Science.gov

Sample records for compact nuclear simulator

  1. Nuclear Physics for Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.

    2009-05-04

    A brief overview is given of the different lines of research developed under the INFN project 'Compact Stellar Objects and Dense Hadronic Matter' (acronym CT51). The emphasis of the project is on the structure of Neutron Stars (NS) and related objects. Starting from crust, the different Nuclear Physics problems are described which are encountered going inside a NS down to its inner core. The theoretical challenges and the observational inputs are discussed in some detail.

  2. COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-06-01

    COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

  3. 4π FOV compact Compton camera for nuclear material investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    A compact Compton camera with a 4π field of view (FOV) was manufactured using the design parameters optimized with the effective choice of gamma-ray interaction order determined from a Monte Carlo simulation. The camera consisted of six CsI(Na) planar scintillators with a pixelized structure that was coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) consisting of multiple anodes connected to custom-made circuits. The size of the scintillator and each pixel was 4.4×4.4×0.5 and 0.2×0.2×0.5 cm, respectively. The total size of each detection module was only 5×5×6 cm and the distance between the detector modules was approximately 10 cm to maximize the camera performance, as calculated by the simulation. Therefore, the camera is quite portable for examining nuclear materials in areas, such as harbors or nuclear power plants. The non-uniformity of the multi-anode PMTs was corrected using a novel readout circuit. Amplitude information of the signals from the electronics attached to the scintillator-coupled multi-anode PMTs was collected using a data acquisition board (cDAQ-9178), and the timing information was sent to a FPGA (SPARTAN3E). The FPGA picked the rising edges of the timing signals, and compared the edges of the signals from six detection modules to select the coincident signal from a Compton pair only. The output of the FPGA triggered the DAQ board to send the effective Compton events to a computer. The Compton image was reconstructed, and the performance of the 4π FOV Compact camera was examined.

  4. Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  5. Nuclear fuel particles and method of making nuclear fuel compacts therefrom

    DOEpatents

    DeVelasco, Rubin I.; Adams, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for making nuclear fuel compacts exhibiting low heavy metal contamination and fewer defective coatings following compact fabrication from a mixture of hardenable binder, such as petroleum pitch, and nuclear fuel particles having multiple layer fission-product-retentive coatings, with the dense outermost layer of the fission-product-retentive coating being surrounded by a protective overcoating, e.g., pyrocarbon having a density between about 1 and 1.3 g/cm.sup.3. Such particles can be pre-compacted in molds under relatively high pressures and then combined with a fluid binder which is ultimately carbonized to produce carbonaceous nuclear fuel compacts having relatively high fuel loadings.

  6. NET23/STING Promotes Chromatin Compaction from the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I.; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture. PMID:25386906

  7. NET23/STING promotes chromatin compaction from the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Malik, Poonam; Zuleger, Nikolaj; de las Heras, Jose I; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture.

  8. Supernovae, compact stars and nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1989-08-25

    We briefly review the current understanding of supernova. We investigate the implications of rapid rotation corresponding to the frequency of the new pulsar reported in the supernovae remnant SN1987A. It places very stringent conditions on the equation of state if the star is assumed to be bound by gravity alone. We find that the central energy density of the star must be greater than 12 times that of nuclear density to be stable against the most optimistic estimate of general relativistic instabilities. This is too high for the matter to plausibly consist of individual hadrons. We conclude that the newly discovered pulsar, if its half-millisecond signals are attributable to rotation, cannot be a neutron star. We show that it can be a strange quark star, and that the entire family of strange stars can sustain high rotation under appropriate conditions. We discuss the conversion of a neutron star to strange star, the possible existence of a crust of heavy ions held in suspension by centrifugal and electric forces, the cooling and other features. 39 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Kid-mediated chromosome compaction ensures proper nuclear envelope formation.

    PubMed

    Ohsugi, Miho; Adachi, Kenjiro; Horai, Reiko; Kakuta, Shigeru; Sudo, Katsuko; Kotaki, Hayato; Tokai-Nishizumi, Noriko; Sagara, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2008-03-07

    Toward the end of mitosis, neighboring chromosomes gather closely to form a compact cluster. This is important for reassembling the nuclear envelope around the entire chromosome mass but not individual chromosomes. By analyzing mice and cultured cells lacking the expression of chromokinesin Kid/kinesin-10, we show that Kid localizes to the boundaries of anaphase and telophase chromosomes and contributes to the shortening of the anaphase chromosome mass along the spindle axis. Loss of Kid-mediated anaphase chromosome compaction often causes the formation of multinucleated cells, specifically at oocyte meiosis II and the first couple of mitoses leading to embryonic death. In contrast, neither male meiosis nor somatic mitosis after the morula-stage is affected by Kid deficiency. These data suggest that Kid-mediated anaphase/telophase chromosome compaction prevents formation of multinucleated cells. This protection is especially important during the very early stages of development, when the embryonic cells are rich in ooplasm.

  10. 2nd Iberian Nuclear Astrophysics Meeting on Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Garcia, M. Angeles; Pons, Jose; Albertus, C.

    2012-02-01

    ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Dr M Ángeles Pérez-García (Área Física Teórica-Universidad de Salamanca & IUFFYM) Dr J A Miralles (Universidad de Alicante) Dr J Pons (Universidad de Alicante) Dr C Albertus (Área Física Nuclear-Universidad de Salamanca & IUFFYM) Dr F Atrio (Área Física Teórica-Universidad de Salamanca & IUFFYM) PREFACE The second Iberian Nuclear Astrophysics meeting was held at the University of Salamanca, Spain on 22-23 September 2011. This volume contains most of the presentations delivered at this international workshop. This meeting was the second in the series following the previous I Encuentro Ibérico de Compstar, held at the University of Coimbra, Portugal in 2010. The main purpose of this meeting was to strengthen the scientific collaboration between the participants of the Iberian and the rest of the southern European branches of the European Nuclear Astrophysics network, formerly, COMPSTAR. This ESF (European Science Foundation) supported network has been crucial in helping to make a broader audience for the the most interesting and relevant research lines being developed currently in Nuclear Astrophysics, especially related to the physics of neutron stars. It is indeed important to emphasize the need for a collaborative approach to the rest of the scientific communities so that we can reach possible new members in this interdisciplinary area and as outreach for the general public. The program of the meeting was tailored to theoretical descriptions of the physics of neutron stars although some input from experimental observers and other condensed matter and optics areas of interest was also included. The main scientific topics included: Magnetic fields in compact stars Nuclear structure and in-medium effects in nuclear interaction Equation of state: from nuclear matter to quarks Importance of crust in the evolution of neutron stars Computational simulations of collapsing dense objects Observational phenomenology In particular, leading

  11. Compact Gamma-Beam Source for Nuclear Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    A compact gamma-beam source dedicated to the development of the nuclear security technologies by use of the nuclear resonance fluorescence is described. Besides, such source is a very promising tool for novel technologies of the express cargoes inspection to prevent nuclear terrorism. Gamma-beam with the quanta energies from 0.3MeV to 7.2MeV is generated in the Compton scattering of the "green" laser photons on the electron beam with energies from 90MeV to 430MeV. The characteristic property of the proposed gammabeam source is a narrow spectrum (less than 1%) at high average gamma-yield (of 1013γ/s) due to special operation mode.

  12. Diffusion Welding of Compact Heat Exchangers for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Denis Clark; Ron Mizia; Dr. Michael V. Glazoff; Mr. Michael W. Patterson

    2012-06-01

    The next-­-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is designed to be a flexible source of energy, producing various mixes of electrical energy and process heat (for example, for hydrogen generation) on demand. Compact heat exchangers provide an attractive way to move energy from the helium primary reactor coolant to process heat uses. For process heat efficiency, reactor outlet temperatures of 750-­-900°C are desirable. There are minor but deleterious components in the primary coolant; the number of alloys that can handle this environment is small. The present work concentrates on Alloys 800H and 617.

  13. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  14. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  15. Measurements of elastic moduli of pharmaceutical compacts: a new methodology using double compaction on a compaction simulator.

    PubMed

    Mazel, Vincent; Busignies, Virginie; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    The elastic properties of pharmaceutical powders play an important role during the compaction process. The elastic behavior can be represented by Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (v). However, during the compaction, the density of the powder bed changes and the moduli must be determined as a function of the porosity. This study proposes a new methodology to determine E and v as a function of the porosity using double compaction in an instrumented compaction simulator. Precompression is used to form the compact, and the elastic properties are measured during the beginning of the main compaction. By measuring the axial and radial pressure and the powder bed thickness, E and v can be determined as a function of the porosity. Two excipients were studied, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and anhydrous calcium phosphate (aCP). The values of E measured are comparable to those obtained using the classical three-point bending test. Poisson's ratio was found to be close to 0.24 for aCP with only small variations with the porosity, and to increase with a decreasing porosity for MCC (0.23-0.38). The classical approximation of a value of 0.3 for ν of pharmaceutical powders should therefore be taken with caution.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of granular compaction: The single granule case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Castillo, Francisco X.; Anwar, Jamshed; Heyes, David M.

    2003-03-01

    We have carried out nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the compaction of a single three-dimensional granule composed of over 1000 Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. The granule was contained within an orthorhombic box with repulsive walls and deformed by a vertically moving top wall. The compaction cycle adopted was intended to mimic the procedure employed in industrial tabletting processes, by compressing the granule during the downward movement of the top wall (compaction) followed by an upward movement of the top wall (decompaction). We have explored the effects of different compression rates on the deformation, microstructure, and the final integrity of the granule. Although the simulations are formally atomistic, we believe a mesoscopic significance can be attached to the results that makes them relevant to the larger scale compaction involved in industrially relevant processes. The cluster representation of the granule allows for significant deformation during the process, and the simulations reproduce a number of well-known effects found in the pharmaceutical tabletting and other literature. Rapid compaction resulted in an essentially elastic response and even break up of the formed tablet during the decompaction stage, an effect known as lamination. Slower compaction speeds, which enabled greater internal rearrangement of the LJ particles through plastic deformation, produced a more structurally uniform tablet at the end of the cycle. For the faster compaction speed the top wall moved away faster than the compacted material could recover, giving rise to misleadingly low values of the apparent elastic response of the material as measured by the force from the material on the top wall. We believe this could be an important issue when interpreting experimental data. These simulations were able to capture the transition between the fast and slow compaction rate regimes and reveal some rudiments of the lamination problem that plagues the industrial

  17. Compaction of Lunar Regolith Simulants under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, P.; Walter, U.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of experiments conducted on a series of parabolic flights to determine the compaction of lunar regolith samples under the influence of reduced gravity. The two regolith simulants, JSC-1A and NU-LHT-2M, showed decreased compaction in lower gravity. On average the sample volumes expanded up to 108 % under Martian and 114 % under lunar gravity, whereas the expansion of NU-LHT-2M was generally stronger than that of JSC-1A.

  18. A compact inflow control device for simulating flight fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homyak, L.; Mcardle, J. G.; Heidelberg, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Inflow control device (ICD's) of various shapes and sizes have been used to simulate inflight fan tone noise during ground static tests. A small, simple inexpensive ICD design was optimized from previous design and fabrication techniques. This compact two-fan-diameter ICD exhibits satisfactory acoustic performance characteristics without causing noise attenuation or redirection. In addition, it generates no important new noise sources. Design and construction details of the compact ICD are discussed and acoustic performance test results are presented.

  19. Mechanical compaction of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M. ); Thompson, T.W.; VanBuskirk, R.G.; Patti, N.C. )

    1991-06-01

    The investigation described in this report acquired experimental information about how materials simulating transuranic (TRU) waste compact under axial compressive stress, and used these data to define a model for use in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room analyses. The first step was to determine compaction curves for various simultant materials characteristic of TRU waste. Stress-volume compaction curves for various combinations of these materials were than derived to represent the combustible, metallic, and sludge waste categories. Prediction of compaction response in this manner is considered essential for the WIPP program because of the difficulties inherent in working with real (radioactive) waste. Next, full-sized 55-gallon drums of simulated combustible, metallic, and sludge waste were axially compacted. These results provided data that can be directly applied to room consolidation and data for comparison with the predictions obtained in Part 1 of the investigation. Compaction curves, which represent the combustible, metallic, and sludge waste categories, were determined, and a curve for the averaged waste inventory of the entire repository was derived. 9 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Nuclear gamma rays from compact objects. [nuclear interactions around neutron stars and black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Higdon, J. C.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Accreting compact objects may be important gamma ray line sources and may explain recent observations of celestial gamma-ray line emission from a transient source in the direction of the galactic anti-center, from the galactic center, and possibly from the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The identification of the lines from the transient source requires a strong redshift. Such a redshift permits the identification of these lines with the most intense nuclear emission lines expected in nature, positron annihilation, and neutron capture on hydrogen and iron. Their production as a result of nuclear interactions in accreting gas around a neutron star is proposed. The gamma-ray line emission from the galactic center and possibly Centaurus A appears to have a surprisingly high luminosity, amounting to perhaps as much as 10% of the total luminosity of these sources. Such high gamma-ray line emission efficiencies could result from nuclear interactions in accreting gas around a massive black hole.

  1. Special nuclear material simulation device

    DOEpatents

    Leckey, John H.; DeMint, Amy; Gooch, Jack; Hawk, Todd; Pickett, Chris A.; Blessinger, Chris; York, Robbie L.

    2014-08-12

    An apparatus for simulating special nuclear material is provided. The apparatus typically contains a small quantity of special nuclear material (SNM) in a configuration that simulates a much larger quantity of SNM. Generally the apparatus includes a spherical shell that is formed from an alloy containing a small quantity of highly enriched uranium. Also typically provided is a core of depleted uranium. A spacer, typically aluminum, may be used to separate the depleted uranium from the shell of uranium alloy. A cladding, typically made of titanium, is provided to seal the source. Methods are provided to simulate SNM for testing radiation monitoring portals. Typically the methods use at least one primary SNM spectral line and exclude at least one secondary SNM spectral line.

  2. Flavor Symmetry and Topology Change in Nuclear Symmetry Energy for Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Rho, Mannque

    2013-03-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy figures crucially in the structure of asymmetric nuclei and, more importantly, in the equation of state (EoS) of compact stars. At present it is almost totally unknown, both experimentally and theoretically, in the density regime appropriate for the interior of neutron stars. Basing on a strong-coupled structure of dense baryonic matter encoded in the skyrmion crystal approach with a topology change and resorting to the notion of generalized hidden local symmetry in hadronic interactions, we address a variety of hitherto unexplored issues of nuclear interactions associated with the symmetry energy, i.e., kaon condensation and hyperons, possible topology change in dense matter, nuclear tensor forces, conformal symmetry, chiral symmetry, etc., in the EoS of dense compact-star matter. One of the surprising results coming from HLS structure that is distinct from what is given by standard phenomenological approaches is that at high density, baryonic matter is driven by renormalization group flow to the "dilaton-limit fixed point" constrained by "mended symmetries". We further propose how to formulate kaon condensation and hyperons in compact-star matter in a framework anchored on a single effective Lagrangian by treating hyperons as the Callan-Klebanov kaon-skyrmion bound states simulated on crystal lattice. This formulation suggests that hyperons can figure in the stellar matter — if at all — when or after kaons condense, in contrast to the standard phenomenological approaches where the hyperons appear as the first strangeness degree of freedom in matter, thereby suppressing or delaying kaon condensation. In our simplified description of the stellar structure in terms of symmetry energies, which is compatible with that of the 1.97 solar mass star, kaon condensation plays a role of "doorway state" to strange quark matter.

  3. Compact toroidal plasmas: simulations and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Harned, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Realistic FRC equilibria are calculated and their stability to the n = 1 tilting mode is studied. Excluding kinetic effects, configurations ranging from elliptical to racetrack are unstable. Particle simulations of FRCs show that particle loss on open field lines can cause sufficient plasma rotation to drive the n = 2 rotational instability. The allowed frequencies of the shear Alfven wave are calculated for use in heating of spheromaks. An expanded spheromak is introduced and its stability properties are studied. Transport calculations of CTs are described. A power balance model shows that many features of gun generated CT plasmas can be explained by the dominance of impurity radiation. It is shown how the Taylor relaxation theory, applied to gun generated CT plasmas, leads to the possibility of steady state current drive. Lastly, applications of accelerated CTs are considered.

  4. Non Nuclear NTR Environmental Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2006-01-20

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today's best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Current planning calls for such a simulator to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the coming year, and it is anticipated that it will be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of fuel element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the NTR simulator with regard to reproducing the fuel degradation patterns previously observed during the NERVA testing.

  5. Non Nuclear NTR Environmental Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, William J.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today's best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Current planning calls for such a simulator to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the coming year, and it is anticipated that it will be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of fuel element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the NTR simulator with regard to reproducing the fuel degradation patterns previously observed during the NERVA testing.

  6. Non-Nuclear Testing of Compact Reactor Technologies at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, J. Boise; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Safe, reliable, compact, autonomous, long-life fission systems have numerous potential applications, both terrestrially and in space. Technologies and facilities developed in support of these systems could be useful to a variety of concepts. At moderate power levels, fission systems can be designed to operate for decades without the need for refueling. In addition, fast neutron damage to cladding and structural materials can be maintained at an acceptable level. Nuclear design codes have advanced to the stage where high confidence in the behavior and performance of a system can be achieved prior to initial testing. To help ensure reactor affordability, an optimal strategy must be devised for development and qualification. That strategy typically involves a combination of non-nuclear and nuclear testing. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for concepts in which nuclear operating characteristics are well understood and nuclear effects such as burnup and radiation damage are not likely to be significant. To be mass efficient, a SFPS must operate at higher coolant temperatures and use different types of power conversion than typical terrestrial reactors. The primary reason is the difficulty in rejecting excess heat to space. Although many options exist, NASA s current reference SFPS uses a fast spectrum, pumped-NaK cooled reactor coupled to a Stirling power conversion subsystem. The reference system uses technology with significant terrestrial heritage while still providing excellent performance. In addition, technologies from the SFPS system could be applicable to compact terrestrial systems. Recent non-nuclear testing at NASA s Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) has helped assess the viability of the reference SFPS and evaluate methods for system integration. In July, 2011 an Annular Linear Induction Pump (ALIP) provided by Idaho National Laboratory was tested at the EFF-TF to assess performance and verify suitability for use in a10 kWe technology

  7. Time-dependent simulations of a Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.; Bateman, G.

    1988-05-01

    Detailed simulations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak are carried out using a 1-1/2-D transport code. The calculations include time-varying densities, fields, and plasma shape. It is shown that ignition can be achieved in this device if somewhat better than L-mode energy confinement time scaling is possible. We also conclude that the performance of such a compact, short-pulse device can depend greatly on how the plasma is evolved to its flat-top parameters. Furthermore, in cases such as the ones discussed here, where there is not a great deal of ignition margin and the electron density is held constant, ignition ends if the helium ash is not removed. In general, control of the deuterium--tritium density is equivalent to burn control. 48 refs., 15 figs.

  8. ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Carazo, V; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Guse, S; Harris, J R; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Paul, A C; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Schmidt, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sitaraman, S; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2009-06-11

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve {approx}10 MV/m gradients for 10s of nanoseconds pulses and to {approx}100 MV/m gradients for {approx}1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We detail the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  9. ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.-J.; Falabella, S.; Guethlein, G.; Harris, J. R.; Hawkins, S.; Holmes, C.; Nelson, S.; Paul, A. C.; Poole, B.; Sanders, D.; Sitaraman, S.; Sullivan, J.; Wang, L.; Watson, J.; Carazo, V.; Guse, S.; Pearson, D.; Schmidt, R.

    2009-12-02

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve approx10 MV/m gradients for 10 s of nanoseconds pulses and approx100 MV/m gradients for approx1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We describe the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  10. Ultra-Compact Accelerator Technologies for Application in Nuclear Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampayan, S.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.-J.; Carazo, V.; Falabella, S.; Guethlein, G.; Guse, S.; Harris, J. R.; Hawkins, S.; Holmes, C.; Krogh, M.; Nelson, S.; Paul, A. C.; Pearson, D.; Poole, B.; Schmidt, R.; Sanders, D.; Selenes, K.; Sitaraman, S.; Sullivan, J.; Wang, L.; Watson, J.

    2009-12-01

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve ˜10 MV/m gradients for 10 s of nanoseconds pulses and ˜100 MV/m gradients for ˜1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We describe the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  11. Numerical simulation of compact intracloud discharge and generated electromagnetic pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2015-06-01

    Using the concept of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche, numerical simulation of compact intracloud discharge as a generator of powerful natural electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) in the HF-UHF range was conducted. We evaluated the numbers of electrons initiating the avalanche, with which the calculated EMP characteristics are consistent with measured ones. The discharge capable of generating EMPs produces runaway electrons in numbers close to those in the source of terrestrial γ-flashes (TGF) registered in the nearest space, which may be an argument for a joint EMP and TGF source.

  12. Acoustic Characterization of Compact Jet Engine Simulator Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.

    2013-01-01

    Two dual-stream, heated jet, Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units are designed for wind tunnel acoustic experiments involving a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) vehicle. The newly fabricated CJES units are characterized with a series of acoustic and flowfield investigations to ensure successful operation with minimal rig noise. To limit simulator size, consistent with a 5.8% HWB model, the CJES units adapt Ultra Compact Combustor (UCC) technology developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Stable and controllable operation of the combustor is demonstrated using passive swirl air injection and backpressuring of the combustion chamber. Combustion instability tones are eliminated using nonuniform flow conditioners in conjunction with upstream screens. Through proper flow conditioning, rig noise is reduced by more than 20 dB over a broad spectral range, but it is not completely eliminated at high frequencies. The low-noise chevron nozzle concept designed for the HWB test shows expected acoustic benefits when installed on the CJES unit, and consistency between CJES units is shown to be within 0.5 dB OASPL.

  13. Teaching About Nuclear Power: A Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxey, Phyllis F.

    1980-01-01

    Recommends that simulation games be used to teach high school students in social studies courses about contemporary and controversial issues such as nuclear power. A simulation is described which involves students in deciding whether to build a nuclear power plant in the California desert. Teaching and debriefing tips are also provided. (DB)

  14. Teaching About Nuclear Power: A Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxey, Phyllis F.

    1980-01-01

    Recommends that simulation games be used to teach high school students in social studies courses about contemporary and controversial issues such as nuclear power. A simulation is described which involves students in deciding whether to build a nuclear power plant in the California desert. Teaching and debriefing tips are also provided. (DB)

  15. Simulating the Nuclear Threat in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseman, Gerald L.

    1989-01-01

    Suggests using simulation technique in the classroom to illustrate decision making, the perspectives of those in power, and the processes and institutions of government. Uses the simulation of a nuclear emergency alert to identify the issues and problems of nuclear confrontation. Provides instructions and an outline for the class. (NL)

  16. Shielding Analysis of a Small Compact Space Nuclear Reactor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    87117-6008 I Dl’ _ -•, AFWL-TR-G7- 04 This final report was prepared by the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico , under Job...Reactor Lennard W. Lee Jr. B.S. Nuclear Engineering, Mississippi State University, 1983 M.S. Nuclear Engineering, Univeisity of New Mexico , 1987 Early...6.15. FEMPID Reactor Model. 71 7.0 GeneraL.n4 Dese Response Functic-ns FFMP2D and FEMPID will generate gamma and neutron radiation fluxes which may be

  17. APPLICATION OF FLOW SIMULATION FOR EVALUATION OF FILLING-ABILITY OF SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urano, Shinji; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Sakihara, Kohei

    In this paper, MPS method was applied to fluid an alysis of self-compacting concrete. MPS method is one of the particle method, and it is suitable for the simulation of moving boundary or free surface problems and large deformation problems. The constitutive equation of self-compacting concrete is assumed as bingham model. In order to investigate flow Stoppage and flow speed of self-compacting concrete, numerical analysis examples of slump flow and L-flow test were performed. In addition, to evaluate verification of compactability of self-compacting concrete, numerical analys is examples of compaction at the part of CFT diaphragm were performed. As a result, it was found that the MPS method was suitable for the simulation of compaction of self-compacting concrete, and a just appraisal was obtained by setting shear strain rate of flow-limit πc and limitation point of segregation.

  18. Designing ARIES-CS compact radial build and nuclear system: Neutronics, shielding, and activation

    SciTech Connect

    El-GuebalyUniv. Wisco, L.; Wilson, P.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, G.; Slaybaugh, R; Kiedrowski, B; Ibrahim, A.; MartinUniv Wiscons, C.; Tautges, Tim; Raffray, R.; Lyon, J.; Wang, X.; Bromberg, L.; Merrill, Brad; Wagner, L.; Najmabadi, F.

    2008-01-01

    Within the ARIES-CS project, design activities have focused on developing the first compact device that enhances the attractiveness of the stellarator as a power plant. The objectives of this paper are to review the nuclear elements that received considerable attention during the design process and provide a perspective on their successful integration into the final design. Among these elements are the radial build definition, the well-optimized in-vessel components that satisfy the ARIES top-level requirements, the carefully selected nuclear and engineering parameters to produce an economic optimum, the modeling for the first time ever-of the highly complex stellarator geometry for the three-dimensional nuclear assessment, and the overarching safety and environmental constraints to deliver an attractive, reliable, and truly compact stellarator power plant.

  19. Chromatin De-Compaction By The Nucleosomal Binding Protein HMGN5 Impairs Nuclear Sturdiness

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Taher, Leila; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Anderson, Stasia; Bustin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In most metazoan nuclei, heterochromatin is located at the nuclear periphery in contact with the nuclear lamina, which provides mechanical stability to the nucleus. We show that in cultured cells, chromatin de-compaction by the nucleosome binding protein HMGN5 decreases the sturdiness, elasticity, and rigidity of the nucleus. Mice overexpressing HMGN5, either globally or only in the heart, are normal at birth but develop hypertrophic heart with large cardiomyoctyes, deformed nuclei and disrupted lamina, and die of cardiac malfunction. Chromatin de-compaction is seen in cardiomyocytes of newborn mice but misshaped nuclei with disrupted lamina are seen only in adult cardiomyocytes, suggesting that loss of heterochromatin diminishes the ability of the nucleus to withstand the mechanical forces of the contracting heart. Thus, heterochromatin enhances the ability of the nuclear lamina to maintain the sturdiness and shape of the eukaryotic nucleus; a structural role for chromatin that is distinct from its genetic functions. PMID:25609380

  20. A compact automated radionuclide separation system for nuclear medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, A. H.; Horwitz, E. P.; Hines, J. J.; Young, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    The purification of radionuclides for medical applications presents unique challenges; most notably the needs for chemical purity, radionuclidic purity, and reliable production. To address these considerations, a new generator technology and instrument have been developed to permit the rapid chromatographic purification of clinically useful quantities of radionuclides for use in diagnostic or therapeutic nuclear medicine. The device comprises a separations module containing miniature chromatographic columns, a computer controller with driver software, and the fluid delivery components. This instrument is well suited for use in radionuclide generators as separations can typically be performed in <5 min with overall decontamination factors of >106. Chromatographic experiments targeting application in a 212Bi generator have demonstrated the usefulness of the Automated Radionuclide Separator as a low-pressure chromatography system.

  1. A Compact Nuclear Fusion Reactor for Space Flights

    SciTech Connect

    Nastoyashchiy, Anatoly F.

    2006-05-02

    A small-scale nuclear fusion reactor is suggested based on the concepts of plasma confinement (with a high pressure gas) which have been patented by the author. The reactor considered can be used as a power setup in space flights. Among the advantages of this reactor is the use of a D3He fuel mixture which at burning gives main reactor products -- charged particles. The energy balance considerably improves, as synchrotron radiation turn out 'captured' in the plasma volume, and dangerous, in the case of classical magnetic confinement, instabilities in the direct current magnetic field configuration proposed do not exist. As a result, the reactor sizes are quite suitable (of the order of several meters). A possibility of making reactive thrust due to employment of ejection of multiply charged ions formed at injection of pellets from some adequate substance into the hot plasma center is considered.

  2. Detection of compact ultraviolet nuclear emission in liner galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ho, Luis C.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bahcall, John N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Macchetto, F. Duccio

    1995-01-01

    Low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), which exist in a large fraction of galaxies, may be the least luminous manifestation of quasar activity. As such, they may make possible the study of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) phenomenon in the nearest galaxies. The nature of LINERs has, however, remained controversial because an AGN-like nonstellar continuum source has not been directly observed in them. We report the detection of bright (greater than or approximately = 2 x 10(exp -16) ergs/s/sq cm/A), unresolved (full width at half maximum (FWHM) less than or approximately = 0.1 sec) point sources of UV (approximately 2300 A) emission in the nuclei of nine nearby galaxies. The galaxies were imaged using the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and seven of them are from a complete sample of 110 nearby galaxies that was observed with HST. Ground-based optical spectroscopy reveals that five of the nuclei are LINERs, three are starburst nuclei, and one is a Seyfert nucleus. The observed UV flux in each of the five LINERs implies an ionizing flux that is sufficient to account to the observed emission lines through photoionization. The detection of a strong UV continuum in the LINERs argues against shock excitation as the source of the observed emission lines, and supports the idea that photoionization excites the lines in at least some objects of this class. We have analyzed ground-based spectra for most of the northern-hemisphere galaxies in the HST sample and find that 26 of them are LINERs, among which only the above five LINERs have a detected nuclear UV source.

  3. Computational Challenges in Nuclear Weapons Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    McMillain, C F; Adams, T F; McCoy, M G; Christensen, R B; Pudliner, B S; Zika, M R; Brantley, P S; Vetter, J S; May, J M

    2003-08-29

    After a decade of experience, the Stockpile Stewardship Program continues to ensure the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons. The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) program was established to provide leading edge, high-end simulation capabilities needed to meet the program's assessment and certification requirements. The great challenge of this program lies in developing the tools and resources necessary for the complex, highly coupled, multi-physics calculations required to simulate nuclear weapons. This paper describes the hardware and software environment we have applied to fulfill our nuclear weapons responsibilities. It also presents the characteristics of our algorithms and codes, especially as they relate to supercomputing resource capabilities and requirements. It then addresses impediments to the development and application of nuclear weapon simulation software and hardware and concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations on an approach for working with industry and government agencies to address these impediments.

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A detailed description of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) is presented. The contents include: 1) Design Requirements; 2) NTREES Layout; 3) Data Acquisition and Control System Schematics; 4) NTREES System Schematic; and 5) NTREES Setup.

  5. A Novel Approach to Fabricating Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    SciTech Connect

    Pappano, Peter J; Burchell, Timothy D; Trammell, Michael P; Hunn, John D

    2008-01-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is a combined complex of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and hydrogen production facility. The VHTR can have a prismatic or pebble bed design and is powered by TRISO fuel in the form of a fuel compact (prismatic) or pebble (pebble bed). The US is scheduled to build a demonstration VHTR at the Idaho National Laboratory site by 2020. The first step toward building of this facility is development and qualification of the fuel for the reactor. This paper summarizes the research and development efforts performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) toward development of a qualified fuel compact for a VHTR.

  6. Rice growth monitoring using simulated compact polarimetric C band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Li, Kun; Liu, Long; Shao, Yun; Brisco, Brian; Li, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a set of nine compact polarimetric (CP) images were simulated from polarimetric RADARSAT-2 data acquired over a test site containing two types of rice field in Jiangsu province, China. The types of rice field in the test site were (1) transplanted hybrid rice fields, and (2) direct-sown japonica rice fields. Both types have different yields and phenological stages. As a first step, the two types of rice field were distinguished with 94% and 86% accuracy respectively through analyzing CP synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and their behavior in terms of scattering mechanisms during the rice growth season. The focus was then on phenology retrieval for each type of rice field. A decision tree (DT) algorithm was built to fulfill the precise retrieval of rice phenological stages, in which seven phenological stages were discriminated. The key criterion for each phenological stage was composed of 1-4 CP parameters, some of which were first used for rice phenology retrieval and found to be very sensitive to rice phenological changes. The retrieval results were verified at parcel level for a set of 12 stands of rice and up to nine observation dates per stand. This gave an accuracy of 88-95%. Throughout the phenology retrieval process, only simulated CP data were used, without any auxiliary data. These results demonstrate the potential of CP SAR for rice growth monitoring applications.

  7. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05 simulations, in particular, allow us to also study the role and impact of the nuclear symmetry energy on these pasta configurations. This work is supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  8. DNA methylation affects nuclear organization, histone modifications, and linker histone binding but not chromatin compaction.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nick; Thomson, Inga; Boyle, Shelagh; Allan, James; Ramsahoye, Bernard; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2007-05-07

    DNA methylation has been implicated in chromatin condensation and nuclear organization, especially at sites of constitutive heterochromatin. How this is mediated has not been clear. In this study, using mutant mouse embryonic stem cells completely lacking in DNA methylation, we show that DNA methylation affects nuclear organization and nucleosome structure but not chromatin compaction. In the absence of DNA methylation, there is increased nuclear clustering of pericentric heterochromatin and extensive changes in primary chromatin structure. Global levels of histone H3 methylation and acetylation are altered, and there is a decrease in the mobility of linker histones. However, the compaction of both bulk chromatin and heterochromatin, as assayed by nuclease digestion and sucrose gradient sedimentation, is unaltered by the loss of DNA methylation. This study shows how the complete loss of a major epigenetic mark can have an impact on unexpected levels of chromatin structure and nuclear organization and provides evidence for a novel link between DNA methylation and linker histones in the regulation of chromatin structure.

  9. Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.M.; Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation of nuclear power plant simulation facilities with regard to their acceptability for use in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) operator licensing exam is described. The evaluation is based primarily on simulator fidelity, but incorporates some aspects of direct operator/trainee performance measurement. The panel presentation and paper discuss data requirements, data collection, data analysis and criteria for conclusions regarding the fidelity evaluation, and summarize the proposed use of direct performance measurment. While field testing and refinement of the methodology are recommended, this initial effort provides a firm basis for NRC to fully develop the necessary methodology.

  10. The standard upwind compact difference schemes for incompressible flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Compact difference schemes have been used extensively for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. However, the earlier formulations of the schemes are of central type (called central compact schemes, CCS), which are dispersive and susceptible to numerical instability. To enhance stability of CCS, the optimal upwind compact schemes (OUCS) are developed recently by adding high order dissipative terms to CCS. In this paper, it is found that OUCS are essentially not of the upwind type because they do not use upwind-biased but central type of stencils. Furthermore, OUCS are not the most optimal since orders of accuracy of OUCS are at least one order lower than the maximum achievable orders. New upwind compact schemes (called standard upwind compact schemes, SUCS) are developed in this paper. In contrast to OUCS, SUCS are constructed based completely on upwind-biased stencils and hence can gain adequate numerical dissipation with no need for introducing optimization calculations. Furthermore, SUCS can achieve the maximum achievable orders of accuracy and hence be more compact than OUCS. More importantly, SUCS have prominent advantages on combining the stable and high resolution properties which are demonstrated from the global spectral analyses and typical numerical experiments.

  11. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, William J.

    2008-01-01

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  12. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    SciTech Connect

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2008-01-21

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  13. The Corollaries of the Ultra-Compact Nuclear Rings in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    2011-10-01

    Some `composite' Seyfert 2 nuclei show evidence for massive ultra-compact starbursts within the central 40-200 pc. When spatially resolved with the HST, these starbursts exhibit morphology similar to `canonical,' 1-2 kpc size, nuclear rings which form as a result of radial gas inflows in barred and {maybe} interacting galaxies. Based on our recent work, although only a few of such Ultra-Compact Nuclear Rings {UCNRs} are known to date, there are reasons to believe that this is the tip of the iceberg. UCNRs can be closely related to both the AGN and starburst activity in the nucleus, and to the host galaxy. They may thus be the missing link between the two. We propose the first comprehensive statistical study of the fraction and properties of such UCNRs in nearby galaxies using HST archival data. We shall also investigatethe UCNR population in matched samples of Seyfert 2s, LINERs, `transition' objects and `pure' nuclear starbursts. The targets will be selected from the homogeneous survey of 486 objects of Ho et al., of which we estimate more than half to have suitable archive data. We shall find the size, ellipticity, color distributions and stellar populations of the UCNRs, explore how they relate to nuclear activity and analyze correlations between UCNR population and global galactic properties. We shall determine whether the UCNRs form a distinct population from the canonical 1-2 kpc size nuclear rings or they constitute the tail distribution of their larger counterparts. The properties of the UCNR population will allow us to distinguish between the various theoretical models of gas flow within the central 40-200 pc, thus providing stringent clues to the fueling mechanisms of AGN and explore any possible linkage between central starbursts and AGN. While we do not expect to provide definitive answers to all of these questions, this will be the first attempt to link observationally and theoretically the AGN processes to those in their host galaxies.

  14. Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Krack, Matthias; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2015-10-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermo-mechanical properties. In these simulations, the forces on the ions are dictated by interaction potentials generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, and to develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry. In addition to providing insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, MD simulations can also provide parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models.

  15. A compact Class D RF power amplifier for mobile nuclear magnetic resonance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, J.; Dykstra, R.; Eccles, C.; Gouws, G.; Obruchkov, S.

    2017-07-01

    A 20 MHz Class D amplifier with an output of 100 W of RF power has been developed. The compact size printed circuit board area of 50 cm2 and efficiency of 73% make it suitable for mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems. Test results show that the rise and ring down times of the amplifier are less than 0.2 μs, and it is capable of producing constant amplitude pulses as short as 2 μs. Experiments using a Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill pulse sequence with a NMR MOUSE sensor confirm that the Class D amplifier is suitable for mobile NMR applications.

  16. A compact Class D RF power amplifier for mobile nuclear magnetic resonance systems.

    PubMed

    Zhen, J; Dykstra, R; Eccles, C; Gouws, G; Obruchkov, S

    2017-07-01

    A 20 MHz Class D amplifier with an output of 100 W of RF power has been developed. The compact size printed circuit board area of 50 cm(2) and efficiency of 73% make it suitable for mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems. Test results show that the rise and ring down times of the amplifier are less than 0.2 μs, and it is capable of producing constant amplitude pulses as short as 2 μs. Experiments using a Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill pulse sequence with a NMR MOUSE sensor confirm that the Class D amplifier is suitable for mobile NMR applications.

  17. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To support the eventual development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  18. Water migration through compacted bentonite backfills for containment of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, J.H.; Hodges, F.N.; Kuhn, W.L.; Myers, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    Tests carried out with compacted sodium and calcium bentonites at room temperature indicate that bentonite backfills will effectively control water movement near a high-level nuclear waste package. Saturation tests indicate that water will rapidly diffuse into a dry bentonite backfill, reaching saturation in times on the order of tens of years. The apparent diffusion coefficient for sodium bentonite (about5 wt% initial water content) compacted to 2.1 g/cm/sup 3/ is 1.7 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//sec. However, the hydraulic conductivities of saturated bentonites are low, ranging from approximately 10/sup -11/ cm/sec to 10/sup -13/ cm/sec over a density range of 1.5 g/cm/sup 3/ to 2.2 g/cm/sup 3/. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonites are at least several orders of magnitude lower than those of candidate-host silicate rocks, indicating that most flowing groundwater contacting a bentonite backfill would be diverted around the backfill rather than flowing through it. In addition, because of the very low hydraulic conductivities of bentonite backfills, the rate of chemical transport between the containerized waste and the surrounding host rock will be effectively controlled by diffusion through the backfill. The formation of a diffusion barrier by the backfill will significantly reduce the long-term rate of radionuclide release from the waste package, an advantage distinct from the delay in release resulting from the sorptive properties of a bentonite backfill.

  19. Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) Furnace for Post-Irradiation Heating Tests of VHTR Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A Demkowicz; Paul Demkowicz; David V Laug

    2010-10-01

    Abstract –Fuel irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination are currently in progress as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Fuels Development and Qualification Program. The PIE campaign will include extensive accident testing of irradiated very high temperature reactor fuel compacts to verify fission product retention characteristics at high temperatures. This work will be carried out at both the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, beginning with accident tests on irradiated fuel from the AGR-1 experiment in 2010. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested at INL to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000°C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, Eu, and I) and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  20. Experimental simulations of beam propagation over large distances in a compact linear Paul trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik P.; Chung, Moses; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard

    2006-05-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory experiment that places the physicist in the frame of reference of a long, charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by similar equations, including nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent voltages applied to the PTSX quadrupole electrodes are equivalent to the axially oscillating magnetic fields applied in the AG system. Experiments concerning the quiescent propagation of intense beams over large distances can then be performed in a compact and flexible facility. An understanding and characterization of the conditions required for quiescent beam transport, minimum halo particle generation, and precise beam compression and manipulation techniques, are essential, as accelerators and transport systems demand that ever-increasing amounts of space charge be transported. Application areas include ion-beam-driven high energy density physics, high energy and nuclear physics accelerator systems, etc. One-component cesium plasmas have been trapped in PTSX that correspond to normalized beam intensities, ŝ=ωp2(0)/2ωq2, up to 80% of the space-charge limit where self-electric forces balance the applied focusing force. Here, ωp(0)=[nb(0)eb2/mbɛ0]1/2 is the on-axis plasma frequency, and ωq is the smooth-focusing frequency associated with the applied focusing field. Plasmas in PTSX with values of ŝ that are 20% of the limit have been trapped for times corresponding to equivalent beam propagation over 10km. Results are presented for experiments in which the amplitude of the quadrupole focusing lattice is modified as a function of time. It is found that instantaneous changes in lattice amplitude can be detrimental to transverse confinement of the charge bunch.

  1. Induction simulation of gas core nuclear engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Vogel, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, construction and operation of an induction heated plasma device known as a combined principles simulator is discussed. This device incorporates the major design features of the gas core nuclear rocket engine such as solid feed, propellant seeding, propellant injection through the walls, and a transpiration cooled, choked flow nozzle. Both argon and nitrogen were used as propellant simulating material, and sodium was used for fuel simulating material. In addition, a number of experiments were conducted utilizing depleted uranium as the fuel. The test program revealed that satisfactory operation of this device can be accomplished over a range of operating conditions and provided additional data to confirm the validity of the gas core concept.

  2. Greatly Enhanced Merger Rates of Compact-object Binaries in Non-spherical Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Antonini, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    The Milky Way and a significant fraction of galaxies are observed to host a central massive black hole (MBH) embedded in a non-spherical nuclear star cluster. We study the secular orbital evolution of compact-object binaries in these environments and characterize the excitation of extremely large eccentricities that can lead to mergers by gravitational radiation. We find that the eccentricity excitation occurs most efficiently when the nodal precession timescale of the binary’s orbit around the MBH due to the non-spherical cluster becomes comparable (within a factor of ∼10) to the timescale on which the binary is torqued by the MBH due to the Lidov–Kozai (LK) mechanism. We show that in this regime the perturbations due to the cluster increase the fraction of systems that reach extreme eccentricities (1{--}e∼ {10}-4{--}{10}-6) by a factor of ∼10–100 compared to the idealized case of a spherical cluster, increasing the merger rates of compact objects by a similar factor. We identify two main channels that lead to this extreme eccentricity excitation: (i) chaotic diffusion of the eccentricities due to resonance overlap; (ii) cluster-driven variations of the mutual inclinations between the binary orbit and its center-of-mass orbit around the MBH, which can intensify the LK oscillations. We estimate that our mechanism can produce BH–BH and BH–neutron star binary merger rates of up to ≈ 15 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1 and ≈ 0.4 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1, respectively. Thus, we propose the cluster-enhanced LK mechanism as a new channel for the merger of compact-object binaries, competing with scenarios that invoke isolated binary evolution or dynamical formation in globular clusters.

  3. Compact quasi-monoenergetic photon sources from laser-plasma accelerators for nuclear detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Rykovanov, Sergey; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Steinke, Sven; Vay, Jean-Luc; Esarey, Eric H.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Nakamura, Kei; Quiter, Brian J.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-05-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources at MeV energies offer improved sensitivity at greatly reduced dose for active interrogation, and new capabilities in treaty verification, nondestructive assay of spent nuclear fuel and emergency response. Thomson (also referred to as Compton) scattering sources are an established method to produce appropriate photon beams. Applications are however restricted by the size of the required high-energy electron linac, scattering (photon production) system, and shielding for disposal of the high energy electron beam. Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) produce GeV electron beams in centimeters, using the plasma wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser. Recent LPA experiments are presented which have greatly improved beam quality and efficiency, rendering them appropriate for compact high-quality photon sources based on Thomson scattering. Designs for MeV photon sources utilizing the unique properties of LPAs are presented. It is shown that control of the scattering laser, including plasma guiding, can increase photon production efficiency. This reduces scattering laser size and/or electron beam current requirements to scale compatible with the LPA. Lastly, the plasma structure can decelerate the electron beam after photon production, reducing the size of shielding required for beam disposal. Together, these techniques provide a path to a compact photon source system.

  4. A compact breed and burn fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, D.; Kim, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A long-life breed-and-burn (B and B) type fast reactor has been investigated from the neutronics points of view. The B and B reactor has the capability to breed the fissile fuels and use the bred fuel in situ in the same reactor. In this work, feasibility of a compact sodium-cooled B and B fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel as blanket material has been studied. In order to derive a compact B and B fast reactor, a tight fuel lattice and relatively large fuel pin are used to achieve high fuel volume fraction. The core is initially loaded with an LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel and a metallic fuel is used in the core. The Monte Carlo depletion has been performed for the core to see the long-term behavior of the B and B reactor. Several important parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, fission power, and fast neutron fluence, are analyzed through Monte Carlo reactor analysis. Evolution of the core fuel composition is also analyzed as a function of burnup. Although the long-life small B and B fast reactor is found to be feasible from the neutronics point of view, it is characterized to have several challenging technical issues including a very high fast neutron fluence of the structural materials. (authors)

  5. AGN POPULATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS. I. DATA AND NUCLEAR ACTIVITY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Coziol, R. E-mail: chony@iaa.es E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.mx

    2010-03-15

    We have conducted a new spectroscopic survey to characterize the nature of nuclear activity in Hickson compact group (HCG) galaxies and establish its frequency. We have obtained new intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy for 200 member galaxies and corrected for underlying stellar population contamination using galaxy templates. Spectra for 11 additional galaxies have been acquired from the ESO and 6dF public archives, and emission-line ratios have been taken from the literature for 59 more galaxies. Here we present the results of our classification of the nuclear activity for 270 member galaxies, which belong to a well-defined sample of 64 HCGs. We found a large fraction of galaxies, 63%, with emission lines. Using standard diagnostic diagrams, 45% of the emission-line galaxies were classified as pure active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 23% as Transition Objects (TOs), and 32% as star-forming nuclei (SFNs). In the HCGs, the AGN activity appears as the most frequent activity type. Adopting the interpretation that in TOs a low-luminosity AGN coexists with circumnuclear star formation, the fraction of galaxies with an AGN could rise to 42% of the whole sample. The low frequency (20%) of SFNs confirms that there is no star formation enhancement in HCGs. After extinction correction, we found a median AGN H{alpha} luminosity of 7.1 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, which implies that AGNs in HCG have a characteristically low luminosity. This result added to the fact that there is an almost complete absence of broad-line AGNs in compact groups (CGs) as found by MartInez et al. and corroborated in this study for HCGs, is consistent with very few gas left in these galaxies. In general, therefore, what may characterize the level of activity in CGs is a severe deficiency of gas.

  6. The production of radionuclides for nuclear medicine from a compact, low-energy accelerator system.

    PubMed

    Webster, William D; Parks, Geoffrey T; Titov, Dmitry; Beasley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is reliant on radionuclides for medical imaging procedures and radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The recent shut-downs of key radionuclide producers have highlighted the fragility of the current radionuclide supply network, however. To ensure that nuclear medicine can continue to grow, adding new diagnostic and therapy options to healthcare, novel and reliable production methods are required. Siemens are developing a low-energy, high-current - up to 10 MeV and 1 mA respectively - accelerator. The capability of this low-cost, compact system for radionuclide production, for use in nuclear medicine procedures, has been considered. The production of three medically important radionuclides - (89)Zr, (64)Cu, and (103)Pd - has been considered, via the (89)Y(p,n), (64)Ni(p,n) and (103)Rh(p,n) reactions, respectively. Theoretical cross-sections were generated using TALYS and compared to experimental data available from EXFOR. Stopping power values generated by SRIM have been used, with the TALYS-generated excitation functions, to calculate potential yields and isotopic purity in different irradiation regimes. The TALYS excitation functions were found to have a good agreement with the experimental data available from the EXFOR database. It was found that both (89)Zr and (64)Cu could be produced with high isotopic purity (over 99%), with activity yields suitable for medical diagnostics and therapy, at a proton energy of 10MeV. At 10MeV, the irradiation of (103)Rh produced appreciable quantities of (102)Pd, reducing the isotopic purity. A reduction in beam energy to 9.5MeV increased the radioisotopic purity to 99% with only a small reduction in activity yield. This work demonstrates that the low-energy, compact accelerator system under development by Siemens would be capable of providing sufficient quantities of (89)Zr, (64)Cu, and (103)Pd for use in medical diagnostics and therapy. It is suggested that the system could be used to produce many other

  7. Simulation of vertical compaction in models of regional ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, S.A.; ,

    1991-01-01

    A new computer program was developed to simulate vertical compaction in models of regional ground-water flow. The program accounts for ground-water storage changes and compaction in discontinuous interbeds or in extensive confining beds. The new program is a package for the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model. Several features of the program make it useful for application in shallow unconfined flow systems. Geostatic load can be treated as a function of water-table elevation, and compaction is a function of computed changes in effective stress at the center of a model layer. Thickness of compressible sediments in an unconfined model layer can vary in proportion to saturated thickness. The new package was tested by comparison with an existing model of one-dimensional compaction.

