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Sample records for compact tension specimens

  1. Stress distribution and fracture behavior of beryllium compact tension specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ruiwen Dong Ping; Wang Xiaolin

    2008-02-15

    Compact tension specimens of beryllium (Be) were designed to study fracture behavior and mechanical properties. The local stress distribution near a notch in a compact tension specimen was measured in situ by the combination of an X-ray stress analysis and a custom-designed load device. The fracture morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The result showed that the local stresses near the notch tip are much higher than in other areas, and cracking occurs first in that area. The load-crack opening displacement curve of the Be compact tension specimen was obtained, and used to calculate the fracture toughness as 15.7 MPa{radical}m. The compact tension specimen fracture surfaces were mainly characterized by cleavage fracture over three different areas. Cleavage micro-cracks along the basal slip plane were formed at the crack tip, and their growth was controlled by the primary stress after reaching a critical length.

  2. Fracture of Composite Compact Tension Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    E: lb/in.; X 10* M.: Fiber Volume, % 1002 S- glass /epoxy Unidirectional Crossply 6.9 4.7 2.3 4.7 1.0 1.1 0.28 0.14 55 MOD 1-5208...configuration used in most of the fracture experiments is shown in Fig. 1. In unidirectional S- glass /epoxy specimens the fiber direction with respect to...conducted only with 0° or 90° fiber orientation. Cross-ply specimens of both S- glass and graphite were tested with the outer plies oriented at 0°, 45

  3. The fracture toughness of wood in compact specimens (CT specimens) tested for off-center tension

    SciTech Connect

    Gappoev, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    The application of fracture mechanics methods in the design of building construction requires reliable knowledge of material crack resistance characteristics. At present, no standard test techniques for crack resistance in wood materials have been developed. In testing wood for crack resistance, it has been recommended that single-notched beam specimens (of the SENB type) subjected to three-point bending be used. The recommended method is rather simple; however, it has disadvantages that impair its accuracy. In particular, errors may arise from not directly accounting for the proper mass of a specimen. To evaluate these errors and to lend support to our previous results obtained on beam specimens, we tested compact specimens for off-center tension. Methods for determining the crack resistance characteristics (G{sub Ic,}, G{sub IF}, K{sub Ic}) of compact wood specimens (CT-specimens), tested for off-center tension, are described. The behavior of the fracture energy G{sub IF} during crack propagation is discussed.

  4. A Back Face Strain Compliance Expression for the Compact Tension Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    A numerically generated expression to determine crack length in a compact tension specimen from back face strain compliance is presented. The numerically generated back face strain expression is bounded by two experimentally determined expressions previously published in the literature. Additionally, stress intensity factor and crack mouth opening expressions are determined. These expressions agree well with previously published results.

  5. The compact tension, C(T), specimen in laminated composite testing

    SciTech Connect

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    Use of the compact tension, C(T), specimens in laminated composites testing is investigated by considering two examples. A new computational methodology that scales up constituent material properties, stress, and strain limits to the structure level is used to evaluate damage propagation stages as well as the structural fracture load. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progressive fracture, and ultimate fracture modes are identified. Specific dependences of C(T) specimen test characteristics on laminate configuration and composite constituent properties are quantified.

  6. Reduction in Stress Intensity Factor of a Compact Tension Specimen by Bonding Symmetrical GFRP Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, P. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Singh, K. K.; Sarkar, P. K.; Kumar, P.

    2013-10-01

    Reduction in stress intensity factor (SIF) of an acrylic compact tension (CT) specimen is studied by symmetrical bonding of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) patches on both sides of the specimen. The CT specimen was designed and developed to satisfy all dimensional constraints for plane strain condition. A suitable load fixture using dead weight for higher accuracy was designed for the purpose. The numerical and experimental analysis of CT specimen with varying geometry of the GFRP patches was carried out to analyze their effect on SIF of the specimen. The strain near the crack tip was measured by bonding a small strain gauge to estimate the equivalent SIF of the CT specimen. The test data was compared with the results of numerical analysis carried out using ANSYS software. The variation in strain value determined through theoretical analysis, numerical evaluation and experimental measurement is within 7 %. The equivalent SIF was found to be drastically reduced after bonding the CT specimen with GFRP patches.

  7. Grain tracing and strain determination in a Be compact tension specimen using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, R.; Green, R.; Garcia, M.D.; Satyam, P.V.; Yun, W.B.; Maser, J.; Kai, Z.; Lai, B.; Sinha, S.K.

    1999-04-19

    X-ray synchrotron radiation of high (11 KeV) energy and high flux (10{sup 10} photons per square centimeter per second) has been used to measure strains and polycrystallinity in 6-mm thick polycrystalline beryllium compact tension (CT) specimens at and around the crack tip (for fatigue-precracked sample) or at chevron notch point under load or no-load conditions. The authors demonstrated the feasibility strain field mapping as well as determining the polycrystallinity at or near the points of maximum load in beryllium CT specimens. The experimental techniques and results will be discussed.

  8. Mixed-mode static and fatigue crack growth in central notched and compact tension shear specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyannikov, V.N.

    1999-07-01

    Elastic-plastic crack growth under mixed Mode I and 2 in six types of aluminum alloys and three types of steel were investigated. The experimental study of fatigue crack growth in six types of the aluminum alloys and one type of the steel is performed on biaxially loaded eight-petal specimens (EPS). All specimens for biaxial loading contained inclined through thickness central cracks. Mixed Mode I/2 static and fatigue crack growth experiments on the three types of steels and one type of the aluminum alloy used compact tension shear (CTS) specimens. Two approaches are developed for geometrical modeling of crack growth trajectories for the central notched and compact tension shear specimens respectively. The principal feature of such modeling is the determination of crack growth direction and the definition of crack length increment in this direction. On the basis of the analysis of the experimental data for the aluminum alloys and the steels an empirical crack reorientation criterion is suggested for both brittle and ductile materials. The damage process zone size concept is used for calculations and mixed-mode crack path. The influence of specimen geometry, biaxial loading and properties of the aluminum alloys and the steels on both crack growth direction and crack path at the macroscopic scale is discussed.

  9. Effect of Reinforcement Architecture on Fracture of Selectively Reinforced Metallic Compact Tension Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abada, Christopher H.; Farley, Gary L.; Hyer, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    A computer-based parametric study of the effect of reinforcement architectures on fracture response of aluminum compact-tension (CT) specimens is performed. Eleven different reinforcement architectures consisting of rectangular and triangular cross-section reinforcements were evaluated. Reinforced specimens produced between 13 and 28 percent higher fracture load than achieved with the non-reinforced case. Reinforcements with blunt leading edges (rectangular reinforcements) exhibited superior performance relative to the triangular reinforcements with sharp leading edges. Relative to the rectangular reinforcements, the most important architectural feature was reinforcement thickness. At failure, the reinforcements carried between 58 and 85 percent of the load applied to the specimen, suggesting that there is considerable load transfer between the base material and the reinforcement.

  10. Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, B.J. Jr.; Lloyd, W.R.; Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.

    1997-02-04

    A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: (a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; (b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; (c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and (d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen. 6 figs.

  11. Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, Jr., Brent J.; Lloyd, W. Randolph; Ward, Michael B.; Epstein, Jonathan S.

    1997-01-01

    A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen.

  12. Problems Associated with Statistical Pattern Recognition of Acoustic Emission Signals in a Compact Tension Fatigue Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were acquired during fatigue testing of an aluminum 2024-T4 compact tension specimen using a commercially available AE system. AE signals from crack extension were identified and separated from noise spikes, signals that reflected from the specimen edges, and signals that saturated the instrumentation. A commercially available software package was used to train a statistical pattern recognition system to classify the signals. The software trained a network to recognize signals with a 91-percent accuracy when compared with the researcher's interpretation of the data. Reasons for the discrepancies are examined and it is postulated that additional preprocessing of the AE data to focus on the extensional wave mode and eliminate other effects before training the pattern recognition system will result in increased accuracy.

  13. Effect of crack curvature on stress intensity factors for ASTM standard compact tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1983-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (SIF) are calculated using the method of lines for the compact tension specimen in tensile and shear loading for curved crack fronts. For the purely elastic case, it was found that as the crack front curvature increases, the SIF value at the center of the specimen decreases while increasing at the surface. For the higher values of crack front curvatures, the maximum value of the SIF occurs at an interior point located adjacent to the surface. A thickness average SIF was computed for parabolically applied shear loading. These results were used to assess the requirements of ASTM standards E399-71 and E399-81 on the shape of crack fronts. The SIF is assumed to reflect the average stress environment near the crack edge.

  14. Digital image correlation method for calculating coefficients of Williams expansion in compact tension specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahi, Majid R.; Moazzami, Mostafa

    2017-03-01

    The digital image correlation (DIC) method is used to obtain the coefficients of higher-order terms in the Williams expansion in a compact tension (CT) specimens made of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The displacement field is determined by the correlation between reference image (i.e., before deformation) and deformed image. The part of displacements resulting from rigid body motion and rotation is eliminated from the displacement field. For a large number of points in the vicinity of the crack tip, an over-determined set of simultaneous linear equations is collected, and by using the fundamental concepts of the least-squares method, the coefficients of the Williams expansion are calculated for pure mode I conditions. The experimental results are then compared with the numerical results calculated by finite element method (FEM). Very good agreement is shown to exist between the DIC and FE results confirming the effectiveness of the DIC technique in obtaining the coefficients of higher order terms of Williams series expansion from the displacement field around the crack tip.

  15. Compliance calibration of specimens used in the R-curve practice. [for compact, crack-line-wedge-loaded, and center-crack tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, D. E.; Sha, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    The compliance calibrations for the compact (CS) and crack-line-wedge-loaded (CLWL) specimens have been determined by experimental measurements and by boundary-collocation analysis. The CS and CLWL specimen configurations were modeled more accurately than those used in previous analytical investigations. Polynomial expressions for the compliance at various stations along the crack line for CS and CLWL specimens are presented. The compliance calibrations for the center-crack tension (CCT) specimen have been determined theoretically by boundary-collocation and finite-element analysis. The calculated compliance values for the CCT specimen are compared with values obtained from the Irwin-Westergaard expression and from a modification to the Irwin-Westergaard expression proposed by Eftis and Liebowitz. The Eftis-Liebowitz expression was found to be in good agreement (plus or minus 2 percent) with both analyses for crack aspect ratios up to 0.8 and for gage half-span to specimen width ratios up to 0.5.

  16. Crack growth behavior under creep-fatigue conditions using compact and double edge notch tension-compression specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Chary, Santosh Balaji

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has recently developed a new standard for creep-fatigue crack growth testing, E 2760-10, that supports testing compact specimens, C(T), under load controlled conditions. C(T) specimens are commonly used for fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth testing under constant-load-amplitude conditions. The use of these specimens is limited to positive load ratios. They are also limited in the amount of crack growth data that can be developed at high stress intensity values due to accumulation of plastic and/or creep strains leading to ratcheting in the specimen. Testing under displacement control can potentially address these shortcomings of the load-controlled tests for which the C(T) geometry is unsuitable. A double edge notch tension-compression, DEN(T-C), specimen to perform displacement controlled creep-fatigue crack growth testing is developed and optimized with the help of finite element and boundary element analyses. Accurate expressions for estimating the fracture mechanics crack tip parameters such as the stress intensity parameter, K, the crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD), and the load-line displacement (LLD) are developed over a wide range of crack sizes for the DEN(T-C) specimen. A new compliance relationship for use in experimental testing has been developed by using the compliance form available in ASTM E-647 standard. Experimentally determined compliance value compared well with the new relation for C15 steel (AISI 1015) and P91 steel tested at room and elevated temperature conditions respectively. Fatigue crack growth rate data generated using the DEN(T-C) specimens on the two metallic materials are in good agreement with the data generated using standard compact specimens; thus validating the stress-intensity factor and the compliance equation for the double edge notch tension-compression specimen. The testing has shown that the DEN(T-C) specimen is prone to crack asymmetry issues. Through

  17. Evolution of Residual Stresses with Fatigue Crack Growth in a Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welded Aluminum Alloy Compact Tension Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, C. D. M.; Zanellato, O.; Edwards, L.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2008-10-01

    The evolution of the residual stresses during fatigue crack growth in a welded compact tension C(T) specimen was measured using neutron diffraction. The measurements were performed by growing a fatigue crack in a sample in situ on a neutron diffractometer. The stresses were found to be unaffected by crack growth through the compressive part of the initial residual stress field. The residual stresses at the crack tip increased when the crack entered the tensile residual stress field to maintain residual stress equilibrium. Finite element (FE) modeling of the evolution of the residual stresses showed good correlation with the experimental results. The residual stress evolution was found to be governed by redistribution of the initial stress field and only slightly affected by fatigue-induced effects at the measured spatial resolution (2 mm × 2 mm × 7 mm).

  18. Ductile Fracture Simulation in a Compact Tension Specimen Using a Triaxiality Dependent Cohesive Zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Faizan Md.; Banerjee, Anuradha

    2014-05-01

    This article reports the results of numerical implementation of a recently proposed versatile cohesive law (TCZM) that incorporates triaxiality of the stress state explicitly in its formulation. TCZM was implemented numerically by devising user-defined elements in ABAQUS v 6.10 for a CT specimen geometry to replicate its fracture behavior as observed in experiments. The measured macroscopic force-deflection curve characteristics show a good agreement with the experimental observations, which illustrates the effectiveness of the TCZM.

  19. SUBCRITICAL CRACK PROPAGATION STUDIES IN HI-NICALON AND HI-NICALON TYPE-S FIBER SiC/SiC COMPOSITES USING COMPACT TENSION SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2007-10-02

    PNNL has performed subcritical crack growth tests under constant applied load at various elevated temperatures in inert environments using subscale compact tension (CT) specimens of two types of SiC-composite materials. The use of CT specimens is preferred over the usual dingle-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens due to more uniform applied stresses over the crack growth region. This study will compare crack growth data taken between two materials as well as specimen geometry types, CT compared to SENB. Plain weave [0/90] Hi-Nicalon CT specimens were tested in argon atmospheres and compared to similar tests of 5-harness satin weave [0/90] Hi-Nicalon Type-S composites. We report here some of the preliminary fractographic examinations of the two materials and an initial assessment of the crack growth data. Additional information on this study will be presented later and also at ICFRM-13 in December.

  20. Back-face strain compliance and electrical-potential crack length calibrations for the disk-shaped compact-tension DC(T) specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C.J.; McNaney, J.M.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    Back-face strain compliance and electrical-potential crack length calibrations have been experimentally determined for the disk-shaped compact-tension DC(T) specimen. Finite-element modeling was used to ascertain the back-face strain distribution at several crack lengths to determine the significance of inconsistent gage placement. The numerical solutions demonstrated good agreement with experiment, especially at smaller crack lengths when the back-face strain gradients are minimal. It is concluded that precise gage placement is only critical when the crack tip closely approaches the back of the test specimen.

  1. A comparison of the fracture behavior of thick laminated composites utilizing compact tension, three-point bend, and center-cracked tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of specimen configuration and laminate thickness on the fracture behavior of notched laminated composites is presented. The behavior of (0/+, 45/90)ns, (0/90)ns and (0/+, - 45)ns graphite/epoxy T300/5208 laminates was studied. When fracture toughness was computed at the failing load of the center-cracked tension specimen, laminate thickness significantly influenced fracture toughness. If fracture toughness was computed at the interception of the 5 percent secant line with the load-COD record, fracture toughness was found to be independent of both laminate thickness and specimen configuration. Defined in this manner, fracture toughness can be physically interpreted as an indicator of the onset of significant notch-tip damage.

  2. On the use of the three point bend and compact tension specimens to measure fracture toughness of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of specimen thickness on the fracture toughness of two laminates and three specimen geometries was investigated. As thickness increased the toughness decreased and approached an asymptotic value that was dependent upon the type of laminate but was practically independent of specimen geometry. Enhanced X-ray photographs and removal of an outside ply revealed that most of the delaminations were surface effects.

  3. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  4. Axial alignment fixtures for tension tests of threaded specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Succop, G.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Description of two axial alignment fixtures that are capable of providing very low load application eccentricity in tension tests of threaded notched cylindrical specimens. The described fixtures are simple in design, very compact, and free from the effects of friction. Also, an evaluation procedure is presented that can be used to qualify any fixture for use in sharp notch tensile tests.

  5. The Assessment and Validation of Mini-Compact Tension Test Specimen Geometry and Progress in Establishing Technique for Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2016-09-01

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of small specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Assessment and validation of mini-CT specimen geometry has been performed on previously well characterized HSST Plate 13B, an A533B class 1 steel. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature measured by these Mini-CT specimens is within the range of To values that were derived from various large fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, the scatter of the fracture toughness values measured by Mini-CT specimens perfectly follows the Weibull distribution function providing additional proof for validation of this geometry for the Master Curve evaluation of rector pressure vessel steels. Moreover, the International collaborative program has been developed to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated weld metal. The program is underway and involves ORNL, CRIEPI, and EPRI.

  6. Analysis of off-axis tension test of wood specimens

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a stress analysis of the off-axis tension test of clear wood specimens based on orthotropic elasticity theory. The effects of Poisson's ratio and shear coupling coefficient on stress distribution are analyzed in detail. The analysis also provides a theoretical foundation for the selection of a 10° grain angle in wood specimens for the...

  7. Impact tension of sheet metals - Effect of initial specimen length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinek, A.; Klepaczko, J. R.

    2003-09-01

    It is well known that a specimen for impact testing of materials must be optimized concerning its dimensions. The main reason is to reduce strain gradients due to the effects of elastic-plastic wave propagation. On the other hand, when Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) is applied for tension test, the net displacement of the specimen ends is very limited, usually from 2.0 to 3.0mm. Thus, to reach maximum strain 0.5 the specimen length must be reduced to dimensions from 4.0mm to 6.0mm. Consequently small diameter, or lateral dimensions in case of flat specimen, must be applied to assure one-dimensional deformation. Such small lengths substantially perturb the real material behavior to be determined. So the main motivation of this study was to perform a systematic analysis, numerical and analytical, to find differences in behavior of short and long specimens loaded in impact tension. The FE code Abaqus/Explicit has been used to simulate several specimen lengths from 10mm to 40mm, and several velocities from 10m/s to 100m/s.

  8. Use of a compact sandwich specimen to evaluate fracture toughness and interfacial bonding of bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lankford, J; Agrawal, C M

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a reliable and statistically valid test to measure the fracture toughness of small specimens of bone, and by extension, prosthetic materials, using a compact sandwich specimen. Samples of bone were sandwiched between holders of a different material and using this specimen configuration a new technique was developed to test the fracture toughness of the bone interlayer. The effects of different specimens sizes and holder materials were investigated empirically. Using finite element analysis a correction factor was determined to account for the finite thickness of the interlayer and the analytical solutions governing the test specimen were accordingly modified. Bulk compact tension specimens of bone were tested for comparison. Both wet and dry bone were evaluated and the fracture surface morphology characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate no statistically significant differences between the fracture toughness values obtained from the compact tension and sandwich specimens. The application of this technique to the testing of interfacial bonding between bone and biomaterials is discussed.

  9. Verification of effective thicknesses for side-grooved compact specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The definition of effective thicknesses of the ASTM standard 25 percent side-grooved compact specimens to calculate the elastic compliance, elastic SIF, and elastic-plastic J integral is reevaluated. 3D elastic-plastic analyses of polane-strain, smooth, and 25 percent side-grooved compact specimen models are conducted using the ZIP3D code. Calculated compliance, SIFs, and J-integrals are compared with E-813 solutions.

  10. Stress distribution in composite flatwise tension test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Curtis A.; Pereira, J. Michael

    1993-01-01

    A finite element analysis was conducted to determine the stress distribution in typical graphite/epoxy composite flat wise tension (FWT) specimens under normal loading conditions. The purpose of the analysis was to determine the relationship between the applied load and the stress in the sample to evaluate the validity of the test as a means of measuring the out-of-plane strength of a composite laminate. Three different test geometries and three different material lay ups were modeled. In all cases, the out-of-plane component of stress in the test section was found to be uniform, with no stress concentrations, and very close to the nominal applied stress. The stress in the sample was found to be three-dimensional, and the magnitude of in-plane normal and shear stresses varied with the anisotropy of the test specimen. However, in the cases considered here, these components of stress were much smaller than the out-of-plane normal stress. The geometry of the test specimen had little influence on the results. It was concluded that the flat wise tension test provides a good measure of the out-of-plane strength for the representative materials that were studied.

  11. Nitinol Fatigue Investigation on Stent-Finish Specimens Using Tension-Tension Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Pike, K.; Zipse, A.; Schlun, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nitinol fatigue strain limit versus both strain amplitude (range 0.25-1.25%) and mean strain (1.0, 2.0, and 4.0%) was investigated using a tension-tension method. In order to apply the fatigue testing results to a nitinol stent and evaluate stent fatigue performance, the dog-bone style specimens were processed from the same raw material common to implantable stent manufacturing, i.e., similar nitinol tubing, surface quality, and electropolished surface. To simulate a physiological environment, the tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted in water at 37 °C. This strain-controlled fatigue test was conducted with a run-out set at 106 cycles. The fatigue strain limit at 106 cycles as well as the mean strain effect and the effects of inclusions are discussed. Fatigue results appeared in a bi-modal pattern when the strain amplitude was at a level between too high, which made all specimens to fail, and too low, which allowed all specimens to survive.

  12. Device for tensioning test specimens within an hermetically sealed chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. K.; Shady, D. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The device is characterized by a support column adapted to be received within an insulated, hermetically sealable chamber. A plurality of anchor pins are mounted on the column for releasibly connecting thereto a plurality of test specimens. A plurality of axially displaceable pull rods are received by the column in coaxial alignment with the anchor pins. One end of each pull rod is provided with a coupling for connecting the pull rod to a test specimen. The opposite end of the pull rod is entended through a cover plate and adapted to be connected with a remotely related linear actuator through a connecting link including a load cell for measuring stress as the pull rod is placed in tension by the actuator.

  13. Treatment of singularities in a middle-crack tension specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element analysis of a middle-crack tension specimen subjected to mode I loading was performed to study the stress singularity along the crack front. The specimen was modeled using 20-node isoparametric elements with collapsed nonsingular elements at the crack front. The displacements and stresses from the analysis were used to estimate the power of singularities, by a log-log regression analysis, along the crack front. Analyses showed that finite-sized cracked bodies have two singular stress fields. Because of two singular stress fields near the free surface and the classical square root singularity elsewhere, the strain energy release rate appears to be an appropriate parameter all along the crack front.

  14. Crack displacements for J/I/ testing with compact specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    The suggestion is made that the standard compact specimen (with opening displacement measured at the crack mouth) may be entirely suitable for J-integral determinations if a very simple conversion factor is used. Experimental determination of J-integral values requires the measurement of displacements at the points of load application. For the compact specimen this is a difficult task. On the basis of studies reported by Newman (1979) and Fisher and Buzzard (1980), it is suggested that for any J-based test the standard compact specimen can be used. A very good approximation to the load point displacement (within 3.4 percent) can be obtained by measuring the crack mouth displacement and multiplying by 0.773.

  15. Fracture toughness measurements with subsize disk compact specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Special fixtures and test methods have been developed for testing small disk compact specimens (1.25 mm diam by 4.6 mm thick). Specimens of European type 316L austenitic stainless steel were irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 or 250 C and tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250 C. Results show that irradiation to this dose level at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the test temperature increases. Irradiation at 250 C is more damaging than at 90 C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The testing shows that it is possible to generate useful fracture toughness data with a small disk compact specimens.

  16. Crack Closure Characteristics Considering Center Cracked and Compact Tension Specimens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    adjacent elements differed in size by no more than a factor of 2. The fine mesh elements near the crack tip were much smaller than the -7 2CTS with an area...N .1- £KO.~.-N 0 0 td t + U.Us* 0 C.+ *4 w O mcow K O4 ’ 4u 0. X Ulf! W I 2 0 Z K0 NO- N Cos.@-0S W.N a-1 WW m .M0 000004.*0 00 4-W-M. R800*x -3-o" 0

  17. Experimental compliance calibration of the compact fracture toughness specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. M.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Compliances and stress intensity coefficients were determined over crack length to width ratios from 0.1 to 0.8. Displacements were measured at the load points, load line, and crack mouth. Special fixturing was devised to permit accurate measurement of load point displacement. The results are in agreement with the currently used results of boundary collocation analyses. The errors which occur in stress intensity coefficients or specimen energy input determinations made from load line displacement measurements rather than from load point measurements are emphasized.

  18. SLOW BEND-TENSION TEST CORRELATIONS OF SHORT BEAMS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE CHARPY-TYPE SPECIMEN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    longitudinal compressive stress of the unnotched Charpy specimen correlated well with the uniaxial tension test yield stress data. Also, the yield loads...unnotched Charpy yield-load data. Finally, it is shown that it is possible to calculate from uniaxial tension test data the maximum bending load of an

  19. Mode 1 crack surface displacements for a round compact specimen subject to a couple and force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1979-01-01

    Mode I displacement coefficients along the crack surface are presented for a radially cracked round compact specimen, treated as a plane elastostatic problem, subjected to two types of loading; a uniform tensile stress and a nominal bending stress distribution across the net section. By superposition the resultant displacement coefficient or the corresponding influence coefficient can be obtained for any practical load location. Load line displacements are presented for A/D ratios ranging from 0.40 to 0.95, where A is the crack length measured from the crack mouth to the crack tip and D is the specimen diameter. Through a linear extrapolation procedure crack mouth displacements are also obtained. Experimental evidence shows that the results are valid over the range of A/D ratios analyzed for a practical pin loaded round compact specimen.

  20. Non-reactive solute diffusion in unconfined and confined specimens of a compacted soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Catherine S; Davis, Melanie M; Shackelford, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    The effect of specimen confinement on the determination of the effective diffusion coefficients, D*, for chloride, a non-reactive (non-adsorbing) solute, diffusing in a compacted soil was evaluated. The diffusion tests were performed by placing an acetic acid/sodium acetate buffer solution containing ZnCl2 (pH approximately 4.8) in a reservoir in contact with unconfined and confined specimens of a compacted sand-clay mixture for test durations of 7 or 14 d. The concentrations of chloride in the reservoir were measured as a function of time during the test, as well as a function of depth within the specimen at the end of the test. The resulting concentration distributions were analyzed using two models to Fick's second law for non-reactive solute diffusion in porous media, viz., (1) an analytical model assuming the porosity distribution could be represented by a single, weighted mean porosity and (2) a commercially available model, POLLUTE, that directly accounted for the measured porosity distribution. The D* for unconfined specimens based on the analytical model tended to be overestimated by a factor ranging from 1.13 to 1.59 relative to the D* using POLLUTE, whereas the D* values based on both methods for confined specimens typically were more consistent. In addition, the D* for unconfined specimens was greater than the D* for confined specimens when soil concentrations were used for the analysis, presumably due to the higher porosity for the unconfined specimens relative to the confined specimens. Analyses based on reservoir concentrations were inconsistent and contradictory in some cases, suggesting that the D* values based on soil concentrations were more reliable.

  1. Cyclic tension compression testing of AHSS flat specimens with digital image correlation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoerr, Lay; Sever, Nimet; McKune, Paul; Faath, Timo

    2013-12-01

    A cyclic tension-compression testing program was conducted on flat specimens of TPN-W®780 (Three Phase Nano) and DP980 (Dual Phase) Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). This experimental method was enabled utilizing an anti-buckling clamping device performed in a test machine, and the surface strains along the thickness edge are measured with a three-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system. The in-plane pre-strain and reversed strain values, at specified strain rates, are investigated to observe the potential plastic flow and the nonlinear strain hardening behavior of the materials. The validity of the test results is established with the monotonic tension tests, to substantiate the true stress-strain curves corrected for the frictional and biaxial stresses induced by the clamping device. A process method for analyzing the correction using a macro script is shown to simplify the output of the true stress-strain results for material model calibration. An in progress study to validate the forming and spring-back predictive capabilities of a calibrated TPN-W®780 complex material model to an actual stamping of an automotive component will demonstrate the usefulness of the experimental cyclic test method. Suggestions to improve the testing, strain analysis and calibration of the model parameters are proposed for augmented use of this test method.

  2. Plane-stress fracture of compact and notch-bend specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Thin-gaged or high toughness materials containing cracks usually fail in a ductile manner with nominal failure stresses approaching the ultimate strength of the material. For such materials, a two-parameter fracture criterion was developed. An equation which related the linear elastic stress-intensity factor, elastic nominal stress, and two material parameters was previously derived and has been used as a fracture criterion for surface- and through-cracked specimens under tensile loading. This two-parameter fracture criterion was rederived in a more general form and was extended to compact and notch-bend fracture specimens. A close correlation was found between experimental and predicted failure stresses.

  3. Comparison of compliance results for the wedge-loaded compact specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the ratio of stress intensity factor to crack-mouth displacement as a function of crack length are presented for the wedge-loaded compact specimen. Comparisons are made between experimental compliance results, numerical results from collocation methods, and deep-crack limit-solution results. Applications are for crack-arrest and stress-corrosion-cracking tests for metals and other materials under predominantly linear elastic conditions.

  4. Corrosive and cytotoxic properties of compact specimens and microparticles of Ni-Cr dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Ljubisa; Vucevic, Dragana; Radovic, Ljubica; Djordjevic, Snezana; Nikacevic, Milutin; Colic, Miodrag

    2014-04-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental alloys have been widely used in prosthodontic practice, but there is a permanent concern about their biocompatibility due to the release of metal ions. This is especially important when Ni-Cr metal microparticles are incorporated into gingival tissue during prosthodontic procedures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine and compare the corrosion and cytotoxic properties of compact specimens and microparticles of Ni-Cr dental alloy. Ni-Cr alloy, Remanium CSe bars (4 mm diameter), were made by the standard casting method and then cut into 0.5-mm-thick disks. Metal particles were obtained by scraping the bars using a diamond instrument for crown preparation. The microstructure was observed by an optical microscope. Quantitative determination and morphological and dimensional characterization of metal particles were carried out by a scanning electron microscope and Leica Application Suite software for image analysis. Corrosion was studied by conditioning the alloy specimens in the RPMI 1640 medium, containing 10% fetal calf serum in an incubator with 5% CO2 for 72 hours at 37°C. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry was used to assess metal ion release. The cytotoxity of conditioning medium (CM) was investigated on L929 cells using an MTT test. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. After casting, the microstructure of the Remanium CSe compact specimen composed of Ni, Cr, Mo, Si, Fe, Al, and Co had a typical dendritic structure. Alloy microparticles had an irregular shape with a wide size range: from less than 1 μm to more than 100 μm. The release of metal ions, especially Ni and Mo from microparticles, was significantly higher, compared to the compact alloy specimen. The CM prepared from compact alloy was not cytotoxic at any tested dilutions, whereas CM from alloy microparticles showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity (90% CM and 45% CM versus control; p < 0.005). Ni-Cr microparticles showed less

  5. Crack-opening displacements in center-crack, compact, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens. [of flat plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical crack-opening displacements for center-crack, compact, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens (reported in the ASTM Proposed Recommended Practice for R-Curve Determination (1974)) disagree with experimental measurements in the literature. The disagreement is a result of using approximate specimen configurations and load representation to obtain the theoretical displacements. An improved method of boundary collocation is presented which was used to obtain the theoretical displacements in these three specimen types; the actual specimen configurations and more accurate load representation were used. In the analysis of crack-opening displacements in the compact and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens, the effects of the pin-loaded holes were also included. The theoretical calculations agree with the experimental measurements reported in the literature. Also examined are accurate polynomial expressions for crack-opening displacements in both compact and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens.

  6. Plane-stress fracture of compact and notch-bend specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Thin-gaged or high toughness materials containing cracks usually fail in a ductile manner with nominal failure stresses approaching the ultimate strength of the material. For such materials, a two-parameter fracture criterion was developed. An equation which related the linear elastic stress-intensity factor, elastic nominal stress, and two material parameters has previously been derived and has been used as a fracture criterion for surface- and through-cracked specimens under tensile loading. In the present paper the two-parameter fracture criterion was rederived in a more general form and was extended to compact and notch-bend fracture specimens. A close correlation was found between experimental and calculated failure stresses.

  7. Plane-stress fracture of compact and notch-bend specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Thin-gaged or high toughness materials containing cracks usually fail in a ductile manner with nominal failure stresses approaching the ultimate strength of the material. For such materials, a two-parameter fracture criterion was developed. An equation which related the linear elastic stress-intensity factor, elastic nominal stress, and two material parameters has previously been derived and has been used as a fracture criterion for surface- and through-cracked specimens under tensile loading. In the present paper the two-parameter fracture criterion was rederived in a more general form and was extended to compact and notch-bend fracture specimens. A close correlation was found between experimental and calculated failure stresses.

