, finishing, and accepting these conditions on miniature threads is described as is their impact in assemblies of precision miniature electromechanical assemblies.

  16. Recent Advances in Miniaturized Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Olio, F.; Tatoli, T.; Ciminelli, C.; Armenise, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Low-cost chip-scale optoelectronic gyroscopes having a resolution ≤ 10 °/h and a good reliability also in harsh environments could have a strong impact on the medium/high performance gyro market, which is currently dominated by well-established bulk optical angular velocity sensors. The R&D activity aiming at the demonstration of those miniaturized sensors is crucial for aerospace/defense industry, and thus it is attracting an increasing research effort and notably funds. In this paper the recent technological advances on the compact optoelectronic gyroscopes with low weight and high energy saving are reviewed. Attention is paid to both the so-called gyroscope-on-a-chip, which is a novel sensor, at the infantile stage, whose optical components are monolithically integrated on a single indium phosphide chip, and to a new ultra-high Q ring resonator for gyro applications with a configuration including a 1D photonic crystal in the resonant path. The emerging field of the gyros based on passive ring cavities, which have already shown performance comparable with that of optical fiber gyros, is also discussed.

  17. Development of a miniaturized deformable mirror controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Lynch, Dana; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Belikov, Ruslan; Klamm, Benjamin; Hyde, Elizabeth; Mumm, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    High-Performance Adaptive Optics systems are rapidly spreading as useful applications in the fields of astronomy, ophthalmology, and telecommunications. This technology is critical to enable coronagraphic direct imaging of exoplanets utilized in ground-based telescopes and future space missions such as WFIRST, EXO-C, HabEx, and LUVOIR. We have developed a miniaturized Deformable Mirror controller to enable active optics on small space imaging mission. The system is based on the Boston Micromachines Corporation Kilo-DM, which is one of the most widespread DMs on the market. The system has three main components: The Deformable Mirror, the Driving Electronics, and the Mechanical and Heat management. The system is designed to be extremely compact and have lowpower consumption to enable its use not only on exoplanet missions, but also in a wide-range of applications that require precision optical systems, such as direct line-of-sight laser communications, and guidance systems. The controller is capable of handling 1,024 actuators with 220V maximum dynamic range, 16bit resolution, and 14bit accuracy, and operating at up to 1kHz frequency. The system fits in a 10x10x5cm volume, weighs less than 0.5kg, and consumes less than 8W. We have developed a turnkey solution reducing the risk for currently planned as well as future missions, lowering their cost by significantly reducing volume, weight and power consumption of the wavefront control hardware.

  18. Micro-miniature radio frequency transmitter for communication and tracking applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Emery, M.S.; Falter, K.G.; Nowlin, C.H.; Rochelle, J.M.; Clonts, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    A micro-miniature radio frequency (rf) transmitter has been developed and demonstrated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the rf transmitter development was to maximize the transmission distance while drastically shrinking the overall transmitter size, including antenna. Based on analysis and testing, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with a 16-GHz gallium arsenide (GaAs) oscillator and integrated on-chip antenna was designed and fabricated using microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) technology. Details of the development and the results of various field tests will be discussed. The rf transmitter is applicable to covert surveillance and tracking scenarios due to its small size of 2.2 x 2.2 mm, including the antenna. Additionally, the 16-GHz frequency is well above the operational range of consumer-grade radio scanners, providing a degree of protection from unauthorized interception. Variations of the transmitter design have been demonstrated for tracking and tagging beacons, transmission of digital data, and transmission of real-time analog video from a surveillance camera. Preliminary laboratory measurements indicate adaptability to direct-sequence spread-spectrum transmission, providing a low probability of intercept and/or detection. Concepts related to law enforcement applications will be presented.

  19. Toward a miniaturized fundus camera.

    PubMed

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie; Flynn, John T; Pratisto, Hans; Niederer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) describes a pathological development of the retina in prematurely born children. In order to prevent severe permanent damage to the eye and enable timely treatment, the fundus of the eye in such children has to be examined according to established procedures. For these examinations, our miniaturized fundus camera is intended to allow the acquisition of wide-angle digital pictures of the fundus for on-line or off-line diagnosis and documentation. We designed two prototypes of a miniaturized fundus camera, one with graded refractive index (GRIN)-based optics, the other with conventional optics. Two different modes of illumination were compared: transscleral and transpupillary. In both systems, the size and weight of the camera were minimized. The prototypes were tested on young rabbits. The experiments led to the conclusion that the combination of conventional optics with transpupillary illumination yields the best results in terms of overall image quality.

  20. Organic photodiodes for biosensor miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Jason R; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Yamaguchi, Mariko Y; Füreder, Erwin; Pieler, Roland; Schamesberger, Martin; Winder, Christoph; Prall, Hans Jürgen; Sonnleitner, Max; Ligler, Frances S

    2009-05-01

    Biosensors have successfully demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or at the point of care. While microfluidic systems reduce the footprint for biochemical processing devices and electronic components are continually becoming smaller, optical components suitable for integration--such as LEDs and CMOS chips--are generally still too expensive for disposable components. This paper describes the integration of polymer diodes onto a biosensor chip to create a disposable device that includes both the detector and the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results using a hand-held reader attached to a laptop computer. The miniaturized biosensor with the disposable slide including the organic photodiode detected Staphylococcal enterotoxin B at concentrations as low as 0.5 ng/mL.

  1. Organic Photodiodes for Biosensor Miniaturization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1 pW/mm2. Using this system, sandwich immunoassays were performed on the OPD substrate for detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Results...demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or...the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results

  2. European low-noise MMIC technologies for cryogenic millimetre wave radio astronomical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonini, Andrea; Mariotti, Sergio; Valenziano, Luca

    2012-09-01

    The Low Noise technology has a paramount relevance on radiotelescopes and radiometers performances. Its influence on sensitivity and temporal stability has a deep impact on obtainable scientific results. As well known, front end active part of scientific instruments are cryocooled in order to drastically reduce the intrinsic thermal noise generated by its electronic parts and consequently increase the sensitivity. In this paper we will describe the obtained results by an Italian Space Agency funded activity. The aim is to validate European MMIC Low Noise technologies and designs for cryogenic environments in the range of millimetre wave. As active device, HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) are considered the best device for high frequency and low noise cryo applications. But not all the semiconductor foundry process are suitable for applications in such environment. Two European Foundries has been selected and two different HEMT based Low Noise Amplifiers have been designed and produced. The main goal of this activity is identify an European technology basement for space and ground based low noise cryogenic applications. Designs, layout, architectures, foundry processes and results will be compared.

  3. The High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer on the GLOBAL HAWK: From Technology Development to Science Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Shannon; Denning, Richard; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Lim, Boon; Tanabe, Jordan; Tanner, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) during three recent field campaigns on the Global Hawk Unmanned Ariel Vehicles (UAV), focusing on the enabling technology that led to unprecedented observations of significant weather phenomenon, such as thermodynamic evolution of the tropical cyclone core during rapid intensification and the high resolution three dimensional mapping of several atmospheric river events. HAMSR is a 25 channel cross-track scanning microwave sounder with channels near the 60 and 118 GHz oxygen lines and the 183 GHz water vapor line. HAMSR was originally designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a technology demonstrator in 1998. Subsequent to this, HAMSR participated in three NASA hurricane field campaigns, CAMEX-4, TCSP and NAMMA. Beginning in 2008, HAMSR was extensively upgraded to deploy on the NASA Global Hawk (GH) platform and serve as an asset to the NASA sub-orbital program. HAMSR has participated on the Global Hawk during the 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification (GRIP) campaign, the 2011 Winter Storms and Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) campaign and is currently participating in the NASA Ventures Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) campaign (2011-2015).

  4. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior.

  5. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  6. Miniature Surface Plasmon Polariton Amplitude Modulator by Beat Frequency and Polarization Control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chu-En; Yu, Chih-Jen; Yeh, Ting-Tso; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of modulators keeps pace for the compact devices in optical applications. Here, we present a miniature surface plasmon polariton amplitude modulator (SPPAM) by directing and interfering surface plasmon polaritons on a nanofabricated chip. Our results show that this SPPAM enables two kinds of modulations. The first kind of modulation is controlled by encoding angular-frequency difference from a Zeeman laser, with a beat frequency of 1.66 MHz; the second of modulation is validated by periodically varying the polarization states from a polarization generator, with rotation frequencies of 0.5–10 k Hz. In addition, the normalized extinction ratio of our plasmonic structure reaches 100. Such miniaturized beat-frequency and polarization-controlled amplitude modulators open an avenue for the exploration of ultrasensitive nanosensors, nanocircuits, and other integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:27558516

  7. Demonstration of a Sub-Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuit (S-MMIC) using InP HEMT with a 35-nm Gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, W. R.; Din, S.; Padilla, J.; Radisic, V.; Mei, G.; Yoshida, W.; Liu, P. S.; Uyeda, J.; Barsky, M.; Gaier, T.; Fung, A.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Lai, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present two single stage MMIC amplifiers with the first demonstrating a measured S21 gain of 3-dB at 280-GHz and the second demonstrating 2.5-dB gain at 300- GHz, which is the threshold of the sub-millimeter wave regime. The high-frequency operation is enabled by a high-speed InP HEMT with a 35-nm gate. This is the first demonstrated S21 gain at sub-millimeter wave frequencies in a MMIC.

  8. Li-ion battery operated power amplifier MMICs utilizing SrTiO 3 capacitors and heterojunction FETs for PDC and CDMA cellular phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Nishimura, T. B.; Takemura, K.; Miyasaka, Y.

    1999-04-01

    Highly efficient two-stage 1 W power amplifier MMICs utilizing SrTiO 3 capacitors and Si-doped AlGaAs/InGaAs/Si-doped AlGaAs FETs have been developed for Li-ion battery operated digital cellular phones. For the personal digital cellular (PDC) applications, a power amplifier MMIC with 2.0×2.4 mm 2 area includes all bias and matching circuits. The MMIC delivered a 950 MHz π/4-shifted QPSK output signal power ( Pout) of 0.8 W (29.0 dBm), a power-added efficiency (PAE) of 30% and an associated gain ( Ga) of 26.4 dB with an adjacent channel leakage power ratio (ACPR) of -50.5 dBc at 50 kHz off-center frequency under 3.4 V drain bias operation. The power performance showed good agreement with a simulated one when series resistances in the output matching circuit and the drain bias circuit for the second-stage FET were taken into account. When the circuits were removed from the MMIC, it exhibited PAE of 42.4% and Pout of 1.0 W (30.0 dBm) with Ga of 29.8 dB at the PDC criteria. These results revealed that a low loss in the output passive circuits of a power amplifier MMIC is essential. Then, a power amplifier MMIC for the IS-95 application at 840 MHz was designed and evaluated without the output circuit. The MMIC with 2.0×1.5 mm 2 area delivered Pout of 0.93 W (29.7 dBm), PAE of 48.6% and Ga of 28.4 dB with ACPR of -42 dBc at 0.9 MHz off-center frequency under 3.5 V operation. Even operated at a reduced supply voltage of 1.2 V, a high PAE of 46.9% was obtained. These results indicate that the developed power amplifier MMICs and its approach are promising for small-size and lightweight digital cellular phones with long talk time.

  9. Miniaturization of flight deflection measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A flight deflection measurement system is disclosed including a hybrid microchip of a receiver/decoder. The hybrid microchip decoder is mounted piggy back on the miniaturized receiver and forms an integral unit therewith. The flight deflection measurement system employing the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be used in a wind tunnel. In particular, the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be employed in a spin measurement system due to its small size and can retain already established control surface actuation functions.

  10. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  11. Design of a miniaturized integrated spectrometer for spectral tissue sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belay, Gebirie Yizengaw; Hoving, Willem; Ottevaere, Heidi; van der Put, Arthur; Weltjens, Wim; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    Minimally-invasive image-guided procedures become increasingly used by physicians to obtain real-time characterization feedback from the tissue at the tip of their interventional device (needle, catheter, endoscopic or laparoscopic probes, etc…) which can significantly improve the outcome of diagnosis and treatment, and ultimately reduce cost of the medical treatment. Spectral tissue sensing using compact photonic probes has the potential to be a valuable tool for screening and diagnostic purposes, e.g. for discriminating between healthy and tumorous tissue. However, this technique requires a low-cost broadband miniature spectrometer so that it is commercially viable for screening at point-of-care locations such as physicians' offices and outpatient centers. Our goal is therefore to develop a miniaturized spectrometer based on diffractive optics that combines the functionalities of a visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectrometer in one very compact housing. A second goal is that the hardware can be produced in high volume at low cost without expensive time consuming alignment and calibration steps. We have designed a miniaturized spectrometer which operates both in the visible/near-infrared and shortwave-infrared wavelength regions ranging from 400 nm to 1700 nm. The visible/near-infrared part of the spectrometer is designed for wavelengths from 400 nm to 800 nm whereas the shortwave-infrared segment ranges from 850 nm to 1700 nm. The spectrometer has a resolution of 6 nm in the visible/near-infrared wavelength region and 10 nm in the shortwave-infrared. The minimum SNR of the spectrometer for the intended application is about 151 in the VIS/NIR range and 6000 for SWIR. In this paper, the modelling and design, and power budget analysis of the miniaturized spectrometer are presented. Our work opens a door for future affordable micro- spectrometers which can be integrated with smartphones and tablets, and used for point

  12. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  13. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  14. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  15. Ka-Band Waveguide Three-Way Serial Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Freeman, Jon C.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2012-01-01

    In this innovation, the three-way combiner consists internally of two branch-line hybrids that are connected in series by a short length of waveguide. Each branch-line hybrid is designed to combine input signals that are in phase with an amplitude ratio of two. The combiner is constructed in an E-plane split-block arrangement and is precision machined from blocks of aluminum with standard WR-28 waveguide ports. The port impedances of the combiner are matched to that of a standard WR-28 waveguide. The component parts include the power combiner and the MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) power amplifiers (PAs). The three-way series power combiner is a six-port device. For basic operation, power that enters ports 3, 5, and 6 is combined in phase and appears at port 1. Ports 2 and 4 are isolated ports. The application of the three-way combiner for combining three PAs with unequal output powers was demonstrated. NASA requires narrow-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) at Ka-band frequencies with output power in the range of 3 to 5 W for radio or gravity science experiments. In addition, NASA also requires wideband, high-efficiency SSPAs at Ka-band frequencies with output power in the range of 5 to 15 W for high-data-rate communications from deep space to Earth. The three-way power combiner is designed to operate over the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, which is NASA s deep-space frequency band.

  16. A high dynamic range power sensor based on GaAs MMIC process and MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhenxiang; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a high dynamic range power sensor based on GaAs process and MEMS technology. The proposed sensor consisted of the terminating-type sensor and the coupling-type sensor. The former measures low power while the latter is for high power detection. This device is designed and fabricated by GaAs MMIC process. In order to optimize microwave performance, impedance compensating technology by increasing the slot width of the CPW transmission line is developed. Related calculation and simulation are also presented in this paper. The microwave performance test reveals that the return loss is close to -28 dB@8 GHz, -27 dB@10 GHz and -26 dB@12 GHz, respectively. The microwave power response experiment is investigated from 1 mW to 150 mW. For the incident power less than 100 mW, the terminating-type sensor operates and the measured sensitivity is about 0.095 mV/mW@8 GHz, 0.088 mV/mW@10 GHz and 0.084 mV/mW@12 GHz, respectively. Related lumped equivalent circuit models of the loaded resistors are developed to explain the loss induced by the frequency of the signal. For the incident power with the improved dynamic range from 100 mW to 150 mW, the coupling-type sensor is adopted and the measured sensitivity is about 9.2 μV/mW@8 GHz, 8.6 μV/mW@8 GHz and 9.0 μV/mW@12 GHz, respectively.

  17. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  18. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  19. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  20. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  1. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  2. Lightweight, Miniature Inertial Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Liang; Crassidis, Agamemnon

    2012-01-01

    A miniature, lighter-weight, and highly accurate inertial navigation system (INS) is coupled with GPS receivers to provide stable and highly accurate positioning, attitude, and inertial measurements while being subjected to highly dynamic maneuvers. In contrast to conventional methods that use extensive, groundbased, real-time tracking and control units that are expensive, large, and require excessive amounts of power to operate, this method focuses on the development of an estimator that makes use of a low-cost, miniature accelerometer array fused with traditional measurement systems and GPS. Through the use of a position tracking estimation algorithm, onboard accelerometers are numerically integrated and transformed using attitude information to obtain an estimate of position in the inertial frame. Position and velocity estimates are subject to drift due to accelerometer sensor bias and high vibration over time, and so require the integration with GPS information using a Kalman filter to provide highly accurate and reliable inertial tracking estimations. The method implemented here uses the local gravitational field vector. Upon determining the location of the local gravitational field vector relative to two consecutive sensors, the orientation of the device may then be estimated, and the attitude determined. Improved attitude estimates further enhance the inertial position estimates. The device can be powered either by batteries, or by the power source onboard its target platforms. A DB9 port provides the I/O to external systems, and the device is designed to be mounted in a waterproof case for all-weather conditions.

  3. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  4. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  5. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found.

  6. Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-10-17

    The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

  7. Advances in Miniaturized Instruments for Genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of demonstrations of the miniaturized instruments were reported for genomic applications. They provided the advantages of miniaturization, automation, sensitivity, and specificity for the development of point-of-care diagnostics. The aim of this paper is to report on recent developments on miniaturized instruments for genomic applications. Based on the mature development of microfabrication, microfluidic systems have been demonstrated for various genomic detections. Since one of the objectives of miniaturized instruments is for the development of point-of-care device, impedimetric detection is found to be a promising technique for this purpose. An in-depth discussion of the impedimetric circuits and systems will be included to provide total consideration of the miniaturized instruments and their potential application towards real-time portable imaging in the “-omics” era. The current excellent demonstrations suggest a solid foundation for the development of practical and widespread point-of-care genomic diagnostic devices. PMID:25114919

  8. Miniaturized Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for starbugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Michael; Richards, Samuel; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Argyros, Alexander; Alcalde, Belen

    2014-07-01

    The ability to position multiple miniaturized wavefront sensors precisely over large focal surfaces are advantageous to multi-object adaptive optics. The Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO) has prototyped a compact and lightweight Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor that fits into a standard Starbug parallel fibre positioning robot. Each device makes use of a polymer coherent fibre imaging bundle to relay an image produced by a microlens array placed at the telescope focal plane to a re-imaging camera mounted elsewhere. The advantages of the polymer fibre bundle are its high-fill factor, high-throughput, low weight, and relatively low cost. Multiple devices can also be multiplexed to a single lownoise camera for cost efficiencies per wavefront sensor. The use of fibre bundles also opens the possibility of applications such as telescope field acquisition, guiding, and seeing monitors to be positioned by Starbugs. We present the design aspects, simulations and laboratory test results.

  9. Miniature high-performance infrared spectrometer for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzelecky, Roman V.; Haddad, Emile; Wong, Brian; Lafrance, Denis; Jamroz, Wes; Ghosh, Asoke K.; Zheng, Wanping; Phong, Linh

    2004-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy probes the characteristic vibrational and rotational modes of chemical bonds in molecules to provide information about both the chemical composition and the bonding configuration of a sample. The significant advantage of the Infrared spectral technique is that it can be used with minimal consumables to simultaneously detect a large variety of chemical and biochemical species with high chemical specificity. To date, relatively large Fourier Transform (FT-IR) spectrometers employing variations of the Michelson interferometer have been successfully employed in space for various IR spectroscopy applications. However, FT-IR systems are mechanically complex, bulky (> 15 kg), and require considerable processing. This paper discusses the use of advanced integrated optics and smart optical coding techniques to significantly extend the performance of miniature IR spectrometers by several orders of magnitude in sensitivity. This can provide the next-generation of compact, high-performance IR spectrometers with monolithically integrated optical systems for robust optical alignment. The entire module can weigh under 3 kg to minimize the mass penalty for space applications. Miniaturized IR spectrometers are versatile and very convenient for small and micro satellite based missions. They can be dedicated to the monitoring of the CO2 in an Earth Observation mission, to Mars exobiology exploration, as well as to vital life support in manned space system; such as the cabin air quality and the quality of the recycled water supply.

  10. Miniaturization of a Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Jones, Evan O.; Dagle, Robert A.; Xia, Gordon; Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-09-01

    The development of a miniaturized hydrogen plant is discussed. The micro-scale system is capable of producing 1-5 sccm hydrogen that could be used as a fuel supply in a small fuel cell to produce <1 W power. The paper describes the developmental approach, significant unit operations, material selection, and reactor design. The final microscale fuel processing system is composed of a catalytic combustor, catalytic methanol reformer, selective methanation reactor, and the necessary vaporizers and heat exchangers. The fuel processing system is less than 0.3 cm3 and less than 1 gram mass. Thermal efficiencies as high as 33% for hydrogen production were achieved. When a methanation reactor was incorporated into the system, a carbon monoxide level of less than 100 ppm was reached, but at a reduced system efficiency. Further development work includes increasing efficiency through improved system integration.

  11. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  12. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  13. Overview of the miniaturization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, Robert O., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This overview paper will cover the miniaturization technologies as applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) or micromanufacturing. Technologies reviewed will include bulk and surface micromachining of silicon, the high-aspect ratio technologies including deep X-ray lithography (LIGA) and photo sensitive polyimide, and the complementary processes which include micro-drilling, milling, turning, and electrical discharge machining, laser based micromachining and focussed ion beam micromachining. Examples of each of the process technologies will be given and a capabilities comparison among the technologies will be presented. A historical comparison of MEMS with the vlsi industry will be made and the current status and market forecast for these technologies will be presented. A brief comparison of US research with current research in Japan and Europe will be made along with comments about the status of US research, including current research projects at the Institute for Micromanufacturing.

  14. Miniature drag-force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag-force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilever beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain-gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like those of a second-order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  15. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  16. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  17. Miniature laser ignited bellows motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, Steven L.; Beckman, Tom M.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature optically ignited actuation device has been demonstrated using a laser diode as an ignition source. This pyrotechnic driven motor provides between 4 and 6 lbs of linear force across a 0.090 inch diameter surface. The physical envelope of the device is 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch diameter. This unique application of optical energy can be used as a mechanical link in optical arming systems or other applications where low shock actuation is desired and space is limited. An analysis was performed to determine pyrotechnic materials suitable to actuate a bellows device constructed of aluminum or stainless steel. The aluminum bellows was chosen for further development and several candidate pyrotechnics were evaluated. The velocity profile and delivered force were quantified using an non-intrusive optical motion sensor.

  18. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    DOEpatents

    Abel, Philip [Overland Park, KS; Watterson, Carl [Kansas City, MO

    2011-02-15

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  19. High-Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer for the Global Hawk Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Shannon T.; Lim, Boon H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Tanabe, Jordan M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Denning, Richard F.; Stachnik, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave imaging radiometers operating in the 50-183 GHz range for retrieving atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles from airborne platforms have been limited in the spatial scales of atmospheric structures that are resolved not because of antenna aperture size, but because of high receiver noise masking the small variations that occur on small spatial scales. Atmospheric variability on short spatial and temporal scales (second/ km scale) is completely unresolved by existing microwave profilers. The solution was to integrate JPL-designed, high-frequency, low-noise-amplifier (LNA) technology into the High-Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR), which is an airborne microwave sounding radiometer, to lower the system noise by an order of magnitude to enable the instrument to resolve atmospheric variability on small spatial and temporal scales. HAMSR has eight sounding channels near the 60-GHz oxygen line complex, ten channels near the 118.75-GHz oxygen line, and seven channels near the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. The HAMSR receiver system consists of three heterodyne spectrometers covering the three bands. The antenna system consists of two back-to-back reflectors that rotate together at a programmable scan rate via a stepper motor. A single full rotation includes the swath below the aircraft followed by observations of ambient (roughly 0 C in flight) and heated (70 C) blackbody calibration targets located at the top of the rotation. A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is used to read the digitized radiometer counts and receive the reflector position from the scan motor encoder, which are then sent to a microprocessor and packed into data files. The microprocessor additionally reads telemetry data from 40 onboard housekeeping channels (containing instrument temperatures), and receives packets from an onboard navigation unit, which provides GPS time and position as well as independent attitude information (e.g., heading, roll, pitch, and yaw). The raw

  20. Miniature Extreme Ultraviolet Solar Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Seely, J. F.; Bremer, J.; Jones, A. R.; Vest, R.; Sakdinawat, A.

    2015-12-01

    Free-standing zone plates for use in EUV solar radiometers have been fabricated using electron beam lithography and calibrated at the NIST SURF synchrotron facility. The radiometers that we are developing use zone plates (ZPs) to focus the total solar irradiance in narrow EUV spectral bands and measure it with negligible sensitivity to field angle and polarization, and with greater accuracy and greater long-term stability than radiometers that have alternative architectures. These radiometers are easy to accommodate on spacecraft due to their small size, low mass, low power requirements, low data rates, and modest pointing requirements. A proto-type instrument will be presented with performance characteristics and spacecraft resource requirements for hosting these new instruments. The compact size of the optical train make these zone plates attractive for small CubeSats. The robustness of the compact design makes these radiometers available for a large variety of applications.

  1. The Compact for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Fred Harvey

    The Compact for Education is not yet particularly significant either for good or evil. Partly because of time and partly because of unreasonable expectations, the Compact is not yet a going concern. Enthusiasts have overestimated Compact possibilities and opponents have overestimated its dangers, so if the organization has limited rather than…

  2. Contact stresses calculated for miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, F. G.; Domerest, K. E.; Horton, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Using mathematical formulations to plot the graphs of the contact preload versus the Hertzian load, calculations of unit loading of the preloaded brushes on slip rings can be made. This optimizes the design of contact brushes and miniature slip rings.

  3. Using Miniature Landforms in Teaching Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, James F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores the uses of true landform miniatures and small-scale analogues and suggests ways to teach geomorphological concepts using small-scale relief features as illustrative examples. (JDH)

  4. Miniature infrared data acquisition and telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. H.; Ward, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Miniature Infrared Data Acquisition and Telemetry (MIRDAT) Phase 1 study was performed to determine the technical and commercial feasibility of producing a miniaturized electro-optical telemetry system. This system acquires and transmits experimental data from aircraft scale models for realtime monitoring in wind tunnels. During the Phase 1 study, miniature prototype MIRDAT telemetry devices were constructed, successfully tested in the laboratory and delivered to the user for wind tunnel testing. A search was conducted for commercially available components and advanced hybrid techniques to further miniaturize the system during Phase 2 development. A design specification was generated from laboratory testing, user requirements and discussions with component manufacturers. Finally, a preliminary design of the proposed MIRDAT system was documented for Phase 2 development.

