Science.gov

Sample records for comparative model analysis

  1. Minimalist models for proteins: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tozzini, Valentina

    2010-08-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renewed interest in the coarse-grained (CG) models for biopolymers, also stimulated by the needs of modern molecular biology, dealing with nano- to micro-sized bio-molecular systems and larger than microsecond timescale. This combination of size and timescale is, in fact, hard to access by atomic-based simulations. Coarse graining the system is a route to be followed to overcome these limits, but the ways of practically implementing it are many and different, making the landscape of CG models very vast and complex. In this paper, the CG models are reviewed and their features, applications and performances compared. This analysis, restricted to proteins, focuses on the minimalist models, namely those reducing at minimum the number of degrees of freedom without losing the possibility of explicitly describing the secondary structures. This class includes models using a single or a few interacting centers (beads) for each amino acid. From this analysis several issues emerge. The difficulty in building these models resides in the need for combining transferability/predictive power with the capability of accurately reproducing the structures. It is shown that these aspects could be optimized by accurately choosing the force field (FF) terms and functional forms, and combining different parameterization procedures. In addition, in spite of the variety of the minimalist models, regularities can be found in the parameters values and in FF terms. These are outlined and schematically presented with the aid of a generic phase diagram of the polypeptide in the parameter space and, hopefully, could serve as guidelines for the development of minimalist models incorporating the maximum possible level of predictive power and structural accuracy.

  2. Wellness Model of Supervision: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.; Oliver, Marvarene; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared the effectiveness of the Wellness Model of Supervision (WELMS; Lenz & Smith, 2010) with alternative supervision models for developing wellness constructs, total personal wellness, and helping skills among counselors-in-training. Participants were 32 master's-level counseling students completing their…

  3. Comparative analysis of Goodwin's business cycle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S.; Todorov, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    We compare the behavior of solutions of Goodwin's business cycle equation in the form of neutral delay differential equation with fixed delay (NDDE model) and in the form of the differential equations of 3rd, 4th and 5th orders (ODE model's). Such ODE model's (Taylor series expansion of NDDE in powers of θ) are proposed in N. Dharmaraj and K. Vela Velupillai [6] for investigation of the short periodic sawthooth oscillations in NDDE. We show that the ODE's of 3rd, 4th and 5th order may approximate the asymptotic behavior of only main Goodwin's mode, but not the sawthooth modes. If the order of the Taylor series expansion exceeds 5, then the approximate ODE becomes unstable independently of time lag θ.

  4. Comparative analysis of condensation models within DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, Nikolay Y.; Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2014-12-09

    Two condensation process modeling approaches within DSMC methodology are compared. The first is based on the modified nucleation theory which correctly describes small clusters and the second on the kinetic theory and considers not only supercritical clusters, but clusters of all sizes including dimers. The relaxation of the size distribution function is calculated for the spatially homogeneous cases, where the monomer parameters are kept constant. As an example the vapour of Cu atoms is considered and importance of taking into account of the internal energies of clusters is shown. Peculiarities of the classical and kinetic approaches are discussed herein.

  5. Multiattribute Decision Modeling Techniques: A Comparative Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Rating Technique (SMART) as a direct response to Raiffa’s (1969) article on multiattribute utility theory , which Edwards found extremcy stimulating but...approaches such as multiattribute utility /value assessment and hierarchical analysis and have applied these techniques to a number of non-military... multiattributed ) outcomes O(l)...O(k), and if the utility function is denoted by u and the probabilities of the k events are p(l)...p(k), then the

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Toxicity Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    A-1 B. Selected Gridgen Parameter Values...ranged between 3 and 80 minutes. Agent dispersion was modeled using IDA’s GRIDGEN program, which is a modification of VLSTRACK v. 1.6.3 to give...BioStrike 2 compatible output. The values of some of the parameters used in GRIDGEN are given in Appendix B. GRIDGEN output is in the form of the

  7. Tools for comparative protein structure modeling and analysis.

    PubMed

    Eswar, Narayanan; John, Bino; Mirkovic, Nebojsa; Fiser, Andras; Ilyin, Valentin A; Pieper, Ursula; Stuart, Ashley C; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Madhusudhan, M S; Yerkovich, Bozidar; Sali, Andrej

    2003-07-01

    The following resources for comparative protein structure modeling and analysis are described (http://salilab.org): MODELLER, a program for comparative modeling by satisfaction of spatial restraints; MODWEB, a web server for automated comparative modeling that relies on PSI-BLAST, IMPALA and MODELLER; MODLOOP, a web server for automated loop modeling that relies on MODELLER; MOULDER, a CPU intensive protocol of MODWEB for building comparative models based on distant known structures; MODBASE, a comprehensive database of annotated comparative models for all sequences detectably related to a known structure; MODVIEW, a Netscape plugin for Linux that integrates viewing of multiple sequences and structures; and SNPWEB, a web server for structure-based prediction of the functional impact of a single amino acid substitution.

  8. Comparative dynamic analysis of the full Grossman model.

    PubMed

    Ried, W

    1998-08-01

    The paper applies the method of comparative dynamic analysis to the full Grossman model. For a particular class of solutions, it derives the equations implicitly defining the complete trajectories of the endogenous variables. Relying on the concept of Frisch decision functions, the impact of any parametric change on an endogenous variable can be decomposed into a direct and an indirect effect. The focus of the paper is on marginal changes in the rate of health capital depreciation. It also analyses the impact of either initial financial wealth or the initial stock of health capital. While the direction of most effects remains ambiguous in the full model, the assumption of a zero consumption benefit of health is sufficient to obtain a definite for any direct or indirect effect.

  9. Comparative analysis of existing models for power-grid synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of power-grid networks is becoming an increasingly active area of research within the physics and network science communities. The results from such studies are typically insightful and illustrative, but are often based on simplifying assumptions that can be either difficult to assess or not fully justified for realistic applications. Here we perform a comprehensive comparative analysis of three leading models recently used to study synchronization dynamics in power-grid networks—a fundamental problem of practical significance given that frequency synchronization of all power generators in the same interconnection is a necessary condition for a power grid to operate. We show that each of these models can be derived from first principles within a common framework based on the classical model of a generator, thereby clarifying all assumptions involved. This framework allows us to view power grids as complex networks of coupled second-order phase oscillators with both forcing and damping terms. Using simple illustrative examples, test systems, and real power-grid datasets, we study the inherent frequencies of the oscillators as well as their coupling structure, comparing across the different models. We demonstrate, in particular, that if the network structure is not homogeneous, generators with identical parameters need to be modeled as non-identical oscillators in general. We also discuss an approach to estimate the required (dynamical) system parameters that are unavailable in typical power-grid datasets, their use for computing the constants of each of the three models, and an open-source MATLAB toolbox that we provide for these computations.

  10. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Uveitis Models in Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pepple, Kathryn L.; Rotkis, Lauren; Wilson, Leslie; Sandt, Angela; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inflammation generates changes in the protein constituents of the aqueous humor. Proteins that change in multiple models of uveitis may be good biomarkers of disease or targets for therapeutic intervention. The present study was conducted to identify differentially-expressed proteins in the inflamed aqueous humor. Methods Two models of uveitis were induced in Lewis rats: experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU). Differential gel electrophoresis was used to compare naïve and inflamed aqueous humor. Differentially-expressed proteins were separated by using 2-D gel electrophoresis and excised for identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF). Expression of select proteins was verified by Western blot analysis in both the aqueous and vitreous. Results The inflamed aqueous from both models demonstrated an increase in total protein concentration when compared to naïve aqueous. Calprotectin, a heterodimer of S100A8 and S100A9, was increased in the aqueous in both PMU and EAU. In the vitreous, S100A8 and S100A9 were preferentially elevated in PMU. Apolipoprotein E was elevated in the aqueous of both uveitis models but was preferentially elevated in EAU. Beta-B2–crystallin levels decreased in the aqueous and vitreous of EAU but not PMU. Conclusions The proinflammatory molecules S100A8 and S100A9 were elevated in both models of uveitis but may play a more significant role in PMU than EAU. The neuroprotective protein β-B2–crystallin was found to decline in EAU. Therapies to modulate these proteins in vivo may be good targets in the treatment of ocular inflammation. PMID:26747776

  11. Hidden Markov models for evolution and comparative genomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Bykova, Nadezda A; Favorov, Alexander V; Mironov, Andrey A

    2013-01-01

    The problem of reconstruction of ancestral states given a phylogeny and data from extant species arises in a wide range of biological studies. The continuous-time Markov model for the discrete states evolution is generally used for the reconstruction of ancestral states. We modify this model to account for a case when the states of the extant species are uncertain. This situation appears, for example, if the states for extant species are predicted by some program and thus are known only with some level of reliability; it is common for bioinformatics field. The main idea is formulation of the problem as a hidden Markov model on a tree (tree HMM, tHMM), where the basic continuous-time Markov model is expanded with the introduction of emission probabilities of observed data (e.g. prediction scores) for each underlying discrete state. Our tHMM decoding algorithm allows us to predict states at the ancestral nodes as well as to refine states at the leaves on the basis of quantitative comparative genomics. The test on the simulated data shows that the tHMM approach applied to the continuous variable reflecting the probabilities of the states (i.e. prediction score) appears to be more accurate then the reconstruction from the discrete states assignment defined by the best score threshold. We provide examples of applying our model to the evolutionary analysis of N-terminal signal peptides and transcription factor binding sites in bacteria. The program is freely available at http://bioinf.fbb.msu.ru/~nadya/tHMM and via web-service at http://bioinf.fbb.msu.ru/treehmmweb.

  12. Comparative analysis of four disease prediction models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumudini, Nadella; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Alex Stanley, Balraj; Niveditha, Manoharan; Sharmila, Gunasekaran; Kumaraswami, Konda; Borghain, Rupam; Mridula, Rukmini; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multi-factorial disorder with high-penetrant mutations accounting for small percentage of PD. Our previous studies demonstrated individual association of genetic variants in folate, xenobiotic, and dopamine metabolic pathways with PD risk. The rational of the study was to develop a risk prediction model for PD using these genetic polymorphisms along with synuclein (SNCA) polymorphism. We have generated additive, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), recursive partitioning (RP), and artificial neural network (ANN) models using 21 SNPs as inputs and disease outcome as output. The clinical utility of all these models was assessed by plotting receiver operating characteristics curves where in area under the curve (AUC) was used as an index of diagnostic utility of the model. The additive model was the simplest and exhibited an AUC of 0.72. The MDR model showed significant gene-gene interactions between SNCA, DRD4VNTR, and DRD2A polymorphisms. The RP model showed SHMT C1420T as important determinant of PD risk. This variant allele was found to be protective and this protection was nullified by MTRR A66G. Inheritance of SHMT wild allele and SNCA intronic polymorphism was shown to increase the risk of PD. The ANN model showed higher diagnostic utility (AUC = 0.86) compared to all the models and was able to explain 56.6% cases of sporadic PD. To conclude, the ANN model developed using SNPs in folate, xenobiotic, and dopamine pathways along with SNCA has higher clinical utility in predicting PD risk compared to other models.

  13. Comparative Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Al" 56 COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS(U) MASSACJWSETTS INST OF TECH 1/1 CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAO 9 S MELD NOV B, RI-N-95i NMM4-85-K-0124...0 0 0 0 0 0 i. -~~ --- WU V1 2 fwx~, - - W-na alc F!LFI MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CO ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY Lfl 0 Al/Memo...differential qualita- tive (DQ) analysis, which solves the task, providing explanations suitable for use by design systems, automated diagnosis, intelligent

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Community Wind Power DevelopmentModels

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Wind, Tom; Juhl, Dan; Grace, Robert; West, Peter

    2005-05-20

    For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned windpower development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for windpower. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus cooperative ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Global Cropping Systems Models and Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. B.; You, L.; Wood, S.; Wood-Sichra, U.; Wu, W.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural practices have dramatically altered the land cover of the Earth, but the spatial extent and intensity of these practices is often difficult to catalogue. Cropland accounts for nearly 15 million km2 of the Earth's land cover - amounting to 12% of the Earth's ice-free land surface - yet information on the distribution and performance of specific crops is often available only through national or sub-national statistics. While remote sensing products offer spatially disaggregated information, those currently available on a global scale are ill-suited for many applications due to the limited separation of crop types within the area classified as cropland. Recently, however, there have been multiple independent efforts to incorporate the detailed information available from statistical surveys with supplemental spatial information to produce a spatially explicit global dataset specific to individual cropss for the year 2000. While these datasets provide analysts and decision makers with improved information on global cropping systems, the final global cropping maps differ from one another substantially. This study aims to explore and quantify systematic similarities and differences between four major global cropping systems products: the monthly irrigated and rainfed crop areas around the year 2000 (MIRAC2000) dataset, the spatial production allocation model (SPAM), the global agro-ecological zone (GAEZ) dataset, and the dataset developed by Monfreda et al., 2008. The analysis explores not only the final cropping systems maps but also the interdependencies of each product, methodological differences and modeling assumptions, which will provide users with information vital for discerning between datasets in selecting a product appropriate for each intended application.

  16. Mental Models about Seismic Effects: Students' Profile Based Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moutinho, Sara; Moura, Rui; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, meaningful learning takes a central role in science education and is based in mental models that allow the representation of the real world by individuals. Thus, it is essential to analyse the student's mental models by promoting an easier reconstruction of scientific knowledge, by allowing them to become consistent with the curricular…

  17. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskel...

  18. Comparative analysis of conceptual models with error correction, artificial neural networks and committee models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corzo P, Gerald A.; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    In operational flow forecasting conceptual or process-based hydrological models are typically used, and more and more in combination with precipitation forecasts complemented by corrected data assimilation or data-driven error corrector models. Alternatively, predictive data-driven models, alone or in ensembles, have been employed in different researches, claiming that they ensure high accuracy of flow forecasting; for this, an artificial neural network (ANN) seems to be the most developed in studies. In this paper a comparative analysis of different error correctors and ANN models is made to contribute on the selection of operational. For this we explore the performance of various model combinations forecasting single and multiple time steps. The HBV hydrological model with and without error correction, data-driven models (ANNs) and hybrid committee models integrating conceptual models and ANNs. The capabilities of a model at a single time step (simulation) as well as multiple forecast horizons are represented in comparative graphs. Limitations of the meteorological forecasts are not contemplated in the hydrological forecast scenarios, so precipitation hindcast information was used as input in all models. Single time step forecast simulation of the HBV has 30 percent higher error than a one day forecast ANN model. However, for forecast horizons higher than 3 days a high variability of models' accuracy is found, and the clear dominant performance of the HBV hydrological model with an ANN error corrector is observed. In the forecasts for up to two days the committee and error-corrected models were the best, followed by ANN, and the conceptual model without error correction. The conceptual HBV model alone shows to perform best on long term sequential or iterative forecasts.

  19. Comparative Design, Modeling, and Control Analysis of Robotic Transmissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    recommend it, especially the part about hanging over the side of the ship 6 and feeding the fish in a force 10 gale!! Andy, Martin, Bill, Bob2, Jim, Skip...such a good job iii machining all the necessary hardware throughout these years, and fixing the many design flaws and coping with the inhuman deadlines...mathematical physical system modeling techniques to better understand machine behavior and design issues. We will also motivate the need for the research

  20. How to Construct More Accurate Student Models: Comparing and Optimizing Knowledge Tracing and Performance Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong, Yue; Beck, Joseph E.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2011-01-01

    Student modeling is a fundamental concept applicable to a variety of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). However, there is not a lot of practical guidance on how to construct and train such models. This paper compares two approaches for student modeling, Knowledge Tracing (KT) and Performance Factors Analysis (PFA), by evaluating their predictive…

  1. An Analysis Technique/Automated Tool for Comparing and Tracking Analysis Modes of Different Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towner, Robert L.; Band, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis technique was developed to compare and track mode shapes for different Finite Element Models. The technique may be applied to a variety of structural dynamics analyses, including model reduction validation (comparing unreduced and reduced models), mode tracking for various parametric analyses (e.g., launch vehicle model dispersion analysis to identify sensitivities to modal gain for Guidance, Navigation, and Control), comparing models of different mesh fidelity (e.g., a coarse model for a preliminary analysis compared to a higher-fidelity model for a detailed analysis) and mode tracking for a structure with properties that change over time (e.g., a launch vehicle from liftoff through end-of-burn, with propellant being expended during the flight). Mode shapes for different models are compared and tracked using several numerical indicators, including traditional Cross-Orthogonality and Modal Assurance Criteria approaches, as well as numerical indicators obtained by comparing modal strain energy and kinetic energy distributions. This analysis technique has been used to reliably identify correlated mode shapes for complex Finite Element Models that would otherwise be difficult to compare using traditional techniques. This improved approach also utilizes an adaptive mode tracking algorithm that allows for automated tracking when working with complex models and/or comparing a large group of models.

  2. A comparative analysis on different nanofluid models for the oscillatory stagnation point flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Khan, A. U.; Saleem, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we have presented the comparative analysis of the oscillatory stagnation point flow of nanofluids. Both the phase flow model and Buongiorno model are discussed for oscillatory stagnation point flows and a comparison between experimental model and theoretical model is presented. The resulting partial differential equations for oscillatory two-dimensional flows are simplified in a fixed frame and a moving frame of reference subject to the assumed form of solutions. The homotopy analysis method is used to solve the reduced system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The consequences are examined through graphs and tables. It is also found that comparatively both the Boungiorno nanofluid model and phase flow model are of compatible order for a special set of parameters but generally such results do not hold.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty. PMID:27148030

  4. Predicting Air Permeability of Handloom Fabrics: A Comparative Analysis of Regression and Artificial Neural Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Ashis; Majumdar, Prabal Kumar; Bannerjee, Debamalya

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of two modeling methodologies for the prediction of air permeability of plain woven handloom cotton fabrics. Four basic fabric constructional parameters namely ends per inch, picks per inch, warp count and weft count have been used as inputs for artificial neural network (ANN) and regression models. Out of the four regression models tried, interaction model showed very good prediction performance with a meager mean absolute error of 2.017 %. However, ANN models demonstrated superiority over the regression models both in terms of correlation coefficient and mean absolute error. The ANN model with 10 nodes in the single hidden layer showed very good correlation coefficient of 0.982 and 0.929 and mean absolute error of only 0.923 and 2.043 % for training and testing data respectively.

  5. Comparing model-based and model-free analysis methods for QUASAR arterial spin labeling perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Michael A; Woolrich, Mark W; Petersen, Esben T; Golay, Xavier; Payne, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Amongst the various implementations of arterial spin labeling MRI methods for quantifying cerebral perfusion, the QUASAR method is unique. By using a combination of labeling with and without flow suppression gradients, the QUASAR method offers the separation of macrovascular and tissue signals. This permits local arterial input functions to be defined and "model-free" analysis, using numerical deconvolution, to be used. However, it remains unclear whether arterial spin labeling data are best treated using model-free or model-based analysis. This work provides a critical comparison of these two approaches for QUASAR arterial spin labeling in the healthy brain. An existing two-component (arterial and tissue) model was extended to the mixed flow suppression scheme of QUASAR to provide an optimal model-based analysis. The model-based analysis was extended to incorporate dispersion of the labeled bolus, generally regarded as the major source of discrepancy between the two analysis approaches. Model-free and model-based analyses were compared for perfusion quantification including absolute measurements, uncertainty estimation, and spatial variation in cerebral blood flow estimates. Major sources of discrepancies between model-free and model-based analysis were attributed to the effects of dispersion and the degree to which the two methods can separate macrovascular and tissue signal.

  6. Whole genome comparative analysis of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) with four model fish species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparative mapping is a powerful tool to study evolution of genomes. It allows transfer of genome information from the well-studied model species to non-model species. Catfish is an economically important aquaculture species in United States. A large amount of genome resources have been developed from catfish including genetic linkage maps, physical maps, BAC end sequences (BES), integrated linkage and physical maps using BES-derived markers, physical map contig-specific sequences, and draft genome sequences. Application of such genome resources should allow comparative analysis at the genome scale with several other model fish species. Results In this study, we conducted whole genome comparative analysis between channel catfish and four model fish species with fully sequenced genomes, zebrafish, medaka, stickleback and Tetraodon. A total of 517 Mb draft genome sequences of catfish were anchored to its genetic linkage map, which accounted for 62% of the total draft genome sequences. Based on the location of homologous genes, homologous chromosomes were determined among catfish and the four model fish species. A large number of conserved syntenic blocks were identified. Analysis of the syntenic relationships between catfish and the four model fishes supported that the catfish genome is most similar to the genome of zebrafish. Conclusion The organization of the catfish genome is similar to that of the four teleost species, zebrafish, medaka, stickleback, and Tetraodon such that homologous chromosomes can be identified. Within each chromosome, extended syntenic blocks were evident, but the conserved syntenies at the chromosome level involve extensive inter-chromosomal and intra-chromosomal rearrangements. This whole genome comparative map should facilitate the whole genome assembly and annotation in catfish, and will be useful for genomic studies of various other fish species. PMID:24215161

  7. Comparative analysis of numerical models of pipe handling equipment used in offshore drilling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlus, Witold; Ebbesen, Morten K.; Hansen, Michael R.; Choux, Martin; Hovland, Geir

    2016-06-01

    Design of offshore drilling equipment is a task that involves not only analysis of strict machine specifications and safety requirements but also consideration of changeable weather conditions and harsh environment. These challenges call for a multidisciplinary approach and make the design process complex. Various modeling software products are currently available to aid design engineers in their effort to test and redesign equipment before it is manufactured. However, given the number of available modeling tools and methods, the choice of the proper modeling methodology becomes not obvious and - in some cases - troublesome. Therefore, we present a comparative analysis of two popular approaches used in modeling and simulation of mechanical systems: multibody and analytical modeling. A gripper arm of the offshore vertical pipe handling machine is selected as a case study for which both models are created. In contrast to some other works, the current paper shows verification of both systems by benchmarking their simulation results against each other. Such criteria as modeling effort and results accuracy are evaluated to assess which modeling strategy is the most suitable given its eventual application.

  8. Protein Dynamics from NMR: The Slowly Relaxing Local Structure Analysis Compared with Model-Free Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meirovitch, Eva; Shapiro, Yury E.; Polimeno, Antonino; Freed, Jack H.

    2009-01-01

    15N-1H spin relaxation is a powerful method for deriving information on protein dynamics. The traditional method of data analysis is model-free (MF), where the global and local N-H motions are independent and the local geometry is simplified. The common MF analysis consists of fitting single-field data. The results are typically field-dependent, and multi-field data cannot be fit with standard fitting schemes. Cases where known functional dynamics has not been detected by MF were identified by us and others. Recently we applied to spin relaxation in proteins the Slowly Relaxing Local Structure (SRLS) approach which accounts rigorously for mode-mixing and general features of local geometry. SRLS was shown to yield MF in appropriate asymptotic limits. We found that the experimental spectral density corresponds quite well to the SRLS spectral density. The MF formulae are often used outside of their validity ranges, allowing small data sets to be force-fitted with good statistics but inaccurate best-fit parameters. This paper focuses on the mechanism of force-fitting and its implications. It is shown that MF force-fits the experimental data because mode-mixing, the rhombic symmetry of the local ordering and general features of local geometry are not accounted for. Combined multi-field multi-temperature data analyzed by MF may lead to the detection of incorrect phenomena, while conformational entropy derived from MF order parameters may be highly inaccurate. On the other hand, fitting to more appropriate models can yield consistent physically insightful information. This requires that the complexity of the theoretical spectral densities matches the integrity of the experimental data. As shown herein, the SRLS densities comply with this requirement. PMID:16821820

  9. Analysis of RNAseq datasets from a comparative infectious disease zebrafish model using GeneTiles bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Veneman, Wouter J; de Sonneville, Jan; van der Kolk, Kees-Jan; Ordas, Anita; Al-Ars, Zaid; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2015-03-01

    We present a RNA deep sequencing (RNAseq) analysis of a comparison of the transcriptome responses to infection of zebrafish larvae with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Mycobacterium marinum bacteria. We show how our developed GeneTiles software can improve RNAseq analysis approaches by more confidently identifying a large set of markers upon infection with these bacteria. For analysis of RNAseq data currently, software programs such as Bowtie2 and Samtools are indispensable. However, these programs that are designed for a LINUX environment require some dedicated programming skills and have no options for visualisation of the resulting mapped sequence reads. Especially with large data sets, this makes the analysis time consuming and difficult for non-expert users. We have applied the GeneTiles software to the analysis of previously published and newly obtained RNAseq datasets of our zebrafish infection model, and we have shown the applicability of this approach also to published RNAseq datasets of other organisms by comparing our data with a published mammalian infection study. In addition, we have implemented the DEXSeq module in the GeneTiles software to identify genes, such as glucagon A, that are differentially spliced under infection conditions. In the analysis of our RNAseq data, this has led to the possibility to improve the size of data sets that could be efficiently compared without using problem-dedicated programs, leading to a quick identification of marker sets. Therefore, this approach will also be highly useful for transcriptome analyses of other organisms for which well-characterised genomes are available.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Soft Computing Models in Prediction of Bending Rigidity of Cotton Woven Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, R.; Behera, B. K.