  8. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  9. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; ...

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore » combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  10. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimum combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.

  11. SUSEE: A Compact, Lightweight Space Nuclear Power System Using Present Water Reactor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Maise, George; Powell, James; Paniagua, John

    2006-01-20

    The SUSEE space reactor system uses existing nuclear fuels and the standard steam cycle to generate electrical and thermal power for a wide range of in-space and surface applications, including manned bases, sub-surface mobile probes to explore thick ice deposits on Mars and the Jovian moons, and mobile rovers. SUSEE cycle efficiency, thermal to electric, ranges from {approx}20 to 24%, depending on operating parameters. Rejection of waste heat is by a lightweight condensing radiator that can be launched as a compact rolled-up package and deployed into flat panels when appropriate. The 50 centimeter diameter SUSEE reactor can provide power over the range of 10 kW(e) to 1 MW(e) for a period of 10 years. Higher power outputs are possible using slightly larger reactors. System specific weight (reactor, turbine, generator, piping, and radiator) is {approx}3 kg/kW(e). Two SUSEE reactor options are described, based on the existing Zr/O2 cermet and the UH3/ZrH2 TRIGA nuclear fuels.

  12. SUSEE: A Compact, Lightweight Space Nuclear Power System Using Present Water Reactor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maise, George; Powell, James; Paniagua, John

    2006-01-01

    The SUSEE space reactor system uses existing nuclear fuels and the standard steam cycle to generate electrical and thermal power for a wide range of in-space and surface applications, including manned bases, sub-surface mobile probes to explore thick ice deposits on Mars and the Jovian moons, and mobile rovers. SUSEE cycle efficiency, thermal to electric, ranges from ~20 to 24%, depending on operating parameters. Rejection of waste heat is by a lightweight condensing radiator that can be launched as a compact rolled-up package and deployed into flat panels when appropriate. The 50 centimeter diameter SUSEE reactor can provide power over the range of 10 kW(e) to 1 MW(e) for a period of 10 years. Higher power outputs are possible using slightly larger reactors. System specific weight (reactor, turbine, generator, piping, and radiator is ~3 kg/kW(e). Two SUSEE reactor options are described, based on the existing Zr/O2 cermet and the UH3/ZrH2 TRIGA nuclear fuels.

  13. MITEE: A Compact Ultralight Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Engine for Planetary Science Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J.; Maise, G.; Paniagua, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach for a near-term compact, ultralight nuclear thermal propulsion engine, termed MITEE (Miniature Reactor Engine) is described. MITEE enables a wide range of new and unique planetary science missions that are not possible with chemical rockets. With U-235 nuclear fuel and hydrogen propellant the baseline MITEE engine achieves a specific impulse of approximately 1000 seconds, a thrust of 28,000 newtons, and a total mass of only 140 kilograms, including reactor, controls, and turbo-pump. Using higher performance nuclear fuels like U-233, engine mass can be reduced to as little as 80 kg. Using MITEE, V additions of 20 km/s for missions to outer planets are possible compared to only 10 km/s for H2/O2 engines. The much greater V with MITEE enables much faster trips to the outer planets, e.g., two years to Jupiter, three years to Saturn, and five years to Pluto, without needing multiple planetary gravity assists. Moreover, MITEE can utilize in-situ resources to further extend mission V. One example of a very attractive, unique mission enabled by MITEE is the exploration of a possible subsurface ocean on Europa and the return of samples to Earth. Using MITEE, a spacecraft would land on Europa after a two-year trip from Earth orbit and deploy a small nuclear heated probe that would melt down through its ice sheet. The probe would then convert to a submersible and travel through the ocean collecting samples. After a few months, the probe would melt its way back up to the MITEE lander, which would have replenished its hydrogen propellant by melting and electrolyzing Europa surface ice. The spacecraft would then return to Earth. Total mission time is only five years, starting from departure from Earth orbit. Other unique missions include Neptune and Pluto orbiter, and even a Pluto sample return. MITEE uses the cermet Tungsten-UO2 fuel developed in the 1960's for the 710 reactor program. The W-UO2 fuel has demonstrated capability to operate in 3000 K hydrogen for

  14. Multi-physics nuclear reactor simulator for advanced nuclear engineering education

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, A.

    2012-07-01

    Multi-physics nuclear reactor simulator, which aims to utilize for advanced nuclear engineering education, is being introduced to Nagoya Univ.. The simulator consists of the 'macroscopic' physics simulator and the 'microscopic' physics simulator. The former performs real time simulation of a whole nuclear power plant. The latter is responsible to more detail numerical simulations based on the sophisticated and precise numerical models, while taking into account the plant conditions obtained in the macroscopic physics simulator. Steady-state and kinetics core analyses, fuel mechanical analysis, fluid dynamics analysis, and sub-channel analysis can be carried out in the microscopic physics simulator. Simulation calculations are carried out through dedicated graphical user interface and the simulation results, i.e., spatial and temporal behaviors of major plant parameters are graphically shown. The simulator will provide a bridge between the 'theories' studied with textbooks and the 'physical behaviors' of actual nuclear power plants. (authors)

  15. Formation of compact clusters from high resolution hybrid cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Gray, William J.

    2013-11-20

    The early universe hosted a large population of small dark matter 'minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse, the minihalo gas. Gray and Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reaction, and then cools to form dense, chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters may be observable with the next generation of telescopes and the largest of them should survive to the present-day, having properties similar to halo globular clusters.

  16. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  17. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic- metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  19. Electric heater for nuclear fuel rod simulators

    DOEpatents

    McCulloch, Reginald W.; Morgan, Jr., Chester S.; Dial, Ralph E.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an electric cartridge-type heater for use as a simulator for a nuclear fuel pin in reactor studies. The heater comprises an elongated cylindrical housing containing a longitudinally extending helically wound heating element with the heating element radially inwardly separated from the housing. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of boron nitride electrically insulate the heating element from the housing while providing good thermal conductivity. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of magnesia or a magnesia-15 percent boron nitride mixture are disposed in the cavity of the helical heating element. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the magnesia or the magnesia-boron nitride mixture is higher than that of the boron nitride disposed about the heating element for urging the boron nitride radially outwardly against the housing during elevated temperatures to assure adequate thermal contact between the housing and the boron nitride.

  20. Discrete element simulation of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing with low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Nosewicz, Szymon; Jurczak, Kamila; Chmielewski, Marcin; Bochenek, Kamil; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents numerical studies of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing. The powder compaction in this work is considered as an initial stage of a hot pressing process so it is realized with relatively low pressure (up to 50 MPa). Hence the attention has been focused on the densification mechanisms at this range of pressure and models suitable for these conditions. The discrete element method employing spherical particles has been used in the numerical studies. Numerical simulations have been performed for two different contact models—the elastic Hertz-Mindlin-Deresiewicz model and the plastic Storåkers model. Numerical results have been compared with the results of laboratory tests of the die compaction of the NiAl powder. Comparisons have shown that the discrete element method is capable to represent properly the densification mechanisms by the particle rearrangement and particle deformation.

  1. Hydrodynamic simulations of stellar wind disruption by a compact X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blondin, John M.; Kallman, Timothy R.; Fryxell, Bruce A.; Taam, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional numerical simulations of the gas flow in the orbital plane of a massive X-ray binary system, in which the mass accretion is fueled by a radiation-driven wind from an early-type companion star. These simulations are used to examine the role of the compact object (either a neutron star or a black hole) in disturbing the radiatively accelerating wind of the OB companion, with an emphasis on understanding the origin of the observed soft X-ray photoelectric absorption seen at late orbital phases in these systems. On the basis of these simulations, it is suggested that the phase-dependent photoelectric absorption seen in several of these systems can be explained by dense filaments of compressend gas formed in the nonsteady accreation bow shock and wake of the compact object.

  2. Simulation of irreversible rock compaction effects on geopressured reservoir response: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1986-12-01

    A series of calculations are presented which quantitatively demonstrate the effects of nonlinear stress-deformation properties on the behavior of geopressured reservoirs. The range of stress-deformation parameters considered is based on information available from laboratory rock mechanics tests performed at the University of Texas at Austin and at Terra Tek, Inc. on cores recovered from geopressured wells. The effects of irreversible formation rock compaction, associated permeability reduction, and repetitive load/unload cycling are considered. The formation rock and geopressured brine properties are incorporated into an existing reservoir simulator using a bilinear model for the irreversible compaction process. Pressure drawdown and buildup testing of a well producing from the geopressured formation is simulated for a suite of calculations covering the range of formation parameters. The results are presented and discussed in terms of the inference (e.g., permeability and reservoir volume) that would be drawn from the simulated test data by an analyst using conventional methods.

  3. Multidimensional multiphysics simulation of nuclear fuel behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, R. L.; Hales, J. D.; Novascone, S. R.; Tonks, M. R.; Gaston, D. R.; Permann, C. J.; Andrs, D.; Martineau, R. C.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear fuel operates in an environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena, occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. This multiphysics behavior is often tightly coupled and many important aspects are inherently multidimensional. Most current fuel modeling codes employ loose multiphysics coupling and are restricted to 2D axisymmetric or 1.5D approximations. This paper describes a new modeling tool able to simulate coupled multiphysics and multiscale fuel behavior, for either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. Specific fuel analysis capabilities currently implemented in this tool are described, followed by a set of demonstration problems which include a 10-pellet light water reactor fuel rodlet, three-dimensional analysis of pellet clad mechanical interaction in the vicinity of a defective fuel pellet, coupled heat transfer and fission product diffusion in a TRISO-coated fuel particle, a demonstration of the ability to couple to lower-length scale models to account for material property variation with microstructural evolution, and a demonstration of the tool's ability to efficiently solve very large and complex problems using massively-parallel computing. A final section describes an early validation exercise, comparing simulation results to a light water reactor fuel rod experiment.

  4. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  5. New compact equation for numerical simulation of freak waves on deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. I.; Kachulin, D. I.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    Considering surface gravity waves which propagate in same direction we applied canonical transformation to a water wave equation and drastically simplify the Hamiltonian. After this transformation, corresponding equation of motion is written in x-space in a compact form. This new equation is suitable for analytical studies and numerical simulations. Localized in space breather-type solution was found numerically by using iterative Petviashvili method. Numerical simulation of breathers collision shows the stability of such solutions. We observed the freak wave formation in numerical simulations of sea surface waving in the framework of new equation.

  6. The spiral-compact galaxy pair AM 2208-251: Computer simulations versus observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaric, Mario; Byrd, Gene G.

    1990-01-01

    The system AM2208-251 is a roughly edge-on spiral extending east-west with a smaller round compact E system about 60 arcsec east of the spiral nucleus along the major axis of the spiral. Bertola, Huchtmeier, and Zeilinger (1990) have presented optical spectroscopic as well as single dish 21 cm observations of this system. Their spectroscopic data show, via emission lines lambda lambda 3727-29A, a rising rotation curve near the nucleus. These spectroscopic observations may indicate a tidal interaction in the system. In order to learn more about such pairs, the authors simulated the interaction using the computer model developed by Miller (1976 a,b, 1978) and modified by the authors (Byrd 1986, 1987, 1988). To do the simulation they need an idea of the mutual orbits of the two galaxies. Their computer model is a two-dimensional polar N-body program. It consists of a self-gravitating disk of particles, within an inert axially symmetric stabilizing halo potential. The particles are distributed in a 24(radial) by 36(azimuthal) polar grid. Self consistent calculations can be done only within the grid area. The disk is modeled with a finite Mestel disk, where all the particles initially move in circular orbits with constant tangential velocities (Mestel 1963), resulting in a flat rotation curve. The gas particles in the spiral's disk, which make up 30 percent of its mass, collide in the following manner. The number of particles in each bin of the polar grid is counted every time step. If it is greater than a given critical density, all the particles in the bin collide, obtaining in the result the same velocities, equal to the average for the bin. This process produces clumps of gas particles-the star formation sites. The authors suppress the collision in the inner part of the disk (within the circle r = 6) to represent the hole seen in the gas in the nuclear bulge of spirals. They thus avoid spurious effects due to collisions in that region. They also varied the size of

  7. Fast surrogate-assisted simulation-driven optimization of compact microwave hybrid couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgan, Piotr; Koziel, Slawomir

    2016-07-01

    This work presents a robust methodology for expedited simulation-driven design optimization of compact microwave hybrid couplers. The technique relies on problem decomposition, and a bottom-up design strategy, starting from the level of basic building blocks of the coupler, and finishing with a tuning procedure that exploits a fast surrogate model of the entire structure. The latter is constructed by cascading local response surface approximations of coupler elementary elements. The cross-coupling effects within the structure are neglected in the first stage of the design process; however, they are accounted for in the tuning phase by means of space-mapping correction of the surrogate. The proposed approach is demonstrated through the design of a compact rat-race and two branch-line couplers. In all cases, the computational cost of the optimization process is very low and corresponds to just a few high-fidelity electromagnetic simulations of respective structures. Experimental validation is also provided.

  8. Calibration of a compaction simulator for the measurement of tablet thickness during compression.

    PubMed

    Holman, L E; Marshall, K

    1993-06-01

    For the calibration of a compaction simulator for punch displacement measurements, the displacement of the punch must be related to the voltage output of a linear variable displacement transducer (LVDT) which is attached to the punch via its movable core, with correction for any deformation of the machine parts which are inherently incorporated in the LVDT readings. Contrary to common assumptions the relationship between the displacement of the movable core and the voltage output of the LVDTs used is not linear. Similarly, the deformation of the machine parts did not follow Hooke's law of linear elasticity but exhibited characteristics of nonlinear elasticity. The data demonstrate the need for careful validation of the calibration of a compaction simulator when accurate punch displacements are required.

  9. The diverse evolutionary paths of simulated high-z massive, compact galaxies to z = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Sarah; Torrey, Paul; Ma, Chung-Pei; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies have much smaller physical sizes at high redshift than today. The strong evolution of galaxy size may be caused by progenitor bias, major and minor mergers, adiabatic expansion, and/or renewed star formation, but it is difficult to test these theories observationally. Herein, we select a sample of 35 massive, compact galaxies (M* = 1-3 × 1011 M⊙, M*/R1.5 > 1010.5 M⊙/kpc1.5) at z = 2 in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Illustris and trace them forwards to z = 0 to uncover their evolution and identify their descendants. By z = 0, the original factor of 3 difference in stellar mass spreads to a factor of 20. The dark matter halo masses similarly spread from a factor of 5 to 40. The galaxies' evolutionary paths are diverse: about half acquire an ex situ envelope and are the core of a more massive descendant, a third survive undisturbed and gain very little mass, 15 per cent are consumed in a merger with a more massive galaxy, and a small remainder are thoroughly mixed by major mergers. The galaxies grow in size as well as mass, and only ˜10 per cent remain compact by z = 0. The majority of the size growth is driven by the acquisition of ex situ mass. The most massive galaxies at z = 0 are the most likely to have compact progenitors, but this trend possesses significant dispersion which precludes a direct linkage to compact galaxies at z = 2. The compact galaxies' merger rates are influenced by their z = 2 environments, so that isolated or satellite compact galaxies (which are protected from mergers) are the most likely to survive to the present day.

  10. Complete event simulations of nuclear fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona

    2015-10-01

    For many years, the state of the art for treating fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. In these average fission models energy is not explicitly conserved and everything is uncorrelated because all particles are emitted independently. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of the emitted particles are correlated. Such correlations are interesting for many modern applications. Event-by-event generation of complete fission events makes it possible to retain the kinematic information for all particles emitted: the fission products as well as prompt neutrons and photons. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. Complete event simulations can be included in general Monte Carlo transport codes. We describe the general functionality of currently available fission event generators and compare results for several important observables. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. We acknowledge support of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development in DOE/NNSA.

  11. Designing a compact high performance brain PET scanner—simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kuang; Majewski, Stan; Kinahan, Paul E.; Harrison, Robert L.; Elston, Brian F.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Dolinsky, Sergei; Stolin, Alexander V.; Brefczynski-Lewis, Julie A.; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-05-01

    The desire to understand normal and disordered human brain function of upright, moving persons in natural environments motivates the development of the ambulatory micro-dose brain PET imager (AMPET). An ideal system would be light weight but with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, although these requirements are often in conflict with each other. One potential approach to meet the design goals is a compact brain-only imaging device with a head-sized aperture. However, a compact geometry increases parallax error in peripheral lines of response, which increases bias and variance in region of interest (ROI) quantification. Therefore, we performed simulation studies to search for the optimal system configuration and to evaluate the potential improvement in quantification performance over existing scanners. We used the Cramér-Rao variance bound to compare the performance for ROI quantification using different scanner geometries. The results show that while a smaller ring diameter can increase photon detection sensitivity and hence reduce the variance at the center of the field of view, it can also result in higher variance in peripheral regions when the length of detector crystal is 15 mm or more. This variance can be substantially reduced by adding depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability to the detector modules. Our simulation study also shows that the relative performance depends on the size of the ROI, and a large ROI favors a compact geometry even without DOI information. Based on these results, we propose a compact ‘helmet’ design using detectors with DOI capability. Monte Carlo simulations show the helmet design can achieve four-fold higher sensitivity and resolve smaller features than existing cylindrical brain PET scanners. The simulations also suggest that improving TOF timing resolution from 400 ps to 200 ps also results in noticeable improvement in image quality, indicating better timing resolution is desirable for brain imaging.

  12. Multiphase environment of compact galactic nuclei: the role of the nuclear star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Kunneriath, D.; Czerny, B.; Adhikari, T. P.; Karas, V.

    2017-01-01

    We study the conditions for the onset of thermal instability in the innermost regions of compact galactic nuclei, where the properties of the interstellar environment are governed by the interplay of quasi-spherical accretion on to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the heating/cooling processes of gas in a dense nuclear star cluster (NSC). Stellar winds are the source of material for radiatively inefficient (quasi-spherical, non-magnetized) inflow/outflow on to the central SMBH, where a stagnation point develops within the Bondi-type accretion. We study the local thermal equilibrium to determine the parameter space that allows cold and hot phases in mutual contact to co-exist. We include the effects of mechanical heating by stellar winds and radiative cooling/heating by the ambient field of the dense star cluster. We consider two examples: the NSC in the Milky Way central region (including the gaseous mini-spiral of Sgr A*), and the ultracompact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1. We find that the two systems behave in different ways because they are placed in different areas of parameter space in the instability diagram: gas temperature versus dynamical ionization parameter. In the case of Sgr A*, stellar heating prevents the spontaneous formation of cold clouds. The plasma from stellar winds joins the hot X-ray emitting phase and forms an outflow. In M60-UCD1, our model predicts spontaneous formation of cold clouds in the inner part of the galaxy. These cold clouds may survive since the cooling time-scale is shorter than the inflow/outflow time-scale.

  13. Mechanism of Wiggly Compaction Band Formation in High-porosity Sandstone: Field Observation, Microscopic Analysis and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Field data and microscopic analysis are combined with numerical simulation to investigate the mechanism of wiggly compaction band formation in the high-porosity aeolian Aztec sandstone, Valley of Fire, Nevada. Field data show that the segments of wiggly compaction bands have similar orientations to preexisting shear-enhanced compaction bands, H1 and H2. The wiggly bands are inferred to propagate and periodically switch orientations between H1 and H2. The direction of greatest compression (σ3) is interpreted as perpendicular to the overall strike of wiggly compaction bands, and the band segments that are perpendicular to σ3 are pure compaction bands. Analysis of micropores shows that pure compaction bands have the greatest porosity, and may have a different failure mechanism. In discrete element modelling, a particle is used to represent a pore structure surrounded by several grains. Similar to actual pore structure, the breakable particle is compacted when the resultant force acting on the particle exceeds the yielding cap determined by the failure force (Ff) and aspect ratio of the cap ellipse (k). The discrete element model, built up of many breakable particles, is compressed to simulate the formation of compaction bands. The direction of propagation of compacted zones is determined by the cap aspect ratio (k). When k=0.5, compacted zones tend to propagate perpendicular to σ3, which corresponds to pure compaction bands. When k=2, two 45-degree directions are the predominant directions of compacted zones. The local stress state around a band tip is changed when it propagates, and the segment switches to the other direction when it reaches a critical length. As a result the wiggly compaction band takes on a wiggly pattern.

  14. NTP system simulation and detailed nuclear engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) & detailed nuclear engine modeling; modeling and engineering simulation of nuclear thermal rocket systems; nuclear thermal rocket simulation system; INSPI-NTVR core axial flow profiles; INSPI-NTRV core axial flow profiles; specific impulse vs. chamber pressure; turbine pressure ratio vs. chamber pressure; NERVA core axial flow profiles; P&W XNR2000 core axial flow profiles; pump pressure rise vs. chamber pressure; streamline of jet-induced flow in cylindrical chamber; flow pattern of a jet-induced flow in a chamber; and radiative heat transfer models.

  15. Extension of PENELOPE to protons: simulation of nuclear reactions and benchmark with Geant4.

    PubMed

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Vynckier, S

    2013-11-01

    Describing the implementation of nuclear reactions in the extension of the Monte Carlo code (MC) PENELOPE to protons (PENH) and benchmarking with Geant4. PENH is based on mixed-simulation mechanics for both elastic and inelastic electromagnetic collisions (EM). The adopted differential cross sections for EM elastic collisions are calculated using the eikonal approximation with the Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Slater atomic potential. Cross sections for EM inelastic collisions are computed within the relativistic Born approximation, using the Sternheimer-Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength. Nuclear elastic and inelastic collisions were simulated using explicitly the scattering analysis interactive dialin database for (1)H and ICRU 63 data for (12)C, (14)N, (16)O, (31)P, and (40)Ca. Secondary protons, alphas, and deuterons were all simulated as protons, with the energy adapted to ensure consistent range. Prompt gamma emission can also be simulated upon user request. Simulations were performed in a water phantom with nuclear interactions switched off or on and integral depth-dose distributions were compared. Binary-cascade and precompound models were used for Geant4. Initial energies of 100 and 250 MeV were considered. For cases with no nuclear interactions simulated, additional simulations in a water phantom with tight resolution (1 mm in all directions) were performed with FLUKA. Finally, integral depth-dose distributions for a 250 MeV energy were computed with Geant4 and PENH in a homogeneous phantom with, first, ICRU striated muscle and, second, ICRU compact bone. For simulations with EM collisions only, integral depth-dose distributions were within 1%/1 mm for doses higher than 10% of the Bragg-peak dose. For central-axis depth-dose and lateral profiles in a phantom with tight resolution, there are significant deviations between Geant4 and PENH (up to 60%/1 cm for depth-dose distributions). The agreement is much better with FLUKA, with deviations within

  16. Characterization and conditioning by cementation and compaction of ashes coming from simulated radwastes

    SciTech Connect

    Canadas, L.; Vale, J.; Salvador, L.

    1994-12-31

    The statement and the results of a systematic program of characterization and evaluation of conditioning by cementation and supercompaction of ashes coming from different simulated radwastes are presented. The main program objectives are to define the influence of the most important operating parameters of conditioning methods on the mechanical properties of the conditioned products and to obtain the guidelines for the optimization of their final storage, evaluating the achievable volume reduction and its relation with mechanical strength. The study is based on the physical and chemical characterization of the ashes and the determination of their behavior with respect to two conditioning methods: cementation and high pressure compaction, to determine the strength development, the mechanical stability, and the volume reduction achieved. The ashes are obtained by incineration of low activity simulated radwastes, which represent different real wastes with high volume to activity ratio. The conditioning by cementation is tested over a series of cementitious pastes made with two cement types, changing in ash and water content. Products are controlled by measuring volume, setting time, expansion, and strength. High pressure compaction tests are made at laboratory scale, measuring the ash volume reduction as a function of compacting pressure.

  17. Compaction and quenching of high-z galaxies in cosmological simulations: blue and red nuggets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Tweed, Dylan; Inoue, Shigeki; DeGraf, Colin; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel R.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.

    2015-07-01

    We use cosmological simulations to study a characteristic evolution pattern of high-redshift galaxies. Early, stream-fed, highly perturbed, gas-rich discs undergo phases of dissipative contraction into compact, star-forming systems (`blue' nuggets) at z ˜ 4-2. The peak of gas compaction marks the onset of central gas depletion and inside-out quenching into compact ellipticals (red nuggets) by z ˜ 2. These are sometimes surrounded by gas rings or grow extended dry stellar envelopes. The compaction occurs at a roughly constant specific star formation rate (SFR), and the quenching occurs at a constant stellar surface density within the inner kpc (Σ1). Massive galaxies quench earlier, faster, and at a higher Σ1 than lower mass galaxies, which compactify and attempt to quench more than once. This evolution pattern is consistent with the way galaxies populate the SFR-size-mass space, and with gradients and scatter across the main sequence. The compaction is triggered by an intense inflow episode, involving (mostly minor) mergers, counter-rotating streams or recycled gas, and is commonly associated with violent disc instability. The contraction is dissipative, with the inflow rate >SFR, and the maximum Σ1 anticorrelated with the initial spin parameter. The central quenching is triggered by the high SFR and stellar/supernova feedback (maybe also active galactic nucleus feedback) due to the high central gas density, while the central inflow weakens as the disc vanishes. Suppression of fresh gas supply by a hot halo allows the long-term maintenance of quenching once above a threshold halo mass, inducing the quenching downsizing.

  18. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE SWITCH REGION OF A COMPACT PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Caporaso, G J; Sullivan, J S

    2007-06-15

    A compact proton accelerator for medical applications is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The accelerator architecture is based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) concept. One critical area to consider is the switch region. Electric field simulations and thermal calculations of the switch area were performed to help determine the operating limits of rmed SiC switches. Different geometries were considered for the field simulation including the shape of the thin Indium solder meniscus between the electrodes and SiC. Electric field simulations were also utilized to demonstrate how the field stress could be reduced. Both transient and steady steady-state thermal simulations were analyzed to find the average power capability of the switches.

  19. Simulating compact quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atoms: probing confinement and nonperturbative effects.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2012-09-21

    Recently, there has been much interest in simulating quantum field theory effects of matter and gauge fields. In a recent work, a method for simulating compact quantum electrodynamics (CQED) using Bose-Einstein condensates has been suggested. We suggest an alternative approach, which relies on single atoms in an optical lattice, carrying 2l + 1 internal levels, which converges rapidly to CQED as l increases. That enables the simulation of CQED in 2 + 1 dimensions in both the weak and the strong coupling regimes, hence, allowing us to probe confinement as well as other nonperturbative effects of the theory. We provide an explicit construction for the case l = 1 which is sufficient for simulating the effect of confinement between two external static charges.

  20. Development of the Compact Jet Engine Simulator from concept to useful test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoedebecke, Blake Louis

    Two Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units were designed for integrated wind tunnel acoustic experiments involving a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) vehicle. To meet the 5.8% scale of the HWB model, Ultra Compact Combustor technology from the Air Force Research Laboratory was used. The CJES units were built and integrated with a control system in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel. The combustor liners, plug--vane and flow conditioner components were built in-house at Langley Research Center. The operation of the CJES units was mapped and fixes found for combustor instability tones and rig flow noise. The original concept remained true, but the internal hardware evolved through out the process. The CJES units sucssfully completed the HWB validation test and can be used for acoustic testing or propulsion integration studies that require jet engines.

  1. Diagenetic compaction of simulated anhydrite fault gouge under static conditions and implications for fault healing behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluymakers, A.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    For geological storage of CO2 in depleted oil and gas reservoirs to be effective, the stored gas must remain isolated from the atmosphere for thousands of years. Faults that cut the reservoir/seal system are considered one of the most likely leakage pathways, especially if fault reactivation leads to fault dilation. However, when fault movement ceases, newly formed fault gouge will heal as a function of time. To estimate the time scale on which such healing occurs, an understanding of the deformation mechanisms that control fault (gouge) compaction is needed. Anhydrite is a common caprock in many oil and gas fields around the world and in the Netherlands in particular, where anhydrite-capped reservoirs present several options for CO2 storage. For this reason, we performed uniaxial compaction experiments on simulated anhydrite fault gouge to investigate the deformation and healing processes that operate under simulated post-slip conditions, i.e. static conditions. The gouge was prepared by crushing and sieving nearly pure anhydrite (>95wt%) derived from exploration boreholes in the north of the Netherlands. Constant stress (5-12 MPa) and stress stepping experiments (5/7.5/10 MPa) were conducted at 80°C on fault gouge samples of different initial grain size (20-500μm), under both wet and dry conditions. We also performed preliminary experiments to determine the effect of CO2 on the healing behaviour of anhydrite gouge. Dry samples showed little or no compaction creep, whereas wet samples (i.e. samples flooded with saturated CaSO4 solution) showed compaction at easily measureable rates. In the case of wet samples, our mechanical data and microstructural observations showed that, for fine grain sizes and low stresses, the rate of gouge compaction is controlled by pressure solution under diffusion-control. With increasing grain size and stress, however, fluid-assisted subcritical microcracking becomes the dominant deformation mechanism. Pressurizing the pore fluid

  2. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  3. The diversity of evolutionary pathways of compact elliptical galaxies in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Observations of the high-redshift universe have revealed a population of galaxies which are already very massive (~1e11 solar masses at z=2) and have typical sizes of < 2 kpc, much smaller than their counterparts in the local universe. How such dense, massive galaxies form, and why they appear to be less common at low redshift, have been questions of interest for both theorists and observers. I will discuss these questions in the context of the Illustris simulation, a hydrodynamical cosmological simulation in which tens of thousands of galaxies form, evolve, and interact with each other, situated within a cosmological context. I select a group of massive compact galaxies at z=2 in the simulation and trace them back and forth in time to discover both how they formed at high redshift, and what they evolve into at the present day. I find a variety of both progenitors (compact galaxies form in the simulation either via central starbursts generally brought on by mergers, or by racing out to the tip of the SF main sequence and forming very early) and descendants (many formerly-compact galaxies lurk at the core of a more massive galaxy today, others were consumed in mergers, and some evolve passively and undisturbed). I will also discuss the implications of these results for observational methods of connecting galaxy populations across redshifts - in particular, the assumption of a constant cumulative comoving number density - and suggest an improvement to this method which takes the complexity and variety of galaxies' evolutionary paths into account.

  4. CALIBRATION AND HOT TESTING OF THE ADVANCED NUCLEAR MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS USED FOR WASTE CHARACTERIZATION IN COGEMA'S NEW ACC COMPACTION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Toubon, H.; Vuillier; Gain, T.; Huver, M.

    2003-02-27

    Spent nuclear fuel from commercial power reactors is reprocessed at the COGEMA plant in La Hague. After shearing and dissolution of the fuel assemblies, the hulls and nozzles are sent to COGEMA's new compaction facility (ACC) to reduce the final volume of waste. Technological waste generated in the reprocessing plant is also sent to the ACC facility. Compacted waste is characterized by two measurement stations: a gamma spectrometry station and an active and passive neutron measurement station. The main purpose of these measurement stations is to determine the guaranteed nuclear parameters of the compacted waste and their associated uncertainties: (1) total U and Pu masses, (2) Pu, Cm, and total alpha activities, (3) 137Cs, 90Sr-90Y,241Pu beta activities, (4) decay heat. After giving a description of the measurement stations, this paper will describe the qualification tests performed in the context of the ACC project. The extensive calibration tests performed on site with different sources and different waste matrices will be described (approximately 500 neutron and gamma experiments). Hot tests that were conducted after hot start-up at the end of 2001 and prior to the start of commercial operation will be also presented. A number of drums produced by the upstream facilities were introduced one by one into the ACC facility in order to avoid mixing of different fuel assemblies. This procedure allows comparison between characterization performed in the upstream facilities on the basis of fuel data available before processing and the measurements performed on the new ACC stations. These comparisons showed good agreement between the different methods of characterization and thus validated the innovative technologies and methods used by COGEMA for compacted waste generated by the ACC facility.

  5. Compact model of ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor for circuit simulation based on multidomain Landau–Kalathnikov theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Hidehiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Hattori, Junichi; Koike, Hanpei; Miyata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Mitsue; Sakai, Shigeki

    2017-04-01

    We report a new compact model for a ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor (FeFET) considering multiple ferroelectric domain structures that can be thermally activated. The dynamics of the electric polarization and the thermal activation rate are calculated on the basis of the Landau–Khalatnikov (LK) theory. We implement this compact model in a circuit simulator, SmartSPICE, using Verilog-A language for analog circuit simulations. The device characteristics of FeFETs reported in experiments are well fitted by our compact model. We also perform the circuit simulation for the inverter utilizing FeFETs by using this compact model. Unlike normal inverters composed of MOSFETs, the switching speed of the inverter changes with the voltage pulse before the operation.

  6. Size evolution of normal and compact galaxies in the EAGLE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, M.; Bower, R. G.; Crain, R. A.; Schaye, J.; Theuns, T.; Trayford, J. W.; Qu, Y.; Schaller, M.; Berthet, M.; Helly, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    We present the evolution of galaxy sizes, from redshift 2 to 0, for actively star forming and passive galaxies in the cosmological hydrodynamical 1003 cMpc3 simulation of the EAGLE project. We find that the sizes increase with stellar mass, but that the relation weakens with increasing redshift. Separating galaxies by their star formation activity, we find that passive galaxies are typically smaller than active galaxies at a fixed stellar mass. These trends are consistent with those found in observations and the level of agreement between the predicted and observed size-mass relations is of the order of 0.1 dex for z < 1 and 0.2-0.3 dex from redshift 1 to 2. We use the simulation to compare the evolution of individual galaxies with that of the population as a whole. While the evolution of the size-stellar mass relation for active galaxies provides a good proxy for the evolution of individual galaxies, the evolution of individual passive galaxies is not well represented by the observed size-mass relation due to the evolving number density of passive galaxies. Observations of z ˜ 2 galaxies have revealed an abundance of massive red compact galaxies, which depletes below z ˜ 1. We find that a similar population forms naturally in the simulation. Comparing these galaxies with their z = 0 descendants, we find that all compact galaxies grow in size due to the high-redshift stars migrating outwards. Approximately 60 per cent of the compact galaxies increase in size further due to renewed star formation and/or mergers.

  7. Filling of simulated lateral canals with gutta percha or resilon when using thermomechanical compaction

    PubMed Central

    Anna-Júnior, Arnaldo Sant’; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Duarte, Marco Antônio Hungaro; da Silva, Guilherme Ferreira; Bosso, Roberta; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the filling of simulated lateral canals with gutta-percha or Resilon when using thermomechanical compaction. Setting and Design: Forty-five human single-rooted teeth were subjected to tooth decalcification and clearing. Materials and Methods: After root canal preparation, artificial lateral canals were made at 2, 5, and 8 mm from the working length (WL), corresponding to the apical, middle, and cervical thirds, respectively. The specimens were divided (n = 15) according to the filling material: Dentsply gutta-percha (GD), Odous gutta-percha (GO), and Resilon cones (RE). Root canals were obturated by thermomechanical compaction using a #45 compactor and no sealer. Lateral canals were analyzed by digital radiography and digital images after tooth decalcification and clearing using the Image Tool software. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests at 5% significance. Results: In the coronal third, RE and GO presented more filling ability than GD (P < 0.05). In the middle and apical thirds, RE presented the best results. Conclusions: Resilon demonstrated filling ability as material for root canal obturation by using thermomechanical compaction. PMID:24944441

  8. A compact physical model for the simulation of pNML-based architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turvani, G.; Riente, F.; Plozner, E.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.; Breitkreutz-v. Gamm, S.

    2017-05-01

    Among emerging technologies, perpendicular Nanomagnetic Logic (pNML) seems to be very promising because of its capability of combining logic and memory onto the same device, scalability, 3D-integration and low power consumption. Recently, Full Adder (FA) structures clocked by a global magnetic field have been experimentally demonstrated and detailed characterizations of the switching process governing the domain wall (DW) nucleation probability Pnuc and time tnuc have been performed. However, the design of pNML architectures represent a crucial point in the study of this technology; this can have a remarkable impact on the reliability of pNML structures. Here, we present a compact model developed in VHDL which enables to simulate complex pNML architectures while keeping into account critical physical parameters. Therefore, such parameters have been extracted from the experiments, fitted by the corresponding physical equations and encapsulated into the proposed model. Within this, magnetic structures are decomposed into a few basic elements (nucleation centers, nanowires, inverters etc.) represented by the according physical description. To validate the model, we redesigned a FA and compared our simulation results to the experiment. With this compact model of pNML devices we have envisioned a new methodology which makes it possible to simulate and test the physical behavior of complex architectures with very low computational costs.

  9. Development of accurate waveform models for eccentric compact binaries with numerical relativity simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Eliu; Agarwal, Bhanu; Chua, Alvin; George, Daniel; Haas, Roland; Hinder, Ian; Kumar, Prayush; Moore, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    We recently constructed an inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveform model to describe the dynamical evolution of compact binaries on eccentric orbits, and used this model to constrain the eccentricity with which the gravitational wave transients currently detected by LIGO could be effectively recovered with banks of quasi-circular templates. We now present the second generation of this model, which is calibrated using a large catalog of eccentric numerical relativity simulations. We discuss the new features of this model, and show that its enhance accuracy makes it a powerful tool to detect eccentric signals with LIGO.

  10. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new computerized control system for a transient test reactor incorporates a simulator for pre-operational testing of control programs. The part of the simulator pertinent to the discussion here consists of two microprocessors. An 8086/8087 reactor simulator calculates simulated reactor power by solving the reactor kinetics equations. An 8086 instrument simulator takes the most recent power value developed by the reactor simulator and simulates the appropriate reading on each of the eleven reactor instruments. Since the system is required to run on a one millisecond cycle, careful programming was required to take care of all eleven instruments in that short time. This note describes the special programming techniques used to attain the needed performance.

  11. Rethinking Sensitivity Analysis of Nuclear Simulations with Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Paul Rosen; Andrea Alfonsi; Giovanni Pastore; Cristian Rabiti; Valerio Pascucci

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear engineering, understanding the safety margins of the nuclear reactor via simulations is arguably of paramount importance in predicting and preventing nuclear accidents. It is therefore crucial to perform sensitivity analysis to understand how changes in the model inputs affect the outputs. Modern nuclear simulation tools rely on numerical representations of the sensitivity information -- inherently lacking in visual encodings -- offering limited effectiveness in communicating and exploring the generated data. In this paper, we design a framework for sensitivity analysis and visualization of multidimensional nuclear simulation data using partition-based, topology-inspired regression models and report on its efficacy. We rely on the established Morse-Smale regression technique, which allows us to partition the domain into monotonic regions where easily interpretable linear models can be used to assess the influence of inputs on the output variability. The underlying computation is augmented with an intuitive and interactive visual design to effectively communicate sensitivity information to the nuclear scientists. Our framework is being deployed into the multi-purpose probabilistic risk assessment and uncertainty quantification framework RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual Control Environment). We evaluate our framework using an simulation dataset studying nuclear fuel performance.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Ground Coupling of Low Yield Nuclear Detonation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Without nuclear testing, advanced simulation and experimental facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ), are essential to assuring...in planning future experimental work at NIF . 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 93 14. SUBJECT TERMS National Ignition Facility, GEODYN, Ground Coupling...simulation and experimental facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ), are essential to assuring safety, reliability, and effectiveness

  13. Teaching About the Nuclear Power Controversy by Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Thomas

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple simulation for teaching secondary students about nuclear power as a source of energy by having them role play various interest groups. Game rules, including division of class members into four interest groups, are described. The author suggests eight references that would be useful for the simulation. (Author/DB)

  14. The use of a non-nuclear density gauge for monitoring the compaction process of asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den bergh, Wim; Vuye, Cedric; Kara, Patricia; Couscheir, Karolien; Blom, Johan; Van Bouwel, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical performance of an asphalt pavement affects its durability – thus carbon footprint. Many parameters contribute to the success of a durable asphalt mix, e.g. material selection, an accurate mix and even the road design in which the asphalt mix quality is quantified. The quality of the asphalt mix, by its mechanical properties, is also related to the compaction degree. However, and specifically for high volume rates, the laying process at the construction site needs an effective method to monitor and adjust immediately the compaction quality before cooling and without damaging the layer, which is now absent. In this paper the use of a non-nuclear density gauge (PQI – Pavement Quality Indicator) is evaluated, based on a site at Brussels Airport. Considering the outcome of the present research, this PQI is advised as a unique tool for continuous density measurements and allow immediate adjustments during compaction, and decreases the number of core drilling for quality control, and as a posteriori asphalt pavement density test where cores are prohibited. The use of PQI could be recommended to be a part of the standard quality control process in the Flemish region.

  15. Reservoir simulation in a North Sea reservoir experiencing significant compaction drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.C.; Jewell, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Valhall field in the Norwegian North Sea is a high porosity chalk reservoir undergoing primary pressure depletion. Over the last ten years there have been a number of computer modeling studies of the field which have all assumed an original oil-in-place of approximately 2,000 MMSTB (318.0{times}10{sup 6}m{sup 3}) to the present due to the addition of wells and the optimization of completion techniques. However, the single most important and unique feature influencing Valhall long term production performance is reservoir rock compaction. This paper describes the mathematical model used to simulate reservoir performance in a compacting reservoir with specific discussion regarding the proportion of oil produced by each physical recovery process. An understanding of the recovery mechanisms and their relative importance is critical for the successful management of the field. This paper also presents an alternative method for evaluating the various recovery processes using a simple solution to the material balance equation. This is used to substantiate the magnitude of the various recovery mechanisms identified in the simulation model.

  16. Hyperthermal Environments Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Engine Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Clifton, W. B.; Hickman, Robert R.; Wang, Ten-See; Dobson, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    An arc-heater driven hyperthermal convective environments simulator was recently developed and commissioned for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket materials. This newly established non-nuclear testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce hightemperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of nuclear reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects, and is intended to serve as a low-cost facility for supporting non-nuclear developmental testing of hightemperature fissile fuels and structural materials. The resulting reactor environments simulator represents a valuable addition to the available inventory of non-nuclear test facilities and is uniquely capable of investigating and characterizing candidate fuel/structural materials, improving associated processing/fabrication techniques, and simulating reactor thermal hydraulics. This paper summarizes facility design and engineering development efforts and reports baseline operational characteristics as determined from a series of performance mapping and long duration capability demonstration tests. Potential follow-on developmental strategies are also suggested in view of the technical and policy challenges ahead. Keywords: Nuclear Rocket Engine, Reactor Environments, Non-Nuclear Testing, Fissile Fuel Development.

  17. Sea level static calibration of a compact multimission aircraft propulsion simulator with inlet flow distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Won, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of propulsion-integrated aircraft models have identified inlet flow distortion as a major source of compressor airflow measurement error in turbine-powered propulsion simulators. Consequently, two Compact Multimission Aircraft Propulsion Simulator (CMAPS) units were statically tested at sea level ambient conditions to establish simulator operating performance characteristics and to calibrate the compressor airflow against an accurate bellmouth flowmeter in the presence of inlet flow distortions. The distortions were generated using various-shaped wire mesh screens placed upstream of the compressor. CMAPS operating maps and performance envelopes were obtained for inlet total pressure distortions (ratio of the difference between the maximum and minimum total pressures to the average total pressure) up to 35 percent, and were compared to baseline simulator operating characteristics for a uniform inlet. Deviations from CMAPS baseline performance were attributed to the coupled variation of both compressor inlet-flow distortion and Reynolds number index throughout the simulator operating envelope for each screen configuration. Four independent methods were used to determine CMAPS compressor airflow; direct compressor inlet and discharge measurements, an entering/exiting flow-balance relationships, and a correlation between the mixer pressure and the corrected compressor airflow. Of the four methods, the last yielded the least scatter in the compressor flow coefficient, approximately + or - 3 percent over the range of flow distortions.

  18. Development of Northeast Asia Nuclear Power Plant Accident Simulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyub; Kim, Juyoul; Po, Li-Chi Cliff

    2016-11-24

    A conclusion from the lessons learned after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident was that Korea needs a tool to estimate consequences from a major accident that could occur at a nuclear power plant located in a neighboring country. This paper describes a suite of computer-based codes to be used by Korea's nuclear emergency response staff for training and potentially operational support in Korea's national emergency preparedness and response program. The systems of codes, Northeast Asia Nuclear Accident Simulator (NANAS), consist of three modules: source-term estimation, atmospheric dispersion prediction and dose assessment. To quickly assess potential doses to the public in Korea, NANAS includes specific reactor data from the nuclear power plants in China, Japan and Taiwan. The completed simulator is demonstrated using data for a hypothetical release.

  19. A compact neutron beam generator system designed for prompt gamma nuclear activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D

    2011-08-01

    In this work a compact system was designed for bulk sample analysis using the technique of PGNAA. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source, a moderator/reflector/filter assembly, and a suitable enclosure to delimit the resulting neutron beam. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimised to maximise the thermal neutron component useful for samples analysis with a suitably low level of beam contamination. The neutron beam delivered by this compact system is used to irradiate the sample and the prompt gamma rays produced by neutron reactions within the sample elements are detected by appropriate gamma rays detector. Neutron and gamma rays transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP5).

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SIMULATORS FOR SOVIET-DESIGNED NUCLEAR REACTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kohut, P.; Tutu, N.K.; Cleary, E.J.; Erickson, K.G.; Yoder, J.; Kroshilin, A.

    2001-01-07

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE), under the US government's International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators, are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper.

  1. Length scale effects of friction in particle compaction using atomistic simulations and a friction scaling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, T. W.; Horstemeyer, M. F.

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to illustrate and quantify the length scale effects related to interparticle friction under compaction. Previous studies have shown as the length scale of a specimen decreases, the strength of a single crystal metal or ceramic increases. The question underlying this research effort continues the thought—If there is a length scale parameter related to the strength of a material, is there a length scale parameter related to friction? To explore the length scale effects of friction, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using an embedded atom method potential were performed to analyze the compression of two spherical FCC nickel nanoparticles at different contact angles. In the MD model study, we applied a macroscopic plastic contact formulation to determine the normal plastic contact force at the particle interfaces and used the average shear stress from the MD simulations to determine the tangential contact forces. Combining this information with the Coulomb friction law, we quantified the MD interparticle coefficient of friction and showed good agreement with experimental studies and a Discrete Element Method prediction as a function of contact angle. Lastly, we compared our MD simulation friction values to the tribological predictions of Bhushan and Nosonovsky (BN), who developed a friction scaling model based on strain gradient plasticity and dislocation-assisted sliding that included a length scale parameter. The comparison revealed that the BN elastic friction scaling model did a much better job than the BN plastic scaling model of predicting the coefficient of friction values obtained from the MD simulations.

  2. Simulation of polymer removal from a powder injection molding compact by thermal debinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Y. C.; Yu, S. C. M.; Tam, K. C.; Shengjie, Ying

    2000-10-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is an important net-shape manufacturing process. Thermal debinding is a common methodology for the final removal of residual polymer from a PIM compact prior to sintering. This process is an intricate combination of evaporation, liquid and gas migration, pyrolysis of polymer, and heat transfer in porous media. A better understanding of thermal debinding could lead to optimization of the process to prevent the formation of defects. Simulation of the process based on an integrated mathematical model for mass and heat transfer in porous media is proposed. The mechanisms of mass transport, i.e., liquid flow, gas flow, vapor diffusion, and convection, as well as the phase transitions of polymer, and their interactions, are included in the model. The macroscopic partial differential equations are formulated by volume averaging of the microscopic conservation laws. The basic equations consist of mass conservation and energy conservation and are solved numerically. Polymer residue, pressure, and temperature distributions are predicted. The importance of the various mass transfer mechanisms is evaluated. The effects of key mass transfer parameters on thermal debinding are discussed. It is revealed from the results that the assumed binder front, which is supposed to recede into the powder compact as removal progresses, does not exist. The mass flux of polymer liquid is of the same order of the mass flux of polymer vapor in the gas phase, and the polymer vapor diffusion in the liquid phase is negligible.

  3. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric hydrodynamical Bondi-Hoyle accretion on to a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2015-12-01

    Bondi-Hoyle accretion configurations occur as soon as a gravitating body is immersed in an ambient medium with a supersonic relative velocity. From wind-accreting X-ray binaries to runaway neutron stars, such a regime has been witnessed many times and is believed to account for shock formation, the properties of which can be only marginally derived analytically. In this paper, we present the first results of the numerical characterization of the stationary flow structure of Bondi-Hoyle accretion on to a compact object, from the large-scale accretion radius down to the vicinity of the compact body. For different Mach numbers, we study the associated bow shock. It turns out that those simulations confirm the analytical prediction by Foglizzo & Ruffert concerning the topology of the inner sonic surface with an adiabatic index of 5/3. They also enable us to derive the related mass accretion rates, the position and the temperature of the bow shock, as function of the flow parameters, along with the transverse density and temperature profiles in the wake.