  5. Miniature robots can assist in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Oleynikov, D; Rentschler, M; Hadzialic, A; Dumpert, J; Platt, S R; Farritor, S

    2005-04-01

    Laparoscopy reduces patient trauma but eliminates the surgeon's ability to directly view and touch the surgical environment. Although current robot-assisted laparoscopy improves the surgeon's ability to manipulate and visualize the target organs, the instruments and cameras remain constrained by the entry incision. This limits tool tip orientation and optimal camera placement. This article focuses on developing miniature in vivo robots to assist surgeons during laparoscopic surgery by providing an enhanced field of view from multiple angles and dexterous manipulators not constrained by the abdominal wall fulcrum effect. Miniature camera robots were inserted through a small incision into the insufflated abdominal cavity of an anesthetized pig. Trocar insertion and other laparoscopic tool placements were then viewed with these robotic cameras. The miniature robots provided additional camera angles that improved surgical visualization during a cholecystectomy. These successful prototype trials have demonstrated that miniature in vivo robots can provide surgeons with additional visual information that can increase procedural safety.

  6. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  7. Miniaturized Plasma and Neutral Diagnostics for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Enloe, C. L.; Krause, L. A.; Herrero, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a miniaturized suite of instruments which provides both bulk energy resolved plasma properties and coarse neutral mass spectroscopy suitable for measurements on the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). The suite is comprised of two instruments; the Miniaturized Electro-Static Analyzer (MESA), and the Flat Plasma Spectrometer (FLAPS), designed to measure the near earth environment on the Air Force Academy small satellite missions Falconsat-2 and 3.

  8. Metamaterials for Miniaturization of Optical Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0226 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS Aleksandr Figotin UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Final Report 09/24...8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 10/09/2014 Final 30/06/2011-30/06/2014 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS FA9550-11-1...relativistic and spinorial aspects of our neoclassical electromagnetic theory. Metamaterials , fundamentals of electromagnetic theory, dissipation, magnetic

  9. Miniature Electrostatic Ion Thruster With Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A miniature electrostatic ion thruster is proposed that, with one exception, would be based on the same principles as those of the device described in the previous article, "Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster". The exceptional feature of this thruster would be that, in addition to using electric fields for linear acceleration of ions and electrons, it would use a magnetic field to rotationally accelerate slow electrons into the ion stream to neutralize the ions.

  10. Miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention documents the efforts on the research and development of a miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system. A miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system is presented; Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) based alignment algorithm for space applications is discussed. Two navigation cameras are also included to measure the range and range rate which can be integrated into the GPS/MEMS IMU system to enhance the navigation solution.

  11. Ka-band MMIC receiver with ion-implanted technology for high-volume and low-cost application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, J.; Geddes, J.; Detry, J.; Carlson, D.

    1991-10-01

    A monolithic-microwave-integrated-circuit (MMIC) receiver in ion implantation technology, with LNA and mixer integrated circuits (ICs) shows 4.7-dB noise figure and 6.8-dB conversion gain at 35 GHz with a low IF frequency of 10-50 MHz. The data reported are for a receiver in the Ka-band. The results are for two separate amplifier and mixer ICs combined to form a receiver or down converter. The authors have successfully demonstrate viable and manufacturable technology that is useful for high volume and cost-effective applications. The measured results show the technology is able to deliver high performance with very good yield.

  12. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  13. Miniature Ion-Array Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A figure is shown that depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would share many features of design and operation of the instrument described in another article. The main differences between that instrument and this one would lie in the configuration and mode of operation of the filter and detector electrodes. A filter electrode and detector electrodes would be located along the sides of a drift tube downstream from the accelerator electrode. These electrodes would apply a combination of (1) a transverse AC electric field that would effect differential transverse dispersal of ions and (2) a transverse DC electric field that would drive the dispersed ions toward the detector electrodes at different distances along the drift tube. The electric current collected by each detector electrode would be a measure of the current, and thus of the abundance of the species of ions impinging on that electrode. The currents collected by all the detector electrodes could be measured simultaneously to obtain continuous readings of abundances of species. The downstream momentum of accelerated ions would be maintained through neutralization on the electrodes; the momentum of the resulting neutral atoms would serve to expel gases from spectrometer, without need for a pump.

  14. Miniature electrically operated diaphragm valve

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Wong, Chungnin C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Fischer, Gary J.; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a miniature electrically operated valve that can stand off significant pressures, that can be inexpensively produced, and that can be made to operate without continuous electrical power. A valve according to the present invention comprises a housing and a beam mounted with the housing. A diaphragm mounted with the housing forms a sealed fluid volume. An electromagnetic energy source, such as an electromagnetic coil, mounts with the housing and when energized urges the beam in one direction. The beam can be urged in the opposing direction by passive means or by reversing the polarity of the electromagnetic energy source or by a second electromagnetic energy source. Two fluid ports mount with the housing. A first fluid port mounts so that, as the beam is urged in one direction or the opposite, the beam urges the diaphragm to move between engaging and substantially sealing the fluid port and disengaging and not substantially sealing the fluid port. A seat can be mounted with the diaphragm to aid in sealing the fluid port. Latching mechanisms such as permanent magnets can be mounted so that the valve remains in the open or closed positions without continuous electrical power input. Fluid can flow through the housing between the two fluid ports when the diaphragm does not seal the first fluid port, but can be prevented from flowing by urging the beam so that the diaphragm seals the first fluid port. Various embodiments accommodate various latching mechanisms, electromagnetic energy sources, number of fluid ports, and diaphragm design considerations.

  15. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-04

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories.

  16. Effects of doping concentration ratio on electrical characterization in pseudomorphic HEMT-based MMIC switches for ICT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jae-Kyoung; Oh, Jung-Hun; Sung, Ho-Kun; Wang, Cong

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the doping concentration ratios between upper and lower silicon planar-doping layers on the DC and RF characteristics of the double planar doped pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs) are investigated. From the device simulation, an increase of maximum extrinsic transconductance and a decrease of total on- and off-state capacitances are observed, as well as an increase of the upper to lower planar-doping concentration ratios (UTLPDR), which give rise to an enhancement of the switching speed and isolation characteristics. On the basis of simulation results, two types of pHEMTs are fabricated with two different UTLPDRs of 4:1 and 1:2. After applying these two types' pHEMTs, single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) transmitter/receiver monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) switches are also designed and fabricated. The SPDT MMIC switch with a 4:1 UTLPDR shows an insertion loss of 0.58 dB, isolation of 40.2 dB, and switching speed of 100 ns, respectively, which correspondingly indicate a 0.23 dB lower insertion loss, 2.90 dB higher isolation and 2.5 times faster switching speed than those of 1:2 UTLPDR at frequency range of 2-6 GHz. From the simulation results and comparative studies, we propose that the UTLPDR must be greater than 4:1 for the best switching performance. With the abovementioned excellent performances, the proposed switch would be quite promising in the application of information and communications technology system.

  17. Miniature Bose-Einstein condensate system design based on a transparent atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jingfang; Xu, Xinping; Jiang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new miniature Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) system based on a transparent atom chip with a compact external coil structure. A standard six-beam macroscopic magneto-optical trap (MOT) is able to be created near the chip surface due to the chip’s transparency. A novel wire pattern consisting of a double-z wire and a z-shaped wire is designed on the transparent atom chip. With a vertical bias magnetic field, the double-z wire can create the quadrupole magnetic field of an intermediate chip MOT, which is suitable for transporting atoms from the macroscopic MOT to the chip z-wire trap efficiently. The compact external coil structure is designed with a rectangular frameless geometry consisting of only four coil pairs and its volume is less than 0.3 liters. The maximum system power consumption during the BEC generation procedure is about 45 W. The miniature system is evaluated, and about 3 × 106 atoms can be loaded into the chip z-wire trap. The miniature chip BEC system has the advantages of small volume and low power consumption, and it has great potential for practical applications of BEC.

  18. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  19. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  20. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  1. Design of optics for compact star sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minyi; Shi, Rongbao; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    In order to adapt to small size and low cost space platform such as mini-satellites, this paper studies the design of optics for compact star sensor. At first, the relationship between limiting magnitude and optical system specifications which includes field of view and entrance pupil diameter is analyzed, based on its Pyramid identification algorithm and signal-to-noise ratio requirement. The specifications corresponding to different limiting magnitude can be obtained after the detector is selected, and both of the complexity of optical lens and the size of baffle can be estimated. Then the range of the limiting magnitude can be determined for the miniaturization of the optical system. Taking STAR1000 CMOS detector as an example, the compact design of the optical system can be realized when the limiting magnitude is in the interval of 4.9Mv 5.5Mv. At last, the lens and baffle of a CMOS compact star sensor is optimally designed, of which length and weight is respectively 124 millimeters and 300 grams.

  2. Miniature Compressive Ultra-spectral Imaging System Utilizing a Single Liquid Crystal Phase Retarder

    PubMed Central

    August, Isaac; Oiknine, Yaniv; AbuLeil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Stern, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been proved to be an effective tool for many applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, medicine, agriculture, remote sensing and industrial process inspection. However, due to the demand for high spectral and spatial resolution it became extremely challenging to design and implement such systems in a miniaturized and cost effective manner. Using a Compressive Sensing (CS) setup based on a single variable Liquid Crystal (LC) retarder and a sensor array, we present an innovative Miniature Ultra-Spectral Imaging (MUSI) system. The LC retarder acts as a compact wide band spectral modulator. Within the framework of CS, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover ultra-spectral image cubes. Using the presented compressive MUSI system, we demonstrate the reconstruction of gigapixel spatio-spectral image cubes from spectral scanning shots numbering an order of magnitude less than would be required using conventional systems. PMID:27004447

  3. Membrane-type resonator as an effective miniaturized tuned vibration mass damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang; Au-Yeung, Ka Yan; Yang, Min; Tang, Suet To; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Damping of low frequency vibration by lightweight and compact devices has been a serious challenge in various areas of engineering science. Here we report the experimental realization of a type of miniature low frequency vibration dampers based on decorated membrane resonators. At frequency around 150 Hz, two dampers, each with outer dimensions of 28 mm in diameter and 5 mm in height, and a total mass of 1.78 g which is less than 0.6% of the host structure (a nearly free-standing aluminum beam), can reduce its vibrational amplitude by a factor of 1400, or limit its maximum resonance quality factor to 18. Furthermore, the conceptual design of the dampers lays the foundation and demonstrates the potential of further miniaturization of low frequency dampers.

  4. Fluidics cube for biosensor miniaturization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, J. M.; Feldstein, M. J.; Leatzow, D. M.; Flack, L. K.; Golden, J. P.; Ligler, F. S.

    2001-01-01

    To create a small, portable, fully automated biosensor, a compact means of fluid handling is required. We designed, manufactured, and tested a "fluidics cube" for such a purpose. This cube, made of thermoplastic, contains reservoirs and channels for liquid samples and reagents and operates without the use of any internal valves or meters; it is a passive fluid circuit that relies on pressure relief vents to control fluid movement. We demonstrate the ability of pressure relief vents to control fluid movement and show how to simply manufacture or modify the cube. Combined with the planar array biosensor developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, it brings us one step closer to realizing our goal of a handheld biosensor capable of analyzing multiple samples for multiple analytes.

  5. Advances in miniature spectrometer and sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Jouko; Rissanen, Anna; Saari, Heikki; Karioja, Pentti; Karppinen, Mikko; Aalto, Timo; Tukkiniemi, Kari

    2014-05-01

    Miniaturization and cost reduction of spectrometer and sensor technologies has great potential to open up new applications areas and business opportunities for analytical technology in hand held, mobile and on-line applications. Advances in microfabrication have resulted in high-performance MEMS and MOEMS devices for spectrometer applications. Many other enabling technologies are useful for miniature analytical solutions, such as silicon photonics, nanoimprint lithography (NIL), system-on-chip, system-on-package techniques for integration of electronics and photonics, 3D printing, powerful embedded computing platforms, networked solutions as well as advances in chemometrics modeling. This paper will summarize recent work on spectrometer and sensor miniaturization at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tunable filter technology has been developed in two technical versions: Piezoactuated FPIs have been applied in miniature hyperspectral imaging needs in light weight UAV and nanosatellite applications, chemical imaging as well as medical applications. Microfabricated MOEMS FPIs have been developed as cost-effective sensor platforms for visible, NIR and IR applications. Further examples of sensor miniaturization will be discussed, including system-on-package sensor head for mid-IR gas analyzer, roll-to-roll printed Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technology as well as UV imprinted waveguide sensor for formaldehyde detection.

  6. Miniaturized UV/VIS spectrometer made by MOEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibayama, Katsumi; Yokino, Takafumi; Hikita, Katsuro; Iwasaki, Norihiro; Teichmann, Helmut; Staerker, Ulrich; DiPrima, Flavio; Yamamoto, Koei

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many compact spectrometers for purposes such as environmental monitoring and process quality control in industrial production have been realized. However, most of them still employ spectrometer mounts with focal lengths in the range of several cm. Therefore, their size is about that of a palm which is too large for OEM-use in handily sized optical sensor equipment. Accordingly, we have developed a thumb-sized, truly miniaturized spectrometer for the spectral range 340nm to 750nm, which is particularly suited for use inside hand-held or portable color management sensor equipment. The spectrometer is using a self-imaging, aberration-corrected concave grating with very short focal length and a blazed grating profile for high diffraction efficiency. The grating is replicated onto the top of a convex glass lens using nano-imprint technology. Opposite to the concave grating, a dedicated C-MOS image sensor with an in-built on-chip slit is placed. The slit with a width of 75μm is formed into the silicon chip using MEMS technology. Due to this advanced technology, the distance between the sensor area and the slit is as small as 1mm. Based on this high level of integration, the number of optical components could be kept to a minimum and the distance between the concave grating and C-MOS image sensor is about 8.5mm only. In summary, we have realized a well-performing miniaturized spectrometer with an extremely small package size of 28mm - 17mm - 13mm and a weight of only about 9g, which is highly suited for integration into optical sensing equipment.

  7. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K.; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J.; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications. PMID:27231633

  8. Goniometry and Limb Girth in Miniature Dachshunds

    PubMed Central

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A.; Chen, Annie V.; Kiszonas, Alecia M.; Lutskas, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the mean and median pelvic limb joint angles and girth measurements in miniature Dachshunds presenting with varying degrees of pelvic limb weakness secondary to thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion. Methods. 15 miniature Dachshunds who presented to WSU-VTH for thoracolumbar disc extrusion. Dachshunds varied in neurologic status from ambulatory paraparetic to paraplegic at the time of measurements. Results. There were no significant differences in joint angles or girth among the three groups (ambulatory paraparetic, nonambulatory paraparetic, or paraplegic) (P > 0.05). When group was disregarded and values for extension, flexion, and girth combined, no differences existed. Conclusions. Goniometry and limb girth measurements can successfully be made in the miniature Dachshund; however, the shape of the Dachshund leg makes obtaining these values challenging. There were no differences in joint angle or girth measurements between dogs with varying neurologic dysfunction at the time of measurement. PMID:27403455

  9. Superamphiphobic miniature boat fabricated by laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Cong; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-03-01

    We fabricated a superamphiphobic miniature boat with marked drag reduction and excellent loading capacity using femtosecond laser direct writing technology. The as-prepared superamphiphobic surface of the boat exhibited apparent contact angles larger than 150° toward both water and oil. Miniature boats with the superamphiphobic surface slid effortlessly on both water and oil-polluted water surfaces, with an increase in sliding distance by up to 52% and load increase of up to 27% compared with those of a boat with an untreated surface. A potential mechanism that explains the excellent performance of the superamphiphobic miniature boat was also discussed. This work provides a simple and economically viable strategy to obtain advanced surfaces for use in microfluidics and marine engineering.

  10. FY 2006 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  11. Acral mutilation syndrome in a miniature pinscher.

    PubMed

    Bardagí, M; Montoliu, P; Ferrer, L; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    2011-01-01

    Acral mutilation syndrome (AMS) is a rare canine hereditary sensory neuropathy that results in progressive mutilation of the distal extremities and which has been reported only in German short-haired pointers, English pointers, English springer spaniels and French spaniels. The present report describes a case of AMS in an 18-month-old female miniature pinscher with progressive self-mutilation of the hind feet. The dog did not respond to any treatment and was humanely destroyed at the age of 30 months. Microscopical findings post mortem were restricted to the nervous system and were compatible with AMS. This is the first case of AMS described in a miniature pinscher. It is not known if the disease was the result of a point mutation in this particular dog or if the miniature pinscher breed will evolve to become a breed predisposed to AMS.

  12. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1998-07-21

    A miniature plastic gripper is described actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  13. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  14. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  15. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1997-03-11

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same are disclosed. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  16. Method and system for assembling miniaturized devices

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Klingmann, Jeffrey L.; Seugling, Richard M.

    2013-03-12

    An apparatus for assembling a miniaturized device includes a manipulator system including six manipulators operable to position and orient components of the miniaturized device with submicron precision and micron-level accuracy. The manipulator system includes a first plurality of motorized axes, a second plurality of manual axes, and force and torque and sensors. Each of the six manipulators includes at least one translation stage, at least one rotation stage, tooling attached to the at least one translation stage or the at least one rotation stage, and an attachment mechanism disposed at a distal end of the tooling and operable to attach at least a portion of the miniaturized device to the tooling. The apparatus also includes an optical coordinate-measuring machine (OCMM) including a machine-vision system, a laser-based distance-measuring probe, and a touch probe. The apparatus also includes an operator control system coupled to the manipulator system and the OCMM.

  17. FY 2005 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Sliger, William A.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical and chromatic aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional bistatic LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  18. Presynaptic miniature GABAergic currents in developing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Bouhours, Brice; Rostaing, Philippe; Papageorgiou, George; Corrie, John E T; Triller, Antoine; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2010-04-29

    Miniature synaptic currents have long been known to represent random transmitter release under resting conditions, but much remains to be learned about their nature and function in central synapses. In this work, we describe a new class of miniature currents ("preminis") that arise by the autocrine activation of axonal receptors following random vesicular release. Preminis are prominent in gabaergic synapses made by cerebellar interneurons during the development of the molecular layer. Unlike ordinary miniature postsynaptic currents in the same cells, premini frequencies are strongly enhanced by subthreshold depolarization, suggesting that the membrane depolarization they produce belongs to a feedback loop regulating neurotransmitter release. Thus, preminis could guide the formation of the interneuron network by enhancing neurotransmitter release at recently formed synaptic contacts.

  19. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  20. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  1. Jarvik 2000 pump technology and miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Jarvik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Blood-pump miniaturization has made amazing progress, reducing the pump diameter to one-tenth of the size of previous positive displacement pumps. In particular, axial-flow-pump technology allows tiny pumps running at high speeds to deliver from 2 to 10 L/min. A review of the background inventions of the Jarvik 2000 technology is presented, together with the reason that making pumps smaller than demanded by the particular application for which they are designed is counterproductive. Pump miniaturization is nearing its practical limit. The optimization of performance and patient outcomes should remain our primary design goal.

  2. Batch fabrication of precision miniature permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Garino, Terry J.; Venturini, Eugene L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes for fabrication of precision miniature rare earth permanent magnets is disclosed. Such magnets typically have sizes in the range 0.1 to 10 millimeters, and dimensional tolerances as small as one micron. Very large magnetic fields can be produced by such magnets, lending to their potential application in MEMS and related electromechanical applications, and in miniature millimeter-wave vacuum tubes. This abstract contains simplifications, and is supplied only for purposes of searching, not to limit or alter the scope or meaning of any claims herein.

  3. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  4. Miniature biotelemeter gives multichannel wideband biomedical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature biotelemeter was developed for sensing and transmitting multiple channels of biomedical data over a radio link. The design of this miniature, 10-channel, wideband (5 kHz/channel), pulse amplitude modulation/ frequency modulation biotelemeter takes advantage of modern device technology (e.g., integrated circuit operational amplifiers, complementary symmetry/metal oxide semiconductor logic, and solid state switches) and hybrid packaging techniques. The telemeter is being used to monitor 10 channels of neuron firings from specific regions of the brain in rats implanted with chronic electrodes. Design, fabrication, and testing of an engineering model biotelemeter are described.

  5. Miniaturized micro-optical scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, M. Edward; Andrews, Angus P.; Gunning, William J.; Khoshnevisan, Moshen

    1994-11-01

    Optical beam scanners are critical components for airborne and space-based laser radar, on- machine-inspection systems, factory automation systems, and optical communication systems. We describe here a laser beam steering system based on dithering two complementary (positive and negative) microlens arrays. When the two microlens arrays are translated relative to one another in the plane parallel to their surfaces, the transmitted light beam is scanned in two directions. We have demonstrated scanning speeds up to 300 Hz with a pair of 6-mm- aperture microlens arrays designed for input from a HeNe laser. The output beam covers a discrete 16 X 16 spot scan pattern with about 3.6 mrad separation and only 400 (mu) rad of beam divergence, in close agreement with design predictions. This demo system is relatively compact; less than 2 in. on a side. We also describe several near-term applications, some critical design trade-offs, and important fabrication and design issues.

  6. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Miniature L-Band Radar Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, Dalia; Price, Douglas; Edelstein, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    A miniature L-band transceiver that operates at a carrier frequency of 1.25 GHz has been developed as part of a generic radar electronics module (REM) that would constitute one unit in an array of many identical units in a very-large-aperture phased-array antenna. NASA and the Department of Defense are considering the deployment of such antennas in outer space; the underlying principles of operation, and some of those of design, also are applicable on Earth. The large dimensions of the antennas make it advantageous to distribute radio-frequency electronic circuitry into elements of the arrays. The design of the REM is intended to implement the distribution. The design also reflects a requirement to minimize the size and weight of the circuitry in order to minimize the weight of any such antenna. Other requirements include making the transceiver robust and radiation-hard and minimizing power demand. Figure 1 depicts the functional blocks of the REM, including the L-band transceiver. The key functions of the REM include signal generation, frequency translation, amplification, detection, handling of data, and radar control and timing. An arbitrary-waveform generator that includes logic circuitry and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a linear-frequency-modulation chirp waveform. A frequency synthesizer produces local-oscillator signals used for frequency conversion and clock signals for the arbitrary-waveform generator, for a digitizer [that is, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC)], and for a control and timing unit. Digital functions include command, timing, telemetry, filtering, and high-rate framing and serialization of data for a high-speed scientific-data interface. The aforementioned digital implementation of filtering is a key feature of the REM architecture. Digital filters, in contradistinction to analog ones, provide consistent and temperature-independent performance, which is particularly important when REMs are distributed throughout a large

  8. A miniature VGA SWIR camera using MT6415CA ROIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Yilmaz, S. Gokhan; Kocak, Serhat

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new miniature VGA SWIR camera called NanoCAM-6415, which is developed to demonstrate the key features of the MT6415CA ROIC such as high integration level, low-noise, and low-power in a small volume. The NanoCAM-6415 uses an InGaAs Focal Plane Array (FPA) with a format of 640 × 512 and pixel pitch of 15 μm built using MT6415CA ROIC. MT6415CA is a low-noise CTIA ROIC, which has a system-on-chip architecture, allows generation of all the required timing and biases on-chip in the ROIC without requiring any external components or inputs, thus enabling the development of compact and low-noise SWIR cameras, with reduced size, weight, and power (SWaP). NanoCAM-6415 camera supports snapshot operation using Integrate-Then-Read (ITR) and Integrate-While-Read (IWR) modes. The camera has three gain settings enabled by the ROIC through programmable Full-Well-Capacity (FWC) values of 10.000 e-, 20.000 e-, and 350.000 e- in the very high gain (VHG), high-gain (HG), and low-gain (LG) modes, respectively. The camera has an input referred noise level of 10 e- rms in the VHG mode at 1 ms integration time, suitable for low-noise SWIR imaging applications. In order to reduce the size and power of the camera, only 2 outputs out of 8 of the ROIC are connected to the external Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) in the camera electronics, providing a maximum frame rate of 50 fps through a 26-pin SDR type Camera Link connector. NanoCAM-6415 SWIR camera without the optics measures 32 mm × 32 mm × 35 mm, weighs 45gr, and dissipates less than 1.8 W using a 5 V supply. These results show that MT6415CA ROIC can successfully be used to develop cameras for SWIR imaging applications where SWaP is a concern. Mikro-Tasarim has also developed new imaging software to demonstrate the functionality of this miniature VGA camera. Mikro-Tasarim provides tested ROIC wafers and also offers compact and easy-to-use test electronics, demo cameras, and hardware

  9. Miniaturized Antennas and Metamaterial-Based Transmission Line Components in Microwave Circuits Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pei-Ling

    This dissertation presents two diversities of miniaturization approaches to the antennas and microwave passive circuit components. The first approach is based on the unique metamaterial transmission line structures. The metamaterial structure or the left-handed structure is an artificial structure that is dispersion engineerable from its constituent parameters. By means of the left-handed transmission lines or the composite right/left-handed (CRLH) transmission lines to replace the conventional microstrip lines, microwave circuit components can be miniaturized via controlling the phase responses at the frequencies of interest, which saves the footprint size. Specifically, this idea was implemented on the dual-band 180°0 and 90° hybrid couplers and both of them demonstrate considerable size reductions in the experiments. On the other hand, the second methodology leading to miniaturization is taking advantage of the slow wave structures. The slow wave structures presented in this dissertation are formed using the capacitive loading periodically. The effective propagation constant beta is enhanced by increasing the effective shunt capacitance in the equivalent circuit model derived from the conventional transmission line theory. The associated guided wavelength is therefore decreased and the same physical structure is capable of operating at lower frequencies. The slow wave structures are employed for compact antenna applications. In particular, the slow wave enhancement factor (SWE), which is defined as the ratio of the loaded to the unloaded propagation constants (beta//beta), is investigated using the loaded unit cell of the equivalent transmission line model and utilized as a design tool for an arbitrary size reduction. It is shown that the SWE agrees very well with miniaturization factor, and therefore load parameters in the circuit model can be readily obtained when a specific size reduction is attempted. Slow wave antennas will be exemplified in the third

  10. A miniature origami biofuel cell based on a consumed cathode.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Han, Yujie; Lou, Baohua; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Lei; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-10

    Considerable interest has been focused on miniature biofuel cells (BFCs) because of their portability and possibility to be implantable. Origami devices with hollow channels will provide novel insight into the assembly methods of miniature BFCs. Herein a miniature origami BFC has been fabricated from a MnO2-graphite flake consumed solid-state cathode. For further practical applications, miniature origami BFCs can directly generate energy from soft drinks.