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative prediction of fabric mechanical properties is an essential requirement for design engineering of textile and apparel products. In this work, the possibility of prediction of bending rigidity of cotton woven fabrics has been explored with the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and two hybrid methodologies, namely Neuro-genetic modeling and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) modeling. For this purpose, a set of cotton woven grey fabrics was desized, scoured and relaxed. The fabrics were then conditioned and tested for bending properties. With the database thus created, a neural network model was first developed using back propagation as the learning algorithm. The second model was developed by applying a hybrid learning strategy, in which genetic algorithm was first used as a learning algorithm to optimize the number of neurons and connection weights of the neural network. The Genetic algorithm optimized network structure was further allowed to learn using back propagation algorithm. In the third model, an ANFIS modeling approach was attempted to map the input-output data. The prediction performances of the models were compared and a sensitivity analysis was reported. The results show that the prediction by neuro-genetic and ANFIS models were better in comparison with that of back propagation neural network model.

  11. Conceptual model of iCAL4LA: Proposing the components using comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Siti Zulaiha; Mutalib, Ariffin Abdul

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses an on-going study that initiates an initial process in determining the common components for a conceptual model of interactive computer-assisted learning that is specifically designed for low achieving children. This group of children needs a specific learning support that can be used as an alternative learning material in their learning environment. In order to develop the conceptual model, this study extracts the common components from 15 strongly justified computer assisted learning studies. A comparative analysis has been conducted to determine the most appropriate components by using a set of specific indication classification to prioritize the applicability. The results of the extraction process reveal 17 common components for consideration. Later, based on scientific justifications, 16 of them were selected as the proposed components for the model.

  12. Comparative Analysis between Profits of the Two Models of a CC Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, A. G.; Rizwan, S. M.; Majumder, M. C.; Ramachandran, K. P.; Taneja, G.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the comparative analysis between profits of the two models of a two-unit CC plant with same/different installed capacity combination. The analysis is useful in deciding the optimum plant equipment capacity combinations and particular model suitability over the other to the existing situation. In plant model I, the actual plant situation with four EOT cranes (unit I, II 200 ton each) is analyzed. But, it is observed that equipment combination in terms of installed capacities as specified above could be analyzed by varying the installed capacity and thereby achieving a significant difference in the plant performance. Hence, plant model II explores a situation by replacing the 200 ton unit II cranes with 100 ton cranes and operating both the units at full installed capacity with priority of repair and operation to unit I. Upon failure in either unit, an inspection is carried out to decide the type of maintenance task to be performed. The actual plant downtime data is used for achieving the optimized reliability indices and comparison among both the models. Essential graphs are plotted to demonstrate the results and related comparison.

  13. A comparative analysis of hazard models for predicting debris flows in Madison County, VA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, Meghan M.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Morgan, Benjamin A.

    2001-01-01

    During the rainstorm of June 27, 1995, roughly 330-750 mm of rain fell within a sixteen-hour period, initiating floods and over 600 debris flows in a small area (130 km2) of Madison County, Virginia. Field studies showed that the majority (70%) of these debris flows initiated with a thickness of 0.5 to 3.0 m in colluvium on slopes from 17 o to 41 o (Wieczorek et al., 2000). This paper evaluated and compared the approaches of SINMAP, LISA, and Iverson's (2000) transient response model for slope stability analysis by applying each model to the landslide data from Madison County. Of these three stability models, only Iverson's transient response model evaluated stability conditions as a function of time and depth. Iverson?s model would be the preferred method of the three models to evaluate landslide hazards on a regional scale in areas prone to rain-induced landslides as it considers both the transient and spatial response of pore pressure in its calculation of slope stability. The stability calculation used in SINMAP and LISA is similar and utilizes probability distribution functions for certain parameters. Unlike SINMAP that only considers soil cohesion, internal friction angle and rainfall-rate distributions, LISA allows the use of distributed data for all parameters, so it is the preferred model to evaluate slope stability over SINMAP. Results from all three models suggested similar soil and hydrologic properties for triggering the landslides that occurred during the 1995 storm in Madison County, Virginia. The colluvium probably had cohesion of less than 2KPa. The root-soil system is above the failure plane and consequently root strength and tree surcharge had negligible effect on slope stability. The result that the final location of the water table was near the ground surface is supported by the water budget analysis of the rainstorm conducted by Smith et al. (1996).

  14. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential

  15. Modelling submerged coastal environments: Remote sensing technologies, techniques, and comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Chris

    Built upon remote sensing and GIS littoral zone characterization methodologies of the past decade, a series of loosely coupled models aimed to test, compare and synthesize multi-beam SONAR (MBES), Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry (ALB), and satellite based optical data sets in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, eco-region. Bathymetry and relative intensity metrics for the MBES and ALB data sets were run through a quantitative and qualitative comparison, which included outputs from the Benthic Terrain Modeller (BTM) tool. Substrate classification based on relative intensities of respective data sets and textural indices generated using grey level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were investigated. A spatial modelling framework built in ArcGIS(TM) for the derivation of bathymetric data sets from optical satellite imagery was also tested for proof of concept and validation. Where possible, efficiencies and semi-automation for repeatable testing was achieved using ArcGIS(TM) ModelBuilder. The findings from this study could assist future decision makers in the field of coastal management and hydrographic studies. Keywords: Seafloor terrain characterization, Benthic Terrain Modeller (BTM), Multi-beam SONAR, Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry, Satellite Derived Bathymetry, ArcGISTM ModelBuilder, Textural analysis, Substrate classification.

  16. Badminton instructional in Malaysian schools: a comparative analysis of TGfU and SDT pedagogical models.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Sanmuga

    2016-01-01

    Model based physical education curriculum of Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) is still at early stage of implementation in Malaysian schools whereby the technical or skill-led model continues to dominate the physical education curriculum. Implementing TGfU seems to be problematic and untested in this environment. Therefore, this study examined, the effects that a revised model of TGfU compared to Skill Drill Technical (SDT) a technical model had on learning movement skills in Badminton, including returning to base, decision making and skill execution whilst performing in a doubles game play and also explored teachers' perceptions of navigating between the two models. Participants aged 15.5 ± 1.0 years, N = 32, school Badminton players were randomly selected and assigned equally into groups of TGfU and SDT. Reflective data was gathered from two experienced physical education teachers who were involved in this study. Findings indicated for movement to the base in doubles game play indicated significant improvement, after intervention via TGfU. As for decision-making and skill execution in doubles game play, analysis revealed no significant difference after intervention. Findings from teachers reflection, indicated the importance of mini game play in both TGfU and SDT models, as the students enjoyed, and built up positive attitudes for both winning or losing in game situations. However, when negotiating the TGfU model, the teacher found it difficult at times to execute the pedagogical model, as students needed guidance to discuss aspects related to tactics. However, to keep this pedagogical model viable further research findings ought to be circulated among teachers in Malaysia and similar Southeast Asian counties.

  17. Comparative Analysis of InSAR Digital Surface Models for Test Area Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Iulia; Poncos, Valentin; Teleaga, Delia

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the interferometric processing of ERS Tandem, ENVISAT and TerraSAR- X for digital surface model (DSM) generation. The selected test site is Bucharest (Romania), a built-up area characterized by the usual urban complex pattern: mixture of buildings with different height levels, paved roads, vegetation, and water bodies. First, the DSMs were generated following the standard interferometric processing chain. Then, the accuracy of the DSMs was analyzed against the SPOT HRS model (30 m resolution at the equator). A DSM derived by optical stereoscopic processing of SPOT 5 HRG data and also the SRTM (3 arc seconds resolution at the equator) DSM have been included in the comparative analysis.

  18. Comparative mRNA analysis of behavioral and genetic mouse models of aggression.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria G; Pain, Oliver; Sluyter, Frans; Mineur, Yann S; Crusio, Wim E; de Boer, Sietse; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; Kesserwani, Jad; Robinson, Edward; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of aggression have traditionally compared strains, most notably BALB/cJ and C57BL/6. However, these strains were not designed to study aggression despite differences in aggression-related traits and distinct reactivity to stress. This study evaluated expression of genes differentially regulated in a stress (behavioral) mouse model of aggression with those from a recent genetic mouse model aggression. The study used a discovery-replication design using two independent mRNA studies from mouse brain tissue. The discovery study identified strain (BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J) × stress (chronic mild stress or control) interactions. Probe sets differentially regulated in the discovery set were intersected with those uncovered in the replication study, which evaluated differences between high and low aggressive animals from three strains specifically bred to study aggression. Network analysis was conducted on overlapping genes uncovered across both studies. A significant overlap was found with the genetic mouse study sharing 1,916 probe sets with the stress model. Fifty-one probe sets were found to be strongly dysregulated across both studies mapping to 50 known genes. Network analysis revealed two plausible pathways including one centered on the UBC gene hub which encodes ubiquitin, a protein well-known for protein degradation, and another on P38 MAPK. Findings from this study support the stress model of aggression, which showed remarkable molecular overlap with a genetic model. The study uncovered a set of candidate genes including the Erg2 gene, which has previously been implicated in different psychopathologies. The gene networks uncovered points at a Redox pathway as potentially being implicated in aggressive related behaviors.

  19. Solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis by spherical and fdm head modeling: a comparative analysis - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Vatta, Federica; Meneghini, Fabio; Esposito, Fabrino; Mininel, Stefano; Di Salle, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Neural source localization techniques based on electroencephalography (EEG) use scalp potential data to infer the location of underlying neural activity. This procedure entails modeling the sources of EEG activity and modeling the head volume conduction process to link the modeled sources to the EEG, solving the so called EEG forward problem, and reconstructing the brain electrical activity from recorded EEG data, solving the EEG inverse problem. Many factors affect the accuracy of the forward and hence of the inverse problem solution, one of them is the shape of the head model. Realistic head models can lead to more accurate forward problem solutions, but imply heavier computational burdens in comparison to spherical models. Conversely, inverse solutions require the forward model to be computationally efficient. The aim of this study is to investigate the different general potentialities, in terms of EEG source reconstruction, which can be achieved adopting realistic or spherical geometries in head modeling. Previous studies in the literature analyzed the effect of head model geometry presenting results for particular cases of head models. In this paper, we re-address the effect of realistic geometry in head modeling, seeking for more general results by adopting the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) phantom model to represent a whole family of realistic head models. This paper presents results of a computer simulation study in which the potentialities of two different four-shell head models are compared, the realistic MNI-based FDM and the corresponding sensor-fitted spherical-shaped model, by means of the Point Spread Function (PSF) correlation maps, with a quantitative analysis of the accuracy in EEG source reconstruction given by head modeling refinement from the spherical to the more complex realistic FDM head modeling.

  20. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of Grass Pollen Allergens Using Brachypodium distachyon as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Akanksha; Sharma, Niharika; Bhalla, Prem; Singh, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Comparative genomics have facilitated the mining of biological information from a genome sequence, through the detection of similarities and differences with genomes of closely or more distantly related species. By using such comparative approaches, knowledge can be transferred from the model to non-model organisms and insights can be gained in the structural and evolutionary patterns of specific genes. In the absence of sequenced genomes for allergenic grasses, this study was aimed at understanding the structure, organisation and expression profiles of grass pollen allergens using the genomic data from Brachypodium distachyon as it is phylogenetically related to the allergenic grasses. Combining genomic data with the anther RNA-Seq dataset revealed 24 pollen allergen genes belonging to eight allergen groups mapping on the five chromosomes in B. distachyon. High levels of anther-specific expression profiles were observed for the 24 identified putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium. The genomic evidence suggests that gene encoding the group 5 allergen, the most potent trigger of hay fever and allergic asthma originated as a pollen specific orphan gene in a common grass ancestor of Brachypodium and Triticiae clades. Gene structure analysis showed that the putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium either lack or contain reduced number of introns. Promoter analysis of the identified Brachypodium genes revealed the presence of specific cis-regulatory sequences likely responsible for high anther/pollen-specific expression. With the identification of putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium, this study has also described some important plant gene families (e.g. expansin superfamily, EF-Hand family, profilins etc) for the first time in the model plant Brachypodium. Altogether, the present study provides new insights into structural characterization and evolution of pollen allergens and will further serve as a base for their functional

  1. Comparing the Fit of Item Response Theory and Factor Analysis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Cai, Li; Hernandez, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Linear factor analysis (FA) models can be reliably tested using test statistics based on residual covariances. We show that the same statistics can be used to reliably test the fit of item response theory (IRT) models for ordinal data (under some conditions). Hence, the fit of an FA model and of an IRT model to the same data set can now be…

  2. Computer-aided modelling and analysis of PV systems: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Koukouvaos, Charalambos; Kandris, Dionisis; Samarakou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Modern scientific advances have enabled remarkable efficacy for photovoltaic systems with regard to the exploitation of solar energy, boosting them into having a rapidly growing position among the systems developed for the production of renewable energy. However, in many cases the design, analysis, and control of photovoltaic systems are tasks which are quite complex and thus difficult to be carried out. In order to cope with this kind of problems, appropriate software tools have been developed either as standalone products or parts of general purpose software platforms used to model and simulate the generation, transmission, and distribution of solar energy. The utilization of this kind of software tools may be extremely helpful to the successful performance evaluation of energy systems with maximum accuracy and minimum cost in time and effort. The work presented in this paper aims on a first level at the performance analysis of various configurations of photovoltaic systems through computer-aided modelling. On a second level, it provides a comparative evaluation of the credibility of two of the most advanced graphical programming environments, namely, Simulink and LabVIEW, with regard to their application in photovoltaic systems.

  3. Stochastic segmentation models for array-based comparative genomic hybridization data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tze Leung; Xing, Haipeng; Zhang, Nancy

    2008-04-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a high throughput, high resolution technique for studying the genetics of cancer. Analysis of array-CGH data typically involves estimation of the underlying chromosome copy numbers from the log fluorescence ratios and segmenting the chromosome into regions with the same copy number at each location. We propose for the analysis of array-CGH data, a new stochastic segmentation model and an associated estimation procedure that has attractive statistical and computational properties. An important benefit of this Bayesian segmentation model is that it yields explicit formulas for posterior means, which can be used to estimate the signal directly without performing segmentation. Other quantities relating to the posterior distribution that are useful for providing confidence assessments of any given segmentation can also be estimated by using our method. We propose an approximation method whose computation time is linear in sequence length which makes our method practically applicable to the new higher density arrays. Simulation studies and applications to real array-CGH data illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach.

  4. Computer-Aided Modelling and Analysis of PV Systems: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Koukouvaos, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Modern scientific advances have enabled remarkable efficacy for photovoltaic systems with regard to the exploitation of solar energy, boosting them into having a rapidly growing position among the systems developed for the production of renewable energy. However, in many cases the design, analysis, and control of photovoltaic systems are tasks which are quite complex and thus difficult to be carried out. In order to cope with this kind of problems, appropriate software tools have been developed either as standalone products or parts of general purpose software platforms used to model and simulate the generation, transmission, and distribution of solar energy. The utilization of this kind of software tools may be extremely helpful to the successful performance evaluation of energy systems with maximum accuracy and minimum cost in time and effort. The work presented in this paper aims on a first level at the performance analysis of various configurations of photovoltaic systems through computer-aided modelling. On a second level, it provides a comparative evaluation of the credibility of two of the most advanced graphical programming environments, namely, Simulink and LabVIEW, with regard to their application in photovoltaic systems. PMID:24772007

  5. Comparative analysis of economic models in selected solar energy computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. W.; Barnes, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The economic evaluation models in five computer programs widely used for analyzing solar energy systems (F-CHART 3.0, F-CHART 4.0, SOLCOST, BLAST, and DOE-2) are compared. Differences in analysis techniques and assumptions among the programs are assessed from the point of view of consistency with the Federal requirements for life cycle costing (10 CFR Part 436), effect on predicted economic performance, and optimal system size, case of use, and general applicability to diverse systems types and building types. The FEDSOL program developed by the National Bureau of Standards specifically to meet the Federal life cycle cost requirements serves as a basis for the comparison. Results of the study are illustrated in test cases of two different types of Federally owned buildings: a single family residence and a low rise office building.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminov, Ildar; Tarasova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Tatyana; Avazov, Artur

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt) and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  7. A comparative modeling analysis of multiscale temporal variability of rainfall in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Jos M.; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2008-07-01

    The effects of long-term natural climate variability and human-induced climate change on rainfall variability have become the focus of much concern and recent research efforts. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative analysis of observed multiscale temporal variability of rainfall in the Perth, Newcastle, and Darwin regions of Australia. This empirical and stochastic modeling analysis explores multiscale rainfall variability, i.e., ranging from short to long term, including within-storm patterns, and intra-annual, interannual, and interdecadal variabilities, using data taken from each of these regions. The analyses investigated how storm durations, interstorm periods, and average storm rainfall intensities differ for different climate states and demonstrated significant differences in this regard between the three selected regions. In Perth, the average storm intensity is stronger during La Niña years than during El Niño years, whereas in Newcastle and Darwin storm duration is longer during La Niña years. Increase of either storm duration or average storm intensity is the cause of higher average annual rainfall during La Niña years as compared to El Niño years. On the other hand, within-storm variability does not differ significantly between different ENSO states in all three locations. In the case of long-term rainfall variability, the statistical analyses indicated that in Newcastle the long-term rainfall pattern reflects the variability of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) index, whereas in Perth and Darwin the long-term variability exhibits a step change in average annual rainfall (up in Darwin and down in Perth) which occurred around 1970. The step changes in Perth and Darwin and the switch in IPO states in Newcastle manifested differently in the three study regions in terms of changes in the annual number of rainy days or the average daily rainfall intensity or both. On the basis of these empirical data analyses, a stochastic

  8. Systems thinking, the Swiss Cheese Model and accident analysis: a comparative systemic analysis of the Grayrigg train derailment using the ATSB, AcciMap and STAMP models.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Peter; Waterson, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    The Swiss Cheese Model (SCM) is the most popular accident causation model and is widely used throughout various industries. A debate exists in the research literature over whether the SCM remains a viable tool for accident analysis. Critics of the model suggest that it provides a sequential, oversimplified view of accidents. Conversely, proponents suggest that it embodies the concepts of systems theory, as per the contemporary systemic analysis techniques. The aim of this paper was to consider whether the SCM can provide a systems thinking approach and remain a viable option for accident analysis. To achieve this, the train derailment at Grayrigg was analysed with an SCM-based model (the ATSB accident investigation model) and two systemic accident analysis methods (AcciMap and STAMP). The analysis outputs and usage of the techniques were compared. The findings of the study showed that each model applied the systems thinking approach. However, the ATSB model and AcciMap graphically presented their findings in a more succinct manner, whereas STAMP more clearly embodied the concepts of systems theory. The study suggests that, whilst the selection of an analysis method is subject to trade-offs that practitioners and researchers must make, the SCM remains a viable model for accident analysis.

  9. COMPARING THE UTILITY OF MULTIMEDIA MODELS FOR HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL EXPOSURE ANALYSIS: TWO CASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of models are available for exposure assessment; however, few are used as tools for both human and ecosystem risks. This discussion will consider two modeling frameworks that have recently been used to support human and ecological decision making. The study will compare ...

  10. Regional disaster impact analysis: comparing Input-Output and Computable General Equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koks, E. E.; Carrera, L.; Jonkeren, O.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Husby, T. G.; Thissen, M.; Standardi, G.; Mysiak, J.

    2015-11-01

    A large variety of models has been developed to assess the economic losses of disasters, of which the most common ones are Input-Output (IO) and Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models. In addition, an increasing numbers of scholars has developed hybrid approaches; one that combines both or either of them in combination with non-economic methods. While both IO and CGE models are widely used, they are mainly compared on theoretical grounds. Few studies have compared disaster impacts of different model types in a systematic way and for the same geographical area, using similar input data. Such a comparison is valuable from both a scientific and policy perspective as the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the estimated losses are likely to vary with the chosen modelling approach (IO, CGE, or hybrid). Hence, regional disaster impact loss estimates resulting from a range of models facilitates better decisions and policy making. Therefore, in this study we analyze one specific case study, using three regional models: two hybrid IO models and a regionally calibrated version of a global CGE model. The case study concerns two flood scenarios in the Po-river basin in Italy. Modelling results indicate that the difference in estimated total (national) economic losses and the regional distribution of those losses may vary by up to a factor of seven between the three models, depending on the type of recovery path. Total economic impact, comprising all Italian regions, is negative in all models though.

  11. Regional disaster impact analysis: comparing input-output and computable general equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koks, Elco E.; Carrera, Lorenzo; Jonkeren, Olaf; Aerts, Jeroen C. J. H.; Husby, Trond G.; Thissen, Mark; Standardi, Gabriele; Mysiak, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    A variety of models have been applied to assess the economic losses of disasters, of which the most common ones are input-output (IO) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. In addition, an increasing number of scholars have developed hybrid approaches: one that combines both or either of them in combination with noneconomic methods. While both IO and CGE models are widely used, they are mainly compared on theoretical grounds. Few studies have compared disaster impacts of different model types in a systematic way and for the same geographical area, using similar input data. Such a comparison is valuable from both a scientific and policy perspective as the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the estimated losses are born likely to vary with the chosen modelling approach (IO, CGE, or hybrid). Hence, regional disaster impact loss estimates resulting from a range of models facilitate better decisions and policy making. Therefore, this study analyses the economic consequences for a specific case study, using three regional disaster impact models: two hybrid IO models and a CGE model. The case study concerns two flood scenarios in the Po River basin in Italy. Modelling results indicate that the difference in estimated total (national) economic losses and the regional distribution of those losses may vary by up to a factor of 7 between the three models, depending on the type of recovery path. Total economic impact, comprising all Italian regions, is negative in all models though.

  12. Genome sequence of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas: a comparative analysis within the Desulfovibrio genus.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Pimentel, Catarina; Santos, Catia I; Clemente, Carla; Varela-Raposo, Ana; Resende, Daniela M; da Silva, Sofia M; de Oliveira, Luciana Márcia; Matos, Marcia; Costa, Daniela A; Flores, Orfeu; Ruiz, Jerónimo C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2014-08-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas is a model organism of sulfate-reducing bacteria of which energy metabolism and stress response have been extensively studied. The complete genomic context of this organism was however, not yet available. The sequencing of the D. gigas genome provides insights into the integrated network of energy conserving complexes and structures present in this bacterium. Comparison with genomes of other Desulfovibrio spp. reveals the presence of two different CRISPR/Cas systems in D. gigas. Phylogenetic analysis using conserved protein sequences (encoded by rpoB and gyrB) indicates two main groups of Desulfovibrio spp, being D. gigas more closely related to D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans strains. Gene duplications were found such as those encoding fumarate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. Complexes not yet described within Desulfovibrio genus were identified: Mnh complex, a v-type ATP-synthase as well as genes encoding the MinCDE system that could be responsible for the larger size of D. gigas when compared to other members of the genus. A low number of hydrogenases and the absence of the codh/acs and pfl genes, both present in D. vulgaris strains, indicate that intermediate cycling mechanisms may contribute substantially less to the energy gain in D. gigas compared to other Desulfovibrio spp. This might be compensated by the presence of other unique genomic arrangements of complexes such as the Rnf and the Hdr/Flox, or by the presence of NAD(P)H related complexes, like the Nuo, NfnAB or Mnh.