  4. Application of artificial neural networks to compact mask models in optical lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo, Viviana; Fühner, Tim; Erdmann, Andreas; Evanschitzky, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Compact mask models provide an alternative to speed up rigorous mask diffraction computation based on electromagnetic field (EMF) modeling. The high time expense of the rigorous mask models in the simulation process challenges the exploration of innovative modeling techniques to compromise accuracy and speed in the computation of the diffracted field and vectorial imaging in optical lithographic systems. The Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach is presented as an alternative to retrieve the spectrum of the mask layout in an accurate yet efficient way. The validity of the ANN for different illuminations, feature sizes, pitches and shapes is investigated. The evaluation of the performance of this approach is performed by a process windows analysis, comparison of the spectra, best focus and critical dimension (CD) through pitch. The application of various layouts demonstrated that the ANN can also be trained with different patterns to reproduce various effects such as: shift of the line position, different linewidths and line ends. Comparisons of the ANN approach with other compact models such as boundary layer model, pulses modification, spectrum correction and pupil filtering techniques are presented.

  5. Index of Nuclear Weapon Effects Simulators. Sanitized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    FEBATRON 705, PULSERAD 1590, and the SHIVA STAR facility. 6 SIMULATOR: Annjlar Core Reseerch Reactor TYPE: Radiation AGENCY: Department of Energy LOCATION...LOCATION: Colorado Springs, CO POINT OF CONJTACT: Donald Bryce KAMAN SclenCLS Corporation 1500 Garden of the Gods Road Colorado Springs, CO 80933 41 p...Sciences Corporation (K.SC) LOCATION: €01C~o,’do Springs, CO POINT OF COTACT: Mr. Glenn Roark Kaman Sciences Coroorat on " .’ 1500 Garden of the Gods

  6. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  7. Off-line programming and simulation in handling nuclear components

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.P.

    1993-10-01

    IGRIP was used to create a simulation of the robotic workcell design for handling components at the PANTEX nuclear arms facility. This initial simulation identified problems with the customer`s proposed worker layout, and allowed a correction to be proposed. Refinement of the IGRIP simulation allowed the design and construction of a workcell mock-up and accurate off-line programming of the system. IGRIP`s off-line programming capabilities are being used to develop the motion control code for the workcell. PNLs success in this area suggests that simulation and off-line programming may be valuable tools for developing robotics in some automation resistant industries.

  8. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low beta compact toroid injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui

    2009-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low {beta} compact toroid (CT) injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into CT fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). A regime is identified in terms of CT injection speed and CT-to-background magnetic field ratio that appears promising for precise core fueling. Shock-dominated regimes, which are probably unfavorable for tokamak fueling, are also identified. The CT penetration depth is proportional to the CT injection speed and density. The entire CT evolution can be divided into three stages: (1) initial penetration, (2) compression in the direction of propagation and reconnection, and (3) coming to rest and spreading in the direction perpendicular to injection. Tilting of the CT is not observed due to the fast transit time of the CT across the background plasma.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of compact gamma cameras based on avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Després, Philippe; Funk, Tobias; Shah, Kanai S; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2007-06-07

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs), and in particular position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs), are an attractive alternative to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for reading out scintillators for PET and SPECT. These solid-state devices offer high gain and quantum efficiency, and can potentially lead to more compact and robust imaging systems with improved spatial and energy resolution. In order to evaluate this performance improvement, we have conducted Monte Carlo simulations of gamma cameras based on avalanche photodiodes. Specifically, we investigated the relative merit of discrete and PSAPDs in a simple continuous crystal gamma camera. The simulated camera was composed of either a 4 x 4 array of four channels 8 x 8 mm2 PSAPDs or an 8 x 8 array of 4 x 4 mm2 discrete APDs. These configurations, requiring 64 channels readout each, were used to read the scintillation light from a 6 mm thick continuous CsI:Tl crystal covering the entire 3.6 x 3.6 cm2 photodiode array. The simulations, conducted with GEANT4, accounted for the optical properties of the materials, the noise characteristics of the photodiodes and the nonlinear charge division in PSAPDs. The performance of the simulated camera was evaluated in terms of spatial resolution, energy resolution and spatial uniformity at 99mTc (140 keV) and 125I ( approximately 30 keV) energies. Intrinsic spatial resolutions of 1.0 and 0.9 mm were obtained for the APD- and PSAPD-based cameras respectively for 99mTc, and corresponding values of 1.2 and 1.3 mm FWHM for 125I. The simulations yielded maximal energy resolutions of 7% and 23% for 99mTc and 125I, respectively. PSAPDs also provided better spatial uniformity than APDs in the simple system studied. These results suggest that APDs constitute an attractive technology especially suitable to build compact, small field of view gamma cameras dedicated, for example, to small animal or organ imaging.

  10. The status of general relativistic simulations of compact binary mergers as engines of short gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios

    2017-05-01

    Black hole - neutron star (BHNS) and neutron star - neutron star (NSNS) binaries are perhaps the most popular progenitors for short-hard gamma ray bursts. After about two decades of numerical relativity simulations of binary compact objects we are beginning to understand the necessary ingredients for jets to emerge from these systems following merger. We report on the latest development of this field summarizing the results from state-of-the-art numerical relativity (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations of compact binary mergers as progenitors of short-hard gamma-ray bursts.

  11. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G.; Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S.

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison of

  12. Survey of Dynamic Simulation Programs for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Troy J. Tranter; Daryl R. Haefner

    2008-06-01

    The absence of any industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other industries. Modeling programs to simulate the dynamic behavior of nuclear fuel separations and processing were originally developed to support the US government’s mission of weapons production and defense fuel recovery. Consequently there has been little effort is the US devoted towards improving this specific process simulation capability during the last two or three decades. More recent work has been focused on elucidating chemical thermodynamics and developing better models of predicting equilibrium in actinide solvent extraction systems. These equilibrium models have been used to augment flowsheet development and testing primarily at laboratory scales. The development of more robust and complete process models has not kept pace with the vast improvements in computational power and user interface and is significantly behind simulation capability in other chemical processing and separation fields.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of breast tumor imaging properties with compact, discrete gamma cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, G.J.; Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    The authors describe Monte Carlo simulation results for breast tumor imaging using a compact, discrete gamma camera. The simulations were designed to analyze and optimize camera design, particularly collimator configuration and detector pixel size. Simulated planar images of 5--15 mm diameter tumors in a phantom patient (including a breast, torso, and heart) were generated for imaging distances of 5--55 mm, pixel sizes of 2 x 2--4 x 4 mm{sup 2}, and hexagonal and square hole collimators with sensitivities from 4,000 to 16,000 counts/mCi/sec. Other factors considered included T/B (tumor-to-background tissue uptake ratio) and detector energy resolution. Image properties were quantified by computing the observed tumor fwhm (full-width at half-maximum) and S/N (sum of detected tumor events divided by the statistical noise). Results suggest that hexagonal and square hole collimators perform comparably, that higher sensitivity collimators provide higher tumor S/N with little increase in the observed tumor fwhm, that smaller pixels only slightly improve tumor fwhm and S/N, and that improved detector energy resolution has little impact on either the observed tumor fwhm or the observed tumor S/N.

  14. Hyperthermal Environments Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Engine Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Foote, J. P.; Clifton, W. B.; Hickman, R. R.; Wang, T.-S.; Dobson, C. C.

    An arc-heater driven hyperthermal convective environments simulator was recently developed and commissioned for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket materials. This newly established non-nuclear testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilised constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurised hydrogen flows representative of nuclear reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects, and is intended to serve as a low-cost facility for supporting non-nuclear developmental testing of high-temperature fissile fuels and structural materials. The resulting reactor environments simulator represents a valuable addition to the available inventory of non-nuclear test facilities and is uniquely capable of investigating and characterising candidate fuel/structural materials, improving associated processing/ fabrication techniques, and simulating reactor thermal hydraulics. This paper summarizes facility design and engineering development efforts and reports baseline operational characteristics as determined from a series of performance mapping and long duration capability demonstration tests. Potential follow-on developmental strategies are also suggested in view of the technical and policy challenges ahead.

  15. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed.

  16. Pressing device for producing compacts from source material in powder form in particular pulverized nuclear reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, G.; Adelmann, M.; Konigs, W.; Wendorf, W.

    1984-04-17

    Pressing device for producing compacts from source material in powder form, in particular pulverized nuclear reactor fuel having a die-plate contained in platen and a bore associated with a ram, for receiving source material powder, a filling shoe, and a reservoir for powder connected by a hose to the filling shoe. The device is characterized by a passing wheel in the filling shoe as filling aid means; a tube containing a feedscrew disposed between the reservoir and hose as metering means; the reservoir having a bottom part with a can type place-on part with an opening eccentric to the axis; a coupling part and a cover part are placed on the open part of the can, these parts are also provided with a passageway to the feedscrew eccentric to the longitudinal axis.

  17. Pasta Elasticity: Molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta is expected in the inner crust of neutron stars at densities near the nuclear saturation density. In this work, the elastic properties of pasta are calculated from large scale molecular dynamics simulations by deforming the simulation volume. Our model uses a semi-classical two-nucleon potential that reproduces nuclear saturation. We report the shear modulus and breaking strain of a variety of pasta phases for different temperatures, densities, and proton fractions. The presence of pasta in neutron stars could have significant effects on crustal oscillations and could be inferred from observations of soft-gamma repeaters. Additionally, these elastic parameters will enable us to improve estimates of the maximum size and lifetime of ``mountains'' on the crust, which could efficiently radiate gravitational waves.

  18. Recent Progress in Nuclear Lattice Simulations with Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.

    2007-10-01

    This proceedings article summarizes recent work presented at Chiral Dynamics 2006 on nuclear lattice simulations with chiral effective field theory for light nuclei. This work has been done in collaboration with Bubar {gra} Borasoy , Evgeny Epelbaum, Hermann Krebs, and Ulf-G. Meißner.

  19. Simulation studies for a nuclear photon pumped excimer laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. G.; Hagefstration, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simulation studies were undertaken to determine the feasibility of a nuclear photon pumped excimer laser using a system where high pressure Xe is bombarded with electrons and protons to form 1720 A. Primary measurements included conversion efficiency and gain vs time measurements.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of a compact microbeam radiotherapy system based on carbon nanotube field emission technology.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Eric C; Chang, Sha X

    2012-08-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiotherapy technique that has shown potent antitumor effects with minimal damage to normal tissue in animal studies. This unique form of radiation is currently only produced in a few large synchrotron accelerator research facilities in the world. To promote widespread translational research on this promising treatment technology we have proposed and are in the initial development stages of a compact MRT system that is based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We report on a Monte Carlo based feasibility study of the compact MRT system design. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using EGSnrc-based codes. The proposed small animal research MRT device design includes carbon nanotube cathodes shaped to match the corresponding MRT collimator apertures, a common reflection anode with filter, and a MRT collimator. Each collimator aperture is sized to deliver a beam width ranging from 30 to 200 μm at 18.6 cm source-to-axis distance. Design parameters studied with Monte Carlo include electron energy, cathode design, anode angle, filtration, and collimator design. Calculations were performed for single and multibeam configurations. Increasing the energy from 100 kVp to 160 kVp increased the photon fluence through the collimator by a factor of 1.7. Both energies produced a largely uniform fluence along the long dimension of the microbeam, with 5% decreases in intensity near the edges. The isocentric dose rate for 160 kVp was calculated to be 700 Gy∕min∕A in the center of a 3 cm diameter target. Scatter contributions resulting from collimator size were found to produce only small (<7%) changes in the dose rate for field widths greater than 50 μm. Dose vs depth was weakly dependent on filtration material. The peak-to-valley ratio varied from 10 to 100 as the separation between adjacent microbeams varies from 150 to 1000 μm. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the proposed compact MRT system

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of a compact microbeam radiotherapy system based on carbon nanotube field emission technology

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Eric C.; Chang, Sha X.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiotherapy technique that has shown potent antitumor effects with minimal damage to normal tissue in animal studies. This unique form of radiation is currently only produced in a few large synchrotron accelerator research facilities in the world. To promote widespread translational research on this promising treatment technology we have proposed and are in the initial development stages of a compact MRT system that is based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We report on a Monte Carlo based feasibility study of the compact MRT system design. Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using EGSnrc-based codes. The proposed small animal research MRT device design includes carbon nanotube cathodes shaped to match the corresponding MRT collimator apertures, a common reflection anode with filter, and a MRT collimator. Each collimator aperture is sized to deliver a beam width ranging from 30 to 200 μm at 18.6 cm source-to-axis distance. Design parameters studied with Monte Carlo include electron energy, cathode design, anode angle, filtration, and collimator design. Calculations were performed for single and multibeam configurations. Results: Increasing the energy from 100 kVp to 160 kVp increased the photon fluence through the collimator by a factor of 1.7. Both energies produced a largely uniform fluence along the long dimension of the microbeam, with 5% decreases in intensity near the edges. The isocentric dose rate for 160 kVp was calculated to be 700 Gy/min/A in the center of a 3 cm diameter target. Scatter contributions resulting from collimator size were found to produce only small (<7%) changes in the dose rate for field widths greater than 50 μm. Dose vs depth was weakly dependent on filtration material. The peak-to-valley ratio varied from 10 to 100 as the separation between adjacent microbeams varies from 150 to 1000 μm. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate

  2. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  3. Special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of two-component outflow powered by magnetic explosion on compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Jin; Masada, Youhei; Asano, Eiji; Shibata, Kazunari

    2011-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of the outflow driven by magnetic explosion on the surface of compact object is investigated through special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We adopt, as an initial equilibrium state, a spherical stellar object embedded in the hydrostatic plasma which has a density ρ(r) ~ r-α and is threaded by a dipole magnetic field. The injection of magnetic energy at the surface of compact star breaks the dynamical equilibrium and triggers two-component outflow. At the early evolutionary stage, the magnetic pressure increases rapidly in time around the stellar surface, initiating a magnetically driven outflow. Then it excites a strong forward shock, shock driven outflow. The expansion velocity of the magnetically driven outflow is characterized by the Alfvén velocity on the stellar surface, and follows a simple scaling relation υmag ~ υA1/2. When the initial density profile declines steeply with radius, the strong shock is accelerated self-similarly to relativistic velocity ahead of the magnetically driven component. We find that the evolution of the strong forward shock can be described by a self-similar relation Γsh ~ rsh, where Γsh is the Lorentz factor of the plasma measured at the shock surface rsh. It should be stressed that the pure hydrodynamic process is responsible for the acceleration of the shock driven outflow. Our two-component outflow model, which is the natural outcome of the magnetic explosion, would deepen the understanding of the magnetic active phenomena on various magnetized stellar objects.

  4. Simulations of the temporal and spatial resolution for a compact time-resolved electron diffractometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2016-02-01

    A novel compact electron gun for use in time-resolved gas electron diffraction experiments has recently been designed and commissioned. In this paper we present and discuss the extensive simulations that were performed to underpin the design in terms of the spatial and temporal qualities of the pulsed electron beam created by the ionisation of a gold photocathode using a femtosecond laser. The response of the electron pulses to a solenoid lens used to focus the electron beam has also been studied. The simulated results show that focussing the electron beam affects the overall spatial and temporal resolution of the experiment in a variety of ways, and that factors that improve the resolution of one parameter can often have a negative effect on the other. A balance must, therefore, be achieved between spatial and temporal resolution. The optimal experimental time resolution for the apparatus is predicted to be 416 fs for studies of gas-phase species, while the predicted spatial resolution of better than 2 nm-1 compares well with traditional time-averaged electron diffraction set-ups.

  5. Compact hybrid solar simulator with the spectral match beyond class A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguckis, Artūras; Novičkovas, Algirdas; Mekys, Algirdas; Tamošiūnas, Vincas

    2016-07-01

    A compact hybrid solar simulator with the spectral match beyond class A is proposed. Six types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and tungsten halogen lamps in total were employed to obtain spectral match with <25% deviation from the standardized one in twelve spectral ranges between 400 and 1100 nm. All spectral ranges were twice as narrow than required by IEC 60904-9 Ed.2.0 and ASTM E927-10(2015) standards. Nonuniformity of the irradiance was evaluated and <2% deviation from the average value of the irradiance (corresponding to A class nonuniformity) can be obtained for the area of >3-cm diameter. A theoretical analysis was performed to evaluate possible performance of our simulator in the case of GaInP/GaAs/GaInAsP/GaInAs four-junction tandem solar cells and AM1.5D (ASTM G173-03 standard) spectrum. Lack of ultraviolet radiation in comparison to standard spectrum leads to 6.94% reduction of short-circuit current, which could be remedied with 137% increase of the output from blue LEDs. Excess of infrared radiation from halogen lamps outside ranges specified by standards is expected to lead to ˜0.77% voltage increase.

  6. FEM simulation of the die compaction of pharmaceutical products: influence of visco-elastic phenomena and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Harona; Mazel, Vincent; Busignies, Virginie; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2013-09-10

    This work studies the influence of visco-elastic behavior in the finite element method (FEM) modeling of die compaction of pharmaceutical products and how such a visco-elastic behavior may improve the agreement between experimental and simulated compression curves. The modeling of the process was conducted on a pharmaceutical excipient, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), by using Drucker-Prager cap model coupled with creep behavior in Abaqus(®) software. The experimental data were obtained on a compaction simulator (STYLCAM 200R). The elastic deformation of the press was determined by performing experimental tests on a calibration disk and was introduced in the simulation. Numerical optimization was performed to characterize creep parameters. The use of creep behavior in the simulations clearly improved the agreement between the numerical and experimental compression curves (stresses, thickness), mainly during the unloading part of the compaction cycle. For the first time, it was possible to reproduce numerically the fact that the minimum tablet thickness is not obtained at the maximum compression stress. This study proves that creep behavior must be taken into account when modeling the compaction of pharmaceutical products using FEM methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. General relativistic simulations of compact binary mergers as engines for short gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios

    2017-04-01

    Black hole—neutron star (BHNS) and neutron star—neutron star (NSNS) binaries are among the favored candidates for the progenitors of the black hole—disk systems that may be the engines powering short-hard gamma ray bursts. After almost two decades of simulations of binary NSNSs and BHNSs in full general relativity we are now beginning to understand the ingredients that may be necessary for these systems to launch incipient jets. Here, we review our current understanding, and summarize the surprises and lessons learned from state-of-the-art (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations in full general relativity of BHNS and NSNS mergers as jet engines for short-hard gamma-ray bursts. We also propose a new approach to probing the nuclear equation of state by virtue of multimessenger observations.

  8. An investigation of the physico-mechanical properties of pharmaceutical compounds by compaction simulator and nano-indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordawekar, Mangesh

    In early development, pharmaceutical formulation scientists are often faced with challenges of developing robust and scalable formulations in extremely stringent timelines based on limited API quantities. Hence, tablet formulation development would benefit significantly from tools that enable predictive analysis based on limited quantities of API to enable selection of excipients with appropriate physico-mechanical properties that would result in robust and scalable formulations. With the recent technological advances, especially in sensor technologies, tools such as the compaction simulator, and instrumented nanoindentation offer hitherto unavailable means of assessing material properties with limited quantities. The goal of this work was to evaluate the physico-mechanical properties of selected pharmaceutical excipients and active pharmaceutical ingredients using a macro-scale analysis technique (compaction simulator), and a micro-scale analysis technique (nanoindentation tester) and compare the results obtained from these techniques in order to determine whether a rank order correlation exists between the two. Excipients representing diverse physic-mechanical properties, and a group of APIs were selected for the study. For the compaction simulator studies, tablets were uniaxially compressed using a flat faced 11.28mm round tooling on the STYLCAM® 200R compaction simulator, to a target final porosity at two different cam speeds (5 rpm and 25 rpm). The force displacement profiles, plastic, elastic, and total compression energies, plasticity index, energy density and the Heckel plots were determined for each compact. These compacts were further analyzed with a Berkovich geometry indenter. The plasticity index, hardness, elastic modulus, as well as creep and relaxation were determined from the force-displacement profiles. The nature of force-displacement curves was studied to differentiate compounds based on predominant mechanisms of deformation. Compaction

  9. Nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernova simulations with realistic nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togashi, H.; Nakazato, K.; Takehara, Y.; Yamamuro, S.; Suzuki, H.; Takano, M.

    2017-05-01

    A new table of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) based on realistic nuclear potentials is constructed for core-collapse supernova numerical simulations. Adopting the EOS of uniform nuclear matter constructed by two of the present authors with the cluster variational method starting from the Argonne v18 and Urbana IX nuclear potentials, the Thomas-Fermi calculation is performed to obtain the minimized free energy of a Wigner-Seitz cell in non-uniform nuclear matter. As a preparation for the Thomas-Fermi calculation, the EOS of uniform nuclear matter is modified so as to remove the effects of deuteron cluster formation in uniform matter at low densities. Mixing of alpha particles is also taken into account following the procedure used by Shen et al. (1998, 2011). The critical densities with respect to the phase transition from non-uniform to uniform phase with the present EOS are slightly higher than those with the Shen EOS at small proton fractions. The critical temperature with respect to the liquid-gas phase transition decreases with the proton fraction in a more gradual manner than in the Shen EOS. Furthermore, the mass and proton numbers of nuclides appearing in non-uniform nuclear matter with small proton fractions are larger than those of the Shen EOS. These results are consequences of the fact that the density derivative coefficient of the symmetry energy of our EOS is smaller than that of the Shen EOS.

  10. NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Aug 15, 2002 to Nov. 15, 2002) - DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Lawrence Townsend; Martin Williamson; Rupy Sawhney; Jacob Fife

    2002-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. This report covers the ninth quarter of the project. The three reactor concept teams have completed initial plant concept development, evaluation and layout. A significant design effort has proceeded with substantial change and evolution from original ideas. The concepts have been reviewed by the industry participants and improvements have been implemented. The third phase, industrial engineering simulation of reactor fabrication has begun.

  11. Protein unfolding transitions in an intrinsically unstable annexin domain: molecular dynamics simulation and comparison with nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tru; Smith, Jeremy C; Sanson, Alain

    2002-08-01

    Unfolding transitions of an intrinsically unstable annexin domain and the unfolded state structure have been examined using multiple approximately 10-ns molecular dynamics simulations. Three main basins are observed in the configurational space: native-like state, compact partially unfolded or intermediate compact state, and the unfolded state. In the native-like state fluctuations are observed that are nonproductive for unfolding. During these fluctuations, after an initial loss of approximately 20% of the core residue native contacts, the core of the protein transiently completely refolds to the native state. The transition from the native-like basin to the partially unfolded compact state involves approximately 75% loss of native contacts but little change in the radius of gyration or core hydration properties. The intermediate state adopts for part of the time in one of the trajectories a novel highly compact salt-bridge stabilized structure that can be identified as a conformational trap. The intermediate-to-unfolded state transition is characterized by a large increase in the radius of gyration. After an initial relaxation the unfolded state recovers a native-like topology of the domain. The simulated unfolded state ensemble reproduces in detail experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data and leads to a convincing complete picture of the unfolded domain.

  12. Mechanism of formation of wiggly compaction bands in porous sandstone: 2. Numerical simulation using discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Pollard, David D.; Gu, Kai; Shi, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Wiggly compaction bands in porous aeolian sandstone vary from chevron shape to wavy shape to nearly straight. In some outcrops these variations occur along a single band. A bonded close-packed discrete element model is used to investigate what mechanical properties control the formation of wiggly compaction bands (CBs). To simulate the volumetric yielding failure of porous sandstone, a discrete element shrinks when the force state of one of its bonds reaches the yielding cap defined by the failure force and the aspect ratio (k) of the yielding ellipse. A Matlab code "MatDEM3D" has been developed on the basis of this enhanced discrete element method. Mechanical parameters of elements are chosen according to the elastic properties and the strengths of porous sandstone. In numerical simulations, the failure angle between the band segment and maximum principle stress decreases from 90° to approximately 45° as k increases from 0.5 to 2, and compaction bands vary from straight to chevron shape. With increasing strain, subsequent compaction occurs inside or beside compacted elements, which leads to further compaction and thickening of bands. The simulations indicate that a greater yielding stress promotes chevron CBs, and a greater cement strength promotes straight CBs. Combined with the microscopic analysis introduced in the companion paper, we conclude that the shape of wiggly CBs is controlled by the mechanical properties of sandstone, including the aspect ratio of the yielding ellipse, the critical yielding stress, and the cement strength, which are determined primarily by petrophysical attributes, e.g., grain sorting, porosity, and cementation.

  13. The High Field Compact Approach in Nuclear Fusion: Present and Foreseeable Developments vs. Damnatio Memoriae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillantini, P.; Coppi, B.; Grasso, G.

    2016-10-01

    A confirmation of the fact that the most promising approach, in the effort to demonstrate experimentally that fusion burning D-T plasmas can reach near-ignition conditions, is that of high field compact (HFC) machines, has come from recent analyses of confinement experiments conducted over the years. In fact, this approach can be adopted to begin investigations of D-D and D-3 He burning regimes. An important development that can be used in these experiments is that of high field super-conductor technology. This technology was pioneered with the adoption and design of the largest (vertical field) coils of the Ignitor machine using MgB2 super-conductors cooled to about 10oK. The use of hybrid magnets combining MgB2 and high temperature super-conductors to reach the needed high fields for all the machine components has been proposed also with a specific configuration for envisioned future experiments. A surprising occurrence, related to the ideas at the basis of the HFC machine approach has been the practice of the ``damnatio memoriae'' inflicted on their originators. Sponsored in part by the U.S. D.O.E.

  14. MITEE-B: A Compact Ultra Lightweight Bi-Modal Nuclear Propulsion Engine for Robotic Planetary Science Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Paniagua, John; Borowski, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) enables unique new robotic planetary science missions that are impossible with chemical or nuclear electric propulsion systems. A compact and ultra lightweight bi-modal nuclear engine, termed MITEE-B (MInature ReacTor EnginE - Bi-Modal) can deliver 1000's of kilograms of propulsive thrust when it operates in the NTP mode, and many kilowatts of continuous electric power when it operates in the electric generation mode. The high propulsive thrust NTP mode enables spacecraft to land and takeoff from the surface of a planet or moon, to hop to multiple widely separated sites on the surface, and virtually unlimited flight in planetary atmospheres. The continuous electric generation mode enables a spacecraft to replenish its propellant by processing in-situ resources, provide power for controls, instruments, and communications while in space and on the surface, and operate electric propulsion units. Six examples of unique and important missions enabled by the MITEE-B engine are described, including: (1) Pluto lander and sample return; (2) Europa lander and ocean explorer; (3) Mars Hopper; (4) Jupiter atmospheric flyer; (5) SunBurn hypervelocity spacecraft; and (6) He3 mining from Uranus. Many additional important missions are enabled by MITEE-B. A strong technology base for MITEE-B already exists. With a vigorous development program, it could be ready for initial robotic science and exploration missions by 2010 AD. Potential mission benefits include much shorter in-space times, reduced IMLEO requirements, and replenishment of supplies from in-situ resources.

  15. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following; nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) engine system analysis program development; nuclear thermal propulsion engine analysis capability requirements; team resources used to support NESS development; expanded liquid engine simulations (ELES) computer model; ELES verification examples; NESS program development evolution; past NTP ELES analysis code modifications and verifications; general NTP engine system features modeled by NESS; representative NTP expander, gas generator, and bleed engine system cycles modeled by NESS; NESS program overview; NESS program flow logic; enabler (NERVA type) nuclear thermal rocket engine; prismatic fuel elements and supports; reactor fuel and support element parameters; reactor parameters as a function of thrust level; internal shield sizing; and reactor thermal model.

  16. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  17. Compact Detection System for High Sensitivity Hydrogen Profiling of Materials by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel Keith; Urban, Ben; Pacheco, Jose

    2009-03-10

    Hydrogen is a ubiquitous contaminant that is known to have dramatic effects on the electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties of many types of materials in even minute quantities. Thus, the detection of hydrogen in materials is of major importance. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) is a powerful technique for nondestructive profiling hydrogen in materials. However, NRA has found only limited use in many applications because of poor sensitivity due to cosmic ray background (CSRB). Most attempts to eliminate CSRB to achieve ppm detection levels using higher energy nuclear reactions or tons of passive shielding are not compatible with commercial ion beam analysis space and equipment requirements Zimmerman, et al. have previously reported upon a coincidence detector that meets IBA space requirements and reduces the cosmic ray background, but the detector suffers from lower detection efficiency and small sample size. We have replaced the BGO well detector in the Zimmerman coincidence detection scheme with a larger Nal well detector and used faster timing electronics to produce a detector that can handle larger samples with higher detection efficiency, and still eliminate cosmic ray background.

  18. Simulating Compact Elliptical Galaxy Formation by Tidal Stripping for Comparison to the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Christine; Snyder, Elaine M.; Kannappan, Sheila; Sinha, Manodeep; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    Observations of compact elliptical galaxies (cEs) have uncovered abnormally high velocity dispersions and surface brightnesses for objects of their mass. These properties indicate that they may be the tidally stripped remnants of larger disk galaxies. We test this tidal stripping scenario using N-body simulations of cE formation with the Gadget-2 code. We track the velocity dispersions of stellar particles within the half-light radius throughout our simulations, which allows us to compare our simulated galaxies with velocity dispersion data for cEs in the RESOLVE survey. We first consider initial conditions similar to published work, which report stripping of a large spiral galaxy (stellar mass ~ 10^11 solar masses) to cE size in a cluster potential. We find that the density of the disk galaxy is too high to allow it to lose particles to the less dense cluster. We argue that the initial position of the galaxy with respect to the cluster as well as the large size of the cluster particles in comparison to the size of the galaxy particles artificially heightened the stripping percentages reported in previous work. We hypothesize that only a dwarf galaxy with a shallower density profile can be stripped to cE size, and we present initial efforts to test this idea. We simulate a dwarf galaxy based on a real system in the RESOLVE survey, with stellar mass 10^9 solar masses and half-light radius 1.15 kpc. Within ~700 pc our dwarf is denser than our cluster, suggesting the stripped remnant should be close to the size of RESOLVE cEs. This radius contains approximately 13% of the total stellar mass of the galaxy, or ~2 x 10^8 solar masses. We therefore expect our stripped remnant to be at least this massive, although the impact parameter of the orbit will determine how much mass is actually removed. We discuss the position of our simulated galaxies compared to RESOLVE cEs in the velocity dispersion vs. mass plane. This research has been supported by National Science

  19. Multi-pass Monte Carlo simulation method in nuclear transmutations.

    PubMed

    Mateescu, Liviu; Kadambi, N Prasad; Ravindra, Nuggehalli M

    2016-12-01

    Monte Carlo methods, in their direct brute simulation incarnation, bring realistic results if the involved probabilities, be they geometrical or otherwise, remain constant for the duration of the simulation. However, there are physical setups where the evolution of the simulation represents a modification of the simulated system itself. Chief among such evolving simulated systems are the activation/transmutation setups. That is, the simulation starts with a given set of probabilities, which are determined by the geometry of the system, the components and by the microscopic interaction cross-sections. However, the relative weight of the components of the system changes along with the steps of the simulation. A natural measure would be adjusting probabilities after every step of the simulation. On the other hand, the physical system has typically a number of components of the order of Avogadro's number, usually 10(25) or 10(26) members. A simulation step changes the characteristics for just a few of these members; a probability will therefore shift by a quantity of 1/10(25). Such a change cannot be accounted for within a simulation, because then the simulation should have then a number of at least 10(28) steps in order to have some significance. This is not feasible, of course. For our computing devices, a simulation of one million steps is comfortable, but a further order of magnitude becomes too big a stretch for the computing resources. We propose here a method of dealing with the changing probabilities, leading to the increasing of the precision. This method is intended as a fast approximating approach, and also as a simple introduction (for the benefit of students) in the very branched subject of Monte Carlo simulations vis-à-vis nuclear reactors.

  20. Neutron pulse simulation in nuclear waste for waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Toffer, H.; Watson, W.T.; Roetman, V.E.

    1993-12-01

    The numerical simulations discussed in this paper show how analysis with computer-generated illustrations can be used to explain the concepts and advantages of pulsed neutron systems for tank waste evaluations. Furthermore, the analysis-illustration approach lends itself to parametric studies evaluating design features of hardware before it is fabricated. Nuclear material characteristics of hazardous or toxic simulants can be evaluated before preparing them or finding nontoxic or nonhazardous substitutes that will exhibit similar nuclear properties. Pulsed neutron systems hold significant promise for partial characterization of tank waste. The device could operate in a high background gamma radiation field and provide important information on moisture concentrations, fissionable material contents, and material interfaces quickly and at considerably less cost than obtainable from sample analyses.

  1. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  2. Investigation of Flow Conditioners for Compact Jet Engine Simulator Rig Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.

    2011-01-01

    The design requirements for two new Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units for upcoming wind tunnel testing lead to the distinct possibility of rig noise contamination. The acoustic and aerodynamic properties of several flow conditioner devices are investigated over a range of operating conditions relevant to the CJES units to mitigate the risk of rig noise. An impinging jet broadband noise source is placed in the upstream plenum of the test facility permitting measurements of not only flow conditioner self-noise, but also noise attenuation characteristics. Several perforated plate and honeycomb samples of high porosity show minimal self-noise but also minimal attenuation capability. Conversely, low porosity perforated plate and sintered wire mesh conditioners exhibit noticeable attenuation but also unacceptable self-noise. One fine wire mesh sample (DP450661) shows minimal selfnoise and reasonable attenuation, particularly when combined in series with a 15.6 percent open area (POA) perforated plate upstream. This configuration is the preferred flow conditioner system for the CJES, providing up to 20 dB of broadband attenuation capability with minimal self-noise.

  3. Hydraulic performance of compacted clay liners under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Aldaeef, A A; Rayhani, M T

    2015-10-01

    Compacted clay liners (CCLs) are commonly used as hydraulic barriers in several landfill applications to isolate contaminants from the surrounding environment and minimize the escape of leachate from the landfill. Prior to waste placement in landfills, CCLs are often exposed to temperature fluctuations which can affect the hydraulic performance of the liner. Experimental research was carried out to evaluate the effects of daily thermal cycles on the hydraulic performance of CCLs under simulated landfill conditions. Hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on different soil specimens after being exposed to various thermal and dehydration cycles. An increase in the CCL hydraulic conductivity of up to one order of magnitude was recorded after 30 thermal cycles for soils with low plasticity index (PI = 9.5%). However, medium (PI = 25%) and high (PI = 37.2%) plasticity soils did not show significant hydraulic deviation due to their self-healing potential. Overlaying the CCL with a cover layer minimized the effects of daily thermal cycles, and maintained stable hydraulic performance in the CCLs even after exposure to 60 thermal cycles. Wet-dry cycles had a significant impact on the hydraulic aspect of low plasticity CCLs. However, medium and high plasticity CCLs maintained constant hydraulic performance throughout the test intervals. The study underscores the importance of protecting the CCL from exposure to atmosphere through covering it by a layer of geomembrane or an interim soil layer.

  4. THE OFF-CENTERED SEYFERT-LIKE COMPACT EMISSION IN THE NUCLEAR REGION OF NGC 3621

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Silva, Patricia da

    2016-02-01

    We analyze an optical data cube of the nuclear region of NGC 3621, taken with the integral field unit of the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph. We found that the previously detected central line emission in this galaxy actually comes from a blob, located at a projected distance of 2.″14 ± 0.″08 (70.1 ± 2.6 pc) from the stellar nucleus. Only diffuse emission was detected in the rest of the field of view, with a deficit of emission at the position of the stellar nucleus. Diagnostic diagram analysis reveals that the off-centered emitting blob has a Seyfert 2 spectrum. We propose that the line-emitting blob may be a “fossil” emission-line region or a light “echo” from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), which was significantly brighter in the past. Our estimates indicate that the bolometric luminosity of the AGN must have decreased by a factor of ∼13–500 during the past ∼230 yr. A second scenario to explain the morphology of the line-emitting areas in the nuclear region of NGC 3621 involves no decrease of the AGN bolometric luminosity and establishes that the AGN is highly obscured toward the observer but not toward the line-emitting blob. The third scenario proposed here assumes that the off-centered line-emitting blob is a recoiling supermassive black hole, after the coalescence of two black holes. Finally, an additional hypothesis is that the central X-ray source is not an AGN, but an X-ray binary. This idea is consistent with all the scenarios we proposed.

  5. Simulation of nuclear quadrupole resonance for sensor probe optimization.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Junichiro; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Itozaki, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    A simulation method to estimate the detection efficiency of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was proposed for optimizing a sensing probe operating at radio frequencies (RFs). It first calculates the transmitted magnetic field from the probe coil to the target sample. The nuclei make quadrupole resonance by it. We considered this nonlinear reaction to estimate NQR emission by the nuclei. Then the received NQR signal intensity from the sample at the probe coil. We calculated the efficiency by testing two different probe types (solenoid and gradiometer) and by changing the relative positions of the probe and sample. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Simulation of compact circumstellar shells around Type Ia supernovae and the resulting high-velocity features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    For Type Ia supernovae that are observed prior to B-band maximum (approximately 18-20 days after the explosion) Ca absorption features are observed at velocities of order 10,000 km/s faster than the typical photospheric features. These high velocity features weaken in the first couple of weeks, disappearing entirely by a week after B-band maximum. The source of this high velocity material is uncertain: it may be the result of interaction between the supernova and circumstellar material or may be the result of plumes or bullets of material ejected during the course of the explosion. We simulate interaction between a supernova and several compact circumstellar shells, located within 0.03 solar radii of the progenitor white dwarf and having masses of 0.02 solar masses or less. We use FLASH to perform hydrodynamic simulations of the system to determine the structure of the ejecta and shell components after the interaction, then use these results to generate synthetic spectra with 1 day cadence for the first 25 days after the explosion. We compare the evolution of the velocity and pseudo-equivalent width of the Ca near-infrared triplet features in the synthetic spectra to observed values, demonstrating that these models are consistent with observations. Additionally, we fit the observed spectra of SN 2011fe (Parrent 2012, Pereira 2013) prior to B-band maximum using these models and synthetic spectra and provide an estimate for Ca abundance within the circumstellar material with implications for the mechanism by which the white dwarf explodes.

  7. Large-Scale Simulation of Nuclear Reactors: Issues and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Merzari, Elia; Obabko, Aleks; Fischer, Paul; Halford, Noah; Walker, Justin; Siegel, Andrew; Yu, Yiqi

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation has been an intrinsic part of nuclear engineering research since its inception. In recent years a transition is occurring toward predictive, first-principle-based tools such as computational fluid dynamics. Even with the advent of petascale computing, however, such tools still have significant limitations. In the present work some of these issues, and in particular the presence of massive multiscale separation, are discussed, as well as some of the research conducted to mitigate them. Petascale simulations at high fidelity (large eddy simulation/direct numerical simulation) were conducted with the massively parallel spectral element code Nek5000 on a series of representative problems. These simulations shed light on the requirements of several types of simulation: (1) axial flow around fuel rods, with particular attention to wall effects; (2) natural convection in the primary vessel; and (3) flow in a rod bundle in the presence of spacing devices. The focus of the work presented here is on the lessons learned and the requirements to perform these simulations at exascale. Additional physical insight gained from these simulations is also emphasized.

  8. Adaptive Sampling Algorithms for Probabilistic Risk Assessment of Nuclear Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diego Mandelli; Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear simulations are often computationally expensive, time-consuming, and high-dimensional with respect to the number of input parameters. Thus exploring the space of all possible simulation outcomes is infeasible using finite computing resources. During simulation-based probabilistic risk analysis, it is important to discover the relationship between a potentially large number of input parameters and the output of a simulation using as few simulation trials as possible. This is a typical context for performing adaptive sampling where a few observations are obtained from the simulation, a surrogate model is built to represent the simulation space, and new samples are selected based on the model constructed. The surrogate model is then updated based on the simulation results of the sampled points. In this way, we attempt to gain the most information possible with a small number of carefully selected sampled points, limiting the number of expensive trials needed to understand features of the simulation space. We analyze the specific use case of identifying the limit surface, i.e., the boundaries in the simulation space between system failure and system success. In this study, we explore several techniques for adaptively sampling the parameter space in order to reconstruct the limit surface. We focus on several adaptive sampling schemes. First, we seek to learn a global model of the entire simulation space using prediction models or neighborhood graphs and extract the limit surface as an iso-surface of the global model. Second, we estimate the limit surface by sampling in the neighborhood of the current estimate based on topological segmentations obtained locally. Our techniques draw inspirations from topological structure known as the Morse-Smale complex. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of using a global prediction model versus local topological view of the simulation space, comparing several different strategies for adaptive sampling in both

  9. COMPACT STELLAR BINARY ASSEMBLY IN THE FIRST NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS AND r-PROCESS SYNTHESIS IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; MacLeod, Morgan; Trenti, Michele; Roberts, Luke F.; Lee, William H.; Saladino-Rosas, Martha I.

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of elemental abundances in the ancient and most metal deficient stars are extremely important because they serve as tests of variable nucleosynthesis pathways and can provide critical inferences of the type of stars that lived and died before them. The presence of r-process elements in a handful of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP-r) stars, which are assumed to be closely connected to the chemical yield from the first stars, is hard to reconcile with standard neutron star mergers. Here we show that the production rate of dynamically assembled compact binaries in high-z nuclear star clusters can attain a sufficient high value to be a potential viable source of heavy r-process material in CEMP-r stars. The predicted frequency of such events in the early Galaxy, much lower than the frequency of Type II supernovae but with significantly higher mass ejected per event, can naturally lead to a high level of scatter of Eu as observed in CEMP-r stars.

  10. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Fuel Element Testing in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). Last year NTREES was successfully used to satisfy a testing milestone for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) project and met or exceeded all required objectives.

  11. Nuclear signal simulation applied to gas ionizing chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Coulon, Romain; Dumazert, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Particle transport codes used in detector simulation allow the calculation of the energy deposited by charged particles produced following an interaction. The pulses temporal shaping is more and more used in nuclear measurement into pulse shape analysis techniques. A model is proposed in this paper to simulate the pulse temporal shaping and the associated noise level thanks to the output track file PTRAC provides by Monte-Carlo particle transport codes. The model has been dedicated to ion chambers and more especially for High Pressure Xenon chambers HPXe where the pulse shape analysis can resolve some issues regarding with this technology as the ballistic deficit phenomenon. The model is fully described and an example is presented as a validation of such full detector simulation. (authors)

  12. Accident sequences simulated at the Juragua nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1998-08-01

    Different hypothetical accident sequences have been simulated at Unit 1 of the Juragua nuclear power plant in Cuba, a plant with two VVER-440 V213 units under construction. The computer code MELCOR was employed for these simulations. The sequences simulated are: (1) a design-basis accident (DBA) large loss of coolant accident (LOCA) with the emergency core coolant system (ECCS) on, (2) a station blackout (SBO), (3) a small LOCA (SLOCA) concurrent with SBO, (4) a large LOCA (LLOCA) concurrent with SBO, and (5) a LLOCA concurrent with SBO and with the containment breached at time zero. Timings of important events and source term releases have been calculated for the different sequences analyzed. Under certain weather conditions, the fission products released from the severe accident sequences may travel to southern Florida.

  13. Towards automated mapping of lake ice using RADARSAT-2 and simulated RCM compact polarimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, Claude

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Ice Service (CIS) produces a weekly ice fraction product (a text file with a single lake-wide ice fraction value, in tenth, estimated for about 140 large lakes across Canada and northern United States) created from the visual interpretation of RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR dual-polarization (HH and HV) imagery, complemented by optical satellite imagery (AVHRR, MODIS and VIIRS). The weekly ice product is generated in support of the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) needs for lake ice coverage in their operational numerical weather prediction model. CIS is interested in moving from its current (manual) way of generating the ice fraction product to a largely automated process. With support from the Canadian Space Agency, a project was recently initiated to assess the potential of polarimetric SAR data for lake ice cover mapping in light of the upcoming RADARSAT Constellation Mission (to be launched in 2018). The main objectives of the project are to evaluate: 1) state-of-the-art image segmentation algorithms and 2) RADARSAT-2 polarimetric and simulated RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM) compact polarimetric SAR data for ice/open water discrimination. The goal is to identify the best segmentation algorithm and non-polarimetric/polarimetric parameters for automated lake ice monitoring at CIS. In this talk, we will present the background and context of the study as well as initial results from the analysis of RADARSAT-2 Standard Quad-Pol data acquired during the break-up and freeze-up periods of 2015 on Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories.

  14. Quantum simulations of nuclei and nuclear pasta with the multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagert, I.; Fann, G. I.; Fattoyev, F. J.; Postnikov, S.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Neutron star and supernova matter at densities just below the nuclear matter saturation density is expected to form a lattice of exotic shapes. These so-called nuclear pasta phases are caused by Coulomb frustration. Their elastic and transport properties are believed to play an important role for thermal and magnetic field evolution, rotation, and oscillation of neutron stars. Furthermore, they can impact neutrino opacities in core-collapse supernovae. Purpose: In this work, we present proof-of-principle three-dimensional (3D) Skyrme Hartree-Fock (SHF) simulations of nuclear pasta with the Multi-resolution ADaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulations (MADNESS). Methods: We perform benchmark studies of 16O, 208Pb, and 238U nuclear ground states and calculate binding energies via 3D SHF simulations. Results are compared with experimentally measured binding energies as well as with theoretically predicted values from an established SHF code. The nuclear pasta simulation is initialized in the so-called waffle geometry as obtained by the Indiana University Molecular Dynamics (IUMD) code. The size of the unit cell is 24 fm with an average density of about ρ =0.05 fm-3 , proton fraction of Yp=0.3 , and temperature of T =0 MeV. Results: Our calculations reproduce the binding energies and shapes of light and heavy nuclei with different geometries. For the pasta simulation, we find that the final geometry is very similar to the initial waffle state. We compare calculations with and without spin-orbit forces. We find that while subtle differences are present, the pasta phase remains in the waffle geometry. Conclusions: Within the MADNESS framework, we can successfully perform calculations of inhomogeneous nuclear matter. By using pasta configurations from IUMD it is possible to explore different geometries and test the impact of self-consistent calculations on the latter.

  15. The impact of compaction and leachate recirculation on waste degradation in simulated landfills.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae Hac; Yang, Fan; Xu, Qiyong

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the impact of compaction and leachate recirculation on anaerobic degradation of municipal solid waste (MSW) at different methane formation phases. Two stainless steel lysimeters, C1 and C2, were constructed by equipping a hydraulic cylinder to apply pressure load (42kPs) on the MSW. When MSW started to produce methane, C1 was compacted, but C2 was compacted when the methane production rate declined from the peak generation rate. Methane production of C1was inhibited by the compaction and resulted in producing a total of 106L methane (44L/kgVS). However, the compaction in C2 promoted MSW degradation resulting in producing a total of 298L methane (125L/kgVS). The concentrations of volatile fatty acids and chemical oxygen demand showed temporary increases, when pressure load was applied. It was considered that the increased substrate accessibility within MSW by compaction could cause either the inhibition or the enhancement of methane production, depending the tolerability of methanogens on the acidic inhibition. Leachate recirculation also gave positive effects on methane generation from wet waste in the decelerated methanogenic phase by increasing mass transfer and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Upgrades to the NESS (Nuclear Engine System Simulation) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittje, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the President's Vision for Space Exploration, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) concept is being evaluated as a potential propulsion technology for human expeditions to the moon and Mars. The need for exceptional propulsion system performance in these missions has been documented in numerous studies, and was the primary focus of a considerable effort undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's. The NASA Glenn Research Center is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies with the aid of the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) code. This paper presents the additional capabilities and upgrades made to this code in order to perform higher fidelity NTR propulsion system analysis and design.

  17. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  18. Compact groups from the Millennium Simulations - I. Their nature and the completeness of the Hickson sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Giménez, Eugenia; Mamon, Gary A.