  11. Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

  12. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  13. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  14. Miniature Housings for Electronics With Standard Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.; Alhorn, Dean C.

    2006-01-01

    A family of general-purpose miniature housings has been designed to contain diverse sensors, actuators, and drive circuits plus associated digital electronic readout and control circuits. The circuits contained in the housings communicate with the external world via standard RS-485 interfaces.

  15. The technology of miniature acoustic element arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bom, N.; Lancee, C. T.; Ridder, J.; Ligtvoet, C.; Roelandt, J.

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of miniature element array construction are discussed. Some initial results on optimization of lateral resolution with a special focusing technique in linear array design is presented, together with the constructional details. Furthermore the construction of a catheter tip array is treated in detail.

  16. Miniaturization of a biomedical gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Mirtaheri, Peyman; Omtveit, Tore; Klotzbuecher, Thomas; Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Orjan G; Tønnessen, Tor Inge

    2004-12-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that a conductivity based PCO2 sensor is an attractive solution for early detection of ischemia and presented two design geometries. For organ surface measurements, the planar design was suitable but it was difficult to insert the sensor into the tissue. A cylindrical design solution was favored for insertion due to the large membrane contact area and easy placement in a medical catheter. Since the previous cylindrical prototype was large and could damage the tissue, a more miniaturized sensor was needed. In the current paper, we present a miniaturized sensor with an outer diameter of 1 mm. The applied technology for manufacturing the sensor was a combination of mechanical turning, excimer laser drilling and conventional molding technique. The materials applied were PEEK (polyetherether ketone), PI (polyimide) with gold layers and polysiloxane. The membrane had to be gas permeable while acting as a barrier for ion transport, and was made of polysiloxane and had a thickness of 100-150 microm. The miniaturized sensor was tested for calibration, response time, drifting and pressure sensitivity. The results show that the miniaturized PCO2 sensor is capable of rapid and stable measurements both in vitro and ex vivo. The result from this study will be applied for the industrial manufacturing of such a biomedical sensor as a clinical product.

  17. A miniature mass spectrometer for hydrazine detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Sinha, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with a focal plane (Mattauch-Herzog) geometry has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The MMS has the potential to meet the NASA requirements of 10 parts per billion sensitivity for Hydrazine detection, as well as the requirements for instant response, portability, and low maintenance.

  18. Miniature Paintings: Small Size, Big Impact!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Bill

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a miniature painting project that allows students to research a master painter and then replicate the work on a smaller scale. This lesson focuses on the students' ability to learn to identify style, subject matter, themes, and content in painting through the study of historical paintings, and the application of various…

  19. Miniature Marimbas: Migrant Workers' Memories of Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jayne

    1995-01-01

    Three Mexican migrant workers attending classes at Geneseo (New York) Migrant Center used leftover art materials to represent their home village in miniature. A spontaneous artistic expression, the objects allowed the men an opportunity to reminisce and reinforce cultural and interpersonal ties, and gave insight about their background and culture…

  20. Miniature Scroll Pumps Fabricated by LIGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, Dean; Shcheglov, Kirill; White, Victor; Bae, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Miniature scroll pumps have been proposed as roughing pumps (low - vacuum pumps) for miniature scientific instruments (e.g., portable mass spectrometers and gas analyzers) that depend on vacuum. The larger scroll pumps used as roughing pumps in some older vacuum systems are fabricated by conventional machining. Typically, such an older scroll pump includes (1) an electric motor with an eccentric shaft to generate orbital motion of a scroll and (2) conventional bearings to restrict the orbital motion to a circle. The proposed miniature scroll pumps would differ from the prior, larger ones in both design and fabrication. A miniature scroll pump would include two scrolls: one mounted on a stationary baseplate and one on a flexure stage (see figure). An electromagnetic actuator in the form of two pairs of voice coils in a push-pull configuration would make the flexure stage move in the desired circular orbit. The capacitance between the scrolls would be monitored to provide position (gap) feedback to a control system that would adjust the drive signals applied to the voice coils to maintain the circular orbit as needed for precise sealing of the scrolls. To minimize power consumption and maximize precision of control, the flexure stage would be driven at the frequency of its mechanical resonance. The miniaturization of these pumps would entail both operational and manufacturing tolerances of <1 m. Such tight tolerances cannot be achieved easily by conventional machining of high-aspect-ratio structures like those of scroll-pump components. In addition, the vibrations of conventional motors and ball bearings exceed these tight tolerances by an order of magnitude. Therefore, the proposed pumps would be fabricated by the microfabrication method known by the German acronym LIGA ( lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding) because LIGA has been shown to be capable of providing the required tolerances at large aspect ratios.

  1. Miniature Grating for Spectrally-Encoded Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongkyun; Martinez, Ramses V.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is an ultraminiature endoscopy technology that acquires high-definition images of internal organs through a sub-mm endoscopic probe. In SEE, a grating at the tip of the imaging optics diffracts the broadband light into multiple beams, where each beam with a distinctive wavelength is illuminated on a unique transverse location of the tissue. By encoding one transverse coordinate with the wavelength, SEE can image a line of the tissue at a time without using any beam scanning devices. This feature of the SEE technology allows the SEE probe to be miniaturized to sub-mm dimensions. While previous studies have shown that SEE has the potential to be utilized for various clinical imaging applications, the translation of SEE for medicine has been hampered by challenges in fabricating the miniature grating inherent to SEE probes. This paper describes a new fabrication method for SEE probes. The new method uses a soft lithographic approach to pattern a high-aspect-ratio grating at the tip of the miniature imaging optics. Using this technique, we have constructed a 500-μm-diameter SEE probe. The miniature grating at the tip of the probe had a measured diffraction efficiency of 75%. The new SEE probe was used to image a human finger and formalin fixed mouse embryos, demonstrating the capability of this device to visualize key anatomic features of tissues with high image contrast. In addition to providing high quality imaging SEE optics, the soft lithography method allows cost-effective and reliable fabrication of these miniature endoscopes, which will facilitate the clinical translation of SEE technology. PMID:23503940

  2. Design of a miniature hydraulic compression load frame for microdiffraction tests at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Varma, R.; Krasnicki, S.; Sinha, S.

    1999-10-11

    In support of the x-ray synchrotrons radiation multidiffraction project of Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), we have designed and fabricated a miniature hydraulic compression load frame with 20000 N load capacity for metal specimen tests at the APS. The compact design allows the load frame to sit on the center of a 6-circle goniometer with six degrees of freedom and maximum solid angle accessibility for the incoming x-ray beam and diffraction beam detectors. A set of compact precision stages with submicron resolution has been designed for the load frame positioning to compensate the sample internal elastic and/or plastic deformation during the loading process. The system design, specifications, and test results are presented.

  3. Efficient EM Simulation of GCPW Structures Applied to a 200-GHz mHEMT Power Amplifier MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Roca, Yolanda; Amado-Rey, Belén; Wagner, Sandrine; Leuther, Arnulf; Bangert, Axel; Gómez-Alcalá, Rafael; Tessmann, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The behaviour of grounded coplanar waveguide (GCPW) structures in the upper millimeter-wave range is analyzed by using full-wave electromagnetic (EM) simulations. A methodological approach to develop reliable and time-efficient simulations is proposed by investigating the impact of different simplifications in the EM modelling and simulation conditions. After experimental validation with measurements on test structures, this approach has been used to model the most critical passive structures involved in the layout of a state-of-the-art 200-GHz power amplifier based on metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). This millimeter-wave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) has demonstrated a measured output power of 8.7 dBm for an input power of 0 dBm at 200 GHz. The measured output power density and power-added efficiency (PAE) are 46.3 mW/mm and 4.5 %, respectively. The peak measured small-signal gain is 12.7 dB (obtained at 196 GHz). A good agreement has been obtained between measurements and simulation results.

  4. 225-255-GHz InP DHBT Frequency Tripler MMIC Using Complementary Split-Ring Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Yong; Li, Oupeng; Sun, Yan; Lu, Haiyan; Cheng, Wei; Xu, Ruimin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel design of frequency tripler monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) using complementary split-ring resonator (CSRR) is proposed based on 0.5-μm InP DHBT process. The CSRR-loaded microstrip structure is integrated in the tripler as a part of impedance matching network to suppress the fundamental harmonic, and another frequency tripler based on conventional band-pass filter is presented for comparison. The frequency tripler based on CSRR-loaded microstrip generates an output power between -8 and -4 dBm from 228 to 255 GHz when the input power is 6 dBm. The suppression of fundamental harmonic is better than 20 dBc at 77-82 GHz input frequency within only 0.15 × 0.15 mm2 chip area of the CSRR structure on the ground layer. Compared with the frequency tripler based on band-pass filter, the tripler using CSRR-loaded microstrip obtains a similar suppression level of unwanted harmonics and higher conversion gain within a much smaller chip area. To our best knowledge, it is the first time that CSRR is used for harmonic suppression of frequency multiplier at such high frequency band.

  5. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  6. Design of a compact, low-price, lifetime measuring instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.; Moeller, Reinhard; Tafeit, Erwin

    1994-08-01

    The technical requirements for a small, rugged, and moderately- priced device for measuring fluorescence lifetimes have been investigated. The suitability and performance of various lifetime measuring schemes were compared. Based on these investigations a compact time-domain instrument was developed allowing measurement of fluorescence decays with a time resolution well below 1 ns. A semiconductor laser (frequency-doubled, if necessary) is used as a light source. Detection is done with a miniaturized photomultiplier. In favorable cases measurement of a fluorescent decay curve is accomplished within less than one minute.

  7. Development of a first-generation miniature multiple reference optical coherence tomography imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul M.; Dsouza, Roshan; O'Riordan, Colm; Collins, Seán; O'Brien, Peter; Wilson, Carol; Hogan, Josh; Leahy, Martin J.

    2016-12-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a technology ideally suited to low-cost, compact OCT imaging. This modality is an extension of time-domain OCT with the addition of a partial mirror in front of the reference mirror. This enables extended, simultaneous depth scanning with the relatively short scan range of a miniature voice coil motor on which the scanning mirror is mounted. This work details early stage development of the first iteration of a miniature MR-OCT device. This iteration utilizes a fiber-coupled input from an off-board superluminescent diode. The dimensions of the module are 40×57 mm. Off-the-shelf miniature optical components, voice coil motors, and photodetectors are used, with the complexity of design depending on the specific application. The photonic module can be configured as either polarized or nonpolarized and can include balanced detection. The results shown in this work are from the nonpolarized device. The system was characterized through measurement of the input spectrum, axial resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio. Typical B-scans of static and in vivo samples are shown, which illustrate the potential applications for such a technology.

  8. A novel miniaturized EDM mechanism based on linear stepping ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y. J.; Hu, F. Q.; Wang, Z. L.; Zhao, W. S.

    2005-12-01

    In order to machine inclined micro-holes and operate in narrow space, a novel miniaturized EDM (Electro Discharge Machining) mechanism has been developed. Because of its merit of compact size (70×40×50mm), the mechanism can be fixed on robot. The prototype of miniaturized EDM system consists of electrode direct drive unit, EDM electrical parameters and servo controller, ultrasonic EDM generator, manual robot, in addition to miniaturized EDM mechanism. Differential Reciprocating Driving Method (DRDM) is presented, and the coaxial forced vibration of electrode can be achieved. Coaxial vibration is applied to promote the evacuation of debris, and it helps to achieve stable and efficient machining. The optimal design of ultrasonic motor has been implemented using Finite Element Method (FEM), and the reasonable structure has been achieved. Feeding resolution of electrode can reach 40nm in differential reciprocating style. The holes with figures of Φ85μm circle, Φ90μm inclined circle, Y and inclined Y have been machined.

  9. MiniMAX: miniature, mobile, agile, x-ray system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott A.; Cunningham, Gwynneth; Gonzales, Samuel

    2012-06-01

    We present a unique, lightweight, compact, low-cost, x-ray imager: MiniMAX (Miniature, Mobile, Agile, X-ray). This system, which exploits the best aspects of Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR) technology, weighs less than 6lbs, fits into a 6" diameter x 16" long carbon-fiber tube, and is constructed almost entirely from offthe- shelf components. MiniMAX is suitable for use in weld inspection, archaeology, homeland security, and veterinary medicine. While quantum limited for MeV radiography, the quantum-efficiency is too low for routine medical use. Formats include: 4"x6", 8"x12", or 16"x24" and can be readily displayed on the camera back, using a pocket projector, or on a tablet computer. In contrast to a conventional, flying-spot scanner, MiniMAX records a photostimulated image from the entire phosphor at once using a bright, red LED flash filtered through an extremely efficient (OD>9) dichroic filter.

  10. Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for preformulation.

    PubMed

    Alsenz, Jochem; Haenel, Elisabeth; Anedda, Aline; Du Castel, Pauline; Cirelli, Giorgio

    2016-05-25

    This study describes a novel Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for measuring disk intrinsic dissolution rates (DIDR). In MINDISS, compacted mini disks of drugs (2-5mg/disk) are prepared in custom made holders with a surface area of 3mm(2). Disks are immersed, pellet side down, into 0.35ml of appropriate dissolution media per well in 96-well microtiter plates, media are stirred and disk-holders are transferred to new wells after defined periods of time. After filtration, drug concentration in dissolution media is quantified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) and solid state property of the disk is characterized by Raman spectroscopy. MINDISS was identified as an easy-to-use tool for rapid, parallel determination of DIDR of compounds that requires only small amounts of compound and of dissolution medium. Results obtained with marketed drugs in MINDISS correlate well with large scale DIDR methods and indicate that MINDISS can be used for (1) rank-ordering of compounds by intrinsic dissolution in late phase discovery and early development, (2) comparison of polymorphic forms and salts, (3) screening and selection of appropriate dissolution media, and (4) characterization of the intestinal release behavior of compounds along the gastro intestinal tract by changing biorelevant media during experiments.

  11. Miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaylor, Brant M.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Greenfield, Nathan J.; Roos, Peter A.; Seger, Eric M.; Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2012-03-01

    We present a miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors. Bridger Photonics, Inc. (Bridger) in collaboration with Montana State University (MSU), has developed electrostatically actuated deformable MEMS mirrors for use in compact focus control and zoom imaging systems. Applications including microscopy, endomicroscopy, robotic surgery and cell-phone cameras. In comparison to conventional systems, our MEMS-based designs require no mechanically moving parts. Both circular and elliptical membranes are now being manufactured at the wafer level and possess excellent optical surface quality (membrane flatness < λ/4). The mirror diameters range from 1 - 4 mm. For membranes with a 25 μm air gap, the membrane stroke is 10 μm. In terms of the optical design, the mirrors are considered variable power optical elements. A device with 2 mm diameter and 10 μm stroke can vary its optical power over 40 diopters or 0.04mm∧(-1). Equivalently, this corresponds to a focal length ranging from infinity to 25 mm. We have designed and demonstrated a zoom system using two MOEMS elements and exclusively commercial off-the-shelf optical components to achieve an optical zoom of 1.9x with a 15° full field of view. The total optical track length of the system is 36 mm. The design is approximately 30 mm x 30 mm x 20 mm including the optomechanical housing and image sensor. With custom optics, we anticipate achieving form factors that are compatible with incorporation into cell phones.

  12. Development of a miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Outa, E; Ogino, S; Otake, Y; Shiozaki, H; Fujimoto, T; Tagusari, O; Kitamura, M

    1993-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as a totally implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). This pump consists of an impeller combined with a guide-vane, a tube housing, and a DC motor. The pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged to the ascending aorta. Our newly developed axial flow pump system has the following advantages: 1) it is a simple and compact system, 2) minimal blood stasis both in the device and the LV cavity, 3) minimal blood contacting surface of the pump, 4) easy accessibility with a less invasive surgical procedure, and 5) low cost. A pump flow > 5 L/min was obtained against 100 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. The pump could produce a passive pulsatile flow effect with a beating heart more efficiently than other non-pulsatile pumps because of minimal pressure drop and inertia along the bypass tract. Anatomic fit studies using dissected hearts of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cadavers showed that this pump could smoothly pass through the aortic valve without any interference with mitral valve function. Recently, a dynamic pressure groove bearing and a miniature lip seal have been developed. The dynamic pressure groove bearing has a simple structure and acts as a pressure resistant sealing mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Miniaturized Lab System for Future Cold Atom Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulas, Sascha; Vogt, Christian; Resch, Andreas; Hartwig, Jonas; Ganske, Sven; Matthias, Jonas; Schlippert, Dennis; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Maria Rasel, Ernst; Damjanic, Marcin; Weßels, Peter; Kohfeldt, Anja; Luvsandamdin, Erdenetsetseg; Schiemangk, Max; Grzeschik, Christoph; Krutzik, Markus; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Herrmann, Sven; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2017-02-01

    We present the technical realization of a compact system for performing experiments with cold 87Rb and 39K atoms in microgravity in the future. The whole system fits into a capsule to be used in the drop tower Bremen. One of the advantages of a microgravity environment is long time evolution of atomic clouds which yields higher sensitivities in atom interferometer measurements. We give a full description of the system containing an experimental chamber with ultra-high vacuum conditions, miniaturized laser systems, a high-power thulium-doped fiber laser, the electronics and the power management. In a two-stage magneto-optical trap atoms should be cooled to the low μK regime. The thulium-doped fiber laser will create an optical dipole trap which will allow further cooling to sub- μK temperatures. The presented system fulfills the demanding requirements on size and power management for cold atom experiments on a microgravity platform, especially with respect to the use of an optical dipole trap. A first test in microgravity, including the creation of a cold Rb ensemble, shows the functionality of the system.

  14. Development of a miniature multiple reference optical coherence tomography imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul M.; O'Riordan, Colm; Collins, Seán.; O'Brien, Peter; Wilson, Carol; Hogan, Josh; Leahy, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a new technology ideally suited to low-cost, compact OCT imaging. This modality is an extension of time-domain OCT with the addition of a partial mirror in front of the reference mirror. This enables extended, simultaneous depth scanning with the relatively short sweep of a miniature voice coil motor on which the scanning mirror is mounted. Applications of this technology include biometric security, ophthalmology, personal health monitoring and non-destructive testing. This work details early-stage development of the first iteration of a miniature MR-OCT device. This device utilizes a fiber-coupled input from an off-board superluminescent diode (SLD). Typical dimensions of the module are 40 × 57 mm, but future designs are expected to be more compact. Off-the-shelf miniature optical components, voice coil motors and photodetectors are used, with the complexity of design depending on specific applications. The photonic module can be configured as either polarized or non-polarized and can include balanced detection. The photodetectors are directly connected to a printed circuit board under the module containing a transimpedance amplifier with complimentary outputs. The results shown in this work are from the non-polarized device. Assembly of the photonic modules requires extensive planning. In choosing the optical components, Zemax simulations are performed to model the beam characteristics. The physical layout is modeled using Solidworks and each component is placed and aligned via a well-designed alignment procedure involving an active-alignment pick-and-place assembly system.

  15. Miniature sensor suitable for electronic nose applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Allman, Steve L.; Johansson, Alicia; Boisen, Anja

    2007-05-01

    A major research effort has been devoted over the years for the development of chemical sensors for the detection of chemical and explosive vapors. However, the deployment of such chemical sensors will require the use of multiple sensors (probably tens of sensors) in a sensor package to achieve selective detection. In order to keep the overall detector unit small, miniature sensors with sufficient sensitivity of detection will be needed. We report sensitive detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a stimulant for the nerve agents, using a miniature sensor unit based on piezoresistive microcantilevers. The sensor can detect parts-per-trillion concentrations of DMMP within 10s exposure times. The small size of the sensor makes it ideally suited for electronic nose applications.

  16. SMARBot: a modular miniature mobile robot platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yan; Johnson, Kerry; Simms, Brian; Conforth, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Miniature robots have many advantages over their larger counterparts, such as low cost, low power, and easy to build a large scale team for complex tasks. Heterogeneous multi miniature robots could provide powerful situation awareness capability due to different locomotion capabilities and sensor information. However, it would be expensive and time consuming to develop specific embedded system for different type of robots. In this paper, we propose a generic modular embedded system architecture called SMARbot (Stevens Modular Autonomous Robot), which consists of a set of hardware and software modules that can be configured to construct various types of robot systems. These modules include a high performance microprocessor, a reconfigurable hardware component, wireless communication, and diverse sensor and actuator interfaces. The design of all the modules in electrical subsystem, the selection criteria for module components, and the real-time operating system are described. Some proofs of concept experimental results are also presented.

  17. Development and Miniaturization of RF based probes for Electron Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    To make a diagnostics on plasmas for materials processing plasmas accompanying with deposition of non-conducting films in etching and/or CVD processes, curling probe (CP) with a spiral slot antenna has been recently developed as a compact diagnostic tool which enables the local electron density measurement. The electron density is obtained from a shift of the probe resonance frequency in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). A conventional CP has a diameter larger than 15 mm typically, because a slot length of the CP is as long as several tens millimeters for its resonance frequency less than several GHz. Further miniaturization of the CP was required to expand applicable range to various plasma sources like a narrow-gap parallel plate discharge. We tried miniaturization of the CP down to less than 3 mm in the probe diameter by fabricating narrow spiral slot antenna, and experimentally and numerically the miniaturized probe was investigated how much influence the slot width has on probe resonance characteristics and electron density measurements. In the case of the conventional CP made of stainless steel, 0.3-mm-wide normal slot antenna, the resonance spectra was clearly observed regardless of antenna materials of copper or stainless steel (SS). However, when the slot width was reduced down to 0.03 mm, the slot resonance was strongly dependent on the antenna materials. Namely the resonance peak was almost vanished for the SS antenna, whereas clearly appeared for the copper antenna. In general, the narrower the slot is, the higher attenuation factor the slot has for electromagnetic wave propagating along the slot. In such an attenuated transmission line of the narrow slot, high electric conductivity of the antenna seems preferable for the slot resonance. Furthermore, the miniaturized CP with the copper antenna was also introduced into low pressure (< 1Pa) Ar plasma. The resonance frequency was confirmed to changes sensitively with electron

  18. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  19. Miniature Reversal Electron-Attachment Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara

    1994-01-01

    Miniature reversal electron-attachment detector (miniREAD) enables direct injection of air or vapor at atmospheric pressure from monitored area into mass-spectrometric instrument to detect explosives, narcotics, or other substances, vapors of which suspected of being present in low concentrations. In comparison with older reversal electron-attachment detector, miniREAD simpler in design; more rugged; and easier to build, repair, and maintain. In addition, probably more sensitive.

  20. Miniature, Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilski, Steve; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Miniature Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope (MVS-CMG) was designed for small satellites (mass from less than 1 kg up to 500 kg). Currently available CMGs are too large and heavy, and available miniature CMGs do not provide sufficient control authority for use on practical satellites. This primarily results from the need to greatly increase the speed of rotation of the flywheel in order to reduce the flywheel size and mass. This goal was achieved by making use of a proprietary, space-qualified, high-speed (100,000 rpm) motor technology to spin the flywheel at a speed ten times faster than other known miniature CMGs under development. NASA is supporting innovations in propulsion, power, and guidance and navigation systems for low-cost small spacecraft. One of the key enabling technologies is attitude control mechanisms. CMGs are particularly attractive for spacecraft attitude control since they can achieve higher torques with lower mass and power than reaction wheels, and they provide continuous torque capability that enables precision pointing (in contrast to on-off thruster control). The aim of this work was to develop a miniature, variable-speed CMG that is sized for use on small satellites. To achieve improved agility, these spacecraft must be able to slew at high rate, which requires attitude control actuators that can apply torques on the order of 5 N-m. The MVS-CMG is specifically designed to achieve a high-torque output with a minimum flywheel and system mass. The flywheel can be run over a wide range of speeds, which is important to help reduce/eliminate potential gimbal lock, and can be used to optimize the operational envelope of the CMG.

  1. Degenerative myelopathy in an adult miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Matthews, N S; de Lahunta, A

    1985-06-01

    Degenerative myelopathy was diagnosed at necropsy of an adult Miniature Poodle with a 33-month history of progressive pelvic limb ataxia and proprioceptive deficit. Microscopic examination of the cord revealed diffuse degenerative myelopathy. Degenerative myelopathy is usually seen in adult, large-breed dogs and progresses over a period of months. In this case, the myelopathy progressed slowly and the degree of paralysis became more extensive than usually seen.

  2. A miniature tilting pad gas lubricated bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixsmith, H.; Swift, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a miniature tilting pad gas bearing developed for use in very small turbomachines. The bearings have been developed for cryogenic turboexpanders with shaft diameters down to about 0.3 cm and rotational speeds up to one million rpm. Cryogenic expansion turbines incorporating this type of bearing should be suitable for refrigeration rates down to about 10 w.

  3. Sub miniaturized laser doppler velocimeter sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gharib, Morteza (Inventor); Modaress, Darius (Inventor); Taugwalder, Frederic (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A miniaturized laser Doppler velocimeter is formed in a housing that is preferably 3 mm in diameter or less. A laser couples light to a first diffractive optical element that is formed on the fiber end. The light is coupled to a lens that also includes a diffractive optical element. The same lens is also used to collect receive light, and receives includes another diffractive optical element to collect that received light.

  4. High Q Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated high Q measurements in a room temperature Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator (MSAR). Initial measurements of bulk acoustic modes in room temperature sapphire at 39 MHz have demonstrated a Q of 8.8 x 10(exp 6). The long term goal of this work is to integrate such a high Q resonator with small, low noise quartz oscillator electronics, providing a fractional frequency stability better than 1 x 10(exp -14) @ 1s.

  5. Compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chenhao; Chen, Jian; Zhan, Qiwen

    2017-03-01

    A compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) sorter is proposed and demonstrated. The sorter comprises a quadratic fan-out mapper and a dual-phase corrector positioned in the pupil plane and the Fourier plane, respectively. The optical system is greatly simplified compared to previous demonstrations of OAM sorting, and the performance in resolution and efficiency is maintained. A folded configuration is set up using a single reflective spatial light modulator (SLM) to demonstrate the validity of the scheme. The two phase elements are implemented on the left and right halves of the SLM and connected by a right-angle prism. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolution of the compact OAM sorter, and the current limit in efficiency can be overcome by replacing with transmissive SLMs and removing the beam splitters. This novel scheme paves the way for the miniaturization and integration of high-resolution OAM sorters.