  13. Genome sequence of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas: a comparative analysis within the Desulfovibrio genus*

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Pimentel, Catarina; Santos, Catia I; Clemente, Carla; Varela–Raposo, Ana; Resende, Daniela M; da Silva, Sofia M; de Oliveira, Luciana Márcia; Matos, Marcia; Costa, Daniela A; Flores, Orfeu; Ruiz, Jerónimo C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2014-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas is a model organism of sulfate-reducing bacteria of which energy metabolism and stress response have been extensively studied. The complete genomic context of this organism was however, not yet available. The sequencing of the D. gigas genome provides insights into the integrated network of energy conserving complexes and structures present in this bacterium. Comparison with genomes of other Desulfovibrio spp. reveals the presence of two different CRISPR/Cas systems in D. gigas. Phylogenetic analysis using conserved protein sequences (encoded by rpoB and gyrB) indicates two main groups of Desulfovibrio spp, being D. gigas more closely related to D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans strains. Gene duplications were found such as those encoding fumarate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. Complexes not yet described within Desulfovibrio genus were identified: Mnh complex, a v-type ATP-synthase as well as genes encoding the MinCDE system that could be responsible for the larger size of D. gigas when compared to other members of the genus. A low number of hydrogenases and the absence of the codh/acs and pfl genes, both present in D. vulgaris strains, indicate that intermediate cycling mechanisms may contribute substantially less to the energy gain in D. gigas compared to other Desulfovibrio spp. This might be compensated by the presence of other unique genomic arrangements of complexes such as the Rnf and the Hdr/Flox, or by the presence of NAD(P)H related complexes, like the Nuo, NfnAB or Mnh. PMID:25055974

  14. Sensitivity analysis of PBL schemes by comparing WRF model and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzarini, A.; Angelini, F.; Ferrero, L.; Moscatelli, M.; Perrone, M. G.; Pirovano, G.; Riva, G. M.; Sangiorgi, G.; Toppetti, A. M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Bolzacchini, E.

    2014-09-01

    This work discusses the sources of model biases in reconstructing the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) height among five commonly used PBL parameterizations. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model was applied over the critical area of Northern Italy with 5 km of horizontal resolution, and compared against a wide set of experimental data for February 2008. Three non-local closure PBL schemes (Asymmetrical Convective Model version 2, ACM2; Medium Range Forecast, MRF; Yonsei University, YSU) and two local closure parameterizations (Mellor Yamada Janjic, MYJ; University of Washington Moist Turbulence, UW) were selected for the analysis. Vertical profiles of aerosol number concentrations and Lidar backscatter profiles were collected in the metropolitan area of Milan in order to derive the PBL hourly evolution. Moreover, radio-soundings of Milano Linate airport as well as surface temperature, mixing ratio and wind speed of several meteorological stations were considered too. Results show that all five parameterizations produce similar performances in terms of temperature, mixing ratio and wind speed in the city of Milan, implying some systematic errors in all simulations. However, UW and ACM2 use the same local closure during nighttime conditions, allowing smaller mean biases (MB) of temperature (ACM2 MB = 0.606 K, UW MB = 0.209 K), and wind speed (ACM2 MB = 0.699 m s-1, UW MB = 0.918 m s-1). All schemes have the same variations of the diurnal PBL height, since over predictions of temperature and wind speed are found to cause a general overestimation of mixing during its development in winter. In particular, temperature estimates seem to impact the early evolution of the PBL height, while entrainment fluxes parameterizations have major influence on the afternoon development. MRF, MYJ and ACM2 use the same approach in reconstructing the entrainment process, producing the largest overestimations of PBL height (MB ranges from 85.51-179.10 m). On the contrary, the

  15. Recent results on the spatiotemporal modelling and comparative analysis of Black Death and bubonic plague epidemics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christakos, G.; Olea, R.A.; Yu, H.-L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: This work demonstrates the importance of spatiotemporal stochastic modelling in constructing maps of major epidemics from fragmentary information, assessing population impacts, searching for possible etiologies, and performing comparative analysis of epidemics. Methods: Based on the theory previously published by the authors and incorporating new knowledge bases, informative maps of the composite space-time distributions were generated for important characteristics of two major epidemics: Black Death (14th century Western Europe) and bubonic plague (19th-20th century Indian subcontinent). Results: The comparative spatiotemporal analysis of the epidemics led to a number of interesting findings: (1) the two epidemics exhibited certain differences in their spatiotemporal characteristics (correlation structures, trends, occurrence patterns and propagation speeds) that need to be explained by means of an interdisciplinary effort; (2) geographical epidemic indicators confirmed in a rigorous quantitative manner the partial findings of isolated reports and time series that Black Death mortality was two orders of magnitude higher than that of bubonic plague; (3) modern bubonic plague is a rural disease hitting harder the small villages in the countryside whereas Black Death was a devastating epidemic that indiscriminately attacked large urban centres and the countryside, and while the epidemic in India lasted uninterruptedly for five decades, in Western Europe it lasted three and a half years; (4) the epidemics had reverse areal extension features in response to annual seasonal variations. Temperature increase at the end of winter led to an expansion of infected geographical area for Black Death and a reduction for bubonic plague, reaching a climax at the end of spring when the infected area in Western Europe was always larger than in India. Conversely, without exception, the infected area during winter was larger for the Indian bubonic plague; (5) during the

  16. Comparative Analysis of Yeast Metabolic Network Models Highlights Progress, Opportunities for Metabolic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Heavner, Benjamin D.; Price, Nathan D.

    2015-01-01

    We have compared 12 genome-scale models of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network published since 2003 to evaluate progress in reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network. We compared the genomic coverage, overlap of annotated metabolites, predictive ability for single gene essentiality with a selection of model parameters, and biomass production predictions in simulated nutrient-limited conditions. We have also compared pairwise gene knockout essentiality predictions for 10 of these models. We found that varying approaches to model scope and annotation reflected the involvement of multiple research groups in model development; that single-gene essentiality predictions were affected by simulated medium, objective function, and the reference list of essential genes; and that predictive ability for single-gene essentiality did not correlate well with predictive ability for our reference list of synthetic lethal gene interactions (R = 0.159). We conclude that the reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network is indeed gradually improving through the iterative process of model development, and there remains great opportunity for advancing our understanding of biology through continued efforts to reconstruct the full biochemical reaction network that constitutes yeast metabolism. Additionally, we suggest that there is opportunity for refining the process of deriving a metabolic model from a metabolic network reconstruction to facilitate mechanistic investigation and discovery. This comparative study lays the groundwork for developing improved tools and formalized methods to quantitatively assess metabolic network reconstructions independently of any particular model application, which will facilitate ongoing efforts to advance our understanding of the relationship between genotype and cellular phenotype. PMID:26566239

  17. Comparative analysis of system identification techniques for nonlinear modeling of the neuron-microelectrode junction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saad Ahmad; Thakore, Vaibhav; Behal, Aman; Bölöni, Ladislau; Hickman, James J

    2013-03-01

    Applications of non-invasive neuroelectronic interfacing in the fields of whole-cell biosensing, biological computation and neural prosthetic devices depend critically on an efficient decoding and processing of information retrieved from a neuron-electrode junction. This necessitates development of mathematical models of the neuron-electrode interface that realistically represent the extracellular signals recorded at the neuroelectronic junction without being computationally expensive. Extracellular signals recorded using planar microelectrode or field effect transistor arrays have, until now, primarily been represented using linear equivalent circuit models that fail to reproduce the correct amplitude and shape of the signals recorded at the neuron-microelectrode interface. In this paper, to explore viable alternatives for a computationally inexpensive and efficient modeling of the neuron-electrode junction, input-output data from the neuron-electrode junction is modeled using a parametric Wiener model and a Nonlinear Auto-Regressive network with eXogenous input trained using a dynamic Neural Network model (NARX-NN model). Results corresponding to a validation dataset from these models are then employed to compare and contrast the computational complexity and efficiency of the aforementioned modeling techniques with the Lee-Schetzen technique of cross-correlation for estimating a nonlinear dynamic model of the neuroelectronic junction.

  18. Comparative analysis of system identification techniques for nonlinear modeling of the neuron-microelectrode junction

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saad Ahmad; Thakore, Vaibhav; Behal, Aman; Bölöni, Ladislau; Hickman, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of non-invasive neuroelectronic interfacing in the fields of whole-cell biosensing, biological computation and neural prosthetic devices depend critically on an efficient decoding and processing of information retrieved from a neuron-electrode junction. This necessitates development of mathematical models of the neuron-electrode interface that realistically represent the extracellular signals recorded at the neuroelectronic junction without being computationally expensive. Extracellular signals recorded using planar microelectrode or field effect transistor arrays have, until now, primarily been represented using linear equivalent circuit models that fail to reproduce the correct amplitude and shape of the signals recorded at the neuron-microelectrode interface. In this paper, to explore viable alternatives for a computationally inexpensive and efficient modeling of the neuron-electrode junction, input-output data from the neuron-electrode junction is modeled using a parametric Wiener model and a Nonlinear Auto-Regressive network with eXogenous input trained using a dynamic Neural Network model (NARX-NN model). Results corresponding to a validation dataset from these models are then employed to compare and contrast the computational complexity and efficiency of the aforementioned modeling techniques with the Lee-Schetzen technique of cross-correlation for estimating a nonlinear dynamic model of the neuroelectronic junction.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Spatial Visualization Ability and Drafting Models for Industrial and Technology Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine significant positive effects among the use of three different types of drafting models, and to identify whether any differences exist towards promotion of spatial visualization ability for students in Industrial Technology and Technology Education courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  20. The Effectiveness of Physical Models in Teaching Anatomy: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yammine, Kaissar; Violato, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    There are various educational methods used in anatomy teaching. While three dimensional (3D) visualization technologies are gaining ground due to their ever-increasing realism, reports investigating physical models as a low-cost 3D traditional method are still the subject of considerable interest. The aim of this meta-analysis is to quantitatively…

  1. Modelling formulations using gene expression programming--a comparative analysis with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Colbourn, E A; Roskilly, S J; Rowe, R C; York, P

    2011-10-09

    This study has investigated the utility and potential advantages of gene expression programming (GEP)--a new development in evolutionary computing for modelling data and automatically generating equations that describe the cause-and-effect relationships in a system--to four types of pharmaceutical formulation and compared the models with those generated by neural networks, a technique now widely used in the formulation development. Both methods were capable of discovering subtle and non-linear relationships within the data, with no requirement from the user to specify the functional forms that should be used. Although the neural networks rapidly developed models with higher values for the ANOVA R(2) these were black box and provided little insight into the key relationships. However, GEP, although significantly slower at developing models, generated relatively simple equations describing the relationships that could be interpreted directly. The results indicate that GEP can be considered an effective and efficient modelling technique for formulation data.

  2. A comparative analysis of three vector-borne diseases across Australia using seasonal and meteorological models

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Margaret D.; Ehrlich, Hanna Y.; Mor, Siobhan M.; Naumova, Elena N.

    2017-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV), Barmah Forest virus (BFV), and dengue are three common mosquito-borne diseases in Australia that display notable seasonal patterns. Although all three diseases have been modeled on localized scales, no previous study has used harmonic models to compare seasonality of mosquito-borne diseases on a continent-wide scale. We fit Poisson harmonic regression models to surveillance data on RRV, BFV, and dengue (from 1993, 1995 and 1991, respectively, through 2015) incorporating seasonal, trend, and climate (temperature and rainfall) parameters. The models captured an average of 50–65% variability of the data. Disease incidence for all three diseases generally peaked in January or February, but peak timing was most variable for dengue. The most significant predictor parameters were trend and inter-annual periodicity for BFV, intra-annual periodicity for RRV, and trend for dengue. We found that a Temperature Suitability Index (TSI), designed to reclassify climate data relative to optimal conditions for vector establishment, could be applied to this context. Finally, we extrapolated our models to estimate the impact of a false-positive BFV epidemic in 2013. Creating these models and comparing variations in periodicities may provide insight into historical outbreaks as well as future patterns of mosquito-borne diseases. PMID:28071683

  3. A comparative analysis of three vector-borne diseases across Australia using seasonal and meteorological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratton, Margaret D.; Ehrlich, Hanna Y.; Mor, Siobhan M.; Naumova, Elena N.

    2017-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV), Barmah Forest virus (BFV), and dengue are three common mosquito-borne diseases in Australia that display notable seasonal patterns. Although all three diseases have been modeled on localized scales, no previous study has used harmonic models to compare seasonality of mosquito-borne diseases on a continent-wide scale. We fit Poisson harmonic regression models to surveillance data on RRV, BFV, and dengue (from 1993, 1995 and 1991, respectively, through 2015) incorporating seasonal, trend, and climate (temperature and rainfall) parameters. The models captured an average of 50–65% variability of the data. Disease incidence for all three diseases generally peaked in January or February, but peak timing was most variable for dengue. The most significant predictor parameters were trend and inter-annual periodicity for BFV, intra-annual periodicity for RRV, and trend for dengue. We found that a Temperature Suitability Index (TSI), designed to reclassify climate data relative to optimal conditions for vector establishment, could be applied to this context. Finally, we extrapolated our models to estimate the impact of a false-positive BFV epidemic in 2013. Creating these models and comparing variations in periodicities may provide insight into historical outbreaks as well as future patterns of mosquito-borne diseases.

  4. Comparative analysis of regression and artificial neural network models for wind speed prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgili, Mehmet; Sahin, Besir

    2010-11-01

    In this study, wind speed was modeled by linear regression (LR), nonlinear regression (NLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) methods. A three-layer feedforward artificial neural network structure was constructed and a backpropagation algorithm was used for the training of ANNs. To get a successful simulation, firstly, the correlation coefficients between all of the meteorological variables (wind speed, ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity and rainfall) were calculated taking two variables in turn for each calculation. All independent variables were added to the simple regression model. Then, the method of stepwise multiple regression was applied for the selection of the “best” regression equation (model). Thus, the best independent variables were selected for the LR and NLR models and also used in the input layer of the ANN. The results obtained by all methods were compared to each other. Finally, the ANN method was found to provide better performance than the LR and NLR methods.

  5. A comparative analysis of 9 multi-model averaging approaches in hydrological continuous streamflow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Richard; Gatien, Philippe; Renaud, Benoit; Brissette, François; Martel, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to test whether a weighted combination of several hydrological models can simulate flows more accurately than the models taken individually. In addition, the project attempts to identify the most efficient model averaging method and the optimal number of models to include in the weighting scheme. In order to address the first objective, streamflow was simulated using four lumped hydrological models (HSAMI, HMETS, MOHYSE and GR4J-6), each of which were calibrated with three different objective functions on 429 watersheds. The resulting 12 hydrographs (4 models × 3 metrics) were weighted and combined with the help of 9 averaging methods which are the simple arithmetic mean (SAM), Akaike information criterion (AICA), Bates-Granger (BGA), Bayes information criterion (BICA), Bayesian model averaging (BMA), Granger-Ramanathan average variant A, B and C (GRA, GRB and GRC) and the average by SCE-UA optimization (SCA). The same weights were then applied to the hydrographs in validation mode, and the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency metric was measured between the averaged and observed hydrographs. Statistical analyses were performed to compare the accuracy of weighted methods to that of individual models. A Kruskal-Wallis test and a multi-objective optimization algorithm were then used to identify the most efficient weighted method and the optimal number of models to integrate. Results suggest that the GRA, GRB, GRC and SCA weighted methods perform better than the individual members. Model averaging from these four methods were superior to the best of the individual members in 76% of the cases. Optimal combinations on all watersheds included at least one of each of the four hydrological models. None of the optimal combinations included all members of the ensemble of 12 hydrographs. The Granger-Ramanathan average variant C (GRC) is recommended as the best compromise between accuracy, speed of execution, and simplicity.

  6. Comparing proportional hazards and accelerated failure time models for survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Orbe, Jesus; Ferreira, Eva; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2002-11-30

    This paper describes a method proposed for a censored linear regression model that can be used in the context of survival analysis. The method has the important characteristic of allowing estimation and inference without knowing the distribution of the duration variable. Moreover, it does not need the assumption of proportional hazards. Therefore, it can be an interesting alternative to the Cox proportional hazards models when this assumption does not hold. In addition, implementation and interpretation of the results is simple. In order to analyse the performance of this methodology, we apply it to two real examples and we carry out a simulation study. We present its results together with those obtained with the traditional Cox model and AFT parametric models. The new proposal seems to lead to more precise results.

  7. Color model comparative analysis for breast cancer diagnosis using H and E stained images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyu; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.

    2015-03-01

    Digital cancer diagnosis is a research realm where signal processing techniques are used to analyze and to classify color histopathology images. Different from grayscale image analysis of magnetic resonance imaging or X-ray, colors in histopathology images convey large amount of histological information and thus play significant role in cancer diagnosis. Though color information is widely used in histopathology works, as today, there is few study on color model selections for feature extraction in cancer diagnosis schemes. This paper addresses the problem of color space selection for digital cancer classification using H and E stained images, and investigates the effectiveness of various color models (RGB, HSV, CIE L*a*b*, and stain-dependent H and E decomposition model) in breast cancer diagnosis. Particularly, we build a diagnosis framework as a comparison benchmark and take specific concerns of medical decision systems into account in evaluation. The evaluation methodologies include feature discriminate power evaluation and final diagnosis performance comparison. Experimentation on a publicly accessible histopathology image set suggests that the H and E decomposition model outperforms other assessed color spaces. For reasons behind various performance of color spaces, our analysis via mutual information estimation demonstrates that color components in the H and E model are less dependent, and thus most feature discriminate power is collected in one channel instead of spreading out among channels in other color spaces.

  8. Theories of Comparative Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    model of a projectile fired from a cannon in a uniform gravitational field serves to demonstrate the problems due to qualitative arithmetic. Nei...recently demonstrated the qualitative Gauss rule, a type of algebraic manip- ulation that is solution preserving. While it cannot eliminate all...projectile fired from a cannon illustrates this point. Given an increase in muzzle velocity, Vft, as a perturbation, DQ " analysis predicts that apogee

  9. Realistic and spherical head modeling for EEG forward problem solution: a comparative cortex-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Vatta, Federica; Meneghini, Fabio; Esposito, Fabrizio; Mininel, Stefano; Di Salle, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of forward models for electroencephalography (EEG) partly depends on head tissues geometry and strongly affects the reliability of the source reconstruction process, but it is not yet clear which brain regions are more sensitive to the choice of different model geometry. In this paper we compare different spherical and realistic head modeling techniques in estimating EEG forward solutions from current dipole sources distributed on a standard cortical space reconstructed from Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) MRI data. Computer simulations are presented for three different four-shell head models, two with realistic geometry, either surface-based (BEM) or volume-based (FDM), and the corresponding sensor-fitted spherical-shaped model. Point Spread Function (PSF) and Lead Field (LF) cross-correlation analyses were performed for 26 symmetric dipole sources to quantitatively assess models' accuracy in EEG source reconstruction. Realistic geometry turns out to be a relevant factor of improvement, particularly important when considering sources placed in the temporal or in the occipital cortex.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Induced vs. Spontaneous Models of Autoimmune Uveitis Targeting the Interphotoreceptor Retinoid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Qian, Haohua; Horai, Reiko; Chan, Chi-Chao; Falick, Yishay; Caspi, Rachel R.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of autoimmunity to the retina mimic specific features of human uveitis, but no model by itself reproduces the full spectrum of human disease. We compared three mouse models of uveitis that target the interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP): (i) the “classical” model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunization with IRBP; (ii) spontaneous uveitis in IRBP T cell receptor transgenic mice (R161H) and (iii) spontaneous uveitis in Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE)−/− mice. Disease course and severity, pathology and changes in visual function were studied using fundus imaging and histological examinations, optical coherence tomography and electroretinography. All models were on the B10.RIII background. Unlike previously reported, IRBP-induced EAU in B10.RIII mice exhibited two distinct patterns of disease depending on clinical scores developed after onset: severe monophasic with extensive destruction of the retina and rapid loss of visual signal, or lower grade with a prolonged chronic phase culminating after several months in retinal degeneration and loss of vision. R161H and AIRE−/− mice spontaneously developed chronic progressive inflammation; visual function declined gradually as retinal degeneration developed. Spontaneous uveitis in R161H mice was characterized by persistent cellular infiltrates and lymphoid aggregation, whereas AIRE−/− mice characteristically developed multi-focal infiltrates and severe choroidal inflammation. These data demonstrate variability and unique distinguishing features in the different models of uveitis, suggesting that each one can represent distinct aspects of uveitis in humans. PMID:24015215

  11. Comparative analysis of data collection methods for individualized modeling of radiologists' visual similarity judgments

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Xu, Songhua; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Hudson, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: We conducted an observer study to investigate how the data collection method affects the efficacy of modeling individual radiologists judgments regarding the perceptual similarity of breast masses on mammograms. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained prior to the study. Six observers of variable experience levels in breast imaging were recruited to assess the perceptual similarity of mammographic masses. The observers subjective judgments were collected using: (i) a rating method, (ii) a preference method, and (iii) a hybrid method combining rating and ranking. Personalized user models were developed with the collected data to predict observers opinions. The relative efficacy of each data collection method was assessed based on the classification accuracy of the resulting user models. Results: The hybrid data collection method produced significantly more accurate individualized user models of perceptual opinions with comparable and sometimes better time efficiency than the other two data collection methods. The user models derived from hybrid data were clearly superior even when developed with a dramatically smaller number of training cases. Conclusions: A hybrid method combining rating and ranking is an intuitive and efficient way for collecting subjective similarity judgments to model human perceptual opinions with a higher accuracy than other more commonly used data collection methods.

  12. Comparative Analysis and Modeling of the Severity of Steatohepatitis in DDC-Treated Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vikash; Sultan, Marc; Kashofer, Karl; Ralser, Meryem; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Starmann, Julia; Osprian, Ingrid; Grimm, Christina; Hache, Hendrik; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Sültmann, Holger; Trauner, Michael; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Wierling, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has a broad spectrum of disease states ranging from mild steatosis characterized by an abnormal retention of lipids within liver cells to steatohepatitis (NASH) showing fat accumulation, inflammation, ballooning and degradation of hepatocytes, and fibrosis. Ultimately, steatohepatitis can result in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Methodology and Results In this study we have analyzed three different mouse strains, A/J, C57BL/6J, and PWD/PhJ, that show different degrees of steatohepatitis when administered a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) containing diet. RNA-Seq gene expression analysis, protein analysis and metabolic profiling were applied to identify differentially expressed genes/proteins and perturbed metabolite levels of mouse liver samples upon DDC-treatment. Pathway analysis revealed alteration of arachidonic acid (AA) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) metabolism upon other pathways. To understand metabolic changes of arachidonic acid metabolism in the light of disease expression profiles a kinetic model of this pathway was developed and optimized according to metabolite levels. Subsequently, the model was used to study in silico effects of potential drug targets for steatohepatitis. Conclusions We identified AA/eicosanoid metabolism as highly perturbed in DDC-induced mice using a combination of an experimental and in silico approach. Our analysis of the AA/eicosanoid metabolic pathway suggests that 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) are perturbed in DDC mice. We further demonstrate that a dynamic model can be used for qualitative prediction of metabolic changes based on transcriptomics data in a disease-related context. Furthermore, SAMe metabolism was identified as being perturbed due to DDC treatment. Several genes as well as some metabolites of this module show differences between A/J and C57BL/6J

  13. NAS Demand Predictions, Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) Compared with Other Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeff; Dollyhigh, Samuel; Smith, Jeremy; Trani, Antonio; Baik, Hojong; Hinze, Nicholas; Ashiabor, Senanu

    2006-01-01

    The current work incorporates the Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) to predict the future demand for airline travel. TSAM is a multi-mode, national model that predicts the demand for all long distance travel at a county level based upon population and demographics. The model conducts a mode choice analysis to compute the demand for commercial airline travel based upon the traveler s purpose of the trip, value of time, cost and time of the trip,. The county demand for airline travel is then aggregated (or distributed) to the airport level, and the enplanement demand at commercial airports is modeled. With the growth in flight demand, and utilizing current airline flight schedules, the Fratar algorithm is used to develop future flight schedules in the NAS. The projected flights can then be flown through air transportation simulators to quantify the ability of the NAS to meet future demand. A major strength of the TSAM analysis is that scenario planning can be conducted to quantify capacity requirements at individual airports, based upon different future scenarios. Different demographic scenarios can be analyzed to model the demand sensitivity to them. Also, it is fairly well know, but not well modeled at the airport level, that the demand for travel is highly dependent on the cost of travel, or the fare yield of the airline industry. The FAA projects the fare yield (in constant year dollars) to keep decreasing into the future. The magnitude and/or direction of these projections can be suspect in light of the general lack of airline profits and the large rises in airline fuel cost. Also, changes in travel time and convenience have an influence on the demand for air travel, especially for business travel. Future planners cannot easily conduct sensitivity studies of future demand with the FAA TAF data, nor with the Boeing or Airbus projections. In TSAM many factors can be parameterized and various demand sensitivities can be predicted for future travel. These

  14. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianxun; Benson, Barbara; Tran, Huy; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA) but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct “knock-in” strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain. PMID:27494522

  15. Comparative analysis for various redox flow batteries chemistries using a cost performance model

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Aladsair J.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Stephenson, David E.; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Reed, David M.; Li, Bin; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-10-20

    A robust performance-based cost model is developed for all-vanadium, iron-vanadium and iron chromium redox flow batteries. Systems aspects such as shunt current losses, pumping losses and thermal management are accounted for. The objective function, set to minimize system cost, allows determination of stack design and operating parameters such as current density, flow rate and depth of discharge (DOD). Component costs obtained from vendors are used to calculate system costs for various time frames. A 2 kW stack data was used to estimate unit energy costs and compared with model estimates for the same size electrodes. The tool has been shared with the redox flow battery community to both validate their stack data and guide future direction.