    2010-12-01

    We identify compact groups of galaxies (CGs) within mock galaxy catalogues from the Millennium Simulation at z= 0 with the semi-analytic models (SAMs) of galaxy formation of Bower et al., Croton et al. and De Lucia & Blaizot. CGs are identified using the same 2D criteria as those visually applied by Hickson (1982) to his CGs (HCGs), but with a brightest galaxy magnitude limit, and we also add the important effect of observers blending close projected pairs. Half of the mock CGs identified in projection contain at least four accordant velocities (mvCGs), versus 70 per cent for HCGs. In comparison to mvCGs, the HCGs are only 8 per cent complete at distances <9000 km s-1, missing the CGs with small angular sizes, a strongly dominant galaxy, and (for the second SAM) the mvCGs that are fainter and those with lower surface brightness. 10 per cent of the mock mvCGs are identical to the parent virialized group, meaning that they are isolated, while the remainder are embedded in their parent virialized groups. We explore different ways to determine the fraction of physically dense groups given the data from the simulations. Binding energy criteria turn out to be inapplicable given the segregation between galaxies and dark matter particles. We rely instead on the combination of the three-dimensional length of the CGs (maximum real space galaxy separation) and their elongation along the line of sight (ratio of maximum line-of-sight to maximum projected separations), restricting ourselves in both cases to the smallest quartets within the CGs. We find that between 64 and 80 per cent (depending on the SAM) of the mvCGs have 3D lengths shorter than 200 h-1 kpc, between 71 and 80 per cent have line-of-sight elongations less than 2, while between 59 and 76 per cent have either 3D lengths shorter than 100 h-1 kpc or both lengths shorter than 200 h-1 kpc and elongations smaller than 2. Therefore, chance alignments (CAs) of galaxies concern at most 40 per cent of the mvCGs. These CAs

  19. Used nuclear fuel separations process simulation and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, C.; Krebs, J.F.; Copple, J.M.; Frey, K.E.; Maggos, L.E.; Figueroa, J.; Willit, J.L.; Papadias, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Recent efforts in separations process simulation at Argonne have expanded from the traditional focus on solvent extraction flowsheet design in order to capture process dynamics and to simulate other components, processing and systems of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For example, the Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction (AMUSE) code has been enhanced to make it both more portable and more readily extensible. Moving away from a spreadsheet environment makes the addition of new species and processes simpler for the expert user, which should enable more rapid implementation of chemical models that simulate evolving processes. The dyAMUSE (dynamic AMUSE) version allows the simulation of transient behavior across an extractor. Electrochemical separations have now been modeled using spreadsheet codes that simulate the electrochemical recycle of fast reactor fuel. The user can follow the evolution of the salt, products, and waste compositions in the electro-refiner, cathode processors, and drawdown as a function of fuel batches treated. To further expand capabilities in integrating multiple unit operations, a platform for linking mathematical models representing the different operations that comprise a reprocessing facility was adapted to enable systems-level analysis and optimization of facility functions. (authors)

  20. Nuclear power plant simulators: their use in operator training and requalification

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.W.; Baer, D.K.; Francis, C.C.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of a study performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the capabilities and use of nuclear power plant simulators either built or being built by the US nuclear power industry; to determine the adequacy of existing standards for simulator design and for the training of power plant operators on simulators; and to assess the issues about simulator training programs raised by the March 28, 1979, accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2.

  1. Collisional Effects in Simulations of High Altitude Nuclear Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanim

    2013-10-01

    The simulation of the later-time (> 1 second) debris dynamics of a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE) require, at a minimum, an understanding of the interaction of the ionized blast material with the relatively collisional upper ionosphere and lower exosphere (<= 200 km). At these altitudes, the collisional mean free path of ionized atmospheric particles may become smaller than the length scale of the diamagnetic bubble. Here we report on the local dynamics about the debris/air interface for Starfish Prime like, and lower energy, HANEs at altitudes in which collisionality becomes important. We model the debris dynamics with the hybrid plasma simulation code KIM3D, and use a standard Miller-Combi particle pairing algorithm to model particle collisions. We demonstrate new dynamics associated with finite collisionality in mildly collisional HANEs.

  2. Allosteric mechanisms of nuclear receptors: insights from computational simulations.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Jonathan A G; Gallastegui, Nerea; Osguthorpe, David J; Hagler, Arnold T; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2014-08-05

    The traditional structural view of allostery defines this key regulatory mechanism as the ability of one conformational event (allosteric site) to initiate another in a separate location (active site). In recent years computational simulations conducted to understand how this phenomenon occurs in nuclear receptors (NRs) has gained significant traction. These results have yield insights into allosteric changes and communication mechanisms that underpin ligand binding, coactivator binding site formation, post-translational modifications, and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, substantial efforts have been made in understanding the dynamic processes involved in ligand binding and coregulator recruitment to different NR conformations in order to predict cell/tissue-selective pharmacological outcomes of drugs. They also have improved the accuracy of in silico screening protocols so that nowadays they are becoming part of optimisation protocols for novel therapeutics. Here we summarise the important contributions that computational simulations have made towards understanding the structure/function relationships of NRs and how these can be exploited for rational drug design.

  3. Vitamin C supplementation enhances compact morulae formation but reduces the hatching blastocyst rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Rui-Zhe; Cui, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Zhe; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, is capable of significantly improving the developmental competence of porcine and mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of vitamin C on the developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were investigated. The results indicated that vitamin C (40 μg/mL) positively affected the scavenging of intracellular ROS, cleavage rate at 24 h (76.67 vs. 68.26%, p<0.05), compact morulae formation (60.83 vs. 51.30%, p<0.05), and the blastomere apoptosis index (3.70 ± 1.41 vs. 4.43% ± 1.65, p<0.05) of bovine SCNT embryos. However, vitamin C supplementation did not significantly affect the blastocyst formation rate and proportion of inner cell mass over total cells per blastocyst on day 7. Moreover, vitamin C supplementation obviously impaired the total cell numbers per blastocyst (97.20 ± 11.35 vs. 88.57 ± 10.43, p<0.05) on day 7 and the hatching blastocysts formation rate on day 9 (26.51 vs. 50.65%, p<0.05) compared with that of the untreated group. Vitamin C supplementation preferentially improved the viability of bovine SCNT embryos prior to the blastocyst stage, but did not enhance the formation and quality of blastocysts in vitro. In conclusion, the effect of vitamin C on the development of bovine SCNT embryos is complex, and vitamin C is not a suitable antioxidant chemical for the in vitro culture of bovine SCNT embryos.

  4. Experimental study of quantum simulation for quantum chemistry with a nuclear magnetic resonance simulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Boruo; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-10-13

    Quantum computers have been proved to be able to mimic quantum systems efficiently in polynomial time. Quantum chemistry problems, such as static molecular energy calculations and dynamical chemical reaction simulations, become very intractable on classical computers with scaling up of the system. Therefore, quantum simulation is a feasible and effective approach to tackle quantum chemistry problems. Proof-of-principle experiments have been implemented on the calculation of the hydrogen molecular energies and one-dimensional chemical isomerization reaction dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance systems. We conclude that quantum simulation will surpass classical computers for quantum chemistry in the near future.

  5. Gaining insight into effective metrology height through the use of a compact CDSEM model for lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chao; Graves, Trey; Vaglio Pret, Alessandro; Robertson, Stewart; Smith, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Computer simulation of lithographic performance, including resist CD, film thickness, sidewall angle and profile has been extensively studied during the past three decades. Lithography simulation has been widely adopted as an enabling technology for high-volume chip manufacturing. However, measurement artifacts arising from CD-SEM metrology are typically ignored in simulation, due to the difficulty of accurately modeling the effect of the CD-SEM at acceptable computational speed. In this paper, we demonstrate how CD measurements can be improved by including a fast, compact CD-SEM model. For example, the variation in effective resist metrology height along contour lines extracted from a simulated CD-SEM image is characterized for a range of structures through focus. We also demonstrate how SEM settings affect the shape of extracted SEM contour and metrology height at contour edge. The Edge Placement Error (EPE) caused by SEM artifact is carefully studied.

  6. THIEF: An interactive simulation of nuclear materials safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Stanbro, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The safeguards community is facing an era in which it will be called upon to tighten protection of nuclear material. At the same time, it is probable that safeguards will face more competition for available resources from other activities such as environmental cleanup. To exist in this era, it will be necessary to understand and coordinate all aspects of the safeguards system. Because of the complexity of the interactions involved, this process puts a severe burden on designers and operators of safeguards systems. This paper presents a simulation tool developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to allow users to examine the interactions among safeguards elements as they apply to combating the insider threat. The tool consists of a microcomputer-based simulation in which the user takes the role of the insider trying to remove nuclear material from a facility. The safeguards system is run by the computer and consists of both physical protection and MC A computer elements. All data elements describing a scenario can be altered by the user. The program can aid in training, as well as in developing threat scenarios. 4 refs.

  7. Simulation of the flow through randomly arranged porous media using a compact finite difference immersed boundary solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malico, Isabel; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo

    2011-11-01

    At flow rates between 10 compact finite difference immersed boundary flow solver to simulate the flow through randomly arranged porous media with different porosity values. The unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a Cartesian staggered grid with fourth-order Runge-Kutta temporal discretization and fourth-order compact schemes for spatial discretization. The porous media is implemented through body forces that allow for the imposition of boundary conditions that coincide with the computational grid. The support of FCT, Portugal (SFRH/BPD/48160/2008) is acknowledged.

  8. Nuclear Star Forming Ring of the Milky Way: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungsoo S.; Saitoh, T. R.; Jeon, M.; Merritt, D.; Figer, D. F.; Wada, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of gas clouds in the central kpc region of the Milky Way that is modeled with a three-dimensional bar potential. Our simulations consider realistic gas cooling and heating, star formation, and supernova feedback. As found in previous two-dimensional simulations, gas clouds undergo an abrupt loss of angular momentum at the cusps of the innermost closed, elongated orbits along the bar (X1 orbits), plunge to a new family of orbits much deeper in the potential (X2 orbits), and accumulate there forming the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). We find that the gas clouds in the X2 orbits can reach high enough densities to form stars, and our star formation rates are consistent with observationally inferred SFR values, a fraction of 0.1 M⊙ yr-1, obtained by Yusef-Zadeh et al. Star formation in our simulations takes place mostly in the outermost X2 orbits with a radius of 200 pc, and this suggests that the star formation observed in the CMZ may be a mini version the of nuclear star forming ring seen in some external disk galaxies.

  9. MCNP Simulation Benchmarks for a Portable Inspection System for Narcotics, Explosives, and Nuclear Material Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Krystal; Elsalim, Mashal; King, Michael; Strellis, Dan; Gozani, Tsahi

    2013-04-01

    MCNPX simulations have been used to guide the development of a portable inspection system for narcotics, explosives, and special nuclear material (SNM) detection. The system seeks to address these threats to national security by utilizing a high-yield, compact neutron source to actively interrogate the threats and produce characteristic signatures that can then be detected by radiation detectors. The portability of the system enables rapid deployment and proximity to threats concealed in small spaces. Both dD and dT electronic neutron generators (ENG) were used to interrogate ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and cocaine hydrochloride, and the detector response of NaI, CsI, and LaBr3 were compared. The effect of tungsten shielding on the neutron flux in the gamma ray detectors was investigated, while carbon, beryllium, and polyethylene ENG moderator materials were optimized by determining the reaction rate density in the threats. In order to benchmark the modeling results, experimental measurements are compared with MCNPX simulations. In addition, the efficiency and die-away time of a portable differential die-away analysis (DDAA) detector using 3He proportional counters for SNM detection has been determined.

  10. Three Dimensional Simulation of the Baneberry Nuclear Event

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I

    2003-07-16

    Baneberry, a 10-kiloton nuclear event, was detonated at a depth of 278 m at the Nevada Test Site on December 18, 1970. Shortly after detonation, radioactive gases emanating from the cavity were released into the atmosphere through a shock-induced fissure near surface ground zero. Extensive geophysical investigations, coupled with a series of 1D and 2D computational studies were used to reconstruct the sequence of events that led to the catastrophic failure. However, the geological profile of the Baneberry site is complex and inherently three-dimensional, which meant that some geological features had to be simplified or ignored in the 2D simulations. This left open the possibility that features unaccounted for in the 2D simulations could have had an important influence on the eventual containment failure of the Baneberry event. This paper presents results from a high-fidelity 3D Baneberry simulation based on the most accurate geologic and geophysical data available. The results are compared with available data, and contrasted against the results of the previous 2D computational studies.

  11. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Fuel Element Testing in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) testing milestone, a graphite composite fuel element using a uranium simulant was received from the Oakridge National Lab and tested in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) at various operating conditions. The nominal operating conditions required to satisfy the milestone consisted of running the fuel element for a few minutes at a temperature of at least 2000 K with flowing hydrogen. This milestone test was successfully accomplished without incident.

  12. Special Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of a Two-component Outflow Powered by Magnetic Explosion on Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Jin; Masada, Youhei; Asano, Eiji; Shibata, Kazunari

    2011-05-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of outflows driven by magnetic explosion on the surface of a compact star is investigated through special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We adopt, as the initial equilibrium state, a spherical stellar object embedded in hydrostatic plasma which has a density ρ(r) vprop r -α and is threaded by a dipole magnetic field. The injection of magnetic energy at the surface of a compact star breaks the equilibrium and triggers a two-component outflow. At the early evolutionary stage, the magnetic pressure increases rapidly around the stellar surface, initiating a magnetically driven outflow. A strong forward shock driven outflow is then excited. The expansion velocity of the magnetically driven outflow is characterized by the Alfvén velocity on the stellar surface and follows a simple scaling relation v mag vprop v A 1/2. When the initial density profile declines steeply with radius, the strong shock is accelerated self-similarly to relativistic velocity ahead of the magnetically driven component. We find that it evolves according to a self-similar relation Γsh vprop r sh, where Γsh is the Lorentz factor of the plasma measured at the shock surface r sh. A purely hydrodynamic process would be responsible for the acceleration mechanism of the shock driven outflow. Our two-component outflow model, which is the natural outcome of the magnetic explosion, can provide a better understanding of the magnetic active phenomena on various magnetized compact stars.

  13. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  14. Adaptive low Mach number simulations of nuclear flame microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.A.

    2003-03-20

    We introduce a numerical model for the simulation of nuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae. This model is based on a low Mach number formulation that analytically removes acoustic wave propagation while retaining the compressibility effects resulting from nuclear burning. The formulation presented here generalizes low Mach number models used in combustion that are based on an ideal gas approximation to the arbitrary equations of state such as those describing the degenerate matter found in stellar material. The low Mach number formulation permits time steps that are controlled by the advective time scales resulting in a substantial improvement in computational efficiency compared to a compressible formulation. We briefly discuss the basic discretization methodology for the low Mach number equations and their implementation in an adaptive projection framework. We present validation computations in which the computational results from the low Mach number model are compared to a compressible code and present an application of the methodology to the Landau-Darrieus instability of a carbon flame.

  15. Simulating the venting of radioactivity from a soviet nuclear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Daniel J.; Peterson, Kendall R.

    Fresh fission products were found in several routine air samples in Europe during the second and third weeks of March 1987. Initially, it was suspected that the radionuclides, principally 133Xe and 131I, had been accidentally released from a European facility handling nuclear materials. However, the announcement of an underground nuclear test at Semipalatinsk, U.S.S.R. on 26 February 1987 suggested that the elevated amounts of radioactivity may, instead, have been caused by a venting episode. Upon learning of these events, we simulated the transport and diffusion of 133Xe with our Hemispheric MEDIC and ADPIC models, assuming Semipalatinsk to be the source of the radioactive emissions. The correspondence between the calculated concentrations and the daily average 133Xe measurements made by the Federal Office for Civil Protection in F.R.G. was excellent. While this agreement does not, in itself, prove that an atmospheric venting of radioactive material occurred at Semipalatinsk, a body of circumstantial evidence exists which, when added together, strongly supports this conclusion. Our calculations suggested a total fission yield of about 40 kt, which is within the 20-150 kt range of tests acknowledged by the U.S.S.R. Finally, dose calculations indicated that no health or environmental impact occurred outside of the U.S.S.R. due to the suspected venting of 133Xe. However, the inhalation dose resulting from 133I, an unmodeled component of the radioactive cloud, represented a greater potential risk to public health.

  16. High temperature dilatometry of simulated oxide nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, A. V.; Baranov, V. G.; Kuzmin, R. S.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    High temperature dilatometry of model systems based on uranium dioxide with additives of burnable neutron absorbers both as Gd2O3 and as AlGdO3, and fission products simulators (FPS) was performed. It shown that in some cases instead of high temperature samples shrinkage there is a sharp transition to the expansion, which is associated with an increase of the samples volume due to the formation of liquid phases. The beginning of a complex composition eutectic melting starts at temperatures from 1950 to 2250 °C in the uranium dioxide samples containing significant amounts of Al, Gd, and FPS. Thus, in the analysis of oxide nuclear fuel behavior at high temperatures should be considered that the formation of liquid phases is possible at a temperature of 1000 °C lower than a melting point of pure stoichiometric uranium dioxide if its initial composition became more complex.

  17. Chemical durability of simulated nuclear glasses containing water

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Tomozawa, M.

    1995-04-01

    The chemical durability of simulated nuclear waste glasses having different water contents was studied. Results from the product consistency test (PCT) showed that glass dissolution increased with water content in the glass. This trend was not observed during MCC-1 testing. This difference was attributed to the differences in reactions between glass and water. In the PCT, the glass network dissolution controlled the elemental releases, and water in the glass accelerated the reaction rate. On the other hand, alkali ion exchange with hydronium played an important role in the MCC-1. For the latter, the amount of water introduced into a leached layer from ion-exchange was found to be much greater than that of initially incorporated water in the glass. Hence, the initial water content has no effect on glass dissolution as measured by the MCC-1 test.

  18. Chavir: Virtual reality simulation for interventions in nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect

    Thevenon, J. B.; Tirel, O.; Lopez, L.; Chodorge, L.; Desbats, P.

    2006-07-01

    Companies involved in the nuclear industry have to prepare for interventions by precisely analyzing the radiological risks and rapidly evaluating the consequences of their operational choices. They also need to consolidate the experiences gained in the field with greater responsiveness and lower costs. This paper brings out the advantages of using virtual reality technology to meet the demands in the industry. The CHAVIR software allows the operators to prepare (and repeat) all the operations they would have to do in a safe virtual world, before performing the actual work inside the facilities. Since the decommissioning or maintenance work is carried out in an environment where there is radiation, the amount of radiation that the operator would be exposed to is calculated and integrated into the simulator. (authors)

  19. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2015-12-01

    Compact bodies which are not at rest compare to an homogeneous ambient environment are believed to undergo Bondi-Hoyle axisymmetric accretion as soon as their relative velocity reaches supersonic levels. Contrary to its spherical counterpart, B-H accretion presents flow structures difficult to analytically derive, hence the need for numerical investigations. The broad dynamics at stake when a tiny compact object engulfs surrounding material at a much larger scale has made numerical consistency a polemical issue as it has prevented both scales to be grasped for reasonable wind velocities. We designed a numerical setup which reconciliates the requirement for finite size accretor with steady states properties of the Bondi-Hoyle flow independent of the size of the inner boundary. The robustness of this setup is evaluated accordingly to predictions concerning the mass accretion rate evolution with the Mach number at infinity and the topology of the sonic surface as determined by te{Foglizzo1996}. It provides an estimation of the mass accretion rates and thus, of the expected X-ray luminosity for an idealized B-H configuration which might not be too far off for isolated compact objects like runaway neutron stars or hyper-luminous X-ray sources.

  20. Results of optical Monte Carlo simulations of a compact γ camera for the detection of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Dean; Truman, Andrew; Kwok, Harry; Bergman, Alanah

    2001-07-01

    Breast cancer is most often treatable when detected in the early stages, before the primary disease spreads to sentinel lymph nodes in the axilla and supraclavicular region. A sentinel lymph node is the closest adjacent lymph node to receive lymphatic drainage from a primary breast tumour. It is from these nodes that cancer cells metastasise throughout the lymphatic system, spreading the disease. This work details the optical Monte Carlo modelling of an ultra compact, nuclear medicine γ camera that will be used intra-operatively to detect malignant sentinel lymph nodes. This development will improve the identification and localisation of these sentinel nodes, thereby facilitating improved techniques for axillary lymph node dissection, and sentinel lymph node biopsy.

  1. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Drown, D.C.; Hart, R.E.; Peterson, M.E.

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. Leaching and migration of neptunium in a simulated engineered barrier system consisting of HLW glass and compacted bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Y.; Furuya, H.; Idemitsu, K.; Arima, T.; Osako, H.; Banba, T.; Maeda, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Nomura, I.; Kikkawa, S.; Saito, M.; Okamoto, H.

    2001-09-01

    In a simulated engineered barrier system consisting of a simulated HLW glass doped with 237Np, a compacted bentonite and water under reducing conditions, leaching of Np from the glass and diffusion of the leached Np through the bentonite were measured systematically. The following results were obtained: (1) The concentration of dissolved species of Np in the leachate is 10 -7-10 -8 M, which indicates that Np(IV) is the dominant oxidation state in the system and the concentration may be controlled by solubility of NpO2xH2O ( am) . (2) The presence of compacted bentonite facilitates reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) in the system. (3) The apparent diffusion coefficient of the leached Np through the bentonite is evaluated to be lower than 1.5×10 -13 m2/ s, showing that the diffusivity of Np(IV) is more than one order of magnitude lower than that of Np(V).

  3. NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Nov. 15, 2001 - Feb. 15,2002) ''Design and Layout Concepts for Compact, Factory-Produced, Transportable, Generation IV Reactor Systems''

    SciTech Connect

    Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Mohammed Khan; Joe McConn; Lawrence Townsend; Wesley Williams; Martin Williamson

    2002-03-15

    The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. Three nuclear power plant concepts are being studied representing water, helium and lead-bismuth coolants. This is the sixth quarterly progress report.

  4. Recent Improvement of Measurement Instrumentation to Supervise Nuclear Operations and to Contribute Input Data to 3D Simulation Code - 13289

    SciTech Connect

    Mahe, Charly; Chabal, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    The CEA has developed many compact characterization tools to follow sensitive operations in a nuclear environment. Usually, these devices are made to carry out radiological inventories, to prepare nuclear interventions or to supervise some special operations. These in situ measurement techniques mainly take place at different stages of clean-up operations and decommissioning projects, but they are also in use to supervise sensitive operations when the nuclear plant is still operating. In addition to this, such tools are often associated with robots to access very highly radioactive areas, and thus can be used in accident situations. Last but not least, the radiological data collected can be entered in 3D calculation codes used to simulate the doses absorbed by workers in real time during operations in a nuclear environment. Faced with these ever-greater needs, nuclear measurement instrumentation always has to involve on-going improvement processes. Firstly, this paper will describe the latest developments and results obtained in both gamma and alpha imaging techniques. The gamma camera has been used by the CEA since the 1990's and several changes have made this device more sensitive, more compact and more competitive for nuclear plant operations. It is used to quickly identify hot spots, locating irradiating sources from 50 keV to 1500 keV. Several examples from a wide field of applications will be presented, together with the very latest developments. The alpha camera is a new camera used to see invisible alpha contamination on several kinds of surfaces. The latest results obtained allow real time supervision of a glove box cleaning operation (for {sup 241}Am contamination). The detection principle as well as the main trials and results obtained will be presented. Secondly, this paper will focus on in situ gamma spectrometry methods developed by the CEA with compact gamma spectrometry probes (CdZnTe, LaBr{sub 3}, NaI, etc.). The radiological data collected is used

  5. High-Fidelity Space-Time Adaptive Multiphysics Simulations in Nuclear Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Solin, Pavel; Ragusa, Jean

    2014-03-09

    We delivered a series of fundamentally new computational technologies that have the potential to significantly advance the state-of-the-art of computer simulations of transient multiphysics nuclear reactor processes. These methods were implemented in the form of a C++ library, and applied to a number of multiphysics coupled problems relevant to nuclear reactor simulations.

  6. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Volume 1: Program user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman J.

    1993-01-01

    A Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine system design analysis tool is required to support current and future Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) propulsion and vehicle design studies. Currently available NTP engine design models are those developed during the NERVA program in the 1960's and early 1970's and are highly unique to that design or are modifications of current liquid propulsion system design models. To date, NTP engine-based liquid design models lack integrated design of key NTP engine design features in the areas of reactor, shielding, multi-propellant capability, and multi-redundant pump feed fuel systems. Additionally, since the SEI effort is in the initial development stage, a robust, verified NTP analysis design tool could be of great use to the community. This effort developed an NTP engine system design analysis program (tool), known as the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) program, to support ongoing and future engine system and stage design study efforts. In this effort, Science Applications International Corporation's (SAIC) NTP version of the Expanded Liquid Engine Simulation (ELES) program was modified extensively to include Westinghouse Electric Corporation's near-term solid-core reactor design model. The ELES program has extensive capability to conduct preliminary system design analysis of liquid rocket systems and vehicles. The program is modular in nature and is versatile in terms of modeling state-of-the-art component and system options as discussed. The Westinghouse reactor design model, which was integrated in the NESS program, is based on the near-term solid-core ENABLER NTP reactor design concept. This program is now capable of accurately modeling (characterizing) a complete near-term solid-core NTP engine system in great detail, for a number of design options, in an efficient manner. The following discussion summarizes the overall analysis methodology, key assumptions, and capabilities associated with the NESS presents an

  7. SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A TWO-COMPONENT OUTFLOW POWERED BY MAGNETIC EXPLOSION ON COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Jin; Asano, Eiji; Shibata, Kazunari; Masada, Youhei

    2011-05-20

    The nonlinear dynamics of outflows driven by magnetic explosion on the surface of a compact star is investigated through special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We adopt, as the initial equilibrium state, a spherical stellar object embedded in hydrostatic plasma which has a density {rho}(r) {proportional_to} r{sup -}{alpha} and is threaded by a dipole magnetic field. The injection of magnetic energy at the surface of a compact star breaks the equilibrium and triggers a two-component outflow. At the early evolutionary stage, the magnetic pressure increases rapidly around the stellar surface, initiating a magnetically driven outflow. A strong forward shock driven outflow is then excited. The expansion velocity of the magnetically driven outflow is characterized by the Alfven velocity on the stellar surface and follows a simple scaling relation v{sub mag} {proportional_to} v{sub A}{sup 1/2}. When the initial density profile declines steeply with radius, the strong shock is accelerated self-similarly to relativistic velocity ahead of the magnetically driven component. We find that it evolves according to a self-similar relation {Gamma}{sub sh} {proportional_to} r{sub sh}, where {Gamma}{sub sh} is the Lorentz factor of the plasma measured at the shock surface r{sub sh}. A purely hydrodynamic process would be responsible for the acceleration mechanism of the shock driven outflow. Our two-component outflow model, which is the natural outcome of the magnetic explosion, can provide a better understanding of the magnetic active phenomena on various magnetized compact stars.

  8. Sub-saturation matter in compact stars: Nuclear modelling in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2015-02-24

    A recently introduced analytical model for the nuclear density profile [1] is implemented in the Extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) energy density functional. This allows to (i) shed a new light on the issue of the sign of surface symmetry energy in nuclear mass formulas, as well as to (ii) show the importance of the in-medium corrections to the nuclear cluster energies in thermodynamic conditions relevant for the description of core-collapse supernovae and (proto)-neutron star crust.

  9. Higher-Order Compact Schemes for Numerical Simulation of Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert V.; Demuren, Ayodeji O.; Carpenter, Mark

    1998-01-01

    A higher order accurate numerical procedure has been developed for solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for 2D or 3D fluid flow problems. It is based on low-storage Runge-Kutta schemes for temporal discretization and fourth and sixth order compact finite-difference schemes for spatial discretization. The particular difficulty of satisfying the divergence-free velocity field required in incompressible fluid flow is resolved by solving a Poisson equation for pressure. It is demonstrated that for consistent global accuracy, it is necessary to employ the same order of accuracy in the discretization of the Poisson equation. Special care is also required to achieve the formal temporal accuracy of the Runge-Kutta schemes. The accuracy of the present procedure is demonstrated by application to several pertinent benchmark problems.

  10. INJECTOR PARTICLE SIMULATION AND BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT LINEAR PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y J; Harris, J; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B

    2007-06-18

    A compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), with field gradient up to 100 MW/m is being developed to accelerate proton bunches for use in cancer therapy treatment. The injector must create a proton pulse up to several hundred picoseconds, which is then shaped and accelerated with energies up to 250 MeV. The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code LSP is used to model several aspects of this design. First, we use LSP to obtain the voltage waveform in the A-K gap that will produce a proton bunch with the requisite charge. We then model pulse compression and shaping in the section between the A-K gap and the DWA. We finally use LSP to model the beam transport through the DWA.

  11. Influence of loading volume of mefenamic acid on granules and tablet characteristics using a compaction simulator.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Go; Betz, Gabriele; Leuenberger, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Mefenamic acid (MA), a poorly water-soluble drug, was used as a model substance to investigate granules and tablet characteristics to be optimized for the loading volume of MA (0-74.1% v/v) in the formulation including lactose monohydrate/maize starch (7/3) as excipients. The compactibility of granules increased with loading volume of MA. This was related to the brittle behavior of MA during compression and the increase of intragranular pore volume of granules. The minimum disintegration time (266 +/- 8.3 s) was found in the tablet that was composed of 55.1% v/v MA and 13.6% v/v maize starch. The determination of the critical concentration of disintegrant (% v/v) required for a minimum disintegration time may be useful for solid dosage form design.

  12. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  13. Simulating feedback from nuclear clusters: the impact of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Power, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NCs) are found to exist in the centres of many galaxies and appear to follow scaling relations similar to those of supermassive black holes. Previous analytical work has suggested that such relations are a consequence of feedback-regulated growth. We explore this idea using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the validity of the simplifying assumptions made in analytical models. In particular, we investigate feedback emanating from multiple stellar sources rather than from a single source, as is usually assumed, and show that collisions between shells of gas swept up by feedback leads to momentum cancellation and the formation of high-density clumps and filaments. This high-density material is resistant both to expulsion from the galaxy potential and to disruption by feedback; if it falls back on to the NC, we expect the gas to be available for further star formation or for feeding a central black hole. We also note that our results may have implications for the evolution of globular clusters and stellar clusters in high-redshift dark matter haloes.

  14. Separation of technetium from nuclear waste stream simulants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, S.H.

    1995-09-11

    The author studied liquid anion exchangers, such as Aliquat-336 nitrate, various pyridinium nitrates, and related salts, so that they may be applied toward a specific process for extracting (partitioning) and recovering {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from nuclear waste streams. Many of the waste streams are caustic and contain a variety of other ions. For this reason, the author studied waste stream simulants that are caustic and contain appropriate concentrations of selected, relevant ions. Methods of measuring the performance of the exchangers and extractant systems included contact experiments. Batch contact experiments were used to determine the forward and reverse extraction parameters as a function of temperature, contact time, phase ratio, concentration, solvent (diluent), and other physical properties. They were also used for stability and competition studies. Specifically, the author investigated the solvent extraction behavior of salts of perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}), a stable (non-radioactive) chemical surrogate for {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. Results are discussed for alternate organic solvents; metalloporphyrins, ferrocenes, and N-cetyl pyridium nitrate as alternate extractant salts; electroactive polymers; and recovery of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}.

  15. Parallel tempering simulation of the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson model with compact asynchronous multispin coding on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye; Feng, Sheng; Tam, Ka-Ming; Yun, Zhifeng; Moreno, Juana; Ramanujam, J.; Jarrell, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the Ising model play an important role in the field of computational statistical physics, and they have revealed many properties of the model over the past few decades. However, the effect of frustration due to random disorder, in particular the possible spin glass phase, remains a crucial but poorly understood problem. One of the obstacles in the Monte Carlo simulation of random frustrated systems is their long relaxation time making an efficient parallel implementation on state-of-the-art computation platforms highly desirable. The Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is such a platform that provides an opportunity to significantly enhance the computational performance and thus gain new insight into this problem. In this paper, we present optimization and tuning approaches for the CUDA implementation of the spin glass simulation on GPUs. We discuss the integration of various design alternatives, such as GPU kernel construction with minimal communication, memory tiling, and look-up tables. We present a binary data format, Compact Asynchronous Multispin Coding (CAMSC), which provides an additional 28.4% speedup compared with the traditionally used Asynchronous Multispin Coding (AMSC). Our overall design sustains a performance of 33.5 ps per spin flip attempt for simulating the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson model with parallel tempering, which significantly improves the performance over existing GPU implementations.

  16. Three-dimensional geomechanical simulation of reservoir compaction and implications for well failures in the Belridge diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrich, J.T.; Argueello, J.G.; Thorne, B.J.; Wawersik, W.R. |

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes an integrated geomechanics analysis of well casing damage induced by compaction of the diatomite reservoir at the Belridge Field, California. Historical data from the five field operators were compiled and analyzed to determine correlations between production, injection, subsidence, and well failures. The results of this analysis were used to develop a three-dimensional geomechanical model of South Belridge, Section 33 to examine the diatomite reservoir and overburden response to production and injection at the interwell scale and to evaluate potential well failure mechanisms. The time-dependent reservoir pressure field was derived from a three-dimensional finite difference reservoir simulation and used as input to three-dimensional non-linear finite element geomechanical simulations. The reservoir simulation included -200 wells and covered 18 years of production and injection. The geomechanical simulation contained 437,100 nodes and 374,130 elements with the overburden and reservoir discretized into 13 layers with independent material properties. The results reveal the evolution of the subsurface stress and displacement fields with production and injection and suggest strategies for reducing the occurrence of well casing damage.

  17. Documentation of a computer program to simulate aquifer-system compaction using the modular finite-difference ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, S.A.; Prudic, David E.

    1991-01-01

    Removal of ground water by pumping from aquifers may result in compaction of compressible fine-grained beds that are within or adjacent to the aquifers. Compaction of the sediments and resulting land subsidence may be permanent if the head declines result in vertical stresses beyond the previous maximum stress. The process of permanent compaction is not routinely included in simulations of ground-water flow. To simulate storage changes from both elastic and inelastic compaction, a computer program was written for use with the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground- water flow model. The new program, the Interbed-Storage Package, is designed to be incorporated into this model. In the Interbed-Storage Package, elastic compaction or expansion is assumed to be proportional to change in head. The constant of proportionality is the product of the skeletal component of elastic specific storage and the thickness of the sediments. Similarly, inelastic compaction is assumed to be proportional to decline in head. The constant of proportionality is the product of the skeletal component of inelastic specific storage and the thickness of the sediments. Storage changes are incorporated into the ground-water flow model by adding an additional term to the right-hand side of the flow equation. Within a model time step, the package appropriately apportions storage changes between elastic and inelastic components on the basis of the relation of simulated head to the previous minimum (preconsolidation) head. Two tests were performed to verify that the package works correctly. The first test compared model-calculated storage and compaction changes to hand-calculated values for a three-dimensional simulation. Model and hand-calculated values were essentially equal. The second test was performed to compare the results of the Interbed-Storage Package with results of the one-dimensional Helm compaction model. This test problem simulated compaction in doubly draining

  18. Compact Solar Simulator with a Small Subtense Angle and Controlled Magnification Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Kent S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of simulating a pseudosun using a solar simulator. In the present invention the collector and lens of a lamp are designed to properly focus a plurality of light beams onto a segmented turning mirror. The path of light rays are traced from the lamp to the collector and then finally to the lens to control the solid and tangential magnification of the solar simulator. The segmented turning mirror is located at the focal point of the light beam and redirects the light into a vacuum chamber.

  19. Thermal Simulator Development: Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Fission Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system. At the NASA MSFC Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF), highly designed electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel to test space fission power and propulsion systems. To allow early utilization, nuclear system designs must be relatively simple, easy to fabricate, and easy to test using non-nuclear heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. In this test strategy, highly designed electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel, allowing one to develop a significant understanding of individual components and integrated system operation without the cost, time and safety concerns associated with nuclear testing.

  20. Ship Detection Using RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad Mode and Simulated Compact Polarimetry Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    2009]. [21] Lee, J.-S., Hoppel, K.W., and Mango, S.A. (1994). Intensity and phase statistics of multilook polarimetric and interferometric SAR ...CP) SAR system. A CP SAR system with circular polarization on transmission and two orthogonal linear polarizations on receive was simulated using...RADARSAT-2 FQ data. Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) ship detection algorithms were applied to both the FQ and simulated CP data. From statistical

  1. Numerical simulation of the three dimensional Allen-Cahn equation by the high-order compact ADI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shuying; Feng, Xinlong; He, Yinnian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a new linearized high-order compact difference method is presented for numerical simulation of three dimensional (3D) Allen-Cahn equation with three kinds of boundary conditions. The method, which is based on the Crank-Nicholson/Adams-Bashforth scheme combined with the Douglas-Gunn ADI method, is second order accurate in time and fourth order accurate in space and energy degradation. The main advantages of this method is that the nonlinear penalty term f(u) is linear and an extra stabilizing term is added to alleviate the stability constraint while maintaining accuracy and simplicity. Numerical experiments are given to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the new method.

  2. Aquifer-System Compaction and Land Subsidence: Measurements, Analyses, and Simulations-the Holly Site, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Galloway, Devin L.

    2000-01-01

    Land subsidence resulting from ground-water-level declines has long been recognized as a problem in Antelope Valley, California. At Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), ground-water extractions have caused more than 150 feet of water-level decline, resulting in nearly 4 feet of subsidence. Differential land subsidence has caused sinklike depressions and earth fissures and has accelerated erosion of the playa lakebed surface of Rogers Lake at EAFB, adversely affecting the runways on the lakebed which are used for landing aircraft such as the space shuttles. Since 1990, about 0.4 foot of aquifer-system compaction has been measured at a deep (840 feet) borehole extensometer (Holly site) at EAFB. More than 7 years of paired ground-water-level and aquifer-system compaction measurements made at the Holly site were analyzed for this study. Annually, seasonal water-level fluctuations correspond to steplike variations in aquifer-system compaction; summer water-level drawdowns are associated with larger rates of compaction, and winter water-level recoveries are associated with smaller rates of compaction. The absence of aquifer-system expansion during recovery is consistent with the delayed drainage and resultant delayed, or residual, compaction of thick aquitards. A numerical one-dimensional MODFLOW model of aquitard drainage was used to refine estimates of aquifer-system hydraulic parameters that control compaction and to predict potential future compaction at the Holly site. The analyses and simulations of aquifer-system compaction are based on established theories of aquitard drainage. Historical ground-water-level and land-subsidence data collected near the Holly site were used to constrain simulations of aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence at the site for the period 1908?90, and ground-water-level and aquifer- system compaction measurements collected at the Holly site were used to constrain the model for the period 1990?97. Model results indicate that two thick

  3. Simulation of the novel compact structure of an interferometric biosensor based on multimode interference waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xhoxhi, Moisi; Dudia, Alma; Ymeti, Aurel

    2017-05-01

    We propose the novel structure of an interferometric biosensor based on multimode interference (MMI) waveguides. We present the design of the biosensor using eigenmode expansion (EME) method in accordance with the requirements and standards of today's photonic technology. The MMI structures with a 90 nm Si3N4 core are used as power splitters with 5 outputs. The 5 high-resolution images at the end of the multimode region show high power balance. We analyze the coupling efficiency of the laser source with the structure, the excess loss and power imbalance for different compact MMI waveguides with widths ranging from 45 μm to 15 μm. For a laser source with a tolerance of +/-1mm in linearization we could achieve a coupling efficiency of 52%. MMI waveguides with tapered channels show excess loss values under 0.5 dB and power imbalance values under 0.08 dB. In addition, we show that for a 10 nm deviation of the source wavelength from its optimal value and for a 10 μm deviation of the MMI length from its optimal value, the performance of the MMI waveguides remains acceptable. Finally, we analyze the power budget of the whole biosensor structure and show that it is sufficient for the proper operation of this device.

  4. A Large-Particle Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Non-Linear High-Energy Processes Near Compact Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Svensson, Roland; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1995-01-01

    High-energy radiation processes in compact cosmic objects are often expected to have a strongly non-linear behavior. Such behavior is shown, for example, by electron-positron pair cascades and the time evolution of relativistic proton distributions in dense radiation fields. Three independent techniques have been developed to simulate these non-linear problems: the kinetic equation approach; the phase-space density (PSD) Monte Carlo method; and the large-particle (LP) Monte Carlo method. In this paper, we present the latest version of the LP method and compare it with the other methods. The efficiency of the method in treating geometrically complex problems is illustrated by showing results of simulations of 1D, 2D and 3D systems. The method is shown to be powerful enough to treat non-spherical geometries, including such effects as bulk motion of the background plasma, reflection of radiation from cold matter, and anisotropic distributions of radiating particles. It can therefore be applied to simulate high-energy processes in such astrophysical systems as accretion discs with coronae, relativistic jets, pulsar magnetospheres and gamma-ray bursts.

  5. A Compact Code for Simulations of Quantum Error Correction in Classical Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Peter

    2009-03-10

    This study considers implementations of error correction in a simulation language on a classical computer. Error correction will be necessarily in quantum computing and quantum information. We will give some examples of the implementations of some error correction codes. These implementations will be made in a more general quantum simulation language on a classical computer in the language Mathematica. The intention of this research is to develop a programming language that is able to make simulations of all quantum algorithms and error corrections in the same framework. The program code implemented on a classical computer will provide a connection between the mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics and computational methods. This gives us a clear uncomplicated language for the implementations of algorithms.

  6. Beam dynamics simulations of the injector for a compact THz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Shang, Lei; Feng, Guang-Yao; Hu, Tong-Ning; Chen, Qu-Shan; Li, Cheng-Long

    2014-08-01

    Terahertz radiation has broad application prospects due to its ability to penetrate deep into many organic materials without the damage caused by ionizing radiations. A free electron laser (FEL)-based THz source is the best choice to produce high-power radiation. In this paper, a 14 MeV injector is introduced for generating high-quality beam for FEL, is composed of an EC-ITC RF gun, compensating coils and a travelling-wave structure. Beam dynamics simulations have been done with ASTRA code to verify the design and to optimize parameters. Simulations of the operating mode at 6 MeV have also been executed.

  7. Development of High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a simulator for non-nuclear tests for the development of a space nuclear power system. The development of the Instrumented Thermal Simulator is to assist in developing an understanding of individual components and integrated system operation without the cost, time, safety concerns associated with nuclear testing. The presentation shows the design, the electrical integration, the hardware, and the assembly of the simulators. There are slides that show the test plan, the analysis, and the initial results.

  8. Verilog-A implementation of a double-gate junctionless compact model for DC circuit simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, J.; Flores, P.; Romero, S.; Ávila-Herrera, F.; González, V.; Soto-Cruz, B. S.; Cerdeira, A.

    2016-07-01

    A physically based model of the double-gate juntionless transistor which is capable of describing accumulation and depletion regions is implemented in Verilog-A in order to perform DC circuit simulations. Analytical description of the difference of potentials between the center and the surface of the silicon layer allows the determination of the mobile charges. Furthermore, mobility degradation, series resistance, as well as threshold voltage roll-off, drain saturation voltage, channel shortening and velocity saturation are also considered. In order to provide this model to all of the community, the implementation of this model is performed in Ngspice, which is a free circuit simulation with an ADMS interface to integrate Verilog-A models. Validation of the model implementation is done through 2D numerical simulations of transistors with 1 μ {{m}} and 40 {{nm}} silicon channel length and 1 × 1019 or 5× {10}18 {{{cm}}}-3 doping concentration of the silicon layer with 10 and 15 {{nm}} silicon thickness. Good agreement between the numerical simulated behavior and model implementation is obtained, where only eight model parameters are used.

  9. High Fidelity Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronie response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing, providing a better assessment of system integration issues, characterization of integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assessment of potential design improvements' at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design can developed. Test results presented in this paper correspond to a "first cut" simulator design for a potential

  10. Initial Operation and Shakedown of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Prototypical fuel elements mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission in addition to being exposed to flowing hydrogen. Recent upgrades to NTREES now allow power levels 24 times greater than those achievable in the previous facility configuration. This higher power operation will allow near prototypical power densities and flows to finally be achieved in most prototypical fuel elements.

  11. Simulation of a compact analyzer-based imaging system with a regular x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudevilla, Oriol; Zhou, Wei; Stoupin, Stanislav; Verman, Boris; Brankov, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    Analyzer-based Imaging (ABI) belongs to a broader family of phase-contrast (PC) X-ray techniques. PC measures X-ray deflection phenomena when interacting with a sample, which is known to provide higher contrast images of soft tissue than other X-ray methods. This is of high interest in the medical field, in particular for mammogram applications. This paper presents a simulation tool for table-top ABI systems using a conventional polychromatic X-ray source.

  12. Photoresist 3D profile related etch process simulation and its application to full chip etch compact modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-En; Yang, Wayne; Luan, Lan; Song, Hua

    2015-03-01

    The optical proximity correction (OPC) model and post-OPC verification that takes the developed photoresist (PR) 3D profile into account is needed in the advanced 2Xnm node. The etch process hotspots caused by poor resist profile may not be fully identified during the lithography inspection but will only be observed after the subsequent etch process. A complete mask correction that targets to final etch CD requires not only a lithography R3D profile model but also a etch process compact model. The drawback of existing etch model is to treat the etch CD bias as a function of visibility and pattern density which do not contain the information of resist profile. One important factor to affect the etch CD is the PR lateral erosion during the etch process due to non-vertical PR side wall angle (SWA) and anisotropy of etch plasma source. A simple example is in transferring patterns from PR layer to thin hard mask (HM) layer, which is frequently used in the double pattern (DPT) process. The PR lateral erosion contributes an extra HM etch CD bias which is deviated from PR CD defined by lithography process. This CD bias is found to have a nontrivial dependency on the PR profile and cannot be described by the pattern density or visibility. In this report, we study the etch CD variation to resist SWA under various etch conditions. Physical effects during etch process such as plasma ion reflection and source anisotropy, which modify the local etch rate, are taken into considerations in simulation. The virtual data are generated by Synopsys TCAD tool Sentaurus Topography 3D using Monte Carlo engine. A simple geometry compact model is applied first to explain the behavior of virtual data, however, it works to some extent but lacks accuracy when plasma ion reflection comes into play. A modified version is proposed, for the first time, by including the effects of plasma ion reflection and source anisotropy. The new compact model fits the nonlinear etch CD bias very well for a wide

  13. NASTRAN Analysis Comparison to Shock Tube Tests Used to Simulate Nuclear Overpressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheless, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents a study of the effectiveness of the NASTRAN computer code for predicting structural response to nuclear blast overpressures. NASTRAN's effectiveness is determined by comparing results against shock tube tests used to simulate nuclear overpressures. Seven panels of various configurations are compared in this study. Panel deflections are the criteria used to measure NASTRAN's effectiveness. This study is a result of needed improvements in the survivability/vulnerability analyses subjected to nuclear blast.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarisation by thermal mixing: quantum theory and macroscopic simulations.

    PubMed

    Karabanov, Alexander; Kwiatkowski, Grzegorz; Perotto, Carlo U; Wiśniewski, Daniel; McMaster, Jonathan; Lesanovsky, Igor; Köckenberger, Walter

    2016-11-02

    A theory of dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) by thermal mixing is suggested based on purely quantum considerations. A minimal 6-level microscopic model is developed to test the theory and link it to the well-known thermodynamic model. Optimal conditions for the nuclear polarization enhancement and effects of inhomogeneous broadening of the electron resonance are discussed. Macroscopic simulations of nuclear polarization spectra displaying good agreement with experiments, involving BDPA and trityl free radicals, are presented.

  15. Development of High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Farmer, J.; Dixon, D.; Kapernick, R.; Dickens, R.; Adams, M.

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity thermal simulators that not only match the static power profile that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor, but to also match the dynamic fuel pin performance during feasible transients. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the sheath surface in the thermal simulator. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance was determined using SINDA-FLUINT analysis, and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs was compared to the expected nuclear performance. Through a series of iterative analysis, a conceptual high fidelity design will be developed, followed by engineering design, fabrication, and testing to validate the overall design process. Although the resulting thermal simulator will be designed for a specific reactor concept, establishing this rigorous design process will assist in streamlining the thermal simulator development for other reactor concepts.

  16. Release of boron and cesium or uranium from simulated borosilicate waste glasses through a compacted Ca-bentonite layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, K. S.; Kim, S. S.; Kang, C. H.

    2001-09-01

    The long-term release behavior of some elements from simulated borosilicate waste glasses (S-, K- and A-glass) in contact with a domestic compacted Ca-bentonite block and synthetic granitic groundwater at 80°C under argon atmosphere has been studied by dynamic leach tests since 1997 at KAERI. S- and K-glass differ mainly in their aluminum content, and A-glass contains 19.35 wt% UO 2 instead of fission product elements. Up to the present, the mass loss is almost the same as the normalized boron loss. This means that boron is an indicator on the dissolution of borosilicate waste glass. The leach rates of boron from K- and S-glasses after 861 days were approximately 3.1×10 -2 and 3.0×10 -2 g/ m2 day, respectively. However, the release rates of cesium through the bentonite block from K- and S-glasses were about 1/10th of the release rate of boron, which were almost the same around 2.5×10 -3 g/ m2 day. This may be due to their adsorption on the bentonite. The leach rate of boron from the A-glass was about 5.4×10 -2, but the leach rate of uranium from the A-glass specimen was quite low, below 4×10 -7 g/ m2 day. The low concentration of uranium in the leachates suggests that it hardly moves in a compacted bentonite block. By the EPMA, a yellowish uranium compound was deposited on the surface of the bentonite in contact with the A-glass specimen. The species of this phase should be identified to understand the release mechanism of uranium.