  8. Monitoring of Grouting Compactness in a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct Using Piezoceramic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyong; Kong, Qingzhao; Wang, Wenxi; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-08-22

    A post-tensioning tendon duct filled with grout can effectively prevent corrosion of the reinforcement, maintain bonding behavior between the reinforcement and concrete, and enhance the load bearing capacity of concrete structures. In practice, grouting of the post-tensioning tendon ducts always causes quality problems, which may reduce structural integrity and service life, and even cause accidents. However, monitoring of the grouting compactness is still a challenge due to the invisibility of the grout in the duct during the grouting process. This paper presents a stress wave-based active sensing approach using piezoceramic transducers to monitor the grouting compactness in real time. A segment of a commercial tendon duct was used as research object in this study. One lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoceramic transducer with marble protection, called a smart aggregate (SA), was bonded on the tendon and installed in the tendon duct. Two PZT patch sensors were mounted on the top outside surface of the duct, and one PZT patch sensor was bonded on the bottom outside surface of the tendon duct. In the active sensing approach, the SA was used as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the PZT sensors were utilized to detect the wave response. Cement or grout in the duct functions as a wave conduit, which can propagate the stress wave. If the cement or grout is not fully filled in the tendon duct, the top PZT sensors cannot receive much stress wave energy. The experimental procedures simulated four stages during the grout pouring process, which includes empty status, half grouting, 90% grouting, and full grouting of the duct. Experimental results show that the bottom PZT sensor can detect the signal when the grout level increases towards 50%, when a conduit between the SA and PZT sensor is formed. The top PZT sensors cannot receive any signal until the grout process is completely finished. The wavelet packet-based energy analysis was adopted in this research to

  9. Monitoring of Grouting Compactness in a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct Using Piezoceramic Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tianyong; Kong, Qingzhao; Wang, Wenxi; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    A post-tensioning tendon duct filled with grout can effectively prevent corrosion of the reinforcement, maintain bonding behavior between the reinforcement and concrete, and enhance the load bearing capacity of concrete structures. In practice, grouting of the post-tensioning tendon ducts always causes quality problems, which may reduce structural integrity and service life, and even cause accidents. However, monitoring of the grouting compactness is still a challenge due to the invisibility of the grout in the duct during the grouting process. This paper presents a stress wave-based active sensing approach using piezoceramic transducers to monitor the grouting compactness in real time. A segment of a commercial tendon duct was used as research object in this study. One lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoceramic transducer with marble protection, called a smart aggregate (SA), was bonded on the tendon and installed in the tendon duct. Two PZT patch sensors were mounted on the top outside surface of the duct, and one PZT patch sensor was bonded on the bottom outside surface of the tendon duct. In the active sensing approach, the SA was used as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the PZT sensors were utilized to detect the wave response. Cement or grout in the duct functions as a wave conduit, which can propagate the stress wave. If the cement or grout is not fully filled in the tendon duct, the top PZT sensors cannot receive much stress wave energy. The experimental procedures simulated four stages during the grout pouring process, which includes empty status, half grouting, 90% grouting, and full grouting of the duct. Experimental results show that the bottom PZT sensor can detect the signal when the grout level increases towards 50%, when a conduit between the SA and PZT sensor is formed. The top PZT sensors cannot receive any signal until the grout process is completely finished. The wavelet packet-based energy analysis was adopted in this research to

  10. Catalogue of the J-Q trajectories for CC(T) and SEN(T) specimens in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graba, Marcin

    2011-09-01

    In this paper a short theoretical background about elastic-plastic fracture mechanics is presented and the O'Dowd-Shih theory is discussed. Using FEM, the values of the Q-stress determined for various elastic-plastic materials for two specimens in tension — SEN(T) specimen and CC(T) specimen are presented. The influence of geometry of the specimen, crack length and material properties (work-hardening exponent and yield stress) on the Q-parameter are tested. The numerical results were approximated by closed form formulas. The results are summarized in a catalogue of the Q-stress value, which may be used in engineering analysis for calculation of the real fracture toughness and the stress distribution near crack tip.

  11. Spider Silk Peptide Is a Compact, Linear Nanospring Ideal for Intracellular Tension Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Michael D; Zhou, Ruobo; Conway, Daniel E; Lanzano, Luca; Gratton, Enrico; Schwartz, Martin A; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-03-09

    Recent development and applications of calibrated, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tension sensors have led to a new understanding of single molecule mechanotransduction in a number of biological systems. To expand the range of accessible forces, we systematically measured FRET versus force trajectories for 25, 40, and 50 amino acid peptide repeats derived from spider silk. Single molecule fluorescence-force spectroscopy showed that the peptides behaved as linear springs instead of the nonlinear behavior expected for a disordered polymer. Our data are consistent with a compact, rodlike structure that measures 0.26 nm per 5 amino acid repeat that can stretch by 500% while maintaining linearity, suggesting that the remarkable elasticity of spider silk proteins may in part derive from the properties of individual chains. We found the shortest peptide to have the widest range of force sensitivity: between 2 pN and 11 pN. Live cell imaging of the three tension sensor constructs inserted into vinculin showed similar force values around 2.4 pN. We also provide a lookup table for force versus intracellular FRET for all three constructs.

  12. Magma differentiation in shallow sills controlled by compaction and surface tension: San Rafael desert, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Savov, I. P.; Connor, C.

    2010-12-01

    Veinlets, veins, sheet or layers of syenite are common structures found in alkaline basalt sills. The mechanism usually invoked to explain their formation are liquid immiscibility, multiple intrusion or crystal fractionation from primitive mafic melt. Syenite veins of few centimeters to sheets of up to 1-2 m thick are ubiquitous in remarkably well-exposed sills of the San Rafael subvolcanic field in the Colorado Plateau, Utah. In some of these exposures we have found an intriguing configuration in which the main body of the alkaline sill is underlain by a lower density sheet of syenite of ~ 1 m thick. The contact is flat and is not a chilled margin, therefore a multiple intrusion scenario with long intervals between injections can be disregarded. This implies that both layers were fluid at the time of magma emplacement. As the more felsic less dense syenite is at the bottom of the sill any mechanism governed exclusively by bouyancy would be problematic. In an attempt to shed light on this apparent riddle we propose the following geological scenario: The sill is built by continuous injections. Magma starts to cool and fractional crystallization operates at this stage to differentiate the alkaline magma into syenite. By the time ~60% of crystallization is attained the system can be described as two-phase flow consisting of pore-syenite melt in hot-creeping matrix. The forces acting to segregate melt into veins or sheets are the gravitational force and surface tension. When surface tension is stronger than the gravitational force, differences in average curvature or surface tension translates into pressure differences that drive melt flow from low to high porosity regions. If the last injections occur at the bottom of the sill a syenite layer may be formed. With the aid of dimensional analysis and two-phase numerical models that account for gravitational compaction and surface tension effects, we explore the conditions that allow for centimeter-scale veins to meter

  13. Ductile Fracture of Dynamically Loaded Naval Structures-Compact Tension Specimen Tests and Analyses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    and After Use in Test ........................ ............ 91 * A. 2 - Procedure for Calibrating Fotonic Displacement Sensor .............. 93 A. 3...Typical Characteristics of the Fotonic Sensor ...................... 93 A. 4 - Fotonic Sensor Calibrations for Different . Target Conditions...95 - A. 5 - Sensitivity of Fotonic Sensor for Simulated Test Condition ............................. .. ....... ......... 95 A. 6

  14. A compact and versatile microfluidic probe for local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cors, J. F.; Lovchik, R. D.; Delamarche, E.; Kaigala, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) is a non-contact, scanning microfluidic technology for local (bio)chemical processing of surfaces based on hydrodynamically confining nanoliter volumes of liquids over tens of micrometers. We present here a compact MFP (cMFP) that can be used on a standard inverted microscope and assist in the local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens. The cMFP has a footprint of 175 × 100 × 140 mm3 and can scan an area of 45 × 45 mm2 on a surface with an accuracy of ±15 μm. The cMFP is compatible with standard surfaces used in life science laboratories such as microscope slides and Petri dishes. For ease of use, we developed self-aligned mounted MFP heads with standardized "chip-to-world" and "chip-to-platform" interfaces. Switching the processing liquid in the flow confinement is performed within 90 s using a selector valve with a dead-volume of approximately 5 μl. We further implemented height-compensation that allows a cMFP head to follow non-planar surfaces common in tissue and cellular ensembles. This was shown by patterning different macroscopic copper-coated topographies with height differences up to 750 μm. To illustrate the applicability to tissue processing, 5 μm thick M000921 BRAF V600E+ melanoma cell blocks were stained with hematoxylin to create contours, lines, spots, gradients of the chemicals, and multiple spots over larger areas. The local staining was performed in an interactive manner using a joystick and a scripting module. The compactness, user-friendliness, and functionality of the cMFP will enable it to be adapted as a standard tool in research, development and diagnostic laboratories, particularly for the interaction with tissues and cells.

  15. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis of shallow cracks in single-edge-crack-tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional, elastic-plastic, finite element results are presented for single-edge crack-tension specimens with several shallow crack-length-to-width ratios (0.05 less than or equal to a/W less than or equal to 0.5). Results showed the need to model the initial yield plateau in the stress-strain behavior to accurately model deformation of the A36 steel specimens. The crack-tip-opening-displacement was found to be linearly proportional to the crack-mouth-opening displacement. A new deformation dependent plastic-eta factor equation is presented for calculating the J-integral from test load-displacement records. This equation was shown to be accurate for all crack lengths considered.

  16. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis of shallow cracks in single-edge-crack-tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional, elastic-plastic, finite-element results are presented for single-edge crack-tension specimens with several shallow crack-length-to-width ratios (0.05 less than or equal to a/W less than or equal to 0.5). Results showed the need to model the initial yield plateau in the stress-strain behavior to accurately model deformation of the A36 steel specimens. The crack-tip-opening-displacement was found to be linearly proportional to the crack-mouth-opening displacement. A new deformation dependent plastic-eta factor equation is presented for calculating the J-integral from test load-displacement records. This equation was shown to be accurate for all crack lengths considered.

  17. Comparison tests and experimental compliance calibration of the proposed standard round compact plane strain fracture toughness specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. M.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Standard round specimen fracture test results compared satisfactorily with results from standard rectangular compact specimens machined from the same material. The location of the loading pin holes was found to provide adequate strength in the load bearing region for plane strain fracture toughness testing. Excellent agreement was found between the stress intensity coefficient values obtained from compliance measurements and the analytic solution proposed for inclusion in the standard test method. Load displacement measurements were made using long armed displacement gages and hollow loading cylinders. Gage points registered on the loading hole surfaces through small holes in the walls of the loading cylinders.

  18. Effect of numerical parameters on characterizing the hardening behavior of ductile uniaxial tension specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, Theresa Elena; Dion, Kristin; Laing, John Robert; Corona, Edmundo; Breivik, Nicole L.; Wellman, Gerald William; Shelton, Timothy R.

    2010-11-01

    Many problems of practical importance involve ductile materials that undergo very large strains, in many cases to the point of failure. Examples include structures subjected to impact or blast loads, energy absorbing devices subjected to significant crushing, cold-forming manufacturing processes and others. One of the most fundamental pieces of data that is required in the analysis of this kind of problems is the fit of the uniaxial stress-strain curve of the material. A series of experiments where mild steel plates were punctured with a conical indenter provided a motivation to characterize the true stress-strain curve until the point of failure of this material, which displayed significant ductility. The hardening curve was obtained using a finite element model of the tensile specimens that included a geometric imperfection in the form of a small reduction in the specimen width to initiate necking. An automated procedure iteratively adjusted the true stress-strain curve fit used as input until the predicted engineering stress-strain curve matched experimental measurements. Whereas the fitting is relatively trivial prior to reaching the ultimate engineering stress, the fit of the softening part of the engineering stress-stain curve is highly dependent on the finite element parameters such as element formulation and initial geometry. Results by two hexahedral elements are compared. The first is a standard, under-integrated, uniform-strain element with hourglass control. The second is a modified selectively-reduced-integration element. In addition, the effects of element size, aspect ratio and hourglass control characteristics are investigated. The effect of adaptively refining the mesh based on the aspect ratio of the deformed elements is also considered. The results of the study indicate that for the plate puncture problem, characterizing the material with the same element formulation and size as used in the plate models is beneficial. On the other hand, using

  19. Stress-intensity factors and crack-opening displacements for round compact specimens. [fracture toughness of metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional, boundary collocation stress analysis was used to analyze various round compact specimens. The influence of the round external boundary and of pin-loaded holes on stress intensity factors and crack opening displacements was determined as a function of crack-length-to-specimen-width ratios. A wide-range equation for the stress intensity factors was developed. Equations for crack-surface displacements and load-point displacements were also developed. In addition, stress intensity factors were calculated from compliance methods to demonstrate that load-displacement records must be made at the loading points and not along the crack line for crack-length-to-specimen-width ratios less than about 0.4.

  20. Numerical Compliance and Stress Intensity Factor Calibrations of MRL (Materials Research Laboratories) Compact Specimens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Division, Library Trans-Australia Airlines, Library Qantas Airways Limited Gas and Fuel Corporation of Victoria, Manager Scientific Services... Analysis 1 2.2 Crack Tip Modelling 1 2.3 Pin Loading 2 2.4 Normalised Compliance 2 2.5 Normalised Stress Intensity Factor 2 3. NUMERICAL ANALYSES 3 3.1...equations which have been fitted to the results for convenience. , -7-:.-" 2. ANALYTICAL DETAILS 2.1 Specimens and Analysis " The ASTM standard

  1. Effects of Holding Time on Thermomechanical Fatigue Properties of Compacted Graphite Iron Through Tests with Notched Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrat, Sepideh; Riemslag, Ton A. C.; Kestens, Leo A. I.; Petrov, Roumen H.; Janssen, Michael; Sietsma, Jilt

    2013-05-01

    In cylinder heads of compacted graphite iron (CGI), the heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermomechanical fatigue (TMF). Traditionally, TMF behavior is studied by thermal cycling of smooth specimens. The resulting number of cycles to failure ( N f) constitutes a single parameter that can be used to predict actual service failures. Nevertheless, there are also some drawbacks of the conventional testing procedures, most noticeably the prolonged testing times and a considerable scatter in test results. To address these drawbacks, TMF tests were performed using notched specimens, resulting in shorter testing times with less scatter. In the case of cast iron, artificial notches do not necessarily change the TMF behavior since the inherent graphite particles behave as internal notches. Using a notch depth of 0.2 mm, the effect of prolonged holding times (HT) on TMF lifetime was studied and a clear effect was found. Extended holding times were also found to be accompanied by relaxation of compressive stresses, causing higher tensile stresses to develop in the subsequent low temperature stages of the TMF cycles. The lifetimes in notched CGI specimens can be predicted by the Paris' fatigue crack growth model. This model was used to differentiate between the individual effects of stress level and holding times on TMF lifetime. Microstructural changes were evaluated by analyzing quantitative data sets obtained by orientation contrast microscopy based on electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD).

  2. Apparatus for pre-stress-straining rod-type specimens in tension for in-situ passive fracture testing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Jy-an [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Ken C [Oak Ridge, TN; Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN

    2013-07-31

    A stress-strain testing apparatus imposes a stress-strain on a specimen while disposed in a controlled environment. Each end of the specimen is fastened to an end cap and a strain gage is attached to the specimen. An adjusting mechanism and a compression element are disposed between the end caps forming a frame for applying forces to the end caps and thereby stress-straining the specimen. The adjusting mechanism may be extended or retracted to increase or decrease the imposed stress-strain on the specimen, and the stress-strain is measured by the strain gage on the specimen while the apparatus is exposed to an environment such as high pressure hydrogen. Strain gages may be placed on the frame to measure stress-strains in the frame that may be caused by the environment.

  3. Stress intensity factors for large aspect ratio surface and corner cracks at a semi-circular notch in a tension specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stress intensity factor solutions for semielliptic surface and quarter-elliptic corner cracks emanating from a semicircular notch in a tension specimen are presented. A three-dimensional finite-element analysis in conjunction with the equivalent domain integral was used to calculate stress intensity factors (SIF). SIF solutions for surface or corner crack (crack length to depth ratio of 2) at a notch are presented for a wide range of crack sizes and notch radii. Results showed that the SIF are larger for larger crack lengths and for larger notch radii. The SIF are nearly constant all along the crack front for deep surface cracks and for all corner cracks analysed.

  4. Microtopographic Analysis of Part-Through Crack Growth in Alloy 304L Plate-type Tension Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Lloyd; E. D. Steffler; J. H. Jackson

    2003-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) used their microtopography analysis method to examine the fracture process in two Type 304 stainless steel, part-through crack, plate-type specimens. The two specimens had different initial defect geometries – one being nearly semicircular and moderately deep, the other being longer and shallower. The microtopographic analysis allowed determination of parameters such as: the crack tip opening displacement at initiation; the crack tip opening angle during ductile tearing; the crack mouth opening at through-thickness penetration; and, the incremental crack front profiles throughout the crack growth process. In essence, these data provide a nearly complete description of the entire ductile fracture process for the two cases examined. We describe the microtopographic analysis procedure as it was applied to these two specimens. Crack growth profiles predicted by the microtopography analysis are compared with those shown by heat tinting of the actual fracture subsurface, showing excellent agreement. Several areas of ductile crack growth theory relevant to the microtopographic method of analysis are discussed, including possible effects on the accuracy of the analyses. The accuracy of the resultant data is reviewed, and found acceptable or better. Areas for additional development of the microtopography method to improve accuracy in three-dimensional ductile fracture analysis are identified.

  5. Specimen Machining for the Study of the Effect of Swelling on CGR in PWR Environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the preparation of ten specimens to be used for the study of the effect of swelling on the propagation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking cracks. Four compact tension specimens, four microscopy plates and two tensile specimens were machined from a AISI 304 material that was irradiated up to 33 dpa. The specimens had been machined such as to represent the behavior of materials with 3.7%swelling and <2% swelling.

  6. Compacted sewage sludge as a barrier for tailings: the heavy metal speciation and total organic carbon content in the compacted sludge specimen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huyuan; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Bo; Wang, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) was the main environmental problem facing the mining industry. For AMD had high heavy metals content and low pH, the compacted sewage sludge might be a barrier for tailings whose oxidation and weathering produced AMD, with its own carbon source, microorganism reduction ability and impermeability. To study the heavy metals environmental risk, under the simulate AMD, the deionized water (DW), and the pH 2.1 sulfuric acid water (SA) seepage conditions, respectively, the changes of the chemical speciation of heavy metals Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC) content in the compacted sewage sludge were assessed in the different periods. The results indicated according to the distribution of heavy metals, the potential mobility was for Cd: 6.08 under AMD, 7.48 under SA, ∞ under DW; for Cu: 0.08 under AMD, 0.17 under SA, 0.59 under DW; for Fe: 0.15 under AMD, 0.22 under SA, 0.22 under DW; for Ni: 2.60 under AMD, 1.69 under SA, 1.67 under DW; and for Zn: 0.15 under AMD, 0.23 under SA and 0.21 under DW at the second checking time. TOC content firstly decreased from 67.62±0% to 66.29±0.35%, then increased to 67.74±0.65% under the AMD seepage while TOC decreased to 63.30±0.53%, then to 61.33±0.37% under the DW seepage, decreased to 63.86±0.41%, then to 63.28±0.49% under SA seepage. That indicated under the AMD seepage, the suitable microorganisms communities in the compacted sewage sludge were activated. And the heavy metals environmental risk of compacted sewage sludge was lower with AMD condition than with other two. So the compacted sewage sludge as a barrier for tailings was feasible as the aspect of environmental risk assessment.

  7. Effect of laminate thickness and specimen configuration on the fracture of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the effect of laminate thickness on graphite/epoxy laminates in the present measurements of fracture toughness in center cracked tension specimens, compact tension specimens, and three-point bend specimens. Crack tip damage development prior to fracture is also studied. The results obtained show fracture toughness to be a function of laminate thickness, being in all cases independent of crack size. The fracture surface of all thick laminates was uniform in the interior and self-similar with the starter notch. With only one exception, the fracture toughness of the thicker laminates was relatively independent of specimen configuration.

  8. Stress intensity factor in a tapered specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue-Hui, L.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The general problem of a tapered specimen containing an edge crack is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations. The equations are solved and the stress intensity factor is calculated for a compact and for a slender tapered specimen, the latter simulating the double cantilever beam. The results are obtained primarily for a pair of concentrated forces and for crack surface wedge forces. The stress intensity factors are also obtained for a long strip under uniform tension which contains inclined edge cracks.

  9. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-01

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a "thick" biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  10. J-R Curve Determination for Disk-shaped Compact Specimens Based on the Normalization Method and Direct Current Potential Drop Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    Material ductile fracture toughness can be described by J-integral versus crack extension relationship (J-R curve). As a conventional J-R curve measurement method, unloading compliance (UC) becomes impractical in elevated temperature testing due to relaxation of the material and a friction induced back-up shape of the J-R curve. In addition, the UC method may underpredict the crack extension for standard disk-shaped compact (DC(T)) specimens. In order to address these issues, the normalization method and direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique were applied for determining J-R curves at 24 C and 500 C for 0.18T DC(T) specimens made from type 316L stainless steel. For comparison purchase, the UC method was also applied in 24 C tests. The normalization method was able to yield valid J-R curves in all tests. The J-R curves from the DCPD technique need adjustment to account for the potential drop induced by plastic deformation, crack blunting, etc. and after applying a newly-developed DCPD adjustment procedure, the post-adjusted DCPD J-R curves essentially matched J-R curves from the normalization method. In contrast, the UC method underpredicted the crack extension in all tests resulting in substantial deviation in the derived J-R curves manifested by high Jq values than the normalization or DCPD method. Only for tests where the UC method underpredicted the crack extension by a very small value, J-R curves determined by the UC method were similar to those determined by the normalization or DCPD method.

  11. Fracture Tests on Thin Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy for Specimens with and Without Anti-Buckling Guides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William M.; Newman, James C., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of fracture test were conducted to determine the effects of specimen type specimen width and buckling on the fracture behavior of cracked thin sheet (0.063 inch thick) 2024-T3 aluminum alloy. A summary of the experimental measurements is presented for fracture tests conducted on two specimen types and various widths. Middle-crack tension M(T) and compact tension C(T) specimens were tested in the L-T and T-L orientation with duplicate tests for each condition. Four widths (W= 3, 12, 24, and 40 inch) were tested for the middle-crack tension specimens, and three widths (W=2, 4, and 6 inch) were tested for the compact tension specimens. The M(T) specimens were tested in either a constrained (out-of-plane displacements restrained with antibuckling guides) or unconstrained conditions were the specimen was free to buckle out of plane Measurements were made of load against crack extension for all specimens.

  12. Wide-range displacement expressions for standard fracture mechanics specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. A.; Gross, B.; Leger, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wide-range algebraic expressions for the displacement of cracked fracture mechanics specimens are developed. For each specimen two equations are given: one for the displacement as a function of crack length, the other for crack length as a function of displacement. All the specimens that appear in ASTM Test for Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials (E 399) are represented in addition to the crack mouth displacement for a pure bending specimen. For the compact tension sample and the disk-shaped compact tension sample, the displacement at the crack mouth and at the load line are both considered. Only the crack mouth displacements for the arc-shaped tension samples are presented. The agreement between the displacements or crack lengths predicted by the various equations and the corresponding numerical data from which they were developed are nominally about 3 percent or better. These expressions should be useful in all types of fracture testing including fracture toughness, K-resistance, and fatigue crack growth.

  13. Wide-range displacement expressions for standard fracture mechanics specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. A.; Gross, B.; Leger, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wide-range algebraic expressions for the displacement of cracked fracture mechanics specimens are developed. For each specimen two equations are given: one for the displacement as a function of crack length, the other for crack length as a function of displacement. All the specimens that appear in ASTM Test for Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials (E 399) are represented in addition to the crack mouth displacement for a pure bending specimen. For the compact tension sample and the disk-shaped compact tension sample, the displacement at the crack mouth and at the load line are both considered. Only the crack mouth displacements for the arc-shaped tension samples are presented. The agreement between the displacements or crack lengths predicted by the various equations and the corresponding numerical data from which they were developed are nominally about 3 percent or better. These expressions should be useful in all types of fracture testing including fracture toughness, K-resistance, and fatigue crack growth.

  14. Analytical stress intensity solution for the stable Poisson loaded specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1993-04-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD's) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMOD's, and crack displacement profiles, are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  15. Numerical calibration of the stable poisson loaded specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, Dave N.

    1992-10-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-Curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD's) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMOD's, and crack displacement profiles are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length, thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  16. Analytical stress intensity solution for the Stable Poisson Loaded specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1993-04-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMODs) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMODs, and crack displacement profiles, are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  17. Numerical calibration of the stable poisson loaded specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, Dave N.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-Curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD's) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMOD's, and crack displacement profiles are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length, thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  18. Analytical stress intensity solution for the Stable Poisson Loaded specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMODs) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMODs, and crack displacement profiles, are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  19. An elastic strip with multiple cracks and applications to tapered specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.-H.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper an infinite elastic strip containing arbitrarily oriented cracks and subjected to uniform tension and a pair of concentrated forces is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations. Even though the technique is sufficiently general to solve new multiple crack problem, with the objective of applying the results to tapered specimens, only a certain symmetric crack geometry and loading conditions are considered. The stress intensity factors are calculated for edge cracks in the strip under uniform tension and for a 'compact' and a 'slender' tapered specimen (the latter simulating the double cantilever beam) under concentrated forces or crack surface wedge forces.

  20. Influence of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions on Debonding Prediction for Composite Skin-stiffener Specimens Subjected to Tension and Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed deflections, skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with lamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  1. Specimen shipment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Procedures for shipping specimens vary with different disease diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, it is important to contact the receiving laboratory and obtain specific instructions. This will facilitate processing of specimens when they reach the laboratory and assure that the quality of the specimens is not compromised. Time spent on field investigation, specimen collection, and obtaining an adequate history will be of little clue is specimens become contaminated, decomposed, or otherwise spoiled enroute to the diagnostic laboratory. There are five bases of proper specimen shipment: (1) prevent cross-contamination from specimen to specimen, (2) prevent decomposition of the specimen, (3) prevent leakage of fluids, (4) preserve individual specimen identity, and (5) properly label the package. Basic supplies needed for specimen shipment are shown in Fig. 3.1.

  2. Physical characteristics affecting the tensile failure properties of compact bone.

    PubMed

    Currey, J D

    1990-01-01

    Compact bone specimens from a wide variety of reptiles, birds, and mammals were tested in tension, and their failure properties related to mineral volume fraction, porosity and histological orientation. The principal findings were that the ultimate strain and the work under the stress-strain curve declined sharply with mineralisation, as did the stress and strain appearing after the specimen had yielded. Ultimate tensile strength was not simply related to any combination of the possible explanatory variables, but some relatively poorly mineralised bones, notably antlers, had high stresses at failure. These high strengths were allowed by a great increase in stress after the bones had yielded at quite low stresses.

  3. Surface Tension Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Burkhard; Engel, Horst; Schleifenbaum, Bernd

    1989-12-01

    A new microscopic technique will be presented for imaging surface topography and the locally varying surface tension of the object. With this technique it is possible to image the locally varying chemical composition of the specimen surface on a microscopic scale because the surface tension depends on the chemical composition. The imaging technique can be described as follows: By a simple preparation technique a thin (thickness several microns) liquid layer (e.g. immersion oil), is placed on the surface of the specimen. The resulting surface tension forces the boundary of the liquid layer to move. As the surface tension is a function of the location the boundary is modulated according to the magnitude of the surface tension at each place. Thus registering the shape of the moving boundary of the liquid layer at equidistant time intervals yields information on the specimen surface. The shape of the moving boundary is detected by a light microscope with differential interference contrast in combination with an image analysis system suited for real-time processing of image sequences in a threshold detection mode.

  4. Three dimensional finite-element analysis of finite-thickness fracture specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The stress-intensity factors for most of the commonly used fracture specimens (center-crack tension, single and double edge-crack tension, and compact), those that have a through-the-thickness crack, were calculated using a three dimensional finite-element elastic stress analysis. Three-dimensional singularity elements were used around the crack front. The stress intensity factors along the crack front were evaluated by using a force method, developed herein, that requires no prior assumption of either plane stress or plane strain. The calculated stress-intensity factors from the present analysis were compared with those from the literature whenever possible and were generally found to be in good agreement. The stress-intensity factors at the midplane for all specimens analyzed were within 3 percent of the two dimensional plane strain values. The stress intensity factors at the specimen surfaces were considerably lower than at the midplanes. For the center-crack tension specimens with large thickness to crack-length ratios, the stress-intensity factor reached a maximum near the surface of the specimen. In all other specimens considered the maximum stress intensity occurred at the midplane.

  5. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kneip, S.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J.

    2011-08-29

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  6. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  7. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  8. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  9. An inset CT specimen for evaluating fracture in small samples of material.

    PubMed

    Yahyazadehfar, M; Nazari, A; Kruzic, J J; Quinn, G D; Arola, D

    2014-02-01

    In evaluations on the fracture behavior of hard tissues and many biomaterials, the volume of material available to study is not always sufficient to apply a standard method of practice. In the present study an inset Compact Tension (inset CT) specimen is described, which uses a small cube of material (approximately 2×2×2mm(3)) that is molded within a secondary material to form the compact tension geometry. A generalized equation describing the Mode I stress intensity was developed for the specimen using the solutions from a finite element model that was defined over permissible crack lengths, variations in specimen geometry, and a range in elastic properties of the inset and mold materials. A validation of the generalized equation was performed using estimates for the fracture toughness of a commercial dental composite via the "inset CT" specimen and the standard geometry defined by ASTM E399 (2006). Results showed that the average fracture toughness obtained from the new specimen (1.23±0.02MPam(0.5)) was within 2% of that from the standard. Applications of the inset CT specimen are presented for experimental evaluations on the crack growth resistance of dental enamel and root dentin, including their fracture resistance curves. Potential errors in adopting this specimen are then discussed, including the effects of debonding between the inset and molding material on the estimated stress intensity distribution. Results of the investigation show that the inset CT specimen offers a viable approach for studying the fracture behavior of small volumes of structural materials.

  10. An Inset CT Specimen for Evaluating Fracture in Small Samples of Material

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, M.; Nazari, A.; Kruzic, J.J.; Quinn, G.D.; Arola, D.

    2013-01-01

    In evaluations on the fracture behavior of hard tissues and many biomaterials, the volume of material available to study is not always sufficient to apply a standard method of practice. In the present study an inset Compact Tension (inset CT) specimen is described, which uses a small cube of material (approximately 2×2×2 mm3) that is molded within a secondary material to form the compact tension geometry. A generalized equation describing the Mode I stress intensity was developed for the specimen using the solutions from a finite element model that was defined over permissible crack lengths, variations in specimen geometry, and a range in elastic properties of the inset and mold materials. A validation of the generalized equation was performed using estimates for the fracture toughness of a commercial dental composite via the “inset CT” specimen and the standard geometry defined by ASTM E399. Results showed that the average fracture toughness obtained from the new specimen (1.23 ± 0.02 MPa•m0.5) was within 2% of that from the standard. Applications of the inset CT specimen are presented for experimental evaluations on the crack growth resistance of dental enamel and root dentin, including their fracture resistance curves. Potential errors in adopting this specimen are then discussed, including the effects of debonding between the inset and molding material on the estimated stress intensity distribution. Results of the investigation show that the inset CT specimen offers a viable approach for studying the fracture behavior of small volumes of structural materials. PMID:24268892

  11. Long-term fatigue behavior of compact bone at low strain magnitude and rate.

    PubMed

    Schaffler, M B; Radin, E L; Burr, D B

    1990-01-01

    Fatigue behavior of compact bone at physiological strain ranges was examined in vitro. Standardized specimens of bovine compact bone were cyclically loaded in uniaxial tension of 0-1200 or 0-1500 microstrain for up to 13-37 million cycles to study the long-term fatigue properties. All specimens exhibited fatigue during the first several million cycles of loading, evidenced by a gradual decrease of specimen modulus during this initial loading period; mean modulus loss for all specimens was approximately 6%. After this initial stiffness loss, specimen modulus stabilized and did not change again for the duration of the loading. Osteonal bone specimens lost significantly more stiffness than primary bone specimens during the early loading history, but neither microstructural type progressed to fatigue failure. These data suggest that some fatigue of compact bone is a realistic expectation of the normal loading environment, but this fatigue does not progress to fatigue failure within a physiologically reasonable number of cycles when tested in vitro at strain magnitudes like those measured in living animals. Implications for fatigue/stress fractures in vivo are discussed.

  12. Virtual Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  13. The impact of tensioning device mal-positioning on strand tension during Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to confer optimal strength and stiffness to the graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the maintenance of equal strand tension prior to fixation, is desired; positioning of the tensioning device can significantly affect strand tension This study aimed to determine the effect of tensioning device mal-positioning on individual strand tension in simulated cadaveric ACL reconstructions. Methods Twenty cadaveric specimens, comprising bovine tibia and tendon harvested from sheep, were used to simulate ACL reconstruction with a looped four-strand tendon graft. A proprietary tensioning device was used to tension the graft during tibial component fixation with graft tension recorded using load cells. The effects of the tensioning device at extreme angles, and in various locking states, was evaluated. Results Strand tension varied significantly when the tensioning device was held at extreme angles (p < 0.001) or in 'locked' configurations of the tensioning device (p < 0.046). Tendon position also produced significant effects (p < 0.016) on the resultant strand tension. Conclusion An even distribution of tension among individual graft strands is obtained by maintaining the tensioning device in an unlocked state, aligned with the longitudinal axis of the tibial tunnel. If the maintenance of equal strand tension during tibial fixation of grafts is important, close attention must be paid to positioning of the tensioning device in order to optimize the resultant graft tension and, by implication, the strength and stiffness of the graft and ultimately, surgical outcome. PMID:21711536

  14. [Fracture toughness of cortical bone in tension, shear, and tear--a comparison of longitudinal and transverse fracture].

    PubMed

    Feng, Z

    1997-09-01

    The fracture toughness at crack initiation was determined for bovine cortical bone under tension (mode I), shear (mode II), and tear (mode III). A total of 130 compact tension specimens, compact shear specimens and triple pantleg specimens were used for the measurement of fracture toughness under tension, shear, and tear, respectively. Multiple-sample compliance method was utilized to measure the critical strain energy release rate (Gc) at the a/W = 0.55 (crack length, a, to specimen width, W, ratio). The critical stress intensity factor (Kc) was also calculated from the critical loading (PQ) of the specimens at the a/W = 0.55. The effect of the anisotropy of bone on its resistance to crack initiation under shear and tear loading was investigated as well. The fracture toughness of bone with precrack orientations parallel(designed as longitudinal fracture) to and that with precrack orientations normal (designed as transverse fracture) to the longitudinal axis of bone were compared. In longitudinal fracture, the critical strain energy release rates(Gc) of cortical bone under tension, shear, and tear were 644 +/- 102, 2430 +/- 836, and 1723 +/- 486 N/m, respectively. In transverse fracture, the critical strain energy release rates(Gc) of cortical bone under tesion, shear, and tear were 1374 +/- 183, 4710 +/- 1284, and 4016 +/- 948 N/m, respectively. An analysis of variance demonstrated that the crack initiation fracture toughness of bone under shear and tear loading is significantly greater than that under tensile loading in both longitudinal and transverse fracture. Our results also suggest that cortical bone has been "designed" to prevent crack initiation in transverse fracture under tension, shear, and tesar.

  15. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on the Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter of Glass Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, specimen configuration, and specimen size on the transverse tension strength of two glass epoxy materials loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, and/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was sensitive to span length due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, the utility of this scaling law for predicting transverse tension strength is unclear.

  16. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on the Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter of Glass Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, specimen configuration, and specimen size on the transverse tension strength of two glass epoxy materials loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, and/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was sensitive to span length due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, the utility of this scaling law for predicting transverse tension strength is unclear.

  17. Specimen for high-temperature tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Split nut with internal taper to hold specially formed specimen composed of filaments of refractory material provides means for holding at high temperature and under tension so that performance evaluations may be made.