  16. A comparative model and techno-economic analysis of next generation AON ethernet and TDM PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Larsen, Claus Popp; Gavler, Anders; Lannoo, Bart; Chiaroni, Dominique; Popov, Mikhail

    2010-12-01

    A global reference model covering next generation active and passive networks has been developed for techno-economic evaluations, and an extensive techno-economic analysis with a focus on CAPEX has been performed for 10G TDM PON and 1G AON - both capable of delivering 1Gbit/s to end-users. Two major cases have been considered: urban and rural at green field deployment. The results show that AON is less expensive than PON solution in urban case while in rural case 10G TDM PON is more competitive.

  17. Eliciting mixed emotions: a meta-analysis comparing models, types, and measures

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Raul; Totterdell, Peter; Kellett, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The idea that people can experience two oppositely valenced emotions has been controversial ever since early attempts to investigate the construct of mixed emotions. This meta-analysis examined the robustness with which mixed emotions have been elicited experimentally. A systematic literature search identified 63 experimental studies that instigated the experience of mixed emotions. Studies were distinguished according to the structure of the underlying affect model—dimensional or discrete—as well as according to the type of mixed emotions studied (e.g., happy-sad, fearful-happy, positive-negative). The meta-analysis using a random-effects model revealed a moderate to high effect size for the elicitation of mixed emotions (dIG+ = 0.77), which remained consistent regardless of the structure of the affect model, and across different types of mixed emotions. Several methodological and design moderators were tested. Studies using the minimum index (i.e., the minimum value between a pair of opposite valenced affects) resulted in smaller effect sizes, whereas subjective measures of mixed emotions increased the effect sizes. The presence of more women in the samples was also associated with larger effect sizes. The current study indicates that mixed emotions are a robust, measurable and non-artifactual experience. The results are discussed in terms of the implications for an affect system that has greater versatility and flexibility than previously thought. PMID:25926805

  18. Comparing model-based adaptive LMS filters and a model-free hysteresis loop analysis method for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cong; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Rodgers, Geoffrey W.; Xu, Chao

    2017-02-01

    The model-free hysteresis loop analysis (HLA) method for structural health monitoring (SHM) has significant advantages over the traditional model-based SHM methods that require a suitable baseline model to represent the actual system response. This paper provides a unique validation against both an experimental reinforced concrete (RC) building and a calibrated numerical model to delineate the capability of the model-free HLA method and the adaptive least mean squares (LMS) model-based method in detecting, localizing and quantifying damage that may not be visible, observable in overall structural response. Results clearly show the model-free HLA method is capable of adapting to changes in how structures transfer load or demand across structural elements over time and multiple events of different size. However, the adaptive LMS model-based method presented an image of greater spread of lesser damage over time and story when the baseline model is not well defined. Finally, the two algorithms are tested over a simpler hysteretic behaviour typical steel structure to quantify the impact of model mismatch between the baseline model used for identification and the actual response. The overall results highlight the need for model-based methods to have an appropriate model that can capture the observed response, in order to yield accurate results, even in small events where the structure remains linear.

  19. The octopus: a model for a comparative analysis of the evolution of learning and memory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hochner, Binyamin; Shomrat, Tal; Fiorito, Graziano

    2006-06-01

    Comparative analysis of brain function in invertebrates with sophisticated behaviors, such as the octopus, may advance our understanding of the evolution of the neural processes that mediate complex behaviors. Until the last few years, this approach was infeasible due to the lack of neurophysiological tools for testing the neural circuits mediating learning and memory in the brains of octopus and other cephalopods. Now, for the first time, the adaptation of modern neurophysiological methods to the study of the central nervous system of the octopus allows this avenue of research. The emerging results suggest that a convergent evolutionary process has led to the selection of vertebrate-like neural organization and activity-dependent long-term synaptic plasticity. As octopuses and vertebrates are very remote phylogenetically, this convergence suggests the importance of the shared properties for the mediation of learning and memory.

  20. Comparative proteome analysis of serum from acute pulmonary embolism rat model for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-qing; Yun, Jun; Xue, Fu-bo; Bai, Chang-qing; Yang, Shu-guang; Que, Hai-ping; Zhao, Xin; Wu, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shao-jun

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common, potentially fatal disease and its diagnosis is challenging because clinical signs and symptoms are nonspecific. In this study, to investigate protein alterations of a rat PE model, total serum proteins collected at different time points were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Bioinformatics analysis of 24 differentially expressed proteins showed that 20 had corresponding protein candidates in the database. According to their properties and obvious alterations after PE, changes of serum concentrations of Hp, Fn, DBP, RBP, and TTR were selected to be reidentified by western blot analysis. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed DBP, RBP, and TTR to be down-regulated at mRNA levels in livers but not in lung tissues. The low serum concentrations of DBP, RBP, and TTR resulted in the up-regulation of 25(OH)D3, vitamin A, and FT4 (ligands of DBP, RBP, and TTR) after acute PE in rat models. The serum levels of Hp and Fn were detected in patients with DVT/PE and controls to explore their diagnostic prospects in acute PE because the mRNA levels of Hp and Fn were found to be up-regulated both in lung tissues and in livers after acute PE. Our data suggested that the concentration of serum Fn in controls was 79.42 +/- 31.57 microg/L, whereas that of PE/DVT patients was 554.43 +/- 136.18 microg/L (P < 0.001), and that the concentration of serum Hp in controls was 824.37 +/- 235.24 mg/L, whereas that of PE/DVT patients was 2063.48 +/- 425.38 mg/L (P < 0.001). The experimental PE rat model selected in this study was more similar to the clinical process than the other existing PE animal models, and the findings indicated instant changes of serum proteins within 48 h after acute PE. The exploration of these differentially expressed proteins or their combination with existent markers such as D-dimer may greatly improve the

  1. A Network Epidemic Model with Preventive Rewiring: Comparative Analysis of the Initial Phase.

    PubMed

    Britton, Tom; Juher, David; Saldaña, Joan

    2016-12-01

    This paper is concerned with stochastic SIR and SEIR epidemic models on random networks in which individuals may rewire away from infected neighbors at some rate [Formula: see text] (and reconnect to non-infectious individuals with probability [Formula: see text] or else simply drop the edge if [Formula: see text]), so-called preventive rewiring. The models are denoted SIR-[Formula: see text] and SEIR-[Formula: see text], and we focus attention on the early stages of an outbreak, where we derive the expressions for the basic reproduction number [Formula: see text] and the expected degree of the infectious nodes [Formula: see text] using two different approximation approaches. The first approach approximates the early spread of an epidemic by a branching process, whereas the second one uses pair approximation. The expressions are compared with the corresponding empirical means obtained from stochastic simulations of SIR-[Formula: see text] and SEIR-[Formula: see text] epidemics on Poisson and scale-free networks. Without rewiring of exposed nodes, the two approaches predict the same epidemic threshold and the same [Formula: see text] for both types of epidemics, the latter being very close to the mean degree obtained from simulated epidemics over Poisson networks. Above the epidemic threshold, pairwise models overestimate the value of [Formula: see text] computed from simulations, which turns out to be very close to the one predicted by the branching process approximation. When exposed individuals also rewire with [Formula: see text] (perhaps unaware of being infected), the two approaches give different epidemic thresholds, with the branching process approximation being more in agreement with simulations.

  2. [Comparative analysis of spatial EEG organization on models of non-verbal divergent and convergent thinking].

    PubMed

    Sviderskaia, N E; Antonov, A G; Butneva, L S

    2007-01-01

    Features of neurophysiological organization of two main thinking types playing different roles in creative processes, i.e., divergent and convergent were studied with participation of 30 right-handed male subjects at the age from 30 to 50 years. Two tests were presented: (1) creation of many visual images on the basis of two simple geometrical figures (the model of divergent thinking) and (2) classification of a figure element with one of the offered standard samples (convergent thinking). The number of created images or correctly classified elements for five minutes served a criterion of performance productivity. It was found that performance of the divergent test with high productivity (as compared to low productivity) was characterized by a greater increase in non-linear interactions between the cortical potentials, especially in the axis right frontal--left occipital areas. At the same time, under conditions of high productivity, the number of active narrow-frequency spectral-coherent EEG bands increased. The data confirm the notion of neurophysiological organization of creative processes, according to which creative processes require the intensification of retrieval operations (both conscious and unconscious), based on extensive interhemispheric interaction and involvement of a system of EEG coherent structures oscillating with different frequencies.

  3. Local participation in biodiversity conservation initiatives: a comparative analysis of different models in South East Mexico.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, María Elena; García-Frapolli, Eduardo; Pritchard, Diana J; Sánchez González, María Consuelo; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel; Porter-Bolland, Luciana; Reyes-Garcia, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    In Mexico, biodiversity conservation is primarily implemented through three schemes: 1) protected areas, 2) payment-based schemes for environmental services, and 3) community-based conservation, officially recognized in some cases as Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas. In this paper we compare levels of local participation across conservation schemes. Through a survey applied to 670 households across six communities in Southeast Mexico, we document local participation during the creation, design, and implementation of the management plan of different conservation schemes. To analyze the data, we first calculated the frequency of participation at the three different stages mentioned, then created a participation index that characterizes the presence and relative intensity of local participation for each conservation scheme. Results showed that there is a low level of local participation across all the conservation schemes explored in this study. Nonetheless, the payment for environmental services had the highest local participation while the protected areas had the least. Our findings suggest that local participation in biodiversity conservation schemes is not a predictable outcome of a specific (community-based) model, thus implying that other factors might be important in determining local participation. This has implications on future strategies that seek to encourage local involvement in conservation.

  4. Comparing the Performance of Three Land Models in Global C Cycle Simulations: A Detailed Structural Analysis: Structural Analysis of Land Models

    SciTech Connect

    Rafique, Rashid; Xia, Jianyang; Hararuk, Oleksandra; Leng, Guoyong; Asrar, Ghassem; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-04-01

    Land models are valuable tools to understand the dynamics of global carbon (C) cycle. Various models have been developed and used for predictions of future C dynamics but uncertainties still exist. Diagnosing the models’ behaviors in terms of structures can help to narrow down the uncertainties in prediction of C dynamics. In this study three widely used land surface models, namely CSIRO’s Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools were driven by the observed meteorological forcing. The simulated C storage and residence time were used for analysis. The C storage and residence time were computed globally for all individual soil and plant pools, as well as net primary productivity (NPP) and its allocation to different plant components’ based on these models. Remotely sensed NPP and statistically derived HWSD, and GLC2000 datasets were used as a reference to evaluate the performance of these models. Results showed that CABLE exhibited better agreement with referenced C storage and residence time for plant and soil pools, as compared with CLM-CASA and CLM4. CABLE had longer bulk residence time for soil C pools and stored more C in roots, whereas, CLM-CASA and CLM4 stored more C in woody pools due to differential NPP allocation. Overall, these results indicate that the differences in C storage and residence times in three models are largely due to the differences in their fundamental structures (number of C pools), NPP allocation and C transfer rates. Our results have implications in model development and provide a general framework to explain the bias/uncertainties in simulation of C storage and residence times from the perspectives of model structures.

  5. A comparative hidden Markov model analysis pipeline identifies proteins characteristic of cereal-infecting fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungal pathogens cause devastating losses in economically important cereal crops by utilising pathogen proteins to infect host plants. Secreted pathogen proteins are referred to as effectors and have thus far been identified by selecting small, cysteine-rich peptides from the secretome despite increasing evidence that not all effectors share these attributes. Results We take advantage of the availability of sequenced fungal genomes and present an unbiased method for finding putative pathogen proteins and secreted effectors in a query genome via comparative hidden Markov model analyses followed by unsupervised protein clustering. Our method returns experimentally validated fungal effectors in Stagonospora nodorum and Fusarium oxysporum as well as the N-terminal Y/F/WxC-motif from the barley powdery mildew pathogen. Application to the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum reveals a secreted phosphorylcholine phosphatase that is characteristic of hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic cereal pathogens and shares an ancient selection process with bacterial plant pathogens. Three F. graminearum protein clusters are found with an enriched secretion signal. One of these putative effector clusters contains proteins that share a [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif in the N-terminal and show features not commonly associated with fungal effectors. This motif is conserved in secreted pathogenic Fusarium proteins and a prime candidate for functional testing. Conclusions Our pipeline has successfully uncovered conservation patterns, putative effectors and motifs of fungal pathogens that would have been overlooked by existing approaches that identify effectors as small, secreted, cysteine-rich peptides. It can be applied to any pathogenic proteome data, such as microbial pathogen data of plants and other organisms. PMID:24252298

  6. Sound propagation in woods. Comparative analysis between in situ measurements, laboratory measurements and the values predicted by a theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrero Fernandez, Ana Isabel

    This PhD Thesis studies sound propagation outdoors and the potential effect of trees on such propagation. In the first part of the thesis, seven different types of grounds (sand, grass, concrete...) are characterised from an acoustical point of view. In order to determine the ground impedance of each type of ground, it was necessary to determine the flow resistivity by means of an indirect method. In this method the flow resistivity values are chosen so as to give the best fit between experimental values and the values given by a theoretical propagation model. This first part includes a comparative analysis of sound attenuation over two very similar types of grounds, one with trees and the other one without trees. It is observed that at high frequencies sound attenuation in the case of ground with trees (wood) is higher. In the second part of this work, the theoretical outdoor sound propagation model NORD 2000, which has been developed by a group of scientists in the Scandinavian countries, is described and then validated. This model takes into account the source characteristics, the geometric divergence, atmospheric absorption, ground effects and the scattering produced by obstacles such as trees, houses... In order to validate this theoretical model, we have compared the predictions given by the model under many different circumstances with the values measured in situ in different types of woods and also with the values measured in a scaled model in laboratory, using different trees density, trunk diameters... From a deep analysis of all the set of comparisons it was concluded that the theoretical model NORD 2000 agrees very well with the experimental values both measured in situ and in laboratory (scale model) at low and medium frequencies. At high frequencies there are some discrepancies between the model and the experimental values.

  7. Computer simulation environment for comparative analysis of models for investment portfolio management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchev, Angel, Jr.; Marchev, Angel

    2013-12-01

    Building on the notion of systematically analyzing investment portfolio as a feedback system, there is a need of experimentation system. In this paper such system for experimenting with various traditional, classical, advanced, etc. models for portfolio management is described. The main objective is to have the ability to compete the models systematically on a unified data track.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Leadership Development Models in Post-Baccalaureate Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiedis, Thomas Lee

    2009-01-01

    This research study was concerned with higher education, leadership development, and understanding and examining the training models that are employed to prepare men and women for Christian ministry. The study combines qualitative and quantitative research elements to examine the growing number of leadership development training models in…

  9. Bioinformatics investigation of therapeutic mechanisms of Xuesaitong capsule treating ischemic cerebrovascular rat model with comparative transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiangquan; Wei, Benjun; Chen, Hengwen; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Xuesaitong soft capsule (XST) which consists of panax notoginseng saponin (PNS) has been used to treat ischemic cerebrovascular diseases in China. The therapeutic mechanism of XST has not been elucidated yet from prospective of genomics and bioinformatics. Methods: A transcriptome analysis was performed to review series concerning middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model and XST intervention after MCAO from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were compared between blank group and model group, model group and XST group. Functional enrichment and pathway analysis were performed. Protein-Protein interaction network was constructed. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were screened out and profound analysis was performed. Results: Two series including 22 samples were obtained. 870 DEGs were identified between blank group and model group, and 1189 DEGs were identified between model group and XST group. GO terms and KEGG pathways of MCAO and XST intervention were significantly enriched. PPI networks were constructed to demonstrate the gene-gene interactions. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were highlighted. ANTXR2, FHL3, PRCP, TYROBP, TAF9B, FGFR2, BCL11B, RB1CC1 and MBNL2 were the pivotal genes and possible action sites of XST therapeutic mechanisms. Conclusion: MCAO is a pathological process with multiple. PMID:27347353

  10. A global analysis of the comparability of winter chill models for fruit and nut trees.

    PubMed

    Luedeling, Eike; Brown, Patrick H

    2011-05-01

    Many fruit and nut trees must fulfill a chilling requirement to break their winter dormancy and resume normal growth in spring. Several models exist for quantifying winter chill, and growers and researchers often tacitly assume that the choice of model is not important and estimates of species chilling requirements are valid across growing regions. To test this assumption, Safe Winter Chill (the amount of winter chill that is exceeded in 90% of years) was calculated for 5,078 weather stations around the world, using the Dynamic Model [in Chill Portions (CP)], the Chilling Hours (CH) Model and the Utah Model [Utah Chill Units (UCU)]. Distributions of the ratios between different winter chill metrics were mapped on a global scale. These ratios should be constant if the models were strictly proportional. Ratios between winter chill metrics varied substantially, with the CH/CP ratio ranging between 0 and 34, the UCU/CP ratio between -155 and +20 and the UCU/CH ratio between -10 and +5. The models are thus not proportional, and chilling requirements determined in a given location may not be valid elsewhere. The Utah Model produced negative winter chill totals in many Subtropical regions, where it does not seem to be useful. Mean annual temperature and daily temperature range influenced all winter chill ratios, but explained only between 12 and 27% of the variation. Data on chilling requirements should always be amended with information on the location and experimental conditions of the study in which they were determined, ideally including site-specific conversion factors between winter chill models. This would greatly facilitate the transfer of such information across growing regions, and help prepare growers for the impact of climate change.

  11. A Technique Using Principal Component Analysis to Compare Seasonal Cycles of Earth Radiation from CERES and Model Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Mlynczak, Pamela E.; Potter, Gerald L.

    2012-01-01

    A method for quantitatively comparing the seasonal cycles of two global data sets is presented. The seasonal cycles of absorbed solar radiation (ASR) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) have been computed from an eight-year data set from the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometers and from a model data set produced by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. To compare the seasonal cycles from these two data sets, principal component (PC) analysis is used, where the PCs express the time variations and the corresponding empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) describe the geographic variations. Ocean has a long thermal response time compared to land, so land and ocean are separated for the analysis. The root-mean square values for the seasonal cycles of ASR and OLR are extremely close for the two data sets. The first three PCs are quite close, showing that the time responses and magnitudes over the globe are very similar. The agreement between the two sets of PCs is quantified by computing the matrix of inner products of the two sets. For ASR over land, the first PCs of CERES and the model agree to better than 99.9%. The EOF maps are similar for most of the globe, but differ in a few places, and the agreement of the EOF maps is likewise quantified. Maps of differences between the annual cycles show regions of agreement and disagreement.

  12. Comparative Analysis of the ESA and NASA Interplanetary Meteoroid Enviroment Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kruger, Harald; Soja, Rachel; Sterken, Veerle; Sternovsky, Zotan; Strub, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Meteoroid environment models are used to assess the hazard arising from meteoroid impacts onto space structures. We have analyzed the current meteoroid models of ESA (IMEM) and of NASA (MEM). These models are based on different sets of measurements. MEM is based on radar meteor observations, lunar impact cratering rate, and on zodiacal light observations while IMEM is based on orbital element distributions of comets and asteroids, the lunar impact cratering rate, thermal radiation observations, and on in situ dust measurements. Both models describe the cratering flux at 1AU quite well; however, the flux of mm-sized meteoroids differs by a factor two due to the different assumed relative speeds. At other heliocentric distances from Mercury to Mars the predicted fluxes differ by up to 2 orders of magnitude between the two models. The current knowledge of the interplanetary meteoroid environment as exemplified by these meteoroid models is insufficient to provide reliable assessment of the risk of meteoroid impacts for human travel in interplanetary space.

  13. Population Education in the School Curriculum: A Comparative Analysis of the American and Asian Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okobiah, Omamurhomu Solomon

    1981-01-01

    A content analysis of two selected population education curriculum materials, one representative of advanced nations, the other of developing nations: "Population, Environmental-Ecological Education Project" (Missouri State Department of Education, 1973) and "Population and Family Education" (Unesco Regional Office for Asia,…

  14. Comparing Categorization Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Ratcliff, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments are presented that competitively test rule- and exemplar-based models of human categorization behavior. Participants classified stimuli that varied on a unidimensional axis into 2 categories. The stimuli did not consistently belong to a category; instead, they were probabilistically assigned. By manipulating these assignment…

  15. A Comparative Analysis of MMPI-2 Malingering Detection Models among Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffan, Jarrod S.; Morgan, Robert D.; Lee, Jeahoon; Sellbom, Martin

    2010-01-01

    There are several strategies, or models, for combining the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) validity indicators to detect malingered psychiatric symptoms. Some scholars have recommended that an elevated F (Infrequency) score should be followed by the inspection of Fp (Infrequency-Psychopathology), whereas a recent…

  16. Literacy Models and the Reconstruction of History Education: A Comparative Discourse Analysis of Two Lesson Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross; Reich, Gabriel A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents discourse analyses of two lesson plans designed for secondary school history classes. Although the plans focus on the same topic, they rely on different models of content area literacy: disciplinary literacy, or reading and writing like experts in a given domain, and critical literacy, or reading and writing to address…

  17. A comparative analysis of the density distributions and the structure models of 9Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, we have analysed the elastic scattering cross-section data of 9Li + 12C system at E lab = 540 MeV and 9Li + 208Pb system at E c.m. = 28.3 MeV for some cluster models and various density distributions of the 9Li nucleus. First, we have obtained five different density distributions of the 9Li nucleus to generate real potentials with the help of double-folding model. For these densities, we have calculated the elastic scattering angular distributions. Secondly, using a simple approach, we have investigated some cluster models of the 9Li nucleus consisting of 6He + 3H and 8Li + n systems. We have presented the comparison of elastic scattering angular distributions for each system with each other as well as with the experimental data. Finally, we have given the cross-section values obtained from the theoretical calculations for all the systems studied in this paper.

  18. Comparative analysis of methods for modeling the penetration and plane-parallel motion of conical projectiles in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, V. G.; Bragov, A. M.; Konstantinov, A. Yu.; Kotov, V. L.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the accuracy of known and new modeling methods using the hypothesis of local and plane sections for solution of problems of the impact and plane-parallel motion of conical bodies at an angle to the free surface of the half-space occupied by elastoplastic soil. The parameters of the local interaction model that is quadratic in velocity are determined by solving the one-dimensional problem of the expansion of a spherical cavity. Axisymmetric problems for each of the meridional section are solved simultaneously neglecting mass and momentum transfer in the circumferential direction and using an approach based on the hypothesis of plane sections. The dynamic and kinematic parameters of oblique penetration obtained using modified models are compared with the results of computer simulation in a three-dimensional formulation. The results obtained with regard to the contact stress distribution along the generator of the pointed cone are in satisfactory agreement.

  19. A comparative analysis of island floras challenges taxonomy-based biogeographical models of speciation.

    PubMed

    Igea, Javier; Bogarín, Diego; Papadopulos, Alexander S T; Savolainen, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    Speciation on islands, and particularly the divergence of species in situ, has long been debated. Here, we present one of the first, complete assessments of the geographic modes of speciation for the flora of a small oceanic island. Cocos Island (Costa Rica) is pristine; it is located 550 km off the Pacific coast of Central America. It harbors 189 native plant species, 33 of which are endemic. Using phylogenetic data from insular and mainland congeneric species, we show that all of the endemic species are derived from independent colonization events rather than in situ speciation. This is in sharp contrast to the results of a study carried out in a comparable system, Lord Howe Island (Australia), where as much as 8.2% of the plant species were the product of sympatric speciation. Differences in physiography and age between the islands may be responsible for the contrasting patterns of speciation observed. Importantly, comparing phylogenetic assessments of the modes of speciation with taxonomy-based measures shows that widely used island biogeography approaches overestimate rates of in situ speciation.