  6. Compact Microscope Imaging System With Intelligent Controls Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is a diagnostic microscope analysis tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. This compact miniature microscope, which can perform tasks usually reserved for conventional microscopes, has unique advantages in the fields of microscopy, biomedical research, inline process inspection, and space science. Its unique approach integrates a machine vision technique with an instrumentation and control technique that provides intelligence via the use of adaptive neural networks. The CMIS system was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center specifically for interface detection used for colloid hard spheres experiments; biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement, and tracking; and detection of anode and cathode defects for laboratory samples using microscope technology.

  7. Strain controlled cyclic tests on miniaturized specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, R.; Džugan, J.

    2017-02-01

    The paper is dealing with strain controlled cyclic tests using a non-contact strain measurement based on digital image correlation techniques on proportional sizes of conventional specimens. The cyclic behaviour of 34CrNiMo6 high-strength steel was investigated on miniaturized round specimens with diameter of 2mm that were compared with specimens in accordance with ASTM E606 standards. The cycle asymmetry coefficient was R= -1. This application is intended to be used for life time assessment of in service components in future work which enables to carried out a group of mechanical tests from a limited amount of the experimental material. The attention was paid to confirm the suitability of the proposed size miniaturization geometry, testing set up and procedure. The test results obtained enabled to construct Manson-Coffin curves and assess fatigue parameters. The purpose of this study is to present differences between cyclic curves and cyclic parameters which have been evaluated based on conventional and miniaturized specimens.

  8. Stability-Augmentation Devices for Miniature Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, RIchard M.

    2005-01-01

    Non-aerodynamic mechanical devices are under consideration as means to augment the stability of miniature autonomous and remotely controlled aircraft. Such aircraft can be used for diverse purposes, including military reconnaissance, radio communications, and safety-related monitoring of wide areas. The need for stability-augmentation devices arises because adverse meteorological conditions generally affect smaller aircraft more strongly than they affect larger aircraft: Miniature aircraft often become uncontrollable under conditions that would not be considered severe enough to warrant grounding of larger aircraft. The need for the stability-augmentation devices to be non-aerodynamic arises because there is no known way to create controlled aerodynamic forces sufficient to counteract the uncontrollable meteorological forces on miniature aircraft. A stability-augmentation device of the type under consideration includes a mass pod (a counterweight) at the outer end of a telescoping shaft, plus associated equipment to support the operation of the aircraft. The telescoping shaft and mass pod are stowed in the rear of the aircraft. When deployed, they extend below the aircraft. Optionally, an antenna for radio communication can be integrated into the shaft. At the time of writing this article, the deployment of the telescoping shaft and mass pod was characterized as passive and automatic, but information about the deployment mechanism(s) was not available. The feasibility of this stability-augmentation concept was demonstrated in flights of hand-launched prototype aircraft.

  9. Miniature standoff Raman probe for neurosurgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Oliver A. C.; Hutchings, Joanne; Gray, William; Vincent, Rosa Louise; Day, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Removal of intrinsic brain tumors is a delicate process, where a high degree of specificity is required to remove all of the tumor tissue without damaging healthy brain. The accuracy of this process can be greatly enhanced by intraoperative guidance. Optical biopsies using Raman spectroscopy are a minimally invasive and lower-cost alternative to current guidance methods. A miniature Raman probe for performing optical biopsies of human brain tissue is presented. The probe allows sampling inside a conventional stereotactic brain biopsy system: a needle of length 200 mm and inner diameter of 1.8 mm. By employing a miniature stand-off Raman design, the probe removes the need for any additional components to be inserted into the brain. Additionally, the probe achieves a very low internal silica background while maintaining good collection of Raman signal. To illustrate this, the probe is compared with a Raman probe that uses a pair of optical fibers for collection. The miniature stand-off Raman probe is shown to collect a comparable number of Raman scattered photons, but the Raman signal to background ratio is improved by a factor of five at Raman shifts below ˜500 cm-1. The probe's suitability for use on tissue is demonstrated by discriminating between different types of healthy porcine brain tissue.

  10. Miniaturized, High-Speed, Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Kenyon, Steve; Spartana, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A low-cost, miniature x-ray source has been developed that can be modulated in intensity from completely off to full intensity on nanosecond timescales. This modulated x-ray source (MXS) has no filaments and is extremely rugged. The energy level of the MXS is adjustable from 0 to more than 100 keV. It can be used as the core of many new devices, providing the first practical, arbitrarily time-variable source of x-rays. The high-speed switching capability and miniature size make possible many new technologies including x-ray-based communication, compact time-resolved x-ray diffraction, novel x-ray fluorescence instruments, and low- and precise-dose medical x-rays. To make x-rays, the usual method is to accelerate electrons into a target material held at a high potential. When the electrons stop in the target, x-rays are produced with a spectrum that is a function of the target material and the energy to which the electrons are accelerated. Most commonly, the electrons come from a hot filament. In the MXS, the electrons start off as optically driven photoelectrons. The modulation of the x-rays is then tied to the modulation of the light that drives the photoelectron source. Much of the recent development has consisted of creating a photoelectrically-driven electron source that is robust, low in cost, and offers high intensity. For robustness, metal photocathodes were adopted, including aluminum and magnesium. Ultraviolet light from 255- to 350-nm LEDs (light emitting diodes) stimulated the photoemissions from these photocathodes with an efficiency that is maximized at the low-wavelength end (255 nm) to a value of roughly 10(exp -4). The MXS units now have much higher brightness, are much smaller, and are made using a number of commercially available components, making them extremely inexpensive. In the latest MXS design, UV efficiency is addressed by using a high-gain electron multiplier. The photocathode is vapor-deposited onto the input cone of a Burle Magnum

  11. Miniature Magnet for Electron Spin Resonance Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, L. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes commercially available permanent magnets that have been incorporated in a compact and inexpensive structure providing both field sweep and modulation suitable for electron spin resonance at microwave frequencies. (MLH)

  12. Miniature accelerator-driven gamma source concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, R. W.; Chan, K. D.; Wangler, Thomas P.,; Wood R. L.; Carlsten, B. E.; Kirbie, H. C.

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in W-band (-100 GHz) traveling wave tube technology at Los Alarnos may lead to a compact high-power W-band RE source. A conceptual design of a compact 8-MeV electron linac that codd be powered by this source is presented, including electromagnetic structure calculations, proposed rnicrojbbrication and manufacturing methods, supporting calculations to estimate accelerator performance, and gumma production rates based on preliminary target geometries and expected output beam current.

  13. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  14. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  15. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  16. Compact Solar Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juergens, Albert

    1980-01-01

    Describes a compact solar camera built as a one-semester student project. This camera is used for taking pictures of the sun and moon and for direct observation of the image of the sun on a screen. (Author/HM)

  17. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  18. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  19. Compact Information Representations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-02

    proposal aims at developing mathematically rigorous and general- purpose statistical methods based on stable random projections, to achieve compact...faced with very large, inherently high-dimensional, or naturally streaming datasets. This pro- posal aims at developing mathematically rigorous and

  20. Concept study for a compact homodyne astrophysics spectrometer for exoplanets (CHASE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Sona; Webster, Chris; Fischer, Debra; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Nikzad, Shouleh; Vasisht, Gautam; Traub, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    In this concept study, we are targeting to build a new instrument to sequentially observe exoplanet atmospheres and their parent's stellar spectra over a significant time in NUV and FUV. The Compact Homodyne Astrophysics Spectrometer for Exoplanets (CHASE) offers integrated spectra over a wide field-of-view (FOV 40arcsec) in high spectral resolution (R>105) in a miniaturized architecture using no (or a small < 1m) primary mirror. CHASE's wide FOV is compatible with the relaxed pointing requirements of current CubeSats and SmallSats which makes it readily qualifiable for space in a compact format and have the potential to enable major scientific breakthroughs.

  1. Compact beam splitters with deep gratings for miniature photonic integrated circuits: design and implementation aspects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Hui; Klamkin, Jonathan; Nicholes, Steven C; Johansson, Leif A; Bowers, John E; Coldren, Larry A

    2009-09-01

    We present an extensive study of an ultracompact grating-based beam splitter suitable for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) that have stringent density requirements. The 10 microm long beam splitter exhibits equal splitting, low insertion loss, and also provides a high extinction ratio in an integrated coherent balanced receiver. We further present the design strategies for avoiding mode distortion in the beam splitter and discuss optimization of the widths of the detectors to improve insertion loss and extinction ratio of the coherent receiver circuit. In our study, we show that the grating-based beam splitter is a competitive technology having low fabrication complexity for ultracompact PICs.

  2. Miniature loops in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barczynski, K.; Peter, H.; Savage, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Magnetic loops filled with hot plasma are the main building blocks of the solar corona. Usually they have lengths of the order of the barometric scale height in the corona that is 50 Mm. Aims: Previously it has been suggested that miniature versions of hot loops exist. These would have lengths of only 1 Mm barely protruding from the chromosphere and spanning across just one granule in the photosphere. Such short loops are well established at transition region temperatures (0.1 MK), and we investigate if such miniature loops also exist at coronal temperatures (>1 MK). Methods: We used extreme UV (EUV) imaging observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 0.3'' to 0.4''. Together with EUV imaging and magnetogram data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) data from Hinode we investigated the spatial, temporal and thermal evolution of small loop-like structures in the solar corona above a plage region close to an active region and compared this to a moss area within the active region. Results: We find that the size, motion and temporal evolution of the loop-like features are consistent with photospheric motions, suggesting a close connection to the photospheric magnetic field. Aligned magnetograms show that one of their endpoints is rooted at a magnetic concentration. Their thermal structure, as revealed together with the X-ray observations, shows significant differences to moss-like features. Conclusions: Considering different scenarios, these features are most probably miniature versions of hot loops rooted at magnetic concentrations at opposite sides of a granule in small emerging magnetic loops (or flux tubes).

  3. Fabrication of miniaturized electrostatic deflectors using LIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.H.; Khan-Malek, C.; Muray, L.P.

    1997-04-01

    Miniaturized electron beam columns ({open_quotes}microcolumns{close_quotes}) have been demonstrated to be suitable candidates for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), e-beam lithography and other high resolution, low voltage applications. In the present technology, microcolumns consist of {open_quotes}selectively scaled{close_quotes} micro-sized lenses and apertures, fabricated from silicon membranes with e-beam lithography, reactive ion beam etching and other semiconductor thin-film techniques. These miniaturized electron-optical elements provide significant advantages over conventional optics in performance and ease of fabrication. Since lens aberrations scale roughly with size, it is possible to fabricate simple microcolumns with extremely high brightness sources and electrostatic objective lenses, with resolution and beam current comparable to conventional e-beam columns. Moreover since microcolumns typically operate at low voltages (1 KeV), the proximity effects encountered in e-beam lithography become negligible. For high throughput applications, batch fabrication methods may be used to build large parallel arrays of microcolumns. To date, the best reported performance with a 1 keV cold field emission cathode, is 30 nm resolution at a working distance of 2mm in a 3.5mm column. Fabrication of the microcolumn deflector and stigmator, however, have remained beyond the capabilities of conventional machining operations and semiconductor processing technology. This work examines the LIGA process as a superior alternative to fabrication of the deflectors, especially in terms of degree of miniaturization, dimensional control, placement accuracy, run-out, facet smoothness and choice of suitable materials. LIGA is a combination of deep X-ray lithography, electroplating, and injection molding processes which allow the fabrication of microstructures.

  4. Development of Californium-252 Miniature Source Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Notspecified, N. A.

    2007-06-26

    The purpose of this CRADA between ORNL and lsotron, Inc. is to develop miniature californium-252 sources configured for remote handling that can be used in neutron brachytherapy for treatment of cancer. Brachytherapy places the · radioactive source at or near the site of the tumor, using a catheter. The CRADA ran from late 1999 through November 2005. The heart of a Cf-252 source is the radioactive core wire, which is sealed inside a metallic source capsule. Previous Cf-252 medical sources were based on a cermet wire with californium oxide dispersed in palladium, typically >1-mm diameter and <0.1% Cf-252 by weight. Previously, the standard medical source in the U.S. was the Applicator Tube (AT) source. 23-mm long, 2.8-mm diameter, with ~30 {micro}g of Cf-252, and which required manual loading into patients by medical staff. The goal of this work was to develop capabilities and technology to fabricate higher-intensity Cf-252 sources attached to a positioning cable, with overall diameter approaching that of exist ing photon (iridium-192) brachytherapy sources (i.e., ~1.1 mm). This work was successful in developing and demonstrating new technologies and procedures for the fabrication of miniaturized Cf-252 sources. CRADA-designed equipment reduced the wire diameters significantly (patent pending). Short wire segments were cut and successfully welded inside capsules meeting the miniaturization goals. A batch of seven prototype sources was prepared that met fabrication specifications. Although their neutron emissions were not maximized, they were still several times more intense than the previous AT sources. Very robust source-to-cable attachment methods were demonstrated (patent issued). A shipping canister was designed and built to contain the completed source assembly. lsotron designed and built a computer-controlled remote afterloader system to deliver the new sources for treatments.

  5. A miniature tactical Rb frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, T. M.; Dagle, R.; Debley, W.; Dellamano, H.; Hahn, T.; Horste, J.; Lam, L. K.; Magnuson, R.; Mcclelland, T.

    1984-01-01

    Work on an innovative design for miniature rubidium frequency standards has reached the pre-production demonstration stage at Litton Guidance and Control Systems. Pre-production units were built and tested under contract to the Rome Air Development Center of the U.S. Air Force Systems Command. The units, which are designed for use in tactical military applications, feature fast warm-up, low power consumption, and vibration insensitivity. The output stability under vibration is maintained without the need for external shock-mounts. The design objectives and test results are discussed.

  6. Miniature Robotic Submarine for Exploring Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Bruhn, Fredrik; Carsey, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The miniature autonomous submersible explorer (MASE) has been proposed as a means of scientific exploration -- especially, looking for signs of life -- in harsh, relatively inaccessible underwater environments. Basically, the MASE would be a small instrumented robotic submarine (see figure) that could launch itself or could be launched from another vehicle. Examples of environments that might be explored by use of the MASE include subglacial lakes, deep-ocean hydrothermal vents, acidic or alkaline lakes, brine lenses in permafrost, and ocean regions under Antarctic ice shelves.

  7. Endocrine alopecia in a miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Allan, F J; Jones, B R; Purdie, E C

    1995-06-01

    Hypothyroidism and concurrent sex hormone imbalance associated with alopecia was diagnosed in a 5 year-old entire male Miniature Poodle. The dog had a 3-year history of alopecia, seborrhoea and recurrent superficial pyoderma. Abnormal thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test results supported a diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Partial hair regrowth occurred after interstitial cell tumours, which were present in both testicles, were removed by castration. Complete hair regrowth, however, occurred only after thyroid hormone supplementation. This case highlighted difficulties which may be encountered when interpreting serum hormone concentrations and endocrine function tests.

  8. Miniaturized bendable 400 MHz artificial magnetic conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presse, Anthony; Tarot, Anne-Claude

    2016-04-01

    A bendable artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) with a resonant frequency of 400 MHz is proposed. The dimensions of the unit cell are 50 × 50 mm2 or 0.07 × 0.07 λ0. The miniaturization is achieved with closely coupled patches printed on each side of a 0.127-mm-thick dielectric substrate. This last one is stacked on a flexible 3-mm-thick silicone over a ground plane. An AMC prototype is simulated and manufactured. Also, a printed inverted-F antenna is used to highlight the bandwidth of the AMC.

  9. Miniature ruggedized optical correlator for flight testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karins, James P.; Mills, Stuart A.; Szegedi, N. J.; Ryan, James R.; Kelly, Louis G., Jr.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Augustus, Eric P.; Wangler, Richard J.

    1994-03-01

    An electro-optic processor (EOP) incorporating a miniature ruggedized optical correlator (MROC) has been fabricated for use on a remotely piloted vehicle (RPV). The EOP consists of a single-board computer for system control, a MaxVideo 20 card for interfacing to the sensor and performing image processing functions, and an MROC module. The MROC and associated electronics (SLM drive electronics, CCD readout electronics, laser controller, preprocessor, and controller) are configured in a chassis that is placed into an RPV with a visible camera for signal input and a telemetry system for output of the optical processor to the ground.

  10. Surface-micromachined miniature rf switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fangmin; Lai, Zongsheng; Zhu, Ziqiang; Fan, Zhong; Long, Yongfu; Yang, Gen Q.; Ge, Xiaohong; Chen, Siqin; Xie, Jianfang

    2001-09-01

    A surface micromachined miniature switch has been made on silicon substrate using an electroplated gold micro-beam as the cantilevered arm, a chromium-to-gold electrical contact, and electrostatic actuation as the switching mechanism. The switch has an electrical isolation of -30dB in the 'off' state and an insertion loss of 4-7dB form 1 to 10 Ghz with a return loss of -15dB in the 'on' state. The high insertion loss has attributed to generation of parasitic current in low resistivity of the silicon substrate.

  11. A plasma-shielded, miniature Rogowski probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, E.; Furno, I.; Intrator, T.; Hemsing, E.

    2003-12-01

    The design and first results from an electrically isolated and plasma-shielded Rogowski probe, used in the reconnection scaling experiment (RSX), are presented. The probe is designed to withstand extreme thermal shock, plasma corrosion, and be vacuum sanitary, which is accomplished with a machinable boron nitride shell. The novel miniature design, with an inner detecting area of 0.79 cm2, allows accurate position detection of plasma current channels with ≈2 cm radius and to measure local current density profiles. The temporal resolution (<1 μs) is sufficiently high to resolve the dynamic evolution of RSX plasma current channels.

  12. Miniature interferometer terminals for earth surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    A system of miniature radio interferometer terminals was proposed for the measurement of vector baselines with uncertainties ranging from the millimeter to the centimeter level for baseline lengths ranging, respectively, from a few to a few hundred kilometers. Each terminal would have no moving parts, could be packaged in a volume of less than 0.1 cu m, and would operate unattended. These units would receive radio signals from low-power (10 w) transmitters on earth-orbiting satellites. The baselines between units could be determined virtually instantaneously and monitored continuously as long as at least four satellites were visible simultaneously.

  13. A miniature solid propellant rocket motor

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C.; Hagan, M.; Mulligan, E.

    1997-08-01

    A miniature solid-propellant rocket motor has been developed to impart a specific motion to an object deployed in space. This rocket motor effectively eliminated the need for a cold-gas thruster system or mechanical spin-up system. A low-energy igniter, an XMC4397, employing a semiconductor bridge was used to ignite the rocket motor. The rocket motor was ground-tested in a vacuum tank to verify predicted space performance and successfully flown in a Sandia National Laboratories flight vehicle program.

  14. A Miniaturized Class IV Flextensional Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, Andrew; Tweedie, Andrew; Mathieson, Andrew; Lucas, Margaret

    The class V transducer has found popularity in a diverse range of applications such as surgical and underwater projection systems, where high vibration amplitude for relatively low piezoceramic volume is generated. The class IV transducer offers the potential to attain even higher performance per volume than the class V. In this research, a miniaturized class IV power ultrasonic flextensional transducer is proposed. Simulations were performed using PZFlex finite element analysis, and electrical impedance analysis and experimental modal analysis were conducted for validation, where a high correlation between simulation and experiment has been demonstrated.

  15. Miniaturized detection system for handheld PCR assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, James B.; Benett, William J.; Stratton, Paul; Hadley, Dean R.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    2000-12-01

    We have developed and delivered a four chamber, battery powered, handheld instrument referred to as the HANAA which monitors the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process using a TaqMan based fluorescence assay. The detection system differs form standard configurations in two essential ways. First, the size is miniaturized, with a combined cycling and optics plug-in module for a duplex assay begin about the size of a small box of matches. Second, the detection/analysis system is designed to call a positive sample in real time.

  16. A miniature chemiresistor sensor for carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Srinives, Sira; Sarkar, Tapan; Hernandez, Raul; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-05-18

    A carpet-like nanostructure of polyaniline (PANI) nanothin film functionalized with poly(ethyleneimine), PEI, was used as a miniature chemiresistor sensor for detection of CO2 at room temperature. Good sensing performance was observed upon exposing the PEI-PANI device to 50-5000 ppm CO2 in presence of humidity with negligible interference from ammonia, carbon monoxide, methane and nitrogen dioxide. The sensing mechanism relied on acid-base reaction, CO2 dissolution and amine-catalyzed hydration that yielded carbamates and carbonic acid for a subsequent pH detection. The sensing device showed reliable results in detecting an unknown concentration of CO2 in air.

  17. Miniature Loop Heat Pipe (MLHP) Thermal Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2004-01-01

    The MLHP Thermal Management System consists of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with multiple evaporators and condensers, thermal electrical coolers, and deployable radiators coated with variable emittance coatings (VECs). All components are miniaturized. It retains all the performance characteristics of state-of-the-art LHPs and offers additional advantages to enhance the functionality, versatility, and reliability of the system, including flexible locations of instruments and radiators, a single interface temperature for multiple instruments, cooling the on instruments and warming the off instruments simultaneously, improving. start-up success, maintaining a constant LHP operating temperature over a wide range of instrument powers, effecting automatic thermal switching and thermal diode actions, and reducing supplemental heater powers. It can fully achieve low mass, low power and compactness necessary for future small spacecraft. Potential applications of the MLHP thermal technology for future missions include: 1) Magnetospheric Constellation; 2) Solar Sentinels; 3) Mars Science Laboratory; 4) Mars Scouts; 5) Mars Telecom Orbiter; 6) Space Interferometry Mission; 7) Laser Interferometer Space Antenna; 8) Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter; 9) Terrestrial Planet Finder; 10) Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory, and 11) Exploration Missions. The MLHP Thermal Management System combines the operating features of a variable conductance heat pipe, a thermal switch, a thermal diode, and a state-of-the-art LHP into a single integrated thermal system. It offers many advantages over conventional thermal control techniques, and can be a technology enabler for future space missions. Successful flight validation will bring the benefits of MLHP technology to the small satellite arena and will have cross-cutting applications to both Space Science and Earth Science Enterprises.

  18. Miniature Dual-Corona Ionizer for Bipolar Charging of Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chaolong; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    A corona-based bipolar charger has been developed for use in compact, field-portable mobility size spectrometers. The charger employs an aerosol flow cavity exposed to two corona ionizers producing ions of opposite polarity. Each corona ionizer houses two electrodes in parallel needle-mesh configuration and is operated at the same magnitude of corona current. Experimental measurement of detailed charge distribution of near-monodisperse particles of different diameter in the submicrometer size range showed that the charger is capable of producing well-defined, consistent bipolar charge distributions for flow rates up to 1.5 L/min and aerosol concentration up to 10(7) per cm(3). For particles with preexisting charge of +1, 0, and -1, the measured charge distributions agreed well with the theoretical distributions within the range of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The transmission efficiency of the charger was measured to be 80% for 10 nm particles (at 0.3 L/min and 5 μA corona current) and increased with increasing diameter beyond this size. Measurement of uncharged fractions at various combinations of positive and negative corona currents showed the charger performance to be insensitive to fluctuations in corona current. Ion concentrations under positive and negative unipolar operation were estimated to be 8.2 × 10(7) and 3.37 × 10(8) cm(-3) for positive and negative ions; the n·t product value under positive corona operation was independently estimated to be 8.5 × 10(5) s/cm(3). The ion concentration estimates indicate the charger to be capable of "neutralizing" typical atmospheric and industrial aerosols in most measurement applications. The miniature size, simple and robust operation makes the charger suitable for portable mobility spectrometers.

  19. Miniature fiber acoustic sensors using a photonic-crystal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wonuk; Akkaya, Onur C.; Solgaard, Olav; Digonnet, Michel J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper discusses recent developments in fiber acoustic sensors utilizing a miniature Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer fabricated at the tip of a fiber. The FP is made of a high-reflectivity photonic-crystal membrane placed ˜30 μm from the reflective end of a single-mode fiber. When exposed to an acoustic wave the compliant membrane vibrates, and this vibration is detected as a modulation of the optical power reflected by the FP. The interferometer is enclosed in a sensor head designed, with the assistance of an electro-mechanical model, to minimize squeezed-film damping of the thin air gap between the reflectors and obtain a good acoustic response. The sensor head is fabricated out of silica elements and assembled with silicate bonding to minimize thermal expansion and ensure thermal stability. In the first sensor of this type the reflector at the fiber tip is a gold coating. It exhibits an average minimum detectable pressure (MDP) of 33 μPa/√Hz (1-30 kHz), a high thermal stability, and a weak polarization dependence. The second sensor incorporates several improvements, including a larger membrane for increased vibration amplitude, and higher reflectivity mirrors (PC and fiber tip) for increased displacement sensitivity. Its measured response is flat between ˜600 Hz and 20 kHz, with a normalized sensitivity as high as ˜0.17 Pa-1. Between 1 kHz and 30 kHz its average MDP is ˜2.6 μPa/√Hz, the lowest reported value for a fiber acoustic sensor this small. These results demonstrate the promising potential of this class of stable and compact optical sensors for highly sensitive detection in the audible range.

  20. Miniature Dual-Corona Ionizer for Bipolar Charging of Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chaolong; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    A corona-based bipolar charger has been developed for use in compact, field-portable mobility size spectrometers. The charger employs an aerosol flow cavity exposed to two corona ionizers producing ions of opposite polarity. Each corona ionizer houses two electrodes in parallel needle-mesh configuration and is operated at the same magnitude of corona current. Experimental measurement of detailed charge distribution of near-monodisperse particles of different diameter in the submicrometer size range showed that the charger is capable of producing well-defined, consistent bipolar charge distributions for flow rates up to 1.5 L/min and aerosol concentration up to 107 per cm3. For particles with preexisting charge of +1, 0, and −1, the measured charge distributions agreed well with the theoretical distributions within the range of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The transmission efficiency of the charger was measured to be 80% for 10 nm particles (at 0.3 L/min and 5 μA corona current) and increased with increasing diameter beyond this size. Measurement of uncharged fractions at various combinations of positive and negative corona currents showed the charger performance to be insensitive to fluctuations in corona current. Ion concentrations under positive and negative unipolar operation were estimated to be 8.2 × 107 and 3.37 × 108 cm−3 for positive and negative ions; the n·t product value under positive corona operation was independently estimated to be 8.5 × 105 s/cm3. The ion concentration estimates indicate the charger to be capable of “neutralizing” typical atmospheric and industrial aerosols in most measurement applications. The miniature size, simple and robust operation makes the charger suitable for portable mobility spectrometers. PMID:26512158

  1. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  2. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  3. Compact optical isolator.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, F J

    1971-10-01

    This paper describes a compact Faraday rotation isolator using terbium aluminum garnet (TAG) as the Faraday rotation material and small high field permanent magnets made of copper-rare earth alloys. The nominal isolation is 26 dB with a 0.4-dB forward loss. The present isolator can be adjusted to provide effective isolation from 4880 A to 5145 A. Details of the design, fabrication, and performance of the isolator are presented.