  18. Sharply notch cylindrical tension specimen for screening plane-strain fracture toughness. I - Influence of fundamental testing variables on notch strength. II Applications in aluminum alloy quality assurance of fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.; Bucci, R. J.; Collis, S. F.; Kohm, R. F.; Kaufman, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of studies which have been conducted to establish an improved technology base for a use of the sharply notched cylindrical specimen in quality assurance tests of aluminum alloy products. The results are presented of an investigation of fundamental variables associated with specimen preparation and testing, taking into account the influence of the notch root radius, the eccentricity of loading, the specimen diameter, and the notch depth on the sharp notch strength. Attention is given to the statistical procedures which are necessary to establish correlations between the sharp notch strength and the plane-strain fracture toughness for high-strength aluminum alloys.

  19. Cryogenic fatigue behavior of plain weave glass/epoxy composite laminates under tension tension cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Yasuhide; Takano, Satoru; Horiguchi, Katsumi; Sato, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    This paper focuses on understanding the tension-tension fatigue behavior of woven glass fiber reinforced polymer laminates at cryogenic temperatures. Tension-tension fatigue tests at frequencies of 4 and 10 Hz with a stress ratio of 0.1 were conducted at room temperature, 77 and 4 K. The fatigue stress versus cycles to failure ( S- N) relationships and fatigue limits for 10 6 cycles were obtained. Fractured specimens tested under fatigue tests were also examined with optical microscope.

  20. Axial-Gap Induction Motor For Levitated Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind; Rhim, Won-Kyu; Barber, Dan; Chung, Sang

    1992-01-01

    Motor does not obscure view of specimen. Axial-gap induction motor applies torque to rotate electrostatically or electromagnetically levitated specimen of metal. Possible applications include turning specimens for uniform heating under focused laser beams and obtaining indirect measurements of resistivities or of surface tensions in molten specimens.

  1. Axial-Gap Induction Motor For Levitated Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind; Rhim, Won-Kyu; Barber, Dan; Chung, Sang

    1992-01-01

    Motor does not obscure view of specimen. Axial-gap induction motor applies torque to rotate electrostatically or electromagnetically levitated specimen of metal. Possible applications include turning specimens for uniform heating under focused laser beams and obtaining indirect measurements of resistivities or of surface tensions in molten specimens.

  2. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  3. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  5. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  6. Tension Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The fabric structure pictured is the Campus Center of La Verne College, La Verne, California. Unlike the facilities shown on the preceding pages, it is not air-supported. It is a "tension structure," its multi-coned fabric membrane supported by a network of cables attached to steel columns which function like circus tent poles. The spider-web in the accompanying photo is a computer graph of the tension pattern. The designers, Geiger-Berger Associates PC, of New York City, conducted lengthy computer analysis to determine the the best placement of columns and cables. The firm also served as structural engineering consultant on the Pontiac Silverdome and a number of other large fabric structures. Built by Birdair Structures, Inc., Buffalo, New York, the La Verne Campus Center was the first permanent facility in the United States enclosed by the space-spinoff fabric made of Owens-Corning Beta fiber glass coated with Du Pont Teflon TFE. The flexible design permits rearrangement of the interior to accommodate athletic events, student activities, theatrical productions and other recreational programs. Use of fabric covering reduced building cost 30 percent below conventional construction.

  7. Fixture For Hot Stress Tests Of Thin Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture designed to hold and heat thin, rectangular-cross-section specimen of composite material during hot lengthwise-stress test. Suitable for testing same specimen in either tension or compression. Clamps lightly onto specimen, providing both heat via thermal conduction and lateral support needed to prevent buckling during compression test.

  8. Fixture For Hot Stress Tests Of Thin Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture designed to hold and heat thin, rectangular-cross-section specimen of composite material during hot lengthwise-stress test. Suitable for testing same specimen in either tension or compression. Clamps lightly onto specimen, providing both heat via thermal conduction and lateral support needed to prevent buckling during compression test.

  9. Apparent fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement: effect of test specimen configuration and sterilization method.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G

    1999-01-01

    The plane strain fracture toughness of Palacos R bone cement was determined using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) principles and three different test specimen configurations: single edge notched three-point (SENB), rectangular compact tension (RCT), and chevron notched short rod (CNSR). Another aspect of the study was an investigation of the effect of three methods used to sterilize the powder constituents of the cement-none, gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide--on the fracture toughness of the fully polymerized material. A detailed justification is provided for using LEFM. The fracture toughness results obtained using the CNSR specimens were, on average, 14 and 16% higher than those obtained using the SENB and RCT types, respectively. These differences are accounted for in terms of differences in four aspects of these specimen configuration (namely, residual stress effects, loading rate, material inhomogeneity, and the nature of the test). For a given specimen configuration, gamma irradiation produced a statistically significant decrease in fracture toughness which, it is suggested, is due to the concomitant depreciation in molecular weight. For a given cement type, there is no statistically significant difference in fracture toughness results obtained using SENB and RCT specimens. It is thus suggested that either of these configurations can be used to determine the fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement.

  10. Fatigue testing a plurality of test specimens and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodo, James D. (Inventor); Moore, Dennis R. (Inventor); Morris, Thomas F. (Inventor); Tiller, Newton G. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Described is a fatigue testing apparatus for simultaneously subjecting a plurality of material test specimens to cyclical tension loading to determine the fatigue strength of the material. The fatigue testing apparatus includes a pulling head having cylinders defined therein which carry reciprocating pistons. The reciprocation of the pistons is determined by cyclical supplies of pressurized fluid to the cylinders. Piston rods extend from the pistons through the pulling head and are attachable to one end of the test specimens, the other end of the test specimens being attachable to a fixed base, causing test specimens attached between the piston rods and the base to be subjected to cyclical tension loading. Because all the cylinders share a common pressurized fluid supply, the breaking of a test specimen does not substantially affect the pressure of the fluid supplied to the other cylinders nor the tension applied to the other test specimens.

  11. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  12. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  13. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  14. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  15. DNA Looping, Supercoiling and Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, Laura

    2007-11-01

    In complex organisms, activation or repression of gene expression by proteins bound to enhancer or silencer elements located several kilobases away from the promoter is a well recognized phenomenon. However, a mechanistic understanding of any of these multiprotein interactions is still incomplete. Part of the difficulty in characterizing long-range interactions is the complexity of the regulatory systems and also an underestimation of the effect of DNA supercoiling and tension. Supercoiling is expected to promote interactions between DNA sites because it winds the DNA into compact plectonemes in which distant DNA segments more frequently draw close. The idea that DNA is also under various levels of tension is becoming more widely accepted. Forces that stretch the double helix in vivo are the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone, the action of motor enzymes perhaps acting upon a topologically constrained sequence of DNA or chromosome segregation during cell mitosis following DNA replication. Presently, little is known about the tension acting on DNA in vivo, but characterization of how physiological regulatory processes, such as loop formation, depend on DNA tension in vitro will indicate the stretching force regimes likely to exist in vivo. In this light, the well studied CI protein of bacteriophage l, which was recently found to cause a of 3.8 kbp loop in DNA, is an ideal system in which to characterize long-range gene regulation. The large size of the loop lends itself to single-molecule techniques, which allow characterization of the dynamics of CI-mediated l DNA looping under controlled levels of supercoiling and tension. Such experiments are being used to discover the principles of long-range interactions in l and in more complex systems.

  16. Plane-strain tension tests on aluminum alloy sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, F.; Hosford, W.; Graf, A.

    1995-04-01

    A simple way of making plane-strain tension tests on sheet specimens has been developed. This method was used to test sheets of aluminum alloy 2008 T4 and the results were analyzed in terms of a high exponent yield criterion and isotropic hardening. Experimentally measured forces agreed with those calculated from strain measurements using uniaxial tension test curves.

  17. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures.

  18. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  19. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  20. A Specimen Size Effect on the Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Threshold of IN 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garr, K. R.; Hresko, G. C., III

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) tests were conducted on IN 718 in the solution annealed and aged condition at room temperature in accordance with E647-87. As part of each test, the FCGR threshold was measured using the decreasing Delta K method. A new heat of material was being tested and some of this material was sent to a different laboratory which wanted to use a specimen with a 127 mm width. Threshold data previously had been established on specimens with a width of 50.8 mm. As a check of the laboratory, tests were conducted at room temperature and R equal to 0.1 for comparison with the earlier data. The results were a threshold significantly higher than previously observed. Interchanging of specimen sizes and laboratories showed that the results were not due to a heat-to-heat or lab-to-lab variation. The results to be presented here are those obtained at the original laboratory. Growth rates were measured using the electric potential drop technique at R values of 0.1, 0.7, and 0.9. Compact tension specimen sizes with planer dimensions of 25.4 mm, 50.8 mm, and 127 mm were used. Crack growth rates at threshold were generally below 2.5 X 10(exp -8) mm / cycle. Closure measurements were made on some of the specimens by a manual procedure using a clip gage. When the crack growth rate data for the specimens tested at R equal to 0.1 were plotted as a function of applied Delta K, the thresholds varied with specimen width. The larger the width, the higher the threshold. The thresholds varied from 6.5 MPa-m(exp 1/2) for the 25.4 mm specimen to 15.4 MPa-m(exp 1/2) for the 127 mm specimen. At R equal to 0.7, the 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm specimens had essentially the same threshold, about 2.9 MPa-m(exp 1/2)while the 127 mm specimen had a threshold of 4.5 MPa-m(exp 1/2). When plotted as a function of effective Delta K, the R equal to 0.1 data are essentially normalized. Various aspects of the test procedure will be discussed as well as the results of analysis of the data using

  1. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003752.htm Urine culture - catheterized specimen To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Catheterized specimen urine culture is a laboratory test that looks for germs ...

  2. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  3. Specimen collection and preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Specimens, as discussed in this handbook, have but a single purpose--to provide information leading to the diagnosis of a cause of disease or death. A specimen may be an intact carcass, various tissues removed from carcasses, or parasites. In any event, the specimen should be as fresh and undamaged as possible.

  4. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  5. MACHINING TEST SPECIMENS FROM HARVESTED ZION RPV SEGMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Rosseel, Thomas M; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Zion Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) in Zion, Illinois, presents a special and timely opportunity for developing a better understanding of materials degradation and other issues associated with extending the lifetime of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years of service. In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor fleet, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Solutions, an international nuclear services company, the selective procurement of materials, structures, components, and other items of interest from the decommissioned reactors. In this paper, we will discuss the acquisition of segments of the Zion Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), cutting these segments into blocks from the beltline and upper vertical welds and plate material and machining those blocks into mechanical (Charpy, compact tension, and tensile) test specimens and coupons for microstructural (TEM, SEM, APT, SANS and nano indention) characterization. Access to service-irradiated RPV welds and plate sections will allow through wall attenuation studies to be performed, which will be used to assess current radiation damage models [1].

  6. Influence of Specimen Size on the SCC Growth Rate of Ni-Alloys Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; D Morton; W Moshier

    2005-10-19

    Tests were conducted on a single heat of Alloy 600 using compact tension specimens ranging from 50.80 mm (2 inches) in gross thickness (2T) to 10.16 mm (0.4 inches, 0.4T) in gross thickness. Results indicated that at stress intensity factor (K) levels above 55 MPa{radical}m, the growth rate is affected by specimen size in deaerated primary water. The growth rate can be significantly faster in 0.4T and 0.6T (15.24 mm = 0.6 inches in gross thickness) specimens at these elevated K levels compared to 2T specimens. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates > 6 x 10{sup -7} mm/s were observed at 338 C and 40 cc/kg H{sub 2} in 0.6T and 0.4T specimens at these elevated K levels, although the fracture mode was not significantly affected by the specimen size. The SCC growth rate of 2T specimens under comparable test conditions was {approx}6 x 10{sup -8} mm/s. All of the specimens examined that were tested at K > 55 MPa{radical}m exhibited intergranular failure, although ductile dimples and cracked grains were observed in the 0.4T specimens loaded to the elevated K levels. The effect of specimen size on the crack growth behavior indicated by electric potential drop (EPD) monitoring at K > 55 MPa{radical}m was also reviewed. EPD indicated steady state crack growth during the tests conducted on 1T (25.4 mm = 1.0 inches in gross thickness) and 2T specimens. Steady state crack growth was not indicated by EPD for the 0.4T and 0.6T specimens loaded at K > 55 MPa{radical}m. EPD indicated large jumps in the crack length at discrete points. Initially, it was believed that these large, rapid increases in the crack length corresponded to ductile tearing of uncracked ligaments in the crack wake as the SCC crack advanced. However, examination of the fracture surfaces did not reveal any evidence of isolated regions of ductile tearing in the crack wake. The large increases in the EPD signal were due to strain bursts. These results highlight the need to base SCC growth rates on destructive

  7. Lignification and tension wood.

    PubMed

    Pilate, Gilles; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard; Yoshinaga, Arata; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Laurans, Françoise; Lapierre, Catherine; Ruel, Katia

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood trees are able to reorient their axes owing to tension wood differentiation. Tension wood is characterised by important ultrastructural modifications, such as the occurrence in a number of species, of an extra secondary wall layer, named gelatinous layer or G-layer, mainly constituted of cellulose microfibrils oriented nearly parallel to the fibre axis. This G-layer appears directly involved in the definition of tension wood mechanical properties. This review gathers the data available in the literature about lignification during tension wood formation. Potential roles for lignin in tension wood formation are inferred from biochemical, anatomical and mechanical studies, from the hypotheses proposed to describe tension wood function and from data coming from new research areas such as functional genomics.

  8. Permanent tensions in organization.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Noora

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change. This study used paradox theory and a case study. The case organization is a public university hospital in Finland involving several stakeholders. The analysis suggests that the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change is a paradox that is part of organizational reality. As an organization learns to live with its permanent tensions, the renewal paradox settles into equilibrium. When tensions are provoked, the paradox is disturbed until it finds a new balance. This flexible nature of the paradox is the force that keeps the different stakeholders simultaneously empowered to maintain their unique missions and cohesive in order to benefit from the larger synergy. This research suggests that identification and evaluation of each permanent tension within an organization is important when executing organizational change. The fact that certain tensions are permanent and cannot be solved may have an influence on how planned change initiatives are executed. The results show that permanent tensions may be harnessed for the benefit of an organizational change. This research demonstrates originality by offering an alternative view of tensions, a view which emphasizes not only their permanent and plural nature but their importance for enabling the organization to change at its own, non-disruptive pace. The research also proposes a new concept, the "renewal paradox", to enhance understanding of the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change.

  9. Compact vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; Zafalan, I.

    2017-02-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  10. Compact HPD

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, M.; Kawai, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1996-12-31

    In order to be utilized in such application fields as high energy physics or medical imaging, where a huge number of photodetectors are assembled in designated small area, the world`s smallest HPD, the compact BFD, has been developed. The overall diameter and the length of the tube are 16mm and 15mm, respectively. The effective photocathode area is 8mm in diameter. At applied voltage of -8kV to the photocathode, the electron multiplication gain of a PD incorporated HPD (PD-BPD) is 1,600, and that of an APD (APD-BPD) is 65,000. In the pulse height distribution measurement, photoelectron peaks up to 6 photoelectrons are clearly distinguishable with the APD-BPD. Experiments established that there was no degradation of gain in magnetic fields up to 1.5T, an important performance characteristic of the compact BPD for application in high energy physics.

  11. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  12. Compact, Lightweight Servo-Controllable Brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher S.; Townsend, William; Guertin, Jeffrey; Matsuoka, Yoky

    2010-01-01

    Compact, lightweight servo-controllable brakes capable of high torques are being developed for incorporation into robot joints. A brake of this type is based partly on the capstan effect of tension elements. In a brake of the type under development, a controllable intermediate state of torque is reached through on/off switching at a high frequency.

  13. Perspectives on Campus Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, David C., Ed.

    The purpose of this book was to provide background information and insight on campus tensions, and suggest ideas on how to go about reducing these tensions. The papers are divided into 5 parts. Part I, The New Situation, includes papers by Kenneth E. Boulding, William M. Birenbaum, Marcus G. Raskin, and Peter Schrag. Part II, Where the Students…

  14. Tension type headache

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-01-01

    Tension type headaches are common in clinical practice. Earlier known by various names, the diagnosis has had psychological connotations. Recent evidence has helped clarify the neurobiological basis and the disorder is increasingly considered more in the preview of neurologists. The classification, clinical features, differential diagnosis and treatment of tension type headache are discussed in this paper. PMID:23024570

  15. [Tension-type headaches].

    PubMed

    Trkanjec, Zlatko; Aleksić-Shihabi, Anka

    2008-05-01

    Tension-type headache is one of the most common and most significant primary headaches. Tension-type headache is a very heterogeneous disorder. It can be divided into episodic and chronic tension-type headache. The pain is a dull, pressing, tightening, typically band-like sensation. The pain is of non-pulsating quality, the location is bilateral, and there is no nausea, vomiting, phonophobia or photophobia. There are no prodromal symptoms or aura. The pain is mild to moderate and it does not aggravate with routine physical activities. Some patients have increased tenderness of pericranial muscles. Psychological factors are common in tension-type headache. Nitric oxide has an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic tension-type headache. Probably it promotes central sensitization and therefore increases nociception. In differential diagnosis of tension type-headache, all structural and metabolic diseases causing headache have to be ruled out, as well as all other primary headaches. All comorbid and coexistent states should also be considered. In the treatment of tension-type headache, pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods are employed. Analgesics, myorelaxants, anxiolytics and antidepressants are most commonly used, as well as physical therapy, massage, acupuncture, behavioral therapy and psychotherapy. Recently, the applications of botulinum toxin and acupuncture have been described in the treatment and prophylaxis of tension-type headache.

  16. Perspectives on Campus Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, David C., Ed.

    The purpose of this book was to provide background information and insight on campus tensions, and suggest ideas on how to go about reducing these tensions. The papers are divided into 5 parts. Part I, The New Situation, includes papers by Kenneth E. Boulding, William M. Birenbaum, Marcus G. Raskin, and Peter Schrag. Part II, Where the Students…

  17. Tensions in Distributed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Jeanne; Ng, David

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article proposes the utility of using activity theory as an analytical lens to examine the theoretical construct of distributed leadership, specifically to illuminate tensions encountered by leaders and how they resolved these tensions. Research Method: The study adopted the naturalistic inquiry approach of a case study of an…

  18. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s). (a... specimen(s), the applicant must: (1) For an amendment to allege use under § 2.76, verify by affidavit or...

  20. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  1. Bone fracture analysis on the short rod chevron-notch specimens using the X-ray computer micro-tomography.

    PubMed

    De Santis, R; Anderson, P; Tanner, K E; Ambrosio, L; Nicolais, L; Bonfield, W; Davis, G R

    2000-10-01

    Mechanical fatigue of bone leads to micro-cracking which is associated with remodeling, establishing a balance in the microcrack population of the living tissue, thus, in the steady-state, the microstructure of bone provides sites of discontinuity acting as stress raisers. Hence fracture toughness plays a decisive role in bone functionality by determining the level to which the material can be stressed in the presence of cracks, or, equivalently, the magnitude of cracking which can be tolerated at a given stress level. Cortical bone, which behaves as a quasi-brittle solid when fractured, was tested as short-rod chevron-notched tension specimens (CNT). The main features of the CNT specimen are its geometry and the V shaped notch. The notch leads to steady-state crack propagation whilst the requested geometry allows a diameter 40% smaller than the thickness of a standard compact tension specimens (CT). These features are essential to distinguish the inhomogeneties in the fracture properties of materials like bone. Bone structure and crack propagation of the CNT specimens were analyzed using X-ray computed micro-tomography (XMT), which is a non-invasive imaging technique. The unique feature of the micro-CT is the high resolution three-dimensional image which consists of multi-sliced tomographs taken in a fine pitch along the rotational axis. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) computed according to the peak load was 4.8 MNm(-3/2) while that derived from experimental calibration tests using XMT was 4.9 MNm(-3/2).

  2. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  3. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  4. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  5. Echinococcal tension pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, Farhan; Al-Omeri, Muayyad M.

    1969-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is rarely mentioned among the causes of pneumothorax in text-books or monographs, especially those written in English. Five examples of tension pneumothorax secondary to ruptured hydatid cyst of the lung are reported: the mechanism of this tension effect and helpful diagnostic points are discussed. We think that surgical correction is the only satisfactory treatment of tension pneumothorax due to ruptured hydatid cyst: surgery is advocated in any suspected cyst as soon as it is discovered so as to avoid any such serious complication. Images PMID:5348321

  6. Fracture mechanics of bone--the effects of density, specimen thickness and crack velocity on longitudinal fracture.

    PubMed

    Behiri, J C; Bonfield, W

    1984-01-01

    The fracture mechanics parameters of critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for longitudinal fracture of bovine tibia cortical bone were determined by the compact tension method. It was demonstrated that, for a given bone density, Kc and Gc depended on the loading rate, and resultant crack velocity, with a maximum in fracture toughness (Kc approximately 6.3 MNm-3/2, Gc approximately 2900 Jm-2) at a crack velocity approximately 10(-3) ms-1. For a given loading rate, or crack velocity, an increase in bone density, in the range from 1.92 to 2.02 Mgm-3, produced increases in Kc and Gc, but a variation in specimen thickness (from 0.5 to 2 mm) had no effect on the measured fracture mechanics parameters.

  7. Damage type and strain mode associations in human compact bone bending fatigue.

    PubMed

    Boyce, T M; Fyhrie, D P; Glotkowski, M C; Radin, E L; Schaffler, M B

    1998-05-01

    When compact bone is subjected to fatigue loading, it develops matrix microdamage, which reduces the tissue's ability to resist fracture. The relative influence of different strain modes on damage and strength in compact bone has not been characterized, to our knowledge. In this study, the nonuniform strain field produced by four-point bending was used to introduce fatigue damage into tibial bending beam specimens from men 40-49 years old. The specimens were then bulk-stained with basic fuchsin to mark damage surfaces and were examined histologically and with confocal microscopy to describe damage morphologies and position relative to tension and compression-strained regions of the specimen. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the amounts of different types of bone microdamage. Three major types were observed. In regions subjected to tensile strains, the bone had focal regions of diffusely increased basic fuchsin staining (i.e., diffuse microdamage). Confocal microscopy of these regions showed them to be composed of extensive networks of fine, ultrastructural-level cracks. In compressive strain regions, the tissue developed linear microcracks in interstitial areas similar to those originally described by Frost. Fine, tearing-type (wispy-appearing) cracks were observed near and in the plane of the neutral axis. The paths of these fine cracks were not influenced by microstructural boundaries. Other minor damage morphologies (sector-stained osteons, delamination of regions of lamellae, and intraosteonal cracking) were observed, but their distribution was unrelated to local strain field. Thus. in fatigue of human compact bone, the principal mechanisms of matrix failure (i.e., linear microcrack, diffuse damage foci, and tearing-type damage) are strongly dependent on local strain type.

  8. Compact torus

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of the compact torus approach is to provide toroidal magnetic-field configurations that are based primarily on plasma currents and can be freed from closely surrounding mechanical structures. Some familiar examples are the current-carrying plasma rings of reversed-field theta pinches and relativistic-electron smoke ring experiments. The spheromak concept adds an internal toroidal magnetic field component, in order to enhance MHD stability. In recent experiments, three different approaches have been used to generate spheromak plasmas: (1) the reversed-field theta pinch; (2) the coaxial plasma gun; (3) a new quasi-static method, based on the initial formation of a toroidal plasma sleeve around a mechanical ring that generates poloidal and toroidal fluxes, followed by field-line reconnection to form a detached spheromak plasma. The theoretical and experimental MHD stability results for the spheromak configuration are found to have common features.

  9. DNA Spools under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulić, I. M.; Schiessel, H.

    2004-06-01

    DNA spools, structures in which DNA is wrapped and helically coiled onto itself or onto a protein core, are ubiquitous in nature. We develop a general theory describing the nonequilibrium behavior of DNA spools under linear tension. Two puzzling and seemingly unrelated recent experimental findings, the sudden quantized unwrapping of nucleosomes and that of DNA toroidal condensates under tension, are theoretically explained and shown to be of the same origin. The study provides new insights into nucleosome and chromatin fiber stability and dynamics.

  10. DNA loops generate intracentromere tension in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Lawrimore, Josh; Vasquez, Paula A.; Falvo, Michael R.; Taylor, Russell M.; Vicci, Leandra; Yeh, Elaine; Forest, M. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The centromere is the DNA locus that dictates kinetochore formation and is visibly apparent as heterochromatin that bridges sister kinetochores in metaphase. Sister centromeres are compacted and held together by cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase-mediated entanglements until all sister chromosomes bi-orient along the spindle apparatus. The establishment of tension between sister chromatids is essential for quenching a checkpoint kinase signal generated from kinetochores lacking microtubule attachment or tension. How the centromere chromatin spring is organized and functions as a tensiometer is largely unexplored. We have discovered that centromere chromatin loops generate an extensional/poleward force sufficient to release nucleosomes proximal to the spindle axis. This study describes how the physical consequences of DNA looping directly underlie the biological mechanism for sister centromere separation and the spring-like properties of the centromere in mitosis. PMID:26283798

  11. DNA loops generate intracentromere tension in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Lawrimore, Josh; Vasquez, Paula A; Falvo, Michael R; Taylor, Russell M; Vicci, Leandra; Yeh, Elaine; Forest, M Gregory; Bloom, Kerry

    2015-08-17

    The centromere is the DNA locus that dictates kinetochore formation and is visibly apparent as heterochromatin that bridges sister kinetochores in metaphase. Sister centromeres are compacted and held together by cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase-mediated entanglements until all sister chromosomes bi-orient along the spindle apparatus. The establishment of tension between sister chromatids is essential for quenching a checkpoint kinase signal generated from kinetochores lacking microtubule attachment or tension. How the centromere chromatin spring is organized and functions as a tensiometer is largely unexplored. We have discovered that centromere chromatin loops generate an extensional/poleward force sufficient to release nucleosomes proximal to the spindle axis. This study describes how the physical consequences of DNA looping directly underlie the biological mechanism for sister centromere separation and the spring-like properties of the centromere in mitosis. © 2015 Lawrimore et al.

  12. Managing the right tension.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Dominic; Favaro, Ken

    2006-12-01

    Of all the competing objectives every company faces, three pairs stand out: profitability versus growth, the short term versus the long term, and the whole organization versus the units. In each case, progress on one front usually comes at the expense of progress on the other. The authors researched the performance of more than 1000 companies worldwide over the past two decades and found that most struggle to succeed across the three tensions. From 1983 to 2003, for example, only 32% of these companies more often than not achieved positive profitability and revenue growth at the same time. The problem, the authors discovered, is not so much that managers don't recognize the tensions--those are all too familiar to anyone who has ever run a business. Rather, it is that managers frequently don't focus on the tension that matters most to their company. Even when they do identify the right tension, they usually make the mistake of prioritizing a "lead" objective within it-for example, profitability over growth. As a result, companies often end up moving first in this direction, then in that, and then back again, never quite resolving the tension. The companies that performed best adopted a very different approach. Instead of setting a lead objective, they looked at how best to strengthen what the two sides of each tension have in common: For profitability and growth,the common bond is customer benefit; for the short term and the long, it is sustainable earnings; and for the whole and its parts, it is particular organizational resources and capabilities. The authors describe how companies can select the right tension, what traps they may fall into when they focus on one side over the other, and how to escape these traps by managing to the bonds between objectives.

  13. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior.

  14. [Treatment of tension headache].

    PubMed

    Schoenen, J

    2000-01-01

    The scientific basis of tension- type headache suffers from the lack of precise pathophysiological knowledge and the heterogenecity of this disorder. Treatment of acute tension-type headache episodes is more effective with an NSAIDs (ibuprofen 400-800mg, naproxen 550-825mg, ketoprofen 50-75mg) than with aspirin or paracetamol. Caffein containing preparations of NSAIDs are slightly superior, but should not be taken frequently to avoid headache chronification. For chronic tension-type headache, relaxation therapies with EMG biofeedback and tricyclics have about the same efficacy rate of 40-50p.100. Physical therapy and acupuncture are in general less effective. There is thus clearly a need for better strategies, e.g. combination of available therapies and novel approaches.

  15. Surface Tension of Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perko, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry and more specifically surface tension are introduced to spacetime. Lagrangian equations of motion for membranes of curved spacetime manifold are derived. The equations of motion in spatial directions are dispersion equations and can be rearranged to Schrodinger's equation where Plank's constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. The equation of motion in the time-direction has two immediately recognizable solutions: electromagnetic waves and corpuscles. The corpuscular membrane solution can assume different genus depending on quantized amounts of surface energy. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found that satisfies general relativity. Application of the surface tension to quantum electrodynamics and implications for quantum chromodynamics are discussed. Although much work remains, it is suggested that spacetime surface tension may provide a classical explanation that combines general relativity with field theories in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  16. Compact Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-01

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  17. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  18. Tension solar mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, W.P.

    1986-09-02

    A solar collector is described comprising a central tower having a solar receiver thereon; tension towers positioned concentrically about the central tower;a rigid inner ring disposed about the central tower and sized to permit vertical movement relative to the central tower; cables extending between the inner ring and the tops of each of the tension towers; and a reflectively-coated sheet of flexible material attached to the upper surface of the cables; whereby the action of gravity on the cables and the sheet form a concave reflector for focusing solar energy onto the solar receiver.

  19. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Start A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3-145 dpa at 380-503 °C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 °C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180-200 MPa √{m} at 350-450 °C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature ⩾430 °C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 °C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  20. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  1. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3 145 dpa at 380 503 C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm 3mm 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa ffiffiffiffiffi m p at 350 450 C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperatureP430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  2. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s). 2.59 Section 2.59 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s). (a...

  3. Compact Apparatus For Growth Of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Miller, Teresa Y.

    1991-01-01

    Compact apparatus proposed specifically for growth of protein crystals in microgravity also used in terrestrial laboratories to initiate and terminate growth at prescribed times automatically. Has few moving parts. Also contains no syringes difficult to clean, load, and unload and introduces contaminant silicon grease into crystallization solution. After growth of crystals terminated, specimens retrieved and transported simply.

  4. Morphology of stress corrosion cracking due to exposure to high-temperature water containing hydrogen peroxide in stainless steel specimens with different crevice lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Sato, Tomonori; Kato, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2013-10-01

    Crack growth tests were performed in high-temperature water containing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to evaluate the relationships between the crevice structure and H2O2 on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth morphology of stainless steel (SS). Small compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from thermally sensitized type 304 SS. 20-300 ppb H2O2 was injected into the high-temperature water at 561 K. Intergranular SCC (IGSCC) and transgranular SCC were observed near the side grooves and the central region of the original CT specimens, respectively. Chevron notches were removed from the CT specimens after fatigue pre-crack introduction. Owing to pre-crack shortening, the IGSCC area expanded to the central region of the CT specimens and increased with H2O2 concentration. The effects of H2O2 on SCC appeared intensely near the surfaces exposed to high levels of H2O2. Microanalysis and distribution examination of oxide layers were performed and the percentage of H2O2 remaining in the crack was calculated.

  5. Creating Tension in Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folta, Bernarr

    This paper discusses the rationale and teaching methods for a six-week unit, for a high school freshman English Class, on perception, semantics, and writing, which places special focus on developing tension in student writing. The first four objectives of the course focus on perception and the next two focus on semantics. The seventh…

  6. Coping with Dialectical Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockriede, Wayne

    This paper discusses some of the central issues involved in philosophizing about rhetoric by raising two primary questions within the context of three traditional branches of philosophy: ontology, axiology, and epistemology. The two questions raised are: What are dialectical tensions in a philosophy of rhetoric? and How does a person try to cope…

  7. The Tension Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    This is a bibliography of literature on the subject of tension. Books, films, and periodicals with a bearing on stress, relaxation, anxiety, and/or methods of controlling stress are listed from the fields of physiology, psychology, and philosophy. New methods such as transcendental meditation and biofeedback are analyzed briefly and criteria are…

  8. Sensing the Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Spanning over 4 decades, NASA's bolt tension monitoring technology has benefited automakers, airplane builders, and other major manufacturers that rely on the devices to evaluate the performance of computerized torque wrenches and other assembly line mechanisms. In recent years, the advancement of ultrasonic sensors has drastically eased this process for users, ensuring that proper tension and torque are being applied to bolts and fasteners, with less time needed for data analysis. Langley Research Center s Nondestructive Evaluation Branch is one of the latest NASA programs to incorporate ultrasonic sensors within a bolt tension measurement instrument. As a multi-disciplined research group focused on spacecraft and aerospace transportation safety, one of the branch s many commitments includes transferring problem solutions to industry. In 1998, the branch carried out this obligation in a licensing agreement with Micro Control, Inc., of West Bloomfield, Michigan. Micro Control, an automotive inspection company, obtained the licenses to two Langley patents to provide an improved-but-inexpensive means of ultrasonic tension measurement.

  9. Multiscale surface roughening of commercial purity titanium during uniaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina Kozelskaya, Anna Sinyakova, Elena; Lider, Andrey Sklyarova, Elena

    2015-10-27

    The mechanisms of the surface roughening of the titanium specimens during uniaxial tension were demonstrated. By means of optical profilometry and electron backscattered diffraction it was shown that the formation of surface roughening is a multilevel process. The correlation between the density of slip in some grains, and grain rotation, and their displacement towards the free surface was investigated.