  20. Can cyanobacteria serve as a model of plant photorespiration? - a comparative meta-analysis of metabolite profiles.

    PubMed

    Orf, Isabel; Timm, Stefan; Bauwe, Hermann; Fernie, Alisdair R; Hagemann, Martin; Kopka, Joachim; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration is a process that is crucial for the survival of oxygenic phototrophs in environments that favour the oxygenation reaction of Rubisco. While photorespiration is conserved among cyanobacteria, algae, and embryophytes, it evolved to different levels of complexity in these phyla. The highest complexity is found in embryophytes, where the pathway involves four cellular compartments and respective transport processes. The complexity of photorespiration in embryophytes raises the question whether a simpler system, such as cyanobacteria, may serve as a model to facilitate our understanding of the common key aspects of photorespiration. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of publicly available metabolite profiles from the embryophyte Arabidopsis thaliana and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 grown under conditions that either activate or suppress photorespiration. The comparative meta-analysis evaluated the similarity of metabolite profiles, the variability of metabolite pools, and the patterns of metabolite ratios. Our results show that the metabolic signature of photorespiration is in part conserved between the compared model organisms under conditions that favour the oxygenation reaction. Therefore, our findings support the claim that cyanobacteria can serve as prokaryotic models of photorespiration in embryophytes.

  1. Comparative analysis for various redox flow batteries chemistries using a cost performance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Alasdair; Viswanathan, Vilayanur; Stephenson, David; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin; Reed, David; Li, Bin; Balducci, Patrick; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Sprenkle, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The total energy storage system cost is determined by means of a robust performance-based cost model for multiple flow battery chemistries. Systems aspects such as shunt current losses, pumping losses and various flow patterns through electrodes are accounted for. The system cost minimizing objective function determines stack design by optimizing the state of charge operating range, along with current density and current-normalized flow. The model cost estimates are validated using 2-kW stack performance data for the same size electrodes and operating conditions. Using our validated tool, it has been demonstrated that an optimized all-vanadium system has an estimated system cost of < 350 kWh-1 for 4-h application. With an anticipated decrease in component costs facilitated by economies of scale from larger production volumes, coupled with performance improvements enabled by technology development, the system cost is expected to decrease to 160 kWh-1 for a 4-h application, and to 100 kWh-1 for a 10-h application. This tool has been shared with the redox flow battery community to enable cost estimation using their stack data and guide future direction.

  2. Heat flow and gravity responses over salt bodies: A comparative model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corrigan, J.; Sweat, M.

    1995-07-01

    Two-dimensional numerical modeling of sea-floor heat flow and water-bottom gravity responses to systematic variations in simple subsurface salt body geometries provides insight on the relative usefulness of these two data types for extracting salt geometry information. For a given salt body geometry, diffusion of heat through overlying sediments results in a dramatic decrease in the amplitude of heat flow anomalies as the depth to the top of the salt body increases. For top-of-salt depths greater than about 1 km, the heat flow response is insensitive to the length of salt feeder stocks and to the thickness of salt tongues/sheets. This shallow depth-to-top-of-salt sensitivity range, in addition to a number of environmental factors that can adversely affect interpretation of heat flow anomalies in terms of heat refraction towards and through salt bodies, severely limits the usefulness of sea-floor heat flow data for constraining aspects of salt body geometry. For gravity data, the critical factor for addressing salt body geometry is the distribution of salt relative to the sediment-salt density crossover depth (above and below which salt is more and less dense, respectively, than the surrounding sediment). Except when ht relevant geometry information being sought (presence and/or length of feeder stock, thickness of salt tongue or sheet) is near the density crossover depth, the geometry-related information content of the gravity field is greater than that of the heat flow field. Based on these model results, measurement uncertainty considerations, and data limitations, the authors conclude that gravity data generally offer an order of magnitude greater resolution capability than sea-floor heat flow data for addressing salt body geometry issues of exploration interest.

  3. Accuracy of Bolton analysis measured in laser scanned digital models compared with plaster models (gold standard) and cone-beam computer tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jooseong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of Bolton analysis obtained from digital models scanned with the Ortho Insight three-dimensional (3D) laser scanner system to those obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and traditional plaster models. Methods CBCT scans and plaster models were obtained from 50 patients. Plaster models were scanned using the Ortho Insight 3D laser scanner; Bolton ratios were calculated with its software. CBCT scans were imported and analyzed using AVIZO software. Plaster models were measured with a digital caliper. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results Anterior and overall Bolton ratios obtained by the three different modalities exhibited excellent agreement (> 0.970). The mean differences between the scanned digital models and physical models and between the CBCT images and scanned digital models for overall Bolton ratios were 0.41 ± 0.305% and 0.45 ± 0.456%, respectively; for anterior Bolton ratios, 0.59 ± 0.520% and 1.01 ± 0.780%, respectively. ICC results showed that intraexaminer error reliability was generally excellent (> 0.858 for all three diagnostic modalities), with < 1.45% discrepancy in the Bolton analysis. Conclusions Laser scanned digital models are highly accurate compared to physical models and CBCT scans for assessing the spatial relationships of dental arches for orthodontic diagnosis. PMID:26877978

  4. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of forest stands in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The tested approach for calculating the water use by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results reveal that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  5. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of a forest stand in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The approach tested for calculating the water consumption by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time-series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results show that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  6. A comparative sensitivity analysis focused on wet deposition models for the Fukushima and Chernobyl atmospheric dispersion events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Roustan, Yelva; Quélo, Denis; Bocquet, Marc; Winiarek, Victor

    2014-05-01

    In order to model the transport of radionuclides bound to atmospheric particles and the ground contamination at the synoptic scale, the wet deposition is a crucial point. Usually, the wet deposition is divided in two different mechanisms, the below-cloud scavenging (washout) and the in-cloud scavenging (rainout). Since the micro-physics of both deposition processes is not well known yet, the modeling of the wet deposition of particles at the synoptic scale is uncertain and difficult to validate. This leads to an abundance of wet deposition models, none of them being fully adequate. The existing models of particle scavenging can be distinguished by the nature and the number of physical parameters they rely on. For instance the scavenging coefficient variability can be determined only by the rainfall intensity or take into account the rainfall intensity and the particle size distribution. Beyond their intrinsic formulations, the deposition models are sensitive to the input data necessary to use them, cloud height for instance. Finally, the simulated ground deposition is more or less sensitive to the choices of the overall-models involved in the atmospheric transport of particles and the meteorology in general. For accidental atmospheric releases, the uncertainties linked to the source-term are for instance crucial, what justifies the use of different ones in the study. The Polyphemus air quality system is used to perform the simulations of the radioactive dispersion, considering Caesium-137 as particulate matter for the accidental releases from the Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear power plants. In this study, two different approaches are used. In the first one, the influence of the different components taking part in the scavenging modeling are confronted separately (whether the scavenging models or the overall models). The second approach is a global sensitivity analysis computed both on the Chernobyl and Fukushima cases. It relies on simulations performed with

  7. Replacing an academic internal medicine residency program with a physician assistant--hospitalist model: a comparative analysis study.

    PubMed

    Dhuper, Sunil; Choksi, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    This study describes a comparative analysis of replacing medical residents with physician assistants and hospitalists on patient outcomes in a community hospital. Prospective data during the physician assistants-hospitalists service for 2 years was compared with 2 years of retrospective data of the medical residents model. Outcome measures included mortality, adverse events, readmissions, and patient satisfaction. For physician assistants- hospitalists versus medical residents models, all-cause and case mix index-adjusted mortality was 107/5508 (1.94%) and 0.019 versus 156/5458 (2.85%) and 0.029, respectively (P < or = .001). The adverse event cases were 9 versus 5 ( P = .29), and the readmission rate within 30 days was 64 versus 69 (P = .34). Patient satisfaction was 95% versus 96% (P = .33). Quality of care provided by the physician assistants-hospitalists model was equivalent. All-cause and case mix index- adjusted mortality was significantly lower during the physician assistants-hospitalists period.Although the application of these findings to other institutions requires further study, the authors found no intrinsic barriers that would impede implementation elsewhere.

  8. A comparative analysis of predictive models of morbidity in intensive care unit after cardiac surgery – Part I: model planning

    PubMed Central

    Barbini, Emanuela; Cevenini, Gabriele; Scolletta, Sabino; Biagioli, Bonizella; Giomarelli, Pierpaolo; Barbini, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Background Different methods have recently been proposed for predicting morbidity in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of the present study was to critically review a number of approaches for developing models capable of estimating the probability of morbidity in ICU after heart surgery. The study is divided into two parts. In this first part, popular models used to estimate the probability of class membership are grouped into distinct categories according to their underlying mathematical principles. Modelling techniques and intrinsic strengths and weaknesses of each model are analysed and discussed from a theoretical point of view, in consideration of clinical applications. Methods Models based on Bayes rule, k-nearest neighbour algorithm, logistic regression, scoring systems and artificial neural networks are investigated. Key issues for model design are described. The mathematical treatment of some aspects of model structure is also included for readers interested in developing models, though a full understanding of mathematical relationships is not necessary if the reader is only interested in perceiving the practical meaning of model assumptions, weaknesses and strengths from a user point of view. Results Scoring systems are very attractive due to their simplicity of use, although this may undermine their predictive capacity. Logistic regression models are trustworthy tools, although they suffer from the principal limitations of most regression procedures. Bayesian models seem to be a good compromise between complexity and predictive performance, but model recalibration is generally necessary. k-nearest neighbour may be a valid non parametric technique, though computational cost and the need for large data storage are major weaknesses of this approach. Artificial neural networks have intrinsic advantages with respect to common statistical models, though the training process may be problematical. Conclusion Knowledge of model assumptions and the theoretical

  9. Diagnostic analysis of water balance variability: A comparative modeling study of catchments in Perth, Newcastle, and Darwin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Jos M.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Struthers, Iain

    2008-06-01

    A comparative study is performed to explore interactions between climate variability and landscape factors that control water balance variability in three diverse regions of Australia: Perth (temperate with distinct dry summers); Newcastle (temperate with no distinct dry season); and Darwin (tropical region affected by monsoons). This comparative analysis is carried out through adoption of a common conceptual model. The similarity and differences between the three catchments are explored through evaluation of signatures of streamflow and soil moisture variability, and systematic sensitivity analysis with respect to parameters representing various landscape characteristics. The results of the analysis show that the biggest contributor to the differences between the catchments is the distribution of soil depth and the soil's drainage characteristics. The second factor is climate, as exemplified by the (annual) climatic dryness index and the intra-annual (seasonal) variability of both rainfall and potential evaporation, and associated rainfall intensity patterns, and their interactions with the soil properties (i.e., soil depth and the soil's drainage characteristics). In Perth and Darwin, climate seasonality is responsible for a seasonal switching on/off of subsurface stormflow at the start/end of the wet season, respectively. In Newcastle, where soil moisture contents hover near the field capacity value throughout the year, subsurface stormflow occurs frequently throughout the year, with event-based switching on/off in response to individual storms of moderate magnitude and temporal clustering of small storms. In addition, in rare circumstance, surface runoff is triggered in response to extreme storm events and temporal clustering of moderate to large storm events.

  10. A comparative analysis of projected impacts of climate change on river runoff from global and catchment-scale hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosling, S. N.; Taylor, R. G.; Arnell, N. W.; Todd, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparative analysis of projected impacts of climate change on river runoff from two types of distributed hydrological model, a global hydrological model (GHM) and catchment-scale hydrological models (CHM). Analyses are conducted for six catchments that are global in coverage and feature strong contrasts in spatial scale as well as climatic and developmental conditions. These include the Liard (Canada), Mekong (SE Asia), Okavango (SW Africa), Rio Grande (Brazil), Xiangxi (China) and Harper's Brook (UK). A single GHM (Mac-PDM.09) is applied to all catchments whilst different CHMs are applied for each catchment. The CHMs include SLURP v. 12.2 (Liard), SLURP v. 12.7 (Mekong), Pitman (Okavango), MGB-IPH (Rio Grande), AV-SWAT-X 2005 (Xiangxi) and Cat-PDM (Harper's Brook). The CHMs typically simulate water resource impacts based on a more explicit representation of catchment water resources than that available from the GHM and the CHMs include river routing, whereas the GHM does not. Simulations of mean annual runoff, mean monthly runoff and high (Q5) and low (Q95) monthly runoff under baseline (1961-1990) and climate change scenarios are presented. We compare the simulated runoff response of each hydrological model to (1) prescribed increases in global-mean air temperature of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 °C relative to baseline from the UKMO HadCM3 Global Climate Model (GCM) to explore response to different amounts of climate forcing, and (2) a prescribed increase in global-mean air temperature of 2.0 °C relative to baseline for seven GCMs to explore response to climate model structural uncertainty. We find that the differences in projected changes of mean annual runoff between the two types of hydrological model can be substantial for a given GCM (e.g. an absolute GHM-CHM difference in mean annual runoff percentage change for UKMO HadCM3 2 °C warming of up to 25%), and they are generally larger for indicators of high and low monthly runoff. However

  11. A comparative analysis of projected impacts of climate change on river runoff from global and catchment-scale hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosling, S. N.; Taylor, R. G.; Arnell, N. W.; Todd, M. C.

    2010-09-01

    We present a comparative analysis of projected impacts of climate change on river runoff from two types of distributed hydrological model, a global hydrological model (GHM) and catchment-scale hydrological models (CHM). Analyses are conducted for six catchments that are global in coverage and feature strong contrasts in spatial scale as well as climatic and developmental conditions. These include the Liard (Canada), Mekong (SE Asia), Okavango (SW Africa), Rio Grande (Brazil), Xiangxi (China) and Harper's Brook (UK). A single GHM (Mac-PDM.09) is applied to all catchments whilst different CHMs are applied for each catchment. The CHMs include SLURP v. 12.2 (Liard), SLURP v. 12.7 (Mekong), Pitman (Okavango), MGB-IPH (Rio Grande), AV-SWAT-X 2005 (Xiangxi) and Cat-PDM (Harper's Brook). Simulations of mean annual runoff, mean monthly runoff and high (Q5) and low (Q95) monthly runoff under baseline (1961-1990) and climate change scenarios are presented. We compare the simulated runoff response of each hydrological model to (1) prescribed increases in global-mean air temperature of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 °C relative to baseline from the UKMO HadCM3 Global Climate Model (GCM) to explore response to different amounts of climate forcing, and (2) a prescribed increase in global-mean air temperature of 2.0 °C relative to baseline for seven GCMs to explore response to climate model structural uncertainty. We find that the differences in projected changes of mean annual runoff between the two types of hydrological model can be substantial for a given GCM, and they are generally larger for indicators of high and low monthly runoff. However, they are relatively small in comparison to the range of projections across the seven GCMs. Hence, for the six catchments and seven GCMs we considered, climate model structural uncertainty is greater than the uncertainty associated with the type of hydrological model applied. Moreover, shifts in the seasonal cycle of runoff with

  12. Beta-triketone inhibitors of plant p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase: modeling and comparative molecular field analysis of their interactions.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Singh, Nidhi; McCurdy, Christopher R; Godfrey, Colette A; Larsen, Lesley; Weavers, Rex T; Van Klink, John W; Perry, Nigel B

    2009-06-24

    p-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is the target site of beta-triketone herbicides in current use. Nineteen beta-triketones and analogues, including the naturally occurring leptospermone and grandiflorone, were synthesized and tested as inhibitors of purified Arabidopsis thaliana HPPD. The most active compound was a beta-triketone with a C(9) alkyl side chain, not reported as natural, which inhibited HPPD with an I(50) of 19 +/- 1 nM. This is significantly more active than sulcotrione, which had an I(50) of 250 +/- 21 nM in this assay system. The most active naturally occurring beta-triketone was grandiflorone, which had an I(50) of 750 +/- 70 nM. This compound is of potential interest as a natural herbicide because it can be extracted with good yield and purity from some Leptospermum shrubs. Analogues without the 1,3-diketone group needed to interact with Fe(2+) at the HPPD active site were inactive (I(50)s > 50 microM), as were analogues with prenyl or ethyl groups on the triketone ring. Modeling of the binding of the triketones to HPPD, three-dimensional QSAR analysis using CoMFA (comparative molecular field analysis), and evaluation of the hydrophobic contribution with HINT (hydropathic interactions) provided a structural basis to describe the ligand/receptor interactions.

  13. Comparative analysis of computational models of solar wind interaction with Venus based on Pioneer-Venus experimental data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, T. K.; Krymskij, A. M.; Mitnitskij, V. Ya.

    1995-02-01

    Results from a gas-dynamic model of solar wind interaction with Venus are compared with those from hybrid models. Contradictions between the hybrid model of Moor et al. (1991) (MTM) and the (BKM) gas-dynamic model (Breus et al., 1992) are demonstrated. They can be explained by too large computational grid cells used in the MTM model. For the same reason, in the MTM model the effect of a magnetic barrier on the bowshock standoff distance is overestimated, as was shown in the hybrid model of Brecht and Ferrante (1991). The effect of the solar wind mass-loading phenomenon on the bowshock location, taken into account in the BKM model, makes it possible to simulate the location of the bowshock observed by the Pioneer-Venus spacecraft.

  14. Comparative analysis of computational models of solar wind interaction with Venus based on Pioneer-Venus experimental data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, T. K.; Krymskij, A. M.; Mitnitskij, V. Ya.

    1995-02-01

    Results from the gas-dynamic model of Breus et al. (1992, BKM) of solar wind interaction with Venus are compared with those from hybrid models. Contradictions between the hybrid model of Moor et al. (1991, MTM) and the BKM model are demonstrated. They can be explained by too large computational grid cells used in the MTM model. For the same reason, in the MTM model the effect of a magnetic barrier on the bowshock standoff distance is overestimated, as was shown in the hybrid model of Brecht and Ferrante (1991). The effect of the solar wind mass-loading phenomenon on the bowshock location, taken into account in the BKM model, makes it possible to simulate the location of the bowshock observed by the Pioneer-Venus spacecraft.

  15. A Comparative of business process modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangkawarow, I. R. H. T.; Waworuntu, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this era, there is a lot of business process modeling techniques. This article is the research about differences of business process modeling techniques. For each technique will explain about the definition and the structure. This paper presents a comparative analysis of some popular business process modelling techniques. The comparative framework is based on 2 criteria: notation and how it works when implemented in Somerleyton Animal Park. Each technique will end with the advantages and disadvantages. The final conclusion will give recommend of business process modeling techniques that easy to use and serve the basis for evaluating further modelling techniques.

  16. Comparative analysis of insect succession data from Victoria (Australia) using summary statistics versus preceding mean ambient temperature models.

    PubMed

    Archer, Mel

    2014-03-01

    Minimum postmortem interval (mPMI) can be estimated with preceding mean ambient temperature models that predict carrion taxon pre-appearance interval. But accuracy has not been compared with using summary statistics (mean ± SD of taxon arrival/departure day, range, 95% CI). This study collected succession data from ten experimental and five control (infrequently sampled) pig carcasses over two summers (n = 2 experimental, n = 1 control per placement date). Linear and exponential preceding mean ambient temperature models for appearance and departure times were constructed for 17 taxa/developmental stages. There was minimal difference in linear or exponential model success, although arrival models were more often significant: 65% of linear arrival (r2 = 0.09–0.79) and exponential arrival models (r2 = 0.05–81.0) were significant, and 35% of linear departure (r2 = 0.0–0.71) and exponential departure models (r2 = 0.0–0.72) were significant. Performance of models and summary statistics for estimating mPMI was compared in two forensic cases. Only summary statistics produced accurate mPMI estimates.

  17. A new method for comparing rankings through complex networks: model and analysis of competitiveness of major European soccer leagues.

    PubMed

    Criado, Regino; García, Esther; Pedroche, Francisco; Romance, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show a new technique to analyze families of rankings. In particular, we focus on sports rankings and, more precisely, on soccer leagues. We consider that two teams compete when they change their relative positions in consecutive rankings. This allows to define a graph by linking teams that compete. We show how to use some structural properties of this competitivity graph to measure to what extend the teams in a league compete. These structural properties are the mean degree, the mean strength, and the clustering coefficient. We give a generalization of the Kendall's correlation coefficient to more than two rankings. We also show how to make a dynamic analysis of a league and how to compare different leagues. We apply this technique to analyze the four major European soccer leagues: Bundesliga, Italian Lega, Spanish Liga, and Premier League. We compare our results with the classical analysis of sport ranking based on measures of competitive balance.

  18. A new method for comparing rankings through complex networks: Model and analysis of competitiveness of major European soccer leagues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, Regino; García, Esther; Pedroche, Francisco; Romance, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show a new technique to analyze families of rankings. In particular, we focus on sports rankings and, more precisely, on soccer leagues. We consider that two teams compete when they change their relative positions in consecutive rankings. This allows to define a graph by linking teams that compete. We show how to use some structural properties of this competitivity graph to measure to what extend the teams in a league compete. These structural properties are the mean degree, the mean strength, and the clustering coefficient. We give a generalization of the Kendall's correlation coefficient to more than two rankings. We also show how to make a dynamic analysis of a league and how to compare different leagues. We apply this technique to analyze the four major European soccer leagues: Bundesliga, Italian Lega, Spanish Liga, and Premier League. We compare our results with the classical analysis of sport ranking based on measures of competitive balance.

  19. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F.; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E.; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C.; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  20. Grassland and cropland net ecosystem production of the U.S. Great Plains: Regression tree model development and comparative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, Bruce K.; Howard, Daniel; Dahal, Devendra; Gilmanov, Tagir; Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Smith, Kelcy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and results of two ecological-based net ecosystem production (NEP) regression tree models capable of up scaling measurements made at various flux tower sites throughout the U.S. Great Plains. Separate grassland and cropland NEP regression tree models were trained using various remote sensing data and other biogeophysical data, along with 15 flux towers contributing to the grassland model and 15 flux towers for the cropland model. The models yielded weekly mean daily grassland and cropland NEP maps of the U.S. Great Plains at 250 m resolution for 2000–2008. The grassland and cropland NEP maps were spatially summarized and statistically compared. The results of this study indicate that grassland and cropland ecosystems generally performed as weak net carbon (C) sinks, absorbing more C from the atmosphere than they released from 2000 to 2008. Grasslands demonstrated higher carbon sink potential (139 g C·m−2·year−1) than non-irrigated croplands. A closer look into the weekly time series reveals the C fluctuation through time and space for each land cover type.

  1. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistry of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.

  2. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    DOE PAGES

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; ...

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistrymore » of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.« less

  3. Comparative analysis of various real-time data assimilation approaches for assimilating streamflow into a hydrologic routing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Seong Jin; Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Lee, Haksu; Liu, Yuqiong; Seo, Dong Jun; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    Reliable water depth estimation is an extremely important issue in operational early flood warning systems. Different water system models have been implemented in the last decades, and, in parallel, data assimilation approaches have been introduced in order to reduce the uncertainty of such models. The goal of this study is to compare the performances of a distributed hydrologic routing model with streamflow assimilation using six different data assimilation methods, including direct insertion, nudging, Kalman filter, Ensemble Kalman filter, Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman filter and variational method. The model used in this study is a 3-parameter Muskingum (O'Donnell 1985) which was implemented in the Trinity River, within the Dallas-Fort-Worth Metroplex area in Texas, USA. The first methodological step is to discretize the river reach into multiple 1-km sub-reaches in order to estimate water depth in a distributed fashion. Then, different data assimilation approaches were implemented using the state-space approach formulation of the Muskingum model proposed by Georgakakos (1990). Finally, streamflow observations were assimilated at two points where flow sensors are located. The results of this work pointed out that assimilation of streamflow observations can noticeably improve the hydrologic routing model prediction and that ensemble definition is particularly important for both Ensemble Kalman filter and Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman filter. This study is part of the FP7 European Project WeSenseIt Citizen Water Observatory (www.http://wesenseit.eu/) and NSF Project Integrated Sensing and Prediction of urban Water for Sustainable Cities (http://ispuw.uta.edu/nsf)

  4. Implementation and comparative analysis of the optimisations produced by evolutionary algorithms for the parameter extraction of PSP MOSFET model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadia, Sarman K.; Thakker, R. A.; Bhatt, Kirit R.