  4. Compact Torsatron configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Dominguez, N.; Garcia, L.; Lynch, V. E.; Lyon, J. F.; Cary, J. R.; Hanson, J. D.; Navarro, A. P.

    1987-09-01

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high BETA should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite BETA. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  6. Recent advances in miniaturization of infrared spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, James T.; Johnson, Edward A.; Bodkin, W. Andrew; Stevenson, William A.; White, David A.

    2000-03-01

    In the past ten years, a number of miniature spectrometers covering the visible and near infrared wavelengths out to 2.5 microns wavelength have been developed and are now commercially available. These small but high performance instruments have taken advantage of continuing advances in high sensitivity detectors--both CCD's and diode arrays, improvements in holographic gratings, and the availability of low-loss optical materials both in bulk and fiber form that transmit at these wavelengths and that can readily be formed into monolithic shapes for complex optical structures. More recently, a number of researchers have addressed the more intractable problems of extending these miniaturization innovations to spectrometers capable of operation in the mid-infrared wavelengths from 3 microns to 12 microns and beyond. Key enabling technologies for this effort include the recent development of high D*, uncooled thermopile and micro-bolometer detector arrays, new low- mass, high-efficiency pulsed infrared sources, and the design and fabrication of novel monolithic optical structures and waveguides using high index infrared optical materials. This paper reviews the development of these innovative infrared spectrometers and, in particular, the development of the `wedge' spectrometer by Foster-Miller, Inc. and the MicroSpecTM, a MEMS-based solid state spectrograph, by Ion Optics, Inc.

  7. Miniature bioreactors: current practices and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Betts, Jonathan I; Baganz, Frank

    2006-05-25

    This review focuses on the emerging field of miniature bioreactors (MBRs), and examines the way in which they are used to speed up many areas of bioprocessing. MBRs aim to achieve this acceleration as a result of their inherent high-throughput capability, which results from their ability to perform many cell cultivations in parallel. There are several applications for MBRs, ranging from media development and strain improvement to process optimisation. The potential of MBRs for use in these applications will be explained in detail in this review. MBRs are currently based on several existing bioreactor platforms such as shaken devices, stirred-tank reactors and bubble columns. This review will present the advantages and disadvantages of each design together with an appraisal of prototype and commercialised devices developed for parallel operation. Finally we will discuss how MBRs can be used in conjunction with automated robotic systems and other miniature process units to deliver a fully-integrated, high-throughput (HT) solution for cell cultivation process development.

  8. Modular injection systems for miniature engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Mike

    1992-07-01

    Mission requirements for Kinetic Energy Weapons will require miniaturization of current vehicle propulsion systems for future Space Defence Iniative Programs. A modular injection system (MIS) valve is presented which will decrease cost, size and weight of miniaturized storable bipropellant rocket engines and features two poppet-type propellant valve modules pneumatically linked to a pilot solenoid module. A prototype modular injection valve sized for 100lbf thrust was designed and is being tested to show lower costs, fewer moving parts and a reduction in weight and size. Results show that this valve meets objectives of one-half weight, one-half cost and one-fifth the envelopment of current production valves. Studies indicate that a cruciform configuration of four nominal 100lbf thrust engines can be controlled by four modular injection valve systems in a single housing of less than 1.0 m3. Following further development and correlation of results this concept may be scaled to control four higher thrust engines.

  9. Miniature Linear Actuator for Small Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Cliff E.; Hill, Stuart W.

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the development of a kit of mechanisms intended for use aboard future spacecraft having masses between 10 and 100 kg. The report focuses mostly on two prototypes of one of the mechanisms: a miniature linear actuator based on a shape-memory-alloy (SMA) wire. In this actuator, as in SMA-wire actuators described previously in NASA Tech Briefs, a spring biases a moving part toward one limit of its stroke and is restrained or pulled toward the other limit of the stroke by an SMA wire, which assumes a slightly lesser or greater "remembered" length, depending on whether or not an electric current is applied to the wire to heat it above a transition temperature. Topics addressed in the report include the need to develop mechanisms like these, the general approach to be taken in designing SMA actuators, tests of the two prototypes of the miniature linear actuators, and improvements in the second prototype over the first prototype resulting in reduced mass and increased stroke. The report also presents recommendations for future development, briefly discusses problems of tolerances and working with small parts, states a need for better understanding of behaviors of SMAs, and presents conclusions.

  10. Miniaturization in sample treatment for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L; Ramos, J J; Brinkman, U A Th

    2005-01-01

    The increasing demand for faster, more cost-effective and environmentally friendly analytical methods is a major incentive to improve the classical procedures used for sample treatment in environmental analysis. In most classical procedures, the use of rapid and powerful instrumental techniques for the final separation and detection of the analytes contrasts with the time-consuming and usually manual methods used for sample preparation, which slows down the total analytical process. The efforts made in this field in the past ten years have led to the adaptation of existing methods and the development of new techniques to save time and chemicals, and improve overall performance. One route has been to develop at-line or on-line and, frequently, automated systems. In these approaches, miniaturization has been a key factor in designing integrated analytical systems to provide higher sample throughput and/or unattended operation. Selected examples of novel developments in the field of miniaturized sample preparation for environmental analysis are used to evaluate the merits of the various techniques on the basis of published data on real-life analyses of trace-level organic pollutants. Perspectives and trends are briefly discussed.

  11. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  12. Miniaturization of Chip-Scale Photonic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamek, Steve

    Chip-scale photonic circuits promise to alleviate some fundamental physical barriers encountered in many areas of the life sciences and information technologies. This work investigates routes to miniaturization of chip-scale optical devices. Two new techniques and devices based thereon are introduced for the first time. One technique makes use of integrated metallic mirrors to construct reflectors which are by an order of magnitude smaller than their counterparts. Another technique is based on folding of chip-scale devices to fit long structures into small area on a chip. Although both techniques are demonstrated on some specific examples, the developed toolkit is applicable to a wide range of chip-scale devices including modulators, filters, channel add-drop multiplexers, detectors, and others. The major part of this Thesis focuses on miniaturization of waveguide reflectors and the devices based thereon. Fitting long waveguide Bragg gratings into a small area on a chip is demonstrated based on curved waveguide Bragg gratings; theory and analytical model of such structures is developed. In the second part of the Thesis, integrated metallic mirrors are proposed as reflectors with properties complementary to Bragg gratings - low polarization sensitivity, high reflectivity for different transverse modes, and good manufacturability. The feasibility of the proposed ideas is tested in both simulations and experiments. The demonstrated devices including biochemical sensors, micro-resonators, and inline filters are promising for applications in the life sciences and information technologies.

  13. Congenital urethral stenosis in a male miniature piglet

    PubMed Central

    Pouleur-Larrat, Bénédicte; Maccolini, Edouard; Carmel, Eric Norman; Hélie, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    A 2-month-old male miniature pig showed progressive abdominal pain, pollakiuria, and stranguria that progressed to complete urinary obstruction. Postmortem examination revealed idiopathic urethral stenosis at the level of the recess, of probable congenital origin. Urinary tract malformations should be included in the differential diagnosis of miniature piglets with urinary disorders. PMID:24891635

  14. Miniature and Molecularly Specific Optical Screening Technologies for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    05-1-0363 TITLE: Miniature and Molecularly Specific Optical Screening Technologies for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...and Molecularly Specific Optical Screening Technologies for Breast Cancer Duke University Durham, NC 27705 Nirmala Ramanujam The goal of this...proposal is to harness the power of light to create “miniature and molecularly specific optical technologies” for breast cancer diagnosis and

  15. Miniature spinning as a fiber quality assessment tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miniature spinning has long been used to assess cotton varieties in a timely manner. It has been an accepted fact that the quality of miniature spinning is less than optimal, but that it allows a direct comparison between cottons during varietal studies. Recently, researchers have made processing ...

  16. Towards establishing compact imaging spectrometer standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Allen, David W.; Resmini, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing science is currently undergoing a tremendous expansion in the area of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) technology. Spurred largely by the explosive growth of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), sometimes called Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), or drones, HSI capabilities that once required access to one of only a handful of very specialized and expensive sensor systems are now miniaturized and widely available commercially. Small compact imaging spectrometers (CIS) now on the market offer a number of hyperspectral imaging capabilities in terms of spectral range and sampling. The potential uses of HSI/CIS on UAVs/UASs seem limitless. However, the rapid expansion of unmanned aircraft and small hyperspectral sensor capabilities has created a number of questions related to technological, legal, and operational capabilities. Lightweight sensor systems suitable for UAV platforms are being advertised in the trade literature at an ever-expanding rate with no standardization of system performance specifications or terms of reference. To address this issue, both the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are eveloping draft standards to meet these issues. This paper presents the outline of a combined USGS/NIST cooperative strategy to develop and test a characterization methodology to meet the needs of a new and expanding UAV/CIS/HSI user community.

  17. A combined electron beam/optical lithography process step for the fabrication of sub-half-micron-gate-length MMIC chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, James S.; Bozada, Christopher A.

    1994-02-01

    Advanced radar and communication systems rely heavily on state-of-the-art microelectronics. Systems such as the phased-array radar require many transmit/receive (T/R) modules which are made up of many millimeter wave - microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's). The heart of a MMIC chip is the Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) field-effect transistor (FET). The transistor gate length is the critical feature that determines the operating frequency of the radar system. A smaller gate length will typically result in a higher frequency. In order to make a phased array radar system economically feasible, manufacturers must be capable of producing very large quantities of small-gate-length MMIC chips at a relatively low cost per chip. This requires the processing of a large number of wafers with a large number of chips per wafer, minimum processing time, and a very high chip yield. One of the bottlenecks in the fabrication of MIMIC chips is the transistor gate definition. The definition of sub-half-micron gates for GaAs-based field-effect transistors is generally performed by direct-write electron beam lithography (EBL). Because of the throughput limitations of EBL, the gate-layer fabrication is conventionally divided into two lithographic processes where EBL is used to generate the gate fingers and optical lithography is used to generate the large-area gate pads and interconnects. As a result, two complete sequences of resist application, exposure, development, metallization and lift-off are required for the entire gate structure. We have baselined a hybrid process, referred to as EBOL (electron beam/optical lithography), in which a single application of a multi-level resist is used for both exposures. The entire gate structure, (gate fingers, interconnects and pads), is then formed with a single metallization and lift-off process. The EBOL process thus retains the advantages of the high-resolution E-beam lithography and the high throughput of optical lithography while essentially

  18. A combined electron beam/optical lithography process step for the fabrication of sub-half-micron-gate-length MMIC chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sewell, James S.; Bozada, Christopher A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced radar and communication systems rely heavily on state-of-the-art microelectronics. Systems such as the phased-array radar require many transmit/receive (T/R) modules which are made up of many millimeter wave - microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's). The heart of a MMIC chip is the Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) field-effect transistor (FET). The transistor gate length is the critical feature that determines the operating frequency of the radar system. A smaller gate length will typically result in a higher frequency. In order to make a phased array radar system economically feasible, manufacturers must be capable of producing very large quantities of small-gate-length MMIC chips at a relatively low cost per chip. This requires the processing of a large number of wafers with a large number of chips per wafer, minimum processing time, and a very high chip yield. One of the bottlenecks in the fabrication of MIMIC chips is the transistor gate definition. The definition of sub-half-micron gates for GaAs-based field-effect transistors is generally performed by direct-write electron beam lithography (EBL). Because of the throughput limitations of EBL, the gate-layer fabrication is conventionally divided into two lithographic processes where EBL is used to generate the gate fingers and optical lithography is used to generate the large-area gate pads and interconnects. As a result, two complete sequences of resist application, exposure, development, metallization and lift-off are required for the entire gate structure. We have baselined a hybrid process, referred to as EBOL (electron beam/optical lithography), in which a single application of a multi-level resist is used for both exposures. The entire gate structure, (gate fingers, interconnects and pads), is then formed with a single metallization and lift-off process. The EBOL process thus retains the advantages of the high-resolution E-beam lithography and the high throughput of optical lithography while essentially

  19. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  20. A miniaturized artificial mastoid using a skull simulator.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, S P; Håkansson, B E

    1998-01-01

    A miniaturized artificial mastoid of size and weight that allow calibration and measurement of bone conduction hearing aids in a conventional audiometric soundproof box has been developed. Its level of mechanical impedance corresponds to the standard IEC 373 (1990) within the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz. The miniaturized artificial mastoid consists of three parts: coupler, skull simulator (TU-1000), and an external electrical correction filter. The coupler is a highly damped mass-spring system designed to give the miniaturized artificial mastoid mechanical impedance in accordance with the standard IEC 373 (1990). It was found that the miniaturized artificial mastoid yielded results that are in correspondence with results obtained with the Brüel & Kjaer type 4930 artificial mastoid for frequencies above 450 Hz. Thus, at these frequencies, the miniaturized artificial mastoid can be used for audiometer calibration as well as measurement of bone conduction hearing aids.

  1. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  2. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  3. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  4. Oil shale compaction experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.

    1985-11-01

    Oil shale compaction reduces the void volume available for gas flow in vertical modified in situ (VMIS) retorts. The mechanical forces caused by the weight of the overlying shale can equal 700 kPa near the bottom of commercial retorts. Clear evidence of shale compaction was revealed during postburn investigation of the Rio Blanco retorts at the C-a lease tract in Colorado. Western Research Institute conducted nine laboratory experiments to measure the compaction of Green River oil shale rubble during retorting. The objectives of these experiments were (1) to determine the effects of particle size, (2) to measure the compaction of different shale grades with 12 to 25 percent void volume and (3) to study the effects of heating rate on compaction. The compaction recorded in these experiments can be separated into the compaction that occurred during retorting and the compaction that occurred as the retort cooled down. The leaner oil shale charges compacted about 3 to 4 percent of the bed height at the end of retorting regardless of the void volume or heating rate. The richer shale charges compacted by 6.6 to 22.9 percent of the bed height depending on the shale grade and void volume used. Additional compaction of approximately 1.5 to 4.3 percent of the bed height was measured as the oil shale charges cooled down. Compaction increased with an increase in void volume for oil shale grades greater than 125 l/Mg. The particle size of the oil shale brick and the heating rate did not have a significant effect on the amount of compaction measured. Kerogen decomposition is a major factor in the compaction process. The compaction may be influenced by the bitumen intermediate acting as a lubricant, causing compaction to occur over a narrow temperature range between 315 and 430/sup 0/C. While the majority of the compaction occurs early in the retorting phase, mineral carbonate decomposition may also increase the amount of compaction. 14 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m-1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  6. Miniature Stirling cryocoolers at Thales Cryogenics: qualification results and integration solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, R.; Martin, J.-Y.; Willems, D.; Seguineau, C.; de Jonge, G.; Van Acker, S.; Mullié, J.; Le Bordays, J.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    During the 2015 SPIE-DSS conference, Thales Cryogenics presented new miniature cryocoolers for high operating temperatures. In this paper, an update is given regarding the qualification programme performed on these new products. Integration aspects are discussed, including an in-depth examination of the influence of the dewar cold finger on sizing and performance of the cryocooler. The UP8197 will be placed in the reference frame of the Thales product range of high-reliability linear cryocoolers, while the rotary solution will be considered as the most compact solution in the Thales portfolio. Compatibility of the cryocoolers design with new and existing 1/4" dewar designs is examined, and potential future developments are presented.

  7. Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Multi-Evaporator Miniature Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Nagano, Hosei

    2008-01-01

    Under NASA's New Millennium Program Space Technology 8 Project, four experiments are being developed for future small system applications requiring low mass, low power, and compactness. GSFC is responsible for developing the Thermal Loop experiment, which is an advanced thermal control system consisting of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with multiple evaporators and condensers. The objective is to validate the operation of an MLHP, including reliable start-ups, steady operation, heat load sharing, and tight temperature control over the range of 273K to 308K. An MLHP Breadboard has been built and tested for 1200 hours under the laboratory environment and 500 hours in a thermal vacuum chamber. Results of the TV tests are presented here.

  8. Real-time Sample Analysis using Sampling Probe and Miniature Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Lin, Ziqing; Tian, Ran; Shi, Riyi; Cooks, R. Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A miniature mass spectrometry system with a sampling probe has been developed for real-time analysis of chemicals from sample surfaces. The sampling probe is 1.5m in length and is comprised of one channel for introducing the spray and the other channel for transferring the charged species back to the Mini MS. This system provides a solution to the problem of real-time mass spectrometry analysis of a three-dimensional object in the field and is successful with compounds including those in inks, agrochemicals, explosives, and animal tissues. This system can be implemented in the form of a backpack MS with a sampling probe for forensic analysis or in the form of a compact MS with an intra-surgical probe for tissue analysis. PMID:26237577

  9. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure.

    PubMed

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L S; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P L; Schroer, Anna M; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-18

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m(-1), already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  10. Miniaturized sharp band-pass filter based on complementary electric-LC resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Yalda; Dadashzadeh, Golamreza; Oraizi, Homayoon

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel application of complementary electric-LC (CELC) resonator as a basic element to synthesize miniaturized sharp band-pass filters is introduced. The proposed metamaterial band-pass filter is a three-stage CELC-based device, where two shunt short-circuited stubs are employed in the input and output stages and a series gap is etched in the middle stage. By these means, a high-selectivity prototype band-pass filter with 2 % fractional bandwidth in S band is designed and fabricated. The out-of-band attenuation is better than 40 dB, and the upper and lower transition bands are also quite sharp due to the presence of two transmission zeros (nearly 60 and 30 dB fall in 0.2 GHz at lower and upper edges, respectively). Moreover, the filter is substantially miniaturized with a size of effective region of 1.3 cm × 1 cm at 2.9 GHz, which is quite smaller relative to conventional designs with the same performance. The fabrication and measurement of the proposed filter configuration attest to its expected desirable features. Therefore, the application of CELC resonator is proposed for super-compact sharp band-pass filters.

  11. A self-sustained, complete and miniaturized methanol fuel processor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Jiao, Fengjun; Li, Shulian; Li, Hengqiang; Chen, Guangwen

    2015-08-01

    A self-sustained, complete and miniaturized methanol fuel processor has been developed based on modular integration and microreactor technology. The fuel processor is comprised of one methanol oxidative reformer, one methanol combustor and one two-stage CO preferential oxidation unit. Microchannel heat exchanger is employed to recover heat from hot stream, miniaturize system size and thus achieve high energy utilization efficiency. By optimized thermal management and proper operation parameter control, the fuel processor can start up in 10 min at room temperature without external heating. A self-sustained state is achieved with H2 production rate of 0.99 Nm3 h-1 and extremely low CO content below 25 ppm. This amount of H2 is sufficient to supply a 1 kWe proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The corresponding thermal efficiency of whole processor is higher than 86%. The size and weight of the assembled reactors integrated with microchannel heat exchangers are 1.4 L and 5.3 kg, respectively, demonstrating a very compact construction of the fuel processor.

  12. Optical characterization of a miniaturized large field of view motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Els; Ottevaere, Heidi; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the geometrical and optical characterization of a miniaturized very wide field-of-view (FOV) motion sensor inspired by the working principle of insect facet eyes. The goal of the sensor is to detect movement in the environment and to specify where in the surroundings these changes took place. Based on the measurements of the sensor, certain actions can be taken such as sounding an alarm in security applications or turning on the light in domotic applications. The advantage of miniaturizing these sensors is that they are low-cost, compact and more esthetical compared to current motion detectors. The sensor was designed to have a very large FOV of 125° and an angular resolution of 1° or better. The micro-optics is built up of two stacked polymer plates consisting each out of a five by five lens array. In between there is a plate of absorbing material with a five by five array of baffles to create 25 optically isolated channels that each image part of the total FOV of 125° onto the detector. To geometrically characterize the lens arrays and verify the designed specifications, we made use of a coordinate measuring machine. The optical performance of the designed micro-optical system was analyzed by sending white light beams with different angles of incidence with respect to the sample through the sensor, comparing the position of the light spots visible on the detector and determining optical quality parameters such as MTF and distortion.

  13. Miniature Ring-Shaped Peristaltic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh

    2004-01-01

    An experimental miniature peristaltic pump exploits piezoelectrically excited flexural waves that travel around a ring: A fluid is carried in the containers formed in the valleys between the peaks of the flexural waves, What sets the present pump apart from other pumps that exploit piezoelectrically excited flexural waves is the ring shape, which makes it possible to take advantage of some of the desirable characteristics of previously developed piezoelectric rotary motors. A major advantage of the circular (in contradistinction to a straight-line) wave path is that the flexural waves do not come to a stop and, instead, keep propagating around the ring. Hence, a significant portion of the excitation energy supplied during each cycle is reused during the next cycle, with the result that the pump operates more effectively than it otherwise would.

  14. An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter

    2014-02-18

    A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 × 125 × 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software.

  15. Self-folding miniature elastic electric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Meeker, Laura; Tolley, Michael T.; Wood, Robert J.; Rus, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Printing functional materials represents a considerable impact on the access to manufacturing technology. In this paper we present a methodology and validation of print-and-self-fold miniature electric devices. Polyvinyl chloride laminated sheets based on metalized polyester film show reliable self-folding processes under a heat application, and it configures 3D electric devices. We exemplify this technique by fabricating fundamental electric devices, namely a resistor, capacitor, and inductor. Namely, we show the development of a self-folded stretchable resistor, variable resistor, capacitive strain sensor, and an actuation mechanism consisting of a folded contractible solenoid coil. Because of their pre-defined kinematic design, these devices feature elasticity, making them suitable as sensors and actuators in flexible circuits. Finally, an RLC circuit obtained from the integration of developed devices is demonstrated, in which the coil based actuator is controlled by reading a capacitive strain sensor.

  16. Portable, miniaturized, fibre delivered, multimodal CARS exoscope.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brett; Naji, Majid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Alarcon, Emilio; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter; Anis, Hanan

    2013-07-15

    We demonstrate for the first time, a portable multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope (exoscope) for minimally invasive in-vivo imaging of tissues. This device is based around a micro-electromechanical system scanning mirror and miniaturized optics with light delivery accomplished by a photonic crystal fibre. A single Ti:sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser is used as the light source to produce CARS, two photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation images. The high resolution and distortion-free images obtained from various resolution and bio-samples, particularly in backward direction (epi) successfully demonstrate proof of concept, and pave the path towards future non or minimally-invasive in vivo imaging.

  17. A miniaturized fibrinolytic assay for plasminogen activators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Damron, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a micro-clot lysis assay (MCLA) for evaluating fibrinolytic activity of plasminogen activators (PA). Fibrin clots were formed in wells of microtiter plates. Lysis of the clots by PA, indicated by change in turbidity (optical density, OD), was monitored with a microplate reader at five minutes intervals. Log-log plots of PA dilution versus endpoint, the time at which the OD value was halfway between the maximum and minimum value for each well, were linear over a broad range of PA concentrations (2-200 International units/ml). The MCLA is a modification and miniaturization of well established fibrinolytic methods. The significant practical advantages of the MCLA are that it is a simple, relatively sensitive, non-radioactive, quantitative, kinetic, fibrinolytic micro-technique which can be automated.

  18. Miniature solid-state gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawless, W.N.; Cross, L.E.; Steyert, W.A.

    1985-05-07

    A miniature apparatus for compressing gases is disclosed in which an elastomer disposed between two opposing electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic blocks, or between a single electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic block and a rigid surface, is caused to extrude into or recede from a channel defined adjacent to the elastomer in response to application or removal of an electric field from the blocks. Individual cells of blocks and elastomer are connected to effect a gas compression by peristaltic activation of the individual cells. The apparatus is self-valving in that the first and last cells operate as inlet and outlet valves, respectively. Preferred electrostrictive and piezoelectric ceramic materials are disclosed, and an alternative, non-peristaltic embodiment of the apparatus is described. 9 figs.

  19. Miniature solid-state gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawless, William N.; Cross, Leslie E.; Steyert, William A.

    1985-01-01

    A miniature apparatus for compressing gases is disclosed in which an elastomer disposed between two opposing electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic blocks, or between a single electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic block and a rigid surface, is caused to extrude into or recede from a channel defined adjacent to the elastomer in response to application or removal of an electric field from the blocks. Individual cells of blocks and elastomer are connected to effect a gas compression by peristaltic activation of the individual cells. The apparatus is self-valving in that the first and last cells operate as inlet and outlet valves, respectively. Preferred electrostrictive and piezoelectric ceramic materials are disclosed, and an alternative, non-peristaltic embodiment of the apparatus is described.

  20. Miniature Neutron-Alpha Activation Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar; Holloway, James Paul; He, Zhong; Goldsten, John

    2002-10-01

    We are developing a miniature neutron-alpha activation spectrometer for in-situ analysis of chem-bio samples, including rocks, fines, ices, and drill cores, suitable for a lander or Rover platform for Mars or outer-planet missions. In the neutron-activation mode, penetrating analysis will be performed of the whole sample using a γ spectrometer and in the α-activation mode, the sample surface will be analyzed using Rutherford-backscatter and x-ray spectrometers. Novel in our approach is the development of a switchable radioactive neutron source and a small high-resolution γ detector. The detectors and electronics will benefit from remote unattended operation capabilities resulting from our NEAR XGRS heritage and recent development of a Ge γ detector for MESSENGER. Much of the technology used in this instrument can be adapted to portable or unattended terrestrial applications for detection of explosives, chemical toxins, nuclear weapons, and contraband.

  1. Miniature Trailing Edge Effector for Aerodynamic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae (Inventor); Bieniawski, Stefan R. (Inventor); Kroo, Ilan M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improved miniature trailing edge effectors for aerodynamic control are provided. Three types of devices having aerodynamic housings integrated to the trailing edge of an aerodynamic shape are presented, which vary in details of how the control surface can move. A bucket type device has a control surface which is the back part of a C-shaped member having two arms connected by the back section. The C-shaped section is attached to a housing at the ends of the arms, and is rotatable about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down and neutral states. A flip-up type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down, neutral and brake states. A rotating type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the chord line to provide up, down and neutral states.

  2. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability is disclosed. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three. 6 figs.

  3. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.; Dietrich, Daniel D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three.