  17. Documentation of a computer program to simulate aquifer-system compaction using the modular finite-difference ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, S.A.; Prudic, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The process of permanent compaction is not routinely included in simulations of groundwater flow. To simulate storage changes from both elastic and inelastic compaction, a computer program was written for use with the U. S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference groundwater flow model. The new program is called the Interbed-Storage Package. In the Interbed-Storage Package, elastic compaction or expansion is assumed to be proportional to change in head. The constant of proportionality is the product of skeletal component of elastic specific storage and thickness of the sediments. Similarly, inelastic compaction is assumed to be proportional to decline in head. The constant of proportionality is the product of the skeletal component of inelastic specific storage and the thickness of the sediments. Storage changes are incorporated into the groundwater flow model by adding an additional term to the flow equation. Within a model time step, the package appropriately apportions storage changes between elastic and inelastic components on the basis of the relation of simulated head to the previous minimum head. Another package that allows for a time-varying specified-head boundary is also documented. This package was written to reduce the data requirements for test simulations of the Interbed-Storage Package. (USGS)

  18. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  19. Efficient and compact mobile equipment based on the new RADEON-NWM technology to process liquid radioactive wastes resulted from the accidents of the nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect

    Martoyan, Gagik; Nalbandyan, Garik; Gagiyan, Lavrenti; Karamyan, Gagik; Brutyan, Gagik

    2013-07-01

    During the operation of nuclear reactors important volume of liquid and solid radioactive wastes are generated, which, in normal conditions, becomes processed by stationary equipment by different methods to minimize their volume and then sent to specially constructed storages. The cases of accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima showed that the localization of rejected big quantity of radioactive wastes is a prior problem for their further processing by stationary equipment. In this regard it is very important the processing of radioactive wastes on the contaminated areas to localize them by mobile equipment based on the efficient technologies. RADEONNWM new technology allows resolving this problem. This technology is compact, completely automated, which makes possible to assemble it on a standard 40-ft by 7-ft trailer driven by heavy-duty truck. The new technology is fully elaborated, the necessary tests are conducted. (authors)

  20. Application of Artificial Neural Networks to Reliable Nuclear Data for Nonproliferation Modeling and Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Lagari, Pola Lydia; Sobes, Vladimir; Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; ...

    2016-10-01

    Detection and identification of special nuclear materials (SNMs) are an essential part of the US nonproliferation effort. Modern cutting-edge SNM detection methodologies rely more and more on modeling and simulation techniques. Experiments with radiological samples in realistic configurations, is the ultimate tool that establishes the minimum detection limits of SNMs in a host of different geometries. Modern modeling and simulation approaches have the potential to significantly reduce the number of experiments with radioactive sources needed to determine these detection limits and reduce the financial barrier to SNM detection. Unreliable nuclear data is one of the principal causes of uncertainty inmore » modeling and simulating nuclear systems. In particular, nuclear cross sections introduce a significant uncertainty in the nuclear data. The goal of this research is to develop a methodology that will autonomously extract the correct nuclear resonance characteristics of experimental data in a reliable way, a task previously left to expert judgement. Accurate nuclear data will in turn allow contemporary modeling and simulation to become far more reliable, de-escalating the extent of experimental testing. Modeling and simulation techniques reduce the use and distribution of radiological sources, while at the same time increase the reliability of the currently used methods for the detection and identification of SNMs.« less

  1. Application of Artificial Neural Networks to Reliable Nuclear Data for Nonproliferation Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lagari, Pola Lydia; Sobes, Vladimir; Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H.

    2016-10-01

    Detection and identification of special nuclear materials (SNMs) are an essential part of the US nonproliferation effort. Modern cutting-edge SNM detection methodologies rely more and more on modeling and simulation techniques. Experiments with radiological samples in realistic configurations, is the ultimate tool that establishes the minimum detection limits of SNMs in a host of different geometries. Modern modeling and simulation approaches have the potential to significantly reduce the number of experiments with radioactive sources needed to determine these detection limits and reduce the financial barrier to SNM detection. Unreliable nuclear data is one of the principal causes of uncertainty in modeling and simulating nuclear systems. In particular, nuclear cross sections introduce a significant uncertainty in the nuclear data. The goal of this research is to develop a methodology that will autonomously extract the correct nuclear resonance characteristics of experimental data in a reliable way, a task previously left to expert judgement. Accurate nuclear data will in turn allow contemporary modeling and simulation to become far more reliable, de-escalating the extent of experimental testing. Modeling and simulation techniques reduce the use and distribution of radiological sources, while at the same time increase the reliability of the currently used methods for the detection and identification of SNMs.

  2. NIMROD Simulations of Low-q Disruptions in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Device (CTH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Pandya, M. D.; Hanson, J. D.; Mauer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations of low-q disruptions in the CTH are presented. CTH is a current carrying stellarator that is used to study the effects of 3D shaping. The application of 3D shaping stabilizes low-q disruptions in CTH. The amount of 3D shaping is controlled by adjusting the external rotational transform, and it is characterized by the ratio of the external rotational transform to the total transform: f =ιvac / ι . Disruptions are routinely observed during operation with weak shaping (f < 0.05). The frequency of disruptions decreases with increasing amounts of 3D shaping, and the disruptions are completely suppressed for f > 0.1 . Nonlinear simulations are performed using the NIMROD code to better understand how the shaping suppresses the disruptions. Comparisons of runs with weak (f = 0.04) and strong (f = 0.10) shaping are shown. This material is based upon work supported by Auburn University and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Numbers DE-FG02-03ER54692 and DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  3. Improving neutronics simulations and uncertainties via a selection of nuclear data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; Koning, A. J.; van der Marck, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a novel approach to improve neutronics simulations, as in the case of criticality calculations, by simply combining the results of a limited set of random evaluations. Another outcome of this work is to lower uncertainties due to nuclear data by integrating the information from criticality benchmarks into the neutronics simulations scheme. Examples are presented for the 239Pu nuclear data and calculations of criticality benchmarks and a MOX fuel pincell.

  4. Simulations of Methane Hydrate Phenomena Over Geologic Timescales. Part I: Effect of Sediment Compaction Rates on Methans Hydrate and Free Gas Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin Leslie

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this work is a model that describes migration and biogenic formation of methane under conditions representative of dynamic marine basins, and the conversion of soluble methane into either solid hydrate or exsolved gas. Incorporated into the overall model are an accurate phase equilibria model for seawater-methane, a methane source term based on biogenesis data, and a sediment compaction model based on porosity as a function of position, time, and the local volume fractions of hydrate solids and free gas. Simulations have shown that under some compaction scenarios, liquid overpressures reach the lithostatic limit due to permeability constraints, which can diminish the advective transfer of soluble methane within the porous sediment. As such, the formation of methane hydrate can be somewhat of a self-moderating process. The occurrence and magnitude of hydrate formation is directly tied to fundamental parameters such as the compaction/sedimentation rates, liquid advection rates, seafloor depth, geothermal gradient, etc. Results are shown for simulations covering 20 million years, wherein growth profiles for methane hydrate and free gas (neither exceeding 10 vol% at any location) are tracked within a vertical sediment column spanning over 3000 m. A case study is also presented for the Blake Ridge region (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164, Sites 994, 995, and 997) based on simulations covering 6 Ma, wherein it is concluded that methane migration from compaction-driven advection may account for 15-30% of the total hydrate mass present in this region.

  5. HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATIONS OF A COMPACT SOURCE SCENARIO FOR THE GALACTIC CENTER CLOUD G2

    SciTech Connect

    Ballone, A.; Schartmann, M.; Burkert, A.; Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Pfuhl, O.; Ott, T.

    2013-10-10

    The origin of the dense gas cloud G2 discovered in the Galactic Center is still a debated puzzle. G2 might be a diffuse cloud or the result of an outflow from an invisible star embedded in it. We present hydrodynamical simulations of the evolution of different spherically symmetric winds of a stellar object embedded in G2. We find that the interaction with the ambient medium and the extreme gravitational field of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Center must be taken into account in such a source scenario. The thermal pressure of the hot and dense atmosphere confines the wind, while its ram pressure shapes it via stripping along the orbit, with the details depending on the wind parameters. Tidal forces squeeze the wind near pericenter, reducing it to a thin and elongated filament. We also find that in this scenario most of the Brγ luminosity is expected to come from the densest part of the wind, which has a highly filamentary structure with a low filling factor. For our assumed atmosphere, the observations can be best matched by a mass outflow rate of M-dot{sub w}=8.8×10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a wind velocity of v{sub w} = 50 km s{sup –1}. These values are comparable with those of a young T Tauri star wind, as already suggested by Scoville and Burkert.

  6. Advanced power plant training simulator for VVER-440/V230 nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shier, W.; Kennett, R.; Vaclav, E.; Gieci, A.

    1996-11-01

    An advanced, workstation based, nuclear power plant simulator has been developed for use in training the operational staff of the Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant. This training simulator uses state-of- the-art computer hardware and software and provides the capability to simultaneously include six members of the power plant operating staff in the training sessions. A detailed reactor model has been developed, representing the Bohunice VVER-44O/V230 plants, for use with the RELAP5 simulation software. In addition, a comprehensive validation program has been completed that compares the simulation results of the advanced simulator with the results from a current VVER-44O/V230 simulator. A summary of the training features and capabilities of the simulator is also provided.

  7. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers Detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Nissanke, S.; Hallinan, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nakar, E.; Piran, T.

    2016-11-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron-generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produce radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produce γ-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan-radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of weeks. Based on the derived light curves, we suggest an optimized survey at 1.4 GHz with five epochs separated by a logarithmic time interval. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts of simulated GW-merger events to be detected by advanced LIGO and Virgo by current and future radio facilities. The detectable distances for these GW merger events could be as high as 1 Gpc. Around 20%-60% of the long-lasting radio remnants will be detectable in the case of the moderate kinetic energy of 3\\cdot {10}50 erg and a circum-merger density of 0.1 {{cm}}-3 or larger, while 5%-20% of the orphan-radio afterglows with kinetic energy of 1048 erg will be detectable. The detection likelihood increases if one focuses on the well-localizable GW events. We discuss the background noise due to radio fluxes of host galaxies and false positives arising from extragalactic radio transients and variable active galactic nuclei, and we show that the quiet radio transient sky is of great advantage when searching for the radio counterparts.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Exhaust Gas Cooling in Channels with Periodic Elbows for Application in Compact Heat Recovery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, Sergio; Cotton, James S.; Robinson, Anthony J.

    2012-11-01

    Miniature and Micro devices represent the new frontier for advanced heat and mass transfer technology. Due to the small length scales, the use of CFD is very useful for designing and optimizing microfluidic devices since experimentation and visualization at these scales can be difficult. In this work a high temperature air microfluidic cooling strategy for applications such as compact waste heat recovery, exhaust gas recirculation and fuel cell thermal management is proposed. Initially, the application of a simple straight microchannel is considered. In an effort to partially compensate for the poor thermal properties of air, right-angle bends are introduced in order to induce Dean vortices which periodically restart the thermal boundary layer development, thus improving the heat transfer and fluid mixing. Numerical simulations in the range of 100 <= ReDh <= 1000 have been carried out for channels of square cross-section. Channel wall lengths of 1.0 mm are investigated for elbow spacings of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm. High temperature air (300°C) at atmospheric inlet pressure is the working fluid. The results indicate that the elbows substantially improve the local and average heat transfer in the channels while increasing the pressure drop. Design considerations are discussed which take into account the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the channels.

  9. Development of High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe; Kapernick, Richard

    2007-01-30

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity thermal simulators that not only match the static power profile that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor, but also match the dynamic fuel pin performance during feasible transients. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being developed are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. Static and dynamic fuel pin performances for a proposed reactor design have been determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and initial comparison has been made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analysis, a conceptual high fidelity design will be developed, followed by engineering design, fabrication, and testing to validate the overall design process. Although the resulting thermal simulator will be designed for a specific reactor concept, establishing this rigorous design process will assist in streamlining the thermal simulator development for other reactor concepts. This paper presents the current status of high fidelity thermal simulator design relative to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power.

  10. Modeling Choices in Nuclear Warfighting: Two Classroom Simulations on Escalation and Retaliation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Two classroom simulations--"Superpower Confrontation" and "Multipolar Asian Simulation"--are used to teach and test various aspects of the Borden versus Brodie debate on the Schelling versus Lanchester approach to nuclear conflict modeling and resolution. The author applies a Schelling test to segregate high from low empathic…

  11. Modeling Choices in Nuclear Warfighting: Two Classroom Simulations on Escalation and Retaliation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Two classroom simulations--"Superpower Confrontation" and "Multipolar Asian Simulation"--are used to teach and test various aspects of the Borden versus Brodie debate on the Schelling versus Lanchester approach to nuclear conflict modeling and resolution. The author applies a Schelling test to segregate high from low empathic…

  12. Presentation of Fukushima Analyses to U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Simulator Operators and Vendors

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas; Kalinich, Donald A.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N

    2015-02-01

    This document provides Sandia National Laboratories’ meeting notes and presentations at the Society for Modeling and Simulation Power Plant Simulator conference in Jacksonville, FL. The conference was held January 26-28, 2015, and SNL was invited by the U.S. nuclear industry to present Fukushima modeling insights and lessons learned.

  13. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  14. Dynamic model for simulating the acceptance problem of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifritz, W.; Mennig, J.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are attaining greater interest in different fields of application. Since the early 1980s, these methods have been applied intensively to a variety of very different general problems, such as the description of political and economic processes as well as the symbiotic behavior in the flora and fauna. The authors have tried to apply these mathematical methods to the dynamic behavior inherent in the problem of the acceptance of nuclear energy. The model, which simplifies the real situation, is two-dimensional and describes the symbiosis of two individuals: the capacity of nuclear power plants P and their acceptance A by the public. It is clear that in reality the acceptance problem depends on a series of other variables as well. However, it is believed that our investigations reveal some universal properties inherent to our socioeconomic system: nonlinearity and dissipative processes.

  15. KEYNOTE: Simulation, computation, and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Victor, Dr.

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Victor Reis delivered the keynote talk at the closing session of the conference. The talk was forward looking and focused on the importance of advanced computing for large-scale nuclear energy goals such as Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Dr. Reis discussed the important connections of GNEP to the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the SciDAC research portfolio. In the context of GNEP, Dr. Reis talked about possible fuel leasing configurations, strategies for their implementation, and typical fuel cycle flow sheets. A major portion of the talk addressed lessons learnt from ‘Science Based Stockpile Stewardship’ and the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) initiative and how they can provide guidance for advancing GNEP and SciDAC goals. Dr. Reis’s colorful and informative presentation included international proverbs, quotes and comments, in tune with the international flavor that is part of the GNEP philosophy and plan. He concluded with a positive and motivating outlook for peaceful nuclear energy and its potential to solve global problems. An interview with Dr. Reis, addressing some of the above issues, is the cover story of Issue 2 of the SciDAC Review and available at http://www.scidacreview.org This summary of Dr. Reis’s PowerPoint presentation was prepared by Institute of Physics Publishing, the complete PowerPoint version of Dr. Reis’s talk at SciDAC 2006 is given as a multimedia attachment to this summary.

  16. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  17. Compact Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-01

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  18. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  19. Simulation of proton-boron nuclear burning in the potential well of virtual cathode at nanosecond vacuum discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu

    2016-11-01

    The neutron-free reaction of proton-boron nuclear burning accompanied with the yield of three alpha particles (p + 11B → α + 8Be* → 3α) is of great fundamental and applied interest. However, the implementation of the synthesis of p +11B requires such extreme plasma parameters that are difficult to achieve at well-known schemes of controlled thermonuclear fusion. Earlier, the yield of DD neutrons in a compact nanosecond vacuum discharge (NVD) of low energy with deuterated Pd anode have been observed. Further detailed particle-in-cell simulation by the electrodynamic code have recognized that this experiment represents the realization of rather old scheme of inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC). This IEC scheme is one of the few where the energies of ions needed for p + 11B reaction are quite possible. The purpose of this work on simulation of proton-boron reaction is studying the features of possible p + 11B burning at the IEC scheme based on NVD, thus, to look forward and planning the real experiment.

  20. Deflection Measurements of a Thermally Simulated Nuclear Core Using a High-Resolution CCD-Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanojev, B. J.; Houts, M.

    2004-01-01

    Space fission systems under consideration for near-term missions all use compact. fast-spectrum reactor cores. Reactor dimensional change with increasing temperature, which affects neutron leakage. is the dominant source of reactivity feedback in these systems. Accurately measuring core dimensional changes during realistic non-nuclear testing is therefore necessary in predicting the system nuclear equivalent behavior. This paper discusses one key technique being evaluated for measuring such changes. The proposed technique is to use a Charged Couple Device (CCD) sensor to obtain deformation readings of electrically heated prototypic reactor core geometry. This paper introduces a technique by which a single high spatial resolution CCD camera is used to measure core deformation in Real-Time (RT). Initial system checkout results are presented along with a discussion on how additional cameras could be used to achieve a three- dimensional deformation profile of the core during test.

  1. MCNP Simulations of Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Rocket Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    MCNP simulations have been run to evaluate the feasibility of using a combination of fast and thermal neutrons as a nondestructive method to measure of the compaction of the perlite insulation in the liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. When heated it expands from four to twenty times its original volume which makes it very useful for thermal insulation. The cryogenic tanks at Kennedy Space Center are spherical with outer diameters of 69-70 feet and lined with a layer of expanded perlite with thicknesses on the order of 120 cm. There is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time since the tanks were built 1965, affecting the thermal properties and possibly also the structural integrity of the tanks. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simultaneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 Me V) and thermal (25 me V). The two energy ranges produce complementary information. Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering, which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H. The compaction of the perlite can be measured by the change in gamma ray signal strength which is proportional to the atomic number densities of the constituent elements. The MCNP simulations were made to determine the magnitude of this change. The tank wall was approximated by a I-dimensional slab geometry with an 11/16" outer carbon steel wall, an inner stainless wall and 120 cm thick perlite zone. Runs were made for cases with expanded perlite, compacted perlite or with various void fractions. Runs were also made to simulate the effect of adding a moderator. Tallies were made for decay-time analysis from t=0 to 10 ms; total detected gamma

  2. OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  3. CAD-based Monte Carlo Program for Integrated Simulation of Nuclear System SuperMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yican; Song, Jing; Zheng, Huaqing; Sun, Guangyao; Hao, Lijuan; Long, Pengcheng; Hu, Liqin

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method has distinct advantages to simulate complicated nuclear systems and is envisioned as routine method for nuclear design and analysis in the future. High fidelity simulation with MC method coupled with multi-physical phenomenon simulation has significant impact on safety, economy and sustainability of nuclear systems. However, great challenges to current MC methods and codes prevent its application in real engineering project. SuperMC is a CAD-based Monte Carlo program for integrated simulation of nuclear system developed by FDS Team, China, making use of hybrid MC-deterministic method and advanced computer technologies. The design aim, architecture and main methodology of SuperMC were presented in this paper. SuperMC2.1, the latest version for neutron, photon and coupled neutron and photon transport calculation, has been developed and validated by using a series of benchmarking cases such as the fusion reactor ITER model and the fast reactor BN-600 model. SuperMC is still in its evolution process toward a general and routine tool for nuclear system. Warning, no authors found for 2014snam.conf06023.

  4. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well

  5. Geant4-Simulations for cellular dosimetry in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Robert; Wendisch, Maria; Kotzerke, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    The application of unsealed radionuclides in radiobiological experiments can lead to intracellular radionuclide uptake and an increased absorbed dose. Accurate dose quantification is essential to assess observed radiobiological effects. Due to small cellular dimensions direct dose measurement is impossible. We will demonstrate the application of Monte Carlo simulations for dose calculation. Dose calculations were performed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit, wherefore typical experimental situations were designed. Dose distributions inside wells were simulated for different radionuclides. S values were simulated for spherical cells and cell monolayers of different diameter. Concomitantly experiments were performed using the PC Cl3 cell line with mediated radionuclide uptake. For various activity distributions cellular survival was measured. We yielded S values for dose distribution inside the wells. Calculated S values for a single cell are in good agreement to S values provided in the literature (ratio 0.87 to 1.07). Cross-dose is up to ten times higher for Y-90. Concomitantly performed cellular experiments confirm the dose calculation. Furthermore the necessity of correct dose calculation was shown for assessment of radiobiological effects after application of unsealed radionuclides. Thereby the feasibility of using Geant4 was demonstrated.

  6. Modeling and Testing of Non-Nuclear, Highpower Simulated Nuclear Thermal Rocket Reactor Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    When the President offered his new vision for space exploration in January of 2004, he said, "Our third goal is to return to the moon by 2020, as the launching point for missions beyond," and, "With the experience and knowledge gained on the moon, we will then be ready to take the next steps of space exploration: human missions to Mars and to worlds beyond." A human mission to Mars implies the need to move large payloads as rapidly as possible, in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Furthermore, with the scientific advancements possible with Project Prometheus and its Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), (these use electric propulsion), there is a renewed interest in deep space exploration propulsion systems. According to many mission analyses, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), with its relatively high thrust and high specific impulse, is a serious candidate for such missions. Nuclear rockets utilize fission energy to heat a reactor core to very high temperatures. Hydrogen gas flowing through the core then becomes superheated and exits the engine at very high exhaust velocities. The combination of temperature and low molecular weight results in an engine with specific impulses above 900 seconds. This is almost twice the performance of the LOX/LH2 space shuttle engines, and the impact of this performance would be to reduce the trip time of a manned Mars mission from the 2.5 years, possible with chemical engines, to about 12-14 months.

  7. Nuclear power plant and fuel process simulators for educational purposes and quantitative analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Blomberg, P.E.; Kjaer-Pedersen, N.

    1987-01-01

    The excellence of today's technique for plant and fuel process simulators (both in hardware and software) has reached a level that permits a multitude of additional applications beyond the traditional educational purpose. A duplex real-time simulation system, developed by Studsvik, representing the dynamics of a nuclear power plant and the performance of the fuel pins, may be utilized for a number of different important applications. The plant process simulator (Studsvik simulator) and the fuel pin process simulator (INTERPIN-FRPS) have been developed independently and may be operated on an individual basis. However, the combination of the two simulators, as established, implies two major advantages: The hardware (computer and graphics) can be saved, and the Studsvik simulator, particularly its core model, will serve the INTERPIN-FRPS with the necessary and accurate dynamic real-time input data for any local position of the fuel pins in the reactor core.

  8. New exclusive CHIPS-TPT algorithms for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, M.; Savin, D.

    2015-05-01

    The CHIPS-TPT physics library for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions on the new exclusive level is being developed in CFAR VNIIA. The exclusive modeling conserves energy, momentum and quantum numbers in each neutron-nuclear interaction. The CHIPS-TPT algorithms are based on the exclusive CHIPS library, which is compatible with Geant4. Special CHIPS-TPT physics lists in the Geant4 format are provided. The calculation time for an exclusive CHIPS-TPT simulation is comparable to the time of the corresponding Geant4- HP simulation. In addition to the reduction of the deposited energy fluctuations, which is a consequence of the energy conservation, the CHIPS-TPT libraries provide a possibility of simulation of the secondary particles correlation, e.g. secondary gammas, and of the Doppler broadening of gamma lines in the spectrum, which can be measured by germanium detectors.

  9. Corrosion of steel in simulated nuclear waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    1993-12-01

    Processing of inhibited nuclear waste to forms for long-term storage will cause waste tank environments to have dynamic conditions. During processing compositional changes in the waste may produce a corrosive environment for the plain carbon steel tanks. Large concentrations of nitrates which corrode steel are contained in the waste. Nitrite and hydroxides are added to inhibit any corrosion. Concentration changes of nitrate and nitrite were investigated to identify corrosion regimes that may occur during processing. Corrosion testing was performed with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance. Test samples were plain carbon steel which was similar to the material of construction of the waste tanks. The corrosion morphology of test samples was investigated by visual evaluation and scanning electron microscopy. Qualitative chemical analysis was also performed using energy dispersive spectroscopy. The corrosion mechanism changed as a function of the nitrate concentration. As the nitrate concentration was increased the steel transitioned from a passive state to general attack, and finally pitting and crevice corrosion. The nitrate anion appeared to destabilize the surface oxide. Nitrite countered the oxide breakdown, although the exact mechanism was not determined.

  10. Microwave Processing of Simulated Advanced Nuclear Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    D.E. Clark; D.C. Folz

    2010-08-29

    Throughout the three-year project funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and lead by Virginia Tech (VT), project tasks were modified by consensus to fit the changing needs of the DOE with respect to developing new inert matrix fuel processing techniques. The focus throughout the project was on the use of microwave energy to sinter fully stabilized zirconia pellets using microwave energy and to evaluate the effectiveness of techniques that were developed. Additionally, the research team was to propose fundamental concepts as to processing radioactive fuels based on the effectiveness of the microwave process in sintering the simulated matrix material.

  11. Input visualization for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator: CYClus Input Control

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.; Schneider, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses and demonstrates the methods used for the graphical user interface for the Cyclus fuel cycle simulator being developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Cyclus Input Control (CYCIC) is currently being designed with nuclear engineers in mind, but future updates to the program will be made to allow even non-technical users to quickly and efficiently simulate fuel cycles to answer the questions important to them. (authors)

  12. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Structural Mechanics Module Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ferencz, R. M.

    2013-10-30

    The NEAMS project aims to develop a simulation toolkit, the "NEAMS ToolKit," which will enable predictive virtual test and experiments. The NEAMS toolkit will generate insights by exploring reactor system behavior in regimes that are too difficult, too risky, or even impossible to achieve exclusively in a laboratory setting. The objective of the NEAMS toolkit is to develop a "pellet-to-plant" simulation capability useful for predicting performance and safety for a broad range of nuclear reactor power systems.

  13. Simulation of Nuclear Underwater Shock Waves Using Planar Sources: An Investigation of Feasibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-30

    source that can develop a fast risetime (-, 0.1 ms), long pulse width (-- 5 ms) pressure pulse at a constant amplitude of - 20 MPa (3000 psi) in...to push a steel plate; and (3) sealing the charge edges as means to ensure a more constant pressure source for the simulation technique. The computed...51 2 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1.1 Pressure Pulse in Water Typical of a Nuclear Underwater Shock Wave, and Desired to be Simulated with

  14. The imaging performance of compact Lu2O3:Eu powdered phosphor screens: Monte Carlo simulation for applications in mammography.

    PubMed

    Liaparinos, P F; Kandarakis, I S

    2009-06-01

    In medical mammographic imaging systems, one type of detector configuration, often referred to as indirect detectors, is based on a scintillator layer (phosphor screen) that converts the x-ray radiation into optical signal. The indirect detector performance may be optimized either by improving the structural parameters of the screen or by employing new phosphor materials with improved physical characteristics (e.g., x-ray absorption efficiency, intrinsic conversion efficiency, emitted light spectrum). Lu2O3:Eu is a relatively new phosphor material that exhibits improved scintillating properties indicating a promising material for mammographic applications. In this article, a custom validated Monte Carlo program was used in order to examine the performance of compact Lu2O3:Eu powdered phosphor screens under diagnostic mammography conditions (x-ray spectra: 28 kV Mo, 0.030 mm Mo and 32 kV W, 0.050 mm Rh). Lu2O3:Eu screens of coating weight in the range between 20 and 40 mg/cm2 were examined. The Monte Carlo code was based on a model using Mie-scattering theory for the description of light propagation within the phosphor. The overall performance of Lu2O3:Eu powdered phosphor screens was investigated in terms of the (i) quantum detection efficiency, (ii) luminescence efficiency, (iii) compatibility with optical sensors, (iv) modulation transfer function, (v) the Swank factor, and (vi) zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency. Results were compared to the traditional rare-earth Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor material. The increased packing density and therefore the light extinction properties of Lu2O3:Eu phosphor were found to improve the x-ray absorption (approximately up to 21% and 16% at 40 mg/cm2 for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), the spatial resolution (approximately 2.6 and 2.4 cycles/mm at 40 mg/cm2 for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), as well as the zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency (approximately up to 8% and 18% at 20 mg/cm2 for Mo and W x

  15. Look at nuclear artillery yield options using JANUS, a wargame simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, C.G.

    1982-06-15

    JANUS, a two-sided, interactive wargame simulation code, was used to explore how using each of several different yield options in a nuclear artillery shell might affect a tactical battlefield simulation. In a general sense, the results or outcomes of these simulations support the results or outcomes of previous studies. In these simulations the Red player knew of the anticipated nuclear capability of the Blue player. Neither side experienced a decisive win over the other, and both continued fighting and experienced losses that, under most historical circumstances, would have been termed unacceptable - that is, something else would have happened (the attack would have been called off). During play, each side had only fragmentary knowledge of the remaining resources on the other side - thus each side desired to continue fighting on the basis of known information. We found that the anticipated use of nuclear weapons by either side affects the character of a game significantly and that, if the employment of nuclear weapons is to have a decided effect on the progress and outcome of a battle, each side will have to have an adequate number of nuclear weapons. In almost all the simulations we ran using JANUS, enhanced radiation (ER) weapons were more effective than 1-kt fission weapons in imposing overall losses on Red. The typical visibility in the JANUS simulation limited each side's ability to acquire units deep into enemy territory and so the 10-kt fission weapon was not useful against enemy tanks that were not engaged in battle. (Troop safety constraints limited its use on tanks that were engaged in direct fire with the enemy).

  16. A MULTIDIMENSIONAL AND MULTIPHYSICS APPROACH TO NUCLEAR FUEL BEHAVIOR SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; M. R. Tonks; D. R. Gaston; C. J. Permann; D. Andrs; R. C. Martineau

    2012-04-01

    Important aspects of fuel rod behavior, for example pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), fuel fracture, oxide formation, non-axisymmetric cooling, and response to fuel manufacturing defects, are inherently multidimensional in addition to being complicated multiphysics problems. Many current modeling tools are strictly 2D axisymmetric or even 1.5D. This paper outlines the capabilities of a new fuel modeling tool able to analyze either 2D axisymmetric or fully 3D models. These capabilities include temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of fuel; swelling and densification; fuel creep; pellet fracture; fission gas release; cladding creep; irradiation growth; and gap mechanics (contact and gap heat transfer). The need for multiphysics, multidimensional modeling is then demonstrated through a discussion of results for a set of example problems. The first, a 10-pellet rodlet, demonstrates the viability of the solution method employed. This example highlights the effect of our smeared cracking model and also shows the multidimensional nature of discrete fuel pellet modeling. The second example relies on our the multidimensional, multiphysics approach to analyze a missing pellet surface problem. As a final example, we show a lower-length-scale simulation coupled to a continuum-scale simulation.

  17. Characterising nuclear simulant suspensions in situ with an acoustic backscatter system

    SciTech Connect

    Bux, Jaiyana; Hunter, Timothy N.; Paul, Neepa; Biggs, Simon R.; Dodds, Jonathan M.; Peakall, Jeffrey

    2013-07-01

    In situ characterisation of radio-toxic sludges and slurries is critical to numerous operations including those involving their transport and retrieval. An inexpensive, flexible acoustic backscatter system has been employed for the first time here to a 4/10. scale active storage tank comprising of a nuclear simulant suspension, to verify its application. Intricate suspension characteristics and tank operation features emerged. (authors)

  18. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Weapon Effects Test, Evaluation, and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    scenario assessments , scripted gaming activities, and in field experiments involving operational resources. This scenario usage is discussed further in...HARDENING SYSTEMS AND ASSESSING COMPLIANCE – PAST AND PRESENT...The Hardening Process and Design Assessment ....................................32 5.3 Nuclear Weapon Effects Simulators

  19. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  20. Computer simulations reveal mechanisms that organize nuclear dynein forces to separate centrosomes.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Alessandro; Gönczy, Pierre

    2017-07-12

    Centrosome separation along the surface of the nucleus at the onset of mitosis is critical for bipolar spindle assembly. Dynein anchored on the nuclear envelope is known to be important for centrosome separation, but it is unclear how nuclear dynein forces are organized in an anisotropic manner to promote the movement of centrosomes away from each other. Here, we use computational simulations of C. elegans embryos to address this fundamental question, testing three potential mechanisms by which nuclear dynein may act. First, our analysis shows that expansion of the nuclear volume per se does not generate forces driving centrosome separation. Second, we uncover that steric interactions between microtubules and centrosomes contribute to robust onset of nuclear dynein-mediated centrosome separation. Third, we find that the initial position of centrosomes, between nucleus and cell cortex at the embryo posterior, is a key determinant in organizing microtubule aster asymmetry to power nuclear dynein-dependent separation. Overall, our work reveals that accurate initial centrosome position, together with steric interactions, ensure proper anisotropic organization of nuclear dynein forces to separate centrosomes, thus ensuring robust bipolar spindle assembly. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  1. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  2. Fundamental Science-Based Simulation of Nuclear Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-10-04

    This report presents a hierarchical multiscale modeling scheme based on two-way information exchange. To account for all essential phenomena in waste forms over geological time scales, the models have to span length scales from nanometer to kilometer and time scales from picoseconds to millenia. A single model cannot cover this wide range and a multi-scale approach that integrates a number of different at-scale models is called for. The approach outlined here involves integration of quantum mechanical calculations, classical molecular dynamics simulations, kinetic Monte Carlo and phase field methods at the mesoscale, and continuum models. The ultimate aim is to provide science-based input in the form of constitutive equations to integrated codes. The atomistic component of this scheme is demonstrated in the promising waste form xenotime. Density functional theory calculations have yielded valuable information about defect formation energies. This data can be used to develop interatomic potentials for molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage. Potentials developed in the present work show a good match for the equilibrium lattice constants, elastic constants and thermal expansion of xenotime. In novel waste forms, such as xenotime, a considerable amount of data needed to validate the models is not available. Integration of multiscale modeling with experimental work is essential to generate missing data needed to validate the modeling scheme and the individual models. Density functional theory can also be used to fill knowledge gaps. Key challenges lie in the areas of uncertainty quantification, verification and validation, which must be performed at each level of the multiscale model and across scales. The approach used to exchange information between different levels must also be rigorously validated. The outlook for multiscale modeling of wasteforms is quite promising.

  3. Raman study of aluminum speciation in simulated alkaline nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Cliff T; Agnew, Stephen F; Schoonover, Jon R; Kenney, John W; Page, Bobbi; Osborn, Jill; Corbin, Rob

    2002-06-01

    The chemistry of concentrated sodium aluminate solutions stored in many of the large, underground storage tanks containing high-level waste (HLW) at the Hanford and Savannah River Nuclear Reservations is an area of recent research interest. Not only is the presence of aluminate in solution important for continued safe storage of these wastes, the nature of both solid and solution aluminum oxyhydroxides is important for waste pretreatment. Moreover, for many tanks that have leaked high aluminum waste in the past, little is known about the speciation of Al in the soil. In this study, Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the speciation of the aqueous species in the Al2O3-Na2O-H2O system over a wide range of solution compositions and hydration. A ternary phase diagram has been used to correlate the observed changes in the spectra with the composition of the solution and with dimerization of aluminate that occurs at elevated aluminate concentrations (>1.5 M). Dimerization is evidenced by growth of new Al-O stretching bands at 535 and 695 cm(-1) at the expense of the aluminate monomer band at 620 cm(-1). The spectrum of water was strongly influenced by the high concentrations of Na+ and OH- (>17 M). Upon increasing the concentration of NaOH in solution, the delta-(H-O-H) bending band of water (v2 mode) increased in frequency to 1663 cm(-1), indicating that the water contained in the concentrated caustic solution was more strongly hydrogen bonded at the higher base content. In addition, the sharp, well-resolved band at 3610 cm(-1), assigned to the v(O-H) of free OH-, increased in intensity with increasing NaOH. Analysis of the v(O-H) bands in the 3800-2600 cm(-1) region supported the overall increase in hydrogen bonding as evidenced by the increase in relative intensity of a strongly hydrated water band at 3118 cm(-1). Taking into consideration the activity of water, the molar concentrations of the monomeric and dimeric aluminate species were estimated using

  4. Searching for gravitational-waves from compact binary coalescences while dealing with challenges of real data and simulated waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanga, Waduthanthree Thilina

    Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts the existence of gravitational waves (GWs). Direct detection of GWs will provide enormous amount of new information about physics, astronomy and cosmology. Scientists around the world are currently working towards the first direct detection of GWs. The global network of ground-based GW detectors are currently preparing for their first advanced detector Science runs. In this thesis we focus on detection of GWs from compact binary coalescence (CBC) systems. Ability to accurately model CBC GW waveforms makes them the most promising source for the first direct detection of GWs. In this thesis we try to address several challenges associated with detecting CBC signals buried in ground-based GW detector data for past and future searches. Data analysis techniques we employ to detect GW signals assume detector noise is Gaussian and stationary. However, in reality, detector data is neither Gaussian nor stationary. To estimate the performance loss due to these features, we compare the efficiencies of detecting CBC signals in simulated Gaussian and real data. Additionally, we also demonstrate the effectiveness of multi-detector signal based consistency tests such ad null-stream. Despite, non-Gaussian and non-stationary features of real detector data, with effective data quality studies and signal-based vetoes we can approach the performance of Gaussian and stationary data. As we are moving towards advanced detector era, it is important to be prepared for future CBC searches. In this thesis we investigate the performances of non-spinning binary black hole (BBH) searches in simulated Gaussian using advanced detector noise curves predicted for 2015--2016. In the same study, we analyze the GW detection probabilities of latest pN-NR hybrid waveforms submitted to second version of Numerical Injection Analysis (NINJA-2) project. The main motivation for this study is to understand the ability to detect realistic BBH signals of

  5. TOWARD END-TO-END MODELING FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING: SIMULATION OF UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND EARTHQUAKES USING HYDRODYNAMIC AND ANELASTIC SIMULATIONS, HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL EARTH MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Vorobiev, O; Petersson, A; Sjogreen, B

    2009-07-06

    This paper describes new research being performed to improve understanding of seismic waves generated by underground nuclear explosions (UNE) by using full waveform simulation, high-performance computing and three-dimensional (3D) earth models. The goal of this effort is to develop an end-to-end modeling capability to cover the range of wave propagation required for nuclear explosion monitoring (NEM) from the buried nuclear device to the seismic sensor. The goal of this work is to improve understanding of the physical basis and prediction capabilities of seismic observables for NEM including source and path-propagation effects. We are pursuing research along three main thrusts. Firstly, we are modeling the non-linear hydrodynamic response of geologic materials to underground explosions in order to better understand how source emplacement conditions impact the seismic waves that emerge from the source region and are ultimately observed hundreds or thousands of kilometers away. Empirical evidence shows that the amplitudes and frequency content of seismic waves at all distances are strongly impacted by the physical properties of the source region (e.g. density, strength, porosity). To model the near-source shock-wave motions of an UNE, we use GEODYN, an Eulerian Godunov (finite volume) code incorporating thermodynamically consistent non-linear constitutive relations, including cavity formation, yielding, porous compaction, tensile failure, bulking and damage. In order to propagate motions to seismic distances we are developing a one-way coupling method to pass motions to WPP (a Cartesian anelastic finite difference code). Preliminary investigations of UNE's in canonical materials (granite, tuff and alluvium) confirm that emplacement conditions have a strong effect on seismic amplitudes and the generation of shear waves. Specifically, we find that motions from an explosion in high-strength, low-porosity granite have high compressional wave amplitudes and weak shear

  6. Three new renal simulators for use in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullius, Marcos; Fonseca, Mateus; Botelho, Marcelo; Cunha, Clêdison; Souza, Divanízia

    2014-03-01

    Renal scintigraphy is useful to provide both functional and anatomic information of renal flow of cortical functions and evaluation of pathological collecting system. The objective of this study was develop and evaluate the performance of three renal phantoms: Two anthropomorphic static and another dynamic. The static images of the anthropomorphic phantoms were used for comparison with static renal scintigraphy with 99mTc-DMSA in different concentrations. These static phantoms were manufactured in two ways: one was made of acrylic using as mold a human kidney preserved in formaldehyde and the second was built with ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) in a 3D printer. The dynamic renal phantom was constructed of acrylic to simulate renal dynamics in scintigraphy with 99mTc-DTPA. These phantoms were scanned with static and dynamic protocols and compared with clinical data. Using these phantoms it is possible to acquire similar renal images as in the clinical scintigraphy. Therefore, these new renal phantoms can be very effective for use in the quality control of renal scintigraphy, and image processing systems.

  7. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-04-01

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder's intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties' absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  8. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-04-29

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder’s intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties’ absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  9. An adaptive simulation model for analysis of nuclear material shipping operations

    SciTech Connect

    Boerigter, S.T.; Sena, D.J.; Fasel, J.H.

    1998-12-31

    Los Alamos has developed an advanced simulation environment designed specifically for nuclear materials operations. This process-level simulation package, the Process Modeling System (ProMoS), is based on high-fidelity material balance criteria and contains intrinsic mechanisms for waste and recycle flows, contaminant estimation and tracking, and material-constrained operations. Recent development efforts have focused on coupling complex personnel interactions, personnel exposure calculations, and stochastic process-personnel performance criteria to the material-balance simulation. This combination of capabilities allows for more realistic simulation of nuclear material handling operations where complex personnel interactions are required. They have used ProMoS to assess fissile material shipping performance characteristics at the Los Alamos National Laboratory plutonium facility (TA-55). Nuclear material shipping operations are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and require the largest suite of varied personnel interacting in a well-timed manner to accomplish the task. They have developed a baseline simulation of the present operations and have estimated the operational impacts and requirement of the pit production mission at TA-55 as a result of the SSM-PEIS. Potential bottlenecks have been explored and mechanisms for increasing operational efficiency are identified.

  10. NPTool: a simulation and analysis framework for low-energy nuclear physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, A.; Morfouace, P.; de Séréville, N.; Flavigny, F.; Labiche, M.; Shearman, R.

    2016-08-01

    The Nuclear Physics Tool (NPTool) is an open source data analysis and Monte Carlo simulation framework that has been developed for low-energy nuclear physics experiments with an emphasis on radioactive beam experiments. The NPTool offers a unified framework for designing, preparing and analyzing complex experiments employing multiple detectors, each of which may comprise some hundreds of channels. The framework has been successfully used for the analysis and simulation of experiments at facilities including GANIL, RIKEN, ALTO and TRIUMF, using both stable and radioactive beams. This paper details the NPTool philosophy together with an overview of the workflow. The framework has been benchmarked through the comparison of simulated and experimental data for a variety of detectors used in charged particle and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  11. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; Pawlowski, Roger; Toth, Alex; Kelley, C.T.; Evans, Thomas; Philip, Bobby

    2016-04-15

    This paper evaluates the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss–Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product has been developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency of JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.

  12. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; Pawlowski, Roger; Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Evans, Thomas; Philip, Bobby

    2016-04-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss-Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product has been developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency of JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.

  13. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; ...

    2016-04-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss–Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product has been developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Furthermore, numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency ofmore » JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.« less

  14. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; Pawlowski, Roger; Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Evans, Thomas; Philip, Bobby

    2016-04-01

    Here we evaluate the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss–Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product was developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency of JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Finally, both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.

  15. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; ...

    2016-02-06

    This paper evaluates the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss–Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product has been developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Furthermore, numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency ofmore » JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.« less

  16. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; Pawlowski, Roger; Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Evans, Thomas; Philip, Bobby

    2016-02-06

    This paper evaluates the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss–Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product has been developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Furthermore, numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency of JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.; Guimbal, P.

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  18. Using Direct Sub-Level Entity Access to Improve Nuclear Stockpile Simulation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Robert Y.

    1999-08-01

    Direct sub-level entity access is a seldom-used technique in discrete-event simulation modeling that addresses the accessibility of sub-level entity information. The technique has significant advantages over more common, alternative modeling methods--especially where hierarchical entity structures are modeled. As such, direct sub-level entity access is often preferable in modeling nuclear stockpile, life-extension issues, an area to which it has not been previously applied. Current nuclear stockpile, life-extension models were demonstrated to benefit greatly from the advantages of direct sub-level entity access. In specific cases, the application of the technique resulted in models that were up to 10 times faster than functionally equivalent models where alternative techniques were applied. Furthermore, specific implementations of direct sub-level entity access were observed to be more flexible, efficient, functional, and scalable than corresponding implementations using common modeling techniques. Common modeling techniques (''unbatch/batch'' and ''attribute-copying'') proved inefficient and cumbersome in handling many nuclear stockpile modeling complexities, including multiple weapon sites, true defect analysis, and large numbers of weapon and subsystem types. While significant effort was required to enable direct sub-level entity access in the nuclear stockpile simulation models, the enhancements were worth the effort--resulting in more efficient, more capable, and more informative models that effectively addressed the complexities of the nuclear stockpile.

  19. Total simulation of operator team behavior in emergencies at nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Takano, K; Sunaoshi, W; Suzuki, K

    2000-09-01

    In a large and complex system (i.e., a space aeronautics and nuclear power plant) it would be valuable to conduct operator training and support to demonstrate standard operators' behavior in coping with an anomaly caused by multiple malfunctions in which procedures would not have been stipulated previously. A system simulating operator team behavior including individual operator's cognitive behavior, his operations and physical behavior, and even verbal communication among team members, has been developed for a typical commercial nuclear power plant. This simulation model is not a scenario-based system but a complete knowledge-based system, based on the mental model that was envisaged by detailed analyses of experimental results obtained in the full-scope plant simulator. This mental model is composed of a set of knowledge bases and rules able to generate both diagnosis and prognosis depending on the observed situation even for multiple malfunctions. Simulation results of operator team behavior and plant dynamics were compared with corresponding experiments in several anomalies of multiple malfunctions. The comparison showed a reasonable agreement, so the simulation conditions were varied on cognitive task processing speed of individual operators, on team role sharing scheme, and on human machine interface (1st generation to 2nd generation control panel) to assess the sensitivity of this simulation model. Finally, it was shown that this simulation model has applications for the use of training standards and computer aided operator support systems.

  20. Analysis of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection and interdiction using a collaborative constructive simulation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Lee A.; Calman, Jack; Fisher, Brian M.; Kay, Stephen W.; Lavelle, Christopher M.; Mayo, Robert M.; Miller, Bruce E.; Ruben, Katherine M.; West, Roger L.

    2012-05-01

    The acquisition of systems to locate and interdict Special Nuclear Material (SNM) is significantly enhanced when trade space analysis of and CONOPS development for various proposed sensor systems is performed using realistic operational scenarios in a synthetic simulation environment. To this end, the U. S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has developed a collaborative constructive simulation environment hosted at the DTRA Center at Ft. Belvoir, VA. The simulation environment includes a suite of modeling and simulation (M&S) tools, scenario vignette representations, geographic information databases, and authoritative sensor system representations. Currently focused on modeling the detection and interdiction of in-transit SNM, the M&S tools include the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulation for detailed nuclear transport calculations and the JHU/APL enhanced Joint Semi-Automated Forces (JSAF) synthetic simulation environment and several associated High-Level Architecture (HLA) federate simulations for engagement-level vignette executions. This presentation will focus on the JHU/APL enhancements to JSAF which have enabled the execution of SNM detection vignettes. These enhancements include the addition of a user-configurable Radioactive Material (RM) module for representation of SNM objects, a user-configurable RM Detection Module to represent operational and notional gamma and neutron detectors, a Radiation Attenuation Module to calculate net emissions at the detector face in the dynamic JSAF environment, and an RM Stimulation Module to represent notional proton and photon beam systems in active interrogation scenarios.

  1. Neutrino-pair emission from nuclear de-excitation in core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Langanke, K.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2013-12-01

    We study the impact of neutrino-pair production from the de-excitation of highly excited heavy nuclei on core-collapse supernova simulations, following the evolution up to several 100 ms after core bounce. Our study is based on the agile-boltztransupernova code, which features general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and accurate three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry. In our simulations the nuclear de-excitation process is described in two different ways. At first we follow the approach proposed by Fuller and Meyer [Astrophys. J.AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/170317 376, 701 (1991)], which is based on strength functions derived in the framework of the nuclear Fermi-gas model of noninteracting nucleons. Second, we parametrize the allowed and forbidden strength distributions in accordance with measurements for selected nuclear ground states. We determine the de-excitation strength by applying the Brink hypothesis and detailed balance. For both approaches, we find that nuclear de-excitation has no effect on the supernova dynamics. However, we find that nuclear de-excitation is the leading source for the production of electron antineutrinos as well as heavy-lepton-flavor (anti)neutrinos during the collapse phase. At sufficiently high densities, the associated neutrino spectra are influenced by interactions with the surrounding matter, making proper simulations of neutrino transport important for the determination of the neutrino-energy loss rate. We find that, even including nuclear de-excitations, the energy loss during the collapse phase is overwhelmingly dominated by electron neutrinos produced by electron capture.

  2. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-07-05

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  3. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear

  4. Limits on the experimental simulation of nuclear fuel rod response. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hagar, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The steady-state and transient effects of intrinxic geometric and material property differences between typical nuclear fuel pins and electric fuel pin simulators (FPSs) are identified. The effectiveness of varying the transient power supplied to the FPS in reducing the differences between the transient responses of nuclear fuel pins and FPSs is investigated. This effectiveness is shown to be limited by the heat capacity of the FPS, the allowed range of the power program, and different FPS power requirements at different positions on a full-length FPS.

  5. A perspective on large eddy simulation of problems in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Y.A.; Pruitt, J.M.; Steininger, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    Because of the complex nature of coolant flow in nuclear reactors, current subchannel methods for light water reactor analysis are insufficient. The large eddy simulation method has been proposed as a computational tool for subchannel analysis. In large eddy simulation, large flow structures are computed while small scales are modeled, thereby decreasing computational time as compared with direct numerical simulation methods. Large eddy simulation has been used in complex geometry calculations providing good results in tube bundle cross-flow situations in steam generators. It is proposed that the large eddy simulation method be extended from single- to two-phase flow calculations to help in the prediction of the thermal diffusion of energy between adjacent subchannels.