    2016-05-01

    The study proposes an application of evolutionary algorithms, specifically an artificial bee colony (ABC), variant ABC and particle swarm optimisation (PSO), to extract the parameters of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) model. These algorithms are applied for the MOSFET parameter extraction problem using a Pennsylvania surface potential model. MOSFET parameter extraction procedures involve reducing the error between measured and modelled data. This study shows that ABC algorithm optimises the parameter values based on intelligent activities of honey bee swarms. Some modifications have also been applied to the basic ABC algorithm. Particle swarm optimisation is a population-based stochastic optimisation method that is based on bird flocking activities. The performances of these algorithms are compared with respect to the quality of the solutions. The simulation results of this study show that the PSO algorithm performs better than the variant ABC and basic ABC algorithm for the parameter extraction of the MOSFET model; also the implementation of the ABC algorithm is shown to be simpler than that of the PSO algorithm.

  5. Observed & Modeled Changes in the Onset of Spring: A Preliminary Comparative Analysis by Geographic Regions of the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquist, C.

    2012-12-01

    Phenology, the study of seasonal life cycle events in plants and animals, is a well-recognized indicator of climate change impacts on people and nature. Models, experiments, and observational studies show changes in plant and animal phenology as a function of environmental change. Current research aims to improve our understanding of changes by enhancing existing models, analyzing observations, synthesizing previous research, and comparing outputs. Local to regional climatology is a critical driver of phenological variation of organisms across scales. Because plants respond to the cumulative effects of daily weather over an extended period, timing of life cycle events are effective integrators of climate data. One specific measure, leaf emergence, is particularly important because it often shows a strong response to temperature change, and is crucial for assessment of processes related to start and duration of the growing season. Schwartz et al. (2006) developed a suite of models (the "Spring Indices") linking plant development from historical data from leafing and flowering of cloned lilac and honeysuckle with basic climatic drivers to monitor changes related to the start of the spring growing season. These models can be generated at any location that has daily max-min temperature time series. The new version of these models is called the "Extended Spring Indices," or SI-x (Schwartz et al. in press). The SI-x model output (first leaf date and first bloom date) are produced similarly to the original models (SI-o), but do not incorporate accumulated chilling hours; rather energy accumulation starts for all stations on January 1. This change extends the locations SI model output can be generated into the sub-tropics, allowing full coverage of the conterminous USA. Both SI model versions are highly correlated, with mean bias and mean absolute differences around two days or less, and a similar bias and absolute errors when compared to cloned lilac data. To

  6. Two-Year versus One-Year Head Start Program Impact: Addressing Selection Bias by Comparing Regression Modeling with Propensity Score Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leow, Christine; Wen, Xiaoli; Korfmacher, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This article compares regression modeling and propensity score analysis as different types of statistical techniques used in addressing selection bias when estimating the impact of two-year versus one-year Head Start on children's school readiness. The analyses were based on the national Head Start secondary dataset. After controlling for…

  7. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of mice liver treated with different AMPK activators in a mice model of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ang; Wang, Dongmei; An, Yuanyuan; Fang, Wei; Zhu, Haibo

    2017-02-02

    Atherosclerosis is known to be the primary underlying factor responsible for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Suppression of AMP-activated protein kinase stimulates arterial deposition of excess lipids, resulting in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. In this study we successfully developed the disease model of mice and mimicked the therapeutic effect, for that we chose three different AMP-activated protein kinase activators (IMM-H007, A-769662 and Metformin) to identify which one has a superior effect in the atherosclerosis model. We combined the transcriptomes of four groups of mice liver including high-fat diet group and the experimental groups treated with different AMP-activated protein kinase activators. We analyzed the increased genes to candidate metabolic and disease pathways. Compared to the high-fat diet group, a total of 799 differentially expressed genes were identified in treatment groups. There were 291, 473, and 323 differentially expressed genes in H007, Metformin, and A-769662 group respectively. And seven statistically significant pathways were observed in both H007 and Metformin groups. We expect that gene expression profiling in the mice model would extend our understanding of atherosclerosis in the molecular level. This study provides a fundamental framework for future clinical research on human atherosclerosis and new clues for developing novel drugs for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  8. Comparative analysis of collaboration networks

    SciTech Connect

    Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz

    2011-03-14

    In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov 'Master and Margarita', the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

  9. Comparative analysis of collaboration networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov "Master and Margarita", the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

  10. Convergence analysis of a finite element skull model of Herpestes javanicus (Carnivora, Mammalia): implications for robust comparative inferences of biomechanical function.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Flynn, John J

    2015-01-21

    Predictions of skull biomechanical capability based on virtual models constitute a valuable data source for testing hypotheses about craniodental form and feeding behavior. Such comparative analyses also inform dietary reconstruction in extinct species. 3D modeling using Finite Element (FE) methods is a common technique applied to the comparative analysis of craniodental function in extinct and extant vertebrates. However, taxonomically diverse skull models in the literature often are not directly comparable to each other, in part because of distinctions in how boundary conditions are defined, but also because of substantial differences in the number of FEs composing the models. In this study, we test whether a conventional convergence test is adequate in identifying the minimum number of FEs needed to achieve internally stable results for a single species. We constructed a series of skull models of Herpestes javanicus, and simulated unilateral biting across the dentition; the models differed in the number of FEs, degrees of freedom at the joint and bite point constraints, and type of tetrahedral FEs used. We found that convergence patterns differed across constraint types, FE quantities, and bite position simulated. Four-noded tetrahedral (tet-4) FE models with relaxed constraints produced the most stable measurements compared to over-constrained tet-4 models and to relaxed tet-10 models. In absence of an optimal FE quantity from convergence testing, we propose a broadly applicable sub-sampling protocol, whereby average measurement values across multiple models per specimen are used for among-species comparisons. A regime of sampling three low FE quantity models produced the closest estimates of mean measurement values relative to larger model sets, being within the 95% bootstrap estimated confidence intervals. Future studies should focus on identifying sources of variation associated with other FE modeling protocols, so that they can be accounted for before

  11. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto; Harper, Stacey

    The integration of rapid assays, large datasets, informatics, and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here, we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality in developing embryonic zebrafish, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a hazard ranking of diverse nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both the core composition and outermost surface chemistry of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a surface chemistry-based model of gold nanoparticle toxicity. Our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. Research should continue to focus on methodologies for determining nanomaterial hazard based on multiple sub-lethal responses following realistic, low-dose exposures, thus increasing the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard to support the development of nanoparticle structure-activity relationships.

  12. Comparative artificial neural network and partial least squares models for analysis of Metronidazole, Diloxanide, Spiramycin and Cliquinol in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Elkhoudary, Mahmoud M; Abdel Salam, Randa A; Hadad, Ghada M

    2014-09-15

    Metronidazole (MNZ) is a widely used antibacterial and amoebicide drug. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid and specific analytical method for the determination of MNZ in mixture with Spiramycin (SPY), Diloxanide (DIX) and Cliquinol (CLQ) in pharmaceutical preparations. This work describes simple, sensitive and reliable six multivariate calibration methods, namely linear and nonlinear artificial neural networks preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-ANN) and principle component analysis (PCA-ANN) as well as partial least squares (PLS) either alone or preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-PLS) for UV spectrophotometric determination of MNZ, SPY, DIX and CLQ in pharmaceutical preparations with no interference of pharmaceutical additives. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like ANN can handle it. Analytical performance of these methods was statistically validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity. The developed methods indicate the ability of the previously mentioned multivariate calibration models to handle and solve UV spectra of the four components' mixtures using easy and widely used UV spectrophotometer.

  13. Comparative artificial neural network and partial least squares models for analysis of Metronidazole, Diloxanide, Spiramycin and Cliquinol in pharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoudary, Mahmoud M.; Abdel Salam, Randa A.; Hadad, Ghada M.

    2014-09-01

    Metronidazole (MNZ) is a widely used antibacterial and amoebicide drug. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid and specific analytical method for the determination of MNZ in mixture with Spiramycin (SPY), Diloxanide (DIX) and Cliquinol (CLQ) in pharmaceutical preparations. This work describes simple, sensitive and reliable six multivariate calibration methods, namely linear and nonlinear artificial neural networks preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-ANN) and principle component analysis (PCA-ANN) as well as partial least squares (PLS) either alone or preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-PLS) for UV spectrophotometric determination of MNZ, SPY, DIX and CLQ in pharmaceutical preparations with no interference of pharmaceutical additives. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like ANN can handle it. Analytical performance of these methods was statistically validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity. The developed methods indicate the ability of the previously mentioned multivariate calibration models to handle and solve UV spectra of the four components’ mixtures using easy and widely used UV spectrophotometer.

  14. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  15. Comparing flood loss models of different complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Kai; Kreibich, Heidi; Vogel, Kristin; Riggelsen, Carsten; Scherbaum, Frank; Merz, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Any deliberation on flood risk requires the consideration of potential flood losses. In particular, reliable flood loss models are needed to evaluate cost-effectiveness of mitigation measures, to assess vulnerability, for comparative risk analysis and financial appraisal during and after floods. In recent years, considerable improvements have been made both concerning the data basis and the methodological approaches used for the development of flood loss models. Despite of that, flood loss models remain an important source of uncertainty. Likewise the temporal and spatial transferability of flood loss models is still limited. This contribution investigates the predictive capability of different flood loss models in a split sample cross regional validation approach. For this purpose, flood loss models of different complexity, i.e. based on different numbers of explaining variables, are learned from a set of damage records that was obtained from a survey after the Elbe flood in 2002. The validation of model predictions is carried out for different flood events in the Elbe and Danube river basins in 2002, 2005 and 2006 for which damage records are available from surveys after the flood events. The models investigated are a stage-damage model, the rule based model FLEMOps+r as well as novel model approaches which are derived using data mining techniques of regression trees and Bayesian networks. The Bayesian network approach to flood loss modelling provides attractive additional information concerning the probability distribution of both model predictions and explaining variables.

  16. Gradient Matching Methods for Computational Inference in Mechanistic Models for Systems Biology: A Review and Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Benn; Husmeier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Parameter inference in mathematical models of biological pathways, expressed as coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs), is a challenging problem in contemporary systems biology. Conventional methods involve repeatedly solving the ODEs by numerical integration, which is computationally onerous and does not scale up to complex systems. Aimed at reducing the computational costs, new concepts based on gradient matching have recently been proposed in the computational statistics and machine learning literature. In a preliminary smoothing step, the time series data are interpolated; then, in a second step, the parameters of the ODEs are optimized, so as to minimize some metric measuring the difference between the slopes of the tangents to the interpolants, and the time derivatives from the ODEs. In this way, the ODEs never have to be solved explicitly. This review provides a concise methodological overview of the current state-of-the-art methods for gradient matching in ODEs, followed by an empirical comparative evaluation based on a set of widely used and representative benchmark data.

  17. Developing discriminate model and comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes and pathways for bloodstream samples of diabetes mellitus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus of type 2 (T2D), also known as noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes, is a common disease. It is estimated that more than 300 million people worldwide suffer from T2D. In this study, we investigated the T2D, pre-diabetic and healthy human (no diabetes) bloodstream samples using genomic, genealogical, and phonemic information. We identified differentially expressed genes and pathways. The study has provided deeper insights into the development of T2D, and provided useful information for further effective prevention and treatment of the disease. Results A total of 142 bloodstream samples were collected, including 47 healthy humans, 22 pre-diabetic and 73 T2D patients. Whole genome scale gene expression profiles were obtained using the Agilent Oligo chips that contain over 20,000 human genes. We identified 79 significantly differentially expressed genes that have fold change ≥ 2. We mapped those genes and pinpointed locations of those genes on human chromosomes. Amongst them, 3 genes were not mapped well on the human genome, but the rest of 76 differentially expressed genes were well mapped on the human genome. We found that most abundant differentially expressed genes are on chromosome one, which contains 9 of those genes, followed by chromosome two that contains 7 of the 76 differentially expressed genes. We performed gene ontology (GO) functional analysis of those 79 differentially expressed genes and found that genes involve in the regulation of cell proliferation were among most common pathways related to T2D. The expression of the 79 genes was combined with clinical information that includes age, sex, and race to construct an optimal discriminant model. The overall performance of the model reached 95.1% accuracy, with 91.5% accuracy on identifying healthy humans, 100% accuracy on pre-diabetic patients and 95.9% accuract on T2D patients. The higher performance on identifying pre-diabetic patients was

  18. Least-Squares Regression and Spectral Residual Augmented Classical Least-Squares Chemometric Models for Stability-Indicating Analysis of Agomelatine and Its Degradation Products: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Ibrahim A; Abdelrahman, Maha M; El Ghobashy, Mohamed R; Ali, Nesma A

    2016-01-01

    Two accurate, sensitive, and selective stability-indicating methods are developed and validated for simultaneous quantitative determination of agomelatine (AGM) and its forced degradation products (Deg I and Deg II), whether in pure forms or in pharmaceutical formulations. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and spectral residual augmented classical least-squares (SRACLS) are two chemometric models that are being subjected to a comparative study through handling UV spectral data in range (215-350 nm). For proper analysis, a three-factor, four-level experimental design was established, resulting in a training set consisting of 16 mixtures containing different ratios of interfering species. An independent test set consisting of eight mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The results presented indicate the ability of mentioned multivariate calibration models to analyze AGM, Deg I, and Deg II with high selectivity and accuracy. The analysis results of the pharmaceutical formulations were statistically compared to the reference HPLC method, with no significant differences observed regarding accuracy and precision. The SRACLS model gives comparable results to the PLSR model; however, it keeps the qualitative spectral information of the classical least-squares algorithm for analyzed components.

  19. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models. Materials and Methods Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model) of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model. Results There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models. PMID:27304976

  20. Comparative analysis of meteorological performance of coupled chemistry-meteorology models in the context of AQMEII phase 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution simulations critically depend on the quality of the underlying meteorology. In phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII-2), thirteen modeling groups from Europe and four groups from North America operating eight different regional...

  1. Transitions in state public health law: comparative analysis of state public health law reform following the Turning Point Model State Public Health Act.

    PubMed

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Hodge, James G; Gebbie, Kristine M

    2009-03-01

    Given the public health importance of law modernization, we undertook a comparative analysis of policy efforts in 4 states (Alaska, South Carolina, Wisconsin, and Nebraska) that have considered public health law reform based on the Turning Point Model State Public Health Act. Through national legislative tracking and state case studies, we investigated how the Turning Point Act's model legal language has been considered for incorporation into state law and analyzed key facilitating and inhibiting factors for public health law reform. Our findings provide the practice community with a research base to facilitate further law reform and inform future scholarship on the role of law as a determinant of the public's health.

  2. Emergent structures and understanding from a comparative uncertainty analysis of the FUSE rainfall-runoff modelling platform for >1,100 catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, J. E.; Odoni, N. A.; Coxon, G.; Bloomfield, J.; Clark, M. P.; Greene, S.; Johnes, P.; Macleod, C.; Reaney, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    If we are to learn about catchments and their hydrological function then a range of analysis techniques can be proposed from analysing observations to building complex physically based models using detailed attributes of catchment characteristics. Decisions regarding which technique is fit for a specific purpose will depend on the data available, computing resources, and the underlying reasons for the study. Here we explore defining catchment function in a relatively general sense expressed via a comparison of multiple model structures within an uncertainty analysis framework. We use the FUSE (Framework for Understanding Structural Errors - Clark et al., 2008) rainfall-runoff modelling platform and the GLUE (Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation - Beven and Freer, 2001) uncertainty analysis framework. Using these techniques we assess two main outcomes: 1) Benchmarking our predictive capability using discharge performance metrics for a diverse range of catchments across the UK 2) evaluating emergent behaviour for each catchment and/or region expressed as ';best performing' model structures that may be equally plausible representations of catchment behaviour. We shall show how such comparative hydrological modelling studies show patterns of emergent behaviour linked both to seasonal responses and to different geoclimatic regions. These results have implications for the hydrological community regarding how models can help us learn about places as hypothesis testing tools. Furthermore we explore what the limits are to such an analysis when dealing with differing data quality and information content from ';pristine' to less well characterised and highly modified catchment domains. This research has been piloted in the UK as part of the Environmental Virtual Observatory programme (EVOp), funded by NERC to demonstrate the use of cyber-infrastructure and cloud computing resources to develop better methods of linking data and models and to support scenario analysis

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Secretome from a Model Filarial Nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis) Reveals Maximal Diversity in Gravid Female Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Stuart D.; Babayan, Simon A.; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Gray, Nick; Xia, Dong; Martin, Coralie; Kumar, Sujai; Taylor, David W.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Filarial nematodes (superfamily Filarioidea) are responsible for an annual global health burden of ∼6.3 million disability-adjusted life-years, which represents the greatest single component of morbidity attributable to helminths affecting humans. No vaccine exists for the major filarial diseases, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis; in part because research on protective immunity against filariae has been constrained by the inability of the human-parasitic species to complete their lifecycles in laboratory mice. However, the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis has become a popular experimental model, as BALB/c mice are fully permissive for its development and reproduction. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of excretory-secretory products from L. sigmodontis across five lifecycle stages and identifications of host proteins associated with first-stage larvae (microfilariae) in the blood. Applying intensity-based quantification, we determined the abundance of 302 unique excretory-secretory proteins, of which 64.6% were present in quantifiable amounts only from gravid adult female nematodes. This lifecycle stage, together with immature microfilariae, released four proteins that have not previously been evaluated as vaccine candidates: a predicted 28.5 kDa filaria-specific protein, a zonadhesin and SCO-spondin-like protein, a vitellogenin, and a protein containing six metridin-like ShK toxin domains. Female nematodes also released two proteins derived from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Notably, excretory-secretory products from all parasite stages contained several uncharacterized members of the transthyretin-like protein family. Furthermore, biotin labeling revealed that redox proteins and enzymes involved in purinergic signaling were enriched on the adult nematode cuticle. Comparison of the L. sigmodontis adult secretome with that of the human-infective filarial nematode Brugia malayi (reported previously in three independent published studies

  4. Comparative power spectrum analysis of EEG activity in spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar rats in kainate model of temporal model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Kortenska, Lidia; Marinov, Pencho; Boyanov, Kiril

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we have reported that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibit higher susceptibility than Wistar rats in kainate (KA) model of epilepsy. The aim of the present study is to compare the baseline of EEG signals in SHRs and Wistar rats using Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) during the three phases of KA model (acute, latent and chronic). The SHRs showed higher baseline relative power of delta waves in the left frontal cortex and lower gamma-HF waves in the left frontal and left/right parietal cortex, respectively, compared to Wistar rats. During the acute phase, both absolute and relative power of fast EEG bands (gamma-HF) was lower in the left/right frontal and the left/right parietal cortex in SHRs compared to Wistar rats. During the latent phase, no difference in the power of the investigated bands was detected between the two strains. During the chronic epileptic phase, the SHRs were characterized with higher power of HF oscillations than Wistar rats both in the frontal and parietal cortex without brain lateralization while theta, alpha and beta bands were with diminished power in the left parietal cortex of SHRs compared to normotensive Wistar rats. Taken together, the presented results suggest that the increased delta waves and lower gamma-HF waves in the frontal/parietal cortex are associated with a higher seizure susceptibility of SHRs compared to Wistar rats while fastest oscillations has a critical role in seizure generation and propagation of hypertensive rats.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of the Meaning of Model Minority among Ethnic Koreans in China and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Koreans have been successful in nesting their educational achievement into places like China and the United States, where they have earned the title of "model minority". This research is a comparison of the manner in which the model minority stereotype is handled by Korean Chinese and Korean Americans. The gathered data leads us to argue…

  6. Sociological analysis and comparative education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woock, Roger R.

    1981-12-01

    It is argued that comparative education is essentially a derivative field of study, in that it borrows theories and methods from academic disciplines. After a brief humanistic phase, in which history and philosophy were central for comparative education, sociology became an important source. In the mid-50's and 60's, sociology in the United States was characterised by Structural Functionalism as a theory, and Social Survey as a dominant methodology. Both were incorporated into the development of comparative education. Increasingly in the 70's, and certainly today, the new developments in sociology are characterised by an attack on Positivism, which is seen as the philosophical position underlying both functionalism and survey methods. New or re-discovered theories with their attendant methodologies included Marxism, Phenomenological Sociology, Critical Theory, and Historical Social Science. The current relationship between comparative education and social science is one of uncertainty, but since social science is seen to be returning to its European roots, the hope is held out for the development of an integrated social theory and method which will provide a much stronger basis for developments in comparative education.

  7. A Comparative Analysis of a Game-Based Mobile Learning Model in Low-Socioeconomic Communities of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Paul; Buckner, Elizabeth; Kim, Hyunkyung; Makany, Tamas; Taleja, Neha; Parikh, Vallabhi

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effectiveness of a game-based mobile learning model for children living in underdeveloped regions with significant contextual variations. Data for this study came from a total of 210 children between the ages of 6-14 years old from six marginalized communities in India. The findings reveal that children with little or no…

  8. A Causal-Comparative Analysis of the Effects of a Student Support Team (SST) Intervention Model at a Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mid D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify and examine the effectiveness of a "Student Support Team" (SST) intervention model designed to increase the performance of struggling secondary students and to help them achieve prescribed state standards on the mathematics "Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS)"…

  9. Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindskog, M. Wacker, A.; Wolf, J. M.; Liverini, V.; Faist, J.; Trinite, V.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M.; Aidam, R.; Ostendorf, R.

    2014-09-08

    We study the operation of an 8.5 μm quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

  10. Analysis of genetic population structure in Acacia caven (Leguminosae, Mimosoideae), comparing one exploratory and two Bayesian-model-based methods.

    PubMed

    Pometti, Carolina L; Bessega, Cecilia F; Saidman, Beatriz O; Vilardi, Juan C

    2014-03-01

    Bayesian clustering as implemented in STRUCTURE or GENELAND software is widely used to form genetic groups of populations or individuals. On the other hand, in order to satisfy the need for less computer-intensive approaches, multivariate analyses are specifically devoted to extracting information from large datasets. In this paper, we report the use of a dataset of AFLP markers belonging to 15 sampling sites of Acacia caven for studying the genetic structure and comparing the consistency of three methods: STRUCTURE, GENELAND and DAPC. Of these methods, DAPC was the fastest one and showed accuracy in inferring the K number of populations (K = 12 using the find.clusters option and K = 15 with a priori information of populations). GENELAND in turn, provides information on the area of membership probabilities for individuals or populations in the space, when coordinates are specified (K = 12). STRUCTURE also inferred the number of K populations and the membership probabilities of individuals based on ancestry, presenting the result K = 11 without prior information of populations and K = 15 using the LOCPRIOR option. Finally, in this work all three methods showed high consistency in estimating the population structure, inferring similar numbers of populations and the membership probabilities of individuals to each group, with a high correlation between each other.

  11. Analysis of genetic population structure in Acacia caven (Leguminosae, Mimosoideae), comparing one exploratory and two Bayesian-model-based methods

    PubMed Central

    Pometti, Carolina L.; Bessega, Cecilia F.; Saidman, Beatriz O.; Vilardi, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian clustering as implemented in STRUCTURE or GENELAND software is widely used to form genetic groups of populations or individuals. On the other hand, in order to satisfy the need for less computer-intensive approaches, multivariate analyses are specifically devoted to extracting information from large datasets. In this paper, we report the use of a dataset of AFLP markers belonging to 15 sampling sites of Acacia caven for studying the genetic structure and comparing the consistency of three methods: STRUCTURE, GENELAND and DAPC. Of these methods, DAPC was the fastest one and showed accuracy in inferring the K number of populations (K = 12 using the find.clusters option and K = 15 with a priori information of populations). GENELAND in turn, provides information on the area of membership probabilities for individuals or populations in the space, when coordinates are specified (K = 12). STRUCTURE also inferred the number of K populations and the membership probabilities of individuals based on ancestry, presenting the result K = 11 without prior information of populations and K = 15 using the LOCPRIOR option. Finally, in this work all three methods showed high consistency in estimating the population structure, inferring similar numbers of populations and the membership probabilities of individuals to each group, with a high correlation between each other. PMID:24688293

  12. Support vector regression and artificial neural network models for stability indicating analysis of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures in pharmaceutical preparation: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Ibrahim A.; Darwish, Hany W.