  4. Power Electronics for a Miniaturized Arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1997-01-01

    A 0.3 kW Power Processing Unit (PPU) was designed, tested on resistive loads, and then integrated with a miniaturized arcjet. The main goal of the design was to minimize size and mass while maintaining reasonable efficiency. In order to obtain the desired reductions in mass, simple topologies and control methods were considered. The PPU design incorporates a 50 kHz, current-mode-control, pulse-width-modulated (PWM), push-pull topology. An input voltage of 28 +/- 4V was chosen for compatibility with typical unregulated low voltage busses anticipated for smallsats. An efficiency of 0.90 under nominal operating conditions was obtained. The component mass of the PPU was 0.475 kg and could be improved by optimization of the output filter design. The estimated mass for a flight PPU based on this design is less than a kilogram.

  5. Miniaturized attitude control system for nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candini, Gian Paolo; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Santoni, Fabio

    2012-12-01

    A miniaturized attitude control system suitable for nanosatellites, developed using only commercial off-the-shelf components, is described in the paper. It is a complete and independent system to be used on board nanosatellites, allowing automated attitude control. To integrate this system into nanosatellites such as Cubesats its size has been reduced down to a cube of side about 5 cm. The result is a low cost attitude control system built with terrestrial components, integrating three micro magnetotorquers, three micro reaction wheels, three magnetometers and redundant control electronics, capable of performing automatics operations on request from the ground. The system can operate as a real time maneuvering system, executing commands sent from the ground or as a standalone attitude control system receiving the solar array status from a hosting satellite and the satellite ephemeris transmitted from the ground station. The main characteristics of the developed system and test results are depicted in this paper.

  6. An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter

    2014-02-01

    A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 × 125 × 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software.

  7. Miniature reciprocating heat pumps and engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiesen, Jack H. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses a miniature thermodynamic device that can be constructed using standard micro-fabrication techniques. The device can be used to provide cooling, generate power, compress gases, pump fluids and reduce pressure below ambient (operate as a vacuum pump). Embodiments of the invention relating to the production of a cooling effect and the generation of electrical power, change the thermodynamic state of the system by extracting energy from a pressurized fluid. Energy extraction is attained using an expansion process, which is as nearly isentropic as possible for the appropriately chosen fluid. An isentropic expansion occurs when a compressed gas does work to expand, and in the disclosed embodiments, the gas does work by overcoming either an electrostatic or a magnetic force.

  8. A miniaturized pointing mount for Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, C. G.; Howell, T., Jr.; Nicaise, P. D.; Parker, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A Miniaturized Pointing Mount (MPM) for Spacelab missions is defined and simulation results are described. This mount is proposed to complement the Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS). It uses the same mount isolator concept as the Spacelab IPS but is much more efficient and economical for the accommodation of small shuttle payloads. The MPM is built from star tracker assemblies left over from the Apollo Telescope Mount program thereby assuring low cost and development risk. Simulation results indicate a high level of instrument stability can be expected. The short development time of the MPM would permit it to serve as a precursor to the Spacelab IPS for verifying critical new concepts such as the mount isolation and hold down mechanisms.

  9. Miniature linear-to-rotary motion actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokach, Michael R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A miniature hydraulic actuation system capable of converting linear actuator motion to control surface rotary motion has been designed for application to active controls on dynamic wind tunnel models. Due to space constraints and the torque requirements of an oscillating control surface at frequencies up to 50 Hertz, a new actuation system was developed to meet research objectives. This new actuation system was designed and developed to overcome the output torque limitations and fluid loss/sealing difficulties associated with an existing vane type actuator. Static control surface deflections and dynamic control surface oscillations through a given angle are provided by the actuation system. The actuator design has been incorporated into a transonic flutter model with an active trailing edge flap and two active spoilers. The model is scheduled for testing in the LaRC 16 Foot Transonic Dynamics Tunnel during Summer 1993. This paper will discuss the actuation system, its design, development difficulties, test results, and application to aerospace vehicles.

  10. Channel Temperature Model for Microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on SiC and Sapphire MMICs in High Power, High Efficiency SSPAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    2004-01-01

    A key parameter in the design trade-offs made during AlGaN/GaN HEMTs development for microwave power amplifiers is the channel temperature. An accurate determination can, in general, only be found using detailed software; however, a quick estimate is always helpful, as it speeds up the design cycle. This paper gives a simple technique to estimate the channel temperature of a generic microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMT on SiC or Sapphire, while incorporating the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The procedure is validated by comparing its predictions with the experimentally measured temperatures in microwave devices presented in three recently published articles. The model predicts the temperature to within 5 to 10 percent of the true average channel temperature. The calculation strategy is extended to determine device temperature in power combining MMICs for solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs).

  11. An Integrated 520-600 GHz Sub-Harmonic Mixer and Tripler Combination Based on GaAs MMIC Membrane Planar Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B.; Gill, J.; Maestrini, A.; Lee, C.; Lin, R.; Sin, S.; Peralta, A.; Mehdi, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present here the design, development and test of an integrated sub-millimeter front-end featuring a 520-600 GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300 GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional machined as well as silicon micro-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB mixer noise temperature of 2360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. Preliminary results on the silicon micro-machined blocks give a DSB mixer noise temperature of 4860 K and conversion losses of 12.16 dB at 540 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer for both packages is between 30 and 50 mW

  12. An Integrated 520-600 GHz Sub-Harmonic Mixer and Tripler Combination Based on GaAs MMIC Membrane Planar Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B.; Gill, J.; Maestrini, A.; Lee, C.; Lin, R.; Sin, S.; Peralta, A.; Mehdi, I.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the design, development and test of an integrated sub-millimeter front-end featuring a 520-600 GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300 GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional machined as well as silicon micro-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB mixer noise temperature of 2360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. Preliminary results on the silicon micro-machined blocks give a DSB mixer noise temperature of 4860 K and conversion losses of 12.16 dB at 540 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer for both packages is between 30 and 50 mW.

  13. Miniaturized Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Engineering Directorate is developing the Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (AERCam), a low-volume, low-mass free-flying camera system . AERCam project team personnel recently initiated development of a miniaturized version of AERCam known as Mini AERCam. The Mini AERCam target design is a spherical "nanosatellite" free-flyer 7.5 inches in diameter and weighing 1 0 pounds. Mini AERCam is building on the success of the AERCam Sprint STS-87 flight experiment by adding new on-board sensing and processing capabilities while simultaneously reducing volume by 80%. Achieving enhanced capability in a smaller package depends on applying miniaturization technology across virtually all subsystems. Technology innovations being incorporated include micro electromechanical system (MEMS) gyros, "camera-on-a-chip" CMOS imagers, rechargeable xenon gas propulsion system , rechargeable lithium ion battery, custom avionics based on the PowerPC 740 microprocessor, GPS relative navigation, digital radio frequency communications and tracking, micropatch antennas, digital instrumentation, and dense mechanical packaging. The Mini AERCam free-flyer will initially be integrated into an approximate flight-like configuration for demonstration on an airbearing table. A pilot-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop simulation to simulate on-orbit navigation and dynamics will complement the airbearing table demonstration. The Mini AERCam lab demonstration is intended to form the basis for future development of an AERCam flight system that provides beneficial on-orbit views unobtainable from fixed cameras, cameras on robotic manipulators, or cameras carried by EVA crewmembers.

  14. Miniaturization of a SWIR hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Christopher P.; Pfister, William; Even, Detlev; Velasco, Arleen; Yee, Selwyn; Breitwieser, David; Naungayan, Joseph

    2011-05-01

    A new approach for the design and fabrication of a miniaturized SWIR Hyperspectral imager is described. Previously, good results were obtained with a VNIR Hyperspectral imager, by use of light propagation within bonded solid blocks of fused silica. These designs use the Offner design form, providing excellent, low distortion imaging. The same idea is applied to the SWIR Hyperspectral imager here, resulting in a microHSITM SWIR Hyperspectral sensor, capable of operating in the 850-1700 nm wavelength range. The microHSI spectrometer weighs 910 g from slit input to camera output. This spectrometer can accommodate custom foreoptics to adapt to a wide range of fields-of-view (FOV). The current application calls for a 15 degree FOV, and utilizes an InGaAs image sensor with a spatial format of 640 x 25 micron pixels. This results in a slit length of 16 mm, and a foreoptics focal length of 61 mm, operating at F# = 2.8. The resulting IFOV is 417 μrad for this application, and a spectral dispersion of 4.17 nm/pixel. A prototype SWIR microHSI was fabricated, and the blazed diffraction grating was embedded within the optical blocks, resulting in a 72% diffraction efficiency at the wavelength of 1020 nm. This spectrometer design is capable of accommodating slit lengths of up to 25.6 mm, which opens up a wide variety of applications. The microHSI concepts can be extended to other wavelength regions, and a miniaturized LWIR microHSI sensor is in the conceptual design stage.

  15. Miniaturized spectral imager for Aalto-1 nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannila, Rami; Näsilä, Antti; Praks, Jaan; Saari, Heikki; Antila, Jarkko

    2011-11-01

    The Aalto-1 is a 3U-cubesat project coordinated by Aalto University. The satellite, Aalto-1, will be mainly built by students as project assignments and thesis works. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland will develop the main Earth observation payload, a miniaturized spectral imager, for the satellite. It is a novel highly miniaturized tunable filter type spectral imager. Mass of the spectral imager will be less than 400 grams, and dimensions will be approximately 80 mm x 80 mm x 45 mm. The spectral imager is based on a tunable Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) accompanied by an RGB CMOS image sensor. The FPI consists of two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap and it is based either on a microelectromechanical (MEMS) or piezo-actuated structure. The MEMS FPI is a monolithic device, i.e. it is made entirely on one substrate in a batch process, without assembling separate pieces together. The gap is adjusted by moving the upper mirror with electrostatic force. Benefits of the MEMS FPI are low mass and small size. However, large aperture (2-10 mm) MEMS FPIs are currently under development, thus it is not yet known if their performance is adequate. The piezo-actuated FPI uses three piezo-actuators and is controlled in a closed capacitive feedback loop. The drawback of the piezo-actuated FPI is its higher mass. However, it has a large aperture which enables a shorter exposure times. Selection of the FPI type will be done after thorough evaluation. Depending on the selected FPI type, the spectral resolution of the imager will be 5 - 10 nm at full width at half maximum and it will operate in the visible and/or near infrared range.

  16. A miniaturized HTS microwave receiver front-end subsystem for radar and communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yongbo; Guo, Jin; Gao, Changzheng; Li, Chunguang; Li, Hong; Wang, Jia; Cui, Bin; He, Xiaofeng; Li, Chao; Li, Na; Li, Guoqiang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Xueqiang; Meng, Jibao; He, Yusheng

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a miniaturized high performance high temperature superconducting (HTS) microwave receiver front-end subsystem, which uses a mini stirling cryocooler to cool a high selective HTS filter and a low noise amplifier (LNA). The HTS filter was miniaturized by using specially designed compact resonators and fabricating with double-sided YBCO films on LAO substrate which has a relatively high permittivity. The LNA was specially designed to work at cryogenic temperature with noise figure of 0.27 dB at 71 K. The mini cryocooler, which is widely used in infrared detectors, has a smaller size (60 mm × 80 mm × 100 mm) and a lighter weight (340 g) than the stirling cryocoolers commonly used in other HTS filter subsystem. The whole front-end subsystem, including a HTS filter, a LNA, a cryocooler and the vacuum chamber, has a size of only φ120 mm × 175 mm and a weight of only 3.3 kg. The microwave devices inside the subsystem are working at 71.8 K with a consumed cooling power of 0.325 W. The center frequency of this subsystem is 925.2 MHz and the bandwidth is 2.7 MHz (which is a fractional bandwidth of 0.2%), with the gain of 19.75 dB at center frequency and the return loss better than -18.11 dB in the pass band. The stop band rejection is more than 60 dB and the skirt slope is exceeding 120 dB MHz -1. The noise figure of this subsystem is less than 0.8 dB. This front-end subsystem can be used in radars and communication systems conveniently due to it’s compact size and light weight.

  17. Scalable Nonlinear Compact Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debojyoti; Constantinescu, Emil M.; Brown, Jed

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we focus on compact schemes resulting in tridiagonal systems of equations, specifically the fifth-order CRWENO scheme. We propose a scalable implementation of the nonlinear compact schemes by implementing a parallel tridiagonal solver based on the partitioning/substructuring approach. We use an iterative solver for the reduced system of equations; however, we solve this system to machine zero accuracy to ensure that no parallelization errors are introduced. It is possible to achieve machine-zero convergence with few iterations because of the diagonal dominance of the system. The number of iterations is specified a priori instead of a norm-based exit criterion, and collective communications are avoided. The overall algorithm thus involves only point-to-point communication between neighboring processors. Our implementation of the tridiagonal solver differs from and avoids the drawbacks of past efforts in the following ways: it introduces no parallelization-related approximations (multiprocessor solutions are exactly identical to uniprocessor ones), it involves minimal communication, the mathematical complexity is similar to that of the Thomas algorithm on a single processor, and it does not require any communication and computation scheduling.

  18. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  19. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  20. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  1. Compact Infrasonic Windscreen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Shams, Qamar A.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    A compact windscreen has been conceived for a microphone of a type used outdoors to detect atmospheric infrasound from a variety of natural and manmade sources. Wind at the microphone site contaminates received infrasonic signals (defined here as sounds having frequencies <20 Hz), because a microphone cannot distinguish between infrasonic pressures (which propagate at the speed of sound) and convective pressure fluctuations generated by wind turbulence. Hence, success in measurement of outdoor infrasound depends on effective screening of the microphone from the wind. The present compact windscreen is based on a principle: that infrasound at sufficiently large wavelength can penetrate any barrier of practical thickness. Thus, a windscreen having solid, non-porous walls can block convected pressure fluctuations from the wind while transmitting infrasonic acoustic waves. The transmission coefficient depends strongly upon the ratio between the acoustic impedance of the windscreen and that of air. Several materials have been found to have impedance ratios that render them suitable for use in constructing walls that have practical thicknesses and are capable of high transmission of infrasound. These materials (with their impedance ratios in parentheses) are polyurethane foam (222), space shuttle tile material (332), balsa (323), cedar (3,151), and pine (4,713).

  2. Compact Video Microscope Imaging System Implemented in Colloid Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Long description Photographs showing fiber-optic light source, microscope and charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera head connected to camera body, CCD camera body feeding data to image acquisition board in PC, and Cartesian robot controlled via PC board. The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system can scan, find areas of interest in, focus on, and acquire images automatically. Many multiple-cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is feasible only with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control. The software also has a user-friendly interface, which can be used independently of the hardware for further post-experiment analysis. CMIS has been successfully developed in the SML Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center and adapted for use for colloid studies and is available for telescience experiments. The main innovations this year are an improved interface, optimized algorithms, and the ability to control conventional full-sized microscopes in addition to compact microscopes. The CMIS software-hardware interface is being integrated into our SML Analysis package, which will be a robust general-purpose image-processing package that can handle over 100 space and industrial applications.

  3. Reestablishment of radiographic kidney size in Miniature Schnauzer dogs

    PubMed Central

    SOHN, Jungmin; YUN, Sookyung; LEE, Jeosoon; CHANG, Dongwoo; CHOI, Mincheol; YOON, Junghee

    2016-01-01

    Kidney size may be altered in renal diseases, and the detection of kidney size alteration has diagnostic and prognostic values. We hypothesized that radiographic kidney size, the kidney length to the second lumbar vertebra (L2) length ratio, in normal Miniature Schnauzer dogs may be overestimated due to their shorter vertebral length. This study was conducted to evaluate radiographic and ultrasonographic kidney size and L2 length in clinically normal Miniature Schnauzers and other dog breeds to evaluate the effect of vertebral length on radiographic kidney size and to reestablish radiographic kidney size in normal Miniature Schnauzers. Abdominal radiographs and ultrasonograms from 49 Miniature Schnauzers and 54 other breeds without clinical evidence of renal disease and lumbar vertebral abnormality were retrospectively evaluated. Radiographic kidney size, in the Miniature Schnauzer (3.31 ± 0.26) was significantly larger than that in other breeds (2.94 ± 0.27). Relative L2 length, the L2 length to width ratio, in the Miniature Schnauzer (1.11 ± 0.06) was significantly shorter than that in other breeds (1.21 ± 0.09). However, ultrasonographic kidney sizes, kidney length to aorta diameter ratios, were within or very close to normal range both in the Miniature Schnauzer (6.75 ± 0.67) and other breeds (7.16 ± 1.01). Thus, Miniature Schnauzer dogs have breed-specific short vertebrae and consequently a larger radiographic kidney size, which was greater than standard reference in normal adult dogs. Care should be taken when evaluating radiographic kidney size in Miniature Schnauzers to prevent falsely diagnosed renomegaly. PMID:27594274

  4. Development of a Miniature Snapshot Multispectral Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    imaging results. A main motivation behind development of such a compact imager is to be able to detect chemicals used in improvised explosive...devices (IEDs). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fabry-Perot filter, multispectral, SWIR, microlens optics, IED detection 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...or prism, a filter wheel, a diffractive optic lens, a Fabry-Perot (F-P) etalon, or a tunable filter. All of these optical devices are used with a

  5. Miniature telemetry systems arm submunition tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renken, G. W.; Ferguson, D.

    1991-04-01

    The characteristics of compact resilient telemetry systems for advanced submunitions are described with attention given to the architecture of the telemetry module (TM). A high-performance GaAs monolithic microwave integrated-circuit transmitter is critical to the system design, and antenna-impedance mismatch requirements can be addressed by one of two proposed MESFET treatments. The subminiature TM can be used as a measurement instrument for munitions testing because it can withstand launch acceleration and other extreme conditions.

  6. Miniature Two-Axis Joystick Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollow, R.

    1983-01-01

    Novel movable-button-actuated self-centering controller uses optoelectronics to produce X and Y signals for aircraft control. In addition to be extremely compact, device puts our voltages having high signal-to-noise ratio, especially at critical center position where in many controllers this ratio is poorest. Combination of new saddle-shaped button and positive centering gives "feel" and "breakout" met with pilot approval.

  7. A MEMS-based miniature DNA analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.; Gonzalez, C.; Hadley, D.

    1995-04-25

    We detail the design and development of a miniature thermal cycling instrument for performing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that uses microfabricated, silicon-based reaction chambers. The MEMS-based, battery-operated instrument shows significant improvements over commercial thermal cycling instrumentation. Several different biological systems have been amplified and verified with the miniature PCR instrument including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus; both cloned and genomic DNA templates of {beta} globin; and the genetic disease, Cystic Fibrosis from human DNA. The miniaturization of a PCR thermal cycler is the initial module of a fully-integrated portable, low-power, rapid, and highly efficient bioanalytical instrument.

  8. Miniature in vivo robotics and novel robotic surgical platforms.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin C; Buettner, Shelby L; Lehman, Amy C; Farritor, Shane M; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2009-05-01

    Robotic surgical systems, such as the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, California), have revolutionized laparoscopic surgery but are limited by large size, increased costs, and limitations in imaging. Miniature in vivo robots are being developed that are inserted entirely into the peritoneal cavity for laparoscopic and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgical (NOTES) procedures. In the future, miniature camera robots and microrobots should be able to provide a mobile viewing platform. This article discusses the current state of miniature robotics and novel robotic surgical platforms and the development of future robotic technology for general surgery and urology.

  9. A new miniaturized fiber positioning node for LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Gu, Yonggang; Shen, Yuran; Zhai, Chao

    2016-07-01

    To distribute more fiber positioning nodes on the LAMOST focal plate, two steps are proposed to miniaturize the fiber positioning node in this paper. The first step is to miniaturize the mechanical device of the fiber positioning node. The second step is to redesign the entire wireless driving board using smaller and performance-higher devices. As a result, the size of the new miniaturized fiber positioning node has to be reduced by above 40% and the dense of fiber positioning nodes on focal plate increases by 20% at least.

  10. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  11. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  12. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  13. Compact photonic spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact photonic spin filter formed by integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens (focal length of ±f ) into a conventional plano-concave lens (focal length of -f). By choosing the input port of the filter, photons with a desired spin state, such as the right-handed component or the left-handed one, propagate alone its original propagation direction, while the unwanted spin component is quickly diverged after passing through the filter. One application of the filter, sorting the spin-dependent components of vector vortex beams on higher-order Poincaré sphere, is also demonstrated. Our scheme provides a simple method to manipulate light, and thereby enables potential applications for photonic devices.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  16. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  17. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  18. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  19. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  20. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  1. Pneumatically Actuated Miniature Peristaltic Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Feldman, Jason; Svehla, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    Pneumatically actuated miniature peristaltic vacuum pumps have been proposed for incorporation into advanced miniature versions of scientific instruments that depend on vacuum for proper operation. These pumps are expected to be capable of reaching vacuum-side pressures in the torr to millitorr range (from .133 down to .0.13 Pa). Vacuum pumps that operate in this range are often denoted roughing pumps. In comparison with previously available roughing pumps, these pumps are expected to be an order of magnitude less massive and less power-hungry. In addition, they would be extremely robust, and would operate with little or no maintenance and without need for oil or other lubricants. Portable mass spectrometers are typical examples of instruments that could incorporate the proposed pumps. In addition, the proposed pumps could be used as roughing pumps in general laboratory applications in which low pumping rates could be tolerated. The proposed pumps could be designed and fabricated in conventionally machined and micromachined versions. A typical micromachined version (see figure) would include a rigid glass, metal, or plastic substrate and two layers of silicone rubber. The bottom silicone layer would contain shallow pump channels covered by silicone arches that could be pushed down pneumatically to block the channels. The bottom silicone layer would be covered with a thin layer of material with very low gas permeability, and would be bonded to the substrate everywhere except in the channel areas. The top silicone layer would be attached to the bottom silicone layer and would contain pneumatic- actuation channels that would lie crosswise to the pump channels. This version is said to be micromachined because the two silicone layers containing the channels would be fabricated by casting silicone rubber on micromachined silicon molds. The pneumatic-actuation channels would be alternately connected to a compressed gas and (depending on pump design) either to atmospheric

  2. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  3. A 300-nm compact mm-wave linac FEL design

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.

    1995-12-31

    Microfabrication technology offers an alternative method for fabricating precision, miniature-size components suitable for use in accelerator physics and commercial applications. The original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf accelerating structure design, optical and x-ray masks production, deep x-ray lithography (LIGA exposures), and precision structural alignments. In this paper we will present a design study for a compact single pass mm-linac FEL to produce short wavelength radiation. This system will consists of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period. Initial experimental results on a scale model rf gun and microundulator will be presented.

  4. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  5. Progress Toward a Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2009-01-01

    There was an update on the subject of two previous NASA Tech Briefs articles: Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock (NPO-43075), Vol. 32, No. 5 (May 2008), page 63; and Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock (NPO-42919), Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 62. To recapitulate: A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump maintains the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a neon buffer gas. There was progress in the development of the clock, with emphasis on the design, fabrication, pump-down, and bake-out of the vacuum tube (based on established practice in the travelingwave- tube-amplifier industry) and the ability of the tube to retain a vacuum after a year of operation. Other developments include some aspects of the operation of mercury-vapor source (a small appendage oven containing HgO) so as to maintain the optimum low concentration of mercury vapor, and further efforts to miniaturize the vacuum and optical subsystems to fit within a volume of 2 L.

  6. Compact Receiver Front Ends for Submillimeter-Wave Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich T.; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Peralta, Alejandro; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John J.; Gulkis, Samuel; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2012-01-01

    The current generation of submillimeter-wave instruments is relatively mass and power-hungry. The receiver front ends (RFEs) of a submillimeter instrument form the heart of the instrument, and any mass reduction achieved in this subsystem is propagated through the instrument. In the current implementation, the RFE consists of different blocks for the mixer and LO circuits. The motivation for this work is to reduce the mass of the RFE by integrating the mixer and LO circuits in one waveguide block. The mixer and its associated LO chips will all be packaged in a single waveguide package. This will reduce the mass of the RFE and also provide a number of other advantages. By bringing the mixer and LO circuits close together, losses in the waveguide will be reduced. Moreover, the compact nature of the block will allow for better thermal control of the block, which is important in order to reduce gain fluctuations. A single waveguide block with a 600- GHz RFE functionality (based on a subharmonically pumped Schottky diode pair) has been demonstrated. The block is about 3x3x3 cubic centimeters. The block combines the mixer and multiplier chip in a single package. 3D electromagnetic simulations were carried out to design the waveguide circuit around the mixer and multiplier chip. The circuit is optimized to provide maximum output power and maximum bandwidth. An integrated submillimeter front end featuring a 520-600-GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300-GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity was tested. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional metal-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB (double sideband) mixer noise temperature of 2,360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer is between 30 and 50 mW.

  7. Miniature paint-spray gun for recessed areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanasse, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Miniature spray gun regulates paints and other liquids to spray at close range, facilitating spraying of remote or recessed areas. Individual valves for regulating air pressure and paint maximizes atomization for low pressure spraying.

  8. Miniature LIMS System for In Situ Detection of Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Neuland, M. B.; Wurz, P.

    2016-05-01

    The current measurement capabilities of our miniature Laser Ablation Ionization Mass Spectrometer for sensitive and quantitative in situ chemical analyses (element, isotope and molecular) of solids on planetary surfaces will be presented.

  9. Miniature Tractor Pull Helps Teach Mechanical Power Transmission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.

    1996-01-01

    A miniature tractor pull was developed as a high school activity, enabling students to assess a tractor's pulling capabilities and determine subsequent horsepower. The activity takes the textbook concept of horsepower and makes it come alive. (JOW)

  10. An Investigation Into the Performance of a Miniature Diesel Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, P. W.

    1970-01-01

    Reports the procedures and results of a student investigation of the performance of a miniature diesel engine. The experiments include (1) torque measurement, (2) power measurement, and (3) variation of power output with applied load. Bibliography. (LC)

  11. Compaction with Automatic Jog Introduction,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    The compaction algorithm This section defines mathematically the problem of compaction with auto- matk jog introduction, and presents a practical...t(5) of potential cuts of S, and usng their mutability cmndi to constrain the positiokn of modulo in S. The proof that this technique gen - erates a

  12. Optimum contact conditions for miniaturized surface acoustic wave linear motor

    PubMed

    Takasaki; Kurosawa; Higuchi

    2000-03-01

    This paper reports the successful operation of a 70 MHz driving surface acoustic wave (SAW) linear motor with a miniaturized stator transducer. This paper also deals with an investigation into an optimized slider design for the miniaturized SAW linear motor. The performance of three silicon type sliders, with different projection size, was compared. Output forces of the three sliders were measured with change of pre-load. It was found that the slider with smaller projection tended to produce greater output force.