  6. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Clarno, Kevin T; Hamilton, Steven P; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Pugmire, Dave; Dilts, Gary; Banfield, James E

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms and boundary conditions of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation, such as the neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions, and assembly mechanical stresses. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. In addition, a new nuclear fuel-specific preconditioner was developed to account for the high aspect ratio of each fuel pin (12 feet axially, but 1 4 inches in diameter) with many individual fuel regions (pellets). With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 17 17 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics), including the fuel, gap, and cladding of each of the 264 fuel pins; the 25 guide tubes; the top and bottom structural regions; and the upper and lower (neutron) reflector regions. The final, full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 162

  7. Effects of root-induced compaction on rhizosphere hydraulic properties--X-ray microtomography imaging and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Aravena, Jazmín E; Berli, Markus; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A; Tyler, Scott W

    2011-01-15

    Soil compaction represents one of the most ubiquitous environmental impacts of human development, decreasing bulk-scale soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity, thereby reducing soil productivity and fertility. At the aggregate-scale however, this study shows that natural root-induced compaction increases contact areas between aggregates, leading to an increase in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the soils adjacent to the roots. Contrary to intuition, water flow may therefore be locally enhanced due to root-induced compaction. This study investigates these processes by using recent advances in X-ray microtomography (XMT) imaging and numerical water flow modeling to show evolution in interaggregate contact and its implications for water flow between aggregates under partially saturated conditions. Numerical modeling showed that the effective hydraulic conductivity of a pair of aggregates undergoing uniaxial deformation increased following a nonlinear relationship as the interaggregate contact area increased due to increasing aggregate deformation. Numerical modeling using actual XMT images of aggregated soil around a root surrogate demonstrated how root-induced deformation increases unsaturated water flow toward the root, providing insight into the growth, function, and water uptake patterns of roots in natural soils.

  8. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using simulated condensation: An auto-adaptive computer learning technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    The application of artificial neural network concepts to engineering analysis involves training networks, and therefore computers, to perform pattern classification or function mapping tasks. This training process requires the near optimization of network inter-neural connections. A new method for the stochastic optimization of these interconnections is presented in this dissertation. The new approach, called simulated condensation, is applied to networks of generalized, fully interconnected, continuous preceptrons. Simulated condensation optimizes the nodal bias, gain, and output activation constants as well as the usual interconnection weights. In this work, the simulated condensation network paradigm is applied to nuclear power plant operating status recognition. A set of standard problems such as the exclusive-or problem and others are also analyzed as benchmarks for the new methodology. The objective of the nuclear power plant accidient condition diagnosis effort is to train a network to identify both safe and potentially unsafe power plant conditions based on real time plant data. The data is obtained from computer generated accident scenarios. A simulated condensation network is trained to recognize seven nuclear power plant accident conditions as well as the normal full power operating condition. These accidents include, hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection and steam generator tube leak accidents. Twenty-seven plant process variables are used as input to the neural network. Results show the feasibility of using simulated condensation as a method for diagnosing nuclear power plant conditions. The method is general and can easily be applied to other types of plants and plant processes.

  9. Design Considerations for the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, Bill; Kirk, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today s best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Currently, such a simulator is nearing completion at the Marshall Space Flight Center, and will shortly be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of he1 element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator or NTREES and some of the design considerations which were considered prior to and during its construction.

  10. Design Considerations for the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, Bill; Kirk, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today s best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Currently, such a simulator is nearing completion at the Marshall Space Flight Center, and will shortly be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of he1 element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator or NTREES and some of the design considerations which were considered prior to and during its construction.

  11. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  12. Exclusive CHIPS-TPT algorithms for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, Mikhail; Savin, Dmitriy

    2016-09-01

    The CHIPS-TPT physics library for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions on the new exclusive level is being developed in CFAR VNIIA. The exclusive modeling conserves energy, momentum and quantum numbers in each neutron-nuclear interaction. The CHIPS-TPT algorithms are based on the exclusive CHIPS library, which is compatible with Geant4. Special CHIPS-TPT physics lists in the Geant4 format are provided. The calculation time for an exclusive CHIPS-TPT simulation is comparable to the time of the corresponding inclusive Geant4-HP simulation and much faster for mono-isotopic simulations. In addition to the reduction of the deposited energy fluctuations, which is a consequence of the energy conservation, the CHIPS-TPT libraries provide a possibility of simulation of the secondary particles correlation, e.g. secondary gammas or n-γ correlations, and of the Doppler broadening of the γ-lines in the simulated spectra, which can be measured by germanium detectors.

  13. Quantum dynamical simulations for nuclear spin selective laser control of ortho- and para-fulvene.

    PubMed

    Belz, S; Grohmann, T; Leibscher, M

    2009-07-21

    In the present paper we explore the prospects for laser control of the photoinduced nonadiabatic dynamics of para- and ortho-fulvene with the help of quantum dynamical simulations. Previous investigations [Bearpark et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 5253 (1996); Alfalah et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124318 (2009)] show that photoisomerization of fulvene is hindered by ultrafast radiationless decay through a conical intersection at planar configuration. Here, we demonstrate that photoisomerization can nevertheless be initiated by damping unfavorable nuclear vibrations with properly designed laser pulses. Moreover, we show that the resulting intramolecular torsion is nuclear spin selective. The selectivity of the photoexcitation with respect to the nuclear spin isomers can be further enhanced by applying an optimized sequence of two laser pulses.

  14. Evaluation of Recent Upgrades to the NESS (Nuclear Engine System Simulation) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittje, James E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2008-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) concept is being evaluated as a potential propulsion technology for exploratory expeditions to the moon, Mars, and beyond. The need for exceptional propulsion system performance in these missions has been documented in numerous studies, and was the primary focus of a considerable effort undertaken during the Rover/NERVA program from 1955 to 1973. The NASA Glenn Research Center is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies with the aid of the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) code. This paper presents the additional capabilities and upgrades made to this code in order to perform higher fidelity NTR propulsion system analysis and design, and a comparison of its results to the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) design.

  15. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOEpatents

    Kallenbach, Gene A.; Noda, Frank T.; Mitchell, Dean J.; Etzkin, Joshua L.

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  16. Nuclear subsurface explosion modeling and hydrodynamic fragmentation simulation of hazardous asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premaratne, Pavithra Dhanuka

    Disruption and fragmentation of an asteroid using nuclear explosive devices (NEDs) is a highly complex yet a practical solution to mitigating the impact threat of asteroids with short warning time. A Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) concept, developed at the Asteroid Deflection Research Center (ADRC), consists of a primary vehicle that acts as kinetic impactor and a secondary vehicle that houses NEDs. The kinetic impactor (lead vehicle) strikes the asteroid creating a crater. The secondary vehicle will immediately enter the crater and detonate its nuclear payload creating a blast wave powerful enough to fragment the asteroid. The nuclear subsurface explosion modeling and hydrodynamic simulation has been a challenging research goal that paves the way an array of mission critical information. A mesh-free hydrodynamic simulation method, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) was utilized to obtain both qualitative and quantitative solutions for explosion efficiency. Commercial fluid dynamics packages such as AUTODYN along with the in-house GPU accelerated SPH algorithms were used to validate and optimize high-energy explosion dynamics for a variety of test cases. Energy coupling from the NED to the target body was also examined to determine the effectiveness of nuclear subsurface explosions. Success of a disruption mission also depends on the survivability of the nuclear payload when the secondary vehicle approaches the newly formed crater at a velocity of 10 km/s or higher. The vehicle may come into contact with debris ejecting the crater which required the conceptual development of a Whipple shield. As the vehicle closes on the crater, its skin may also experience extreme temperatures due to heat radiated from the crater bottom. In order to address this thermal problem, a simple metallic thermal shield design was implemented utilizing a radiative heat transfer algorithm and nodal solutions obtained from hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms, such as neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions and assembly mechanical stresses, of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 1717 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics). A full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 160 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps. The single radiation transport calculation required about 50% of the time required to solve the thermo-mechanics with a single loading step, which demonstrates that it is feasible to incorporate, in a single code, a high-fidelity radiation transport capability with a high-fidelity nuclear fuel thermo-mechanics capability and anticipate acceptable computational requirements. The

  18. Designing a Component-Based Architecture for the Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuels and Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, Jay Jay; Elwasif, Wael R; Hively, Lee M; Bernholdt, David E; Hetrick III, John M; Bohn, Tim T

    2009-01-01

    Concerns over the environment and energy security have recently prompted renewed interest in the U.S. in nuclear energy. Recognizing this, the U.S. Dept. of Energy has launched an initiative to revamp and modernize the role that modeling and simulation plays in the development and operation of nuclear facilities. This Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program represents a major investment in the development of new software, with one or more large multi-scale multi-physics capabilities in each of four technical areas associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, as well as additional supporting developments. In conjunction with this, we are designing a software architecture, computational environment, and component framework to integrate the NEAMS technical capabilities and make them more accessible to users. In this report of work very much in progress, we lay out the 'problem' we are addressing, describe the model-driven system design approach we are using, and compare them with several large-scale technical software initiatives from the past. We discuss how component technology may be uniquely positioned to address the software integration challenges of the NEAMS program, outline the capabilities planned for the NEAMS computational environment and framework, and describe some initial prototyping activities.

  19. An End-To-End Test of A Simulated Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyke, Melissa; Hrbud, Ivana; Goddfellow, Keith; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series addresses Phase I Space Fission Systems issues in it particular non-nuclear testing and system integration issues leading to the testing and non-nuclear demonstration of a 400-kW fully integrated flight unit. The first part of the SAFE 30 test series demonstrated operation of the simulated nuclear core and heat pipe system. Experimental data acquired in a number of different test scenarios will validate existing computational models, demonstrated system flexibility (fast start-ups, multiple start-ups/shut downs), simulate predictable failure modes and operating environments. The objective of the second part is to demonstrate an integrated propulsion system consisting of a core, conversion system and a thruster where the system converts thermal heat into jet power. This end-to-end system demonstration sets a precedent for ground testing of nuclear electric propulsion systems. The paper describes the SAFE 30 end-to-end system demonstration and its subsystems.

  20. Modeling, simulation, and analysis of satellite communications in nuclear disturbed environments with OPNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark A.

    2006-05-01

    Experiences modeling, simulating, and evaluating satellite and ground support systems using the OPNET tool are presented. The specific instance presented concerns work performed as part of a Nuclear Detonation Detection System (NDS) trade study. Models to be presented include a UHF satellite, mobile and fixed ground systems, and airborne systems. Model presentations start and proceed through scenario, node, component(s), detailed component attributes, and code variations providing a look at engineering level modeling of complex SATCOM systems. Traffic used in the scenarios is continuous transmission of message traffic used to evaluate the ability of UHF systems to perform in a "worst case" high altitude nuclear burst environment. Nuclear effects on RF signal propagation are identified and defined. Models and their simulation results provide a look at the capability of the OPNET tool in evaluating the capability of current as well as proposed future space and terrestrial communications systems from both the operational and acquisition perspectives when the systems are subjected to nuclear disturbed environments.

  1. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Svard, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2015-03-04

    Here, previous simulation studies of Differential Die–Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs.

  2. Simulation modeling of nuclear steam generator water level process--a case study

    PubMed

    Zhao; Ou; Du

    2000-01-01

    Simulation modeling of the nuclear steam generator (SG) water level process in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP) is described in this paper. A practical methodology was adopted so that the model is both simple and accurate for control engineering implementation. The structure of the model is in the form of a transfer function, which was determined based on first-principles analysis and expert experience. The parameters of the model were obtained by taking advantage of the recorded historical response curves under the existing closed-loop control system. The results of process dimensional data verification and experimental tests demonstrate that the simulation model depicts the main dynamic characteristics of the SG water level process and is in accordance with the field recorded response curves. The model has been successfully applied to the design and test of an advanced digital feedwater control system in QNPP.

  3. Nuclear winter - Three-dimensional simulations including interactive transport, scavenging, and solar heating of smoke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, R. C.; Auer, L. H.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Wood, M. C.; Toon, O. B.

    1986-01-01

    A reexamination is conducted of the 'nuclear winter' hypothesis with a three-dimensional global model modified to allow for localized injection of smoke, its transport by the simulated winds, its absorption of sunlight, and its removal by model-simulated precipitation. Smoke injected into the troposphere is driven upward by solar heating. The tropopause, initially above the smoke, reforms below the heat smoke layer and separates it from precipitation below. Although much smoke is scavenged while the thermal structure is being altered, the residence time of the remaining smoke is greatly increased. Particularly for July conditions, a longer-lasting 'nuclear winter' effect is observed than was found in earlier modeling studies in which normal tropospheric residence times were assumed. In January the smaller solar flux in the northern hemisphere allows faster removal of smoke than in July. Significant cooling of the northern hemisphere continents is predicted; its dependence on season and injected smoke mass is described.

  4. Ensemble Simulation of the Atmospheric Radionuclides Discharged by the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiyama, Thomas; Kajino, Mizuo; Kunii, Masaru

    2013-04-01

    Enormous amounts of radionuclides were discharged into the atmosphere by a nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) after the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. The radionuclides were dispersed from the power plant and deposited mainly over eastern Japan and the North Pacific Ocean. A lot of numerical simulations of the radionuclide dispersion and deposition had been attempted repeatedly since the nuclear accident. However, none of them were able to perfectly simulate the distribution of dose rates observed after the accident over eastern Japan. This was partly due to the error of the wind vectors and precipitations used in the numerical simulations; unfortunately, their deterministic simulations could not deal with the probability distribution of the simulation results and errors. Therefore, an ensemble simulation of the atmospheric radionuclides was performed using the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation system coupled with the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) non-hydrostatic mesoscale model (NHM); this mesoscale model has been used operationally for daily weather forecasts by JMA. Meteorological observations were provided to the EnKF data assimilation system from the JMA operational-weather-forecast dataset. Through this ensemble data assimilation, twenty members of the meteorological analysis over eastern Japan from 11 to 31 March 2011 were successfully obtained. Using these meteorological ensemble analysis members, the radionuclide behavior in the atmosphere such as advection, convection, diffusion, dry deposition, and wet deposition was simulated. This ensemble simulation provided the multiple results of the radionuclide dispersion and distribution. Because a large ensemble deviation indicates the low accuracy of the numerical simulation, the probabilistic information is obtainable from the ensemble simulation results. For example, the uncertainty of precipitation triggered the uncertainty of wet deposition; the

  5. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  6. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  7. Operational safety enhancement of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors via development of nuclear power plant simulators and transfer of related technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohut, P.; Epel, L.G.; Tutu, N.K.

    1998-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under the US government`s International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper.

  8. Removal of actinides from nuclear reprocessing wastes: a pilot plant study using non-radioactive simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, H.R.; McIsaac, L.D.; Chamberlain, D.B.; McManus, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes generated at the ICPP contain small amounts of actinides, primarily Pu and Am. Removal of these actinides reduces the long term storage hazards of the waste. The development of a flowsheet to remove trivalent actinides is discussed in this paper. Pilot plant studies used actinide simulants. As a result of these studies, the Height of a Transfer Unit (HTU) was selected as the better measure of pulse column separation efficiency.

  9. Results of simulated abnormal heating events for full-length nuclear fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Full-length nuclear fuel rods were tested in a furnace to simulate the slow heating rates postulated for commercial pressurized water reactor fuel rods exposed to an overheating event in a storage cask. Fuel rod temperatures and internal gas pressures were monitored during the test and are presented along with mensural data for cladding. Metallography of the cladding provided data on grain growth, hydriding, oxidation, cladding stresses, and the general nature of the failures.

  10. Ab initio simulation of radiation damage in nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Daniel; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Using Kinetic Monte Carlo we developed a code to study point defect hopping in BCC metallic alloys using energetics and attempt frequencies calculated using VASP, an electronic structure software package. Our code provides a way of simulating the effects of neutron radiation on potential reactor materials. Specifically we will compare the Molybdenum-Chromium alloy system to steel alloys for use in nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  11. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  12. Approaching the Post-Newtonian Regime with Numerical Relativity: A Compact-Object Binary Simulation Spanning 350 Gravitational-Wave Cycles.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, Béla; Blackman, Jonathan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Chu, Tony; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pan, Yi

    2015-07-17

    We present the first numerical-relativity simulation of a compact-object binary whose gravitational waveform is long enough to cover the entire frequency band of advanced gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA, for mass ratio 7 and total mass as low as 45.5M_{⊙}. We find that effective-one-body models, either uncalibrated or calibrated against substantially shorter numerical-relativity waveforms at smaller mass ratios, reproduce our new waveform remarkably well, with a negligible loss in detection rate due to modeling error. In contrast, post-Newtonian inspiral waveforms and existing calibrated phenomenological inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms display greater disagreement with our new simulation. The disagreement varies substantially depending on the specific post-Newtonian approximant used.

  13. Compactness of the Lithium Peroxide Thin Film Formed in Li-O2 Batteries and Its Link to the Charge Transport Mechanism: Insights from Stochastic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yinghui; Zhao, Ruijie; Deng, Yue; Franco, Alejandro A

    2017-02-02

    We simulated the discharge process of Li-O2 batteries and the growth of Li2O2 thin films at the mesoscale with a novel kinetic Monte Carlo model, which combined a stochastic description of mass transport and detailed elementary reaction kinetics. The simulation results show that the ordering of the Li2O2 thin film is determined by the interplay between diffusion and reaction kinetics. Due to the fast reaction kinetics on the catalyst, the Li2O2 formed in the presence of catalyst (cat-CNF) shows a low degree of ordering and is more likely to be amorphous. Moreover, the mobility of the LiO2 ion pair, which depends largely on the nature of the electrolyte, also impacts the homogeneity of the compactness of the Li2O2 thin film. These results are of high importance for understanding the role of the catalyst and reaction kinetics in Li-O2 batteries.

  14. Laser experiments to simulate coronal mass ejection driven magnetospheres and astrophysical plasma winds on compact magnetized stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Ditmire, T.; Zakharov, Yu. P.

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory experiments using a plasma wind generated by laser-target interaction are proposed to investigate the creation of a shock in front of the magnetosphere and the dynamo mechanism for creating plasma currents and voltages. Preliminary experiments are shown where measurements of the electron density gradients surrounding the obstacles are recorded to infer the plasma winds. The proposed experiments are relevant to understanding the electron acceleration mechanisms taking place in shock-driven magnetic dipole confined plasmas surrounding compact magnetized stars and planets. Exploratory experiments have been published [P. Brady, T. Ditmire, W. Horton, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 043112 (2009)] with the one Joule Yoga laser and centimeter sized permanent magnets.

  15. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images.

    PubMed

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S

    2015-05-07

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image.

  16. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S.

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image.

  17. Pulsed Neutron Imaging for Non-destructive Testing using Simulated Nuclear Fuel Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Sano, Tadafumi; Hori, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Hasemi, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Takashi; Nakajima, Ken

    An integrated assessment method for a nuclear fuel with high decay heat and high radioactivity is required to establish fast reactor system with Trans-Uranium (TRU) fuel containing minor actinides. In addition, a Pu quantitation method with rapidity and accuracy is also necessary in a viewpoint of nuclear security. For these demands, a quantitative evaluation technique for nuclei concentration, thermal property and physical information of such fuel has to be developed. The present study focuses on the non-destructive imaging using pulsed neutrons. Experiments are carried out at Hokkaido University Neutron Source (HUNS) and a gas electron multiplier (GEM) is applied to obtain 2-D information of time-of-flight (TOF). To simulate a nuclear fuel pellet, a sample with equivalent thermal neutron cross-section to the enriched uranium fuel is prepared and the transmitted images of the simulated sample are acquired. Furthermore, a small piece of In, which simulates the Pu spot in the actual fuel, is inserted into the sample and the detectability of the small spot is discussed.

  18. Large-scale large eddy simulation of nuclear reactor flows: Issues and perspectives

    DOE PAGES

    Merzari, Elia; Obabko, Aleks; Fischer, Paul; ...

    2016-11-03

    Numerical simulation has been an intrinsic part of nuclear engineering research since its inception. In recent years a transition is occurring toward predictive, first-principle-based tools such as computational fluid dynamics. Even with the advent of petascale computing, however, such tools still have significant limitations. In the present work some of these issues, and in particular the presence of massive multiscale separation, are discussed, as well as some of the research conducted to mitigate them. Petascale simulations at high fidelity (large eddy simulation/direct numerical simulation) were conducted with the massively parallel spectral element code Nek5000 on a series of representative problems.more » These simulations shed light on the requirements of several types of simulation: (1) axial flow around fuel rods, with particular attention to wall effects; (2) natural convection in the primary vessel; and (3) flow in a rod bundle in the presence of spacing devices. Finally, the focus of the work presented here is on the lessons learned and the requirements to perform these simulations at exascale. Additional physical insight gained from these simulations is also emphasized.« less

  19. Large-scale large eddy simulation of nuclear reactor flows: Issues and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Merzari, Elia; Obabko, Aleks; Fischer, Paul; Halford, Noah; Walker, Justin; Siegel, Andrew; Yu, Yiqi

    2016-11-03

    Numerical simulation has been an intrinsic part of nuclear engineering research since its inception. In recent years a transition is occurring toward predictive, first-principle-based tools such as computational fluid dynamics. Even with the advent of petascale computing, however, such tools still have significant limitations. In the present work some of these issues, and in particular the presence of massive multiscale separation, are discussed, as well as some of the research conducted to mitigate them. Petascale simulations at high fidelity (large eddy simulation/direct numerical simulation) were conducted with the massively parallel spectral element code Nek5000 on a series of representative problems. These simulations shed light on the requirements of several types of simulation: (1) axial flow around fuel rods, with particular attention to wall effects; (2) natural convection in the primary vessel; and (3) flow in a rod bundle in the presence of spacing devices. Finally, the focus of the work presented here is on the lessons learned and the requirements to perform these simulations at exascale. Additional physical insight gained from these simulations is also emphasized.

  20. Development of compact accelerator neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letourneau, Alain; Marchix, Anthony; Tran, Ngoc-Hoang; Chauvin, Nicolas; Menelle, Alain; Ott, Frédéric; Schwindling, Jérôme

    2017-09-01

    There is a worldwide growing interest for small-scale and reduced-cost neutron sources not based on nuclear fission. High-intensity proton or deuteron beams impinging on light materials could be used to produce such neutron sources with intensities or brightness comparable to nuclear reactor for dedicated experiments. To develop such technologies several key technological issues have to be addressed. Among them the neutron production and the maximization of the neutron extraction and transport to the instrument is a key parameter for the design of high-brightness sources adapted for the required application. This issue have to be addressed with validated and predictive Monte-Carlo simulations. In this paper we present preliminary results on the use of Geant4 in the context of Compact Accelerator based Neutron Source (CANS) developments.

  1. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  2. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    PubMed

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors.

  3. Results from Tight and Loose Coupled Multiphysics in Nuclear Fuels Performance Simulations using BISON

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. Andrs; R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez

    2013-05-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won’t converge and vice versa.

  4. Results from tight and loose coupled multiphysics in nuclear fuels performance simulations using BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Andrs, D.; Williamson, R. L.; Hales, J. D.; Perez, D. M.

    2013-07-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won't converge and vice versa. (authors)

  5. A performance-based method for calculating the design thickness of compacted clay liners exposed to high strength leachate under simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Safari, Edwin; Jalili Ghazizade, Mahdi; Abdoli, Mohammad Ali

    2012-09-01

    Compacted clay liners (CCLs) when feasible, are preferred to composite geosynthetic liners. The thickness of CCLs is typically prescribed by each country's environmental protection regulations. However, considering the fact that construction of CCLs represents a significant portion of overall landfill construction costs; a performance based design of liner thickness would be preferable to 'one size fits all' prescriptive standards. In this study researchers analyzed the hydraulic behaviour of a compacted clayey soil in three laboratory pilot scale columns exposed to high strength leachate under simulated landfill conditions. The temperature of the simulated CCL at the surface was maintained at 40 ± 2 °C and a vertical pressure of 250 kPa was applied to the soil through a gravel layer on top of the 50 cm thick CCL where high strength fresh leachate was circulated at heads of 15 and 30 cm simulating the flow over the CCL. Inverse modelling using HYDRUS-1D indicated that the hydraulic conductivity after 180 days was decreased about three orders of magnitude in comparison with the values measured prior to the experiment. A number of scenarios of different leachate heads and persistence time were considered and saturation depth of the CCL was predicted through modelling. Under a typical leachate head of 30 cm, the saturation depth was predicted to be less than 60 cm for a persistence time of 3 years. This approach can be generalized to estimate an effective thickness of a CCL instead of using prescribed values, which may be conservatively overdesigned and thus unduly costly.

  6. Numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in a sea bay water area used for water supply to nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A. S.

    2013-07-15

    Consideration is given to the numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in sea water areas used for both water supply to and dissipation of low-grade heat from a nuclear power plant on the shore of a sea bay.

  7. A Perspective on Coupled Multiscale Simulation and Validation in Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    M. P. Short; D. Gaston; C. R. Stanek; S. Yip

    2014-01-01

    The field of nuclear materials encompasses numerous opportunities to address and ultimately solve longstanding industrial problems by improving the fundamental understanding of materials through the integration of experiments with multiscale modeling and high-performance simulation. A particularly noteworthy example is an ongoing study of axial power distortions in a nuclear reactor induced by corrosion deposits, known as CRUD (Chalk River unidentified deposits). We describe how progress is being made toward achieving scientific advances and technological solutions on two fronts. Specifically, the study of thermal conductivity of CRUD phases has augmented missing data as well as revealed new mechanisms. Additionally, the development of a multiscale simulation framework shows potential for the validation of a new capability to predict the power distribution of a reactor, in effect direct evidence of technological impact. The material- and system-level challenges identified in the study of CRUD are similar to other well-known vexing problems in nuclear materials, such as irradiation accelerated corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and void swelling; they all involve connecting materials science fundamentals at the atomistic- and mesoscales to technology challenges at the macroscale.

  8. HALO RETENTION AND EVOLUTION OF COALESCING COMPACT BINARIES IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF STRUCTURE FORMATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zemp, Marcel; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Diemand, Juerg E-mail: enrico@ucolick.or

    2009-11-10

    Merging compact binaries are the one source of gravitational radiation so far identified. Because short-period systems that will merge in less than a Hubble time have already been observed as binary pulsars, they are important both as gravitational wave sources for observatories such as LIGO, but also as progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The fact that these systems must have large systemic velocities implies that by the time they merge, they will be far from their formation site. The locations of merging sites depend sensitively on the gravitational potential of the galaxy host, which until now has been assumed to be static. Here we refine such calculations to incorporate the temporal evolution of the host's gravitational potential as well as that of its nearby neighbors using cosmological simulations of structure formation. This results in merger site distributions that are more diffusively distributed with respect to their putative hosts, with locations extending out to distances of a few Mpc for lighter halos. The degree of mixing between neighboring compact binary populations computed in this way is severely enhanced in environments with a high number density of galaxies. We find that SGRB redshift estimates based solely on the nearest galaxy in projection can be very inaccurate, if progenitor systems inhere large systematic kicks at birth.

  9. Simulation of two-phase liquid-vapor flows using a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Ezzatneshan, Eslam

    2015-11-01

    A high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (CFDLBM) is extended and applied to accurately simulate two-phase liquid-vapor flows with high density ratios. Herein, the He-Shan-Doolen-type lattice Boltzmann multiphase model is used and the spatial derivatives in the resulting equations are discretized by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference scheme and the temporal term is discretized with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to provide an accurate and efficient two-phase flow solver. A high-order spectral-type low-pass compact nonlinear filter is used to regularize the numerical solution and remove spurious waves generated by flow nonlinearities in smooth regions and at the same time to remove the numerical oscillations in the interfacial region between the two phases. Three discontinuity-detecting sensors for properly switching between a second-order and a higher-order filter are applied and assessed. It is shown that the filtering technique used can be conveniently adopted to reduce the spurious numerical effects and improve the numerical stability of the CFDLBM implemented. A sensitivity study is also conducted to evaluate the effects of grid size and the filtering procedure implemented on the accuracy and performance of the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed solution procedure based on the compact finite-difference LBM are examined by solving different two-phase systems. Five test cases considered herein for validating the results of the two-phase flows are an equilibrium state of a planar interface in a liquid-vapor system, a droplet suspended in the gaseous phase, a liquid droplet located between two parallel wettable surfaces, the coalescence of two droplets, and a phase separation in a liquid-vapor system at different conditions. Numerical results are also presented for the coexistence curve and the verification of the Laplace law. Results obtained are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and also

  10. Simulation of two-phase liquid-vapor flows using a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Ezzatneshan, Eslam

    2015-11-01

    A high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (CFDLBM) is extended and applied to accurately simulate two-phase liquid-vapor flows with high density ratios. Herein, the He-Shan-Doolen-type lattice Boltzmann multiphase model is used and the spatial derivatives in the resulting equations are discretized by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference scheme and the temporal term is discretized with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to provide an accurate and efficient two-phase flow solver. A high-order spectral-type low-pass compact nonlinear filter is used to regularize the numerical solution and remove spurious waves generated by flow nonlinearities in smooth regions and at the same time to remove the numerical oscillations in the interfacial region between the two phases. Three discontinuity-detecting sensors for properly switching between a second-order and a higher-order filter are applied and assessed. It is shown that the filtering technique used can be conveniently adopted to reduce the spurious numerical effects and improve the numerical stability of the CFDLBM implemented. A sensitivity study is also conducted to evaluate the effects of grid size and the filtering procedure implemented on the accuracy and performance of the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed solution procedure based on the compact finite-difference LBM are examined by solving different two-phase systems. Five test cases considered herein for validating the results of the two-phase flows are an equilibrium state of a planar interface in a liquid-vapor system, a droplet suspended in the gaseous phase, a liquid droplet located between two parallel wettable surfaces, the coalescence of two droplets, and a phase separation in a liquid-vapor system at different conditions. Numerical results are also presented for the coexistence curve and the verification of the Laplace law. Results obtained are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and also

  11. Potential Biogenic Corrosion of Alloy 22, A Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Materials, Under Simulated Repository Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Martin, S.I.; Rivera, A.J.; Bedrossian, P.J.; Lian, T.

    2000-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with assessing the suitability of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. Microorganisms, both those endogenous to the repository site and those introduced as a result of construction and operational activities, may contribute to the corrosion of metal nuclear waste packaging and thereby decrease their useful lifetime as barrier materials. Evaluation of potential Microbiological Influenced Corrosion (MIC) on candidate waste package materials was undertaken reactor systems incorporating the primary elements of the repository: YM rock (either non-sterile or presterilized), material coupons, and a continual feed of simulated YM groundwater. Periodically, both aqueous reactor efflux and material coupons were analyzed for chemical and surfacial characterization. Alloy 22 coupons exposed for a year at room temperature in reactors containing non-sterile YM rock demonstrated accretion of chromium oxide and silaceous scales, with what appear to be underlying areas of corrosion.

  12. Final technical report: Effects of water on properties of the simulated nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Tomozawa, M.

    1996-02-01

    For isolation of nuclear wastes through the vitrification process, waste slurry is mixed with borosilicate based glass and remelted at high temperature. During these processes, water can enter into the final waste glass. It is known that water in silica and silicate glasses changes various glass properties, such as chemical durability, viscosity and electrical conductivity. These properties are very important for processing and assuring the quality and safety controls of the waste glasses. The objective of this project was to investigate the effect of water in the simulated nuclear waste glasses on various glass properties, including chemical durability, glass transition temperature, liquidus temperature, viscosity and electrical conductivity. This report summarizes the results of this investigation conducted at Rensselaer during the past one year.

  13. Lateral Flow Field Behavior Downstream of Mixing Vanes In a Simulated Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, Michael E.; Smith, L. David III; Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.

    2004-07-01

    To assess the fuel assembly performance of PWR nuclear fuel assemblies, average subchannel flow values are used in design analyses. However, for this highly complex flow, it is known that local conditions around fuel rods vary dependent upon the location of the fuel rod in the fuel assembly and upon the support grid design that maintains the fuel rod pitch. To investigate the local flow in a simulated nuclear fuel rod bundle, a testing technique has been employed to measure the lateral flow field in a 5 x 5 rod bundle. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to measure the lateral flow field downstream of a support grid with mixing vanes for four unique subchannels in the 5 x 5 bundle. The dominant lateral flow structures for each subchannel are compared in this paper including the decay of these flow structures. (authors)

  14. Thermal nuclear pulse simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E. ); Ghanbari, C.M. ); Oeding, R.; Shaw, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico is being used to simulate the thermal pulse from a nuclear weapon on relatively large surfaces. Pulses varying in length from 2 seconds to 7 seconds have been produced. The desired pulse length varies as a function of the yield of the weapon being simulated. The present experiment capability can accommodate samples as large as 1.2 {times} 1.5 meters. Samples can be flat or three-dimensional. Samples exposed have ranged from fabrics (protective clothing) to an aircraft canopy and cockpit system, complete with a mannequin in a flight suit and helmet. In addition, a windowed wind tunnel has been constructed which permits exposure of flight surface materials to thermal transients with air speed of Mach 0.8. The wind tunnel can accommodate samples up to .48 {times} .76 meters or an array of smaller samples. The maximum flux capability of the NSTTF is about 70 calories/cm{sup 2}-sec. A black-body temperature of about 6000 K is produced by the solar beam and is therefore ideal for simulating the nuclear source. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  15. S2DS: Physics-based compact model for circuit simulation of two-dimensional semiconductor devices including non-idealities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryavanshi, Saurabh V.; Pop, Eric

    2016-12-01

    We present a physics-based compact model for two-dimensional (2D) field-effect transistors (FETs) based on monolayer semiconductors such as MoS2. A semi-classical transport approach is appropriate for the 2D channel, enabling simplified analytical expressions for the drain current. In addition to intrinsic FET behavior, the model includes contact resistance, traps and impurities, quantum capacitance, fringing fields, high-field velocity saturation, and self-heating, the latter being found to play an important role. The model is calibrated with state-of-the-art experimental data for n- and p-type 2D-FETs, and it can be used to analyze device properties for sub-100 nm gate lengths. Using the experimental fit, we demonstrate the feasibility of circuit simulations using properly scaled devices. The complete model is implemented in SPICE-compatible Verilog-A, and a downloadable version is freely available at the nanoHUB.org.

  16. Simulation of concave-convex imaging mirror system for development of a compact and achromatic full-field x-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jumpei; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2017-02-01

    We propose the use of two pairs of concave-convex mirrors as imaging optics for the compact full-field x-ray microscope with high resolution and magnification factors. The optics consists of two pairs of hyperbolic convex and elliptical concave mirrors with the principal surface near the object, consequently enabling the focal length to be 10 times shorter than conventional advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics. This paper describes characteristics of the optics calculated by ray-tracing and wave-optical simulators. The expected spatial resolution is approximately 40 nm with a wide field of view of more than 10 μm and a total length of about 2 m, which may lead to the possibility of laboratory-sized, achromatic, and high-resolution full-field x-ray microscopes.

  17. Uncertainty analysis of atmospheric deposition simulation of radiocesium and radioiodine from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Yu; Ohara, Toshimasa; Yumimoto, Keiya

    2014-05-01

    Chemical transport models (CTM) played key roles in understanding the atmospheric behaviors and deposition patterns of radioactive materials emitted from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) after the nuclear accident that accompanied the great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. In this study, we assessed uncertainties of atmospheric simulation by comparing observed and simulated deposition of radiocesium (137Cs) and radioiodine (131I). Airborne monitoring survey data were used to assess the model performance of 137Cs deposition patterns. We found that simulation using emissions estimated with a regional-scale (~500 km) CTM better reproduced the observed 137Cs deposition pattern in eastern Japan than simulation using emissions estimated with local-scale (~50 km) or global-scale CTM. In addition, we estimated the emission amount of 137Cs from FDNPP by combining a CTM, a priori source term, and observed deposition data. This is the first use of airborne survey data of 137Cs deposition (more than 16,000 data points) as the observational constraints in inverse modeling. The model simulation driven by a posteriori source term achieved better agreements with 137Cs depositions measured by aircraft survey and at in-situ stations over eastern Japan. Wet deposition module was also evaluated. Simulation using a process-based wet deposition module reproduced the observations well, whereas simulation using scavenging coefficients showed large uncertainties associated with empirical parameters. The best-available simulation reproduced the observed 137Cs deposition rates in high-deposition areas (≥10 kBq m-2) within one order of magnitude. Recently, 131I deposition map was released and helped to evaluate model performance of 131I deposition patterns. Observed 131I/137Cs deposition ratio is higher in areas southwest of FDNPP than northwest of FDNPP, and this behavior was roughly reproduced by a CTM if we assume that released 131I is more in gas phase

  18. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; Pritchett-Sheats, L. A.; Nourgaliev, R. R.

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carried out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; ...

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carriedmore » out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.« less

  20. Compact vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; Zafalan, I.

    2017-02-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  1. Compact HPD

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, M.; Kawai, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1996-12-31

    In order to be utilized in such application fields as high energy physics or medical imaging, where a huge number of photodetectors are assembled in designated small area, the world`s smallest HPD, the compact BFD, has been developed. The overall diameter and the length of the tube are 16mm and 15mm, respectively. The effective photocathode area is 8mm in diameter. At applied voltage of -8kV to the photocathode, the electron multiplication gain of a PD incorporated HPD (PD-BPD) is 1,600, and that of an APD (APD-BPD) is 65,000. In the pulse height distribution measurement, photoelectron peaks up to 6 photoelectrons are clearly distinguishable with the APD-BPD. Experiments established that there was no degradation of gain in magnetic fields up to 1.5T, an important performance characteristic of the compact BPD for application in high energy physics.

  2. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  3. Numerical simulations of compact intracloud discharges as the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche-Extensive Air Shower process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Nag, A.; Rakov, V. A.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Compact intracloud discharges (CIDs) are sources of the powerful, often isolated radio pulses emitted by thunderstorms. The VLF-LF radio pulses are called narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs). It is still not clear how CIDs are produced, but two categories of theoretical models that have previously been considered are the Transmission Line (TL) model and the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche-Extensive Air Showers (RREA-EAS) model. In this paper, we perform numerical calculations of RREA-EASs for various electric field configurations inside thunderstorms. The results of these calculations are compared to results from the other models and to the experimental data. Our analysis shows that different theoretical models predict different fundamental characteristics for CIDs. Therefore, many previously published properties of CIDs are highly model dependent. This is because of the fact that measurements of the radiation field usually provide information about the current moment of the source, and different physical models with different discharge currents could have the same current moment. We have also found that although the RREA-EAS model could explain the current moments of CIDs, the required electric fields in the thundercloud are rather large and may not be realistic. Furthermore, the production of NBPs from RREA-EAS requires very energetic primary cosmic ray particles, not observed in nature. If such ultrahigh-energy particles were responsible for NBPs, then they should be far less frequent than is actually observed.

  4. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert; Rice, Brandon Charles; Bower, Gordon Ross; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Hill, Rachael Ann; LeBlanc, Katya Lee

    2015-11-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator’s eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  5. Validation of Simulation Codes for Future Systems: Motivations, Approach and the Role of Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; G. Aliberti

    2007-10-01

    The validation of advanced simulation tools will still play a very significant role in several areas of reactor system analysis. This is the case of reactor physics and neutronics, where nuclear data uncertainties still play a crucial role for many core and fuel cycle parameters. The present paper gives a summary of validation motivations, objectives and approach. A validation effort is in particular necessary in the frame of advanced (e.g. Generation-IV or GNEP) reactors and associated fuel cycles assessment and design.

  6. Magnetic field simulation of magnetic phase detection sensor for steam generator tube in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwon-sang; Son, Derac; Park, Duck-gun; Kim, Yong-il

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic phases and defects are partly produced in steam generator tubes by stress and heat, because steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants are used under high temperature, high pressure, and radioactivity. The magnetic phases induce an error in the detection of the defects in steam generator tubes by the conventional eddy current method. So a new method is needed for detecting the magnetic phases in the steam generator tubes. We designed a new U-type yoke which has two kinds of coils and simulated the signal by the magnetic phases and defects in the Inconnel 600 tube.

  7. Nuclear and Particle Physics Simulations: The Consortium of Upper-Level Physics Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Roberta; Moloney, Michael J.; Philpott, John; Rothberg, Joseph

    1995-06-01

    The Consortium for Upper Level Physics Software (CUPS) has developed a comprehensive series of Nine Book/Software packages that Wiley will publish in FY `95 and `96. CUPS is an international group of 27 physicists, all with extensive backgrounds in the research, teaching, and development of instructional software. The project is being supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9014548), and it has received other support from the IBM Corp., Apple Computer Corp., and George Mason University. The Simulations being developed are: Astrophysics, Classical Mechanics, Electricity & Magnetism, Modern Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State, Thermal and Statistical, and Wave and Optics.

  8. The GC computer code for flow sheet simulation of pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.

    1996-11-01

    The GC computer code has been developed for flow sheet simulation of pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel. It utilizes a robust algorithm SLG for analyzing simultaneous chemical reactions between species distributed across many phases. Models have been developed for analysis of the oxide fuel reduction process, salt recovery by electrochemical decomposition of lithium oxide, uranium separation from the reduced fuel by electrorefining, and extraction of fission products into liquid cadmium. The versatility of GC is demonstrated by applying the code to a flow sheet of current interest.

  9. A numerical simulation package for analysis of neutronics and thermal fluids of space nuclear power and propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anghaie, S.; Feller, G.J. ); Peery, S.D.; Parsley, R.C. )

    1993-01-20

    A system of computer codes for engineering simulation and in-depth analysis of nuclear and thermal fluid design of nuclear thermal rockets is developed. The computational system includes a neutronic solver package, a thermal fluid solver package and a propellant and materials property package. The Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system code is incorporated with computational modules specific to nuclear powered engines. ROCETS features a component based performance architecture that interfaces component modules into the user designed configuration, interprets user commands, creates an executable FORTRAN computer program, and executes the program to provide output to the user. Basic design features of the Pratt Whitney XNR2000 nuclear rocket concept and its operational performance are analyzed and simulated.

  10. Investigation of methanol-peptide nuclear Overhauser effects through molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gerig, J T

    2012-02-16

    Intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) produced by interactions of methanol with [val(5)]angiotensin in 25% methanol-water at 0 °C were examined through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and compared to experimental results. Calculated average (3)J(NHCαH) spin coupling constants, conformation-sensitive chemical shift changes, and intramolecular (1)H-(1)H NOEs indicated that peptide conformations present over the course of simulation trajectories of 100-300 ns are likely similar to those present in the experimental system. Calculated cross-relaxation terms for the methanol-peptide interactions showed the same trends as corresponding experimental data but were about a factor of 3 too large. The lack of agreement between observed and calculated cross-relaxation terms probably has origins in characteristics of the simulations that lead to overestimation of translational diffusion coefficients of the system components. Simulations confirmed the heterogeneity of the methanol-water solvent at the molecular level, with clusters of methanol and water molecules changing their size and composition on a subpicosecond time scale. Most peptide hydrogens are preferentially solvated by interactions with methanol molecules. Simulations suggest that diffusion of water and methanol molecules near the peptide is slowed as these species approach the peptide backbone.

  11. Impact of a simulated nuclear winter environment on growth development and productivity of potatoes, winter wheat, pines and soybeans

    SciTech Connect

    Palta, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Several recent studies predict strong land surface cooling and reduction in solar irradiance following nuclear explosions (Turco et al., 1983; Covey et al., 1984; Thompson et al., 1984). Although there is disagreement among scientists on the extent and the duration of temperature and irradiation decrease, there is a general agreement on the nuclear winter'' hypothesis following nuclear war (Covey, 1985). Agreements between the timing of excessive frost events and volcanic eruptions supports such nuclear winter scenarios (La Marche Jr. and Hirschboek, 1984). More recently Robock (1988) recorded a drop in surface temperatures following the entrapment of smoke from a forest fire in northern California. These measurements also support the nuclear winter hypothesis. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of a simulated nuclear winter environment on productivity of four plant species. 20 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Single Flow Element in a Nuclear Thermal Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi; Ross, Doug; Chen, Yen-Sen; Wang, Ten-See

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational methodology to predict both detailed and global thermo-fluid environments of a single now element in a hypothetical solid-core nuclear thermal thrust chamber assembly, Several numerical and multi-physics thermo-fluid models, such as chemical reactions, turbulence, conjugate heat transfer, porosity, and power generation, were incorporated into an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics solver. The numerical simulations of a single now element provide a detailed thermo-fluid environment for thermal stress estimation and insight for possible occurrence of mid-section corrosion. In addition, detailed conjugate heat transfer simulations were employed to develop the porosity models for efficient pressure drop and thermal load calculations.

  13. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lemma, F. G.; Colle, J. Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the evaluation of the source term and consequently the risk associated with release from spent fuel sabotage or accidents. Different simulated spent fuels were tested with burn-up up to 8 at. %. The results from the aerosol characterisation were compared with studies of the vaporization process by Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry and thermochemical equilibrium calculations. These studies permit an understanding of the aerosol gaseous precursors and the gaseous reactions taking place during the aerosol formation process.

  14. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells.

  15. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  16. Model simulations of the radioactive material plumes in the Fukushima nuclear power station accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Teruyuki; Goto, Daisuke; Morino, Yu; Misawa, Shota; Tsuruta, Haruo; Uchida, Junya; Takemura, Toshihiko; Ohara, Toshimasa; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Satoh, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    We like to present an analysis of a model-simulated and observed data comparison for depiction of the atmospheric transportation of the 137Cs emitted from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. This method employs a combination of the results of two aerosol model ensembles and the hourly observed atmospheric 137Cs concentration during 14-23 March 2011 at 90 sites in the Suspended Particulate Matter monitoring network. The result elucidates accurate transport routes and the distribution of the surface-level atmospheric 137Cs relevant to eight plume events that were previously identified. The model ensemble simulates the main features of the observed distribution of surface-level atmospheric 137Cs. However, significant differences were found in some cases. Through the analysis we discuss the important processes to control the characteristic shape and movement of each plume. We also report the status of the 2nd international model intercomparison in progress.

  17. Multicomponent leach tests in Standard Canadian Shield Saline Solution on glasses containing simulated nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, R.B.; Wood, D.D.; Hamon, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Leaching experiments on borosilicate glass frit and simulated nuclear waste glasses were performed as a preliminary to leaching experiments on glasses incorporating radioactive waste. The experimental design included (1) simulated waste glass, (2) ASTM Grade-2 titanium container material, (3) clay buffer material, (4) Standard Canadian Shield Saline Solution, and (5) granitic rock. Cumulative fractions of release for boron were determined, as well as the solution concentrations of silicon, iron, strontium and cesium. The leach rates for boron after 28 d were approximately 5 x 10/sup -6/ kg x m/sup -2/ x s/sup -1/ in Hastelloy vessels. There is an apparently strong relationship between the clay/groundwater ratio, the concentration of iron in the solution, and the concentrations of silicon, strontium, and cesium.

  18. Start-up simulation of a thermionic space nuclear reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Xue, H.; Paramonov, D. )

    1993-01-15

    The Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM) is used in this paper to simulate the start-up of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear power system in orbit. The start-up procedures simulated herein are assumed for the purpose of demonstrating the capabilities of the model and may not represent an accurate account of the actual start-up procedures of the TOPAZ-II system. The temperature reactivity feedback effects of the moderator, UO[sub 2] fuel, electrodes, coolant, and other components in the core are calculated and their effects on the thermal and criticality conditions of the reactor are investigated. Also, estimates of the time constants of the temperature reactivity feedback for the UO[sub 2] fuel and the ZrH moderator during start-up, as well as of the total temperature reactivity feedback as a function of the reactor steady-state thermal power, are obtained.

  19. Transient analysis and startup simulation of a thermionic space nuclear reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Xue, Huimin; Paramonov, D. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The thermionic transient analysis model is used to simulate the startup of the TOPAZ-2 space nuclear power system in orbit. The simulated startup procedures are assumed for the purpose of demonstrating the capabilities of the model and may not represent an accurate account of the actual startup procedures of the TOPAZ-2 system. The temperature reactivity feedback effects of the moderator, UO[sub 2] fuel, electrodes, coolant, and other components in the core are calculated, and their effects on the thermal and criticality conditions of the reactor are investigated. Also, estimates of the time constants of the temperature reactivity feedback for the UO[sub 2] fuel and the ZrH moderator during startup, as well as of the total temperature reactivity feedback as a function of the reactor steady-state thermal power, are obtained.