  10. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  11. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    SciTech Connect

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  12. Development of indirect ring tension test for fracture characterization of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Siavashani, Alireza

    Low temperature cracking is a major distress in asphalt pavements. Several test configurations have been introduced to characterize the fracture properties of hot mix (HMA); however, most are considered to be research tools due to the complexity of the test methods or equipment. This dissertation describes the development of the indirect ring tension (IRT) fracture test for HMA, which was designed to be an effective and user-friendly test that could be deployed at the Department of Transportation level. The primary advantages of this innovative and yet practical test include: relatively large fracture surface test zone, simplicity of the specimen geometry, widespread availability of the required test equipment, and ability to test laboratory compacted specimens as well as field cores. Numerical modeling was utilized to calibrate the stress intensity factor formula of the IRT fracture test for various specimen dimensions. The results of this extensive analysis were encapsulated in a single equation. To develop the test procedure, a laboratory study was conducted to determine the optimal test parameters for HMA material. An experimental plan was then developed to evaluate the capability of the test in capturing the variations in the mix properties, asphalt pavement density, asphalt material aging, and test temperature. Five plant-produced HMA mixtures were used in this extensive study, and the results revealed that the IRT fracture test is highly repeatable, and capable of capturing the variations in the fracture properties of HMA. Furthermore, an analytical model was developed based on the viscoelastic properties of HMA to estimate the maximum allowable crack size for the pavements in the experimental study. This analysis indicated that the low-temperature cracking potential of the asphalt mixtures is highly sensitive to the fracture toughness and brittleness of the HMA material. Additionally, the IRT fracture test data seemed to correlate well with the data from

  13. Specimen housing unit for cinemicrographic studies in the vertical plane.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, J R; Tynan, C I; Boykin, E H

    1976-01-01

    A compact housing unit for low-power (X6 to X50) cinemicrographic studies of microbial specimens in the vertical plane is described. This unit was used successfully to record the development of a "halo" of cells around subsurface colonies of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:788640

  14. The elastic behavior of ductile and compacted graphite cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzloff, Kyle Eric

    The elastic modulus of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron is difficult to measure due to a non-linear stress/strain relationship. The elastic region of the stress/strain diagram may not be linear as in Hooke's law, though the specimen exhibits pure elasticity. The curvature in the stress-strain relationship is caused by energy loss in the complex interaction between the graphite nodule and the matrix. The non-linear nature of the stress strain diagram of ductile and compacted graphite iron is explained by the mechanism of solid friction, which has been developed for gray cast iron. A method for accurately determining the zero modulus is proposed, investigated, and correlated to the microstructure. Multi-factor linear regression analysis was used to correlate microstructure, physical, and chemical properties to the elastic modulus; therefore, the elastic modulus can be predicted from microstructural, physical, and chemical data. The significant factors in the regression equation were density, nodularity percentage, and copper content. The effect of copper was found to play a role in determining the elastic modulus and this is contrary to the literature available. The exact mechanism by which the modulus is decreased is not fully understood, but the elastic modulus of the iron was lowered by up to 1 x 106 psi due to the effect of copper. The hysteresis loop of the stress/strain diagram was studied for tension-compression relationships considering the microstructure, stress level, and heat treatment. The surface area in contact with the nodule/matrix interface is proportional to the hysteresis width and this in turn is proportional to the damping capacity of the iron. The data supported the solid friction mechanism for the non-linear stress/strain relationship of ductile and compacted graphite iron. The effects of heat treatment on the density and the nodule/matrix interface were studied in detail. When normalizing ductile or compacted graphite iron the transfer

  15. Spectrum fatigue testing of T-shaped tension clips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmberg, Bjoern; Wallstenius, Bengt

    1992-12-01

    An investigation of strain distributions during static loading and crack propagation and fatigue lives under spectrum loading of T-shaped tension clips was carried out. Three slightly different, with respect to geometry, T shaped tension clips made of aluminum alloy 7010-T73651 were studied. The type 1 and 4 test specimens were different only with respect to the web thickness of the clamping end. The type 1 and 2 test specimens were different with repect to milled flat circular countersink around the holes in the type 2 specimens and with respect to the radius between the web and foot. The spectrum fatigue loading consisted of a load sequence representative for the wing root, lower side, of a fighter aircraft. Tests were made at two different load levels for each specimen type. The strain measurements show that the countersink in the type 2 specimens increases the stresses in the fatigue critical region. This is also manifested in the spectrum fatigue life results, where type 2 specimens show the shortest fatigue lives. The strain measurements show that the torque used for the bolts in joining two test specimens or one test specimen and a dummy has a rather large impact on the strain in the fatigue region. The strains decrease with increasing torque. The spectrum fatigue loading resulted in approximately an equal number of flights to obtain a 10.0 mm crack for specimens of type 1 and 4. This suggests that the type 1 configuration is superior since the web thickness is smaller for this type as compared to the type 4 specimens. In other words, the type 4 specimens have an unnecessary oversize of the clamping end web thickness.

  16. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  17. In-situ creep specimen monitoring: A comparison of guided wave and local transducer techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guers, Manton J.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2017-02-01

    Performing in-situ measurements of specimens in research reactors is challenging because of the environmental conditions. In this paper, two approaches were investigated for performing in-situ measurements of the change in length of creep specimens. In the first method, the transducer is located outside the hostile environment, and the specimen is interrogated by transmitting ultrasonic guided waves down a wire waveguide to the creep specimen. In the second method, a piezoelectric element is mounted directly to the creep specimen. If the piezoelectric element can withstand the operating environment, higher resolution and more compact specimen design can be achieved with the directly mounted transducer elements.

  18. Dynamic high-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, George B; George, Easo P

    2015-01-01

    Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified for dynamic high-temperature tensile characterization of thin-sheet alloys. An induction coil heater was used to heat the specimen while a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. As an example, the high-temperature Kolsky tension bar was used to characterize a DOP-26 iridium alloy in high-strain-rate tension at 860 s(-1)/1030 degrees C.

  19. Device for Tensioning Sheet Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-30

    FOR TENSIONING SHEET MEMBERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention This invention pertains generally to tensioning devices and more...particularly to a device for tensioning thin-sheet materials so as to prevent wrinkling. Description of the Related Art Solar power sources utilized...the system. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for loading a thin-sheet material with tensioning

  20. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  1. Method for thinning specimen

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, David M.; Moran, Michael P.

    2005-03-15

    A method for thinning (such as in grinding and polishing) a material surface using an instrument means for moving an article with a discontinuous surface with an abrasive material dispersed between the material surface and the discontinuous surface where the discontinuous surface of the moving article provides an efficient means for maintaining contact of the abrasive with the material surface. When used to dimple specimens for microscopy analysis, a wheel with a surface that has been modified to produce a uniform or random discontinuous surface significantly improves the speed of the dimpling process without loss of quality of finish.

  2. Magnetic fields of spherical compact stars in a braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Fattoyev, F. J.

    2008-08-15

    We study the stellar magnetic field configuration in dependence on brane tension and present solutions of Maxwell equations in the external background space-time of a magnetized spherical star in a Randall-Sundrum II type braneworld. The star is modeled as a sphere consisting of perfect highly magnetized fluid with infinite conductivity and a frozen-in magnetic field. With respect to solutions for magnetic fields found in the Schwarzschild space-time, brane tension introduces enhancing corrections to the exterior magnetic field which could be relevant for the magnetic fields of magnetized compact objects as pulsars and magnetars and may provide observational evidence for the brane tension.

  3. Compaction dynamics of wet granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Nicolas; Ludewig, Francois; Fiscina, Jorge E.; Lumay, Geoffroy

    2013-03-01

    The extremely slow compaction dynamics of wet granular assemblies has been studied experimentally. The cohesion, due to capillary bridges between neighboring grains, has been tuned using different liquids having specific surface tension values. The characteristic relaxation time for compaction τ grows strongly with cohesion. A kinetic model, based on a free volume kinetic equations and the presence of a capillary energy barrier (due to liquid bridges), is able to reproduce quantitatively the experimental curves. This model allows one to describe the cohesion in wet granular packing. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on the extremely slow compaction dynamics of a granular assembly has also been investigated in the range 20 % - 80 % . Triboelectric and capillary condensation effects have been introduced in the kinetic model. Results confirm the existence of an optimal condition at RH ~ 45 % for minimizing cohesive interactions between glass beads.

  4. Surface tension and microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, J.; Sanz-Andrés, A.; Pérez-Grande, I.; Pindado, S.; Franchini, S.; Alonso, G.

    2014-09-01

    The behaviour of confined liquids on board an orbiting spacecraft is mainly driven by surface tension phenomena, which cause an apparently anomalous response of the liquid when compared with the behaviour that can be observed on an Earth laboratory provided that the amount of liquid is high enough. The reason is that in an orbiting spacecraft the different inertial forces acting on the bulk of the liquid are almost zero, causing thus capillary forces to be the dominant ones. Of course, since gravity forces are proportional to the liquid volume, whereas surface tension forces are proportional to the liquid surface, there are situations on Earth where capillarity can be the dominant effect, as it happens when very small volume liquid samples are considered. However, work with small size samples may require the use of sophisticated optical devices. Leaving aside the neutral buoyancy technique, a way of handling large liquid interfaces is by using drop towers, where the sample falls subjected to the action of Earth’s gravity. This approach is suitable when the characteristic time of the problem under consideration is much smaller than the drop time. In this work the transformation of an out-of-use chimney into a drop tower is presented. Because of the miniaturization, hardiness and low cost of current electronic devices, a drop tower can be used as an inexpensive tool for undergraduate students to experimentally analyse a large variety of surface tension driven phenomena.

  5. Tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S

    1999-01-01

    Tension-type headaches, the most prevalent form of headache, are differentiated as being either episodic or chronic. The episodic form is a physiologic response to stress, anxiety, depression, emotional conflicts, fatigue, or repressed hostility. Treatment focuses on the use of over-the-counter or prescribed simple analgesics for pain relief. Successful treatment of the chronic form depends on recognition of depression or persistent anxiety states. Primary care physicians can effectively manage most of these patients with nonhabituating anxiolytic or antidepressant medications; however, referrals for psychotherapy may be required in some cases. When tension-type headaches occur in children and adolescents, the physician must explore the patient's family and social relationships as well as school performance. In addition to nonhabituating drug therapies, family counseling and biofeedback may be helpful. In coexisting migraine and tension-type headaches, nonhabituating analgesics may be used for the relief of acute pain; the use of ergotamine and triptans should be restricted to relief of the hard or sick headache. Tricyclic antidepressants or monoamine oxidase inhibitors are the gold standards for prophylaxis, although the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be indicated in less severe cases. Several forms of biofeedback have also proved effective. Nonetheless, some patients with this form of headache may require psychiatric treatment for severe depression.

  6. Specimen flatness of thin crystalline arrays: influence of the substrate.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, R M

    1992-10-01

    The extreme degree of specimen flatness (i.e. planarity) required for high-resolution electron diffraction and electron microscopy at high tilt angles cannot be realized with thin, sheet-like crystals of biological macromolecules, just on the basis of the intrinsic stiffness of the specimen itself. In an effort to improve the rate of success at which suitably flat specimens are prepared, this paper analyzes several different factors that can either limit or enhance the specimen flatness. If specimens are adsorbed (by attractive forces) to a support film, such as evaporated carbon, which itself is not flat to atomic dimensions, quantitative calculations show that it is quite likely that the specimen will be too wrinkled to be used for high-resolution studies. Adsorption to an air-water interface is more likely to result in the necessary degree of flatness. Repulsive interactions, which might be used to "sandwich" a specimen between two interfaces, are estimated to be too "soft", i.e. too long-range in character, to be effective. Finally, if only one edge of a specimen sticks firmly to a substrate, then surface tension forces can pull the specimen taut over the surface of the substrate, so that the specimen itself can be more flat than the surface of the substrate upon which it is deposited. A second, important consideration in many studies is the fact that cooling the specimen to low temperature can result in specimen wrinkling, because of the fact that the biological crystal has a much larger coefficient of thermal expansion than that of the evaporated carbon film. In this case one expects that cooling-induced wrinkling might be reduced by using a metal support grid which has a smaller thermal coefficient than that of the carbon film. The validity of this qualitative idea is supported by experiments which show that cooling-induced wrinkling of glucose-embedded purple membrane can be prevented if molybdenum grids are used rather than copper.

  7. Repulsive gravity in tension stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J.; Lynden-Bell, D.

    1991-09-01

    In stars, pressure opposes the attractive force of gravity. In general relativity, if the pressure is negative (a tension) and P is less than -1/3 rho(c)-squared, then the resulting gravity is repulsive. Such material is invoked in cosmology to give the inflation of the universe. In tension stars, this repulsive gravity is balanced by the tension. The simplest tension stars only exist in esoteric situations beyond the neck of an Einstein-Rosen bridge in Schwarzschild space. Here, tension material is confined within a massive shell of normal matter. The resulting object, while still repulsive inside, has an attractive exterior gravity and can, in principle, exist without horizons.

  8. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  9. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  10. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members, which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  11. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-09

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  12. Machining Test Specimens from Harvested Zion RPV Segments for Through Wall Attenuation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Nanstad, Randy K

    2015-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Zion Units 1 and 2 Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) in Zion, Illinois presents a special opportunity for developing a better understanding of materials degradation and other issues associated with extending the lifetime of existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years of service. In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor fleet, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Solutions, the selective procurement of materials, structures, and components from the decommissioned reactors. In this paper, we will discuss the acquisition of segments of the Zion Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), the cutting of these segments into sections and blocks from the beltline and upper vertical welds and plate material, the current status of machining those blocks into mechanical (Charpy, compact tension, and tensile) test specimens and coupons for chemical and microstructural (TEM, APT, SANS, and nano indention) characterization, as well as the current test plans and possible collaborative projects. Access to service-irradiated RPV welds and plate sections will allow through wall attenuation studies to be performed, which will be used to assess current radiation damage models (Rosseel et al. (2012) and Rosseel et al. (2015)).

  13. Quantification of fatigue cracking in CT specimens with passive and active piezoelectric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianguo; Ziehl, Paul; Zarate, Boris; Caicedo, Juan; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Metrovich, Brian; Matta, Fabio

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel bridges is of interest to bridge owners and agencies. Monitoring of fatigue cracks has been attempted with acoustic emission using either resonant or broadband sensors. One drawback of passive sensing is that the data is limited to that caused by growing cracks. In this work, passive emission was complemented with active sensing (piezoelectric wafer active sensors) for enhanced detection capabilities. Passive and active sensing methods were described for fatigue crack monitoring on specialized compact tension specimens. The characteristics of acoustic emission were obtained to understand the correlation of acoustic emission behavior and crack growth. Crack and noise induced signals were interpreted through Swansong II Filter and waveform-based approaches, which are appropriate for data interpretation of field tests. Upon detection of crack extension, active sensing was activated to measure the crack size. Model updating techniques were employed to minimize the difference between the numerical results and experimental data. The long term objective of this research is to develop an in-service prognostic system to monitor structural health and to assess the remaining fatigue life.

  14. The Compact for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Fred Harvey

    The Compact for Education is not yet particularly significant either for good or evil. Partly because of time and partly because of unreasonable expectations, the Compact is not yet a going concern. Enthusiasts have overestimated Compact possibilities and opponents have overestimated its dangers, so if the organization has limited rather than…

  15. A dynamic technique for measuring surface tension at high temperatures in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miiller, A. P.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a dynamic technique for measuring surface tension of liquid metals at high temperatures in a microgravity environment was demonstrated. The basic method involves heating a tubular specimen resistively from ambient temperature through its melting point in about 1 sec by passing an electrical current pulse through it, while simultaneously recording the pertinent experimental quantities. Static equilibrium for the molten specimen is achieved in a microgravity environment by splitting the current after it passes through the specimen tube and returning a fraction along the tube axis, and the remaining fraction outside the specimen. Adjustments to the current split enable a balance between the magnetic and surface tension forces acting on the specimen. Values for surface tension are determined from measurements of the equilibrium dimensions of the molten specimen tube, and the magnitudes of the currents. Rapid melting experiments, performed during microgravity simulations with the NASA KC-135 aircraft, yield a value for the surface tension of copper at its melting point which is in agreement with literature data. Measurements of surface tension of a refractory metal (tantalum) are underway.

  16. Passive and active tension in single cardiac myofibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Linke, W A; Popov, V I; Pollack, G H

    1994-01-01

    Single myofibrils were isolated from chemically skinned rabbit heart and mounted in an apparatus described previously (Fearn et al., 1993; Linke et al., 1993). We measured the passive length-tension relation and active isometric force, both normalized to cross sectional area. Myofibrillar cross sectional area was calculated based on measurements of myofibril diameter from both phase-contrast images and electron micrographs. Passive tension values up to sarcomere lengths of approximately 2.2 microns were similar to those reported in larger cardiac muscle specimens. Thus, the element responsible for most, if not all, passive force of cardiac muscle at physiological sarcomere lengths appears to reside within the myofibrils. Above 2.2 microns, passive tension continued to rise, but not as steeply as reported in multicellular preparations. Apparently, structures other than the myofibrils become increasingly important in determining the magnitude of passive tension at these stretched lengths. Knowing the myofibrillar component of passive tension allowed us to infer the stress-strain relation of titin, the polypeptide thought to support passive force in the sarcomere. The elastic modulus of titin is 3.5 x 10(6) dyn cm-2, a value similar to that reported for elastin. Maximum active isometric tension in the single myofibril at sarcomere lengths of 2.1-2.3 microns was 145 +/- 35 mN/mm2 (mean +/- SD; n = 15). This value is comparable with that measured in fixed-end contractions of larger cardiac specimens, when the amount of nonmyofibrillar space in those preparations is considered. However, it is about 4 times lower than the maximum active tension previously measured in single skeletal myofibrils under similar conditions (Bartoo et al., 1993). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 7 PMID:7948691

  17. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  18. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE PAGES

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  19. Tension in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Löffek, Stefanie; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Helfrich, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Integrins represent a large family of cell receptors that mediate adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), thereby modulating a variety of cellular functions that are required for proliferation, migration, malignant conversion and invasiveness. During tumorigenesis the conversion of a tumor cell from sessile, stationary phenotype to an invasive phenotype requires the ability of tumor cells to interact with their environment in order to transduce signals from the ECM into the cells. Hence, there is increasing evidence that changes in the composition, topography and tension of tumor matrix can be sensed by integrin receptors, leading to the regulation of intracellular signalling events which subsequently help to fuel cancer progression. The fact that intracellular signals perceived from integrin ligand binding impact on almost all steps of tumor progression, including tumor cell proliferation, survival, metastatic dissemination and colonization of a metastatic niche, renders integrins as ideal candidates for the development of therapeutic agents. In this review we summarize the role of integrins in cancer with the special focus on cancer therapies and the recent progress that has been made in the understanding of “integrin-induced tension in cancer”. Finally, we conclude with clinical evidence for the role of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in the development of therapy-resistant tumors. PMID:27854331

  20. High Strain Rate Characterization of Laminate Composites Using Direct-Tension Split Hopkinson Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkala, S.; Hommeida, A.; Brar, N. S.

    1999-06-01

    Data on high strain rate response of laminate composites is required to numerically simulate penetration/perforation events. Tension specimens of laminate composites can only be fabricated in dog-bone shape and, therefore, a direct tension Hopkinson bar configuration is more appropriate for acquiring high strain data. Launching a 6.35-mm wall thickness aluminum tube around 25.4 diameter aluminum incident bar produces the tension pulse in the incident bar. Ends of the composite specimens in the dog-bone configuration are placed in specially designed grips, which are screwed in the incident and transmitter bars. The configuration allows testing of specimens with threaded ends. Stress-strain data on 6061-T6 aluminum and titanium 6-4 at a strain rate of 10^3/s agree with the published data. High strain rate data on laminate composite specimens reinforced with graphite and glass fibers will be presented.

  1. [Polypragmasy in chronic tension headache?].

    PubMed

    Aull, S; Maly, J; Mraz, M; Schnider, P; Travniczek, A; Zeiler, K; Wessely, P

    1994-01-01

    The various forms of treatment (drugs as well as non-drug therapy) of patients suffering from tension type headache are presented. Analgesics and non-steroidal antirheumatics are used in the management of episodic tension type headache, as well as acute exacerbation of chronic tension type headache. In view of the presumably multifactorial pathogenesis, a multidimensional therapeutic approach is required in patients with chronic tension type headache. Antidepressive drugs (thymoleptics) are usually prescribed as basic therapy. Additional implementation of non-drug therapeutic measures tailored to individual symptomatology is advisable, such as EMG biofeedback, other relaxation techniques, massage, physiotherapy and--in selected cases--psychotherapy or acupuncture.

  2. Crystallographic Analysis of Fatigue Crack Initiation Behavior in Coarse-Grained Magnesium Alloy Under Tension-Tension Loading Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Kazuhiro; Kakiuchi, Toshifumi; Uematsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-07-01

    Plane bending fatigue tests are conducted to investigate fatigue crack initiation mechanisms in coarse-grained magnesium alloy, AZ31, under the stress ratios R = -1 and 0.1. The initial crystallographic structures are analyzed by an electron backscatter diffraction method. The slip or twin operation during fatigue tests is identified from the line angle analyses based on Euler angles of the grains. Under the stress ratio R = -1, relatively thick tension twin bands are formed in coarse grains. Subsequently, compression twin or secondary pyramidal slip operates within the tension twin band, resulting in the fatigue crack initiation. On the other hand, under R = 0.1 with tension-tension loading cycles, twin bands are formed on the specimen surface, but the angles of those bands do not correspond to tension twins. Misorientation analyses of c-axes in the matrix grain and twin band reveal that double twins are activated. Under R = 0.1, fatigue crack initiates along the double twin boundaries. The different manners of fatigue crack initiation at R = -1 and 0.1 are related to the asymmetricity of twining under tension and compression loadings. The fatigue strengths under different stress ratios cannot be estimated by the modified Goodman diagram due to the effect of stress ratio on crack initiation mechanisms.

  3. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  4. Green strength of zirconium sponge and uranium dioxide powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishna, Palanki Murty, B. Narasimha; Sahoo, P.K.; Gopalakrishna, T.

    2008-07-15

    Zirconium metal sponge is compacted into rectangular or cylindrical shapes using hydraulic presses. These shapes are stacked and electron beam welded to form a long electrode suitable for vacuum arc melting and casting into solid ingots. The compact electrodes should be sufficiently strong to prevent breakage in handling as well as during vacuum arc melting. Usually, the welds are strong and the electrode strength is limited by the green strength of the compacts, which constitute the electrode. Green strength is also required in uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder compacts, to withstand stresses during de-tensioning after compaction as well as during ejection from the die and for subsequent handling by man and machine. The strengths of zirconium sponge and UO{sub 2} powder compacts have been determined by bending and crushing respectively, and Weibul moduli evaluated. The green density of coarse sponge compact was found to be larger than that from finer sponge. The green density of compacts from lightly attrited UO{sub 2} powder was higher than that from unattrited category, accompanied by an improvement in UO{sub 2} green crushing strength. The factors governing green strength have been examined in the light of published literature and experimental evidence. The methodology and results provide a basis for quality control in metal sponge and ceramic powder compaction in the manufacture of nuclear fuel.

  5. Fracture toughness testing of Linde 1092 reactor vessel welds in the transition range using Charpy-sized specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Pavinich, W.A.; Yoon, K.K.; Hour, K.Y.; Hoffman, C.L.

    1999-10-01

    The present reference toughness method for predicting the change in fracture toughness can provide over estimates of these values because of uncertainties in initial RT{sub NDT} and shift correlations. It would be preferable to directly measure fracture toughness. However, until recently, no standard method was available to characterize fracture toughness in the transition range. ASTM E08 has developed a draft standard that shows promise for providing lower bound transition range fracture toughness using the master curve approach. This method has been successfully implemented using 1T compact fracture specimens. Combustion Engineering reactor vessel surveillance programs do not have compact fracture specimens. Therefore, the CE Owners Group developed a program to validate the master curve method for Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens for future application on irradiated specimens. This method was validated for Linde 1092 welds using unirradiated Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens by comparison of results with those from compact fracture specimens.

  6. Standard Methods for Unnotched Tension Testing of Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted by researchers at the Boeing Defense & Space Group to investigate the effects of specimen sizing on several braided textile materials. Test results from this and other test programs were compared in an effort to determine what effect, if any, specimen size has on elastic property measurements of unnotched tension test. In general, the unnotched tensile strength of 2-D braids was found to be insensitive to specimen width, length, or thickness effects. The results from this study suggest that standard testing methods used for tape materials may be sufficient for tension testing of textile composite materials. Specifically, the straight sided specimen geometry described in ASTM 3034, and used by Boeing, should provide acceptable results. Further experiments performed at Boeing and by other investigators on other textile architectures suggest similar results. Although specimen size studies were not conducted, failing stresses varied on the same order as those obtained with the 2-D materials. This suggests that the accuracy of the results were consistent with those obtained with the 2-D materials.

  7. Janka hardness using nonstandard specimens

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Marshall Begel; William Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Janka hardness determined on 1.5- by 3.5-in. specimens (2×4s) was found to be equivalent to that determined using the 2- by 2-in. specimen specified in ASTM D 143. Data are presented on the relationship between Janka hardness and the strength of clear wood. Analysis of historical data determined using standard specimens indicated no difference between side hardness...

  8. Wide range stress intensity factor expressions for ASTM E 399 standard fracture toughness specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srawley, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    For each of the two types of specimens, bend and compact, described previously for plane strain fracture toughness of materials, E 399, a polynominal expression is given for calculation of the stress intensity factor, K, from the applied force, P, and the specimen dimensions. It is explicitly stated, however, that these expressions should not be used outside the range of relative crack length, a/W, from 0.45 to 0.55. While this range is sufficient for the purpose of E 399, the same specimen types are often used for other purposes over a much wider range of a/W; for example, in the study of fatigue crack growth. Expressions are presented which are at least as accurate as those in E 399-74, and which cover much wider ranges of a/W: for the three-point bend specimen from 0 to 1; and for the compact specimen from 0.2 to 1. The range has to be restricted for the compact specimen because of the proximity of the loading pin holes to the crackline, which causes the stress intensity factor to be sensitive to small variations in dimensions when a/W is small. This is a penalty inherently associated with the compactness of the specimen.

  9. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s). 2.59 Section 2.59 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... mark as used on or in connection with the goods, or in the sale or advertising of the services....

  10. Confronting Racial and Religious Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When a community's demographics change quickly in terms of racial, religious, or ethnic makeup, Wessler notes, tension surfaces. Schools are the likeliest place for these kinds of tensions to openly come to a head. Schools can't always avoid conflicts among students who feel mutual prejudice and suspicion. But schools can address simmering…

  11. Confronting Racial and Religious Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When a community's demographics change quickly in terms of racial, religious, or ethnic makeup, Wessler notes, tension surfaces. Schools are the likeliest place for these kinds of tensions to openly come to a head. Schools can't always avoid conflicts among students who feel mutual prejudice and suspicion. But schools can address simmering…

  12. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  13. SURFACE TENSION OF SERUM

    PubMed Central

    du Noüy, P. Lecomte

    1925-01-01

    1. The injection of antigen into an animal determines a gradual change in the blood fluid which finds expression in two physicochemical manifestations that can readily be followed, namely a decrease in the static value of the surface tension of serum solutions, and a special form of crystallization when serum diluted with isotonic sodium chloride solution is allowed to evaporate under certain conditions. 2. The change in the blood is at a maximum around the 13th day after the first antigen injection, and decreases progressively thereafter until it can no longer be observed, which is usually around the 30th day. 3. The change follows the same course, whether a single large injection of antigen is made, or many smaller ones. It begins at the same time in either case, it comes to a maximum after the same period, and in its subsequent course it is not affected by the reinjection of antigen. The manifestations of the change would appear to be independent of the presence of antigen in the circulation. 4. The mean length of the protein molecules of the immune serum obtained after the injection of the antigen dealt with is little if at all different from that of the protein molecules of normal serum. 5. It is possible that this reaction is independent of the antibody formation. PMID:19869026

  14. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Sheiko, Sergei S.; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100–1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer “bottlebrushes” tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of z smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z3/2(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z2 (b/d)2 for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z1/2 / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes (d≅bz) with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb). PMID:27516626

  15. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Sheiko, Sergei S; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2011-06-14

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100-1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer "bottlebrushes" tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of [Formula: see text] smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z(3/2)(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z(2) (b/d)(2) for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z(1/2) / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes [Formula: see text] with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb).

  16. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Controlled shear/tension fixture

    DOEpatents

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway [Knoxville, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN; George, Easo P [Knoxville, TN

    2012-07-24

    A test fixture for simultaneously testing two material test samples is provided. The fixture provides substantially equal shear and tensile stresses in each test specimens. By gradually applying a load force to the fixture only one of the two specimens fractures. Upon fracture of the one specimen, the fixture and the load train lose contact and the second specimen is preserved in a state of upset just prior to fracture. Particular advantages of the fixture are (1) to control the tensile to shear load on the specimen for understanding the effect of these stresses on the deformation behavior of advanced materials, (2) to control the location of fracture for accessing localized material properties including the variation of the mechanical properties and residual stresses across the thickness of advanced materials, (3) to yield a fractured specimen for strength measurement and an unfractured specimen for examining the microstructure just prior to fracture.

  18. T*{sub {epsilon}} integral analysis of fracture specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, Y.; Ma, L.; Kobayashi, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    T*{sub {epsilon}} integral values associated with stable crack growth in thin 2024-T3 aluminum compact (CT) specimens and A606 HSLA steel single edge notched (SEN) specimens were determined directly from the crack tip displacement field obtained by moire interferometry. Stable crack growth in the SEN specimen was also simulated by an elastic-plastic finite element (FE) model which was driven by the experimentally determined boundary conditions. T*{sub {epsilon}} obtained experimentally and by FE were in reasonable agreements with each other. Unlike the vanishing J integrals with crack extension, T*{sub {epsilon}} reached steady state values with stable crack growth. Thus, for a given integration contour, {Gamma}{sub {epsilon}}, near the crack tip, T*{sub {epsilon}} can be used as a stable crack growth as well as a ductile fracture criteria.

  19. Pressure-tension test for assessing fatigue in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimani, Sayed M.; Boyd, Andrew J.; Komar, Andrew J. K.

    2017-04-01

    In a pressure-tension test, a cylindrical concrete specimen is inserted into a cylindrical steel jacket, with a rubber ``O'' ring seal at each end to prevent gas leakage. Gas pressure is then applied to the curved surface of the concrete cylinder, leaving the ends free. As the gas pressure is increased, the specimen eventually fractures across a single plane transverse to the axis of the cylinder. The gas pressure at fracture may then be considered as the tensile strength of the concrete. In this study, the pressure-tension test is used to study fatigue in concrete. A total of 22 standard concrete cylinders (100 mm × 200 mm) were tested. Both dry and wet specimens have been studied. Low-cycle loading, which involves the application of a few load cycles at high stress levels - such as a concrete structure under earthquake load - has been used in this study. It was found that the concrete specimens in a low-cycle loading fail after only a few cycles of loading and interestingly at a stress level lower than the maximum value applied in the cyclic loading. In addition, non-destructive testing (NDT) was performed to determine the progressive damage due to tensile load in concrete cylinders using Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV). It was found that UPV can be used to evaluate the damage in concrete even after the application of a very low-level of tensile stress - as low as 10% of its tensile strength.

  20. Investigation of smooth specimen scc test procedures; variations in environment, specimen size, stressing frame, and stress state. [for high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifka, B. W.; Sprowls, D. O.; Kelsey, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The variables studied in the stress-corrosion cracking performance of high strength aluminum alloys were: (1) corrosiveness of the environment, (2) specimen size and stiffness of the stressing system, (3) interpretation of transgranular cracking, and (4) interaction of the state of stress and specimen orientation in a product with an anisotropic grain structure. It was shown that the probability of failure and time to fracture for a specimen loaded in direct tension are influenced by corrosion pattern, the stressing assembly stiffness, and the notch tensile strength of the alloy. Results demonstrate that the combination of a normal tension stress and a shear stress acting on the plane of maximum susceptibility in a product with a highly directional grain cause the greatest tendency for stress-corrosion cracking.

  1. Improving corrosion resistance of post-tensioned substructures emphasizing high performance grouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schokker, Andrea Jeanne

    The use of post-tensioning in bridges can provide durability and structural benefits to the system while expediting the construction process. When post-tensioning is combined with precast elements, traffic interference can be greatly reduced through rapid construction. Post-tensioned concrete substructure elements such as bridge piers, hammerhead bents, and straddle bents have become more prevalent in recent years. Chloride induced corrosion of steel in concrete is one of the most costly forms of corrosion each year. Coastal substructure elements are exposed to seawater by immersion or spray, and inland bridges may also be at risk due to the application of deicing salts. Corrosion protection of the post-tensioning system is vital to the integrity of the structure because loss of post-tensioning can result in catastrophic failure. Documentation for durability design of the grout, ducts, and anchorage systems is very limited. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion protection measures for post-tensioned concrete substructures by designing and testing specimens representative of typical substructure elements using state-of-the-art practices in aggressive chloride exposure environments. This was accomplished through exposure testing of twenty-seven large-scale beam specimens and ten large-scale column specimens. High performance grout for post-tensioning tendon injection was also developed through a series of fresh property tests, accelerated exposure tests, and a large-scale pumping test to simulate field conditions. A high performance fly ash grout was developed for applications with small vertical rises, and a high performance anti-bleed grout was developed for applications involving large vertical rises such as tall bridge piers. Long-term exposure testing of the beam and column specimens is ongoing, but preliminary findings indicate increased corrosion protection with increasing levels of post-tensioning, although traditional

  2. Grips for Lightweight Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, William G., Jr.; Gibson, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Set of grips developed for tensile testing of lightweight composite materials. Double-wedge design substantially increases gripping force and reduces slippage. Specimen held by grips made of hardened wedges. Assembly screwed into load cell in tensile-testing machine.

  3. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  4. Specimen Collection and Submission Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    chikungunya virus , and Zika virus Specimen: see specimen requirements Shipping: ship cold on wet ice or ice packs. Turnaround: within 10 days of... cold on wet ice or ice packs. Turnaround: 1 – 3 weeks Vaccinia virus - detection of DNA in clinical samples Methodology: PCR (Laboratory Response...Tests May Include: West Nile virus (WNV), Eastern equine encephalitis virus , Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus , yellow fever virus , dengue virus

  5. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP).

  6. Comparison of Obturation Quality in Modified Continuous Wave Compaction, Continuous Wave Compaction, Lateral Compaction and Warm Vertical Compaction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Namjou, Sara; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce modified continuous wave compaction (MCWC) technique and compare its obturation quality with that of lateral compaction (LC), warm vertical compaction (WVC) and continuous wave compaction techniques (CWC). The obturation time was also compared among the four techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four single-rooted teeth with 0–5° root canal curve and 64 artificially created root canals with 15° curves in acrylic blocks were evaluated. The teeth and acrylic specimens were each divided into four subgroups of 16 for testing the obturation quality of four techniques namely LC, WVC, CWC and MCWC. Canals were prepared using the Mtwo rotary system and filled with respect to their group allocation. Obturation time was recorded. On digital radiographs, the ratio of area of voids to the total area of filled canals was calculated using the Image J software. Adaptation of the filling materials to the canal walls was assessed at three cross-sections under a stereomicroscope (X30). Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc HSD test, the Kruskal Wallis test and t-test. Results: No significant difference existed in adaptation of filling materials to canal walls among the four subgroups in teeth samples (P ≥ 0.139); but, in artificially created canals in acrylic blocks, the frequency of areas not adapted to the canal walls was significantly higher in LC technique compared to MCWC (P ≤ 0.02). The void areas were significantly more in the LC technique than in other techniques in teeth (P < 0.001). The longest obturation time belonged to WVC technique followed by LC, CW and MCWC techniques (P<0.05). The difference between the artificially created canals in blocks and teeth regarding the obturation time was not significant (P = 0.41). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, MCWC technique resulted in better adaptation of gutta-percha to canal walls than LC at all cross-sections with

  7. Analysis of temperature distribution during tension test of glass fiber reinforced plastic by fiber orientation variation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Kim, Hyoung-Seok; Lee, Dong-Gi

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, analysis of temperature distribution by fiber orientation variation under tension test was proposed through IR thermography camera. Lock-in method, which is one of technique in IR thermography camera to measure minute change in temperature, was utilized to monitor temperature distribution and change during crack propagation. Method to analyze of temperature distribution by fiber orientation variation under tension test of GFRP via IR thermography camera was suggested. At the maximum stress point, temperature was significantly increased. As shown previously, specimen with shorter fracture time showed abrupt increment of temperature at the maximum stress point. Specimen with longer fracture time displayed increment of temperature after the maximum stress point.