  13. Computer-Aided High Precision Verification Of Miniature Spring Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bow, Sing T.; Wang, Da-hao; Chen, Tsung-sheng; Newell, Darrell E.

    1990-01-01

    A system is proposed for the high precision on-line verification of the minia-ture spring structure, including overall height, diameters of various coils as well as pitches between neighboring coils of the miniature conical springs. High preci-sion measurements without physical contact and short processing time are achieved. Deformations of any kind on the conical springs can be identified even from the worst viewing direction.

  14. Development of a Prototype Miniature Silicon Microgyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Dunzhu; Chen, Shuling; Wang, Shourong

    2009-01-01

    A miniature vacuum-packaged silicon microgyroscope (SMG) with symmetrical and decoupled structure was designed to prevent unintended coupling between drive and sense modes. To ensure high resonant stability and strong disturbance resisting capacity, a self-oscillating closed-loop circuit including an automatic gain control (AGC) loop based on electrostatic force feedback is adopted in drive mode, while, dual-channel decomposition and reconstruction closed loops are applied in sense mode. Moreover, the temperature effect on its zero bias was characterized experimentally and a practical compensation method is given. The testing results demonstrate that the useful signal and quadrature signal will not interact with each other because their phases are decoupled. Under a scale factor condition of 9.6 mV/°/s, in full measurement range of ± 300 deg/s, the zero bias stability reaches 15°/h with worse-case nonlinearity of 400 ppm, and the temperature variation trend of the SMG bias is thus largely eliminated, so that the maximum bias value is reduced to one tenth of the original after compensation from -40 °C to 80 °C. PMID:22408543

  15. Miniaturized Amperometric Solid Electrolyte Carbon Dioxide Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, C. C.; Hammond, J. W.; Ward, B.; Lukco, D.; Lampard, P.; Artale, M.; Androjna, D.

    2006-01-01

    A miniaturized electrochemical carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor using Na3Z r2Si2PO12 (NASICON) as a solid electrolyte has been fabricated and de monstrated. Microfabrication techniques were used for sensor fabricat ion to yield a sensing area around 1.0 mm x 1.1 mm. The NASICON solid electrolyte and the Na2CO3/BaCO3 (1:1.7 molar ratio) auxiliary elect rolyte were deposited by sputtering in between and on top of the inte rdigitated finger-shaped platinum electrodes. This structure maximize s the length of the three-phase boundary (electrode, solid electrolyt e, and auxiliary electrolyte), which is critical for gas sensing. The robust CO2 sensor operated up to 600 C in an amperometric mode and a ttempts were made to optimize sensor operating parameters. Concentrat ions of CO2 between 0.02% and 4% were detected and the overall sensor performance was evaluated. Linear response of sensor current output to ln[CO2 concentration] ranging from 0.02% to 1% was achieved.

  16. Miniaturized technology for DNA typing: cassette PCR.

    PubMed

    Manage, Dammika P; Pilarski, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    With the smaller size, low cost, and rapid testing capabilities, miniaturized lab-on-a-chip devices can change the way medical diagnostics are currently performed in the health-care system. We have demonstrated such a device that is self-contained, simple, disposable, and inexpensive. It is capable of performing DNA amplification on an inexpensive instrument suitable for near point of care settings. This technology will enable on the spot evaluation of patients in the clinic for faster medical decision-making and more informed therapeutic choices. Our device, a gel capillary cassette, termed cassette PCR, contains capillary reaction units each holding a defined primer set, with arrays of capillary reaction units for simultaneously detecting multiple targets. With the exception of the sample to be tested, each capillary reaction unit holds all the reagents needed for PCR in a desiccated form that can be stored at room temperature for up to 3 months and even longer in colder conditions. It relies on capillary forces for sample delivery of microliter volumes through capillaries, hence avoiding the need for pumps or valves. In the assembled cassette, the wax architecture supporting the capillaries melts during the PCR and acts as a vapor barrier as well as segregating capillaries with different primer sets. No other chip sealing techniques are required. Cassette PCR accepts raw samples such as urine, genital swabs, and blood. The cassette is made with off-the-shelf components and contains integrated positive and negative controls.

  17. Antenna Miniaturization Using Koch Snowflake Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minal, Dhama, Nitin

    2010-11-01

    The Wireless Industry is witnessing an volatile emergence today in present era. Also requires the performance over several frequency bands or are reconfigurable as the demands on the system changes. This Paper Presents Rectangular, Koch Fractal Patch Antennas on Single and Multilayer Substrate With and Without Air-Gap using Advanced Design System Simulator (ADS). Fractal Antenna provides Miniaturization over conventional microstrip Antennas. The Antennas Have Been Designed on FR4 substrate with ∈ = 4.2, h = 1.53 and the initial Dimension of the simple Rectangular Patch is 36.08 * 29.6 mm. The experimental Resonant Frequencies of the Fractal Patch with 1st, 2nd & 3rd are observed 2.22, 2.14 & 2.02 GHz Respectively in comparison to Rectangular Patch with 2.43 GHz. The reduced Impedance bandwidth of the Fractal Patch has been improved by designing the patch over multilayer substrate with varying Air-gap between two Substrate. As we increase the air- gap between the two substrate layer further enhancement in impedance bandwidth of Fractal antenna has been Obtained. The Radiation pattern of Koch Fractal antenna is as similar to rectangular patch antenna but with better H-plane Cross Polarization for fractal patch. The all simulated Results are in close Agreement with experimental Results.

  18. Miniaturized Technologies for Enhancement of Motor Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Samira

    2016-01-01

    The idea that the damaged brain can functionally reorganize itself – so when one part fails, there lies the possibility for another to substitute – is an exciting discovery of the twentieth century. We now know that motor circuits once presumed to be hardwired are not, and motor-skill learning, exercise, and even mental rehearsal of motor tasks can turn genes on or off to shape brain architecture, function, and, consequently, behavior. This is a very significant alteration from our previously static view of the brain and has profound implications for the rescue of function after a motor injury. Presentation of the right cues, applied in relevant spatiotemporal geometries, is required to awaken the dormant plastic forces essential for repair. The focus of this review is to highlight some of the recent progress in neural interfaces designed to harness motor plasticity, and the role of miniaturization in development of strategies that engage diverse elements of the neuronal machinery to synergistically facilitate recovery of function after motor damage. PMID:27148525

  19. Computational investigation of miniature trailing edge effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae

    Miniature trailing edge effectors (MiTEs) are small flaps (typically 1% to 5% chord) actuated with deflection angles of up to 90 degrees. The small size, combined with little required power and good control authority, enables the device to be used for high bandwidth control as well as conventional attitude control. However, some of the aerodynamic characteristics of these devices are complex and poorly understood. This research investigated the aerodynamics of MiTEs using incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solvers, INS2D and INS3D. To understand the flow structure and establish a parametric database, two dimensional steady-state computations were performed for MiTEs with various geometries and flow conditions. Time accurate computations were used to resolve the unsteady characteristics including transient response and vortex shedding phenomena. The frequency response was studied to fully identify the dynamics of MiTEs. Three dimensional computations show the change in control effectiveness with respect to the spanwise length of MiTEs as well as the spanwise lift distribution induced by these devices. Based on the CFD results, an approximate vortex panel model was developed for design purposes that reproduces the key characteristics of MiTEs. Two application areas for MiTEs were explored. Flutter suppression was demonstrated by combining a finite element structural model with the vortex panel model. The application of MiTEs to augment maximum lift and improve the post stall behavior of an airfoil was also investigated.

  20. Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.

    PubMed

    Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape.

  1. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-11-25

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m.

  2. A new miniaturized atomic magnetic gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Dong; Perry, Abigail; Krzyzewski, Sean; Geller, Shawn; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2016-05-01

    We report the development of a new miniaturized magnetic gradiometer using alkali atoms. The gradiometer, with the length of 5 cm and cross section diameter of 11 mm, is made of two chip-scale atomic magnetometers placed on a printed optical bench with a defined separation. Both magnetometers work in the spin-exchange relaxation free regime, share the same beam for pumping and probing to reduce the common mode noises from the lasers, and atom temperature is independently controlled by heating beams at telecom wavelength. With 2 cm baseline, 1 mW pumping beam power, and less than 400 mW input heating beam power, we measure a noise level of 15 fT/ Hz1/2 from the subtraction of two magnetometer outputs, which corresponds to a gradient field sensitivity of 7.5 fT/ Hz1/2/cm. The maximum common mode magnetic field noise rejection is up to 1000 within the gradiometer bandwidth. This device is useful in many fields that require both sensitive gradient field information and high common mode noise cancellation. We are also developing a new hybrid system based on this device to improve its dynamical range.

  3. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.

    1997-11-18

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump is described for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a {Delta}T=100 C characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1{times}10{sup {minus}7} to 3{times}10{sup {minus}9} Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2{times}10{sup {minus}7} Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5{degree}, and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof. 2 figs.

  4. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a .DELTA.T=100.degree. C. characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5.times.10.sup.-4 Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1.times.10.sup.-7 to 3.times.10.sup.-9 Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2.times.10.sup.-7 Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5.degree., and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof.

  5. Miniature Videoprobe Hockey Stick Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Lester R.; McMurry, Kyle M.

    1998-06-18

    The present invention is a miniature videoprobe system having a probe termination box, a strong back, and a videoprobe housing. The videoprobe system is able to obtain images from a restricted space at least as small as 0.125 inches while producing a high quality image. The strong back has a hockey stick shape with the probe termination box connecting to the top of the handle-like portion of the hockey stick and the videoprobe housing attaching to the opposite end or nose of the hockey stick shape. The videoprobe housing has a roughly arrowhead shape with two thin steel plates sandwiching the internal components there between. The internal components are connected in series to allow for a minor dimension of the videoprobe housing of 0.110 inches. The internal components include an optics train, a CCD chip, and an electronics package. An electrical signal is transmitted from the electronics package through wiring within an internal channel of the strong back to the probe termination box. The strong back has milled into it multiple internal channels for facilitating the transfer of information, items, or devices between the probe termination box and the videoprobe housing.

  6. Low cost miniature data collection platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development of the RF elements of a telecommunications package involved detailed study and analysis of concepts and techniques followed by laboratory testing and evaluation of designs. The design goals for a complete telecommunications package excluding antenna were a total weight of 300 grams, in a total volume of 400 cu cm with a capability of unattended operation for a period of six months. Of utmost importance is extremely low cost when produced in lots of 10,000. Early in the program it became apparent that a single Miniature Data Collection Platform would not satisfy all users. A single high efficiency system would not satisfy a user who had available a large battery capacity but required a low cost system. Conversely, the low cost system would not satisfy the end user who had a very limited battery capacity. A system design to satisfy these varied requirements was implemented by designing several versions of the system building blocks and then constructing three systems from these building blocks.

  7. Oxygen Transfer Characteristics of Miniaturized Bioreactor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Timothy V; Szita, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001 miniaturized bioreactor systems have made great advances in function and performance. In this article the dissolved oxygen (DO) transfer performance of submilliliter microbioreactors, and 1–10 mL minibioreactors was examined. Microbioreactors have reached kLa values of 460 h-1, and are offering instrumentation and some functionality comparable to production systems, but at high throughput screening volumes. Minibioreactors, aside from one 1,440 h-1 kLa system, have not offered as high rates of DO transfer, but have demonstrated superior integration with automated fluid handling systems. Microbioreactors have been typically limited to studies with E. coli, while minibioreactors have offered greater versatility in this regard. Further, mathematical relationships confirming the applicability of kLa measurements across all scales have been derived, and alternatives to fluorescence lifetime DO sensors have been evaluated. Finally, the influence on reactor performance of oxygen uptake rate (OUR), and the possibility of its real-time measurement have been explored. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 1005–1019. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23280578

  8. Design considerations for miniaturized optical neural probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudmann, Linda; Ordonez, Juan S.; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Neural probes are designed to selectively record from or stimulate nerve cells. In optogenetics it is desirable to build miniaturized and long-term stable optical neural probes, in which the light sources can be directly and chronically implanted into the animals to allow free movement and behavior. Because of the size and the beam shape of the available light sources, it is difficult to target single cells as well as spatially localized networks. We therefore investigated design considerations for packages, which encapsulate the light source hermetically and have integrated hemispherical lens structures that enable to focus the light onto the desired region, by optical simulations. Integration of a biconvex lens into the package lid (diameter = 300 μm, material: silicon carbide) increased the averaged absolute irradiance ηA by 298 % compared to a system without a lens and had a spot size of around 120 μm. Solely integrating a plano-convex lens (same diameter and material) results in an ηA of up to 227 %.

  9. The allometry of brain miniaturization in ants.

    PubMed

    Seid, Marc A; Castillo, Armando; Wcislo, William T

    2011-01-01

    Extensive studies of vertebrates have shown that brain size scales to body size following power law functions. Most animals are substantially smaller than vertebrates, and extremely small animals face significant challenges relating to nervous system design and function, yet little is known about their brain allometry. Within a well-defined monophyletic taxon, Formicidae (ants), we analyzed how brain size scales to body size. An analysis of brain allometry for individuals of a highly polymorphic leaf-cutter ant, Atta colombica, shows that allometric coefficients differ significantly for small (<1.4 mg body mass) versus large individuals (b = 0.6003 and 0.2919, respectively). Interspecifically, allometric patterns differ for small (<0.9 mg body mass) versus large species (n = 70 species). Using mean values for species, the allometric coefficient for smaller species (b = 0.7961) is significantly greater than that for larger ones (b = 0.669). The smallest ants had brains that constitute ∼15% of their body mass, yet their brains were relatively smaller than predicted by an overall allometric coefficient of brain to body size. Our comparative and intraspecific studies show the extent to which nervous systems can be miniaturized in taxa exhibiting behavior that is apparently comparable to that of larger species or individuals.

  10. Miniature Microwave Frequency Standard with Trapped 171Yb+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Casias, Adrian; Serkland, Darwin; Manginell, Ronald; Moorman, Matthew; Prestage, John; Yu, Nan; Kellogg, James; Boschen, Dan; Kosvin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    We report the development of a low-power, miniature 171Yb trapped ion clock at Sandia National Laboratories. The ultimate goal of this development effort is to construct a frequency standard that has a frequency stability comparable to a commercial Cs beam standard, but with 100 to 1000 times smaller size and power consumption. The 171Yb ion has a ground state hyperfine splitting of 12.6 GHz that we use as the ``clock'' transition, and the linewidth of the clock resonance is expected to be less than 10-3 Hz, which leads to a very high-Q clock resonance. An atomic clock using trapped ions is an excellent candidate for miniaturization because ions are well isolated from the environment independent of the size of the trap. We have successfully developed miniature ion-trap vacuum packages with sizes ranging from 1 to 10 cubic centimeters. A few microTorr of He buffer gas is introduced into each of our miniature vacuum packages for collisional cooling of the trapped ions. The vacuum packages are sealed and passively pumped by non-evaporable getters. Using a sealed 3 cm3 ion-trap vacuum package in combination with miniaturized lasers, optics, and electronics, we constructed a miniature clock prototype that demonstrated excellent long-term stability reaching the 10-14 range after a few days of integration.

  11. Miniaturized immunoassays: moving beyond the microplate.

    PubMed

    Verch, Thorsten; Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    After more than 40 years, immunoassays are still the backbone of protein biomarker analysis in clinical diagnostics and drug development. They have come a long way since their inception, incorporating technical developments including monoclonal antibodies, novel labels and lately microfluidics. A number of microfluidic platforms have been tested, such as centrifugational compact disc assays, lab-on-a-chip, arrays and digital electrochemical assays. This review focuses on commercial applications of microfluidic immunoassays with reference to some applied academic examples of interest. Advantages and disadvantages of the platform technologies are discussed in general.

  12. Optical biopsy in high-speed handheld miniaturized multifocal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daekeun; Kim, Ki Hean; Yazdanfar, Siavash; So, Peter T. C.

    2005-03-01

    Histological analysis is the clinical standard for assessing tissue health and the identification of pathological states. Its invasive nature dictates that its use should be minimized without compromising diagnostic accuracy. A promising method for minimally invasive histological analysis is optical biopsy, which provides cross sectional or 3D images without any physical sectionings. Optical biopsy method based on multiphoton excitation microscopy can image cross-sectional image for deep tissue structures with subcellular resolution based on tissue endogenous fluorescence molecules. Despite its suitability for tissue imaging, multiphoton microscopy has not been used for in vivo clinical applications due to both compactness and imaging speed problems. We are developing a high-speed, handheld, miniaturized multifocal multiphoton microscope (H2M4) as an optical biopsy probe to enable optical biopsy with subcellular resolution. We incorporate a compact raster scanning actuator based on optimizing a piezo-driven tip tilt mirror by increasing its bandwidth, and reducing its nonlinearity. For flexible light delivery, we choose a photonic bandgap crystal fiber, which transmits ultrashort pulsed laser delivery with reduced spectral distortion and pulse width broadening. We further demonstrate that this fiber produces minimal spatial mode distortion and can achieve comparable image point spread function (PSF) as free space delivery. We further investigate the applicability of multiphoton microscopy for clinical dermal investigation by imaging ex vivo human skins with both normal and abnormal physiologies. This demonstrates the performance of H2M4 and the possibility of optical biopsy for diagnosing skin diseases.

  13. Development of miniaturized, portable magnetic resonance relaxometry system for point-of-care medical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weng Kung; Chen, Lan; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-09-01

    A novel, compact-sized (19 cm × 16 cm) and portable (500 g) magnetic resonance relaxometry system is designed and developed. We overcame several key engineering barriers so that magnetic resonance technology can be potentially used for disease diagnosis-monitoring in point-of-care settings, directly on biological cells and tissues. The whole system consists of a coin-sized permanent magnet (0.76 T), miniaturized radio-frequency microcoil probe, compact lumped-circuit duplexer, and single board 1-W power amplifier, in which a field programmable gate array -based spectrometer is used for pulse excitation, signal acquisition, and data processing. We show that by measuring the proton transverse relaxation rates from a large pool of natural abundance proton-nuclei presence in less than 1 μL of red blood cells, one can indirectly deduce the relative magnetic susceptibility of the bulk cells within a few minutes of signal acquisition time. Such rapid and sensitive blood screening system can be used to monitor the fluctuation of the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the biological cells (e.g., human blood cells), where unusual state of the bulk magnetic susceptibility is related to a number of diseases.

  14. Compact Microscope Imaging System with Intelligent Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a compact microscope imaging system (CMIS) that includes a miniature video microscope, a Cartesian robot (a computer- controlled three-dimensional translation stage), and machine-vision and control subsystems. The CMIS was built from commercial off-the-shelf instrumentation, computer hardware and software, and custom machine-vision software. The machine-vision and control subsystems include adaptive neural networks that afford a measure of artificial intelligence. The CMIS can perform several automated tasks with accuracy and repeatability . tasks that, heretofore, have required the full attention of human technicians using relatively bulky conventional microscopes. In addition, the automation and control capabilities of the system inherently include a capability for remote control. Unlike human technicians, the CMIS is not at risk of becoming fatigued or distracted: theoretically, it can perform continuously at the level of the best human technicians. In its capabilities for remote control and for relieving human technicians of tedious routine tasks, the CMIS is expected to be especially useful in biomedical research, materials science, inspection of parts on industrial production lines, and space science. The CMIS can automatically focus on and scan a microscope sample, find areas of interest, record the resulting images, and analyze images from multiple samples simultaneously. Automatic focusing is an iterative process: The translation stage is used to move the microscope along its optical axis in a succession of coarse, medium, and fine steps. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the image is computed at each step, and the FFT is analyzed for its spatial-frequency content. The microscope position that results in the greatest dispersal of FFT content toward high spatial frequencies (indicating that the image shows the greatest amount of detail) is deemed to be the focal position.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  16. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  17. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  18. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  19. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  20. Realization of Miniaturized Multi-/Wideband Microwave Front-Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Shamaileh, Khair A.

    The ever-growing demand toward designing microwave front-end components with enhanced access to the radio spectrum (e.g., multi-/wideband functionality) and improved physical features (e.g., miniaturized circuitry, ease and cost of fabrication) is becoming more paramount than ever before. This dissertation proposes new design methodologies, simulations, and experimental validations of passive front-ends (i.e., antennas, couplers, dividers) at microwave frequencies. The presented design concepts optimize both electrical and physical characteristics without degrading the intended performance. The developed designs are essential to the upcoming wireless technologies. The first proposed component is a compact ultra-wideband (UWB) Wilkinson power divider (WPD). The design procedure is accomplished by replacing the uniform transmission lines in each arm of the conventional single-frequency divider with impedance-varying profiles governed by a truncated Fourier series. While such non-uniform transmission lines (NTLs) are obtained through the even-mode analysis, three isolation resistors are optimized in the odd-mode circuit to achieve proper isolation and output ports matching over the frequency range of interest. The proposed design methodology is systematic, and results in single-layered and compact structures. For verification purposes, an equal split WPD is designed, simulated, and measured. The obtained results show that the input and output ports matching as well as the isolation between the output ports are below --10 dB; whereas the transmission parameters vary between --3.2 dB and --5 dB across the 3.1--10.6 GHz band. The designed divider is expected to find applications in UWB antenna diversity, multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) schemes, and antenna arrays feeding networks. The second proposed component is a wideband multi-way Bagley power divider (BPD). Wideband functionality is achieved by replacing the single-frequency matching uniform microstrip lines in

  1. Miniature Laboratory for Detecting Sparse Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Yu, Nan

    2005-01-01

    A miniature laboratory system has been proposed for use in the field to detect sparsely distributed biomolecules. By emphasizing concentration and sorting of specimens prior to detection, the underlying system concept would make it possible to attain high detection sensitivities without the need to develop ever more sensitive biosensors. The original purpose of the proposal is to aid the search for signs of life on a remote planet by enabling the detection of specimens as sparse as a few molecules or microbes in a large amount of soil, dust, rocks, water/ice, or other raw sample material. Some version of the system could prove useful on Earth for remote sensing of biological contamination, including agents of biological warfare. Processing in this system would begin with dissolution of the raw sample material in a sample-separation vessel. The solution in the vessel would contain floating microscopic magnetic beads coated with substances that could engage in chemical reactions with various target functional groups that are parts of target molecules. The chemical reactions would cause the targeted molecules to be captured on the surfaces of the beads. By use of a controlled magnetic field, the beads would be concentrated in a specified location in the vessel. Once the beads were thus concentrated, the rest of the solution would be discarded. This procedure would obviate the filtration steps and thereby also eliminate the filter-clogging difficulties of typical prior sample-concentration schemes. For ferrous dust/soil samples, the dissolution would be done first in a separate vessel before the solution is transferred to the microbead-containing vessel.

  2. Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potember, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    Major advances must occur to protect astronauts from prolonged periods in near-zero gravity and high radiation associated with extended space travel. The dangers of living in space must be thoroughly understood and methods developed to reverse those effects that cannot be avoided. Six of the seven research teams established by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) are studying biomedical factors for prolonged space travel to deliver effective countermeasures. To develop effective countermeasures, each of these teams require identification of and quantitation of complex pharmacological, hormonal, and growth factor compounds (biomarkers) in humans and in experimental animals to develop an in-depth knowledge of the physiological changes associated with space travel. At present, identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol. Many of these procedures are complicated and the identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol and associated laboratory equipment. To carry all of this equipment and chemicals on a spacecraft would require a complex clinical laboratory; and it would occupy much of the astronauts time. What is needed is a small, efficient, broadband medical diagnostic instrument to rapidly identify important biomarkers for human space exploration. The Miniature Time-Of- Flight Mass Spectrometer Project in the Technology Development Team is developing a small, high resolution, time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) to quantitatively measure biomarkers for human space exploration. Virtues of the JHU/APL TOFMS technologies reside in the promise for a small (less than one cubic ft), lightweight (less than 5 kg), low-power (less than 50 watts), rugged device that can be used continuously with advanced signal processing diagnostics. To date, the JHU/APL program has demonstrated mass capability from under 100 to beyond 10,000 atomic mass units (amu) in a very small, low power prototype for biological analysis. Further

  3. FY 2007 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2008-02-20

    Miniature spherical retroreflectors, less than 8 millimeters in diameter, are currently being developed to enhance remote optical detection of nuclear proliferation activities. These retroreflecting spheres resemble small, sand-colored marbles that have the unique optical property of providing a strong reflection directly back to the source (i.e., retroreflecting) when illuminated with a laser. The addition of specific coatings, sensitive to specific chemicals or radioactive decay in the environment, can be applied to the surface of these retroreflectors to provide remote detection of nuclear proliferation activities. The presence of radioactive decay (e.g., alpha, gamma, neutron) or specific chemicals in the environment (e.g., TBP, acids) will change the optical properties of the spheres in a predictable fashion, thus indicating the presence or absence of the target materials. One possible scenario might employ an airborne infrared laser system (e.g., quantum-cascade lasers) to illuminate a section of ground littered with these retroreflective spheres. Depending on the coating and the presence of a specific chemical or radioisotope in the environment, the return signal would be modified in some predictable fashion because of fluorescence, frequency shifting, intensity attenuation/enhancement, or change in polarization. Research conducted in FY 2007 focused on developing novel optical fabrication processes and exploiting the unique material properties of chalcogenide infrared-transparent glass (germanium-arsenic-sulfur-tellurium compounds) to produce highly efficient retroreflectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s approach provides comparable performance to the ideal graded index sphere concept, developed by R. K. Luneburg in 1944 (Luneburg 1944), while greatly reducing the complexity in fabrication by utilizing chalcogenide glass materials and compression-molding processes.

  4. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  5. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  6. Compactness of lateral shearing interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrec, Yann; Taboury, Jean; Sauer, Hervé; Chavel, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    Imaging lateral shearing interferometers are good candidates for airborne or spaceborne Fourier-transform spectral imaging. For such applications, compactness is one key parameter. In this article, we compare the size of four mirror-based interferometers, the Michelson interferometer with roof-top (or corner-cube) mirrors, and the cyclic interferometers with two, three, and four mirrors, focusing more particularly on the last two designs. We give the expression of the translation they induce between the two exiting rays. We then show that the cyclic interferometer with three mirrors can be made quite compact. Nevertheless, the Michelson interferometer is the most compact solution, especially for highly diverging beams.

  7. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  8. Compact Star Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, J. H.