  20. Coupled Multi-physical Simulations for the Assessment of Nuclear Waste Repository Concepts: Modeling, Software Development and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massmann, J.; Nagel, T.; Bilke, L.; Böttcher, N.; Heusermann, S.; Fischer, T.; Kumar, V.; Schäfers, A.; Shao, H.; Vogel, P.; Wang, W.; Watanabe, N.; Ziefle, G.; Kolditz, O.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the German site selection process for a high-level nuclear waste repository, different repository concepts in the geological candidate formations rock salt, clay stone and crystalline rock are being discussed. An open assessment of these concepts using numerical simulations requires physical models capturing the individual particularities of each rock type and associated geotechnical barrier concept to a comparable level of sophistication. In a joint work group of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), scientists of the UFZ are developing and implementing multiphysical process models while BGR scientists apply them to large scale analyses. The advances in simulation methods for waste repositories are incorporated into the open-source code OpenGeoSys. Here, recent application-driven progress in this context is highlighted. A robust implementation of visco-plasticity with temperature-dependent properties into a framework for the thermo-mechanical analysis of rock salt will be shown. The model enables the simulation of heat transport along with its consequences on the elastic response as well as on primary and secondary creep or the occurrence of dilatancy in the repository near field. Transverse isotropy, non-isothermal hydraulic processes and their coupling to mechanical stresses are taken into account for the analysis of repositories in clay stone. These processes are also considered in the near field analyses of engineered barrier systems, including the swelling/shrinkage of the bentonite material. The temperature-dependent saturation evolution around the heat-emitting waste container is described by different multiphase flow formulations. For all mentioned applications, we illustrate the workflow from model development and implementation, over verification and validation, to repository-scale application simulations using methods of high performance computing.

  1. A Numerical Simulation of Star Formation in Nuclear Rings of Barred-Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, W.

    2014-01-01

    We use grid-based hydrodynamic simulations to study star formation history in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We assume infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and unmagnetized gaseous disk. To investigate effects of spiral arm potential, we calculate both models with and without spiral. We find that star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is determined by the mass inflow rate to the ring rather than the total gas mass in the ring. In case of models without spiral arms, the SFR shows a strong primary burst at early time, and declines to small values after after that. The primary burst is caused by the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth. On the other hand, models with spiral arms show multiple star bursts at late time caused by additional gas inflow from outside bar region. When the SFR is low, ages of young star clusters exhibit a bipolar azimuthal gradient along the ring since star formation occurs near the contact points between dust lanes and the nuclear ring. When the SFR is large, there are no age gradient of star clusters since star formation sites are widely distributed throughout the whole ring region.

  2. Nuclear EMP simulation for large-scale urban environments. FDTD for electrically large problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William S.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Wilcox, Trevor; Bos, Randall J.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Goorley, John T.; Costigan, Keeley R.

    2012-08-13

    In case of a terrorist nuclear attack in a metropolitan area, EMP measurement could provide: (1) a prompt confirmation of the nature of the explosion (chemical or nuclear) for emergency response; and (2) and characterization parameters of the device (reaction history, yield) for technical forensics. However, urban environment could affect the fidelity of the prompt EMP measurement (as well as all other types of prompt measurement): (1) Nuclear EMP wavefront would no longer be coherent, due to incoherent production, attenuation, and propagation of gamma and electrons; and (2) EMP propagation from source region outward would undergo complicated transmission, reflection, and diffraction processes. EMP simulation for electrically-large urban environment: (1) Coupled MCNP/FDTD (Finite-difference time domain Maxwell solver) approach; and (2) FDTD tends to be limited to problems that are not 'too' large compared to the wavelengths of interest because of numerical dispersion and anisotropy. We use a higher-order low-dispersion, isotropic FDTD algorithm for EMP propagation.

  3. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hongbing; Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of a clearance box monitor used for nuclear power plant decommissioning.

    PubMed

    Bochud, François O; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Bailat, Claude J; Schuler, Christoph

    2009-05-01

    When decommissioning a nuclear facility it is important to be able to estimate activity levels of potentially radioactive samples and compare with clearance values defined by regulatory authorities. This paper presents a method of calibrating a clearance box monitor based on practical experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Adjusting the simulation for experimental data obtained using a simple point source permits the computation of absolute calibration factors for more complex geometries with an accuracy of a bit more than 20%. The uncertainty of the calibration factor can be improved to about 10% when the simulation is used relatively, in direct comparison with a measurement performed in the same geometry but with another nuclide. The simulation can also be used to validate the experimental calibration procedure when the sample is supposed to be homogeneous but the calibration factor is derived from a plate phantom. For more realistic geometries, like a small gravel dumpster, Monte Carlo simulation shows that the calibration factor obtained with a larger homogeneous phantom is correct within about 20%, if sample density is taken as the influencing parameter. Finally, simulation can be used to estimate the effect of a contamination hotspot. The research supporting this paper shows that activity could be largely underestimated in the event of a centrally-located hotspot and overestimated for a peripherally-located hotspot if the sample is assumed to be homogeneously contaminated. This demonstrates the usefulness of being able to complement experimental methods with Monte Carlo simulations in order to estimate calibration factors that cannot be directly measured because of a lack of available material or specific geometries.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 625 in Simulated Nuclear High-Level Waste Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girija, S.; Nandakumar, T.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-11-01

    The present investigation aims to study the effect of various ions present in nuclear high-level waste (HLW) (acidic) medium on the corrosion resistance of Alloy 625, with solution-annealed and sensitized microstructure. The heat-affected zones are prone to sensitization during welding of components and subsequent exposure to acidic waste during service could result in intergranular corrosion in these regions and hence it was attempted to study the corrosion behavior of the alloy under sensitized conditions. Double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test was carried out to obtain the extent of chromium depletion. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization and electrochemical noise investigations were carried out on Alloy 625 in 3 M nitric acid and simulated nuclear HLW medium (prepared in 3 M nitric acid) at 298 K and 323 K. The study showed that the alloy possess good corrosion resistance in 3 M nitric acid and simulated HLW medium. However, a marginal decrease in the corrosion resistance occurred in simulated HLW when compared to the plain acid, as observed from an increase in passivation current density, decrease in transpassive potentials, and decrease in electrochemical noise resistance. Increase in temperature of the medium and change in microstructure from solution-annealed to sensitized state further decreased the corrosion resistance of Alloy 625. Electrochemical noise time records obtained at open circuit conditions showed a stable passive film for 22 h of immersion of the alloy in 3 M nitric acid and simulated HLW. However, the amplitude of current fluctuations was higher for the sensitized microstructure when compared to the solution-annealed microstructure.

  6. System Simulation of Nuclear Power Plant by Coupling RELAP5 and Matlab/Simulink

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Lin; Dong Hou; Zhihong Xu; Yanhua Yang; Ronghua Zhang

    2006-07-01

    Since RELAP5 code has general and advanced features in thermal-hydraulic computation, it has been widely used in transient and accident safety analysis, experiment planning analysis, and system simulation, etc. So we wish to design, analyze, verify a new Instrumentation And Control (I and C) system of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) based on the best-estimated code, and even develop our engineering simulator. But because of limited function of simulating control and protection system in RELAP5, it is necessary to expand the function for high efficient, accurate, flexible design and simulation of I and C system. Matlab/Simulink, a scientific computation software, just can compensate the limitation, which is a powerful tool in research and simulation of plant process control. The software is selected as I and C part to be coupled with RELAP5 code to realize system simulation of NPPs. There are two key techniques to be solved. One is the dynamic data exchange, by which Matlab/Simulink receives plant parameters and returns control results. Database is used to communicate the two codes. Accordingly, Dynamic Link Library (DLL) is applied to link database in RELAP5, while DLL and S-Function is applied in Matlab/Simulink. The other problem is synchronization between the two codes for ensuring consistency in global simulation time. Because Matlab/Simulink always computes faster than RELAP5, the simulation time is sent by RELAP5 and received by Matlab/Simulink. A time control subroutine is added into the simulation procedure of Matlab/Simulink to control its simulation advancement. Through these ways, Matlab/Simulink is dynamically coupled with RELAP5. Thus, in Matlab/Simulink, we can freely design control and protection logic of NPPs and test it with best-estimated plant model feedback. A test will be shown to illuminate that results of coupling calculation are nearly the same with one of single RELAP5 with control logic. In practice, a real Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is

  7. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; ...

    2015-03-04

    Here, previous simulation studies of Differential Die–Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetricallymore » burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs.« less

  8. A virtual control room with an embedded, interactive nuclear reactor simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Markidis, S.; Rizwan, U.

    2006-07-01

    The use of virtual nuclear control room can be an effective and powerful tool for training personnel working in the nuclear power plants. Operators could experience and simulate the functioning of the plant, even in critical situations, without being in a real power plant or running any risk. 3D models can be exported to Virtual Reality formats and then displayed in the Virtual Reality environment providing an immersive 3D experience. However, two major limitations of this approach are that 3D models exhibit static textures, and they are not fully interactive and therefore cannot be used effectively in training personnel. In this paper we first describe a possible solution for embedding the output of a computer application in a 3D virtual scene, coupling real-world applications and VR systems. The VR system reported here grabs the output of an application running on an X server; creates a texture with the output and then displays it on a screen or a wall in the virtual reality environment. We then propose a simple model for providing interaction between the user in the VR system and the running simulator. This approach is based on the use of internet-based application that can be commanded by a laptop or tablet-pc added to the virtual environment. (authors)

  9. Comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions: Numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J.R.; Bos, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), which was an underground explosion conducted in September 1993 in the volcanic tuff of the Nevada Test Site. The NPE source consisted of 1.29 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of ANFO-emulsion blasting agent, with the approximate energy of 1.1 kt, emplaced 389 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa. The authors compare detailed numerical simulations of the NPE with data collected from that experiment, and with calculations of an equally energetic nuclear explosion in identical geology. Calculated waveforms, at ranges out to approximately 1 km, agree moderately well in the time domain with free-field data, and are in qualitative agreement with free-surface records. Comparison of computed waveforms for equally energetic chemical and nuclear sources reveals relatively minor differences beyond the immediate near-source region, with the chemical source having an {approximately}25% greater seismic moment but otherwise indistinguishable (close-in) seismic source properties. 41 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Thermal striping in nuclear reactors: POD analysis of LES simulations and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzari, Elia; Alvarez, Andres; Marin, Oana; Obabko, Aleksandr; Lomperski, Steve; Aithal, Shashi

    2015-11-01

    Thermal fatigue caused due to thermal striping impacts design and analyses of a wide-range of industrial apparatus. This phenomena is of particular significance in nuclear reactor applications, primarily in sodium cooled fast reactors. In order to conduct systematic analyses of the thermal striping phenomena a simplified experimental set-up was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory. In this set-up two turbulent jets with a temperature difference of about 20K were mixed in a rectangular tank. The jets entered the tank via 2 hexagonal inlets. Two different inlet geometries were studied, both experimentally and via high-fidelity LES simulations. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) was performed on the turbulent velocity field in the tank to identify the most dominant energetic modes. The POD analyses of the experimental data in both inlet geometrical configurations were compared with LES simulations. Detailed POD analyses are presented to highlight the impact of geometry on the velocity and thermal fields. These can be correlated with experimental and numerical data to assess the impact of thermal striping on the design of the upper plenum of sodium-cooled nuclear reactors. ALCF.

  11. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation

  12. Monte Carlo simulations for analysis and design of nuclear isomer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Tristan; Goddard, Brian; Carroll, James

    2014-09-01

    The well-established GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was used to analyze the results from a test of bremsstrahlung-induced nuclear isomer switching and to guide development of an experiment to test nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC). Bremsstrahlung-induced experiments have historically been analyzed with the assumption that the photon flux of the bremsstrahlung spectrum at a given energy varies linearly with the spectrum's endpoint. The results obtained with GEANT4 suggest that this assumption is not justified; the revised function differs enough to warrant a re-analysis of the experimental data. This re-analysis has been applied to the switching of the unusually long-lived isomer of 180Ta (T1/2 > 1016 yr.), showing that the energies of its switching states differ by about 30 keV compared to those previously identified. GEANT4 was also employed in the design of a NEEC experiment to test the isomer switching of 93Mo via coupled atomic-nuclear processes. Initial work involved modeling a beam of 93Mo ions incident on a volume of 4He gas and observing the charge exchange process and associated emitted fluorescence. The beam and 4He volume, the ionization trails of the electrons liberated from the 4He atoms, and the subsequent fluorescence were successfully simulated; however, it was found that GEANT4 does not currently support ion charge exchange. Future work will entail either the development of the requisite code for GEANT4, or the use of a different model that can accurately simulate ion charge exchange.

  13. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, Derek R.; Permann, Cody J.; Peterson, John W.; Slaughter, Andrew E.; Andrš, David; Wang, Yaqi; Short, Michael P.; Perez, Danielle M.; Tonks, Michael R.; Ortensi, Javier; Zou, Ling; Martineau, Richard C.

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety, and reliability of both existing and future reactor designs. Historically, simulation of an entire reactor was accomplished by linking together multiple existing codes that each simulated a subset of the relevant multiphysics phenomena. Recent advances in the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) framework have enabled a new approach: multiple domain-specific applications, all built on the same software framework, are efficiently linked to create a cohesive application. This is accomplished with a flexible coupling capability that allows for a variety of different data exchanges to occur simultaneously on high performance parallel computational hardware. Examples based on the KAIST-3A benchmark core, as well as a simplified Westinghouse AP-1000 configuration, demonstrate the power of this new framework for tackling—in a coupled, multiscale manner—crucial reactor phenomena such as CRUD-induced power shift and fuel shuffle. 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license

  14. Nuclear fuel cycle system simulation tool based on high-fidelity component modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, David E.

    2014-02-01

    The DOE is currently directing extensive research into developing fuel cycle technologies that will enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy. The task is formidable considering the numerous fuel cycle options, the large dynamic systems that each represent, and the necessity to accurately predict their behavior. The path to successfully develop and implement an advanced fuel cycle is highly dependent on the modeling capabilities and simulation tools available for performing useful relevant analysis to assist stakeholders in decision making. Therefore a high-fidelity fuel cycle simulation tool that performs system analysis, including uncertainty quantification and optimization was developed. The resulting simulator also includes the capability to calculate environmental impact measures for individual components and the system. An integrated system method and analysis approach that provides consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles was developed. A general approach was utilized allowing for the system to be modified in order to provide analysis for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the framework for simulating many different fuel cycle options is provided. Two example fuel cycle configurations were developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized waste inventories.

  15. Simulation of beta radiator handling procedures in nuclear medicine by means of a movable hand phantom.

    PubMed

    Blunck, Ch; Becker, F; Urban, M

    2011-03-01

    In nuclear medicine therapies, people working with beta radiators such as (90)Y may be exposed to non-negligible partial body doses. For radiation protection, it is important to know the characteristics of the radiation field and possible dose exposures at relevant positions in the working area. Besides extensive measurements, simulations can provide these data. For this purpose, a movable hand phantom for Monte Carlo simulations was developed. Specific beta radiator handling scenarios can be modelled interactively with forward kinematics or automatically with an inverse kinematics procedure. As a first investigation, the dose distribution on a medical doctor's hand injecting a (90)Y solution was measured and simulated with the phantom. Modelling was done with the interactive method based on five consecutive frames from a video recorded during the injection. Owing to the use of only one camera, not each detail of the radiation scenario is visible in the video. In spite of systematic uncertainties, the measured and simulated dose values are in good agreement.

  16. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Gaston, Derek R.; Permann, Cody J.; Peterson, John W.; ...

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety, and reliability of both existing and future reactor designs. Historically, simulation of an entire reactor was accomplished by linking together multiple existing codes that each simulated a subset of the relevant multiphysics phenomena. Recent advances in the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) framework have enabled a new approach: multiple domain-specific applications, all built on the same software framework, are efficiently linked to create a cohesive application. This is accomplished with a flexible coupling capability that allows for a variety of different datamore » exchanges to occur simultaneously on high performance parallel computational hardware. Examples based on the KAIST-3A benchmark core, as well as a simplified Westinghouse AP-1000 configuration, demonstrate the power of this new framework for tackling—in a coupled, multiscale manner—crucial reactor phenomena such as CRUD-induced power shift and fuel shuffle. 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license« less

  17. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  18. Reducing numerical costs for core wide nuclear reactor CFD simulations by the Coarse-Grid-CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viellieber, Mathias; Class, Andreas G.

    2013-11-01

    Traditionally complete nuclear reactor core simulations are performed with subchannel analysis codes, that rely on experimental and empirical input. The Coarse-Grid-CFD (CGCFD) intends to replace the experimental or empirical input with CFD data. The reactor core consists of repetitive flow patterns, allowing the general approach of creating a parametrized model for one segment and composing many of those to obtain the entire reactor simulation. The method is based on a detailed and well-resolved CFD simulation of one representative segment. From this simulation we extract so-called parametrized volumetric forces which close, an otherwise strongly under resolved, coarsely-meshed model of a complete reactor setup. While the formulation so far accounts for forces created internally in the fluid others e.g. obstruction and flow deviation through spacers and wire wraps, still need to be accounted for if the geometric details are not represented in the coarse mesh. These are modelled with an Anisotropic Porosity Formulation (APF). This work focuses on the application of the CGCFD to a complete reactor core setup and the accomplishment of the parametrization of the volumetric forces.

  19. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  20. High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Kapernick, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer. and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics and assess potential design improvements at relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design is developed

  1. High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Kapernick, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer. and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics and assess potential design improvements at relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design is developed

  2. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Kevin B; Walton, Otis R; Benjamin, Russ; Dunlop, William H

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  3. Low Mach Number Simulations of Nuclear Flames Using Spectral Deferred Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvedahl, Ryan; Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann; Bell, John; Nonaka, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Many phenomena in Astrophysics are largely subsonic and require special techniques for long-time integration. MAESTRO is a low Mach number stellar hydrodynamics code that can be used to simulate long-time, low-speed flows that would be extremely time consuming to simulate using traditional compressible codes. MAESTRO filters sound waves while retaining both local and large-scale compressibility which gives increased accuracy and efficiency. In this project we describe the results of applying MAESTRO to thermonuclear flames (thin propagating thermonuclear fusion fronts) as well as the convective layer of a nova. The nova is a carbon-oxygen white dwarf with a hydrogen-helium envelope in tight hydrostatic equilibrium. As the envelope increases in mass, the pressure and temperature increase at the base of the accreted layer. When the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, nuclear fusion (burning) occurs. To capture this burning, we use the extensive reaction network of the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) code to model the reactions in the flow. We apply a spectral deferred corrections (SDC) algorithm to couple the reactions to the hydrodynamics. We present the results of applying the SDC temporal integration strategy in low Mach number simulations of thermonuclear flames. The SDC approach provides a better coupling between the various physical processes with greater accuracy and reduced computational cost as compared to a Strang splitting approach. This work was supported in part by a DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics grant No. DE-FG02-06ER41448 to Stony Brook.

  4. LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K.; Takano, M.; Sato, S.; Shimazu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

  5. Research approach and first results on agglomerate compaction in protoplanetary dust simulation in the Cloud Manipulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Blum, Jurgen; Ingo Von Borstel, Olaf; Schraepler, Rainer; Balapanov, Daniyar; Cecere, Anselmo

    2016-07-01

    Nanometre and micrometre-sized solid particles are ubiquitous in space and on Earth - from galaxies, interstellar space, protoplanetary and debris disks to planetary rings and atmospheres, planetary surfaces, comets, interplanetary space, Earth's atmosphere. Apparently, the most intriguing problem in the picture of the formation of planets is the transition from individual microscopic dust grains to kilometre-sized planetesimals. Revealing the mechanisms of this transition is one of the main tasks of the European Space Agency's project Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS). It was found that Brownian motion driven agglomeration could not provide the transition within reasonable time scale. As a result, at this stage top scientific goals shifted towards forced agglomeration and concentration of particles, targeting revealing the onset of compaction, experimental study of the evolution of fractal dimensions, size and mass distribution, occurrence of bouncing. The main tasks comprise 1) development of the rapid agglomeration model 2) development of the experimental facilities creating big fractal-type agglomerates from 10 to 1000 μm from a cloud of micrometre-size grains; 3) experimental realization of the rapid agglomeration in microgravity and ground conditions; and 4) in situ investigation of the morphology, mobility, mechanical and optical properties of the free-floating agglomerates, including investigation of thermophoresis, photophoresis of the agglomerates and of the two-phase flow phenomena. To solve the experimental part of the tasks we developed a Cloud Manipulation System, realized as a breadboard (CMS BB) for long duration microgravity platforms and a simplified laboratory version (CMS LV) mostly oriented on short duration microgravity and ground tests. The new system is based on the use of thermophoresis, most favourable for cloud manipulation without creating additional particle-particle forces in the cloud with a possibility

  6. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Du, Shiyu; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Nerikar, Pankaj; Stanek, Christopher R.; Tonks, Michael; Millet, Paul; Biner, Bulent

    2012-06-04

    In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain

  7. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  8. Compact Modeling and Simulation of Heavy Ion-Induced Soft Error Rate in Space Environment: Principles and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebrev, Gennady I.; Galimov, Artur M.

    2017-08-01

    A simple physical model for calculation of the ion-induced soft error rate in space environment has been proposed, based on the phenomenological cross-sectional notion. The proposed numerical procedure is adapted to the multiple cell upset characterization in highly scaled memories. Nonlocality of the ion impact has been revealed as the key concept determining the difference between physical processes in low-scaled and highly scaled memories. The model has been validated by comparison between the simulation results and the literature on-board data. It was shown that the proposed method provides single-valued prediction results correlating well with on-board data-based solely on cross-sectional data and LET spectra without any hidden fitting parameters and procedures.

  9. Numerical Simulation of a Compartment Fire in a Nuclear Power Plant Containment Building

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Floyd

    2002-07-01

    The current trend towards the increased use of risk assessment in the regulation of nuclear power plants will inevitably result in changes in the analysis of fire protection systems and the methods of analysis. Before fire protection can be regulated on a risk basis, a consensus must be reached on a number of issues. One key issue is what types of computational tools will be allowable for analyzing fire events, and what types of scenarios those tools will be approved for use. Reaching this consensus will require an understanding of the types of computational tools available and their inherent advantages and disadvantages. To aid with this understanding, three different methods of fire simulation are applied to an oil pool fire test in the HDR (Heiss Dampf Reaktor) containment test facility. These methods are a hand calculation, the zone model code CFAST (Consolidated Model of Fire Growth and Smoke Transport), and the computational fluid dynamics code FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). Each is applied to a steady-state portion of the test using, to the extent possible, the same set of input parameters. The results of the computation are compared to the test data. The comparisons show that each method is potentially suitable for use depending on the information required from the simulation. Each method will potentially have a role to play in risk based regulation depending on the scenario. (authors)

  10. Compact torus

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of the compact torus approach is to provide toroidal magnetic-field configurations that are based primarily on plasma currents and can be freed from closely surrounding mechanical structures. Some familiar examples are the current-carrying plasma rings of reversed-field theta pinches and relativistic-electron smoke ring experiments. The spheromak concept adds an internal toroidal magnetic field component, in order to enhance MHD stability. In recent experiments, three different approaches have been used to generate spheromak plasmas: (1) the reversed-field theta pinch; (2) the coaxial plasma gun; (3) a new quasi-static method, based on the initial formation of a toroidal plasma sleeve around a mechanical ring that generates poloidal and toroidal fluxes, followed by field-line reconnection to form a detached spheromak plasma. The theoretical and experimental MHD stability results for the spheromak configuration are found to have common features.

  11. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  12. Nuclear Power System Architecture and Safety Study- Feasibility of Launch Pad Explosion Simulation using Radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, Stefano; Tracino, Emanuele; Giraudo, Martina

    2014-06-01

    During a mission involving a spacecraft using nuclear power sources (NPS), the consequences to the population induced by an accident has to be taken into account carefully.Part of the study (led by AREVA, with TAS-I as one of the involved parties) was devoted to "Worst Case Scenario Consolidation". In particular, one of the activities carried out by TAS-I had the aim of characterizing the accidental environment (explosion on launch pad or during launch) and consolidate the requirements given as input in the study. The resulting requirements became inputs for Nuclear Power Source container design.To do so, TAS-I did first an overview of the available technical literature (mostly developed in the frame of NASA Mercury / Apollo program), to identify the key parameters to be used for analytical assessment (blast pressure wave, fragments size, speed and distribution, TNT equivalent of liquid propellant).Then, a simplified Radioss model was setup, to verify both the cards needed for blast / fragment impact analysis and the consistency between preliminary results and available technical literature (Radioss is commonly used to design mine - resistant vehicles, by simulating the effect of blasts onto structural elements, and it is used in TAS-I for several types of analysis, including land impact, water impact and fluid - structure interaction).The obtained results (albeit produced by a very simplified model) are encouraging, showing that the analytical tool and the selected key parameters represent a step in the right direction.

  13. Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION): A Tool for Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Futures

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Steven J. Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire; Robert F. Jeffers; A. M. Yacout; Tyler Schweitzer

    2010-11-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that are intended to work together. To support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system such as how the system would respond to each technological change, a series of which moves the fuel cycle from where it is to a postulated future state. The system analysis working group of the United States research program on advanced fuel cycles (formerly called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION. For example, VISION users can now change yearly the selection of separation or reactor technologies, the performance characteristics of those technologies, and/or the routing of material among separation and reactor types - with the model still operating on a PC in <5 min.

  14. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Version 2.0: Program user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman

    1993-01-01

    This Program User's Guide discusses the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine system design features and capabilities modeled in the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS): Version 2.0 program (referred to as NESS throughout the remainder of this document), as well as its operation. NESS was upgraded to include many new modeling capabilities not available in the original version delivered to NASA LeRC in Dec. 1991, NESS's new features include the following: (1) an improved input format; (2) an advanced solid-core NERVA-type reactor system model (ENABLER 2); (3) a bleed-cycle engine system option; (4) an axial-turbopump design option; (5) an automated pump-out turbopump assembly sizing option; (6) an off-design gas generator engine cycle design option; (7) updated hydrogen properties; (8) an improved output format; and (9) personal computer operation capability. Sample design cases are presented in the user's guide that demonstrate many of the new features associated with this upgraded version of NESS, as well as design modeling features associated with the original version of NESS.

  15. Evaluation and Numerical Simulation of Tsunami for Coastal Nuclear Power Plants of India

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Pavan K.; Singh, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-07-01

    Recent tsunami generated on December 26, 2004 due to Sumatra earthquake of magnitude 9.3 resulted in inundation at the various coastal sites of India. The site selection and design of Indian nuclear power plants demand the evaluation of run up and the structural barriers for the coastal plants: Besides it is also desirable to evaluate the early warning system for tsunami-genic earthquakes. The tsunamis originate from submarine faults, underwater volcanic activities, sub-aerial landslides impinging on the sea and submarine landslides. In case of a submarine earthquake-induced tsunami the wave is generated in the fluid domain due to displacement of the seabed. There are three phases of tsunami: generation, propagation, and run-up. Reactor Safety Division (RSD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has initiated computational simulation for all the three phases of tsunami source generation, its propagation and finally run up evaluation for the protection of public life, property and various industrial infrastructures located on the coastal regions of India. These studies could be effectively utilized for design and implementation of early warning system for coastal region of the country apart from catering to the needs of Indian nuclear installations. This paper presents some results of tsunami waves based on different analytical/numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. (authors)

  16. Three dimensional coupled simulation of thermomechanics, heat, and oxygen diffusion in UO2 nuclear fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Chris; Hansen, Glen; Gaston, Derek

    2009-07-01

    The simulation of nuclear reactor fuel performance involves complex thermomechanical processes between fuel pellets, made of fissile material, and the protective cladding barrier that surrounds the pellets. This paper examines a subset of phenomena that are important in the development of an analysis capability for fuel performance calculations, focusing on thermomechanics and diffusion within UO fuel pellets. In this study, correlations from the literature are used for thermal conductivity, specific heat, and oxygen diffusion. This study develops a three dimensional thermomechanical model fully-coupled to an oxygen diffusion model. Both steady state and transient results are examined to compare this three dimensional model with the literature. Further, this equation system is solved in a parallel, fully-coupled, fully-implicit manner using a preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. Numerical results are presented to explore the efficacy of this approach for examining selected fuel performance problems. INL's BISON fuels performance code is used to perform this analysis.

  17. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Isabela A.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Bromley, Thomas R.; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J.; deAzevedo, Eduardo R.; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O.; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  18. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  19. New approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Poveschenko, T.; Poveschenko, O.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the new approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis so called the differential cross method. It is elaborated for detecting boards between physical zones. It is proposed to use GMSH open source mesh editor extended by some features: a special option and a special kind of mesh (cubic background mesh).This method is aimed into Monte Carlo Method as well as for deterministic neutron transport methods. Special attention is attended for reactor core composed of a set of material zones with complicate geometrical boundaries. The idea of this approach is described. In general case method works for 3-D space. Algorithm of creation of the geometrical module is given. 2-D neutron transport benchmark-test for RBMK reactor cluster cell is described. It demonstrates the ability of this approach to provide flexible definition of geometrical meshing with preservation of curved surface or any level of heterogeneity. (authors)

  20. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Romano, F.; D'Urso, D.; Licciardello, T.; Agodi, C.; Candiano, G.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pandola, L.; Scuderi, V.

    2014-12-01

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned. Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u-1 12C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Fission Fragment Damage in Nuclear Fuel and Surrogate Material

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of swift heavy ion damage, typical of fission fragments, in nuclear fuel (UO2) for energy deposition per unit length of 3.9 keV/nm. We did not observe amorphization. The damage mainly consisted of isolated point defects. Only about 1% of the displacements occur on the uranium sublattice. Oxygen Frenkel pairs are an order of magnitude more numerous than uranium Frenkel pairs in the primary damage state. In contrast, previous results show that the ratio of Frenkel pairs on the two sublattices is close to the stoichiometric ratio in ceria. These differences in the primary damage state may lead to differences in radiation response of UO2and CeO2.

  2. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator.

    PubMed

    Silva, Isabela A; Souza, Alexandre M; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-14

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  3. Three dimensional coupled simulation of thermomechanics, heat, and oxygen diffusion in UO2 nuclear fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Newman; Glen Hansen; Derek Gaston

    2009-07-01

    The simulation of nuclear reactor fuel performance involves complex thermomechanical processes between fuel pellets, made of fissile material, and the protective cladding barrier that surrounds the pellets. This paper examines asubset of phenomena that are important in the development of a predictive capability for fuel performance calculations, focusing on thermomechanics and diffusion within UO2 fuel pellets. In this study, correlations from the literature are used for thermal conductivity, specific heat, and oxygen diffusion. This study develops a three dimensional thermomechanical model fully-coupled to an oxygen diffusion model. Both steady state and transient results are examined to compare this three dimensional model with the literature. Further, this equation system is solved in a parallel, fully-coupled, fully-implicit manner using a preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. Numerical results are presented to explore the efficacy of this approach for examining selected fuel performance problems. INL’s BISON fuels performance code is used to perform this analysis.

  4. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M; Romano, F; D'Urso, D; Licciardello, T; Agodi, C; Candiano, G; Cappuzzello, F; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Musumarra, A; Pandola, L; Scuderi, V

    2014-12-21

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned.Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u(-1) (12)C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  5. User’s Guide and History of ANFO (Ammonium Nitrate/Fuel Oil) as a Nuclear Weapons Effect Simulation Explosive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-31

    continue the combustion process . This, afterburning leads to longer duration blast waves and higher impulses. Some thoughts again were given to the use...and use of ANFO as a nuclear weapons blast , cratering, and ground shock simulation source, is traced from 1966 to 1976 when the first full scale target...FACTORS 4 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 9 LIST OF TABLES 15 .i Section 1 A HISTORY OF THE USE O0 ANFO FOR NUCLEAR WEAPONS BLAST AND SHOCK SIMULATION 17 1.1

  6. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Safeguards and Separations Reprocessing Plant Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alex; Billings, Jay Jay; de Almeida, Valmor F

    2011-08-01

    This report details the progress made in the development of the Reprocessing Plant Toolkit (RPTk) for the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. RPTk is an ongoing development effort intended to provide users with an extensible, integrated, and scalable software framework for the modeling and simulation of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants by enabling the insertion and coupling of user-developed physicochemical modules of variable fidelity. The NEAMS Safeguards and Separations IPSC (SafeSeps) and the Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) supporting program element have partnered to release an initial version of the RPTk with a focus on software usability and utility. RPTk implements a data flow architecture that is the source of the system's extensibility and scalability. Data flows through physicochemical modules sequentially, with each module importing data, evolving it, and exporting the updated data to the next downstream module. This is accomplished through various architectural abstractions designed to give RPTk true plug-and-play capabilities. A simple application of this architecture, as well as RPTk data flow and evolution, is demonstrated in Section 6 with an application consisting of two coupled physicochemical modules. The remaining sections describe this ongoing work in full, from system vision and design inception to full implementation. Section 3 describes the relevant software development processes used by the RPTk development team. These processes allow the team to manage system complexity and ensure stakeholder satisfaction. This section also details the work done on the RPTk ``black box'' and ``white box'' models, with a special focus on the separation of concerns between the RPTk user interface and application runtime. Section 4 and 5 discuss that application runtime component in more detail, and describe the dependencies, behavior, and rigorous testing of its constituent components.

  7. Simulation of differential die-away instrument's response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    Previous simulation studies of Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument's response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument's response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs. The results of this study suggest that DDA instrument response depends on the position of the individual neutron detectors and in fact can be split in two modes. The first mode, measured by the back detectors, is not significantly sensitive to the spatial distribution of fissile isotopes and neutron absorbers, but rather reflects the total amount of both contributors as in the cases of symmetrically burned SFAs. In contrary, the second mode, measured by the front detectors, yields certain sensitivity to the orientation of the asymmetrically burned SFA inside the assaying instrument. This study thus provides evidence that the DDA instrument can potentially be utilized as necessary in both ways, i.e. a quick determination of the average SFA characteristics in a single assay, as well as a more detailed characterization involving several DDA observables through assay of the SFA from all of its four sides that can possibly map the burn-up distribution and/or identify diversion or

  8. Examination of Trifluoroethanol Interactions with Trp-Cage through MD Simulations and Intermolecular Nuclear Overhauser Effects.

    PubMed

    Gerig, J T

    2016-11-03

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the protein model Trp-cage in 42% 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-water at 318 K have been carried out with the goal of exploring solvent fluorine-peptide hydrogen nuclear spin cross-relaxation. TFE5 and TFE6 models of TFE developed in previous work from this laboratory were used with the TIP5PE model of water. System densities and component translational diffusion coefficients were well predicted by the simulations, as were many of the cross-relaxation parameters (ΣHF) for which experimental values are available. However, the calculated ΣHF values were too small for some hydrogens of the Trp6 indole ring and for amino acid hydrogens near this residue in the native structure. Simulations carried out with unfolded versions of Trp-cage suggest that underestimates of ΣHF are the result of insufficient sampling of conformational motions that expose these hydrogens to interactions with solvent molecules during simulations of the native peptide. Consideration of the relative amounts of TFE and water surrounding the Trp-cage structure indicates that the composition of the solvent mixture at distances beyond ∼1.5 nm from the surface of the peptide is close to the composition of the bulk solvent, but, as observed by others, TFE tends to accumulate preferentially near the surface of the peptide. Both TFE and water molecules make contacts with the peptide surface; water molecules predominate in contacts with the peptide backbone atoms, and TFE molecules generally preferentially interact with side chains. Translational diffusion of solvent molecules appears to slow down near the surface of the peptide.

  9. Study of components and statistical reaction mechanism in simulation of nuclear process for optimized production of 64Cu and 67Ga medical radioisotopes using TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ nuclear reaction and evaporation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Sepiani, M.

    2015-03-01

    Production of medical radioisotopes is one of the most important tasks in the field of nuclear technology. These radioactive isotopes are mainly produced through variety nuclear process. In this research, excitation functions and nuclear reaction mechanisms are studied for simulation of production of these radioisotopes in the TALYS, EMPIRE & LISE++ reaction codes, then parameters and different models of nuclear level density as one of the most important components in statistical reaction models are adjusted for optimum production of desired radioactive yields.

  10. Study of components and statistical reaction mechanism in simulation of nuclear process for optimized production of {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Ga medical radioisotopes using TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ nuclear reaction and evaporation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrabadi, M. N. Sepiani, M.

    2015-03-30

    Production of medical radioisotopes is one of the most important tasks in the field of nuclear technology. These radioactive isotopes are mainly produced through variety nuclear process. In this research, excitation functions and nuclear reaction mechanisms are studied for simulation of production of these radioisotopes in the TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ reaction codes, then parameters and different models of nuclear level density as one of the most important components in statistical reaction models are adjusted for optimum production of desired radioactive yields.

  11. Characterization of enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors and studies of numeric simulations for compact-binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekowsky, Larne

    Gravitational waves are a consequence of the general theory of relativity. Direct detection of such waves will provide a wealth of information about physics, astronomy, and cosmology. A worldwide effort is currently underway to make the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The global network of detectors includes the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which recently completed its sixth science run. A particularly promising source of gravitational waves is a binary system consisting of two neutron stars and/or black holes. As the objects orbit each other they emit gravitational radiation, lose energy, and spiral inwards. This produces a characteristic "chirp" signal for which we can search in the LIGO data. Currently this is done using matched-filter techniques, which correlate the detector data against analytic models of the emitted gravitational waves. Several choices must be made in constructing a search for signals from such binary coalescences. Any discrepancy between the signals and the models used will reduce the effectiveness of the matched filter. However, the analytic models are based on approximations which are not valid through the entire evolution of the binary. In recent years numerical relativity has had impressive success in simulating the final phases of the coalescence of binary black holes. While numerical relativity is too computationally expensive to use directly in the search, this progress has made it possible to perform realistic tests of the LIGO searches. The results of such tests can be used to improve the efficiency of searches. Conversely, noise in the LIGO and Virgo detectors can reduce the efficiency. This must be addressed by characterizing the quality of the data from the detectors, and removing from the analysis times that will be detrimental to the search. In this thesis we utilize recent results from numerical relativity to study both the degree to which analytic models match realistic waveforms

  12. Plant-Level Modeling and Simulation of Used Nuclear Fuel Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F.

    2012-09-07

    Plant-level modeling and simulation of a used nuclear fuel prototype dissolver is presented. Emphasis is given in developing a modeling and simulation approach to be explored by other processes involved in the recycle of used fuel. The commonality concepts presented in a previous communication were used to create a model and realize its software module. An initial model was established based on a theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport outlined previously. A software module prototype was developed with the required external behavior and internal mathematical structure. Results obtained demonstrate the generality of the design approach and establish an extensible mathematical model with its corresponding software module for a wide range of dissolvers. Scale up numerical tests were made varying the type of used fuel (breeder and light-water reactors) and the capacity of dissolution (0.5 t/d to 1.7 t/d). These tests were motivated by user requirements in the area of nuclear materials safeguards. A computer module written in high-level programing languages (MATLAB and Octave) was developed, tested, and provided as open-source code (MATLAB) for integration into the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model application in development at Sandia National Laboratories. The modeling approach presented here is intended to serve as a template for a rational modeling of all plant-level modules. This will facilitate the practical application of the commonality features underlying the unifying network transport theory proposed recently. In addition, by example, this model describes, explicitly, the needed data from sub-scale models, and logical extensions for future model development. For example, from thermodynamics, an off-line simulation of molecular dynamics could quantify partial molar volumes for the species in the liquid phase; this simulation is currently at reach for high-performance computing. From fluid mechanics, a hold-up capacity function is needed

  13. Development of the simulation system {open_quotes}IMPACT{close_quotes} for analysis of nuclear power plant severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Naitoh, Masanori; Ujita, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Hiroichi

    1997-07-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has initiated a long-term program to develop the simulation system {open_quotes}IMPACT{close_quotes} for analysis of hypothetical severe accidents in nuclear power plants. IMPACT employs advanced methods of physical modeling and numerical computation, and can simulate a wide spectrum of senarios ranging from normal operation to hypothetical, beyond-design-basis-accident events. Designed as a large-scale system of interconnected, hierarchical modules, IMPACT`s distinguishing features include mechanistic models based on first principles and high speed simulation on parallel processing computers. The present plan is a ten-year program starting from 1993, consisting of the initial one-year of preparatory work followed by three technical phases: Phase-1 for development of a prototype system; Phase-2 for completion of the simulation system, incorporating new achievements from basic studies; and Phase-3 for refinement through extensive verification and validation against test results and available real plant data.

  14. Users manual for Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program six-degree-of-freedom reentry simulation (TMAGRA6C)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1990-02-01

    This report documents the updated six-degree-of-freedom reentry simulation TMAGRA6C used in the Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program, ANSP. The simulation provides for the inclusion of the effects of ablation on the aerodynamic stability and drag of reentry bodies, specifically the General Purpose Heat Source, GPHS. The existing six-degree-of-freedom reentry body simulations (TMAGRA6A and TMAGRA6B) used in the JHU/APL Nuclear Safety Program do not include aerodynamic effects resulting from geometric changes to the configuration due to ablation from reentry flights. A wind tunnel test was conducted in 1989 to obtain the effects of ablation on the hypersonic aerodynamics of the GPHS module. The analyzed data were used to form data sets which are included herein in tabular form. These are used as incremental aerodynamic inputs in the new TMAGRA6C six-degree-of-freedom reentry simulation. 20 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Analysis of simulated high burnup nuclear fuel by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manjeet; Sarkar, Arnab; Banerjee, Joydipta; Bhagat, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) grade (Th-U)O2 fuel sample and Simulated High Burn-Up Nuclear Fuels (SIMFUEL) samples mimicking the 28 and 43 GWd/Te irradiated burn-up fuel were studied using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) setup in a simulated hot-cell environment from a distance of > 1.5 m. Resolution of < 38 pm has been used to record the complex spectra of the SIMFUEL samples. By using spectrum comparison and database matching > 60 emission lines of fission products was identified. Among them only a few emission lines were found to generate calibration curves. The study demonstrates the possibility to investigate impurities at concentrations around hundreds of ppm, rapidly at atmospheric pressure without any sample preparation. The results of Ba and Mo showed the advantage of LIBS analysis over traditional methods involving sample dissolution, which introduces possible elemental loss. Limits of detections (LOD) under Ar atmosphere shows significant improvement, which is shown to be due to the formation of stable plasma.

  16. Measuring Out-of-Time-Order Correlators on a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Fan, Ruihua; Wang, Hengyan; Ye, Bingtian; Zeng, Bei; Zhai, Hui; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-07-01

    The idea of the out-of-time-order correlator (OTOC) has recently emerged in the study of both condensed matter systems and gravitational systems. It not only plays a key role in investigating the holographic duality between a strongly interacting quantum system and a gravitational system, it also diagnoses the chaotic behavior of many-body quantum systems and characterizes information scrambling. Based on OTOCs, three different concepts—quantum chaos, holographic duality, and information scrambling—are found to be intimately related to each other. Despite its theoretical importance, the experimental measurement of the OTOC is quite challenging, and thus far there is no experimental measurement of the OTOC for local operators. Here, we report the measurement of OTOCs of local operators for an Ising spin chain on a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator. We observe that the OTOC behaves differently in the integrable and nonintegrable cases. Based on the recent discovered relationship between OTOCs and the growth of entanglement entropy in the many-body system, we extract the entanglement entropy from the measured OTOCs, which clearly shows that the information entropy oscillates in time for integrable models and scrambles for nonintgrable models. With the measured OTOCs, we also obtain the experimental result of the butterfly velocity, which measures the speed of correlation propagation. Our experiment paves a way for experimentally studying quantum chaos, holographic duality, and information scrambling in many-body quantum systems with quantum simulators.

  17. Geant4 models for simulation of hadron/ion nuclear interactions at moderate and low energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Quesada, Jose-Manuel; Wright, Dennis

    The Geant4 toolkit is intended for Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in media. It was initially designed for High Energy Physics purposes such as experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The toolkit offers a set of models allowing effective simulation of cosmic ray interactions with different materials. For moderate and low energy hadron/ion interactions with nuclei there are a number of competitive models: Binary and Bertini intra-nuclear cascade models, quantum molecular dynamic model (QMD), INCL/ABLA cascade model, and Chiral Invariant Phase Space Decay model (CHIPS). We report the status of these models for the recent version of Geant4 (release 9.3, December 2009). The Bertini cascade in-ternal cross sections were upgraded. The native Geant4 precompound and deexcitation models were used in the Binary cascade and QMD. They were significantly improved including emis-sion of light fragments, the Fermi break-up model, the General Evaporation Model (GEM), the multi-fragmentation model, and the fission model. Comparisons between model predictions and data for thin target experiments for neutron, proton, light ions, and isotope production are presented and discussed. The focus of these validations is concentrated on target materials important for space missions.

  18. Fire simulation in nuclear facilities: the FIRAC code and supporting experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, M.W.; Martin, R.A.; Fenton, D.L.; Gunaji, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    The fire accident analysis computer code FIRAC was designed to estimate radioactive and nonradioactive source terms and predict fire-induced flows and thermal and material transport within the ventilation systems of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRAC maintains its basic structure and features and has been expanded and modified to include the capabilities of the zone-type compartment fire model computer code FIRIN developed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The two codes have been coupled to provide an improved simulation of a fire-induced transient within a facility. The basic material transport capability of FIRAC has been retained and includes estimates of entrainment, convection, deposition, and filtration of material. The interrelated effects of filter plugging, heat transfer, gas dynamics, material transport, and fire and radioactive source terms also can be simulated. Also, a sample calculation has been performed to illustrate some of the capabilities of the code and how a typical facility is modeled with FIRAC. In addition to the analytical work being performed at Los Alamos, experiments are being conducted at the New Mexico State University to support the FIRAC computer code development and verification. This paper summarizes two areas of the experimental work that support the material transport capabiities of the code: the plugging of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by combustion aerosols and the transport and deposition of smoke in ventilation system ductwork.

  19. Information Theory and Undersampling Diagnostics for Monte Carlo Simulation of Nuclear Criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Taro

    2005-11-15

    The criterion of information-theoretic stationarity diagnostics for the Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear criticality has been extended to undersampling diagnostics. Here, undersampling diagnostics means the posterior checking of the number of neutron histories per cycle. A statistically sound criterion using Shannon and relative entropies is defined based on the inequality with a penalty term for the minimum descriptive length of instantaneously decodable encoding. An alternative criterion based on a large sample property of particle population is defined within the information-theoretic framework of the asymptotic equipartition property and the method of types. An auxiliary criterion is proposed using the concave property of Shannon entropy. Numerical results are presented for the 'k-effective of the world' problem by Whitesides. The results indicate that the estimation bias of the neutron effective multiplication factor will be reduced to a practically negligible level if these criteria are satisfied. It can be concluded that equilibrium is a stronger condition than stationarity concerning the source distribution in the Monte Carlo simulation.

  20. Probing the Disordered Domain of the Nuclear Pore Complex through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ghavami, Ali; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; van der Giessen, Erik; Onck, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of disordered proteins (FG-nups) that line the transport channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is investigated by means of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A one-bead-per-amino-acid model is presented that accounts for the hydrophobic/hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions between different amino acids, polarity of the solvent, and screening of free ions. The results indicate that the interaction of the FG-nups forms a high-density, doughnut-like distribution inside the NPC, which is rich in FG-repeats. We show that the obtained distribution is encoded in the amino-acid sequence of the FG-nups and is driven by both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. To explore the relation between structure and function, we have systematically removed different combinations of FG-nups from the pore to simulate inviable and viable NPCs that were previously studied experimentally. The obtained density distributions show that the maximum density of the FG-nups inside the pore does not exceed 185 mg/mL in the inviable NPCs, whereas for the wild-type and viable NPCs, this value increases to 300 mg/mL. Interestingly, this maximum density is not correlated to the total mass of the FG-nups, but depends sensitively on the specific combination of essential Nups located in the central plane of the NPC. PMID:25229147

  1. Hollow nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Gao-Chan

    2016-01-01

    It is generally considered that an atomic nucleus is always compact. Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann nuclear transport model, here I show that large block nuclear matter or excited nuclear matter may both be hollow. The size of the inner bubble in these matter is affected by the charge number of nuclear matter. The existence of hollow nuclear matter may have many implications in nuclear or atomic physics or astrophysics as well as some practical applications.

  2. Accretion Disk Outflows from Compact Object Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian

    Nuclear reactions play a key role in the accretion disks and outflows associated with the merger of binary compact objects and the central engines of gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. The proposed research program will investigate the impact of nucleosynthesis on these events and their observable signatures by means of analytic calculations and numerical simulations. One focus of this research is rapid accretion following the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) binary companion. Tidal disruption shreds the WD into a massive torus composed of C, O, and/or He, which undergoes nuclear reactions and burns to increasingly heavier elements as it flows to smaller radii towards the central compact object. The nuclear energy so released is comparable to that released gravitationally, suggesting that burning could drastically alter the structure and stability of the accretion flow. Axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of the torus including nuclear burning will be performed to explore issues such as the mass budget of the flow (accretion vs. outflows) and its thermal stability (steady burning and accretion vs. runaway explosion). The mass, velocity, and composition of outflows from the disk will be used in separate radiative transfer calculations to predict the lightcurves and spectra of the 56Ni-decay powered optical transients from WD-NS/WD-BH mergers. The possible connection of such events to recently discovered classes of sub-luminous Type I supernovae will be assessed. The coalescence of NS-NS/NS-BH binaries also results in the formation of a massive torus surrounding a central compact object. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the long-term evolution of such accretion disks will be performed, which for the first time follow the effects of weak interactions and the nuclear energy released by Helium recombination. The nucleosynthetic yield of disk outflows will be calculated using a detailed

  3. Application of laboratory data from small-scale simulators to human performance issues in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Spettell, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory analogs of nuclear power plant tasks were simulated on personal computers in two experimental studies. Human performance data were collected during each experimental study. The goal of the first experiment was to validate a quantitative model of dependence among human errors during testing, calibration, and maintenance activities. This model, the Multiple Sequential Failure (MSF) model (NUREG/CR-2211) has been used to quantify dependent human error failure probabilities for human reliability analyses in Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs). The goal of the second experiment was to examine the relationship among psychological and behavioral characteristics of individuals and their performance at controlling a simulated nuclear power plant. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of the experimental psychology approach for validating models of human performance at nuclear power plant tasks.