  8. An Experimental Study of a Stitched Composite with a Notch Subjected to Combined Bending and Tension Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Susan O.; Nettles, Alan T.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to measure the strength of stitched carbon/epoxy composites containing through-thickness damage in the form of a crack-like notch. The specimens were subjected to three types of loading: pure bending, pure tension, and combined bending and tension loads. Measurements of applied loads, strains near crack tips, and crack opening displacements (COD) were monitored in all tests. The transverse displacement at the center of the specimen was measured using a Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT). The experimental data showed that the outer surface of the pure tension specimen failed at approximately 6,000 microstrain, while in combined bending and tension loads the measured tensile strains reached 10,000 microstrain.

  9. Effects of specimen thickness and side-groove on fracture toughness of JN1 austenitic stainless steel rolled plate at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Y.; Horiguchi, K.; Kobori, T.

    1997-06-01

    In order to evaluate the fracture toughness (J{sub IC}) of JN1 austenitic stainless steel rolled plate, we performed elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests with standard and modified compact tension specimens at liquid helium temperature. These tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM standards E813-81 and E813-87 for determining J{sub IC} using the unloading compliance method to monitor crack growth. The effects of specimen thickness and side-groove on J{sub IC} and tearing modulus (T{sub mat}) are reported. The final value of physical crack extension was taken as the average of nine measurements using an optical microscope. Fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to verify the failure mechanisms. The effects of crack tunneling on the determination of J-integral resistance curves and valid J{sub IC} values, and a difference between ASTM standards E813-81 and E813-87 are also discussed.

  10. Transverse Tension Fatigue Life Characterization Through Flexure Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The transverse tension fatigue life of S2/8552 glass-epoxy and IM7/8552 carbon-epoxy was characterized using flexure tests of 90-degree laminates loaded in 3-point and 4-point bending. The influence of specimen polishing and specimen configuration on transverse tension fatigue life was examined using the glass-epoxy laminates. Results showed that 90-degree bend specimens with polished machined edges and polished tension-side surfaces, where bending failures where observed, had lower fatigue lives than unpolished specimens when cyclically loaded at equal stress levels. The influence of specimen thickness and the utility of a Weibull scaling law was examined using the carbon-epoxy laminates. The influence of test frequency on fatigue results was also documented for the 4-point bending configuration. A Weibull scaling law was used to predict the 4-point bending fatigue lives from the 3-point bending curve fit and vice-versa. Scaling was performed based on maximum cyclic stress level as well as fatigue life. The scaling laws based on stress level shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the desired direction, however, the magnitude of the shift was not adequate to accurately predict the fatigue lives. Furthermore, the scaling law based on fatigue life shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the opposite direction from measured values. Therefore, these scaling laws were not adequate for obtaining accurate predictions of the transverse tension fatigue lives.

  11. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  12. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  13. Surface tension of polyelectrolyte coacervates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jian; Priftis, Dimitrios; Farina, Robert; Perry, Sarah; Leon, Lorraine; Whitmer, Jonathan; Hoffman, Kyle; Tirrell, Matthew; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-03-01

    Stoichiometric solutions of polycations and polyanions can phase separate, resulting in the coexistence of a supernatant phase and a polymer-rich complex phase. The complex phase may be liquid-like or solid-like, depending on the ionic strength and the temperature. Liquid-like complexes, known as ``coacervates'', retain a large amount of water, up to 70-80% by weight, and exhibit an ultra-low interfacial tension with the coexisting supernatant phase (smaller than the water surface tension by three orders of magnitude). Previous experiments have observed that this interfacial tension decreases with the amount of salt, and vanishes near a critical salt concentration according to a 3 / 2 power of the salt undersaturation. In this work we derive analytical expressions for the interfacial tension in both the low and high charge density limits. For solutions with added salts, we provide explicit expressions for the interfacial tension near the critical salt concentration and explain the 3 / 2 power dependence. Our results are shown to be in good agreement with experiment.

  14. Investigation of Compaction Criteria for Airport Pavement Subgrade Soils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    stress applications and interval of time between compacting and testing .... 13 2 General shapes of hypothetical curves .. .......... ... 14 3...for Keuper Marl clay and curves generated from Equation 4 .... ............... ... 22 8 Gradation and classification data for silty clay, buckshot clay...repeated load applications. Second, the form of the static load stress- strain curve for the two sets of specimens differed significantly. For the

  15. Specification Report for TACOM Track Tensioning Programme

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    design proceeds and further details are available. Mechanical Components Track Tensioning Actuator Type Equal area folded design Active area 100 (mm 2...92 Hose Type Steel braided P.T.F.E hoses with swaged end fittings Sizes: Front to rear distribution -12 Tensioner control valve to tensioner -10 min...Gas spring to tensioner -12 min Chosen supplier and type Aeroquip, AE 246 Tensioner Control Valve Type Two stage electrohydraulic servo valve Rated

  16. Differential compaction mechanism for earth fissures near Casa Grande, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Holzer, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Precise gravity measurements indicate that earth fissures or tension cracks caused by ground-water withdrawal within a 10km2 area SE of Casa Grande are associated with relief on the buried interface between the alluvial aquifer and underlying bedrock. These relations suggest that the fissures are forming in response to localized differential compaction caused by localized variations of aquifer-system thickness. -from Authors

  17. Three-dimensional imaging through millimeter-thick tissue specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Halliwell, Michael; Bull, David R.; Davies, Jack D.; Chinyama, Catherine N.; Wells, Peter N. T.

    1997-04-01

    A 780 nm stage-scanned confocal transmission microscope using compact disk (CD) player optics has been constructed and used to study test objects (including scattering effects) and breast tissue specimens (25-1500 micrometer thick). Confocal alignment in transmission is achieved using the CD optical mechanism moving coils to scan the objective lens until intensity peaks; the specimen is present but motionless. Intensity variation as a 3D function of mis- alignment of the two foci may allow estimation of optic deterioration caused by the specimen; appropriate confocal apertures and sample spacings can then be selected. Experimental measurements have been supplemented by 2D Monte-Carlo modeling of photon transport for a scattering- limited confocal transmission system. Modeling has characterized: transmission as a function of focal depth in a slab; contrast produced by a range of embedded spherical target radii; and optical mis-alignment. Poor dye perfusion within thick stained specimens results in little visible internal structure. This may be improved using partially phase dependent imaging (approximately equal to split- detector), sensitive to specimen refractive index variations.

  18. The tension raft jacket concept

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, P.; Nygaard, C.; Greiner, W.; Johnson, B.; Datta, B.; Dove, P.G.S.; Souza, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Concept level engineering has been performed for a promising new deepwater platform design. The tension raft jacket (TRJ) employs a fairly conventional fixed platform-type jacket and deck supported by a deeply submerged buoyant concrete raft. The raft is founded to the sea bottom by vertically tensioned tendons similar to conventional TLPs. Tensioned drilling and production risers are used. A TRJ design is discussed for a medium-size deck payload and a water depth of about 1,500 feet. Work to date includes preliminary sizing of the deck, jacket, raft and tendons; global response analysis; development of potential fabrication and installation methods; and development of preliminary schedules and costs. The TRJ concept is expected to compete with compliant tower platforms in shallow water depths and with large drilling TLPs in deep water. The primary benefits of the TRJ concept are simplicity of design, constructability with existing Gulf of Mexico (GOM) infrastructure, lower capital costs, and shorter development schedules.

  19. Epistructural Tension Promotes Protein Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2012-05-01

    Epistructural tension is the reversible work per unit area required to span the aqueous interface of a soluble protein structure. The parameter accounts for the free-energy cost of imperfect hydration, involving water molecules with a shortage of hydrogen-bonding partnerships relative to bulk levels. The binding hot spots along protein-protein interfaces are identified with residues that contribute significantly to the epistructural tension in the free subunits. Upon association, such residues either displace or become deprived of low-coordination vicinal water molecules.

  20. Tension pneumocranium in childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Gill, Hardeep Singh; van As, Arjan Bastiaan

    2008-08-01

    To report a case of fatal tension pneumocephalus in a 9-year-old boy following a severe motor vehicle accident. A young boy with a serious closed head injury was resuscitated in the emergency room and underwent CT scan of the head and orbits. The CT-scan revealed a fracture of the orbital roof with extensive bilateral pneumocephalus. A high index of suspicion for tension pneumocephalus is required in patients with severe head injuries presenting with periorbital swelling and perioccular trauma. A prompt CT scan and neurosurgical intervention are indicated.

  1. Standard methods for filled hole tension testing of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, M. A.; Masters, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of two test specimen geometry parameters, the specimen width and W/D ratio, on filled-hole tensile strength were determined for textile composite materials. Test data generated by Boeing and Lockheed on 2-D and 3-D braids, and 3-D weaves were used to make these evaluations. The investigation indicated that filled-hole tensile-strength showed little sensitivity to either parameter. Test specimen configurations used in open-hole tension tests, such as those suggested by ASTM D5766 - Standard Test Method for Open Hole Tensile Strength of Polymer Matrix Composite Laminates or those proposed by MIL-HDBK-17-lD should provide adequate results for material comparisons studies. Comparisons of the materials' open-hole and filled-hole tensile strengths indicated that the latter were generally lower than the former. The 3-D braids were the exception; their filled-hole strengths were unexpected larger than their open-hole strengths. However, these increases were small compared to the scatter in the data. Thus, filled hole tension may be a critical design consideration for textile composite materials.

  2. Tension-tension fatigue behavior of the Space Shuttle strain-isolation-pad material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1981-01-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of 0.41-cm (0.16-in) thick strain-isolation-pad (SIP) material was explored in a series of constant- and random-amplitude loading tests. The SIP material is used on the Space Shuttle to isolate the ceramic insulating tiles from the strains and deflections of the aluminum alloy airframe. In all tests, 12.7 by 12.7 cm (5.0 by 5.0 in) SIP specimens were subjected to tension-tension loading in the through-the-thickness direction at a frequency of 10 Hz. When subjected to cyclic loading, the SIP material exhibited a monotonic increase in thickness and a monotonic increase in tensile tangent moduli. The rate of thickness growth increased with increasing test stress level and decreased with increasing number cycles endured. Power law equations were found to provide a good representation of the thickness growth rate data. Tensile tangent moduli increased by as much as 80 percent during fatigue tests. Simple cumulative damage fatigue models predicted the mean thickness growth under random-amplitude loading with reasonable accuracy (factor of 2 on life).

  3. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  4. Design and fabrication of graphite-epoxy bolted wing skin splice specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy bolted joint specimens were designed and fabricated. These specimens were to be representative of a side-of-body wing skin splice with a 20-year life expectancy in a commercial transport environment. Preliminary tests were performed to determine design values of bearing and net tension stresses. Based upon the information developed, a three-fastener-wide representative wing skin splice was designed for a load of 2627 KN/m (15,000 lbf/in.). One joint specimen was fabricated and tested at NASA. The wing skin splice failed at 106 percent of design ultimate load. This joint design achieved all static load objectives. Fabrication of six specimens, together with their loading fixtures, was completed, and the specimens were delivered to NASA-LRC.

  5. Researching with Children: Ethical Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Einarsdottir, Johanna; Perry, Bob

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to reflect on both the processes and outcomes of the range of approaches aimed at promoting children's engagement in research, with the specific intent of listening to children's voices. This article considers some of the ethical tensions we have experienced when engaging children in research about their prior-to-school and school…

  6. Snapping mechanical metamaterials under tension.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Akbarzadeh, Abdolhamid; Pasini, Damiano

    2015-10-21

    A snapping mechanical metamaterial is designed, which exhibits a sequential snap-through behavior under tension. The tensile response of this mechanical metamaterial can be altered by tuning the architecture of the snapping segments to achieve a range of nonlinear mechanical responses, including monotonic, S-shaped, plateau, and non-monotonic snap-through behavior.

  7. Headache (chronic tension-type).

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anita; Silver, Nicholas

    2009-07-22

    Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) is a disorder that evolves from episodic tension-type headache, with daily or very frequent episodes of headache lasting minutes to days. It affects 4.1% of the general population in the USA, and is more prevalent in women (up to 65% of cases). We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments for chronic tension-type headache? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for chronic tension-type headache? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 50 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture; amitriptyline; analgesics; anticonvulsant drugs; benzodiazepines; botulinum toxin; chiropractic and osteopathic manipulations; cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); Indian head massage; mirtazapine; relaxation and electromyographic biofeedback; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs); and tricyclic antidepressants (other than amitriptyline).

  8. Headache (chronic tension-type).

    PubMed

    Silver, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) is a disorder that evolves from episodic tension-type headache, with daily or very frequent episodes of headache lasting minutes to days. It affects 4.1% of the general population in the USA, and is more prevalent in women (up to 65% of cases). We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments for chronic tension-type headache? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for chronic tension-type headache? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to October 2005 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 38 systematic reviews, RCTs or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, amitriptyline, benzodiazepines, botulinum toxin, cognitive behavioural therapy, Indian head massage, mirtazapine, regular acute pain relief medication, relaxation and electromyographic biofeedback, serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants, and tricyclic antidepressants (other than amitriptyline).

  9. Nonrenormalization of the superstring tension

    SciTech Connect

    Dabholkar, A.; Harvey, J. A.

    1989-07-31

    It is argued that the superstring tension is not renormalized in perturbation theory for vacua which preserve /ital N/=1 spacetime supersymmetry. Some implications of this result for macroscopic superstrings are discussed, as well as some analogies between macroscopic superstrings and solitons in supersymmetric theories.

  10. Compact fringe projection profilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Chng, Sian Shing; Lee, Cheok Peng; Chua, Patrick S. K.; Asundi, A.

    2010-03-01

    A compact fringe projection profilometer is recently developed for profiling small objects. A handphone-size microprojector with LED illumination is assembled into our system to minimize the size optical 3D sensor. In our compact 3D shape measurement system, the approaches of phase shifting, temporal phase unwrapping and modified least-squares calibration are utilized to achieve high precision and an easy procedure. The portable system allows for easy and convenient 3D profile measurement to meet the requirements under diverse application conditions, such as profiling small turbine blades in aerospace workshop. Experimental results testify to the robust and reliable performance of this LED micro-projector based FPP system.

  11. Compact fringe projection profilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Chng, Sian Shing; Lee, Cheok Peng; Chua, Patrick S. K.; Asundi, A.

    2009-12-01

    A compact fringe projection profilometer is recently developed for profiling small objects. A handphone-size microprojector with LED illumination is assembled into our system to minimize the size optical 3D sensor. In our compact 3D shape measurement system, the approaches of phase shifting, temporal phase unwrapping and modified least-squares calibration are utilized to achieve high precision and an easy procedure. The portable system allows for easy and convenient 3D profile measurement to meet the requirements under diverse application conditions, such as profiling small turbine blades in aerospace workshop. Experimental results testify to the robust and reliable performance of this LED micro-projector based FPP system.

  12. Inhomogeneous compact extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Budaev, R. I.; Grobov, A. V.; Dmitriev, A. E.; Rubin, Sergey G.

    2017-10-01

    We show that an inhomogeneous compact extra space possesses two necessary features— their existence does not contradict the observable value of the cosmological constant Λ4 in pure f(R) theory, and the extra dimensions are stable relative to the "radion mode" of perturbations, the only mode considered. For a two-dimensional extra space, both analytical and numerical solutions for the metric are found, able to provide a zero or arbitrarily small Λ4. A no-go theorem has also been proved, that maximally symmetric compact extra spaces are inconsistent with 4D Minkowski space in the framework of pure f(R) gravity.

  13. Investigation of HMA compactability using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    . Actually, the prediction is not regulated by any standards or specifications, although the practice is considered to be workable. In view of the above, an extensive experiment was carried out in both the laboratory and the field based on a trial asphalt pavement section under construction. In the laboratory, the study focused on the estimation of the density of HMA specimens achieved through three different roller compaction modes (static, vibratory and a combination of both) targeted to simulate field compaction and assess the asphalt mix compactability. In the field, the different compaction modes were successively implemented on three subsections of the trial pavement section. Along each subsection, GPR data was collected in order to determine the new material's dielectric properties and based on that, to predict its density using proper algorithm. Thus, cores were extracted to be used as ground truth data. The comparison of the new asphalt material compactability as obtained from the laboratory specimens, the predictions based on GPR data and the field cores provided useful information that facilitated the selection of the most effective compaction mode yielding the proper compaction degree in the field. This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar."

  14. Baseline Test Specimen Machining Report

    SciTech Connect

    mark Carroll

    2009-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project is tasked with selecting a high temperature gas reactor technology that will be capable of generating electricity and supplying large amounts of process heat. The NGNP is presently being designed as a helium-cooled high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. The graphite baseline characterization project is conducting the research and development (R&D) activities deemed necessary to fully qualify nuclear-grade graphite for use in the NGNP reactor. Establishing nonirradiated thermomechanical and thermophysical properties by characterizing lot-to-lot and billet-to-billet variations (for probabilistic baseline data needs) through extensive data collection and statistical analysis is one of the major fundamental objectives of the project. The reactor core will be made up of stacks of graphite moderator blocks. In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the varying characteristics in a wide range of suitable graphites, any of which can be classified as “nuclear grade,” an experimental program has been initiated to develop an extensive database of the baseline characteristics of numerous candidate graphites. Various factors known to affect the properties of graphite will be investigated, including specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation within a billet (either parallel to [P] or transverse to [T] the long axis of the as-produced billet), and billet-to-billet variations within a lot or across different production lots. Because each data point is based on a certain position within a given billet of graphite, particular attention must be paid to the traceability of each specimen and its spatial location and orientation within each billet. The evaluation of these properties is discussed in the Graphite Technology Development Plan (Windes et. al, 2007). One of the key components in the evaluation of these graphite types will be mechanical testing on

  15. Limit loads for centrally cracked square plates under biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graba, Marcin

    2016-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the determination of limit loads for centrally cracked square plates subjected to biaxial tension. It briefly discusses the concept of limit loads and some aspects of numerical modelling. It presents results of numerical calculations conducted for two-dimensional (plane strain state and plane stress state) and three-dimensional cases. It also considers the relationship between the limit load and the crack length, the specimen thickness, the yield strength and the biaxial load factor, defined for the purpose of this work. The paper includes approximation formulae to calculate the limit load.

  16. Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques

    DOEpatents

    Rye,Robert R. , Yost,Frederick G.

    1998-01-01

    An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

  17. Core vs. Bulk Samples in Soil-Moisture Tension Analyses

    Treesearch

    Walter M. Broadfoot

    1954-01-01

    The usual laboratory procedure in determining soil-moisture tension values is to use "undisturbed" soil cores for tensions up to 60 cm. of water and bulk soil samples for higher tensions. Low tensions are usually obtained with a tension table and the higher tensions by use of pressure plate apparatus. In tension analysis at the Vicksburg Infiltration Project...

  18. Appendix A: Specimen 72275 documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1974-01-01

    The friability of the matrix of specimen 72275 caused numerous fragments and an abundance of fines to break away from the main mass during transport from the moon and handling in the lunar receiving laboratory. Samples 72275,1 to 72275,14 were labeled during PET examination. Samples 72275,1, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were placed in storage, and the remainder were distributed.

  19. Appendix A: Specimen 72275 documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1974-01-01

    The friability of the matrix of specimen 72275 caused numerous fragments and an abundance of fines to break away from the main mass during transport from the moon and handling in the lunar receiving laboratory. Samples 72275,1 to 72275,14 were labeled during PET examination. Samples 72275,1, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were placed in storage, and the remainder were distributed.

  20. Magnetized Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Martínez, Aurora; González Felipe, Ricardo; Manreza Paret, Daryel

    2015-01-01

    The magnetized color flavor locked matter phase can be more stable than the unpaired phase, thus becoming the ground state inside neutron stars. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, there exist an anisotropy in the pressures. We estimate the mass-radius relation of magnetized compact stars taking into account the parallel and perpendicular (to the magnetic field) pressure components.

  1. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  2. Compact Information Representations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-02

    detections (e.g., DDoS attacks), machine learning, databases, and search. Fundamentally, compact data representations are highly beneficial because they...Blessing of Dimensionality: Recovering Mixture Data via Dictionary Pursuit, to appear in IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence... Machine Learning (ICML), 2016 11. Ping Li, One Scan 1-Bit Compressed Sensing, in International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics

  3. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  4. Granular compaction by fluidization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariot, Alexis; Gauthier, Georges; Gondret, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    How to arrange a packing of spheres is a scientific question that aroused many fundamental works since a long time from Kepler's conjecture to Edward's theory (S. F. Edwards and R.B.S Oakeshott. Theory of powders. Physica A, 157: 1080-1090, 1989), where the role traditionally played by the energy in statistical problems is replaced by the volume for athermal grains. We present experimental results on the compaction of a granular pile immersed in a viscous fluid when submited to a continuous or bursting upward flow. An initial fluidized bed leads to a well reproduced initial loose packing by the settling of grains when the high enough continuous upward flow is turned off. When the upward flow is then turned on again, we record the dynamical evolution of the bed packing. For a low enough continuous upward flow, below the critical velocity of fluidization, a slow compaction dynamics is observed. Strikingly, a slow compaction can be also observed in the case of "fluidization taps" with bursts of fluid velocity higher than the critical fluidization velocity. The different compaction dynamics is discussed when varying the different control parameters of these "fluidization taps".

  5. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  6. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  7. Compact Solar Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juergens, Albert

    1980-01-01

    Describes a compact solar camera built as a one-semester student project. This camera is used for taking pictures of the sun and moon and for direct observation of the image of the sun on a screen. (Author/HM)

  8. Compact Pinch Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starck, Thomas F.; Brennan, Andrew D.

    1990-01-01

    Compact resistance-welding pinch gun lets one operator do jobs formerly needing two workers. Light in weight and produces repeatable, high-quality weld joints. Welding-electrode head rotates for easy positioning. Lever at top of handle activates spring to pinch electrodes together at preset welding force. Button at bottom of handle activates welding current. Cables supply electrical power.

  9. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  10. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  11. Concepts of marine specimen banking.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, M; Kniewald, G

    1997-05-01

    For more than a decade environmental specimen banking (ESB) has been an established approach for monitoring and retrospective environmental survey purposes in a number of developed countries. Specimen banking is carried out on regional or national scales for various environmental materials. The ecological or problem-oriented approach, as pursued e.g. in Germany or USA has the advantages of a restricted survey and a clear political mandate. Environmental problems, however, are by no means national or regional issues, since the diversity and dispersion of hazardous substances make environmental monitoring clearly a global affair. The structuring of our environment suggests that banking should not be limited by national boundaries, but rather be based on eco-systematic principles. Such distinct banking efforts should be devoted to the monitoring of physico-chemical aspects of climatic change and air pollution, soil quality, and aquatic monitoring on a world-wide scale. As some experience already exists with specialized banking programs for marine samples, such as the National Marine Mammal Tissue Bank or the Mussel Watch Program in the United States, an international marine specimen bank, based on principles of national ESB's, is advocated to be established in due time. Following the recommendations of the 1992 Rio 'Earth Summit' to pursue sustainable development strategies, such an establishment could strongly facilitate efforts concerning pollution control and mitigation, overexploitation and mining of ocean resources on a regional or global scale.

  12. Determination of interphase line tension in Langmuir films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintersmith, Jacob R.; Zou, Lu; Bernoff, Andrew J.; Alexander, James C.; Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Kooijman, Edgar E.; Mann, Elizabeth K.

    2007-06-01

    A Langmuir film is a molecularly thin film on the surface of a fluid; we study the evolution of a Langmuir film with two coexisting fluid phases driven by an interphase line tension and damped by the viscous drag of the underlying subfluid. Experimentally, we study a 4' -8-alkyl[1, 1' -biphenyl]-4-carbonitrile (8CB) Langmuir film via digitally imaged Brewster angle microscopy in a four-roll mill setup which applies a transient strain and images the response. When a compact domain is stretched by the imposed strain, it first assumes a bola shape with two tear-drop shaped reservoirs connected by a thin tether which then slowly relaxes to a circular domain which minimizes the interfacial energy of the system. We process the digital images of the experiment to extract the domain shapes. We then use one of these shapes as an initial condition for the numerical solution of a boundary-integral model of the underlying hydrodynamics and compare the subsequent images of the experiment to the numerical simulation. The numerical evolutions first verify that our hydrodynamical model can reproduce the observed dynamics. They also allow us to deduce the magnitude of the line tension in the system, often to within 1%. We find line tensions in the range of 200-600pN ; we hypothesize that this variation is due to differences in the layer depths of the 8CB fluid phases.

  13. Actin cortex architecture regulates cell surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Priyamvada; Clark, Andrew G; Smith, Matthew B; Cassani, Davide A D; Dierkes, Kai; Ragab, Anan; Roux, Philippe P; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2017-06-01

    Animal cell shape is largely determined by the cortex, a thin actin network underlying the plasma membrane in which myosin-driven stresses generate contractile tension. Tension gradients result in local contractions and drive cell deformations. Previous cortical tension regulation studies have focused on myosin motors. Here, we show that cortical actin network architecture is equally important. First, we observe that actin cortex thickness and tension are inversely correlated during cell-cycle progression. We then show that the actin filament length regulators CFL1, CAPZB and DIAPH1 regulate mitotic cortex thickness and find that both increasing and decreasing thickness decreases tension in mitosis. This suggests that the mitotic cortex is poised close to a tension maximum. Finally, using a computational model, we identify a physical mechanism by which maximum tension is achieved at intermediate actin filament lengths. Our results indicate that actin network architecture, alongside myosin activity, is key to cell surface tension regulation.

  14. Light Scattering by Surface Tension Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbuch, G.; Garbay, F.

    1979-01-01

    This simple and inexpensive experiment is an illustration of the physical concepts of interaction between light and surface tension waves, and provides a new method of measuring surface tension. (Author/GA)

  15. Electron beam welding produces improved duplex crack arrest specimens

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; Hudson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The crack arrest toughness, K/sub Ia/, is generally determined using a monolithic compact type specimen which contains a brittle weld bead to act as a crack initiation site. To test at higher temperatures and toughnesses, electron beam (EB) welded duplex specimens were fabricated. These specimens required the joining of hardened 4340 steel, which acts as the crack initiator, to A533 grade B class 1 steel base material and submerged arc welds in this base metal. The successful fabrication of these specimens required the development of an EB welding procedure with a very narrow heat-affected zone (HAZ). A technique was also developed to eliminate the porosity which was always present in the EB welds through the submerged arc weld deposit region of the joint. The technique involved remelting the joint surface of the A533 steel containing the submerged arc weld to a controlled depth using an oscillated electron beam. This remelt in vacuum reduced the gaseous constituents to low levels and prevented porosity from forming in the deep penetration EB welds between this surface and the 4340 steel.

  16. The Relationship between Tension and Length of the Aortic Adventitia Resected from the Aortic Wall of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Mitsuru; Teranishi, Hiroo; Kudo, Masahumi; Matsuura, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To our knowledge, no previous study has described the measurement of the tensile strength of the human aortic adventitia. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the tension and length of the aortic adventitia resected from the aortic wall of patients with acute aortic dissection. Methods: We obtained rectangular specimens from the aortic adventitia that was resected in patients with acute aortic dissection during surgery. The specimens were placed on a tension meter (Digital Force Gauge FGS-10, SHIMPO, Kyoto, Japan) within 15 min after resection and stretched until they were pulled apart, and the tension and length were recorded. Results: We obtained 18 specimens during surgery from 11 cases of acute aortic dissection. When the specimen was being pulled apart, the mean tension recorded was 10.2 ± 4.9 N/cm specimen width, whereas the mean elongated length recorded was 4.2 ± 1.1 mm/cm specimen length. Discussion: We determined that the aortic adventitia is elastic and expandable up to 140% of its original length. This indicates that dilation of the aorta to >4.2 cm in diameter may result in a rupture if the original aortic diameter prior to dissection was 3 cm. (*English translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2013; 53: 77-81) PMID:25298826

  17. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  18. Introducing surface tension to spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perko, H. A.

    2017-05-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry of surfaces and surface tension are applied to spacetime. More specifically, spacetime is modeled as a spatial fluid continuum bound together by a multi-dimensional membrane of time. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found. Equations of motion for an infinitesimal unit of spacetime are derived. The equation of motion in a time-like direction is a Klein-Gordon type equation. The equations of motion in space-like directions take the form of Schrodinger’s equation where Plank’s constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. Although much work remains, it is suggested that the spacetime surface tension may serve as a mechanical model for many phenomena in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  19. Self-Managing Stress and Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, C. G.; And Others

    Anxiety, or stress and tension, is a major problem in education for teachers as well as students. Training in the self-management of stress and tension seeks to help a person learn how to reduce tension and how to change the stress-producing features of the environment. The training program described in this paper is based on a variation of…

  20. Influence of precracked specimen configuration and starting stress intensity on the stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from a study of the effects of precracked specimen configuration and initial starting stress intensity on crack growth rate and threshold stress intensity, for both onset of cracking and crack arrest. Attention is given to AISI 4340 steel in a 3.5-percent NaCl solution, for configurations of a single edge-cracked specimen tested in cantilever bending under constant load, and a modified compact specimen bolt loaded to a constant deflection. The threshold stress intensity value determined was independent of specimen configuration, if the stress intensity value associated with the compact specimen is taken where the discontinuous break occurs in the velocity-stress intensity curve.

  1. Sarcomere overextension reduces stretch-induced tension loss in myofibrils of rabbit psoas.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Appaji; Herzog, Walter

    2011-07-28

    Stretch-induced damage to skeletal muscles results in loss of isometric tension. Although there is no direct evidence, loss of tension has been implicitly assumed to be the consequence of permanent loss of myofilament overlap in some sarcomeres ('sarcomere overextension'). Using isolated myofibrils of rabbit psoas muscle (n=38; 6 control and 32 test specimens) at 12-15°C, we directly tested the idea that loss of tension following stretch is caused by sarcomere overextension. Experimental myofibrils were maximally activated at the edge of the descending limb (sarcomere length ∼ 2.9 μm) of the sarcomere length-tension relationship and then stretched by 1 μm sarcomere(-1) at a constant speed of 0.1 μms(-1)sarcomere(-1) to result in an average strain of 33.6 ± 0.9% (mean ± 1 SE). Myofibrils were immediately returned to the original lengths and relaxed. Isometric tension measured in a subsequent re-activation 3-5 min later was reduced by 24.6 ± 1.5% from its original value. In 22 out of the 32 test specimens, all sarcomeres maintained myofilament overlap, while in 10 myofibrils one or two sarcomeres were stretched permanently beyond myofilament overlap (>4.0 μm), and thus exhibited overextended sarcomeres. Loss of tension following stretch was significantly smaller in myofibrils with overextended sarcomeres compared to myofibrils with no overextended sarcomeres (19.5 ± 2.3% and 27.1 ± 1.8%, respectively; p=0.017). Combined, these results suggest that the loss of tension associated with stretch-induced damage can occur in the absence of sarcomere overextension and that sarcomere overextension limits rather than causes stretch-induced tension loss.

  2. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  3. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  4. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  5. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  6. Compact Optical Correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Kirsch, James C.

    1989-02-01

    In the past 15 years, a dozen or so designs have been proposed for compact optical correlators. Of these, maybe one-third of them have actually been built and only a few of those tested. This paper will give an overview of some of the systems that have been built as well as mention some promising early and current designs that have not been built. The term compact, as used in the title of this paper, will be applied very loosely; to mean smaller than a laboratory size optical table. To date, only one correlator has been built and tested that actually can be called miniature. This softball size correlator was built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation for the U. S. Army Missile Command at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. More will be said about this correlator in following sections.

  7. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  8. Super-Compact Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc. produced the portable Farfield-2 laser for field applications that require high power pulsed illumination. The compact design was conceived through research at Goddard Space Flight Center on laser instruments for space missions to carry out geoscience studies of Earth. An exclusive license to the key NASA patent for the compact laser design was assigned to Microcosm. The FarField-2 is ideal for field applications, has low power consumption, does not need water cooling or gas supplies, and produces nearly ideal beam quality. The properties of the laser also make it effective over long distances, which is one reason why NASA developed the technology for laser altimeters that can be toted aboard spacecraft. Applications for the FarField-2 include medicine, biology, and materials science and processing, as well as diamond marking, semiconductor line-cutting, chromosome surgery, and fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  10. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  11. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  12. DNA Extraction from Museum Specimens of Parasitic Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jeremy C.; Mills, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    At the same time that molecular researchers are improving techniques to extract DNA from museum specimens, this increased demand for access to museum specimens has created tension between the need to preserve specimens for maintaining collections and morphological research and the desire to conduct molecular analyses. To address these concerns, we examined the suitability of non-invasive DNA extraction techniques on three species of parasitic Hymenoptera (Braconidae), and test the effects of body size (parasitoid species), age (time since collection), and DNA concentration from each extract on the probability of amplifying meaningful fragments of two commonly used genetic loci. We found that age was a significant factor for determining the probability of success for sequencing both 28S and COI fragments. While the size of the braconid parasitoids significantly affected the total amount of extracted DNA, neither size nor DNA concentration were significant factors for the amplification of either gene region. We also tested several primer combinations of various lengths, but were unable to amplify fragments longer than ∼150 base pairs. These short fragments of 28S and COI were however sufficient for species identification, and for the discovery of within species genetic variation. PMID:23077493

  13. Compact Torsatron configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Dominguez, N.; Garcia, L.; Lynch, V. E.; Lyon, J. F.; Cary, J. R.; Hanson, J. D.; Navarro, A. P.

    1987-09-01

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high BETA should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite BETA. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  15. Compact optical isolator.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, F J

    1971-10-01

    This paper describes a compact Faraday rotation isolator using terbium aluminum garnet (TAG) as the Faraday rotation material and small high field permanent magnets made of copper-rare earth alloys. The nominal isolation is 26 dB with a 0.4-dB forward loss. The present isolator can be adjusted to provide effective isolation from 4880 A to 5145 A. Details of the design, fabrication, and performance of the isolator are presented.