    1996-12-01

    A major goal of RXTE is to investigate the fastest timing signals from compact stars, especially neutron stars and black holes. Signals have now been found from many (at least nine) low mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars in the frequency range (100-1200 Hz) expected for the rotation period of the neutron star after being spun up by accretion over a long period. The kilohertz frequency domain for these sources is simpler than the domain of oscillations below about 50 Hz in that a few isolated features can dominate over white noise. However there are three main features to consider (not all present at the same time) and at least two are quasiperiodic with varying widths and frequencies. Several models are pitting their predictions against the behavior of these features, but the bursters, especially, appear to be revealing the neutron stars's spin. It is consistent with our beliefs that no black hole candidate has shown the same complex of signals, although at least one QPO frequency of a few hundred Hz could be expected in black hole candidates by analogy to the 67 Hz observed from GRS 1915+105. The observations also provide critical tests of the interpretions of the lower frequency (5-50 Hz) QPO and the variable noise seen in both low magnetic field neutron stars and black hole candidates. The kilohertz features have not been seen from the accreting pulsars with relatively high magnetic fields, but high luminosity pulsars (such as last year's transient, GRO J1744-28) reveal signatures of the dynamic interaction between the accretion flow, the magnetic field, and perhaps the neutron star surface in addition to their coherent pulsations.

  9. On-Wafer Measurement of a Multi-Stage MMIC Amplifier with 10 dB of Gain at 475 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Fung, KingMan; Pukala, David M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lai, Richard; Ferreira, Linda

    2012-01-01

    JPL has measured and calibrated a WR2.2 waveguide wafer probe from GGB Industries in order to allow for measurement of circuits in the 325-500 GHz range. Circuits were measured, and one of the circuits exhibited 10 dB of gain at 475 GHz. The MMIC circuit was fabricated at Northrop Grumman Corp. (NGC) as part of a NASA Innovative Partnerships Program, using NGC s 35-nm-gatelength InP HEMT process technology. The chip utilizes three stages of HEMT amplifiers, each having two gate fingers of 10 m in width. The circuits use grounded coplanar waveguide topology on a 50- m-thick substrate with through substrate vias. Broadband matching is achieved with coplanar waveguide transmission lines, on-chip capacitors, and open stubs. When tested with wafer probing, the chip exhibited 10 dB of gain at 475 GHz, with over 9 dB of gain from 445-490 GHz. Low-noise amplifiers in the 400-500 GHz range are useful for astrophysics receivers and earth science remote sensing instruments. In particular, molecular lines in the 400-500 GHz range include the CO 4-3 line at 460 GHz, and the CI fine structure line at 492 GHz. Future astrophysics heterodyne instruments could make use of high-gain, low-noise amplifiers such as the one described here. In addition, earth science remote sensing instruments could also make use of low-noise receivers with MMIC amplifier front ends. Present receiver technology typically employs mixers for frequency down-conversion in the 400-500 GHz band. Commercially available mixers have typical conversion loss in the range of 7-10 dB with noise figure of 1,000 K. A low-noise amplifier placed in front of such a mixer would have 10 dB of gain and lower noise figure, particularly if cooled to low temperature. Future work will involve measuring the noise figure of this amplifier.

  10. Compact Shelving Ten Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Leslie R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses experiences at the Niagara University Library with compact shelving. Highlights include citations to other relevant articles; patron use; selection of vendor; reliability; possible problems; and installation considerations, such as floor-load requirements. (LRW)

  11. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  12. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  13. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  14. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  15. Gradual Changes of Gut Microbiota in Weaned Miniature Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Nie, Yangfan; Chen, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhichang; Fan, Qiwen; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of gut microbiota in mammals during the early life is vital to host health. The miniature piglet has recently been considered as an optimal infant model. However, less is known about the development of gut microbiota in miniature piglets. Here, this study was conducted to explore how the gut microbiota develops in weaned Congjiang miniature piglets. In contrast to the relatively stabilized gut fungal community, gut bacterial community showed a marked drop in alpha diversity, accompanied by significant alterations in taxonomic compositions. The relative abundances of 24 bacterial genera significantly declined, whereas the relative abundances of 7 bacterial genera (Fibrobacter, Collinsella, Roseburia, Prevotella, Dorea, Howardella, and Blautia) significantly increased with the age of weaned piglets. Fungal taxonomic analysis showed that the relative abundances of two genera (Kazachstania and Aureobasidium) significantly decreased, whereas the relative abundances of four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Simplicillium, and Candida) significantly increased as the piglets aged. Kazachstania telluris was the signature species predominated in gut fungal communities of weaned miniature piglets. The functional maturation of the gut bacterial community was characterized by the significantly increased digestive system, glycan biosynthesis and metabolism, and vitamin B biosynthesis as the piglets aged. These findings suggest that marked gut microbial changes in Congjiang miniature piglets may contribute to understand the potential gut microbiota development of weaned infants. PMID:27853453

  16. Mini Mass Spectrometer Integrated with a Miniature Ion Funnel.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanbing; Zhang, Xiaohua; Xu, Hualei; Zheng, Yongchang; Yuan, Tao; Xu, Wei

    2017-03-14

    Previously, a continuous atmospheric pressure interfaced miniature mass spectrometer was developed in our lab. The continuous atmospheric pressure interface improves system robustness, stability, and scan speed, but it also results in limited ion transfer efficiency and reduced mass resolution. To solve these problems, a miniature ion funnel was designed and integrated into the miniature mass spectrometer for the first time. Besides ion transfer efficiency, dimension and power consumption of the ion funnel also need to be considered throughout the design process. After a systematic optimization, the designed miniature ion funnel could increase ion transfer efficiency by more than 10 times, while lowering the background pressure of ion trap by ∼2 times. As a result, sensitivity and mass resolution of the second generation miniature mass spectrometer were improved by 20 times and ∼2 times, respectively, while maintaining its high scan speed and stability. A sensitive and robust mini-MS, capable of coupling with ambient ionization sources would meet the needs of many on-site chemical analysis applications, such as in food, drug, and agricultural administrations, forensic science, homeland security, and etc.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of a miniaturized Deep Brain Stimulation electrode lead.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B; McNeill, Peter M; Allison, Rachel K; Bibari, Olivier; Williams, Chris E; McDermott, Hugh J

    2015-01-01

    The effect of miniaturizing the electrode lead for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy was investigated in this work. A direct comparison was made between a miniature lead (0.65 mm diameter) and a lead of standard size (1.3 mm). Acute in vivo implantation in two cat brains was performed to evaluate surgical trauma and confirm capacity to target thalamic nuclei. Insertion into a homogeneous gel model of neural tissue was used to compare insertion forces while visualizing the process. The standard size cannula, used first to guide lead insertion, required substantially higher insertion force compared with the miniature version and produced a significantly larger region of tissue disruption. The characteristic hemorrhage and edema extended 119-352 μm from the implanted track surface of the miniature lead and cannula, while these extended 311-571 μm for the standard size lead and cannula. A miniature DBS implant can reduce the extent of trauma and could potentially help improve neural function preservation after functional neurosurgery.

  18. TF-4020A: TFL's new compact military rubidium standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltsufin, E.; Stern, A.

    1992-06-01

    A military rubidium frequency standard model TF-4020A is described and analyzed. It is a compact (volume less than 500 cc) military rubidium standard and meets MIL-E-5400 (airborne electronic equipment) class 2 (-55 C to +71 C, 70,000 ft). The physics package shown is extremely small (87 cc) and comprises lamp and cavity subassembly and a twofold magnetic field. The oscillator is a miniature oven controlled crystal oscillator with a SC (Stress Compensated) cut crystal for a low vibration susceptibility. The main effort during the design process was concentrated on the design of reliable circuits: general reliability, stability and low susceptibility to external and internal influences like temperature, vibration and electromagnetic interference (EMI). Key features of the unit are: compact design; extremely small physics package (87 cc) with a special rugged design to withstand strong vibration; high stability over the wide operating temperature range of -55 C to +71 C; low susceptibility to EMI; low sensitivity to external DC and AC magnetic field; excellent short term stability of 7 x 10(exp -12)/square root of tau for tau greater than 0.1 s and less than 300 s; excellent long term stability of 1 x 10(exp -11) per month; and versatility to adopt versions without size increase.

  19. Compaction with automatic jog introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, F. M.

    1985-10-01

    A novel polynomial-time algorithm for compacting a VLSI layout is presented. Compared to previous algorithms, the algorithm promises to produce higher quality output while reducing the need for designer intervention. The performance gain is realized by converting wires into constraints on the positions of the active devices. These constraints can be solved by graph-theoretic techniques to yield optimal positions for chip components. A single-layer router is then used to restore the wires to the layout, using as many as jogs as necessary. An automated compaction procedure is an effective tool for cutting production costs of a VLSI circuit at low cost to the designer, because the yield of fabricated chips is strongly dependent on the total circuit area. Sect 1 is an introduction. Sect 2 states the definitions and theoretical results that underlie the new compaction method. Sect 3 shows how the circuit layout is converted to a data structure appropriate for compaction, and Sect 4 details the body of the compaction algorithm. Sect 5 covers several improvements to the algorithm that should make it run considerably faster. Sect 6 comments on the algorithms of results, and a discussion of the practical value of the compaction algorithm.

  20. Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) for In-Situ Planetary Mineralogy: Laboratory and Field Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Gorp, Byron; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Green, Robert O.; Rodriguez, Jose I.; Blaney, Diana; Wilson, Daniel W.; Sellar, R. Glenn; Richardson, Brandon S.

    2012-01-01

    The Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a miniature telescope and spectrometer system intended for mapping terrain mineralogy over distances from 1.5 m to infinity with spatial sampling of 1.35 mrad over a 33 deg field, and spectral sampling of 10 nm in the 600-2500 nm range. The core of the system has been designed for operation in a Martian environment, but can also be used in a terrestrial environment when placed inside a vacuum vessel. We report the laboratory and field calibration data that include spatial and spectral calibration, and demonstrate the use of the system.

  1. Compact piezoelectric micromotor with a single bulk lead zirconate titanate stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Lan, Hua; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I.-Ming

    2013-04-01

    The advance of micro/nanotechnology promotes the development of micromotors in recent years. In this article, a compact piezoelectric ultrasonic micromotor with a single bulk lead zirconate titanate stator is proposed. A traveling wave is generated by superposition of bending modes with 90° phase difference excited by d15 inverse piezoelectric effects. The operating principle simplifies the system structure significantly, and provides a miniaturization solution. A research prototype with the size of 0.75× 0.75×1.55 mm is developed. It can produce start-up torque of 0.27μNmand maximum speed of 2760 r/min at 14RMS.

  2. Compact beam expander based on planar structure to avoid inner focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, Jyh Rou; Wei, An Chi

    2016-10-01

    Based on the planar optical theory, compact beam expanders are proposed to miniaturize the dimension of an optical system. Both simulated and experimental results have demonstrated the designate functions of the proposed beam expanders. Such planar beam expanders (PBEs) consist of both parabolic mirrors which locate on the both sides of one substrate. The calculated results have showed that those PBEs, possessing thinner volume compared with the conventional beam expanders, are achromatic and aberration-free. To verify the optical performance of the designed PBEs, two of them were individually fabricated using the diamond grinding technique. The measured results have shown that the designate functions of the fabricated PBE have been achieved.

  3. Miniature vibration isolation system for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenon, Dan; Boyd, Jim; Buchele, Paul; Self, Rick; Davis, Torey; Hintz, Timothy L.; Jacobs, Jack H.

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant interest in, and move towards using highly sensitive, precision payloads on space vehicles. In order to perform tasks such as communicating at extremely high data rates between satellites using laser cross-links, or searching for new planets in distant solar systems using sparse aperture optical elements, a satellite bus and its payload must remain relatively motionless. The ability to hold a precision payload steady is complicated by disturbances from reaction wheels, control moment gyroscopes, solar array drives, stepper motors, and other devices. Because every satellite is essentially unique in its construction, isolating or damping unwanted vibrations usually requires a robust system over a wide bandwidth. The disadvantage of these systems is that they typically are not retrofittable and not tunable to changes in payload size or inertias. Previous work, funded by AFRL, DARPA, BMDO and others, developed technology building blocks that provide new methods to control vibrations of spacecraft. The technology of smart materials enables an unprecedented level of integration of sensors, actuators, and structures; this integration provides the opportunity for new structural designs that can adaptively influence their surrounding environment. To date, several demonstrations have been conducted to mature these technologies. Making use of recent advances in smart materials, microelectronics, Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors, and Multi-Functional Structures (MFS), the Air Force Research Laboratory along with its partner DARPA, have initiated an aggressive program to develop a Miniature Vibration Isolation System (MVIS) (patent pending) for space applications. The MVIS program is a systems-level demonstration of the application of advanced smart materials and structures technology that will enable programmable and retrofittable vibration control of spacecraft precision payloads. The current effort has been awarded

  4. Two SMA-Actuated Miniature Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Cliff E.

    2005-01-01

    The figures depict two miniature mechanisms actuated by strips made of shape-memory alloy (SMA). A typical SMA is a nickel-titanium alloy known by the trade name "Flexinol" or "Nitinol." In preparation for a typical application, a suitably sized and shaped piece of an SMA is deformed by a predetermined amount at the lower of two operating temperatures, then mounted in a mechanism. When stroking of the mechanism in one direction is desired, the piece of SMA is heated above a transition temperature to make it return to the "remembered" undeformed state. When stroking of the mechanism in the opposite direction is desired, the SMA is cooled below the transition temperature to make it return to the deformed state. Also, the SMA alloy chosen for a specific application is one that has a transition temperature somewhat above the ambient temperature, so that stroking in one direction or the opposite direction can be achieved by heating the SMA, or refraining from heating the SMA, respectively, above the transition temperature. In the present mechanisms as in typical other SMA mechanisms, the heating is effected by electric currents applied via electrical contacts at the ends of the SMA strips. The purpose served by the mechanism of Figure 1 is to lock or release a flexible latch attachment. In preparation for use in this mechanism, two initially straight SMA strips are deformed into curved springs that, when mounted in the mechanism at ambient temperature, clamp the knob at the lower end of the flexible latch attachment. When heated above their transition temperature by an electric current, the SMA strips return to their original straight configuration, thereby releasing the knob. This mechanism is redundant in the sense that as long as at least one of the two SMA strips straightens when commanded to do so, the knob is released. The mechanism of Figure 2 is suited to any of a variety of applications in which there are requirements for a small mechanism that affords

  5. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  6. Totally implantable total artificial heart and ventricular assist device with multipurpose miniature electromechanical energy system.

    PubMed

    Takatani, S; Orime, Y; Tasai, K; Ohara, Y; Naito, K; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Damm, G; Glueck, J; Ling, J

    1994-01-01

    A multipurpose miniature electromechanical energy system has been developed to yield a compact, efficient, durable, and biocompatible total artificial heart (TAH) and ventricular assist device (VAD). Associated controller-driver electronics were recently miniaturized and converted into hybrid circuits. The hybrid controller consists of a microprocessor and controller, motor driver, Hall sensor, and commutation circuit hybrids. The sizing study demonstrated that all these components can be incorporated in the pumping unit of the TAH and VAD, particularly in the centerpiece of the TAH and the motor housing of the VAD. Both TAH and VAD pumping units will start when their power line is connected to either the internal power pack or the external battery unit. As a redundant driving and diagnostic port, an emergency port was newly added and will be placed in subcutaneous location. In case of system failure, the skin will be cut down, and an external motor drive or a pneumatic driver will be connected to this port to run the TAH. This will minimize the circulatory arrest time. Overall efficiency of the TAH without the transcutaneous energy transmission system was 14-18% to deliver pump outputs of 4-9 L/min against the right and left afterload pressures of 25 and 100 mm Hg. The internal power requirement ranged from 6 to 13 W. The rechargeable batteries such as NiCd or NiMH with 1 AH capacity can run the TAH for 30-45 min. The external power requirement, when TETS efficiency of 75% was assumed, ranged from 8 to 18 W. The accelerated endurance test in the 42 degrees C saline bath demonstrated stable performance over 4 months. Long-term endurance and chronic animal studies will continue toward a system with 5 years durability by the year 2000.

  7. A family for miniature, easily reconfigurable particle sensors for space plasma measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, M.; Barabash, S.

    2016-12-01

    Over the last 15 years the Swedish Institute of Space Physics developed a line of miniaturized ion mass analyzers for space plasma studies with masses of 400-600 g and highly compact and dense design to minimize the volume. The sensors cover an energy range from few eV up to 15 keV and reach an angular coverage up to hemispherical and mass resolution up to 7, depending on application. The experience with this line of sensors demonstrates that a sensor mass of 400-600 g is a limit in the trade-off between scientifically valuable performance and the sensor mass. The Solar Wind Monitor (SWIM), part of the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) on board of the Indian Chandrayaan-1 mission to the Moon, was the first sensor in the line. A number of instruments derived from SWIM were built, each using the same basic architecture but adapted for the needs of the corresponding mission: the Miniature Ion Precipitation Analyzer (MIPA) on the European Space Agency's BepiColombo mission to Mercury, the Detector for Ions at Mars (DIM) for the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission and the Yinghuo Plasma Package Ion sensor (YPPi) for the Chinese Yinghuo-1 spacecraft (both to Mars), the Prisma Ion Mass Analyzer (PRIMA) for the Swedish PRISMA spacecraft to Earth orbit, the eXtra Small Analyzer of Neutrals (XASN) for the Russian Luna-Glob lander, and the Laboratory Ion Scattering Analyzer (LISA) used for laboratory studies. We review architecture, design, performance, and fields of application of the instruments in this family and give and outlook in future developments.

  8. Miniature metastable ionization detectors for exobiology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Metastable Ionization Detector (MID) is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the thermal conductivity detectors used on previous flight instruments. The miniature MID provides scientists with a much smaller and highly sensitive detector for flight gas chromatographs. A miniature MID featuring an unconventional triaxial electrode configuration was developed and used routinely in the laboratory. Although much smaller and lighter than the commercial MID, its performance characteristics parallel those of the traditional design. The detector is compatible with the modulated voltage circuitry, also developed here, and thus can perform over an expanded response range of more than 7 orders magnitude. A micro volume version of a miniature MID, with an internal volume of less than 8 microliter, was recently designed is now being tested. The micro volume MID uses carrier gas flow rates of approx. 2cc/min thus eliminating the need for makeup gas when capillary columns are used.

  9. Miniaturization design and implementation of magnetic field coupled RFID antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tiling

    2013-03-01

    The development of internet of things has brought new opportunities and challenges to the application of RFID tags. Moreover, the Miniaturization application trend of tags at present has become the mainstream of development. In this paper, the double-layer design is to reduce the size of HF antenna, and the magnetic null point of magnetic reconnection region between the RLC resonant circuit and the reader provides sufficient energy to the miniaturization of antenna. The calculated and experimental results show that the miniaturization of HF antennas can meet the reading and writing requirement of the international standard ISO/IEC14443 standard. The results of this paper may make a positive contribution to the applications of RFID technology.

  10. Miniature Blimps for Surveillance and Collection of Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Miniature blimps are under development as robots for use in exploring the thick, cold, nitrogen atmosphere of Saturn's moon, Titan. Similar blimps can also be used for surveillance and collection of biochemical samples in buildings, caves, subways, and other, similar structures on Earth. The widely perceived need for means to thwart attacks on buildings and to mitigate the effects of such attacks has prompted consideration of the use of robots. Relative to rover-type (wheeled) robots that have been considered for such uses, miniature blimps offer the advantage of ability to move through the air in any direction and, hence, to perform tasks that are difficult or impossible for wheeled robots, including climbing stairs and looking through windows. In addition, miniature blimps are expected to have greater range and to cost less, relative to wheeled robots.

  11. Efficiency Enhancement of Pico-cell Base Station Power Amplifier MMIC in Gallium Nitride HFET Technology Using the Doherty technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seneviratne, Sashieka

    With the growth of smart phones, the demand for more broadband, data centric technologies are being driven higher. As mobile operators worldwide plan and deploy 4th generation (4G) networks such as LTE to support the relentless growth in mobile data demand, the need for strategically positioned pico-sized cellular base stations known as 'pico-cells' are gaining traction. In addition to having to design a transceiver in a much compact footprint, pico-cells must still face the technical challenges presented by the new 4G systems, such as reduced power consumptions and linear amplification of the signals. The RF power amplifier (PA) that amplifies the output signals of 4G pico-cell systems face challenges to minimize size, achieve high average efficiencies and broader bandwidths while maintaining linearity and operating at higher frequencies. 4G standards as LTE use non-constant envelope modulation techniques with high peak to average ratios. Power amplifiers implemented in such applications are forced to operate at a backed off region from saturation. Therefore, in order to reduce power consumption, a design of a high efficiency PA that can maintain the efficiency for a wider range of radio frequency signals is required. The primary focus of this thesis is to enhance the efficiency of a compact RF amplifier suitable for a 4G pico-cell base station. For this aim, an integrated two way Doherty amplifier design in a compact 10mm x 11.5mm2 monolithic microwave integrated circuit using GaN device technology is presented. Using non-linear GaN HFETs models, the design achieves high effi-ciencies of over 50% at both back-off and peak power regions without compromising on the stringent linearity requirements of 4G LTE standards. This demonstrates a 17% increase in power added efficiency at 6 dB back off from peak power compared to conventional Class AB amplifier performance. Performance optimization techniques to select between high efficiency and high linearity operation are

  12. Analysis of nonlinear elastic behavior in miniature pneumatic artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Erica G.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are well known for their excellent actuator characteristics, including high specific work, specific power, and power density. Recent research has focused on miniaturizing this pneumatic actuator technology in order to develop PAMs for use in small-scale mechanical systems, such as those found in robotic or aerospace applications. The first step in implementing these miniature PAMs was to design and characterize the actuator. To that end, this study presents the manufacturing process, experimental characterization, and analytical modeling of PAMs with millimeter-scale diameters. A fabrication method was developed to consistently produce low-cost, high performance, miniature PAMs using commercially available materials. The quasi-static behavior of these PAMs was determined through experimentation on a single actuator with an active length of 39.16 mm (1.54 in) and a diameter of 4.13 mm (0.1625 in). Testing revealed the PAM’s full evolution of force with displacement for operating pressures ranging from 207 to 552 kPa (30-80 psi in 10 psi increments), as well as the blocked force and free contraction at each pressure. Three key nonlinear phenomena were observed: nonlinear PAM stiffness, hysteresis of the force versus displacement response for a given pressure, and a pressure deadband. To address the analysis of the nonlinear response of these miniature PAMs, a nonlinear stress versus strain model, a hysteresis model, and a pressure bias are introduced into a previously developed force balance analysis. Parameters of these nonlinear model refinements are identified from the measured force versus displacement data. This improved nonlinear force balance model is shown to capture the full actuation behavior of the miniature PAMs at each operating pressure and reconstruct miniature PAM response with much more accuracy than previously possible.

  13. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David A.

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  14. Compact intracloud discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David Adam

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackbeard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackbeard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackbeard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackbeard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground-based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events are produced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDs, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground- based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDs. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDs were recorded from three

  15. Natural examples of Valdivia compact spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenda, Ondrej F. K.

    2008-04-01

    We collect examples of Valdivia compact spaces, their continuous images and associated classes of Banach spaces which appear naturally in various branches of mathematics. We focus on topological constructions generating Valdivia compact spaces, linearly ordered compact spaces, compact groups, L1 spaces, Banach lattices and noncommutative L1 spaces.

  16. On-chip Hot Spot Remediation with Miniaturized Thermoelectric Coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Avram; Wang, Peng

    2009-08-01

    The rapid emergence of nanoelectronics, with the consequent rise in transistor density and switching speed, has led to a steep increase in chip heat flux and growing concern over the emergence of on-chip "hot spots" in microprocessors, along with such high flux regions in power electronic chips and LED's. Miniaturized thermoelectric coolers (μ-TEC's) are a most promising cooling technique for the remediation of such hot spots. This paper presents a comprehensive review of recent advances in novel applications of superlattice, mini-contact, and silicon-based miniaturized thermoelectric coolers in reducing the severity of on-chip hot spots.

  17. Mechanical, Electrical, and Environmental Evaluation of Nano-Miniature Connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, J.W.

    2001-07-30

    Because of their small size (0.025-inch spacing), nano-miniature connectors have been chosen for JTA telemetry applications. At the time they were chosen, extensive testing had not been done to determine the mechanical, electrical, and environmental characteristics of these connectors at the levels required for use by weapon systems. Since nano-miniature connectors use some unique plating and wire crimping processes not used in most design agency connectors, it was decided that these properties should be tested thoroughly. This report describes the results of that testing.

  18. Miniaturization of a magnetically levitated axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W; Olsen, Don B; Joyce, Lyle D; Day, Steven W

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces a unique miniaturization process of a magnetically levitated axial flow blood pump from a functional prototype to a pump suitable for animal trials. Through COMSOL three-dimensional finite element analysis and experimental verification, the hybrid magnetic bearings of the pump have been miniaturized, the axial spacing between magnetic components has been reduced, and excess material in mechanical components of the pump was reduced. Experimental results show that the pump performance was virtually unchanged and the smaller size resulted in the successful acute pump implantation in calves.

  19. Applications of SPICE for modeling miniaturized biomedical sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundt, C. W.; Nagle, H. T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for a miniaturized signal conditioning system for biopotential and ion-selective electrode arrays. The system consists of three main components: sensors, interconnections, and signal conditioning chip. The model for this system is based on SPICE. Transmission-line based equivalent circuits are used to represent the sensors, lumped resistance-capacitance circuits describe the interconnections, and a model for the signal conditioning chip is extracted from its layout. A system for measurements of biopotentials and ionic activities can be miniaturized and optimized for cardiovascular applications based on the development of an integrated SPICE system model of its electrochemical, interconnection, and electronic components.

  20. Miniaturized gas ionization sensors using carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Modi, Ashish; Koratkar, Nikhil; Lass, Eric; Wei, Bingqing; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2003-07-10

    Gas sensors operate by a variety of fundamentally different mechanisms. Ionization sensors work by fingerprinting the ionization characteristics of distinct gases, but they are limited by their huge, bulky architecture, high power consumption and risky high-voltage operation. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of ionization microsensors featuring the electrical breakdown of a range of gases and gas mixtures at carbon nanotube tips. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate very high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering breakdown voltages several-fold in comparison to traditional electrodes, and thereby enabling compact, battery-powered and safe operation of such sensors. The sensors show good sensitivity and selectivity, and are unaffected by extraneous factors such as temperature, humidity, and gas flow. As such, the devices offer several practical advantages over previously reported nanotube sensor systems. The simple, low-cost, sensors described here could be deployed for a variety of applications, such as environmental monitoring, sensing in chemical processing plants, and gas detection for counter-terrorism.