  4. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  5. Development of a Safeguards Process Simulation for Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugart, Nicolas

    SafeGuards Analysis (SGA) is a computational toolbox able to simulate different safeguards scenarios across a number of different fuel cycles and at many different scales within a Matlab Simulink framework. SGA functions by simulating Material Balance Areas (MBAs) under safeguards materials control and accountability and allows the user to define the uncertainty parameters of the associated flow and inventory measurements. The simulated safeguard system uses the uncertain measurement estimates to calculate mass-balance across the MBA. This mass balance is then evaluated by one or more of a number of different statistical tests to determine if a significant amount of material has been removed from the MBA. This thesis describes the development of SGA, and presents a number of example scenarios consisting of one or more MBAs. The goal of each of these scenarios is to determine the ability of SGA to calculate the Type I (false detect) or Type II (missed detection) error probability of the scenario. In each of these example scenarios, SGA generated reasonable results. To fully demonstrate SGA's capabilities, the thesis also examines a more complicated scenario representative of a closed fuel cycle. This examination is paired with the operations research NUclear Measurement System Optimization (NUMSO) toolbox which calculates the best configuration of measurements based on a user-defined set of objectives. The two toolboxes allow a user to develop quickly develop a potentially optimal safeguards system with NUMSO, and then use SGA to examine the detailed behavior of that system. In every example considered in the thesis, SGA performs as designed.

  6. Anisotropic Rotational Diffusion Studied by Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics Simulation: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuson, Michael M.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories studying the anisotropic rotational diffusion of bromobenzene using nuclear spin relaxation and molecular dynamics simulations are described. For many undergraduates, visualizing molecular motion is challenging. Undergraduates rarely encounter laboratories that directly assess molecular motion, and so the concept remains an…

  7. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel: Main oxide phase

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Keri R.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Barefield, James E.; ...

    2017-04-22

    We show the analysis of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is explored using a simplified version of the main oxide phase. The main oxide phase consists of the actinides, lanthanides, and zirconium. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid, quantitative technique for measuring zirconium in a uranium dioxide matrix without the need to dissolve the material. A second set of materials including cerium oxide is also analyzed to determine precision and limit of detection (LOD) using LIBS in a complex matrix. Two types of samples are used in this study:more » binary and ternary oxide pellets. The ternary oxide, (U,Zr,Ce)O2 pellets used in this study are a simplified version the main oxide phase of used nuclear fuel. The binary oxides, (U,Ce)O2 and (U,Zr)O2 are also examined to determine spectral emission lines for Ce and Zr, potential spectral interferences with uranium and baseline LOD values for Ce and Zr in a UO2 matrix. In the spectral range of 200 to 800 nm, 33 cerium lines and 25 zirconium lines were identified and shown to have linear correlation values (R2) > 0.97 for both the binary and ternary oxides. The cerium LOD in the (U,Ce)O2 matrix ranged from 0.34 to 1.08 wt% and 0.94 to 1.22 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 33 of Ce emission lines. The zirconium limit of detection in the (U,Zr)O2 matrix ranged from 0.84 to 1.15 wt% and 0.99 to 1.10 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 25 Zr lines. Finally, the effect of multiple elements in the plasma and the impact on the LOD is discussed.« less

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel: Main oxide phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Keri R.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Barefield, James E.; Colgan, James P.; Kilcrease, David P.; Czerwinski, Ken R.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is explored using a simplified version of the main oxide phase. The main oxide phase consists of the actinides, lanthanides, and zirconium. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid, quantitative technique for measuring zirconium in a uranium dioxide matrix without the need to dissolve the material. A second set of materials including cerium oxide is also analyzed to determine precision and limit of detection (LOD) using LIBS in a complex matrix. Two types of samples are used in this study: binary and ternary oxide pellets. The ternary oxide, (U,Zr,Ce)O2 pellets used in this study are a simplified version the main oxide phase of used nuclear fuel. The binary oxides, (U,Ce)O2 and (U,Zr)O2 are also examined to determine spectral emission lines for Ce and Zr, potential spectral interferences with uranium and baseline LOD values for Ce and Zr in a UO2 matrix. In the spectral range of 200 to 800 nm, 33 cerium lines and 25 zirconium lines were identified and shown to have linear correlation values (R2) > 0.97 for both the binary and ternary oxides. The cerium LOD in the (U,Ce)O2 matrix ranged from 0.34 to 1.08 wt% and 0.94 to 1.22 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 33 of Ce emission lines. The zirconium limit of detection in the (U,Zr)O2 matrix ranged from 0.84 to 1.15 wt% and 0.99 to 1.10 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 25 Zr lines. The effect of multiple elements in the plasma and the impact on the LOD is discussed.

  10. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  11. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  12. Specification and verification of nuclear-power-plant training-simulator response characteristics. Part II. Conclusions and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P M; Selby, D L; Kerlin, T W; Felkins, L

    1982-05-01

    The nuclear industry should adopt and NRC regulatory and research actions should support the systems approach to training as a structured framework for development and validation of personnel training systems. Potential exists for improving the ability to assess simulator fidelity. Systems Identification Technology offers a potential framework for model validation. Installation of the data collection/recording equipment required by NUREG-0696 could provide a vastly improved source of data for simulator fidelity assessment. The NRC needs to continue its post-TMI actions to involve itself more rigorously and more formally in the entire process of NPP personnel training system development. However, this involvement should be a participative one with industry. The existing similator standards and guidelines should be reorganized to support the use of systems approach to training. The standards should require and support a holistic approach to training system development that recognizes simulators and simulator training as only parts of the complete training program and full-scope, high-fidelity, site-specific simulators as only one useful training device. Some recommendations for adapting the SAT/ISD process to the nuclear industry are: The formation of an NRC/industry planning/coordination group, a program planning study to develop a programmatic plan, development of a user's guide and NRC/industry workshops to establish common terminology and practice, and a pilot study applying the adopted SAT/ISD methodology to an actual nuclear industry training program.

  13. Development and investigations of compact heat-transfer equipment for a nuclear power station equipped with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovko, V. F.; Dmitrieva, I. V.; Kodochigov, N. G.; Bykh, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    The project of a nuclear power station the reactor coolant system of which includes a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor combined with a gas-turbine energy conversion unit supposes the use of high-efficient gas-cycle-based heat-transfer equipment. An analysis aimed at selecting the optimal heat-transfer surfaces is presented together with the results from their calculated and experimental investigation. The design features of recuperators arranged integrally with end and intermediate coolers and placed in a vertical sealed high-pressure vessel of limited sizes are considered.

  14. Development of RF plasma simulations of in-reactor tests of small models of the nuclear light bulb fuel region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.; Jaminet, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to develop test configurations and technology necessary to simulate the thermal environment and fuel region expected to exist in in-reactor tests of small models of nuclear light bulb configurations. Particular emphasis was directed at rf plasma tests of approximately full-scale models of an in-reactor cell suitable for tests in Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Nuclear Furnace. The in-reactor tests will involve vortex-stabilized fissioning uranium plasmas of approximately 200-kW power, 500-atm pressure and equivalent black-body radiating temperatures between 3220 and 3510 K.

  15. Evaluation of effective-stress-function algorithm for nuclear fuel simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. C.; Yang, Y. S.; Koo, Y. H.

    2013-07-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the mechanical integrity of nuclear fuel is the most critical issue as it is an important barrier for fission products released into the environment. The integrity of zirconium cladding that surrounds uranium oxide can be threatened during off-normal operation owing to a pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). To analyze the fuel and cladding behavior during off-operation, the fuel performance code should calculate an inelastic analysis in two - or three-dimensional calculations. In this paper, the effective stress function (ESF) algorithm based on a two-dimensional FE module has been implemented to simulate the inelastic behavior of the cladding with stability and accuracy. The ESF algorithm solves the governing equations of the inelastic constitutive behavior by calculating the zero of the appropriate effective-stress-function. To verify the accuracy of the ESF algorithm for an inelastic analysis, a code-to-code benchmark was performed using the commercial FE code, ANSYS 13.0. To demonstrate the stability and convergence of the implemented algorithm, the number of iterations in the ESF algorithm was compared with that in a sequential algorithm in the case of an inelastic problem. Consequently, the evaluation results demonstrate that the implemented ESF algorithm improves the efficiency of the computation without a loss of accuracy for an inelastic analysis. (authors)

  16. Application of adaptive hierarchical sparse grid collocation to the uncertainty quantification of nuclear reactor simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Yankov, A.; Downar, T.

    2013-07-01

    Recent efforts in the application of uncertainty quantification to nuclear systems have utilized methods based on generalized perturbation theory and stochastic sampling. While these methods have proven to be effective they both have major drawbacks that may impede further progress. A relatively new approach based on spectral elements for uncertainty quantification is applied in this paper to several problems in reactor simulation. Spectral methods based on collocation attempt to couple the approximation free nature of stochastic sampling methods with the determinism of generalized perturbation theory. The specific spectral method used in this paper employs both the Smolyak algorithm and adaptivity by using Newton-Cotes collocation points along with linear hat basis functions. Using this approach, a surrogate model for the outputs of a computer code is constructed hierarchically by adaptively refining the collocation grid until the interpolant is converged to a user-defined threshold. The method inherently fits into the framework of parallel computing and allows for the extraction of meaningful statistics and data that are not within reach of stochastic sampling and generalized perturbation theory. This paper aims to demonstrate the advantages of spectral methods-especially when compared to current methods used in reactor physics for uncertainty quantification-and to illustrate their full potential. (authors)

  17. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison.

    PubMed

    Matlashov, Andrei N; Schultz, Larry J; Espy, Michelle A; Kraus, Robert H; Savukov, Igor M; Volegov, Petr L; Wurden, Caroline J

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airport security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers may provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR technique. We describe experimental and computer-simulation results comparing multichannel SQUID based and induction coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquid identification.

  18. The influence of hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen on the corrosion of simulated spent nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Razdan, Mayuri; Shoesmith, David W

    2015-01-01

    The synergistic influence between H(2)O(2) and H(2) on the corrosion of SIMFUEL (simulated spent nuclear fuel) has been studied in solutions with and without added HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-). The response of the surface to increasing concentrations of added H(2)O(2) was monitored by measuring the corrosion potential in either Ar or Ar/H(2)-purged solutions. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy it was shown that the extent of surface oxidation (U(V) + U(VI) content) was directly related to the corrosion potential. Variations in corrosion potential with time, redox conditions, HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-) concentration, and convective conditions showed that surface oxidation induced by H(2)O(2) could be reversed by reaction with H(2), the latter reaction occurring dominantly on the noble metal particles in the SIMFUEL. For sufficiently large H(2)O(2) concentrations, the influence of H(2) was overwhelmed and irreversible oxidation of the surface to U(VI) occurred. Subsequently, corrosion was controlled by the chemical dissolution rate of this U(VI) layer.

  19. Nuclear Simulation and Radiation Physics Investigations of the Target Station of the European Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Filges, Detlef; Neef, Ralf-Dieter; Schaal, Hartwig

    2000-10-15

    The European Spallation Neutron Source (ESS) delivers high-intensity pulsed particle beams with 5-MW average beam power at 1.3-GeV incident proton energy. This causes sophisticated demands on material and geometry choices and a very careful optimization of the whole target system. Therefore, complex and detailed particle transport models and computer code systems have been developed and used to study the nuclear assessment of the ESS target system. The purpose here is to describe the methods of calculation mainly based on the Monte Carlo code to show the performance of the ESS target station. The interesting results of the simulations of the mercury target system are as follows: time-dependent neutron flux densities, energy deposition and heating, radioactivity and afterheat, materials damage by radiation, and high-energy source shielding. The results are discussed in great detail. The validity of codes and models, further requirements to improve the methods of calculation, and the status of running and planned experiments are given also.

  20. SQUIDs vs. Faraday coils for ultlra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance: experimental and simulation comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Matlashov, Andrei N; Espy, Michelle A; Kraus, Robert H; Sayukov, Igor M; Schultz, Larry J; Urbaitis, Algis V; Volegov, Petr L; Wurden, Caroline J

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging or MRI. Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in ultra-low field (ULF) regime that requires measurement field strengths only of the order of 1 Gauss. These techniques exploit the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group at LANL has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airports security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR/MRI technique. We describe an experimental and computer simulation comparison of the world's first multichannel SQUID based and Faraday coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquids identification.

  1. Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

    2004-03-31

    Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

  2. Spectroscopic fingerprints of toroidal nuclear quantum delocalization via ab initio path integral simulations.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Ole; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2013-04-05

    We investigate the quantum-mechanical delocalization of hydrogen in rotational symmetric molecular systems. To this purpose, we perform ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations of a methanol molecule to characterize the quantum properties of hydrogen atoms in a representative system by means of their real-space and momentum-space densities. In particular, we compute the spherically averaged momentum distribution n(k) and the pseudoangular momentum distribution n(kθ). We interpret our results by comparing them to path integral samplings of a bare proton in an ideal torus potential. We find that the hydroxyl hydrogen exhibits a toroidal delocalization, which leads to characteristic fingerprints in the line shapes of the momentum distributions. We can describe these specific spectroscopic patterns quantitatively and compute their onset as a function of temperature and potential energy landscape. The delocalization patterns in the projected momentum distribution provide a promising computational tool to address the intriguing phenomenon of quantum delocalization in condensed matter and its spectroscopic characterization. As the momentum distribution n(k) is also accessible through Nuclear Compton Scattering experiments, our results will help to interpret and understand future measurements more thoroughly.

  3. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Matlashov, Andrei N.; Schultz, Larry J.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Robert H.; Savukov, Igor M.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wurden, Caroline J.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airport security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers may provide enough sensitivity in the 3–10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR technique. We describe experimental and computer-simulation results comparing multichannel SQUID based and induction coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquid identification. PMID:21747638

  4. Evaluation of intersubchannel mixing in a simulated nuclear fuel rod bundle using a gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Sedaghat-Hamedani, A.

    1984-01-01

    Single-phase, isothermal turbulent and forced mixing data were obtained from two and three-subchannel simulations of a nuclear fuel assembly using a gamma-camera imaging system. One of the two or three inlet streams was traced with the gamma emitting radionuclide 99m-Tc pertechnetate, and axial subchannel concentration gradients were measured as a function of gap spacing and Reynolds number over the respective ranges 0.050 to 0.197 inch, and 3000 to 20,000. The gamma camera allowed external monitoring over the axial length of the test assembly thereby eliminating experimental problems associated with flow partitioning and withdrawal systems. In addition, it provided a methodology for making noninvasive measurements under operating conditions downstream of a mixing vane and over the active region of diversion crossflow. The missing parameter ..beta.., defined as the ratio of the transverse to axial mass velocities, was found to be relatively independent of the pitch to rod diameter ratio for gap spaces of 0.100, 0.157, and 0.197 inches, but was observed to increase sharply for the smallest gap spacing (0.050 inch) at a constant Reynolds number. Diversion crossflow was characterized by providing fixed but different flow rate to each subchannel.

  5. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-06-15

    Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

  6. Occurrence and identification of microorganisms in compacted clay-based buffer material designed for use in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault.

    PubMed

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S; Pedersen, K; Haveman, S A; Dekeyser, K; Arlinger, J; Daumas, S; Ekendahl, S; Hallbeck, L; Hamon, C J; Jahromi, N; Delaney, T L

    1997-12-01

    A full-scale nuclear fuel waste disposal container experiment was carried out 240 m below ground in an underground granitic rock research laboratory in Canada. An electric heater was surrounded by buffer material composed of sand and bentonite clay and provided heat equivalent to what is anticipated in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste repository. During the experiment, the heat caused a mass transport of water and moisture content gradients developed in the buffer ranging from 13% closest to the heater to 23% at the rock wall of the deposition hole. Upon decommissioning after 2.5 years, microorganisms could be cultured from all samples having a moisture content above 15% but not from samples with a moisture content below 15%. Heterotrophic aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were found in numbers ranging from 10(1) to 10(6) cells/g dry weight buffer. Approximately 10(2), or less, sulphate-reducing bacteria and methanogens per gram of dry weight buffer were also found. Identification of buffer population members was performed using Analytical Profile Index (API) strips for isolated bacteria and 16S rRNA gene sequencing for in situ samples. A total of 79 isolates from five buffer layers were identified with API strips as representing the beta, gamma and delta groups of Proteobacteria and Gram-positive bacteria. Sixty-seven 16S rRNA clones that were obtained from three buffer layers were classified into 21 clone groups representing alpha and gamma groups of Proteobacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and a yeast. Approximately 20% of the population comprised Gram-positive bacteria. Members of the genera Amycolatopsis, Bacillus, and Nocardia predominated. Among Gram-negative bacteria, the genera Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas predominated. Analysis of lipid biomarker signatures and in situ leucine uptake demonstrated that the buffer population was viable. The results suggest that a nuclear fuel waste buffer will be populated by active microorganisms only if the moisture content is

  7. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong

    2011-06-01

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  8. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent winds during the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident by coupling with a meso-scale meteorological simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, H.; Takemi, T.; Nagai, H.

    2015-06-01

    A significant amount of radioactive material was accidentally discharged into the atmosphere from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant from 12 March 2011, which produced high contaminated areas over a wide region in Japan. In conducting regional-scale atmospheric dispersion simulations, the computer-based nuclear emergency response system WSPEEDI-II developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency was used. Because this system is driven by a meso-scale meteorological (MM) model, it is difficult to reproduce small-scale wind fluctuations due to the effects of local terrain variability and buildings within a nuclear facility that are not explicitly represented in MM models. In this study, we propose a computational approach to couple an LES-based CFD model with a MM model for detailed simulations of turbulent winds with buoyancy effects under real meteorological conditions using turbulent inflow technique. Compared to the simple measurement data, especially, the 10 min averaged wind directions of the LES differ by more than 30 degrees during some period of time. However, distribution patterns of wind speeds, directions, and potential temperature are similar to the MM data. This implies that our coupling technique has potential performance to provide detailed data on contaminated area in the nuclear accidents.

  9. Monte-Carlo Simulations of the Nuclear Energy Deposition Inside the CARMEN-1P Differential Calorimeter Irradiated into OSIRIS Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carette, M.; Lemaire, M.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Lyoussi, A.

    2015-07-01

    carried out. A preliminary analysis shows that the numerical results overestimate the measurements by about 20 %. A new approach has been developed in order to estimate the nuclear heating by two methods (energy deposition or KERMA) by considering the whole complete geometry of the sensor. This new approach will contribute to the interpretation of the irradiation campaign and will be useful to improve the out-of-pile calibration procedure of the sensor and its thermal response during irradiations. The aim of this paper is to present simulations made by using MCNP5 Monte-Carlo transport code (using ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library) for the nuclear heating inside the different parts of the calorimeter (head, rod and base). Calculations into two steps will be realized. We will use as an input source in the model new spectra (neutrons, prompt-photons and delayed-photons) calculated with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4{sup R} inside different experimental channels (water) located into the OSIRIS periphery and used during the CARMEN-1P irradiation campaign. We will consider Neutrons- Photons-Electrons and Photons-Electrons modes. We will begin by a brief description of the differential-calorimeter device geometry. Then the MCNP5 model used for the calculations of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The energy deposition due to the prompt-gamma, delayed-gamma and neutrons, the neutron-activation of the device will be considered. The different components of the nuclear heating inside the different parts of the calorimeter will be detailed. Moreover, a comparison between KERMA and nuclear energy deposition estimations will be given. Finally, a comparison between this total nuclear heating Calculation and Experiment in graphite sample will be determined. (authors)

  10. Degradation and failure susceptibility of carbon steels in simulated Yucca Mountain nuclear repository environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Ahmet

    Environmental degradation and cracking of medium carbon steel (MCS) rock bolts and low carbon steel (LCS) I-beam have been investigated by experimental methods such as linear polarization, impedance spectroscopy, weight loss measurements, and electro-mechanical dynamic slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests, along with potentiostatic in-situ potential-current monitoring techniques. The experiments were conducted in concentrated aqueous environments of various temperatures, which simulated the conditions at the Yucca Mountain (YM) nuclear waste repository site, where the candidate structural materials introduced above, will be used for supporting the waste repository tunnels. MCS corroded at medium general rates approximately around 40 mum/year to 200 mum/year in de-aerated simulated YM waters of various temperatures and concentrations. Increased temperatures increased the corrosion rates in the all de-aerated waters. Increased concentrations of overall species in the simulated waters also increased the corrosion rates, but only slightly. Impedance spectroscopy revealed similar trends for temperature and concentration effects on the rates in both aerated and deaerated environments. Aeration increased corrosion rates significantly in dilute (1X) and ten times concentrated (10X) waters at all temperatures. However, inhibitive precipitates on the specimens formed by oxygen-environment reactions at higher temperatures (up to 85°C) in hundred times concentrated (100X) waters decreased corrosion rates drastically, resulting some localized corrosion and pitting. The average rates were determined to be between approximately 100 mu/year and 1000 mu/year in the entire concentration and temperature range tested. Electrochemical results showed slightly higher rates compared to the other tests because of their much shorter testing period, therefore in general they should be taken as conservative upper bounds. SSRT on LCS under various imposed metal-electrolyte interface

  11. Implementation of a new energy-angular distribution of particles emitted by deuteron induced nuclear reaction in transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, Patrick; Koning, Arjan; Ogando, Francisco; Sanz, Javier

    2017-09-01

    MCUNED code is an MCNPX extension able to handle evaluated nuclear data library for light ion transport simulations. In this work the MCUNED code is improved to describe more accurately the neutron emission during deuteron induced nuclear reaction. This code update consists in introducing a new methodology to take into account the angular distribution of neutron produced by deuteron breakup reaction. To carry out this work a new formulation for the angular distribution of neutrons produced by breakup reaction has been proposed. The implementation of this new methodology requires the use of extra parameters which are provided by the nuclear code TALYS and stored in the ENDF file. This new methodology shows significant improvement in comparison with the former treatment of neutron emission kinematics, these results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Measurement and simulation of the effect of compaction on the pore structure and saturated hydraulic conductivity of grassland and arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G. P.; Laudone, G. M.; Gregory, A. S.; Bird, N. R. A.; Matthews, A. G. de G.; Whalley, W. R.

    2010-05-01

    Measurements have been made of the effect of compaction on water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and porosity of two English soils: North Wyke (NW) grassland clay topsoil and Broadbalk silty topsoil, fertilized inorganically (PKMg) or with farmyard manure (FYM). As expected, the FYM topsoil had greater porosity and greater water retention than PKMg topsoil, and the NW clay topsoil retained more water at each matric potential than the silty topsoils. Compaction had a clear effect on water retention at matric potentials wetter than -10 kPa for the PKMg and FYM soils, corresponding to voids greater than 30 μm cylindrical diameter, whereas smaller voids appeared to be unaffected. The Pore-Cor void network model has been improved by including a Euler beta distribution to describe the sizes of the narrow interconnections, termed throats. The model revealed a change from bimodal to unimodal throat size distributions on compaction, as well as a reduction in sizes overall. It also matched the water retention curves more closely than van Genuchten fits and correctly predicted changes in saturated hydraulic conductivity better than those predicted by a prior statistical approach. However, the changes in hydraulic conductivity were masked by the stochastic variability of the model. Also, an artifact of the model, namely its inability to pack small features close together, caused incorrect increases in pore sizes on compaction. These deficiencies in the model demonstrate the need for an explicitly dual porous network model to account for the effects of compaction in soil.

  13. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The state-of-the-art X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam produced by an X-band RF accelerator and a high-intensity laser pulse generated by chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) has been carried out by our research team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system is called "Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source". The applications include nuclear resonance fluorescence, medical imaging and therapy, and nuclear waste imaging and assay. One of the key factors in this system is how we know the interaction happened in the vacuum chamber, which is the spectrometer of electron beams. The other key factor is the interaction after the spectrometer, which is the outgoing X-ray. In this thesis, the work in the simulation for the result of the interaction between electrons and the laser, the calibration of spectrometer, and laser focus characterization are discussed.

  14. SU-E-T-234: LET Measurement Using Nuclear Emulsion and Monte Carlo Simulation for Proton Beam.

    PubMed

    Shin, J; Cho, S; Park, S; Lee, S; Kwak, J; Kim, S; Morishima, K

    2012-06-01

    The significant issue of particle therapy such as proton and carbon ion biological effect on tumors and normal tissue. This effect closely connected with linear-energy-transfer (LET). This work presents a Monte Carlo study using GEANT4 and the verification using Nuclear Emulsion to show LET for proton beam. National Cancer Center (NCC) has IBA Beam Nozzle and cyclotron for proton therapy. We use proton beam bragg peak range 14cm. Also, we already developed the simulation using GEANT4 and finished validation for scattering proton beam. In our simulation, we make same condition with experimental setup.Nuclear emulsion films interleaved with tissue equivalent absorbers can be fruitfully used to reconstruct proton tracks with very high precision. This Nuclear emulsion film has been supported from Nagoya University, analyzed in Pusan University, was irradiated with a therapeutic proton beam at NCC. The Emulsion packs was located at entrance and bragg peak region of proton. This position means low and high LET region. The scanning of the emulsions has been performed at Nagoya University, where a fully automated microscopic scanning technology has been developed for the OPERA experiment on neutrino oscillations. We could see the reconstructed track of proton scanning emulsion. From film scanning, we got the LET distribution at low and high LET region for several proton tracks. Simulation results was similar distribution within standard deviation in acceptance level. Also we got the RBE distribution using LET measurement for proton beam. We measured LET at entrance and bragg peak region using Monte Carlo study and Nuclear Emulsion film, for NCC proton beam. This results means the good observation of LET using the nuclear emulsion. And this method can be used successfully in medical field. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Rotational spectra, nuclear quadrupole hyperfine tensors, and conformational structures of the mustard gas simulent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubergen, M. J.; Lesarri, A.; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, A. C.; Jensen, J. O.; Ellzy, M. W.; Lochner, J. M.

    2005-10-01

    Rotational spectra have been recorded for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopic forms of two structural conformations of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The rotational constants of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopomers were used to identify the conformational isomers. A total of 236 hyperfine transitions have been assigned for 47 rotational transitions of the 35Cl isotope of a GGT conformer, and 146 hyperfine have been assigned for 37 rotational transitions of the 37Cl isotopomer. For the second conformer, a total of 128 (110) hyperfine and 30 (28) rotational transitions have also been assigned to the 35Cl ( 37Cl) isotopes of a TGT conformation. The extensive hyperfine splitting data, measured to high resolution with a compact Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, were used to determine both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors in the inertial tensor principal axis system. The experimental rotational constant data, as well as the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors, were compared to the results from 27 optimized ab initio (HF/6-311++G ∗∗ and MP2/6-311++G ∗∗) model structures.

  16. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  17. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    SciTech Connect

    Yusufali, C. Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.

    2014-04-24

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  18. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H2) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H2. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H2 liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  19. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufali, C.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K.

    2014-04-01

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al2O3 layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  20. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H{sub 2}. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H{sub 2} liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  1. MC 93 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Monte Carlo Simulation in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragovitsch, Peter; Linn, Stephan L.; Burbank, Mimi

    1994-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Heavy Fragment Production for Hadronic Cascade Codes * Monte Carlo Simulations of Space Radiation Environments * Merging Parton Showers with Higher Order QCD Monte Carlos * An Order-αs Two-Photon Background Study for the Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson * GEANT Simulation of Hall C Detector at CEBAF * Monte Carlo Simulations in Radioecology: Chernobyl Experience * UNIMOD2: Monte Carlo Code for Simulation of High Energy Physics Experiments; Some Special Features * Geometrical Efficiency Analysis for the Gamma-Neutron and Gamma-Proton Reactions * GISMO: An Object-Oriented Approach to Particle Transport and Detector Modeling * Role of MPP Granularity in Optimizing Monte Carlo Programming * Status and Future Trends of the GEANT System * The Binary Sectioning Geometry for Monte Carlo Detector Simulation * A Combined HETC-FLUKA Intranuclear Cascade Event Generator * The HARP Nucleon Polarimeter * Simulation and Data Analysis Software for CLAS * TRAP -- An Optical Ray Tracing Program * Solutions of Inverse and Optimization Problems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics Using Inverse Monte Carlo * FLUKA: Hadronic Benchmarks and Applications * Electron-Photon Transport: Always so Good as We Think? Experience with FLUKA * Simulation of Nuclear Effects in High Energy Hadron-Nucleus Collisions * Monte Carlo Simulations of Medium Energy Detectors at COSY Jülich * Complex-Valued Monte Carlo Method and Path Integrals in the Quantum Theory of Localization in Disordered Systems of Scatterers * Radiation Levels at the SSCL Experimental Halls as Obtained Using the CLOR89 Code System * Overview of Matrix Element Methods in Event Generation * Fast Electromagnetic Showers * GEANT Simulation of the RMC Detector at TRIUMF and Neutrino Beams for KAON * Event Display for the CLAS Detector * Monte Carlo Simulation of High Energy Electrons in Toroidal Geometry * GEANT 3.14 vs. EGS4: A Comparison Using the DØ Uranium/Liquid Argon

  2. Thermally Simulated Testing of a Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; VanDyke, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the concept and preliminary component testing of a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor which uses He/Xe gas that goes directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity for nuclear electric propulsion. This Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Reactor (DDG) is designed to be subcritical under water or wet-sand immersion in case of a launch accident. Because the gas-cooled reactor can directly drive the Brayton turbomachinery, it is possible to configure the system such that there are no external surfaces or pressure boundaries that are refractory metal, even though the gas delivered to the turbine is 1144 K. The He/Xe gas mixture is a good heat transport medium when flowing, and a good insulator when stagnant. Judicious use of stagnant cavities as insulating regions allows transport of the 1144-K gas while keeping all external surfaces below 900 K. At this temperature super-alloys (Hastelloy or Inconel) can be used instead of refractory metals. Super-alloys reduce the technology risk because they are easier to fabricate than refractory metals, we have a much more extensive knowledge base on their characteristics, and, because they have a greater resistance to oxidation, system testing is eased. The system is also relatively simple in its design: no additional coolant pumps, heat exchanger, or freeze-thaw systems are required. Key to success of this concept is a good knowledge of the heat transfer between the fuel pins and the gas, as well as the pressure drop through the system. This paper describes preliminary testing to obtain this key information, as well as experience in demonstrating electrical thermal simulation of reactor components and concepts.

  3. Assessment of simulated and functional disuse on cortical bone by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; De Los Santos, Armando; Lam, Hoyan; Qin, Yi-Xian

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin ( T2) relaxation technique has been described for determining water distribution changes on turkey cortical bone tissue of simulated weightlessness (disuse) in vitro. The advantages of using NMR T2 relaxation techniques for bone water distribution are illustrated. The Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) T2 relaxation data can be used to determine the porosity of bone, and can be inverted to T2 relaxation distribution, and this distribution then can be transformed to a pore size distribution with the longer relaxation times corresponding to larger pores. The free induction delay (FID) T2 relaxation data can be inverted to T2 relaxation distribution and this distribution then can be transformed to bound and mobile water distribution with the longest relaxation time corresponding to mobile water and the middle relaxation time corresponding to bound water. The technique is applied to quantify apparent changes in porosity, bound and mobile water in normal and disuse cortical bone. Overall bone porosity is determined using the calibrated NMR fluid volume from the proton relaxation data divided by overall bone volume. The NMR bound and mobile water changes were determined from cortical bone specimens obtained from normal and disuse turkey bones. Differences in porosity and water distribution were found between specimens from normal and disuse. Our results show that the ratio of the average bound to mobile water in bone from normal turkey is higher than in bone from disuse turkey, and the porosity is lower in normal than in disuse turkey. We also show that the average bone porosity multiplied by the ratio of bound to mobile water may be constant for both normal and disuse bone groups. Currently, the influence of water removal on the strength and toughness of cortical bone has been studied by some researchers. Therefore, the porosity, bound and mobile water distribution changes could provide further information directly related to bone

  4. MCNPX simulations of the silicon carbide semiconductor detector response to fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Zat'ko, Bohumír; Nečas, Vladimír; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been long recognized as a suitable semiconductor material for use in nuclear radiation detectors of high-energy charged particles, gamma rays, X-rays and neutrons. The nuclear interactions occurring in the semiconductor are complex and can be quantified using a Monte Carlo-based computer code. In this work, the MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was employed to support detector design and analysis. MCNPX is widely used to simulate interaction of radiation with matter and supports the transport of 34 particle types including heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The code also supports complex 3D geometries and both nuclear data tables and physics models. In our model, monoenergetic neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction were assumed as a source of fast neutrons. Their energy varied between 16 and 18.2 MeV, according to the accelerating voltage of the deuterons participating in D-T reaction. First, the simulations were used to calculate the optimum thickness of the reactive film composed of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE), which converts neutral particles to charged particles and thusly enhancing detection efficiency. The dependency of the optimal thickness of the HDPE layer on the energy of the incident neutrons has been shown for the inspected energy range. Further, from the energy deposited by secondary charged particles and recoiled ions, the detector response was modeled and the effect of the conversion layer on detector response was demonstrated. The results from the simulations were compared with experimental data obtained for a detector covered by a 600 and 1300 μm thick conversion layer. Some limitations of the simulations using MCNPX code are also discussed.

  5. Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program: Anticipated transient without scram simulations for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, R J; Gottula, R C; Holcomb, E E; Jouse, W C; Wagoner, S R; Wheatley, P D

    1987-05-01

    An analysis of five anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The five detailed deterministic simulations of postulated ATWS sequences were initiated from a main steamline isolation valve (MSIV) closure. The subject of the analysis was the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1, a boiling water reactor (BWR) of the BWR/4 product line with a Mark I containment. The simulations yielded insights to the possible consequences resulting from a MSIV closure ATWS. An evaluation of the effects of plant safety systems and operator actions on accident progression and mitigation is presented.

  6. Glycan flexibility: insights into nanosecond dynamics from a microsecond molecular dynamics simulation explaining an unusual nuclear Overhauser effect.

    PubMed

    Landström, Jens; Widmalm, Göran

    2010-01-26

    An atomistic all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the trisaccharide beta-D-ManpNAc-(1-->4)[alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->3)]-alpha-L-Rhap-OMe with explicit solvent molecules has been carried out. The trisaccharide represents a model for the branching region of the O-chain polysaccharide of a strain from Aeromonas salmonicida. The extensive MD simulations having a 1-micros duration revealed a conformational dynamics process on the nanosecond time scale, that is, a 'time window' not extensively investigated for carbohydrates to date. The results obtained from the MD simulation underscore the predictive power of molecular simulations in studies of biomolecular systems and also explain an unusual nuclear Overhauser effect originating from conformational exchange. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical simulation of free evolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using low-order correlations in Liouville space.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Butler, Mark C; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-12-14

    The design of simulations of free evolution in dipolar-coupled nuclear-spin systems using low-order correlations in Liouville space (LCL) is discussed, and a computational scheme relying on the Suzuki-Trotter algorithm and involving minimal memory requirements is described. The unusual nature of the approximation introduced by Liouville-space reduction in a spinning solid is highlighted by considering the accuracy of LCL simulations at different spinning frequencies, the quasiequilibria achieved by spin systems in LCL simulations, and the growth of high-order coherences in the exact dynamics. In particular, it is shown that accurate LCL simulations of proton spin diffusion occur in a regime where the reduced space excludes the coherences that make the dominant contribution to ∥σ∥(2), the norm-squared of the density matrix.

  8. Geoelectrical monitoring of simulated subsurface leakage to support high-hazard nuclear decommissioning at the Sellafield Site, UK.

    PubMed

    Kuras, Oliver; Wilkinson, Paul B; Meldrum, Philip I; Oxby, Lucy S; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Chambers, Jonathan E; Binley, Andrew; Graham, James; Smith, Nicholas T; Atherton, Nick

    2016-10-01

    A full-scale field experiment applying 4D (3D time-lapse) cross-borehole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to the monitoring of simulated subsurface leakage was undertaken at a legacy nuclear waste silo at the Sellafield Site, UK. The experiment constituted the first application of geoelectrical monitoring in support of decommissioning work at a UK nuclear licensed site. Images of resistivity changes occurring since a baseline date prior to the simulated leaks revealed likely preferential pathways of silo liquor simulant flow in the vadose zone and upper groundwater system. Geophysical evidence was found to be compatible with historic contamination detected in permeable facies in sediment cores retrieved from the ERT boreholes. Results indicate that laterally discontinuous till units forming localized hydraulic barriers substantially affect flow patterns and contaminant transport in the shallow subsurface at Sellafield. We conclude that only geophysical imaging of the kind presented here has the potential to provide the detailed spatial and temporal information at the (sub-)meter scale needed to reduce the uncertainty in models of subsurface processes at nuclear sites. Copyright © 2016 British Geological Survey, NERC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  10. Simulation of ground-water flow near the nuclear-fuel reprocessing facility at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center, Cattaraugus County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-difference model was developed to simulate groundwater flow in a surficial sand and gravel deposit underlying the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at Western New York Nuclear Service Center near West Valley, N.Y. The sand and gravel deposit overlies a till plateau that abuts an upland area of siltstone and shale on its west side, and is bounded on the other three sides by deeply incised stream channels that drain to Buttermilk Creek, a tributary to Cattaraugus Creek. Radioactive materials are stored within the reprocessing plant and are also buried within a till deposit at the facility. Tritiated water is stored in a lagoon system near the plant and released under permit to Franks Creek, a tributary to Buttermilk Creek. Groundwater levels predicted by steady-state simulations closely matched those measured in 23 observation wells, with an average error of 0.5 meter. Simulated groundwater discharges to two stream channels and a subsurface drain were within 5% of recorded values. Steady-state simulations used an average annual recharge rate of 46 cm/yr; predicted evapotranspiration loss from the ground was 20 cm/yr. The lateral range in hydraulic conductivity obtained through model calibration was 0.6 to 10 m/day. Model simulations indicated that 33% of the groundwater discharged from the sand and gravel unit (2.6 L/sec) is lost by evapotranspiration, 3% (3.0 L/sec) flows to seepage faces at the periphery of the plateau, 20% (1.6 L/sec) discharges to stream channels that drain a large wetland area near the center of the plateau, and the remaining 8% (0.6 L/sec) discharges to a subsurface french drain and to a wastewater treatment system. Groundwater levels computed by a transient-state simulation of an annual climatic cycle, including seasonal variation in recharge and evapotranspiration, closely matched water levels measured in eight observation wells. The model predicted that the subsurface drain and the stream channel that drains the

  11. Ground-water flow near two radioactive-waste-disposal areas at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center, Cattaraugus County, New York; results of flow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergeron, M.P.; Bugliosi, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Two adjacent burial areas were excavated in a clay-rich till at a radioactive waste disposal site near West Valley in Cattaraugus County, N.Y.: (1) which contains mainly low-level radioactive wastes generated onsite by a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, has been in operation since 1966; and (2) which contains commercial low-level radioactive wastes, was operated during 1963-75. Groundwater below the upper 3 meters of till generally moves downward through a 20- to 30-meter thick sequence of tills underlain by lacustrine and kame-delta deposits of fine sand and silt. Groundwater in the weathered, upper 3 meters of till can move laterally for several meters before either moving downward into the kame-delta deposits or discharging to the land surface. A two-dimensional finite-element model that simulates two vertical sections was used to evaluate hydrologic factors that control groundwater flow in the till. Conditions observed during March 1983 were reproduced accurately in steady-state simulations that used four isotropic units of differing hydraulic conductivity to represent two fractured and weathered till units near land surfaces, an intermediate group of isolated till zones that contain significant amounts of fine sand and silt, and a sequence of till units at depths that have been consolidated by overburden pressure. Recharge rates used in the best-fit simulation ranged from 1.4 cm/yr along smooth, sloping or compacted surfaces to 3.8 cm/yr near swampy areas. Values of hydraulic conductivity and infiltration used in the calibrated best-fit model were nearly identical to values used in a previous model analysis of the nearby commercial-waste burial area. Results of the model simulations of a burial pit assumed to be filled with water indicate that water near the bottom of the burial pit would migrate laterally in the shallow, weathered till for 5 to 6 meters before moving downward into the unweathered till, and water near the top of the pit would move laterally

  12. Compact Neutron Sources for Energy and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hitoshi

    We choose nuclear data and nuclear material inspection for energy application, and nondestructive testing of explosive and hidden nuclear materials for security application. Low energy (˜100keV) electrostatic accelerators of deuterium are commercially available for nondestructive testing. For nuclear data measurement, electrostatic ion accelerators and L-band (1.428GHz) and S-band (2.856GHz) electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for the neutron source. Compact or mobile X-band (9.3, 11.424GHz) electron linac neutron sources are under development. A compact proton linac neutron source is used for nondestructive testing, especially water in solids. Several efforts for more neutron intensity using proton and deuteron accelerators are also introduced.

  13. Compact Neutron Sources for Energy and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hitoshi

    We choose nuclear data and nuclear material inspection for energy application, and nondestructive testing of explosive and hidden nuclear materials for security application. Low energy (~100 keV) electrostatic accelerators of deuterium are commercially available for nondestructive testing. For nuclear data measurement, electrostatic ion accelerators and L-band (1.428GHz) and S-band (2.856GHz) electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for the neutron source. Compact or mobile X-band (9.3, 11.424GHz) electron linac neutron sources are under development. A compact proton linac neutron source is used for nondestructive testing, especially water in solids. Several efforts for more neutron intensity using proton and deuteron accelerators are also introduced.

  14. The Compact for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Fred Harvey

    The Compact for Education is not yet particularly significant either for good or evil. Partly because of time and partly because of unreasonable expectations, the Compact is not yet a going concern. Enthusiasts have overestimated Compact possibilities and opponents have overestimated its dangers, so if the organization has limited rather than…

  15. Biosorption of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus under culture conditions: adsorption and bioaccumulation processes and models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Kang, Wu; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Guo, Yuting; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2014-06-10

    Algae biosorption is an ideal wastewater treatment method when coupled with algae growth and biosorption. The adsorption and bioaccumulation of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus were investigated in this research. One hundred mL of cultured S. spinosus cells with a dry weight of 1.0 mg in simulated nuclear wastewater were used to analyze the effects on S. spinosus cell growth as well as the adsorption and bioaccumulation characters under conditions of 25 ± 1 °C with approximately 3,000 lux illumination. The results showed that S. spinosus had a highly selective biosorption capacity for strontium, with a maximum bioremoval ratio of 76%. The adsorbed strontium ion on cell walls was approximately 90% of the total adsorbed amount; the bioaccumulation in the cytoplasm varied by approximately 10%. The adsorption quantity could be described with an equilibrium isotherm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model suggested that adsorption was the rate-limiting step of the biosorption process. A new bioaccumulation model with three parameters was proposed and could give a good fit with the experiment data. The results suggested that S. spinosus may be a potential biosorbent for the treatment of nuclear wastewater in culture conditions.

  16. Biosorption of Strontium from Simulated Nuclear Wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus under Culture Conditions: Adsorption and Bioaccumulation Processes and Models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Kang, Wu; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Guo, Yuting; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Algae biosorption is an ideal wastewater treatment method when coupled with algae growth and biosorption. The adsorption and bioaccumulation of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus were investigated in this research. One hundred mL of cultured S. spinosus cells with a dry weight of 1.0 mg in simulated nuclear wastewater were used to analyze the effects on S. spinosus cell growth as well as the adsorption and bioaccumulation characters under conditions of 25 ± 1 °C with approximately 3,000 lux illumination. The results showed that S. spinosus had a highly selective biosorption capacity for strontium, with a maximum bioremoval ratio of 76%. The adsorbed strontium ion on cell walls was approximately 90% of the total adsorbed amount; the bioaccumulation in the cytoplasm varied by approximately10%. The adsorption quantity could be described with an equilibrium isotherm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model suggested that adsorption was the rate-limiting step of the biosorption process. A new bioaccumulation model with three parameters was proposed and could give a good fit with the experiment data. The results suggested that S. spinosus may be a potential biosorbent for the treatment of nuclear wastewater in culture conditions. PMID:24919131

  17. Simulated microgravity inhibits osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via depolymerizing F-actin to impede TAZ nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Luo, Qing; Lin, Chuanchuan; Kuang, Dongdong; Song, Guanbin

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity induces observed bone loss in space flight, and reduced osteogenesis of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) partly contributes to this phenomenon. Abnormal regulation or functioning of the actin cytoskeleton induced by microgravity may cause the inhibited osteogenesis of BMSCs, but the underlying mechanism remains obscure. In this study, we demonstrated that actin cytoskeletal changes regulate nuclear aggregation of the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), which is indispensable for osteogenesis of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Moreover, we utilized a clinostat to model simulated microgravity (SMG) and demonstrated that SMG obviously depolymerized F-actin and hindered TAZ nuclear translocation. Interestingly, stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton induced by Jasplakinolide (Jasp) significantly rescued TAZ nuclear translocation and recovered the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in SMG, independently of large tumor suppressor 1(LATS1, an upstream kinase of TAZ). Furthermore, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) also significantly recovered the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in SMG through the F-actin-TAZ pathway. Taken together, we propose that the depolymerized actin cytoskeleton inhibits osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs through impeding nuclear aggregation of TAZ, which provides a novel connection between F-actin cytoskeleton and osteogenesis of BMSCs and has important implications in bone loss caused by microgravity. PMID:27444891

  18. Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer reactions in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, Salomon R.; Webb, Simon P.; Iordanov, Tzvetelin; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2001-04-01

    A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes is presented. The electronic quantum effects are incorporated with an empirical valence bond approach. The nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen are included with a mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method in which the hydrogen nucleus is described as a multidimensional vibrational wave function. The free energy profiles are obtained as functions of a collective reaction coordinate. A perturbation formula is derived to incorporate the vibrationally adiabatic nuclear quantum effects into the free energy profiles. The dynamical effects are studied with the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions (MDQT) surface hopping method, which incorporates nonadiabatic transitions among the adiabatic hydrogen vibrational states. The MDQT method is combined with a reactive flux approach to calculate the transmission coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy, hydrogen tunneling, and excited vibrational states, as well as the dynamics of the complete enzyme and solvent. The nuclear quantum effects are incorporated during the generation of the free energy profiles and dynamical trajectories rather than subsequently added as corrections. Moreover, this methodology provides detailed mechanistic information at the molecular level and allows the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects. An initial application of this approach to the enzyme liver alcohol dehydrogenase is also presented.

  19. The imaging performance of compact Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu powdered phosphor screens: Monte Carlo simulation for applications in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Liaparinos, P. F.; Kandarakis, I. S.

    2009-06-15

    In medical mammographic imaging systems, one type of detector configuration, often referred to as indirect detectors, is based on a scintillator layer (phosphor screen) that converts the x-ray radiation into optical signal. The indirect detector performance may be optimized either by improving the structural parameters of the screen or by employing new phosphor materials with improved physical characteristics (e.g., x-ray absorption efficiency, intrinsic conversion efficiency, emitted light spectrum). Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu is a relatively new phosphor material that exhibits improved scintillating properties indicating a promising material for mammographic applications. In this article, a custom validated Monte Carlo program was used in order to examine the performance of compact Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu powdered phosphor screens under diagnostic mammography conditions (x-ray spectra: 28 kV Mo, 0.030 mm Mo and 32 kV W, 0.050 mm Rh). Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu screens of coating weight in the range between 20 and 40 mg/cm{sup 2} were examined. The Monte Carlo code was based on a model using Mie-scattering theory for the description of light propagation within the phosphor. The overall performance of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu powdered phosphor screens was investigated in terms of the (i) quantum detection efficiency, (ii) luminescence efficiency, (iii) compatibility with optical sensors, (iv) modulation transfer function, (v) the Swank factor, and (vi) zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency. Results were compared to the traditional rare-earth Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb phosphor material. The increased packing density and therefore the light extinction properties of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu phosphor were found to improve the x-ray absorption (approximately up to 21% and 16% at 40 mg/cm{sup 2} for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), the spatial resolution (approximately 2.6 and 2.4 cycles/mm at 40 mg/cm{sup 2} for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), as well as the zero

  20. Updating source term and atmospheric dispersion simulations for the dose reconstruction in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki; Tsuduki, Katsunori; Katata, Genki; Ota, Masakazu; Furuno, Akiko; Ak