  16. Compact Pinch Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Thomas, Clark S.

    1991-01-01

    Spot welder designed for bonding insulated metal strips together. Compact, measuring only about 33.5 cm in its largest linear dimension. Pinch welder clamps electrodes on weldments with strong, repeatable force. Compressed air supplied through fitting on one handle. Small switch on same handle starts welding process when operator presses it with trigger. Provides higher, more repeatable clamping force than manually driven gun and thus produces weld joints of higher quality. Light in weight and therefore positioned precisely by operator.

  17. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  18. Soft x-ray holographic tomography for biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongyi; Chen, Jianwen; Xie, Honglan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Jiang, Shiping; Zhang, Yuxuan

    2003-10-01

    frequencies to improve the depth resolution. In NSRL, we performed soft X-ray holographic tomography experiments. The specimen was the spider filaments and PM M A as recording medium. By 3D CT reconstruction of the projection data, three dimensional density distribution of the specimen was obtained. Also, we developed a new X-ray holographic tomography m ethod called pre-amplified holographic tomography. The method permits a digital real-time 3D reconstruction with high-resolution and a simple and compact experimental setup as well.

  19. Small membranes under negative surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Yotam Y.; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-01

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes—(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability.

  20. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  1. Pulsatile cell-autonomous contractility drives compaction in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Turlier, Hervé; Nédélec, François; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Mammalian embryos initiate morphogenesis with compaction, which is essential for specifying the first lineages of the blastocyst. The 8-cell-stage mouse embryo compacts by enlarging its cell-cell contacts in a Cdh1-dependent manner. It was therefore proposed that Cdh1 adhesion molecules generate the forces driving compaction. Using micropipette aspiration to map all tensions in a developing embryo, we show that compaction is primarily driven by a twofold increase in tension at the cell-medium interface. We show that the principal force generator of compaction is the actomyosin cortex, which gives rise to pulsed contractions starting at the 8-cell stage. Remarkably, contractions emerge as periodic cortical waves when cells are disengaged from adhesive contacts. In line with this, tension mapping of mzCdh1(-/-) embryos suggests that Cdh1 acts by redirecting contractility away from cell-cell contacts. Our study provides a framework to understand early mammalian embryogenesis and original perspectives on evolutionary conserved pulsed contractions.

  2. Squeeze flow and compaction behavior of toughened polyimide matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Byung Lip; Pater, R.; Soucek, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    The main emphasis was placed upon the squeeze flow and compaction behavior of the Lewis Research Center (LaRC) research project series polyimide matrix composites. The measurement of squeeze film flow behavior was performed by a plastometer which monitors the change of thickness of a prepreg specimen laid between two parallel plates under the specified temperature and pressure history. A critical evaluation of the plastometer data was attempted by examining the morphology of the specimen at various points during the squeeze flow. The effects of crosslinks (Mc) of resin, imidization (B-ataging) condition, and pressure on the squeeze flow behavior were examined. Results are given.

  3. Mental health and group tensions

    PubMed Central

    Koekebakker, J.

    1955-01-01

    The author points out that, with the development of technology in industry and the resultant more-technical roles demanded of workers, communication between them and between all persons in an industrial organization becomes of primary importance. This is particularly so because of the constant demands for change within an industrial organization. Any change, however minor, will inevitably involve a wide area of the organization, and special attention will therefore have to be paid to communication between persons. The author goes on to describe some of the investigations which have been made by the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Leyden, and indicates the extreme difficulty of obtaining accurate information. He shows also how the different attitudes of persons within a factory can lead to completely different perceptions of the field and of the attitudes of others within the same organization. He concludes that the main task of the mental health workers in industry lies in the prevention of tensions within it. One of the means of preventing tensions is to aim at a concept of “productive collaboration” within a factory. This task is seen as a special kind of therapy which must concern all levels of the factory. The author describes a procedure of investigation—diagnostic and therapeutic—within a factory, commencing with a phase of introduction, a pilot study, extensive individual interviewing, group interviewing, and a more specifically therapeutic phase, in which groups or specific individuals are enabled to talk their problems out. Finally, the investigating team must take steps to prevent situations of tension recurring, and, before leaving, must be certain that the plant is capable of maintaining a healthy equilibrium by itself. PMID:13276808

  4. Surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Thermocapillary flow is driven by a thermally induced surface tension variation along a liquid free surface. In the Earth-gravity environment such flows are usually overshadowed by buoyancy driven flows, but at reduced gravity conditions their influence could be significant. A comprehensive theoretical and experimental research program was stated 12 years ago and is still being continued. Past work done at Case Western Reserve University as well as work done by others is reviewed. The justification for low-gravity experiments is presented.

  5. Solute clustering and interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, M. A.; Garside, John

    1986-07-01

    The effect of surface curvature on surface tension has been included in the theory of homogeneous nucleation to show that, under certain conditions, cluster formation results in a decrease in Gibb's free energy. This cluster formation is thus a spontaneous event and a quasi-equilibrium concentration of clusters of narrow size range may then exist in supersaturated solutions. Previous experimental work suggests the existence of solute clusters in a variety of aqueous solutions. The implications for crystal nucleation and growth theory are discussed.

  6. Medicines management. A tension seeker.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, M; Ayyash, H; Burrill, P

    1999-07-22

    Tensions exist across the primary-secondary care interface between GPs and hospital prescribing services. Repeat prescribing arrangements are a good focus for audit, as a patient started by the hospital on a treatment will tend to stay on it after discharge, with knock-on costs for primary care. Cost-effectiveness improvements in prescribing practice have included a significant reduction in hospital prescribing of 'loss-led' oral nitrates in favour of generic equivalents and the adoption as standard of the most cost-effective of the new proton pump inhibitors.

  7. Giant bulla mimicking tension pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Mertol; Saydam, Ozkan; Altin, Remzi; Kart, Levent

    2009-01-01

    In the chest X-ray, we observe tension pneumothorax (TPX) as wide radiolucent view in a hemithorax and pushing the mediastinal structures contralateral. Giant bulla may mimic TPX with wide radiolucent view and mediastinal shift. The present report includes giant pulmonary bulla in 35-year-old woman. The giant bulla was diagnosed as a TPX in emergency, and chest tube was performed. The differentiation between TPX and a giant bulla may be very difficult. The therapies of these two similar entities are completely different. So that, we must be careful about anamnesis, physical examination and radiology for true diagnosis.

  8. Axelrod's model with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Bruno; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we propose a subtle change in Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture. The mechanism consists of excluding from the set of potentially interacting neighbors those that would never possibly exchange. Although the alteration proposed does not alter the state space topologically, it yields significant qualitative changes, specifically the emergence of surface tension, driving the system in some cases to metastable states. The transient behavior is considerably richer, and cultural regions become stable leading to the formation of different spatiotemporal patterns. A metastable "glassy" phase emerges between the globalized phase and the disordered, multicultural phase.

  9. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be...

  10. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be...

  11. The effects of different compaction energy on geotechnical properties of kaolin and laterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Siti Aimi Nadia Mohd; Bakar, Ismail; Wijeyesekera, D. C.; Zainorabidin, Adnan; Azmi, Mastura; Ramli, Harris

    2017-08-01

    Strength and deformation parameters of compacted soil are known to be related to soil type and moisture. However, little attention has been directed towards understanding the influence of compaction energy on soil type and moisture. This study considers the effect of different compaction energy on certain geotechnical properties of Kaolin and Laterite soil. This paper describes a laboratory study conducted to evaluate the relationship between soil type, soil moisture content with different compaction energy and strength characteristic. Specimens were compacted with impact energy at levels of 596 kg/m3(Standard Proctor) and 2682 kJ/m3 (Modified Proctor) over a wide range of moisture contents to determine dry unit weight, and Unconfined Compression Strength Test (UCS). Result shows that compaction energy is an important factor in determining soil strength that should be considered during the planning phase of any earthwork construction operation.

  12. Experimental Observations of a Stitched Composite with a Notch Subjected to Combined Bending and Tension Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Susan O.; Nettles, Alan T.; Poe, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to support development of an analytical model for predicting the failure strains of stitched warp-knit carbon/epoxy composite materials with through-thicknesss damage in the form of a crack-like notch. Measurements of strain near notch tips, crack opening displacement (COD), and applied load were monitored in all tests. The out-of-plane displacement at the center of the notch was also measured when the specimen was subjected to bending. Three types of loading were applied: pure bending, pure tension, and combined bending and tension.

  13. Shrinkage processes in standard-size Norway spruce wood specimens with different vulnerability to cavitation

    PubMed Central

    ROSNER, SABINE; KARLSSON, BO; KONNERTH, JOHANNES; HANSMANN, CHRISTIAN

    2011-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to observe the radial shrinkage of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.)] trunkwood specimens with different hydraulic vulnerability to cavitation from the fully saturated state until the overall shrinkage reaches a stable value, and to relate wood shrinkage and recovery from shrinkage to cavitations of the water column inside the tracheids. Radial shrinkage processes in standard-size sapwood specimens (6 mm × 6 mm × 100 mm; radial, tangential and longitudinal) obtained at different positions within the trunk, representing different ages of the cambium, were compared. Cavitation events were assessed by acoustic emission (AE) testing, hydraulic vulnerability by the AE feature analysis and shrinkage was calculated from the changes in contact pressure between the 150 kHz AE transducer and the wood specimen. Two shrinkage processes were observed in both juvenile (annual rings 1 and 2) and mature wood (annual rings 17–19), the first one termed tension shrinkage and the second one cell wall shrinkage process, which started when most of the tracheids reached relative water contents below fiber saturation. Maximum tension shrinkage coincided with high-energy AEs, and the periods of shrinkage recovery could be traced to tension release due to cavitation. Juvenile wood, which was less sensitive to cavitation, had lower earlywood tracheid diameters and was less prone to deformation due to tensile strain than mature wood, showed a lower cell wall shrinkage, and thus total shrinkage. Earlywood lumen diameters and maximum tension shrinkage were strongly positively related to each other, meaning that bigger tracheids are more prone to deformation at the same water tension than the smaller tracheids. PMID:19797244

  14. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kalliampakou, K. I.; Kotta-Loizou, I.; Befani, C.; Liakos, P.; Simos, G.; Mentis, A. F.; Kalliaropoulos, A.; Doumba, P. P.; Smirlis, D.; Foka, P.; Bauhofer, O.; Poenisch, M.; Windisch, M. P.; Lee, M. E.; Koskinas, J.; Bartenschlager, R.

    2013-01-01

    Low oxygen tension exerts a significant effect on the replication of several DNA and RNA viruses in cultured cells. In vitro propagation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has thus far been studied under atmospheric oxygen levels despite the fact that the liver tissue microenvironment is hypoxic. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of HCV production in actively dividing or differentiating human hepatoma cells cultured under low or atmospheric oxygen tensions. By using both HCV replicons and infection-based assays, low oxygen was found to enhance HCV RNA replication whereas virus entry and RNA translation were not affected. Hypoxia signaling pathway-focused DNA microarray and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed an upregulation of genes related to hypoxic stress, glycolytic metabolism, cell growth, and proliferation when cells were kept under low (3% [vol/vol]) oxygen tension, likely reflecting cell adaptation to anaerobic conditions. Interestingly, hypoxia-mediated enhancement of HCV replication correlated directly with the increase in anaerobic glycolysis and creatine kinase B (CKB) activity that leads to elevated ATP production. Surprisingly, activation of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-α) was not involved in the elevation of HCV replication. Instead, a number of oncogenes known to be associated with glycolysis were upregulated and evidence that these oncogenes contribute to hypoxia-mediated enhancement of HCV replication was obtained. Finally, in liver biopsy specimens of HCV-infected patients, the levels of hypoxia and anaerobic metabolism markers correlated with HCV RNA levels. These results provide new insights into the impact of oxygen tension on the intricate HCV-host cell interaction. PMID:23269812

  15. Flow-induced elongation of von Willebrand factor precedes tension-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Darren; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Wong, Wesley P; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-08-23

    Von Willebrand factor, an ultralarge concatemeric blood protein, must bind to platelet GPIbα during bleeding to mediate hemostasis, but not in the normal circulation to avoid thrombosis. Von Willebrand factor is proposed to be mechanically activated by flow, but the mechanism remains unclear. Using microfluidics with single-molecule imaging, we simultaneously monitored reversible Von Willebrand factor extension and binding to GPIbα under flow. We show that Von Willebrand factor is activated through a two-step conformational transition: first, elongation from compact to linear form, and subsequently, a tension-dependent local transition to a state with high affinity for GPIbα. High-affinity sites develop only in upstream regions of VWF where tension exceeds ~21 pN and depend upon electrostatic interactions. Re-compaction of Von Willebrand factor is accelerated by intramolecular interactions and increases GPIbα dissociation rate. This mechanism enables VWF to be locally activated by hydrodynamic force in hemorrhage and rapidly deactivated downstream, providing a paradigm for hierarchical mechano-regulation of receptor-ligand binding.Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a blood protein involved in clotting and is proposed to be activated by flow, but the mechanism is unknown. Here the authors show that VWF is first converted from a compact to linear form by flow, and is subsequently activated to bind GPIbα in a tension-dependent manner.

  16. Improving the accuracy of specimen labeling.

    PubMed

    Dock, Bobbi

    2005-01-01

    Accurate specimen identification is a challenge in all hospitals. A mislabeled specimen can lead to devastating consequences for a patient. In an effort to decrease the risk of potential harm caused by labeling errors, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota successfully implemented a Zero Tolerance Laboratory Specimen Labeling process. After months of studying, charting, networking, and communicating with all stakeholders the new process led to a 75% reduction in laboratory specimen labeling errors.

  17. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  18. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  19. [Non-compaction cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Neumann, Till; Breuckmann, Frank; Hunold, Peter; Fries, Jochen W U; Dirsch, Olaf; Erbel, Raimund

    2005-09-01

    Isolated non-compaction of the ventricular myocardium (INVM), also known as left ventricular hypertrabeculation or spongy myocardium, belongs to the "unclassified" cardiomyopathies according to the World Health Organization. The main characteristic of this entity is a prominent trabeculation of the left ventricle with deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the ventricular cavity. The pathomechanism of INVM is thought to be an arrest in cardiac myogenesis with persistence of embryonic myocardial morphology. The most frequent clinical manifestations include congestive heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias and systemic thromboembolic events. The therapy of INVM comprises standard medical therapy for heart failure.

  20. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  1. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  2. Apparatus for automated testing of biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for performing automated testing of infections biological specimens is disclosed. The apparatus comprise a process controller for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands, and a test instrument suite comprising a means to treat the specimen to manifest an observable result, and a detector for measuring the observable result to generate specimen test results.

  3. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee testing...

  4. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee testing...

  5. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee testing...

  6. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee testing...

  7. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee testing...

  8. Oil shale compaction experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.

    1985-11-01

    Oil shale compaction reduces the void volume available for gas flow in vertical modified in situ (VMIS) retorts. The mechanical forces caused by the weight of the overlying shale can equal 700 kPa near the bottom of commercial retorts. Clear evidence of shale compaction was revealed during postburn investigation of the Rio Blanco retorts at the C-a lease tract in Colorado. Western Research Institute conducted nine laboratory experiments to measure the compaction of Green River oil shale rubble during retorting. The objectives of these experiments were (1) to determine the effects of particle size, (2) to measure the compaction of different shale grades with 12 to 25 percent void volume and (3) to study the effects of heating rate on compaction. The compaction recorded in these experiments can be separated into the compaction that occurred during retorting and the compaction that occurred as the retort cooled down. The leaner oil shale charges compacted about 3 to 4 percent of the bed height at the end of retorting regardless of the void volume or heating rate. The richer shale charges compacted by 6.6 to 22.9 percent of the bed height depending on the shale grade and void volume used. Additional compaction of approximately 1.5 to 4.3 percent of the bed height was measured as the oil shale charges cooled down. Compaction increased with an increase in void volume for oil shale grades greater than 125 l/Mg. The particle size of the oil shale brick and the heating rate did not have a significant effect on the amount of compaction measured. Kerogen decomposition is a major factor in the compaction process. The compaction may be influenced by the bitumen intermediate acting as a lubricant, causing compaction to occur over a narrow temperature range between 315 and 430/sup 0/C. While the majority of the compaction occurs early in the retorting phase, mineral carbonate decomposition may also increase the amount of compaction. 14 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Update on Normal Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Jyotiranjan; Devi, Lily; Malik, Pradeep K.; Mallick, Jogamaya

    2016-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is labelled when typical glaucomatous disc changes, visual field defects and open anterior chamber angles are associated with intraocular pressure (IOP) constantly below 21 mmHg. Chronic low vascular perfusion, Raynaud's phenomenon, migraine, nocturnal systemic hypotension and over-treated systemic hypertension are the main causes of normal tension glaucoma. Goldmann applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography and visual field analysis are the main tools of investigation for the diagnosis of NTG. Management follows the same principles of treatment for other chronic glaucomas: To reduce IOP by a substantial amount, sufficient to prevent disabling visual loss. Treatment is generally aimed to lower IOP by 30% from pre-existing levels to 12-14 mmHg. Betaxolol, brimonidine, prostaglandin analogues, trabeculectomy (in refractory cases), systemic calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine) and 24-hour monitoring of blood pressure are considered in the management of NTG. The present review summarises risk factors, causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of NTG. PMID:27413503

  10. Entropic Tension in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Sens, Pierre; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Unlike their model membrane counterparts, biological membranes are richly decorated with a heterogeneous assembly of membrane proteins. These proteins are so tightly packed that their excluded area interactions can alter the free energy landscape controlling the conformational transitions suffered by such proteins. For membrane channels, this effect can alter the critical membrane tension at which they undergo a transition from a closed to an open state, and therefore influence protein function in vivo. Despite their obvious importance, crowding phenomena in membranes are much less well studied than in the cytoplasm. Using statistical mechanics results for hard disk liquids, we show that crowding induces an entropic tension in the membrane, which influences transitions that alter the projected area and circumference of a membrane protein. As a specific case study in this effect, we consider the impact of crowding on the gating properties of bacterial mechanosensitive membrane channels, which are thought to confer osmoprotection when these cells are subjected to osmotic shock. We find that crowding can alter the gating energies by more than in physiological conditions, a substantial fraction of the total gating energies in some cases. Given the ubiquity of membrane crowding, the nonspecific nature of excluded volume interactions, and the fact that the function of many membrane proteins involve significant conformational changes, this specific case study highlights a general aspect in the function of membrane proteins. PMID:22438801

  11. Deformation analysis of boron/aluminum specimens by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Daniel; Guo, Yifan; Czarnek, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Whole-field surface deformations were measured for two slotted tension specimens from multiply laminates, one with 0 deg fiber orientation in the surface ply and the other with 45 deg orientation. Macromechanical and micromechanical details were revealed using high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Although global deformations of all plies were essentially equal, numerous random or anomalous features were observed. Local deformations of adjacent 0 deg and 45 deg plies were very different, both near the slot and remote from it, requiring large interlaminar shear strains for continuity. Shear strains were concentrated in the aluminum matrix. For 45 deg plies, a major portion of the deformation was by shear; large plastic slip of matrix occurred at random locations in 45 deg plies, wherein groups of fibers slipped relative to other groups. Shear strains in the interior, between adjacent fibers, were larger than the measured surface strains.

  12. Catalogue of maximum crack opening stress for CC(T) specimen assuming large strain condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graba, Marcin

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, values for the maximum opening crack stress and its distance from crack tip are determined for various elastic-plastic materials for centre cracked plate in tension (CC(T) specimen) are presented. Influences of yield strength, the work-hardening exponent and the crack length on the maximum opening stress were tested. The author has provided some comments and suggestions about modelling FEM assuming large strain formulation.

  13. Silicon Nitride Creep Under Various Specimen-Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Holland, Frederic A.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive creep testing of a hot-pressed silicon nitride (NC 132) was performed at 1300 C in air using five different specimen-loading configurations: (1) pure tension, (2) pure compression, (3) four-point uniaxial flexure, (4) ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and (5) ring-on-ring biaxial flexure. This paper reports experimental results as well as test techniques developed in this work. Nominal creep strain and its rate for a given nominal applied stress were greatest in tension, least in compression, and intermediate in uniaxial and biaxial flexure. Except for the case of compression loading, nominal creep strain generally decreased with time, resulting in a less-defined steady-state condition. Of the four creep formulations-power-law, hyperbolic sine, step, and redistribution--the conventional power-law formulation still provides the most convenient and reasonable estimation of the creep parameters of the NC 132 material. The data base to be obtained will be used to validate the NASA Glenn-developed design code CARES/Creep (ceramics analysis and reliability evaluation of structures and creep).

  14. Scalable Nonlinear Compact Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debojyoti; Constantinescu, Emil M.; Brown, Jed

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we focus on compact schemes resulting in tridiagonal systems of equations, specifically the fifth-order CRWENO scheme. We propose a scalable implementation of the nonlinear compact schemes by implementing a parallel tridiagonal solver based on the partitioning/substructuring approach. We use an iterative solver for the reduced system of equations; however, we solve this system to machine zero accuracy to ensure that no parallelization errors are introduced. It is possible to achieve machine-zero convergence with few iterations because of the diagonal dominance of the system. The number of iterations is specified a priori instead of a norm-based exit criterion, and collective communications are avoided. The overall algorithm thus involves only point-to-point communication between neighboring processors. Our implementation of the tridiagonal solver differs from and avoids the drawbacks of past efforts in the following ways: it introduces no parallelization-related approximations (multiprocessor solutions are exactly identical to uniprocessor ones), it involves minimal communication, the mathematical complexity is similar to that of the Thomas algorithm on a single processor, and it does not require any communication and computation scheduling.

  15. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  16. Lacunarity for compact groups.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R E; Hewitt, E; Ross, K A

    1971-01-01

    Let G be a compact Abelian group with character group X. A subset Delta of X is called a [unk](q) set (1 < q < infinity) if for all trigonometric polynomials f = [unk](k=1) (n) alpha(k)chi(k) (chi(1),...,chi(n) [unk] Delta) an inequality parallelf parallel(q) [unk] [unk] parallelf parallel(1) obtains, where [unk] is a positive constant depending only on Delta. The subset Delta is called a Sidon set if every bounded function on Delta can be matched by a Fourier-Stieltjes transform. It is known that every Sidon set is a [unk](q) set for all q. For G = T, X = Z, Rudin (J. Math. Mech., 9, 203 (1960)) has found a set that is [unk](q) for all q but not Sidon. We extend this result to all infinite compact Abelian groups G: the character group X contains a subset Delta that is [unk](q) for all q, 1 < q < infinity, but Delta is not a Sidon set.

  17. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  18. Compact Infrasonic Windscreen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Shams, Qamar A.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    A compact windscreen has been conceived for a microphone of a type used outdoors to detect atmospheric infrasound from a variety of natural and manmade sources. Wind at the microphone site contaminates received infrasonic signals (defined here as sounds having frequencies <20 Hz), because a microphone cannot distinguish between infrasonic pressures (which propagate at the speed of sound) and convective pressure fluctuations generated by wind turbulence. Hence, success in measurement of outdoor infrasound depends on effective screening of the microphone from the wind. The present compact windscreen is based on a principle: that infrasound at sufficiently large wavelength can penetrate any barrier of practical thickness. Thus, a windscreen having solid, non-porous walls can block convected pressure fluctuations from the wind while transmitting infrasonic acoustic waves. The transmission coefficient depends strongly upon the ratio between the acoustic impedance of the windscreen and that of air. Several materials have been found to have impedance ratios that render them suitable for use in constructing walls that have practical thicknesses and are capable of high transmission of infrasound. These materials (with their impedance ratios in parentheses) are polyurethane foam (222), space shuttle tile material (332), balsa (323), cedar (3,151), and pine (4,713).

  19. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  20. Use of precracked Charpy and smaller specimens to establish the master curve

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.; Nanstad, R.K.; Davidov, Y.A.

    1997-12-01

    The current provisions used in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations for the determination of the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels employs an assumption that there is a direct correlation between K{sub Ic} lower-bound toughness and the Charpy V-notch transition curve. Such correlations are subject to scatter from both approaches which weakens the reliability of fracture mechanics-based analyses. In this study, precracked Charpy and smaller size specimens are used in three-point static bend testing to develop fracture mechanics based K{sub k} values. The testing is performed under carefully controlled conditions such that the values can be used to predict the fracture toughness performance of large specimens. The concept of a universal transition curve (master curve) is applied. Data scatter that is characteristic of commercial grade steels and their weldments is handled by Weibull statistical modeling. The master curve is developed to describe the median K{sub Jc} fracture toughness for 1T size compact specimens. Size effects are modeled using weakest-link theory and are studied for different specimen geometries. It is shown that precracked Charpy specimens when tested within their confined validity limits follow the weakest-link size-adjustment trend and predict the fracture toughness of larger specimens. Specimens of smaller than Charpy sizes (5 mm thick) exhibit some disparities in results relative to weakest-link size adjustment prediction suggesting that application of such adjustment to very small specimens may have some limitations.

  1. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  2. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  3. E10 and a Small Tension Expansion of M Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, T.; Henneaux, M.; Nicolai, H.

    2002-11-01

    A formal ``small tension'' expansion of D=11 supergravity near a spacelike singularity is shown to be equivalent, at least up to 30th order in height, to a null geodesic motion in the infinite-dimensional coset space E10/K(E10), where K(E10) is the maximal compact subgroup of the hyperbolic Kac-Moody group E10(R). For the proof we make use of a novel decomposition of E10 into irreducible representations of its SL(10,R) subgroup. We explicitly show how to identify the first four rungs of the E10 coset fields with the values of geometric quantities constructed from D=11 supergravity fields and their spatial gradients taken at some comoving spatial point.

  4. Surface tension drawing of liquid from microplate capillary wells.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Willem; Ng, Tuck Wah; Lye, Jonathan Kok Keung; Liew, Oi Wah; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Pressure differentials are routinely used to actuate flow in capillaries. We advance here an alternative means of flow generation that capitalizes on the extension of a liquid bridge achieved by the drawing of a rod through the action of surface tension. This meets the exigencies of creating controllable flow using simpler and more compact means. We found the ability to generate controllable flow to be strongly affected by the liquid bridge sustaining features, and that the use of rod diameters larger than the capillary was more conducive. The extensional flow resulting from the rupture of the liquid bridge was also found to have a strong circulation component which facilitated mixing. The approach here is highly amenable for use in capillary well microplates which have significant advantages over standard microplates. The features of this approach offer usage possibilities in biochemical applications in the field, such as in the leukocyte cell adhesion and hemagglutination tests of blood samples.

  5. Splines under tension in integral transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    Splines under tension are used to develop an interpolatory representation of integral radiation operators. A quantitative measure of the stability of this representation is derived and approximated in terms of local grid lengths and the tension parameter. Cubic splines (zero tension parameter) are shown to be approximately stable when the ratio of successive grid lengths lies within a specific range. Scaling procedures for determining the tension constant from the structure of the grids and the characteristics of the problem are discussed, and the utility of these procedures is illustrated by application to the formation of resonance lines in two-dimensional media with exponential height variation of opacity.

  6. Dynamic Compaction of Porous Beds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-26

    NSWVC TR 83-246 00 00 SDYNAMIC COMPACTION OF POROUS B3EDS BY H. W. SANDUSKY T. P. LIDDIARD RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT D I 26 DECEMBER 1985...RIOBA4313 11. TITLE (Include Security Classfication3 Dynamic Compaction of Porous Beds 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sandusky, H. W., and Liddiard, T. P. 13a... Porous Bed Compaction Wave Velocity Oeflaaration-to-Detonation Transition Particle Velocity ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify

  7. A compact, robust and versatile moiré interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, D. H.; Ifju, P. G.; Han, B.

    A moiré interferometer was designed and constructed based on a general system design using a reflective crossed-line diffraction grating to produce the four beams of light necessary for moiré interferometry. The design concept, basic design and tuning procedures are discussed. The important features of the interferometer, i.e. compactness, versatility, polarization insensitivity, relaxed collimation requirements, low laser power and remote optics, are addressed. Several such interferometers have been constructed and successfully applied to engineering problems. These include examining the displacement fields surrounding drilled and preformed holes in composite laminates loaded in tension, and the evaluation of nonhomogeneous behavior in textile composites.

  8. A compact codimension-two braneworld with precisely one brane

    SciTech Connect

    Akerblom, Nikolas; Cornelissen, Gunther

    2010-06-15

    Building on earlier work on football-shaped extra dimensions, we construct a compact codimension-two braneworld with precisely one brane. The two extra dimensions topologically represent a 2-torus which is stabilized by a bulk cosmological constant and magnetic flux. The torus has positive constant curvature almost everywhere, except for a single conical singularity at the location of the brane. In contradistinction to the football-shaped case, there is no fine-tuning required for the brane tension. We also present some plausibility arguments why the model should not suffer from serious stability issues.

  9. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  10. Tension experiments on diaphragm metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henrickson, H B

    1927-01-01

    Strips of german silver, steel, copper, duralumin, nickel and brass were tested in tension in an apparatus in which the change in deflection with time was measured by means of an interferometer. This change in deflection with time caused by the application and removal of a load is defined as "drift" and "recovery," respectively. It was measured in the time interval from approximately 5 seconds to 5 hours after loading. The data are given in a series of graphs in which the drift and recovery are plotted against time. The proportional drift and recovery in five hours are given for a number of the tests, and in addition are shown graphically for nickel and steel.

  11. Bifurcation analysis of the onset of necking in an elastic/plastic cylinder under uniaxial tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, J. W.; Miles, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The bifurcation problem governing the onset of axisymmetric necking in a circular cylindrical specimen in uniaxial tension is analysed. The specimen is made of an incompressible elastic/plastic material. One end is subject to a prescribed uniform axial displacement relative to the other and both ends are shear free. The true stress at bifurcation is greater than the stress at which the maximum load is attained by an amount which depends on (a) the radius to length ratio of the specimen, (b) the ratio of the elastic shear modulus to the tangent modulus, and (c) the derivative of the tangent modulus with respect to the stress. Bifurcation takes place immediately following attainment of the maximum load when the specimen is sufficiently slender.

  12. Bifurcation analysis of the onset of necking in an elastic/plastic cylinder under uniaxial tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, J. W.; Miles, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The bifurcation problem governing the onset of axisymmetric necking in a circular cylindrical specimen in uniaxial tension is analysed. The specimen is made of an incompressible elastic/plastic material. One end is subject to a prescribed uniform axial displacement relative to the other and both ends are shear free. The true stress at bifurcation is greater than the stress at which the maximum load is attained by an amount which depends on (a) the radius to length ratio of the specimen, (b) the ratio of the elastic shear modulus to the tangent modulus, and (c) the derivative of the tangent modulus with respect to the stress. Bifurcation takes place immediately following attainment of the maximum load when the specimen is sufficiently slender.

  13. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.

  14. Mass radius relation of compact stars in the braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Luis B.; Menezes, Débora P.; Alloy, Marcelo D. E-mail: alloy@uffs.edu.br

    2014-08-01

    The braneworld scenario, based on the fact that the four dimension space-time is a hyper-surface of a five dimensional manifold, was shown to deal in a satisfactory way with the hierarchy problem. In this work we study macroscopic stellar properties of compact stars from the braneworld point of view. Using neutron star equations of state, we test the possibility of extra dimensions by solving the brane Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations obtained for three kinds of possible compact objects: hadronic, hybrid and quark stars. By comparing the macroscopic solutions with observational constraints, we establish a brane tension lower limit and the value for which the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations in the braneworld converge to the usual Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations.

  15. Tension-dependent free energies of nucleosome unwrapping

    DOE PAGES

    Lequieu, Joshua; Cordoba, Andres; Schwartz, David C.; ...

    2016-08-23

    Here, nucleosomes form the basic unit of compaction within eukaryotic genomes, and their locations represent an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism of genetic regulation. Quantifying the strength of interactions within the nucleosome is a central problem in biophysics and is critical to understanding how nucleosome positions influence gene expression. By comparing to single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that a coarse-grained molecular model of the nucleosome can reproduce key aspects of nucleosome unwrapping. Using detailed simulations of DNA and histone proteins, we calculate the tension-dependent free energy surface corresponding to the unwrapping process. The model reproduces quantitatively the forces required to unwrapmore » the nucleosome and reveals the role played by electrostatic interactions during this process. We then demonstrate that histone modifications and DNA sequence can have significant effects on the energies of nucleosome formation. Most notably, we show that histone tails contribute asymmetrically to the stability of the outer and inner turn of nucleosomal DNA and that depending on which histone tails are modified, the tension-dependent response is modulated differently.« less

  16. Tension-dependent free energies of nucleosome unwrapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lequieu, Joshua; Cordoba, Andres; Schwartz, David C.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-08-23

    Here, nucleosomes form the basic unit of compaction within eukaryotic genomes, and their locations represent an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism of genetic regulation. Quantifying the strength of interactions within the nucleosome is a central problem in biophysics and is critical to understanding how nucleosome positions influence gene expression. By comparing to single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that a coarse-grained molecular model of the nucleosome can reproduce key aspects of nucleosome unwrapping. Using detailed simulations of DNA and histone proteins, we calculate the tension-dependent free energy surface corresponding to the unwrapping process. The model reproduces quantitatively the forces required to unwrap the nucleosome and reveals the role played by electrostatic interactions during this process. We then demonstrate that histone modifications and DNA sequence can have significant effects on the energies of nucleosome formation. Most notably, we show that histone tails contribute asymmetrically to the stability of the outer and inner turn of nucleosomal DNA and that depending on which histone tails are modified, the tension-dependent response is modulated differently.

  17. Tension-Dependent Free Energies of Nucleosome Unwrapping

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes form the basic unit of compaction within eukaryotic genomes, and their locations represent an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism of genetic regulation. Quantifying the strength of interactions within the nucleosome is a central problem in biophysics and is critical to understanding how nucleosome positions influence gene expression. By comparing to single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that a coarse-grained molecular model of the nucleosome can reproduce key aspects of nucleosome unwrapping. Using detailed simulations of DNA and histone proteins, we calculate the tension-dependent free energy surface corresponding to the unwrapping process. The model reproduces quantitatively the forces required to unwrap the nucleosome and reveals the role played by electrostatic interactions during this process. We then demonstrate that histone modifications and DNA sequence can have significant effects on the energies of nucleosome formation. Most notably, we show that histone tails contribute asymmetrically to the stability of the outer and inner turn of nucleosomal DNA and that depending on which histone tails are modified, the tension-dependent response is modulated differently. PMID:27725965

  18. [The German Environmental Specimen Bank].