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between support vector regression (SVR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) multivariate regression methods is established showing the underlying algorithm for each and making a comparison between them to indicate the inherent advantages and limitations. In this paper we compare SVR to ANN with and without variable selection procedure (genetic algorithm (GA)). To project the comparison in a sensible way, the methods are used for the stability indicating quantitative analysis of mixtures of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride in binary mixtures as a case study in presence of their reported impurities and degradation products (summing up to 6 components) in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form via handling the UV spectral data. For proper analysis, a 6 factor 5 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set of 25 mixtures containing different ratios of the interfering species. An independent test set consisting of 5 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The proposed methods (linear SVR (without GA) and linear GA-ANN) were successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical tablets containing mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like the SVR and ANN can handle it. The methods indicate the ability of the mentioned multivariate calibration models to deconvolute the highly overlapped UV spectra of the 6 components' mixtures, yet using cheap and easy to handle instruments like the UV spectrophotometer.

  13. miRNA expression and function in thyroid carcinomas: a comparative and critical analysis and a model for other cancers

    PubMed Central

    Saiselet, Manuel; Pita, Jaime M.; Augenlicht, Alice; Dom, Geneviève; Tarabichi, Maxime; Fimereli, Danai; Dumont, Jacques E.; Detours, Vincent; Maenhaut, Carine

    2016-01-01

    As in many cancer types, miRNA expression profiles and functions have become an important field of research on non-medullary thyroid carcinomas, the most common endocrine cancers. This could lead to the establishment of new diagnostic tests and new cancer therapies. However, different studies showed important variations in their research strategies and results. In addition, the action of miRNAs is poorly considered as a whole because of the use of underlying dogmatic truncated concepts. These lead to discrepancies and limits rarely considered. Recently, this field has been enlarged by new miRNA functional and expression studies. Moreover, studies using next generation sequencing give a new view of general miRNA differential expression profiles of papillary thyroid carcinoma. We analyzed in detail this literature from both physiological and differential expression points of view. Based on explicit examples, we reviewed the progresses but also the discrepancies and limits trying to provide a critical approach of where this literature may lead. We also provide recommendations for future studies. The conclusions of this systematic analysis could be extended to other cancer types. PMID:27248468

  14. A comparative analysis of inhibitors of the glycolysis pathway in breast and ovarian cancer cell line models

    PubMed Central

    Xintaropoulou, Chrysi; Ward, Carol; Wise, Alan; Marston, Hugh; Turnbull, Arran; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and targeting of this pathway is a potential strategy to inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, inhibition of five glycolysis pathway molecules (GLUT1, HKII, PFKFB3, PDHK1 and LDH) using 9 inhibitors (Phloretin, Quercetin, STF31, WZB117, 3PO, 3-bromopyruvate, Dichloroacetate, Oxamic acid, NHI-1) was investigated in panels of breast and ovarian cancer cell line models. All compounds tested blocked glycolysis as indicated by increased extracellular glucose and decreased lactate production and also increased apoptosis. Sensitivity to several inhibitors correlated with the proliferation rate of the cell lines. Seven compounds had IC50 values that were associated with each other consistent with a shared mechanism of action. A synergistic interaction was revealed between STF31 and Oxamic acid when combined with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Sensitivity to glycolysis inhibition was also examined under a range of O2 levels (21% O2, 7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) and greater resistance to the inhibitors was found at low oxygen conditions (7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) relative to 21% O2 conditions. These results indicate growth of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines is dependent on all the targets examined in the glycolytic pathway with increased sensitivity to the inhibitors under normoxic conditions. PMID:26259240

  15. Comparative analysis of the influence of Fructus Ligustri Lucidi on a rat lumbar disc herniation model.

    PubMed

    Han, Ya-Xin; Liang, Dong; Han, Xiao-Rui; Liang, De-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a term used for a group of conditions, including back pain, femoral nerve pain and sciatica. Currently available treatments and surgical options are insufficient for patients with LDH. Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) is a herb that is used for treating age-associated diseases. The results of the present study suggested that FLL may be used for treatment of patients with LDH. In the present study, matrix metalloproteinase-1, -3, -8 and -9 (MMP-1, -3, -8 and -9) protein and mRNA expression downregulation was observed in patients with LDH according to western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. By contrast, upregulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression was observed in patients with LDH, according to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Mechanical allodynia was observed in rats with LDH not treated with FLL; however, not in FLL‑treated rats. IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α expression levels in the serum from untreated rats were significantly higher than that of the FLL‑treated rat models. Protein expression levels of MMPs in FLL-treated rats were lower than those in untreated rats. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between FLL and protein expression levels require further investigation.

  16. A comparative analysis of inhibitors of the glycolysis pathway in breast and ovarian cancer cell line models.

    PubMed

    Xintaropoulou, Chrysi; Ward, Carol; Wise, Alan; Marston, Hugh; Turnbull, Arran; Langdon, Simon P

    2015-09-22

    Many cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and targeting of this pathway is a potential strategy to inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, inhibition of five glycolysis pathway molecules (GLUT1, HKII, PFKFB3, PDHK1 and LDH) using 9 inhibitors (Phloretin, Quercetin, STF31, WZB117, 3PO, 3-bromopyruvate, Dichloroacetate, Oxamic acid, NHI-1) was investigated in panels of breast and ovarian cancer cell line models. All compounds tested blocked glycolysis as indicated by increased extracellular glucose and decreased lactate production and also increased apoptosis. Sensitivity to several inhibitors correlated with the proliferation rate of the cell lines. Seven compounds had IC50 values that were associated with each other consistent with a shared mechanism of action. A synergistic interaction was revealed between STF31 and Oxamic acid when combined with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Sensitivity to glycolysis inhibition was also examined under a range of O2 levels (21% O2, 7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) and greater resistance to the inhibitors was found at low oxygen conditions (7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) relative to 21% O2 conditions. These results indicate growth of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines is dependent on all the targets examined in the glycolytic pathway with increased sensitivity to the inhibitors under normoxic conditions.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Anderson, Peter A.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. PMID:26744216

  18. Comparative Analysis between [(18)F]Fludarabine-PET and [(18)F]FDG-PET in a Murine Model of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, Narinée; Dhilly, Martine; Guillouet, Stéphane; Leporrier, Michel; Barré, Louisa

    2016-06-06

    Lymphoma research has advanced thanks to introduction of [(18)F]fludarabine, a positron-emitting tool. This novel radiotracer has been shown to display a great specificity for lymphoid tissues. However, in a benign process such as inflammation, the uptake of this tracer has not been questioned. Indeed, in inflammatory zones, elevated glucose metabolism rate may result in false-positives with [(18)F]FDG-PET Imaging. In the present investigation, it has been argued that cells, involved in inflammation, might be less avid of [(18)F]fludarabine. To generate inflammation, Swiss mice were intramuscularly injected with 0.1 mL of turpentine oil into the right front paw. Imaging sessions with (18)F-labeled tracers named above were conducted on days 5 and 25 after inoculation. For each animal, volumes of interest (VOI), delineating the muscle of the inflamed (IP) and normal paws (NP), were determined on PET scans. For characterization of inflammation, muscle samples from IP and NP were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). In early (day 5) inflammation, [(18)F]FDG accumulation was 4.00 ± 1.65 times greater in the IP than in the contralateral NP; for [(18)F]fludarabine, this IP/NP ratio was 1.31 ± 0.28, resulting in a significant difference between radiotracer groups (p < 0.01). In late (day 25) inflammation, the IP/NP ratios were 2.07 ± 0.49 and 1.03 ± 0.07, for [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]fludarabine, respectively (p < 0.001). [(18)F]Fludarabine showed significantly weaker uptake in inflammation when compared with [(18)F]FDG. This encouraging finding suggests that [(18)F]fludarabine-PET might well be a robust approach for distinguishing tumor from inflammatory tissue, avoiding false-positive PET results and thus enabling an accurate imaging of lymphoma.

  19. Secondary structure model for mouse beta Maj globin mRNA derived from enzymatic digestion data, comparative sequence and computer analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lockard, R E; Currey, K; Browner, M; Lawrence, C; Maizel, J

    1986-01-01

    A model for the secondary structure of mouse beta Maj globin messenger RNA is presented based on enzymatic digestion data, comparative sequence and computer analysis. Using 5'-32P-end-labeled beta globin mRNA as a substrate, single-stranded regions were determined with S1 and T1 nucleases and double-stranded regions with V1 ribonuclease from cobra venom. The structure data obtained for ca. 75% of the molecule was introduced into a computer algorithm which predicts secondary structures of minimum free energy consistent with the enzymatic data. Two prominent base paired regions independently derived by phylogenetic analysis were also present in the computer generated structure lending support for the model. An interesting feature of the model is the presence of long-range base pairing interactions which permit the beta globin mRNA to fold back on itself, thereby bringing the 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions within close proximity. This feature is consistent with data from other laboratories suggesting an interaction of the 5'- and 3'-domains in the mammalian globin mRNAs. Images PMID:3737415

  20. Osteolytica: An automated image analysis software package that rapidly measures cancer-induced osteolytic lesions in in vivo models with greater reproducibility compared to other commonly used methods☆

    PubMed Central

    Evans, H.R.; Karmakharm, T.; Lawson, M.A.; Walker, R.E.; Harris, W.; Fellows, C.; Huggins, I.D.; Richmond, P.; Chantry, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Methods currently used to analyse osteolytic lesions caused by malignancies such as multiple myeloma and metastatic breast cancer vary from basic 2-D X-ray analysis to 2-D images of micro-CT datasets analysed with non-specialised image software such as ImageJ. However, these methods have significant limitations. They do not capture 3-D data, they are time-consuming and they often suffer from inter-user variability. We therefore sought to develop a rapid and reproducible method to analyse 3-D osteolytic lesions in mice with cancer-induced bone disease. To this end, we have developed Osteolytica, an image analysis software method featuring an easy to use, step-by-step interface to measure lytic bone lesions. Osteolytica utilises novel graphics card acceleration (parallel computing) and 3-D rendering to provide rapid reconstruction and analysis of osteolytic lesions. To evaluate the use of Osteolytica we analysed tibial micro-CT datasets from murine models of cancer-induced bone disease and compared the results to those obtained using a standard ImageJ analysis method. Firstly, to assess inter-user variability we deployed four independent researchers to analyse tibial datasets from the U266-NSG murine model of myeloma. Using ImageJ, inter-user variability between the bones was substantial (± 19.6%), in contrast to using Osteolytica, which demonstrated minimal variability (± 0.5%). Secondly, tibial datasets from U266-bearing NSG mice or BALB/c mice injected with the metastatic breast cancer cell line 4T1 were compared to tibial datasets from aged and sex-matched non-tumour control mice. Analyses by both Osteolytica and ImageJ showed significant increases in bone lesion area in tumour-bearing mice compared to control mice. These results confirm that Osteolytica performs as well as the current 2-D ImageJ osteolytic lesion analysis method. However, Osteolytica is advantageous in that it analyses over the entirety of the bone volume (as opposed to selected 2-D images

  1. Enhanced Precision of the New Hologic Horizon Model Compared With the Old Discovery Model Is Less Evident When Fewer Vertebrae Are Included in the Analysis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Elizabeth A; Kilim, Holly P; Malabanan, Alan O; Whittaker, LaTarsha G; Rosen, Harold N

    2016-07-12

    The International Society for Clinical Densitometry guidelines recommend using locally derived precision data for spine bone mineral densities (BMDs), but do not specify whether data derived from L1-L4 spines correctly reflect the precision for spines reporting fewer than 4 vertebrae. Our experience suggested that the decrease in precision with successively fewer vertebrae is progressive as more vertebrae are excluded and that the precision for the newer Horizon Hologic model might be better than that for the previous model, and we sought to quantify. Precision studies were performed on Hologic densitometers by acquiring spine BMD in fast array mode twice on 30 patients, according to International Society for Clinical Densitometry guidelines. This was done 10 different times on various Discovery densitometers, and once on a Horizon densitometer. When 1 vertebral body was excluded from analysis, there was no significant deterioration in precision. When 2 vertebrae were excluded, there was a nonsignificant trend to poorer precision, and when 3 vertebrae were excluded, there was significantly worse precision. When 3 or 4 vertebrae were reported, the precision of the spine BMD measurement was significantly better on the Hologic Horizon than on the Discovery, but the difference in precision between densitometers narrowed and was no longer significant when 1 or 2 vertebrae were reported. The results suggest that (1) the measurement of in vivo spine BMD on the new Hologic Horizon densitometer is significantly more precise than on the older Discovery model; (2) the difference in precision between the Horizon and Discovery models decreases as fewer vertebrae are included; (3) the measurement of spine BMD is less precise as more vertebrae are excluded, but still quite reasonable even when only 1 vertebral body is included; and (4) when 3 vertebrae are reported, L1-L4 precision data can reasonably be used to report significance of changes in BMD. When 1 or 2 vertebrae are

  2. Comparing the Discrete and Continuous Logistic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2008-01-01

    The solutions of the discrete logistic growth model based on a difference equation and the continuous logistic growth model based on a differential equation are compared and contrasted. The investigation is conducted using a dynamic interactive spreadsheet. (Contains 5 figures.)

  3. Comparative analysis of the influence of turbulence models on the description of the nitrogen oxides formation during the combustion of swirling pulverized coal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Chernetskaya, N.; Chernetskiy, M.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical research on the influence of the two- parametric k-ε, and k-ω SST turbulence models as well as Reynolds stress model (RSM) on the description of the nitrogen oxides formation during the combustion of pulverized coal in swirling flow. For the numerical simulation of turbulent flow of an incompressible liquid, we used the Reynolds equation taking into account the interfacial interactions. To solve the equation of thermal radiation transfer, the P1 approximation of spherical harmonics method was employed. The optical properties of gases were described based on the sum of gray gases model. To describe the motion of coal particles we used the method of Lagrange multipliers. Burning of coke residue was considered based on diffusion - kinetic approximation. Comparative analysis has shown that the choice of turbulence model has a significant impact on the root mean square (RMS) values of the velocity and temperature pulsation components. This leads to significant differences in the calculation of the nitrogen oxides formation process during the combustion of pulverized coal.

  4. Modeling corrosion inhibition efficacy of small organic molecules as non-toxic chromate alternatives using comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA).

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Breedon, Michael; Cole, Ivan S; Barnard, Amanda S

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally many structural alloys are protected by primer coatings loaded with corrosion inhibiting additives. Strontium Chromate (or other chromates) have been shown to be extremely effectively inhibitors, and find extensive use in protective primer formulations. Unfortunately, hexavalent chromium which imbues these coatings with their corrosion inhibiting properties is also highly toxic, and their use is being increasingly restricted by legislation. In this work we explore a novel tridimensional Quantitative-Structure Property Relationship (3D-QSPR) approach, comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA), which was developed to recognize "high-performing" corrosion inhibitor candidates from the distributions of electronegativity, polarizability and van der Waals volume on the molecular surfaces of 28 small organic molecules. Multivariate statistical analysis identified five prototypes molecules, which are capable of explaining 71% of the variance within the inhibitor data set; whilst a further five molecules were also identified as archetypes, describing 75% of data variance. All active corrosion inhibitors, at a 80% threshold, were successfully recognized by the CoMSA model with adequate specificity and precision higher than 70% and 60%, respectively. The model was also capable of identifying structural patterns, that revealed reasonable starting points for where structural changes may augment corrosion inhibition efficacy. The presented methodology can be applied to other functional molecules and extended to cover structure-activity studies in a diverse range of areas such as drug design and novel material discovery.

  5. Comparative dynamics in a health investment model.

    PubMed

    Eisenring, C

    1999-10-01

    The method of comparative dynamics fully exploits the inter-temporal structure of optimal control models. I derive comparative dynamic results in a simplified demand for health model. The effect of a change in the depreciation rate on the optimal paths for health capital and investment in health is studied by use of a phase diagram.

  6. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  7. A mathematical model of Clostridium difficile transmission in medical wards and a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing different strategies for laboratory diagnosis and patient isolation

    PubMed Central

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Leshno, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common and potentially fatal healthcare-associated infection. Improving diagnostic tests and infection control measures may prevent transmission. We aimed to determine, in resource-limited settings, whether it is more effective and cost-effective to allocate resources to isolation or to diagnostics. Methods We constructed a mathematical model of CDI transmission based on hospital data (9 medical wards, 350 beds) between March 2010 and February 2013. The model consisted of three compartments: susceptible patients, asymptomatic carriers and CDI patients. We used our model results to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing four strategies that were different combinations of 2 test methods (the two-step test and uniform PCR) and 2 infection control measures (contact isolation in multiple-bed rooms or single-bed rooms/cohorting). For each strategy, we calculated the annual cost (of CDI diagnosis and isolation) for a decrease of 1 in the average daily number of CDI patients; the strategy of the two-step test and contact isolation in multiple-bed rooms was the reference strategy. Results Our model showed that the average number of CDI patients increased exponentially as the transmission rate increased. Improving diagnosis by adopting uniform PCR assay reduced the average number of CDI cases per day per 350 beds from 9.4 to 8.5, while improving isolation by using single-bed rooms reduced the number to about 1; the latter was cost saving. Conclusions CDI can be decreased by better isolation and more sensitive laboratory methods. From the hospital perspective, improving isolation is more cost-effective than improving diagnostics. PMID:28187144

  8. Structural modeling and docking studies of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from Leishmania major and Homo sapiens: a comparative analysis for Leishmaniasis treatment.

    PubMed

    Capriles, Priscila V S Z; Baptista, Luiz Phillippe R; Guedes, Isabella A; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R; Custódio, Fabio L; Alves-Ferreira, Marcelo; Dardenne, Laurent E

    2015-02-01

    Leishmaniases are caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania and are considered the second-highest cause of death worldwide by parasitic infection. The drugs available for treatment in humans are becoming ineffective mainly due to parasite resistance; therefore, it is extremely important to develop a new chemotherapy against these parasites. A crucial aspect of drug design development is the identification and characterization of novel molecular targets. In this work, through an in silico comparative analysis between the genomes of Leishmania major and Homo sapiens, the enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (R5PI) was indicated as a promising molecular target. R5PI is an important enzyme that acts in the pentose phosphate pathway and catalyzes the interconversion of d-ribose-5-phosphate (R5P) and d-ribulose-5-phosphate (5RP). R5PI activity is found in two analogous groups of enzymes called RpiA (found in H. sapiens) and RpiB (found in L. major). Here, we present the first report of the three-dimensional (3D) structures and active sites of RpiB from L. major (LmRpiB) and RpiA from H. sapiens (HsRpiA). Three-dimensional models were constructed by applying a hybrid methodology that combines comparative and ab initio modeling techniques, and the active site was characterized based on docking studies of the substrates R5P (furanose and ring-opened forms) and 5RP. Our comparative analyses show that these proteins are structural analogs and that distinct residues participate in the interconversion of R5P and 5RP. We propose two distinct reaction mechanisms for the reversible isomerization of R5P to 5RP, which is catalyzed by LmRpiB and HsRpiA. We expect that the present results will be important in guiding future molecular modeling studies to develop new drugs that are specially designed to inhibit the parasitic form of the enzyme without significant effects on the human analog.

  9. High Altitude Long Endurance UAV Analysis Model Development and Application Study Comparing Solar Powered Airplane and Airship Station-Keeping Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, Thomas A.; Nickol, Craig L.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There have been ongoing efforts in the Aeronautics Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center to develop a suite of integrated physics-based computational utilities suitable for modeling and analyzing extended-duration missions carried out using solar powered aircraft. From these efforts, SolFlyte has emerged as a state-of-the-art vehicle analysis and mission simulation tool capable of modeling both heavier-than-air (HTA) and lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicle concepts. This study compares solar powered airplane and airship station-keeping capability during a variety of high altitude missions, using SolFlyte as the primary analysis component. Three Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) concepts were designed for this study: an airplane (Operating Empty Weight (OEW) = 3285 kilograms, span = 127 meters, array area = 450 square meters), a small airship (OEW = 3790 kilograms, length = 115 meters, array area = 570 square meters), and a large airship (OEW = 6250 kilograms, length = 135 meters, array area = 1080 square meters). All the vehicles were sized for payload weight and power requirements of 454 kilograms and 5 kilowatts, respectively. Seven mission sites distributed throughout the United States were selected to provide a basis for assessing the vehicle energy budgets and site-persistent operational availability. Seasonal, 30-day duration missions were simulated at each of the sites during March, June, September, and December; one-year duration missions were simulated at three of the sites. Atmospheric conditions during the simulated missions were correlated to National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) historical data measurements at each mission site, at four flight levels. Unique features of the SolFlyte model are described, including methods for calculating recoverable and energy-optimal flight trajectories and the effects of shadows on solar energy collection. Results of this study indicate that: 1) the airplane concept attained longer periods of on

  10. Comparative Environmental Threat Analysis: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, J. B.; Reiling, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews how carrying capacity for different environmental problems is operationalized. Discusses whether it is possible to compare threats, using the exceeding of carrying capacity as a yardstick. Points out problems in comparative threat analysis using three case studies: threats to European groundwater resources, threats to ecosystems in Europe,…

  11. Comparative molecular field analysis and molecular modeling studies of 20-(S)- camptothecin analogs as inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase I and anticancer/antitumor agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Sean W.; Fox, Peter C.; Wall, Monroe E.; Wani, Mansukh C.; Bowen, J. Phillip

    1997-01-01

    Conformational studies and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were undertakenfor a series of camptothecin (CPT) analogs to correlate topoisomerase I inhibition with thesteric and electrostatic properties of 32 known compounds. The resulting CoMFA modelshave been used to make predictions on novel CPT derivatives. Using the newly derived MM3parameters, a molecular database of the 32 CPT analogs was created. Various point atomiccharges were generated and assigned to the MM3 minimized structures, which were used inpartial least-squares analyses. Overall, CoMFA models with the greatest predictive validitywere obtained when both the R- and S-isomers were included in the data set, andsemiempirical charges were calculated for MM3 minimized low-energy lactone structures. Across-validated R2 of 0.758 and a non-cross-validated R2 of 0.916 were obtained for MM3minimized structures with PM3 ESP charges for the 32 CPT analogs. The derived QSARequations were used to assign topoisomerase I inhibition values for compounds in this studyand compounds not included in the original data set. Prior to its appearance in the literature,an IC50 of 103 nM was predicted for the 10,11-oxazole derivative. This CoMFA predictedvalue compared favorably with the recently reported value of 150 nM. The CoMFA modelwas also evaluated by predicting the activities of recently reported 11-aza CPT and trionederivatives. The predicted activity (IC50 = 249 nM) for 11-aza CPT compared well with thereported value of 383 nM.

  12. Comparative Study Of Four Models Of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menter, Florian R.

    1996-01-01

    Report presents comparative study of four popular eddy-viscosity models of turbulence. Computations reported for three different adverse pressure-gradient flowfields. Detailed comparison of numerical results and experimental data given. Following models tested: Baldwin-Lomax, Johnson-King, Baldwin-Barth, and Wilcox.

  13. Comparing models of Red Knot population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Predictive population modeling contributes to our basic scientific understanding of population dynamics, but can also inform management decisions by evaluating alternative actions in virtual environments. Quantitative models mathematically reflect scientific hypotheses about how a system functions. In Delaware Bay, mid-Atlantic Coast, USA, to more effectively manage horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) harvests and protect Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations, models are used to compare harvest actions and predict the impacts on crab and knot populations. Management has been chiefly driven by the core hypothesis that horseshoe crab egg abundance governs the survival and reproduction of migrating Red Knots that stopover in the Bay during spring migration. However, recently, hypotheses proposing that knot dynamics are governed by cyclical lemming dynamics garnered some support in data analyses. In this paper, I present alternative models of Red Knot population dynamics to reflect alternative hypotheses. Using 2 models with different lemming population cycle lengths and 2 models with different horseshoe crab effects, I project the knot population into the future under environmental stochasticity and parametric uncertainty with each model. I then compare each model's predictions to 10 yr of population monitoring from Delaware Bay. Using Bayes' theorem and model weight updating, models can accrue weight or support for one or another hypothesis of population dynamics. With 4 models of Red Knot population dynamics and only 10 yr of data, no hypothesis clearly predicted population count data better than another. The collapsed lemming cycle model performed best, accruing ~35% of the model weight, followed closely by the horseshoe crab egg abundance model, which accrued ~30% of the weight. The models that predicted no decline or stable populations (i.e. the 4-yr lemming cycle model and the weak horseshoe crab effect model) were the most weakly supported.

  14. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences. PMID:17905832

  15. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-11-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences.