    PubMed

    Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Gies, Andreas; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) is the long-term storage of environmental and human samples under stable deep-freeze conditions for future research. The ESB is unique in providing a continuous historical record of environmental and human exposure to chemicals in Germany. ESB was started parallel to the development of the first German Chemicals Legislation in the late 1970s. In 1979, the ESB test operation began. After the Chemicals Law came into force in 1982, the ESB was established as a permanent facility in 1985. With the new European Chemicals Legislation, REACH, in 2007 responsibility for the safety of commercial chemicals and risk assessment was assigned to the industry. Since then, the ESB has become even more important in verifying the self-assessment of the industry, in evaluating the effectiveness of regulations, thus ensuring the protection of humans and the environment against adverse effects caused by exposure to chemicals. These objectives are pursued by the regular monitoring of contaminations and the assessment of temporal trends. Demonstrating the necessity of deriving exposure reduction measures, ESB results serve as key information for policy-makers. Information on preventing exposure to chemicals is available to the general public and to the public health services. The ESB is thus an important monitoring instrument of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety. The Federal Environment Agency operates the ESB based on its own concepts, heads the scientific data evaluation and transfers results into the environmental policy arena and to the general public.

  19. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  20. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  1. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  3. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  4. Compact photonic spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact photonic spin filter formed by integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens (focal length of ±f ) into a conventional plano-concave lens (focal length of -f). By choosing the input port of the filter, photons with a desired spin state, such as the right-handed component or the left-handed one, propagate alone its original propagation direction, while the unwanted spin component is quickly diverged after passing through the filter. One application of the filter, sorting the spin-dependent components of vector vortex beams on higher-order Poincaré sphere, is also demonstrated. Our scheme provides a simple method to manipulate light, and thereby enables potential applications for photonic devices.

  5. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  6. Compact SAW aerosol generator.

    PubMed

    Winkler, A; Harazim, S; Collins, D J; Brünig, R; Schmidt, H; Menzel, S B

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we discuss and demonstrate the principle features of surface acoustic wave (SAW) aerosol generation, based on the properties of the fluid supply, the acoustic wave field and the acoustowetting phenomena. Furthermore, we demonstrate a compact SAW-based aerosol generator amenable to mass production fabricated using simple techniques including photolithography, computerized numerical control (CNC) milling and printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing. Using this device, we present comprehensive experimental results exploring the complexity of the acoustic atomization process and the influence of fluid supply position and geometry, SAW power and fluid flow rate on the device functionality. These factors in turn influence the droplet size distribution, measured here, that is important for applications including liquid chromatography, pulmonary therapies, thin film deposition and olfactory displays.

  7. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  8. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  9. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  10. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, Easo P.

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.

  11. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; ...

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends ofmore » the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.« less

  12. Embracing Tensions in Feminist Organizational Communication Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linabary, Jasmine R.; Long, Ziyu; Mouton, Ashton; Rao, Ranjani L.; Buzzanell, Patrice M.

    2017-01-01

    Feminist pedagogies hold potential to create more inclusive and transformative classrooms. Adopting a tension-centered approach, we draw on our individual and collective reflections on the design and instruction of a multi-section undergraduate organizational communication course to build an autoethnographic account of the tensions associated with…

  13. Effect of Gravity on Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, M. M.; Azzam, M. O. J.; Mann, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of liquid-vapor interfaces are made in +/- 1-g environments to note the effect of gravity on surface tension. A slight increase is detected at -1-g0, but is arguably within the uncertainty of the measurement technique. An increased dependence of surface tension on the orientation and magnitude of the gravitational vector is anticipated as the critical point is approached.

  14. Urban-Rural Education: "Relieving the Tension".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easley, Edgar M.

    As part of a panel on rural education, Dr. Edgar M. Easley spoke on the topic "Urban-Rural Education - Relieving the Tension". Based on findings from literature of adult migration to urban areas, Dr. Easley stated the following implications for adult education teachers and administrators: (1) that the tension found in rural migrants related to…

  15. Orgone (Reichian) therapy in tension headache.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A

    1976-01-01

    Orgone (Reichian) therapy, which utilizes a unique physical approach in addition to standard character-analysis, is illustrated in cases of muscle contraction (tension) headache. It offers a more direct technique for attacking the muscular tension (somatic armor) while undermining the psychic defenses.

  16. Surface Tension Measurements of Chemically Modified Oleochemical

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface tension is an important physical property of a substance, which plays a part in a variety of physical phenomenon relevant to many industrial processes. For example, the efficiency of the atomization of a fuel has been shown to be effected dramatically by surface tension and viscosity. Beca...

  17. Investigation of Asphalt Mixture Creep Behavior Using Thin Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zofka, Adam; Marasteanu, Mihai; Turos, Mugur

    2008-02-15

    The asphalt pavement layer consists of two or more lifts of compacted asphalt mixture; the top of the layer is also exposed to aging, a factor that significantly affects the mixture properties. The current testing specifications use rather thick specimens that cannot be used to investigate the gradual change in properties with pavement depth. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the 3-point bending test with thin asphalt mixture beams (127x12.7x6.35 mm) to determine the low-temperature creep compliance of the mixtures. Several theoretical and semi-empirical models, from the theory of composites, are reviewed and evaluated using numerical and experimental data. Preliminary results show that this method can be used for low-temperature mixture characterization but several crucial factors need further inspection and interpretation.

  18. Investigation of Asphalt Mixture Creep Behavior Using Thin Beam Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zofka, Adam; Marasteanu, Mihai; Turos, Mugur

    2008-02-01

    The asphalt pavement layer consists of two or more lifts of compacted asphalt mixture; the top of the layer is also exposed to aging, a factor that significantly affects the mixture properties. The current testing specifications use rather thick specimens that cannot be used to investigate the gradual change in properties with pavement depth. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the 3-point bending test with thin asphalt mixture beams (127×12.7×6.35 mm) to determine the low-temperature creep compliance of the mixtures. Several theoretical and semi-empirical models, from the theory of composites, are reviewed and evaluated using numerical and experimental data. Preliminary results show that this method can be used for low-temperature mixture characterization but several crucial factors need further inspection and interpretation.

  19. Flat tensile specimen design for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthem, Dennis W.

    1990-01-01

    Finite element analyses of flat, reduced gage section tensile specimens with various transition region contours were performed. Within dimensional constraints, such as maximum length, tab region width, gage width, gage length, and minimum tab length, a transition contour radius of 41.9 cm produced the lowest stress values in the specimen transition region. The stresses in the transition region were not sensitive to specimen material properties. The stresses in the tab region were sensitive to specimen composite and/or tab material properties. An evaluation of stresses with different specimen composite and tab material combinations must account for material nonlinearity of both the tab and the specimen composite. Material nonlinearity can either relieve stresses in the composite under the tab or elevate them to cause failure under the tab.

  20. Standardizing the Handling of Surgical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Cheryl; Perrego, Kristen

    2015-11-01

    To standardize the handling of surgical specimens, the OR clinical educators in a community hospital setting devised a series of departmental changes as a quality improvement project. A newly created skill validation was reviewed in an hour-long educational meeting with all OR staff members. In addition to creating a new annual skill validation, discussions about specimens were included in the hand over, the time out, and a newly instituted debriefing tool to be used toward the end of a procedure. This interdisciplinary group devised interventions to improve the process of handling specimens such as standardizing the labeling process and changing the transparency of the specimen container. The goal was to assure standardization of specimen handling, specifically to assist novice staff members, and to harmonize inconsistencies between specialties within the practice of existing staff members. These combined methods helped to ensure accurate communication and procurement of specimens for all procedures.

  1. Effect of gravel on hydraulic conductivity of compacted soil liners

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, T.L. ); Daniel, D.E. )

    1993-01-01

    How much gravel should be allowed in low-hydraulic-conductivity, compacted soil liners To address this question, two clayey soils are uniformly mixed with varying percentages of gravel that, by itself, has a hydraulic conductivity of 170 cm/s. Soil/gravel mixtures are compacted and then permeated. Hydraulic conductivity of the compacted gravel/soil mixtures is less than 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] cm/s for gravel contents as high as 50-60%. For gravel contents [le] 60%, gravel content is not important: all test specimens have a low hydraulic conductivity. For gravel contents > 50-60%, the clayey soils does not fill voids between gravel particles, and high hydraulic conductivity results. The water content of the nongravel fraction is found to be a useful indicator of proper moisture conditions during compaction. From these experiments in which molding water content and compactive energy are carefully controlled, and gravel is uniformly mixed with the soil, it is concluded that the maximum allowable gravel content is approximately 50%.

  2. Compaction with Automatic Jog Introduction,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    The compaction algorithm This section defines mathematically the problem of compaction with auto- matk jog introduction, and presents a practical...t(5) of potential cuts of S, and usng their mutability cmndi to constrain the positiokn of modulo in S. The proof that this technique gen - erates a

  3. The Meaning of a Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  4. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  5. Effect of capillary waves on surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the effect which a cutting off of the capillary waves has on surface tension, taking into account a calculation based on capillary-wave theory. For simplicity, three-dimensional systems are considered, and capillary-wave theory is used to calculate sigma-k, the surface tension of an interface where only those modes with at least one wave-vector component greater than k are allowed. Attention is given to a review of capillary-wave theory, the calculation of surface tensions, a determination of the range of validity of capillary-wave theory, and some numerical examples. The quantitative behavior of sigma-k and its relation to the surface tension of a finite-size system are considered. The most surprising result is that sigma-k can be significantly larger than the unconstrained surface tension.

  6. Making Durable Specimens For Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Consistent metal-oxide cross sections prepared quickly. New process makes TEM/STEM cross sections of metal/oxide interfaces. After specimen bars oxidized, placed in specially designed mold. Following encapsulation in zinc alloy, 3-mm-diameter specimen bar sliced into disks suitable for further preparation steps. Technique used to prepare 3-mm-diameter specimens of cross sections of oxides of alloys intended for use at temperatures greater than approximately 600 degree C.

  7. Laser-heated rotating specimen autoignition test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Au, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Specimens of 440 C steel were rotated in a chamber pressurized with oxygen gas and heated with a 5-kW CO2 laser to determine the temperature required for autoignition to occur. Tests included exposures of static and rotating (25,000 rpm) specimens in oxygen pressurized to 5.51 MPa, and with focused laser fluences of more than 3.5 billion W/sq m. Specimen surface temperatures were monitored with a scanning infrared camera. Temperature measurement difficulties were experienced due to a problem with internal reflection inside the test chamber; however, posttest specimen examinations confirmed that surface melt (1371 C) was achieved in several tests. No sustained combustion was initiated in any rotating specimen. One static specimen was ignited. Results indicated that conditions necessary for autoignition of 440 C steel are more dependent on specimen geometry and available heat removal mechanisms. Sustained combustion occurred in the ignited static specimen with an estimated 130 C/sec cooling rate due to conduction. The rotating specimens could not sustain combustion due to a greater conductive/convective cooling rate of about 4000 C/sec and ejection of molten material. These results were applied to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) oxygen turbopump bearings to conclude that the LOX-cooled 440 C steel bearings cannot sustain combustion initiated by skidding friction.

  8. Effect of wire tension on stiffness of tensioned fine wires in external fixation: a mechanical study.

    PubMed

    Antoci, Valentin; Voor, Michael J; Antoci, Valentin; Roberts, Craig S

    2007-09-01

    To determine the effect of changes in magnitude of transfixion wire tension on stiffness of fine-wire external-fixation load deformation, we compared results obtained with different wire tensions (50-140 kg) under identical conditions of central axial compression, medial compression-bending, posterior compression-bending, posteromedial compression-bending, and torsion. Stiffness values were calculated from the load-deformation and torque-angle curves. Tension of 140 kg provided the most stiffness, and there was a trend toward increasing overall stiffness with increasing wire tension. The 1.8-mm wires should be tensioned to at least 110 kg in most cases of fine-wire external fixation; compared with all tensions less than 110 kg, this tension provides significantly more mechanical stability in all loading modes.

  9. A Compact Ring Design with Tunable Momentum Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2012-05-17

    A storage ring with tunable momentum compaction has the advantage in achieving different RMS bunch length with similar RF capacity, which is potentially useful for many applications, such as linear collider damping ring and predamping ring where injected beam has a large energy spread and a large transverse emittance. A tunable bunch length also makes the commissioning and fine tuning easier in manipulating the single bunch instabilities. In this paper, a compact ring design based on a supercell is presented, which achieves a tunable momentum compaction while maintaining a large dynamic aperture.

  10. Dynamical Modeling of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, Jeremiah U.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent review it is said that free-surface flows 'represent some of the difficult remaining challenges in computational fluid dynamics'. There has been progress with the development of new approaches to treating interfaces, such as the level-set method and the improvement of older methods such as the VOF method. A common theme of many of the new developments has been the regularization of discontinuities at the interface. One example of this approach is the continuum surface force (CSF) formulation for surface tension, which replaces the surface stress given by Laplace's equation by an equivalent volume force. Here, we describe how CSF formulation might be made more useful. Specifically, we consider a derivation of the CSF equations from a minimization of surface energy as outlined by Jacqmin (1996). This reformulation suggests that if one eliminates the computation of curvature in terms of a unit normal vector, parasitic currents may be eliminated. For this reformulation to work, it is necessary that transition region thickness be controlled. Various means for this, in addition to the one discussed by Jacqmin (1996), are discussed.

  11. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of Al7075/SiC nanocomposites fabricated by dynamic compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrian, A.; Majzoobi, G. H.; Enayati, M. H.; Bakhtiari, H.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of Al7075 metal matrix composites reinforced with SiC, and the characterization of their microstructure and mechanical behavior. The mechanically milled Al7075 micron-sized powder and SiC nanoparticles are dynamically compacted using a drop hammer device. This compaction is performed at different temperatures and for various volume fractions of SiC nanoparticles. The relative density is directly related to the compaction temperature rise and indirectly related to the content of SiC nanoparticle reinforcement, respectively. Furthermore, increasing the amount of SiC nanoparticles improves the strength, stiffness, and hardness of the compacted specimens. The increase in hardness and strength may be attributed to the inherent hardness of the nanoparticles, and other phenomena such as thermal mismatch and crack shielding. Nevertheless, clustering of the nanoparticles at aluminum particle boundaries make these regions become a source of concentrated stress, which reduces the load carrying capacity of the compacted nanocomposite.

  12. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  15. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  16. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  17. Compact photoacoustic tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalva, Sandeep Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a non-ionizing biomedical imaging modality which finds applications in brain imaging, tumor angiogenesis, monitoring of vascularization, breast cancer imaging, monitoring of oxygen saturation levels etc. Typical PAT systems uses Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light illumination, single element large ultrasound transducer (UST) as detector. By holding the UST in horizontal plane and moving it in a circular motion around the sample in full 2π radians photoacoustic data is collected and images are reconstructed. The horizontal positioning of the UST make the scanning radius large, leading to larger water tank and also increases the load on the motor that rotates the UST. To overcome this limitation, we present a compact photoacoustic tomographic (ComPAT) system. In this ComPAT system, instead of holding the UST in horizontal plane, it is held in vertical plane and the photoacoustic waves generated at the sample are detected by the UST after it is reflected at 45° by an acoustic reflector attached to the transducer body. With this we can reduce the water tank size and load on the motor, thus overall PAT system size can be reduced. Here we show that with the ComPAT system nearly similar PA images (phantom and in vivo data) can be obtained as that of the existing PAT systems using both flat and cylindrically focused transducers.

  18. Natural and Laboratory-Induced Compaction Bands in Aztec Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimson, B. C.; Lee, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Aztec sandstone used in this research is from the Valley of Fire State Park area, Nevada. This Jurassic aeolian sandstone is extremely weak (uniaxial compressive strength of 1-2 MPa); porosity averages 26%; grains are subrounded and have a bimodal size distribution (0.1 mm and 0.5 mm); its mineral composition (K. Sternlof, personal comm.) is 93% quartz, 5% k-spar, and 2% kaolinite, Fe carbonate and others; grain bonding is primarily through suturing. Sternlof et al. (EOS, November, 2001) observed substantial exposure of mainly compactive deformation bands in the Aztec sandstone. We studied an SEM image of a compaction band found in a hand sample of the Aztec sandstone. We also conducted a drilling test in a 130x130x180 mm prismatic specimen subjected to a preset far-field true triaxial stress condition (\\sigmah = 15 MPa, \\sigmav = 25 MPa, \\sigmaH = 40 MPa). Drilling of a 20 mm dia. vertical hole created a long fracture-like thin tabular breakout along the \\sigmah springline and perpendicular to \\sigmaH direction. SEM analysis of the zones ahead of the breakout tips revealed narrow bands of presumed debonded intact grains interspersed with grain fragments. We infer that the fragments were formed from multiple splitting or crushing of compacted grains in the band of high compressive stress concentration developed along the \\sigmah springline. SEM images away from the breakout tip surroundings showed no such fragments. SEM study of the natural compaction band showed a similar arrangement of mainly intact grains surrounded by grain fragments. Using the Optimas optical software package, we found the percentage of pore area within the band ahead of the breakout tips to average 17%; outside of this zone it was 23%. In the natural compaction band pore area occupied 8.5% of the band; in the host rock adjacent to the compaction band it averaged 19%. These readings strongly suggest porosity reduction due to compaction in both cases. The close resemblance between the

  19. Fatigue damage observed non-destructively in fibre composite coupon test specimens by X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jespersen, K. M.; Mikkelsen, L. P.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a method for monitoring the 3D fatigue damage progression on a micro-structural level in a glass fibre/polymer coupon test specimen by means of laboratory X-ray Computed Tomography (CT). A modified mount and holder made for the standard test samples to fit into the X-ray CT scanner along with a tension clamp solution is presented. Initially, the same location of the test specimen is inspected by ex-situ X-ray CT during the fatigue loading history, which shows the damage progression on a micro-structural level. The openings of individual uni-directional (UD) fibre fractures are seen to generally increase with the number of cycles, and new regions of UD fibre fractures also appear. There are some UD fibre fractures that are difficult to detect since their opening is small. Therefore, the effect of tension on the crack visibility is examined afterwards using a tension clamp solution. With applied tension some additional cracks become visible and the openings of fibre fractures increases, which shows the importance of applied tension during the scan.

  20. Tension generation by threads of contractile proteins

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Threads of contractile proteins were formed via extrusion and their isometric tensions and isotonic contraction velocities were measured. We obtained reproducible data by using a new and sensitive tensiometer. The force-velocity curves of actomyosin threads were similar to those of muscle, with isometric tensions of the order of 10g/cm2 and maximum contraction velocites of the order of 10(-2) lengths/s. The data could be fitted by Hill's equation. Addition of tropomyosin and troponin to the threads increased isometric tension and maximum contraction velocity. Threads which contained troponin and tropomyosin required Ca++ for contraction and the dependence of their isometric tension on the level of free Ca++ was like that of muscle. The dependence of tension or of contraction velocity upon temperature or upon ionic strength is similar for actomyosin threads and muscle fibers. In contrast, the dependence of most parameters which are characteristic of the actomyosin interaction in solution (or suspension) upon these variables is not similar to the dependence of the muscle fiber parameters. The conclusion we have drawn from these results is that the mechanism of tension generation in the threads is similar to the mechanism that exists in muscle. Because the protein composition of the thread system can be manipulated readily and because the tensions and velocities of the threads can be related directly to the physiological parameters of muscle fibers, the threads provide a powerful method for studying contractile proteins. PMID:137958

  1. Layered Plating Specimens For Mechanical Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Linda B.; Flowers, Cecil E.

    1991-01-01

    Layered specimens readily made in standard sizes for tensile and other tests of mechanical properties. Standard specimen of metal ordinarily difficult to plate to standard grip thickness or diameter made by augmentation with easier-to-plate material followed by machining to standard size and shape.

  2. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Research specimens. 2.5... PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or... Federal agency for the purpose of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study...

  3. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  4. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required...

  5. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  6. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... include one specimen per class showing the mark as used on or in connection with the goods or services... associated with the goods. (2) A service mark specimen must show the mark as actually used in the sale...

  7. Layered Plating Specimens For Mechanical Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Linda B.; Flowers, Cecil E.

    1991-01-01

    Layered specimens readily made in standard sizes for tensile and other tests of mechanical properties. Standard specimen of metal ordinarily difficult to plate to standard grip thickness or diameter made by augmentation with easier-to-plate material followed by machining to standard size and shape.

  8. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection. Such...

  9. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required to...

  10. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection. Such...

  11. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection. Such...

  12. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  13. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  14. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  15. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Research specimens. 2.5... PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or... Federal agency for the purpose of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group...

  16. Effect of Water on the Deformation and Failure of Rock in Uniaxial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, K.; Fukui, K.

    2015-09-01

    To design and construct underground structures, it is essential to understand the mechanical properties of rock in not only compression but also tension. It is well known that water is one of the important factors affecting the deformation and failure of rock. In this study, laboratory tests and numerical simulations were conducted to understand the effect of water on rock properties in uniaxial tension. In the experiments, a testing machine previously used for uniaxial tension tests in dry conditions was modified for tests in wet conditions. Using this machine, complete stress-strain curves from the pre- to postpeak regions of water-saturated specimens in uniaxial tension were obtained. The results for granite, tuff, and two types of andesite showed that the stress-strain curves in wet conditions have a lower initial slope and lower strength than those in dry conditions, and they are strongly nonlinear in the prepeak region. Comparing the changes in the results for uniaxial tension versus compression due to water, it was found that the reduction rate of uniaxial tensile strength was greater than that of uniaxial compressive strength, while the ratio between the reduction rates was almost constant for various rocks. In numerical simulations, the stress-strain curves in the prepeak region under dry and wet conditions could be reproduced by crack extension models under uniaxial tensile stress. Numerical analyses indicated that the nonlinearity of the stress-strain curves is probably due to the longer crack extension in wet compared with dry conditions.

  17. Handheld magnetic sensor for measurement of tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, K.; Rajamani, R.

    2012-04-01

    This letter develops an analytical formulation for measurement of tension in a string using a handheld sensor. By gently pushing the sensor against the string, the tension in the string can be obtained. An experimental sensor prototype is constructed to verify the analytical formulation. The centimeter-sized prototype utilizes three moving pistons and magnetic field based measurements of their positions. Experimental data show that the sensor can accurately measure tension on a bench top rig. The developed sensor could be useful in a variety of orthopedic surgical procedures, including knee replacement, hip replacement, ligament repair, shoulder stabilization, and tendon repair.

  18. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  19. Compactness of lateral shearing interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrec, Yann; Taboury, Jean; Sauer, Hervé; Chavel, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    Imaging lateral shearing interferometers are good candidates for airborne or spaceborne Fourier-transform spectral imaging. For such applications, compactness is one key parameter. In this article, we compare the size of four mirror-based interferometers, the Michelson interferometer with roof-top (or corner-cube) mirrors, and the cyclic interferometers with two, three, and four mirrors, focusing more particularly on the last two designs. We give the expression of the translation they induce between the two exiting rays. We then show that the cyclic interferometer with three mirrors can be made quite compact. Nevertheless, the Michelson interferometer is the most compact solution, especially for highly diverging beams.

  20. Compactness of lateral shearing interferometers.

    PubMed

    Ferrec, Yann; Taboury, Jean; Sauer, Hervé; Chavel, Pierre

    2011-08-10

    Imaging lateral shearing interferometers are good candidates for airborne or spaceborne Fourier-transform spectral imaging. For such applications, compactness is one key parameter. In this article, we compare the size of four mirror-based interferometers, the Michelson interferometer with roof-top (or corner-cube) mirrors, and the cyclic interferometers with two, three, and four mirrors, focusing more particularly on the last two designs. We give the expression of the translation they induce between the two exiting rays. We then show that the cyclic interferometer with three mirrors can be made quite compact. Nevertheless, the Michelson interferometer is the most compact solution, especially for highly diverging beams.

  1. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David [Yorktown, VA

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  2. Surface tension driven processes densify and retain permeability in magma and lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ben M.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Ian Schipper, C.; Mark Jellinek, A.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kelly Russell, J.; Lavallée, Yan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    We offer new insights into how an explosive eruption can transition into an effusive eruption. Magma containing >0.2 wt% dissolved water has the potential to vesiculate to a porosity in excess of 80 vol.% at atmospheric pressure. Thus all magmas contain volatiles at depth sufficient to form foams and explosively fragment. Yet gas is often lost passively and effusive eruptions ensue. Magmatic foams are permeable and understanding permeability in magma is crucial for models that predict eruptive style. Permeability also governs magma compaction models. Those models generally imply that a reduction in magma porosity and permeability generates an increased propensity for explosivity. Here, our experimental results show that surface tension stresses drive densification without creating an impermeable 'plug', offering an additional explanation of why dense magmas can avoid explosive eruption. In both an open furnace and a closed autoclave, we subject pumice samples with initial porosity of ∼70 vol.% to a range of isostatic pressures (0.1-11 MPa) and temperatures (350-950 °C) relevant to shallow volcanic environments. Our experimental data and models constrain the viscosity, permeability, timescales, and length scales over which densification by pore-scale surface tension stresses competes with density-driven compaction. Where surface tension dominates the dynamics, densification halts at a plateau connected porosity of ∼25 vol.% for our samples. SEM, pycnometry and micro-tomography show that in this process (1) microporous networks are destroyed, (2) the relative pore network surface area decreases, and (3) a remaining crystal framework enhances the longevity of macro-pore connectivity and permeability critical for sustained outgassing. We propose that these observations are a consequence of a surface tension-driven retraction of viscous pore walls at areas of high bubble curvature (micro-vesicular network terminations), and that this process drives bulk

  3. Liquid phase sintered compacts in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T. K.; Mcanelly, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A model that will explain the effect of gravity on liquid phase sintering was developed. Wetting characteristics and density segregation which are the two important phenomena in liquid phase sintering are considered in the model development. Experiments were conducted on some selected material combinations to study the gravity effects on liquid phase sintering, and to verify the validity of the model. It is concluded that: (1) The surface tension forces acting on solid particles in a one-g environment are not appreciably different from those anticipated in a 0.00001g/g sub 0 (or lower) environment. (2) The capillary forces are dependent on the contact angle, the quantity of the liquid phase, and the distance between solid particles. (3) The pores (i.e., bubbles) do not appear to be driven to the surface by gravity-produced buoyancy forces. (4) The length of time to produce the same degree of settling in a low-gravity environment will be increased significantly. (5) A low gravity environment would appear to offer a unique means of satisfactorily infiltrating a larger and/or complex shaped compact.

  4. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  5. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Compact Star Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, J. H.

    1996-12-01

    A major goal of RXTE is to investigate the fastest timing signals from compact stars, especially neutron stars and black holes. Signals have now been found from many (at least nine) low mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars in the frequency range (100-1200 Hz) expected for the rotation period of the neutron star after being spun up by accretion over a long period. The kilohertz frequency domain for these sources is simpler than the domain of oscillations below about 50 Hz in that a few isolated features can dominate over white noise. However there are three main features to consider (not all present at the same time) and at least two are quasiperiodic with varying widths and frequencies. Several models are pitting their predictions against the behavior of these features, but the bursters, especially, appear to be revealing the neutron stars's spin. It is consistent with our beliefs that no black hole candidate has shown the same complex of signals, although at least one QPO frequency of a few hundred Hz could be expected in black hole candidates by analogy to the 67 Hz observed from GRS 1915+105. The observations also provide critical tests of the interpretions of the lower frequency (5-50 Hz) QPO and the variable noise seen in both low magnetic field neutron stars and black hole candidates. The kilohertz features have not been seen from the accreting pulsars with relatively high magnetic fields, but high luminosity pulsars (such as last year's transient, GRO J1744-28) reveal signatures of the dynamic interaction between the accretion flow, the magnetic field, and perhaps the neutron star surface in addition to their coherent pulsations.

  7. More basic approach to the analysis of multiple specimen R-curves for determination of J/sub c/

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.W.; Williams, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    Multiple specimen J-R curves were developed for groups of 1T compact specimens with different a/W values and depth of side grooving. The purpose of this investigation was to determine J/sub c/ (J at onset of crack extension) for each group. Judicious selection of points on the load versus load-line deflection record at which to unload and heat tint specimens permitted direct observation of approximate onset of crack extension. It was found that the present recommended procedure for determining J/sub c/ from multiple specimen R-curves, which is being considered for standardization, consistently yielded nonconservative J/sub c/ values. A more basic approach to analyzing multiple specimen R-curves is presented, applied, and discussed. This analysis determined J/sub c/ values that closely corresponded to actual observed onset of crack extension.

  8. NEW TRANSPORT MEDIUM FOR SHIPMENT OF CLINICAL SPECIMENS. I. FECAL SPECIMENS.

    PubMed

    CARY, S G; BLAIR, E B

    1964-07-01

    Cary, Sylvia G. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), and Eugene B Blair. New transport medium for shipment of clinical specimens. I. Fecal specimens. J. Bacteriol. 88:96-98. 1964.-A new transport medium for the collection and shipment of clinical specimens is described. Preliminary studies indicate that, with initial fecal specimens, Salmonella and Shigella can be recovered for as long as 49 days, Vibrio comma for 22 days, and Pasteurella pestis for at least 75 days.

  9. Are tensile and compressive Young's moduli of compact bone different?

    PubMed

    Barak, Meir M; Currey, John D; Weiner, Steve; Shahar, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the question of whether the stiffness (Young's modulus) of secondary osteonal cortical bone is different in compression and tension. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is used to measure concurrently the compressive and tensile strains in cortical bone beams tested in bending. ESPI is a non-contact method of measuring surface deformations over the entire region of interest of a specimen, tested wet. The measured strain distributions across the beam, and the determination of the location of the neutral axis, demonstrate in a statistically-robust way that the tensile Young's modulus is slightly (6%), but significantly greater than that of the compressive Young's modulus. It is also shown that within a relatively small bone specimen there are considerable variations in the modulus, presumably caused by structural inhomogeneities.

  10. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  11. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  12. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  13. Compact Shelving Ten Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Leslie R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses experiences at the Niagara University Library with compact shelving. Highlights include citations to other relevant articles; patron use; selection of vendor; reliability; possible problems; and installation considerations, such as floor-load requirements. (LRW)

  14. A compact rotary vane attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D. L.; Otosh, T. Y.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1969-01-01

    Rotary vane attenuator, when used as a front end attenuator, introduces an insertion loss that is proportional to the angle of rotation. New technique allows the construction of a shortened compact unit suitable for most installations.

  15. Tension in the LHC diffractive data?

    SciTech Connect

    Gotsman, Errol

    2015-04-10

    I discuss the LHC diffractive data, and compare it to predicted energy behaviour of various models. I suggest that the so called 'tension' between the experimental results, maybe due to the different Monte Carlo programs used.

  16. The Dynamic Surface Tension of Water

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The surface tension of water is an important parameter for many biological or industrial processes, and roughly a factor of 3 higher than that of nonpolar liquids such as oils, which is usually attributed to hydrogen bonding and dipolar interactions. Here we show by studying the formation of water drops that the surface tension of a freshly created water surface is even higher (∼90 mN m–1) than under equilibrium conditions (∼72 mN m–1) with a relaxation process occurring on a long time scale (∼1 ms). Dynamic adsorption effects of protons or hydroxides may be at the origin of this dynamic surface tension. However, changing the pH does not significantly change the dynamic surface tension. It also seems unlikely that hydrogen bonding or dipole orientation effects play any role at the relatively long time scale probed in the experiments. PMID:28301160

  17. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections.

    PubMed

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition.

  18. Phase Behavior of Lipid Bilayers under Tension

    PubMed Central

    Uline, Mark J.; Schick, M.; Szleifer, Igal

    2012-01-01

    Given the proposed importance of membrane tension in regulating cellular functions, we explore the effects of a finite surface tension on phase equilibrium using a molecular theory that captures the quantitative structure of the phase diagram of the tensionless DPPC/DOPC/Cholesterol lipid bilayer. We find that an increase in the surface tension decreases the temperature of the transition from liquid to gel in a pure DPPC system by ∼1.0 K/(mN/m), and decreases the liquid-disordered to liquid-ordered transition at constant chemical potentials by approximately the same amount. Our results quantitatively isolate the role of tension in comparison to other thermodynamic factors, such as pressure, in determining the phase behavior of lipid bilayers. PMID:22325274

  19. Transcutaneous Determination of Arterial Oxygen Tension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Evaluated were two techniques (the conventional method and the new transcutaneous method) of measuring arterial oxygen tension in 20 severely ill preterm and term infants and in 70 healthy infants. (Author/CL)

  20. The Dynamic Surface Tension of Water.

    PubMed

    Hauner, Ines M; Deblais, Antoine; Beattie, James K; Kellay, Hamid; Bonn, Daniel

    2017-03-23

    The surface tension of water is an important parameter for many biological or industrial processes, and roughly a factor of 3 higher than that of nonpolar liquids such as oils, which is usually attributed to hydrogen bonding and dipolar interactions. Here we show by studying the formation of water drops that the surface tension of a freshly created water surface is even higher (∼90 mN m(-1)) than under equilibrium conditions (∼72 mN m(-1)) with a relaxation process occurring on a long time scale (∼1 ms). Dynamic adsorption effects of protons or hydroxides may be at the origin of this dynamic surface tension. However, changing the pH does not significantly change the dynamic surface tension. It also seems unlikely that hydrogen bonding or dipole orientation effects play any role at the relatively long time scale probed in the experiments.

  1. Characteristics of high-tension magnetos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, F B

    1920-01-01

    This report gives the results of an investigation made into the fundamental physical characteristics of high-tension ignition magnetos, and also describes the methods used for measuring the quantities involved.

  2. Optimal design of biaxial tensile cruciform specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmerle, S.; Boehler, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    F OR EXPERIMENTAL investigations concerning the mechanical behaviour under biaxial stress states of rolled sheet metals, mostly cruciform flat specimens are used. By means of empirical methods, different specimen geometries have been proposed in the literature. In order to evaluate the suitability of a specimen design, a mathematically well defined criterion is developed, based on the standard deviations of the values of the stresses in the test section. Applied to the finite element method, the criterion is employed to realize the shape optimization of biaxial cruciform specimens for isotropic elastic materials. Furthermore, the performance of the obtained optimized specimen design is investigated in the case of off-axes tests on anisotropic materials. Therefore, for the first time, an original testing device, consisting of hinged fixtures with knife edges at each arm of the specimen, is applied to the biaxial test. The obtained results indicate the decisive superiority of the optimized specimens for the proper performance on isotropic materials, as well as the paramount importance of the proposed off-axes testing technique for biaxial tests on anisotropic materials.

  3. Reconstituted Charpy impact specimens. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, J.S.; Wullaert, R.A.; McConnell, P.; Server, W.L.; Fromm, E.O.

    1982-12-01

    The arc stud welding process was used to produce new, full size Charpy V-notch impact specimens from halves of Charpy specimens which had been previously tested. The apparatus was developed such that it could be used not only for unirradiated specimens, but also so that it could be adapted for in-cell use to produce new reconstituted specimens of irradiated material. The materials studied are of interest in nuclear applications. They include A533B, A36, A516-80, submerged arc weld metal (A508 base metal), HY80, cast duplex stainless steel, irradiated A533B, and irradiated submerged arc weld metal (A508 base metal). Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were successfully produced and subsequently impact tested. In general, there was excellent agreement when comparing the original curves to the subsequent curves generated with reconstituted specimens. This program has shown that the arc stud welding process is well suited for producing reconstituted specimens at a reasonable cost using either unirradiated or irradiated material.

  4. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  5. Biaxial mechanical properties of human ureter under tension.

    PubMed

    Rassoli, Aisa; Shafigh, Mohammad; Seddighi, Amirsaeed; Seddighi, Afsoun; Daneshparvar, Hamidreza; Fatouraee, Nasser

    2014-07-08

    The Mechanical properties of the ureteral wall may be altered by certain diseases such as megaureter. Ureter compliance and wall tension alterations can occur, leading to some abnormalities such as reflex mechanisms. Familiarizing with the mechanical properties of the ureter can help us advance in the understanding of urinary tract diseases. A constitutive model that can predict the mechanical response of ureteral tissue under complex mechanical loading is required. Parameters characterizing the mechanical behaviour of the material were estimated from planar biaxial test data, where human ureter specimens were simultaneously loaded along the longitudinal and circumferential directions. The biaxial stress-stretch curve was plotted and fitted to a hyperelastic four-parameter Fung type model and five-parameter Mooney-Rivlin model. The average strength in the longitudinal direction was 3.48 ± 0.47 MPa and 2.31 ± 0.46 MPa (P <.05) for the circumferential direction.In the Fung model the value of parameter a2 (0.699 ± 0.17) was higher than a1 (0.279 ± 0.07), which may be due to the collagen fiber orientation's preference along the longitudinal axis. According to this study, it seems that ureter tissue is stiffer in the longitudinal than in the circumferential direction and maybe the collagen fiber are along the axial axes. Also the specimens showed some degree of anisotropy.

  6. Standard methods for open hole tension testing of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, M. A.; Masters, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    Sizing effects have been investigated by comparing the open hole failure strengths of each of the four different braided architectures as a function of specimen thickness, hole diameter, and the ratio of specimen width to hole diameter. The data used to make these comparisons was primarily generated by Boeing. Direct comparisons of Boeing's results were made with experiments conducted at West Virginia University whenever possible. Indirect comparisons were made with test results for other 2-D braids and 3-D weaves tested by Boeing and Lockheed. In general, failure strength was found to decrease with increasing plate thickness, increase with decreasing hole size, and decreasing with decreasing width to diameter ratio. The interpretation of the sensitive to each of these geometrical parameters was complicated by scatter in the test data. For open hole tension testing of textile composites, the use of standard testing practices employed by industry, such as ASTM D5766 - Standard Test Method for Open Hole Tensile Strength of Polymer Matrix Composite Laminates should provide adequate results for material comparisons studies.

  7. Why does necking ignore notches in dynamic tension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotbaum, Y.; Osovski, S.; Rittel, D.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experimental work has revealed that necking of tensile specimens, subjected to dynamic loading, is a deterministic phenomenon, governed by the applied boundary conditions. Furthermore it was shown that the potential sited, dictated by the boundary conditions, may prevail even in the presence of a notch, thus necking may occur away of the notched region. The present paper combines experimental and numerical work to address this issue. Specifically, it is shown that the dynamic tensile failure locus is dictated by both the applied velocity boundary condition and the material mechanical properties, specifically strain-rate sensitivity and strain-rate hardening. It is shown that at sufficiently high impact velocities, the flows stress in the notch vicinity becomes quite higher than in the rest of the specimen, so that while the former resists deformation, it transfers the load to the latter, resulting in the formation of a local neck and failure away from the notch. Small local perturbations in the material properties are shown to be sufficient to stabilize the structure under local failure until a neck forms elsewhere. While the physical observations are quite counterintuitive with respect to the engineering views of stress concentrator's effect, the present work rationalizes those observations and also provides information for the designers of dynamically tensioned structures that may contain notches or similar flaws.

  8. Why does necking ignore notches in dynamic tension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotbaum, Y.; Osovski, S.; Rittel, D.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental work has revealed that notched tensile specimens, subjected to dynamic loading, may fail by growing a neck outside of the notched region. This apparent lack of sensitivity to a classical stress concentration case was reported but not explained or modeled. The present paper combines experimental and numerical work to address this issue. Specifically, it is shown that the dynamic tensile failure locus is dictated by both the applied velocity boundary condition and the material mechanical properties, specifically strain-rate sensitivity and strain-rate hardening. It is shown that at sufficiently high impact velocities, the flows stress in the notch vicinity becomes quite higher than in the rest of the specimen, so that while the former resists deformation, it transfers the load to the latter. The result will be the formation of a local neck and failure away from the notch. This effect is shown to be active when the material properties are perturbed only at the local level, as in the case of machining of the notch, which in itself may again be sufficient to stabilize the structure under local failure until a neck forms elsewhere. While the physical observations are quite counterintuitive with respect to the engineering views of stress concentrator's effect, the present work rationalizes those observations and also provides information for the designers of dynamically tensioned structures that may contain notches or similar flaws.

  9. Dynamic Tension Spectroscopy and Strength of Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Evan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Ludwig, Florian; Rawicz, Wieslawa

    2003-01-01

    Rupturing fluid membrane vesicles with a steady ramp of micropipette suction produces a distribution of breakage tensions governed by the kinetic process of membrane failure. When plotted as a function of log(tension loading rate), the locations of distribution peaks define a dynamic tension spectrum with distinct regimes that reflect passage of prominent energy barriers along the kinetic pathway. Using tests on five types of giant phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles over loading rates(tension/time) from 0.01–100 mN/m/s, we show that the kinetic process of membrane breakage can be modeled by a causal sequence of two thermally-activated transitions. At fast loading rates, a steep linear regime appears in each spectrum which implies that membrane failure starts with nucleation of a rare precursor defect. The slope and projected intercept of this regime are set by defect size and frequency of spontaneous formation, respectively. But at slow loading rates, each spectrum crosses over to a shallow-curved regime where rupture tension changes weakly with rate. This regime is predicted by the classical cavitation theory for opening an unstable hole in a two-dimensional film within the lifetime of the defect state. Under slow loading, membrane edge energy and the frequency scale for thermal fluctuations in hole size are the principal factors that govern the level of tension at failure. To critically test the model and obtain the parameters governing the rates of transition under stress, distributions of rupture tension were computed and matched to the measured histograms through solution of the kinetic master (Markov) equations for defect formation and annihilation or evolution to an unstable hole under a ramp of tension. As key predictors of membrane strength, the results for spontaneous frequencies of defect formation and hole edge energies were found to correlate with membrane thicknesses and elastic bending moduli, respectively. PMID:14507698

  10. Compaction with automatic jog introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, F. M.

    1985-10-01

    A novel polynomial-time algorithm for compacting a VLSI layout is presented. Compared to previous algorithms, the algorithm promises to produce higher quality output while reducing the need for designer intervention. The performance gain is realized by converting wires into constraints on the positions of the active devices. These constraints can be solved by graph-theoretic techniques to yield optimal positions for chip components. A single-layer router is then used to restore the wires to the layout, using as many as jogs as necessary. An automated compaction procedure is an effective tool for cutting production costs of a VLSI circuit at low cost to the designer, because the yield of fabricated chips is strongly dependent on the total circuit area. Sect 1 is an introduction. Sect 2 states the definitions and theoretical results that underlie the new compaction method. Sect 3 shows how the circuit layout is converted to a data structure appropriate for compaction, and Sect 4 details the body of the compaction algorithm. Sect 5 covers several improvements to the algorithm that should make it run considerably faster. Sect 6 comments on the algorithms of results, and a discussion of the practical value of the compaction algorithm.

  11. Material characterization of liver parenchyma using specimen-specific finite element models.

    PubMed

    Untaroiu, Costin D; Lu, Yuan-Chiao

    2013-10-01

    The liver is one of the most frequently injured abdominal organs during motor vehicle crashes. Realistic car crash simulations require incorporating strain-rate dependent mechanical properties of soft tissue in finite element (FE) material models. This study presents a total of 30 tension tests performed on fresh bovine liver parenchyma at various loading rates in order to characterize the biomechanical and failure properties of liver parenchyma. Each specimen, cut in a standard dog-bone shape, was tested until failure at one of three loading rates (0.01 s(-1), 0.1s(-1), 1 s(-1)) using a tensile testing setup. Load and acceleration recorded from each specimen grip were employed to calculate the time history of force at specimen ends. The shapes of all specimens were reconstructed from laser scans recorded prior to each test and then used to develop specimen-specific FE models. A first-order Ogden material model and the time histories of specimen end displacement were assigned to each specimen FE model. The failure Green-Lagrangian strain showed averages around 50% and no significant dependence on loading rates, but the failure 2nd Piola-Kirchhoff stress showed rate-dependence with average values ranging from 33 kPa to 94 kPa. The FE models with material model parameters identified using a simulation-based optimization replicated well the time history of load recorded during the test. The FE simulations with model parameters identified using an analytical approach or based on the displacement of optical markers showed a significantly stiffer response and lower failure stress/strain than the FE specimen-specific models. This study provides novel biomechanical and failure data which can be easily implemented in FE models and used to assess injury risk in automobile collisions.

  12. Compact Optoelectronic Compass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Carl

    2004-01-01

    A compact optoelectronic sensor unit measures the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky. The data acquired by this chip are processed in an external processor to estimate the relative orientation of the axis of rotation of the Earth. Hence, the combination of this chip and the external processor finds the direction of true North relative to the chip: in other words, the combination acts as a solar compass. If the compass is further combined with a clock, then the combination can be used to establish a threeaxis inertial coordinate system. If, in addition, an auxiliary sensor measures the local vertical direction, then the resulting system can determine the geographic position. This chip and the software used in the processor are based mostly on the same design and operation as those of the unit described in Micro Sun Sensor for Spacecraft (NPO-30867) elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Like the unit described in that article, this unit includes a small multiple-pinhole camera comprising a micromachined mask containing a rectangular array of microscopic pinholes mounted a short distance in front of an image detector of the active-pixel sensor (APS) type (see figure). Further as in the other unit, the digitized output of the APS in this chip is processed to compute the centroids of the pinhole Sun images on the APS. Then the direction to the Sun, relative to the compass chip, is computed from the positions of the centroids (just like a sundial). In the operation of this chip, one is interested not only in the instantaneous direction to the Sun but also in the apparent path traced out by the direction to the Sun as a result of rotation of the Earth during an observation interval (during which the Sun sensor must remain stationary with respect to the Earth). The apparent path of the Sun across the sky is projected on a sphere. The axis of rotation of the Earth lies at the center of the projected circle on the sphere surface. Hence, true North (not magnetic

  13. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    SciTech Connect

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  14. Non-uniform exponential tension splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosner, Tina; Rogina, Mladen

    2007-11-01

    We describe explicitly each stage of a numerically stable algorithm for calculating with exponential tension B-splines with non-uniform choice of tension parameters. These splines are piecewisely in the kernel of D 2(D 2?p 2), where D stands for ordinary derivative, defined on arbitrary meshes, with a different choice of the tension parameter p on each interval. The algorithm provides values of the associated B-splines and their generalized and ordinary derivatives by performing positive linear combinations of positive quantities, described as lower-order exponential tension splines. We show that nothing else but the knot insertion algorithm and good approximation of a few elementary functions is needed to achieve machine accuracy. The underlying theory is that of splines based on Chebyshev canonical systems which are not smooth enough to be ECC-systems. First, by de Boor algorithm we construct exponential tension spline of class C 1, and then we use quasi-Oslo type algorithms to evaluate classical non-uniform C 2 tension exponential splines.

  15. A miniature tension sensor to measure surgical suture tension of deformable musculoskeletal tissues during joint motion.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new suture tension sensor for musculoskeletal soft tissue that shows deformation or movements. The suture tension sensor was 10 mm in size, which was small enough to avoid conflicting with the adjacent sensor. Furthermore, the sensor had good linearity up to a tension of 50 N, which is equivalent to the breaking strength of a size 1 absorbable suture defined by the United States Pharmacopeia. The design and mechanism were analyzed using a finite element model prior to developing the actual sensor. Based on the analysis, adequate material was selected, and the output linearity was confirmed and compared with the simulated result. To evaluate practical application, the incision of the skin and capsule were sutured during simulated total knee arthroplasty. When conventional surgery and minimally invasive surgery were performed, suture tensions were compared. In minimally invasive surgery, the distal portion of the knee was dissected, and the proximal portion of the knee was dissected additionally in conventional surgery. In the skin suturing, the maximum tension was 4.4 N, and this tension was independent of the sensor location. In contrast, the sensor suturing the capsule in the distal portion had a tension of 4.4 N in minimally invasive surgery, while the proximal sensor had a tension of 44 N in conventional surgery. The suture tensions increased nonlinearly and were dependent on the knee flexion angle. Furthermore, the tension changes showed hysteresis. This miniature tension sensor may help establish the optimal suturing method with adequate tension to ensure wound healing and early recovery.

  16. Least Squares Best Fit Method for the Three Parameter Weibull Distribution: Analysis of Tensile and Bend Specimens with Volume or Surface Flaw Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    Material characterization parameters obtained from naturally flawed specimens are necessary for reliability evaluation of non-deterministic advanced ceramic structural components. The least squares best fit method is applied to the three parameter uniaxial Weibull model to obtain the material parameters from experimental tests on volume or surface flawed specimens subjected to pure tension, pure bending, four point or three point loading. Several illustrative example problems are provided.

  17. Os acromiale fixation: a biomechanical comparison of polyethylene suture versus stainless steel wire tension band.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Brian; Song, Xuyang; Iacangelo, Abigail; Kim, Hyunchul; Jazini, Ehsan; Henn, R Frank; Gilotra, Mohit N; Hasan, S Ashfaq

    2016-12-01

    Symptomatic hardware is a commonly reported complication after surgical fixation of an unstable meso-type os acromiale. This study compared the biomechanical properties of a cannulated screw tension band construct using a metal wire tension band vs. a suture tension band, considering that the suture construct could allow for decreased hardware burden in the clinical setting. A meso-type os acromiale was created in 16 cadaveric shoulders. Two cannulated 4-mm screws were placed in each specimen. Tension band augmentation was accomplished with a 1-mm stainless steel wire (wire group) or a #5 braided polyethylene suture (suture group), with 8 specimens in each group. An inferiorly directed force was applied to the anterior acromion at 1 mm/s on a materials testing machine. Stiffness and ultimate failure load were recorded and analyzed. No significant difference (P = .22) was observed in the ultimate failure load between the wire (228  ± 85 N; range, 114-397 N) and the suture (275 ± 139 N; range, 112-530 N). No significant difference (P = .17) was observed in the stiffness between the wire (28  ± 12 N/mm; range, 18-53 N/mm) and the suture (38  ± 25 N/mm; range, 10-83 N/mm). Stainless steel wire and polyethylene suture have similar biomechanical strength in the cannulated screw tension band fixation of meso-type os acromiale at time zero. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tension-Compression Fatigue of a Nextel™720/alumina Composite at 1200 °C in Air and in Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanser, R. L.; Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    Tension-compression fatigue behavior of an oxide-oxide ceramic-matrix composite was investigated at 1200 °C in air and in steam. The composite is comprised of an alumina matrix reinforced with Nextel™720 alumina-mullite fibers woven in an eight harness satin weave (8HSW). The composite has no interface between the fiber and matrix, and relies on the porous matrix for flaw tolerance. Tension-compression fatigue behavior was studied for cyclical stresses ranging from 60 to 120 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz. The R ratio (minimum stress to maximum stress) was -1.0. Fatigue run-out was defined as 105 cycles and was achieved at 80 MPa in air and at 70 MPa in steam. Steam reduced cyclic lives by an order of magnitude. Specimens that achieved fatigue run-out were subjected to tensile tests to failure to characterize the retained tensile properties. Specimens subjected to prior cyclic loading in air retained 100 % of their tensile strength. The steam environment severely degraded tensile properties. Tension-compression cyclic loading was considerably more damaging than tension-tension cyclic loading. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  19. An analysis of blood specimen container leakage.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S M; Wardle, J M

    1978-01-01

    Procedures have been designed to test specimen containers for leakage, using blood and aqueous fluorescein solution as indicators. They have been used in a trial evaluation of a number of commercially available containers intended for medical specimens. Glass bijou bottles, evacuated container systems, and several types of plastic container showed no significant leakage rate with either blood or aqueous solution when they were tested at room temperature, but a large proportion of the plastic containers leaked after being subjected to -20 degrees. C. These would thus be suitable and satisfactory for blood count specimens but not for specimens of serum and other body fluids, which are usually stored frozen. With all types of container tested there was spontaneous discharge of contents (blood or aqueous solution) on opening in a proportion of them; thus no container at present available seems to be entirely free from hazard. PMID:711921

  20. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exams and Tests for Cancer Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Waiting to hear test results ... biopsies used to look for cancer Types of cytology tests used to look for cancer What happens ...

  1. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  2. Urine Specimens: Tips to Help Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... several strategies. One is to suggest the child "blow the feeling away" by blowing out a breath ... specimen is required). Turn on the Tap — The sound of running water can help the child begin ...

  3. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... goods or the sale of the goods when it is impracticable to place the mark on the goods, packaging for... cassette tape recording, CD-ROM, or other appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen...

  4. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... goods when it is impracticable to place the mark on the goods, packaging for the goods, or displays... appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format....

  5. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  6. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  7. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exceeding these size requirements (a “bulky specimen”), the Office will create a digital facsimile of the... cassette tape recording, CD-ROM, or other appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen...

  8. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  9. Design and testing of small composite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of specimen size on the buckling strains of laminates subjected to low velocity projectile impact was investigated. The fiber composite selected was T300/5208 graphite/epoxy system. The quasi-isotropic laminates tested had 16 and 32 plies. The results were compared with those of a 48-ply laminate. Specimens of three different lengths with length to width aspect ratios of 1, 1.5, and 2 were also studied. The results show that (1) the specimen length does not have any significant influence on the buckling strains at failure caused by the projectile impact, and (2) the influence of specimen thickness on the strains at failure would decrease as the velocity of the impacting projectile increases.

  10. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... if removal of the specimen would result in damage to other natural or cultural resources, affect... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or...

  11. Influence of Oxidation on Electrical Properties of Compacted Cu Nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadutov, Volodymyr; Perekos, Anatoliy; Kokorin, Volodymyr; Konoplyuk, Sergiy; Kabantsev, Taras

    2016-10-01

    The phase composition and electrical transport properties of Cu powder obtained by electric spark dispersion and the pellets manufactured from this powder were studied by X-ray phase analysis and electric resistance measurements. The compacted powders were annealed in pure Ar atmosphere. It was shown that electrical resistance of the compacted Cu specimens essentially depends on the annealing temperature. In particular, the electrical resistance of the pellet after annealing at 873 K decreases on heating at low temperatures (semiconducting mechanism). As the temperature is increased, semiconducting behavior of resistivity is altered for metallic one. This change of conductivity type is ascribed to formation of metallic oxide and modification of its content during annealing.

  12. Influence of Oxidation on Electrical Properties of Compacted Cu Nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Nadutov, Volodymyr; Perekos, Anatoliy; Kokorin, Volodymyr; Konoplyuk, Sergiy; Kabantsev, Taras

    2016-12-01

    The phase composition and electrical transport properties of Cu powder obtained by electric spark dispersion and the pellets manufactured from this powder were studied by X-ray phase analysis and electric resistance measurements. The compacted powders were annealed in pure Ar atmosphere. It was shown that electrical resistance of the compacted Cu specimens essentially depends on the annealing temperature. In particular, the electrical resistance of the pellet after annealing at 873 K decreases on heating at low temperatures (semiconducting mechanism). As the temperature is increased, semiconducting behavior of resistivity is altered for metallic one. This change of conductivity type is ascribed to formation of metallic oxide and modification of its content during annealing.

  13. Specimen banks for cancer prognostic factor research.

    PubMed

    Burke, H B; Henson, D E

    1998-10-01

    Prognostic factors are necessary for determining whether a patient will require therapy, for selecting the optimal therapy, and for evaluating the effectiveness of the therapy chosen. Research in prognostic factors has been hampered by long waiting times and a paucity of outcomes. Specimen banks can solve these problems, but their implementation and use give rise to many important and complex issues. This paper presents an overview of some of the issues related to the use of specimen banks in prognostic factor research.

  14. Natural examples of Valdivia compact spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenda, Ondrej F. K.

    2008-04-01

    We collect examples of Valdivia compact spaces, their continuous images and associated classes of Banach spaces which appear naturally in various branches of mathematics. We focus on topological constructions generating Valdivia compact spaces, linearly ordered compact spaces, compact groups, L1 spaces, Banach lattices and noncommutative L1 spaces.

  15. Pore network connectivity anisotropy in Jurassic argillite specimens from eastern Paris Basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Lionel; Géraud, Yves; Bouchez, Jean Luc

    In order to test the feasibility of nuclear waste storage, Andra, the French radioactive waste management agency, gave us the opportunity to study preserved specimens of Jurassic clay-rich rocks from eastern Paris Basin. These rocks, deposited during the Callovian and beginning of the Oxfordian, are dark- to light-grey marls that consist mainly in a mixture of clay, calcite and silt. Magnetic susceptibility and remanence vary according to the clay/calcite/silt ratios and the mineral preferred orientations are characterized by the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility. A few test specimens, sampled from borehole-core #HTM 102, and coming from the base and top levels of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite formation, were subjected to connected porosity measurements using the mercury injection technique. By imposing mercury to flow parallel to a given direction, we were able to determine the anisotropy of connectivity along the three principal magnetic susceptibility axes. We find that the clay-richest specimens have a large and sub-isotropic connected porosity which is mostly accessible through the smallest pore threshold diameters (<0.02 μm). By contrast, carbonate-enriched specimens have anisotropic and smaller connected porosities accessible through larger pore thresholds (˜0.08 μm). Except in a carbonate-enriched specimen where the largest connectivity axis is vertical, attributed to tension cracks normal to bedding, the pore connectivity anisotropy positively correlates with the magnetic anisotropy, hence with the mineral arrangement.

  16. Compact intracloud discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David Adam

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackbeard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackbeard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackbeard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackbeard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground-based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events are produced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDs, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground- based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDs. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDs were recorded from three

  17. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David A.

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  18. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  19. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  20. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  1. Slow Crack Growth Behavior and Life/Reliability Analysis of 96 wt % Alumina at Ambient Temperature With Various Specimen/Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Powers, Lynn M.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive constant stress-rate testing for 96 wt % alumina was conducted in room-temperature distilled water using four different specimen/loading configurations: rectangular beam test specimens under four-point uniaxial flexure, square plate test specimens in ring-on-ring biaxial flexure, square plate test specimens in ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and dog-boned tensile test specimens in pure tension. The slow crack growth (SCG) parameter n was almost independent of specimen/loading configurations, in either four-point uniaxial flexure, ring-on-ring biaxial flexure, ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, or pure tension, ranging from n = 35 to 47 with an average value of n = 41.1 +/- 4.5. The prediction of fatigue strength/reliability based on the four-point uniaxial flexure data by using the CARES/Life design code as well as a simple PIA model was in good agreement with both the ring-on-ring biaxial and the ball-on-ring biaxial flexure data. A poor prediction using the PIA model was observed for the dog-boned tensile test specimens, presumably due to different flaw population involved in the tensile test specimens.

  2. What determines the bending strength of compact bone?

    PubMed

    Currey, J D

    1999-09-01

    The bending strength of a wide variety of bony types is shown to be nearly linearly proportional to Young's modulus of elasticity/100. A somewhat closer and more satisfactory fit is obtained if account is taken of the variation of yield strain with Young's modulus. This finding strongly suggests that bending strength is determined by the yield strain. The yield stress in tension, which might be expected to predict the bending strength, underestimates the true bending strength by approximately 40 %. This may be explained by two phenomena. (1) The post-yield deformation of the bone material allows a greater bending moment to be exerted after the yield point has been reached, thereby increasing the strength as calculated from beam formulae. (2) Loading in bending results in a much smaller proportion of the volume of the specimens being raised to high stresses than is the case in tension, and this reduces the likelihood of a weak part of the specimen being loaded to failure.

  3. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  4. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E; Yoffe, Aron M; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L N; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  5. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  6. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  7. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in bone specimens using methylene blue, toluidine blue ortho and malachite green: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Nader, Sumaia Alves; Meira, Giselle Andrade; Viana, Magda Souza

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effectiveness of APDI with a 660 nm laser combined with methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue ortho (TBO) and malachite green (MG) dyes to inactivate Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilms in compact and cancellous bone specimens. Eighty specimens of compact and 80 of cancellous bone were contaminated with a standard suspension of the microorganism and incubated for 14 days at 37°C to form biofilms. After this period, the specimens were divided into groups (n=10) according to established treatment: PS-L- (control - no treatment); PSmb+L-, PStbo+L-, PSmg+L- (only MB, TBO or MG for 5 min in the dark); PS-L+ (only laser irradiation for 180 s); and APDImb, APDItbo and APDImg (APDI with MB, TBO or MG for 180 s). The findings were statistically analyzed by ANOVA at 5% significance levels. All experimental treatments showed significant reduction of log CFU/mL S. aureus biofilms when compared with the control group for compact and cancellous bones specimens; the APDI group's treatment was more effective. The APDI carried out for the compact specimens showed better results when compared with cancellous specimens at all times of application. For the group of compact bone, APDImg showed greater reductions in CFU/mL (4.46 log 10). In the group of cancellous bone, the greatest reductions were found in the APDImb group (3.06 log 10). APDI with methylene blue, toluidine blue ortho and malachite green dyes and a 660 nm laser proved to be effective in the inactivation of S. aureus biofilms formed in compact and cancellous bone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interfacial tension of polyelectrolyte complex coacervate phases.

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Jian; Priftis, Dimitrios; Farina, R; Perry, Sarah L.; Leon, Lorraine F.; Whitmer, Jonathan; Hoffmann, Kyle; Tirrell, Matthew; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider polyelectrolyte solutions which, under suitable conditions, phase separate into a liquid-like coacervate phase and a coexisting supernatant phase that exhibit an extremely low interfacial tension. Such interfacial tension provides the basis for most coacervate-based applications, but little is known about it, including its dependence on molecular weight, charge density, and salt concentration. By combining a Debye-Huckel treatment for electrostatic interactions with the Cahn-Hilliard theory, we derive explicit expressions for this interfacial tension. In the absence of added salts, we find that the interfacial tension scales as N-3/2(eta/eta(c)-1)(3/2) near the critical point of the demixing transition, and that it scales as eta(1/2) far away from it, where N is the chain length and eta measures the electrostatic interaction strength as a function of temperature, dielectric constant, and charge density of the polyelectrolytes. For the case with added salts, we find that the interfacial tension scales with the salt concentration psi as N-1/4(1-psi/psi(c))(3/2) near the critical salt concentration psi(c). Our predictions are shown to be in quantitative agreement with experiments and provide a means to design new materials based on polyelectrolyte complexation.

  9. [The myth of tension-type headache].

    PubMed

    Diaz-Insa, Samuel

    2014-03-10

    Tension-type headache is an entity recognised by the International Headache Society in its International Headache Classification. The limits of this condition, however, are somewhat fuzzy and poorly defined, and its diagnostic criteria are a sort of negation of the symptoms of migraine. In this review we are especially interested in highlighting the diagnostic vagueness in patients with chronic tension-type headache. This refers, above all, to those with a clear history of migraine and who continue to suffer a number of crises with symptoms of migraine, although they have headaches with tension-type features on a daily basis. Emphasis will be placed on the novel concept of chronic migraine which, today, can include these patients, and has not only diagnostic but also, and above all, therapeutic implications. Tension-type headache is a clinical syndrome that probably covers a series of entities with important aetiopathogenic differences from one to another and, perhaps sometime in the future, many patients who are now labelled as having been diagnosed with this condition will be classified further as having other better-defined diseases. In any case, although it might sound like a myth or just pie-in-the-sky, the tension-type headache is still needed to encompass these entities that are lacking any better-defined diagnoses.

  10. Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

    2005-10-31

    Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2.

  11. An Experimental Study of Shear-Dominated Failure in the 2013 Sandia Fracture Challenge Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Reedlunn, Benjamin; Ingraham, Mathew Duffy; Williams, Shelley

    2015-04-01

    This report presents an experimental study motivated by results obtained during the 2013 Sandia Fracture Challenge. The challenge involved A286 steel, shear-dominated compression specimens whose load-deflection response contained a load maximum fol- lowed by significant displacement under decreasing load, ending with a catastrophic fracture. Blind numerical simulations deviated from the experiments well before the maximum load and did not predict the failure displacement. A series of new tests were conducted on specimens machined from the original A286 steel stock to learn more about the deformation and failure processes in the specimen and potentially improve future numerical simulations. The study consisted of several uniaxial tension tests to explore anisotropy in the material, and a set of new tests on the compression speci- men. In some compression specimen tests, stereo digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure the surface strain fields local to the region of interest. In others, the compression specimen was loaded to a given displacement prior to failure, unloaded, sectioned, and imaged under the microscope to determine when material damage first appeared and how it spread. The experiments brought the following observations to light. The tensile tests revealed that the plastic response of the material is anisotropic. DIC during the shear- dominated compression tests showed that all three in-plane surface strain components had maxima in the order of 50% at the maximum load. Sectioning of the specimens revealed no signs of material damage at the point where simulations deviated from the experiments. Cracks and other damage did start to form approximately when the max- imum load was reached, and they grew as the load decreased, eventually culminating in catastrophic failure of the specimens. In addition to the steel specimens, a similar study was carried out for aluminum 7075-T651 specimens. These specimens achieved much lower loads and displacements

  12. Compaction Stress in Fine Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, A.J.; Kenkre, V.M.; Pease, E.A.; Scott, J.E.

    1999-04-01

    A vexing feature in granular materials compaction is density extrema interior to a compacted shape. Such inhomogeneities can lead to weaknesses and loss of dimensional control in ceramic parts, unpredictable dissolution of pharmaceuticals, and undesirable stress concentration in load-bearing soil. As an example, the centerline density in a cylindrical compact often does not decrease monotonically from the pressure source but exhibits local maxima and minima. Two lines of thought in the literature predict, respectively, diffusive and wavelike propagation of stress. Here, a general memory function approach has been formulated that unifies these previous treatments as special cases; by analyzing a convenient intermediate case, the telegrapher's equation, one sees that local density maxima arise via semidiffusive stress waves reflecting from the die walls and adding constructively at the centerline.

  13. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  14. Response analysis of tension-based tension leg platform under irregular waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskara Rao, D. S.; Panneer Selvam, R.

    2016-07-01

    Tension Leg Platform (TLP) is a hybrid structure used as oil drilling and production facility within water depths of 1200 m. The extension of this TLP concept to deeper waters is a challenge and warrants for some innovative design concepts. In this paper, a relatively new concept of TLP which is christened as Tension-Based Tension Leg Platform (TBTLP) and patented by Srinivasan (1998) has been chosen for study. Response analysis of TLP with one tension base under irregular waves for three different sea states has been performed using hydrodynamic tool ANSYS® AQWA™. Results are reported in terms of RAOs, response spectrums for surge, heave and pitch degrees of freedom from which spectral statistics have been obtained. The statistics of TBTLP have been compared with TLPs (without tension base) for two different water depths to highlight the features of the new concept. The effect of viscous damping and loading effects on the RAOs are also investigated.

  15. Development of short fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy 2524-T3 specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botvina, L. R.; Nesterenko, G. I.; Soldatenkov, A. P.; Demina, Yu. A.; Sviridov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    The development of short fatigue cracks in a 2524-T3 alloy is studied under cyclic tension conditions. Flat specimens with a stress concentrator in the form of a central hole are analyzed. The replica technique is used to determine the microcrack parameters and to estimate the cyclic damage characteristics of the alloy in the stress concentrator zone. The experimental results are compared to the fatigue lives estimated by a calculation-experimental method using the NASGRO software package. The experimental fatigue life at the stage of short crack initiation is found to be significantly shorter than the calculated fatigue life.

  16. Estimation of anterior cruciate ligament tension from inverse dynamics data and electromyography in females during drop landing.

    PubMed

    Kernozek, Thomas W; Ragan, Robert J

    2008-12-01

    Recent human performance studies have shown that various kinematic and kinetic parameters may be implicated in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during landing and cutting. In this paper, a phenomenological sagittal plane model was used to estimate the ACL tension during drop landing from the net knee moments and forces, obtained from inverse dynamics and electromyography. Model parameters were determined with data from anatomical and ACL loading studies of cadaveric specimens. The model was used to process averaged data from 60 cm drop landing trials of sixteen healthy females. ACL loading during drop landing occurred during the between toe and heel impact with a peak tension of 0.15 body weight. The factors that contributed to ACL tension were the patellar tendon force and the tibial slope in combination with the joint axial loads. Factors responsible for reducing ACL tension were hamstring and ground reaction forces. Sagittal plane results largely confirmed a previous forward dynamics study of landing. The knee appeared to be largely stabilized against abduction moments due to the large axial loads present during drop landing for typical landing trials. Rotational moments were small in drop landing and contributed little to ACL tension. Estimates from this model can be used in human performance studies to determine the relative amount of ACL tension produced in different landing scenarios.

  17. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  18. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  19. Compact Chern-Simons vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.

    2017-09-01

    We introduce and investigate new models of the Chern-Simons type in the three-dimensional spacetime, focusing on the existence of compact vortices. The models are controlled by potentials driven by a single real parameter that can be used to change the profile of the vortex solutions as they approach their boundary values. One of the models unveils an interesting new behavior, the tendency to make the vortex compact, as the parameter increases to larger and larger values. We also investigate the behavior of the energy density and calculate the total energy numerically.

  20. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.