  16. A comparative analysis of extended water cloud model and backscatter modelling for above-ground biomass assessment in Corbett Tiger Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, Sarnam; Chatterjee, R. S.; Trivedi, Mukul

    2016-04-01

    Forest biomass acts as a backbone in regulating the climate by storing carbon within itself. Thus the assessment of forest biomass is crucial in understanding the dynamics of the environment. Traditionally the destructive methods were adopted for the assessment of biomass which were further advanced to the non-destructive methods. The allometric equations developed by destructive methods were further used in non-destructive methods for the assessment, but they were mostly applied for woody/commercial timber species. However now days Remote Sensing data are primarily used for the biomass geospatial pattern assessment. The Optical Remote Sensing data (Landsat8, LISS III, etc.) are being used very successfully for the estimation of above ground biomass (AGB). However optical data is not suitable for all atmospheric/environmental conditions, because it can't penetrate through clouds and haze. Thus Radar data is one of the alternate possible ways to acquire data in all-weather conditions irrespective of weather and light. The paper examines the potential of ALOS PALSAR L-band dual polarisation data for the estimation of AGB in the Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) covering an area of 889 km2. The main focus of this study is to explore the accuracy of Polarimetric Scattering Model (Extended Water Cloud Model (EWCM) with respect to Backscatter model in the assessment of AGB. The parameters of the EWCM were estimated using the decomposition components (Raney Decomposition) and the plot level information. The above ground biomass in the CTR ranges from 9.6 t/ha to 322.6 t/ha.

  17. Comparative biology of cystic fibrosis animal models.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John T; Zhang, Yulong; Engelhardt, John F

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are critical for dissecting mechanisms of pathophysiology and developing therapies. In the context of cystic fibrosis (CF), mouse models have been the dominant species by which to study CF disease processes in vivo for the past two decades. Although much has been learned through these CF mouse models, limitations in the ability of this species to recapitulate spontaneous lung disease and several other organ abnormalities seen in CF humans have created a need for additional species on which to study CF. To this end, pig and ferret CF models have been generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer and are currently being characterized. These new larger animal models have phenotypes that appear to closely resemble human CF disease seen in newborns, and efforts to characterize their adult phenotypes are ongoing. This chapter will review current knowledge about comparative lung cell biology and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) biology among mice, pigs, and ferrets that has implications for CF disease modeling in these species. We will focus on methods used to compare the biology and function of CFTR between these species and their relevance to phenotypes seen in the animal models. These cross-species comparisons and the development of both the pig and the ferret CF models may help elucidate pathophysiologic mechanisms of CF lung disease and lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  18. Effect of genetic algorithm as a variable selection method on different chemometric models applied for the analysis of binary mixture of amoxicillin and flucloxacillin: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Khalid A. M.; Nassar, Mohammed W. I.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Serag, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Different chemometric models were applied for the quantitative analysis of amoxicillin (AMX), and flucloxacillin (FLX) in their binary mixtures, namely, partial least squares (PLS), spectral residual augmented classical least squares (SRACLS), concentration residual augmented classical least squares (CRACLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs). All methods were applied with and without variable selection procedure (genetic algorithm GA). The methods were used for the quantitative analysis of the drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and real market sample via handling the UV spectral data. Robust and simpler models were obtained by applying GA. The proposed methods were found to be rapid, simple and required no preliminary separation steps.

  19. Analysis of the Eyjafjallajökull Eruption using the WRF-Chem Model compared to Satellite-Based Ash Retrieval Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steensen, T. S.; Stuefer, M.; Webley, P.; Grell, G. A.; de Freitas, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    On April 14th, 2010, the long-dormant ice-capped volcano Eyjafjallajökull in southern Iceland exhibited a black ash-rich plume that quickly developed into an upper-tropospheric ash-cloud covering large parts of Europe grounding the majority of European air traffic for days. The emission of the ash-cloud continued for three days before the eruption turned more magmatic on April 18th. Due to a strong jet stream the plume initially drifted towards the United Kingdom and Norway with ash-fall occurring in many cities in both countries. Over the course of a week, most countries in Europe were affected by the dispersing cloud resulting in numbers of closed airports never seen before, grounded planes and confused passengers. This eruption, although small on the international scale, drew volcanic hazards into the public eye and called for better understanding of evolving volcanic plumes and their ash content. The Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) coupled with Chemistry (Chem) has been utilized to use wind fields and chemical compositions to forecast the drift and chemical alteration of dispersed substances such as forest fires and volcanic ash and, in this study, was used to simulate the developing plume in time, based on physical input parameters of the initial plume as well as the wind patterns over Europe during April 2010. The results of this model have been compared to satellite-based ash retrieval algorithms like the Reverse Absorption Method and the Principal Component Analysis using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. This comparison allows both, the ratification of the model as a forecasting tool and of the satellites as an in-situ measurement. Both parts are essential components to be able to predict and analyze airborne volcanic ash and to constantly improve the hazard assessment of ash cloud forecasting to minimize the burden on the aviation community while maximizing the

  20. Network Analysis in Comparative Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Eugenia Roldan; Schupp, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This essay describes the pertinence of Social Network Analysis (SNA) for the social sciences in general, and discusses its methodological and conceptual implications for comparative research in particular. The authors first present a basic summary of the theoretical and methodological assumptions of SNA, followed by a succinct overview of its…

  1. Teacher Policy: A Framework for Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatto, Maria Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines a framework for analysis of teacher focused policy studies within an international and comparative perspective. Using the notion of the professional life cycle of teachers, the article examines examples of key empirical studies that illustrate the impact of policy on addressing such issues as teacher recruitment, education,…

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Caygill, Christine P J; Gatenby, Piers A C; Herceg, Zdenko; Lima, Sheila C S; Pinto, Luis F R; Watson, Anthony; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers: genomic polymorphisms, the genetic and epigenetic drivers in esophageal cancers, and the collection of data in the UK Barrett's Oesophagus Registry.

  3. Applying the Rasch Model to Measure Mobility of Women: A Comparative Analysis of Mobility of Informal Workers in Fisheries in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Menon, Nikhila

    2016-01-01

    Mobility or freedom and ability to move is gendered in many cultural contexts. In this paper I analyse mobility associated with work from the capability approach perspective of Sen. This is an empirical paper which uses the Rasch Rating Scale Model (RSM) to construct the measure of mobility of women for the first time in the development studies discourse. I construct a measure of mobility (latent trait) of women workers engaged in two types of informal work, namely, peeling work and fish vending, in fisheries in the cultural context of India. The scale measure enables first, to test the unidimensionality of my construct of mobility of women and second, to analyse the domains of mobility of women workers. The comparative analysis of the scale of permissibility of mobility constructed using the RSM for the informal women workers shows that women face constraints on mobility in social and personal spaces in the socially advanced state of Kerala in India. Work mobility does not expand the real freedoms, hence work mobility can be termed as bounded capability which is a capability limited or bounded by either the social, cultural and gender norms or a combination of all of these. Therefore at the macro level, growth in informal employment in sectors like fisheries which improve mobility of women through work mobility does not necessarily expand the capability sets by contributing to greater freedoms and transformational mobility. This paper has a significant methodological contribution in that it uses an innovative method for the measurement of mobility of women in the development studies discipline.

  4. Comparative proteome analysis of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis grown on β-glucans from different sources and a model for their utilization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinyang; Cheung, Peter C K

    2013-05-08

    Recent studies have demonstrated that β-glucans from different sources, which are considered as potential prebiotics, could enhance growth of bifidobacteria. To elucidate the metabolic pathway of β-glucans in the widely used probiotic B. longum subsp. infantis, a comparative proteomic analysis was carried out along with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), real-time RT-PCR, and enzyme activity assay on samples obtained from cultures grown on β-glucans derived from barley, seaweed, and mushroom. Results showed that 77 spots were found to be differentially expressed among different cultures, and 17 of them were predicted to play a role in β-glucan catabolism, including ABC transporter for sugars, enolase, and phosphotransferase system protein. Among them, 6 genes encoding for 6 proteins were shown to be induced by β-glucans at the transcriptional level and had higher abundance. The enzyme activity assay detected intracellular glucanase activity present in the cultures grown on the β-glucans from seaweed and mushroom. On the basis of the above results, a model for catabolism of β-glucans in B. infantis is proposed as follows: β-glucan molecules in the medium are transported into the cell through the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system and PTS (phosphotransferase system) proteins followed by hydrolysis through action of intracellular glucanase to glucose, which is subsequently incorporated into the central fermentative pathway 'bifid shunt'. This study for the first time reveals the possible degradation pathway of β-glucans by B. infantis, which has implications for potential use of these β-glucans as novel prebiotics in development of synbiotic application.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Models of Bachelors of Arts' Professional Training in Applied Linguistics at the Universities of Ukraine and the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korniienko, Vita

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of scientists' researches from different countries dealing with different aspects of training in the educational systems of developed countries was carried out. The models of Bachelors of Arts in Applied Linguistics professional training in Ukraine were considered. It was analyzed a professional training of Bachelor of Arts in Applied…

  6. National Launch System comparative economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, A.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of economic benefits (or losses), in the form of the life cycle cost savings, resulting from the development of the National Launch System (NLS) family of launch vehicles. The analysis was carried out by comparing various NLS-based architectures with the current Shuttle/Titan IV fleet. The basic methodology behind this NLS analysis was to develop a set of annual payload requirements for the Space Station Freedom and LEO, to design launch vehicle architectures around these requirements, and to perform life-cycle cost analyses on all of the architectures. A SEI requirement was included. Launch failure costs were estimated and combined with the relative reliability assumptions to measure the effects of losses. Based on the analysis, a Shuttle/NLS architecture evolving into a pressurized-logistics-carrier/NLS architecture appears to offer the best long-term cost benefit.

  7. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  8. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Spedding, G R

    2003-09-29

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles.

  9. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  10. Embedded Hyperchaotic Generators: A Comparative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoudi, Said; Tanougast, Camel; Azzaz, Mohamad Salah; Dandache, Abbas

    In this paper, we present a comparative analysis of FPGA implementation performances, in terms of throughput and resources cost, of five well known autonomous continuous hyperchaotic systems. The goal of this analysis is to identify the embedded hyperchaotic generator which leads to designs with small logic area cost, satisfactory throughput rates, low power consumption and low latency required for embedded applications such as secure digital communications between embedded systems. To implement the four-dimensional (4D) chaotic systems, we use a new structural hardware architecture based on direct VHDL description of the forth order Runge-Kutta method (RK-4). The comparative analysis shows that the hyperchaotic Lorenz generator provides attractive performances compared to that of others. In fact, its hardware implementation requires only 2067 CLB-slices, 36 multipliers and no block RAMs, and achieves a throughput rate of 101.6 Mbps, at the output of the FPGA circuit, at a clock frequency of 25.315 MHz with a low latency time of 316 ns. Consequently, these good implementation performances offer to the embedded hyperchaotic Lorenz generator the advantage of being the best candidate for embedded communications applications.

  11. Nuclear matrix elements for 0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Civitarese, Osvaldo; Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double β{sup −} decays (0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyväskylä-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Model Predictions for Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Mixing with Constant and Complex Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Two-, three- and four-equation, single-velocity, multicomponent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, based on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate or lengthscale, are used to simulate At = 0 . 5 Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing with constant and complex accelerations. The constant acceleration case is inspired by the Cabot and Cook (2006) DNS, and the complex acceleration cases are inspired by the unstable/stable and unstable/neutral cases simulated using DNS (Livescu, Wei & Petersen 2011) and the unstable/stable/unstable case simulated using ILES (Ramaprabhu, Karkhanis & Lawrie 2013). The four-equation models couple equations for the mass flux a and negative density-specific volume correlation b to the K- ɛ or K- L equations, while the three-equation models use a two-fluid algebraic closure for b. The lengthscale-based models are also applied with no buoyancy production in the L equation to explore the consequences of neglecting this term. Predicted mixing widths, turbulence statistics, fields, and turbulent transport equation budgets are compared among these models to identify similarities and differences in the turbulence production, dissipation and diffusion physics represented by the closures used in these models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Comparative Genome Analysis of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wing-Yee; Wong, Chi-Fat; Chung, Karl Ming-Kar; Jiang, Jing-Wei; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The Enterobacter cloacae species includes an extremely diverse group of bacteria that are associated with plants, soil and humans. Publication of the complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting endophytic E. cloacae subsp. cloacae ENHKU01 provided an opportunity to perform the first comparative genome analysis between strains of this dynamic species. Examination of the pan-genome of E. cloacae showed that the conserved core genome retains the general physiological and survival genes of the species, while genomic factors in plasmids and variable regions determine the virulence of the human pathogenic E. cloacae strain; additionally, the diversity of fimbriae contributes to variation in colonization and host determination of different E. cloacae strains. Comparative genome analysis further illustrated that E. cloacae strains possess multiple mechanisms for antagonistic action against other microorganisms, which involve the production of siderophores and various antimicrobial compounds, such as bacteriocins, chitinases and antibiotic resistance proteins. The presence of Type VI secretion systems is expected to provide further fitness advantages for E. cloacae in microbial competition, thus allowing it to survive in different environments. Competition assays were performed to support our observations in genomic analysis, where E. cloacae subsp. cloacae ENHKU01 demonstrated antagonistic activities against a wide range of plant pathogenic fungal and bacterial species. PMID:24069314

  14. Value of Organoids from Comparative Epithelia Models

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Julia S.; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Forrest, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Organoids have tremendous therapeutic potential. They were recently defined as a collection of organ-specific cell types, which self-organize through cell-sorting, develop from stem cells, and perform an organ specific function. The ability to study organoid development and growth in culture and manipulate their genetic makeup makes them particularly suitable for studying development, disease, and drug efficacy. Organoids show great promise in personalized medicine. From a single patient biopsy, investigators can make hundreds of organoids with the genetic landscape of the patient of origin. This genetic similarity makes organoids an ideal system in which to test drug efficacy. While many investigators assume human organoids are the ultimate model system, we believe that the generation of epithelial organoids of comparative model organisms has great potential. Many key transport discoveries were made using marine organisms. In this paper, we describe how deriving organoids from the spiny dogfish shark, zebrafish, and killifish can contribute to the fields of comparative biology and disease modeling with future prospects for personalized medicine. PMID:26604860

  15. Comparative analysis of Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic models using the constant and variable crust-mantle density contrast - a case study of Zealandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherbandi, Mohammad; Tenzer, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We compare three different numerical schemes of treating the Moho density contrast in gravimetric inverse problems for finding the Moho depths. The results are validated using the global crustal model CRUST2.0, which is determined based purely on seismic data. Firstly, the gravimetric recovery of the Moho depths is realized by solving Moritz's generalization of the Vening-Meinesz inverse problem of isostasy while the constant Moho density contrast is adopted. The Pratt-Hayford isostatic model is then facilitated to estimate the variable Moho density contrast. This variable Moho density contrast is subsequently used to determine the Moho depths. Finally, the combined least-squares approach is applied to estimate jointly the Moho depths and density contract based on a priori error model. The EGM2008 global gravity model and the DTM2006.0 global topographic/bathymetric model are used to generate the isostatic gravity anomalies. The comparison of numerical results reveals that the optimal isostatic inverse scheme should take into consideration both the variable depth and density of compensation. This is achieved by applying the combined least-squares approach for a simultaneous estimation of both Moho parameters. We demonstrate that the result obtained using this method has the best agreement with the CRUST2.0 Moho depths. The numerical experiments are conducted at the regional study area of New Zealand's continental shelf.

  16. Comparative modelling of cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Kirton, Stewart B; Baxter, Carol A; Sutcliffe, Michael J

    2002-03-31

    The superfamily of enzymes known as the cytochromes P450 (P450s) comprises a wide-ranging class of proteins with diverse functions. They are known, amongst other things, to be involved in the hormonal regulation of metabolism and reproduction, as well as having a major clinical significance through their association with diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hepatitis. Knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein gives insight into its function. The 3D structures of P450s are therefore of considerable scientific interest. A number of high-resolution structures of P450s have been determined by X-ray crystallography and studies of these structures have provided valuable insights into the mechanism of these enzymes. Only one of these structures is mammalian and as yet there is no structural information on human P450s in the public domain. Until such a structure is solved it is necessary to employ alternative methods to gain structural insight into how human P450s perform their biological function. Here we report on the use of comparative modelling to predict the structure of human P450s based on knowledge of their amino acid sequences plus the 3D structures of other (not human) P450s. As an illustrative example of these techniques we have modelled the structure of P450 2C5 using five bacterial P450 structures as templates. We examine the importance of selecting suitable templates, obtaining a good amino acid sequence alignment, and evaluating the models generated. To improve the quality of the models an iterative cycle of sequence alignment, model building, and model evaluation is employed. The result is a model with excellent stereochemistry, good amino acid side chain environment properties, and a Calpha trace similar to the crystal structure.

  17. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ainur B.; Izekenova, Aigulsum; Abikulova, Akmaral

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results: Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level. PMID:24516484

  18. Stock index dynamics worldwide: a comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortines, A. A. G.; Anteneodo, C.; Riera, R.

    2008-09-01

    We perform a comparative analysis of twenty-four daily stock indices across the world, encompassing developed and emerging markets. We compute, directly from the return empirical time series, the Kramers-Moyal (KM) expansion coefficients that govern the evolution of the probability density function of returns throughout timelags. Our study discloses universal patterns of the KM coefficients, which can be described in terms of a few microscopic parameters. These parameters allow to quantify features such as deviations from Gaussianity or from efficiency, providing a tool to discriminate market dynamics.

  19. Fundus camera systems: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    DeHoog, Edward; Schwiegerling, James

    2009-01-10

    Retinal photography requires the use of a complex optical system, called a fundus camera, capable of illuminating and imaging the retina simultaneously. The patent literature shows two design forms but does not provide the specifics necessary for a thorough analysis of the designs to be performed. We have constructed our own designs based on the patent literature in optical design software and compared them for illumination efficiency, image quality, ability to accommodate for patient refractive error, and manufacturing tolerances, a comparison lacking in the existing literature.

  20. Fundus camera systems: a comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    DeHoog, Edward; Schwiegerling, James

    2010-01-01

    Retinal photography requires the use of a complex optical system, called a fundus camera, capable of illuminating and imaging the retina simultaneously. The patent literature shows two design forms but does not provide the specifics necessary for a thorough analysis of the designs to be performed. We have constructed our own designs based on the patent literature in optical design software and compared them for illumination efficiency, image quality, ability to accommodate for patient refractive error, and manufacturing tolerances, a comparison lacking in the existing literature. PMID:19137032

  1. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  2. A Framework for the Comparative Analysis of Farm Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Joseph J.

    Presenting a model for the comparative analysis of farm organizations, this paper analyzes the farm firm as a complex organization; identifies key structural dimensions of an agricultural production unit; and reviews various organizational perspectives for their utility in understanding and explaining the behavior of farm operations and farm…

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Four Prymnesiophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Koid, Amy E.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C.; Caron, David A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  4. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  5. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  6. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  7. Comparative transcriptome analysis of muscular dystrophy models Large(myd), Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd) and Dmd(mdx): what makes them different?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila F; Martins, Poliana Cm; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-08-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of Mendelian diseases. The underlying pathophysiology and phenotypic variability in each form are much more complex, suggesting the involvement of many other genes. Thus, here we studied the whole genome expression profile in muscles from three mice models for MD, at different time points: Dmd(mdx) (mutation in dystrophin gene), Large(myd-/-) (mutation in Large) and Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd-/-) (both mutations). The identification of altered biological functions can contribute to understand diseases and to find prognostic biomarkers and points for therapeutic intervention. We identified a substantial number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in each model, reflecting diseases' complexity. The main biological process affected in the three strains was immune system, accounting for the majority of enriched functional categories, followed by degeneration/regeneration and extracellular matrix remodeling processes. The most notable differences were in 21-day-old Dmd(mdx), with a high proportion of DEGs related to its regenerative capacity. A higher number of positive embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMyHC) fibers confirmed this. The new Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd-/-) model did not show a highly different transcriptome from the parental lineages, with a profile closer to Large(myd-/-), but not bearing the same regenerative potential as Dmd(mdx). This is the first report about transcriptome profile of a mouse model for congenital MD and Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd). By comparing the studied profiles, we conclude that alterations in biological functions due to the dystrophic process are very similar, and that the intense regeneration in Dmd(mdx) involves a large number of activated genes, not differentially expressed in the other two strains.

  8. Comparative analysis of mediastinal fat-associated lymphoid cluster development and lung cellular infiltration in murine autoimmune disease models and the corresponding normal control strains.

    PubMed

    Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Ichii, Osamu; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously discovered mediastinal fat-associated lymphoid clusters (MFALCs) as novel lymphoid clusters associated with mediastinal fat tissue in healthy mice. However, no data about their morphology in immune-associated disease conditions, and their relationship with lung infiltration, is available to date. In the present study, we compared the morphological features of MFALCs in 4-month-old male murine autoimmune disease models (MRL/MpJ-lpr mice and BXSB/MpJ-Yaa mice) with those of the corresponding control strains (MRL/MpJ and BXSB/MpJ, respectively). In addition, we analysed their correlation with lung infiltration. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry for CD3, B220, Iba1, Gr1 and BrdU was performed to detect T cells and B cells, macrophages, granulocytes and proliferating cells, respectively. The spleen weight to body weight ratios and anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody titres were found to be significantly higher in the autoimmune models than in the control strains. Furthermore, the autoimmune model presented prominent MFALCs, with a significantly greater ratio of lymphoid cluster area to total mediastinal fat tissue area, and more apparent diffused cellular infiltration into the lung lobes than the other studied strains. Higher numbers of T and B cells, macrophages and proliferating cells, but fewer granulocytes, were observed in the autoimmune models than in the control strains. Interestingly, a significant positive Pearson's correlation between the size of the MFALCs and the density of CD3-, B220- and Iba1-positive cells in the lung was observed. Therefore, our data suggest a potentially important role for MFALCs in the progression of lung disease. However, further investigation is required to clarify the pathological role of MFALCs in lung disease, especially in inflammatory disorders.

  9. Comparative factor analysis models for an empirical study of EEG data, II: A data-guided resolution of the rotation indeterminacy.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Douglas, R R

    1984-02-01

    In this paper (the second in a series), we consider a (generic) pair of datasets, which have been analyzed by the techniques of the previous paper. Thus, their "stable subspaces" have been established by comparative factor analysis. The pair of datasets must satisfy two confirmable conditions. The first is the "Inclusion Condition," which requires that the stable subspace of one of the datasets is nearly identical to a subspace of the other dataset's stable subspace. On the basis of that, we have assumed the pair to have similar generating signals, with stochastically independent generators. The second verifiable condition is that the (presumed same) generating signals have distinct ratios of variances for the two datasets. Under these conditions a small elaboration of some elementary linear algebra reduces the rotation problem to several eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. Finally, we emphasize that an analysis of each dataset by the method of Douglas and Rogers (1983) is an essential prerequisite for the useful application of the techniques in this paper. Nonempirical methods of estimating the number of factors simply will not suffice, as confirmed by simulations reported in the previous paper.

  10. Comparative analysis of the feline immunoglobulin repertoire.

    PubMed

    Steiniger, Sebastian C J; Glanville, Jacob; Harris, Douglas W; Wilson, Thomas L; Ippolito, Gregory C; Dunham, Steven A

    2017-01-25

    Next-Generation Sequencing combined with bioinformatics is a powerful tool for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in the expressed antibody repertoire and these data sets can be used to advance a number of research areas including antibody discovery and engineering. The accurate measurement of the immune repertoire sequence composition, diversity and abundance is important for understanding the repertoire response in infections, vaccinations and cancer immunology and could also be useful for elucidating novel molecular targets. In this study 4 individual domestic cats (Felis catus) were subjected to antibody repertoire sequencing with total number of sequences generated 1079863 for VH for IgG, 1050824 VH for IgM, 569518 for VK and 450195 for VL. Our analysis suggests that a similar VDJ expression patterns exists across all cats. Similar to the canine repertoire, the feline repertoire is dominated by a single subgroup, namely VH3. The antibody paratope of felines showed similar amino acid variation when compared to human, mouse and canine counterparts. All animals show a similarly skewed VH CDR-H3 profile and, when compared to canine, human and mouse, distinct differences are observed. Our study represents the first attempt to characterize sequence diversity in the expressed feline antibody repertoire and this demonstrates the utility of using NGS to elucidate entire antibody repertoires from individual animals. These data provide significant insight into understanding the feline immune system function.

  11. Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-07

    Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

  12. Comparative metagenome analysis of an Alaskan glacier.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Sulbha; Lohia, Ruchi; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    The temperature in the Arctic region has been increasing in the recent past accompanied by melting of its glaciers. We took a snapshot of the current microbial inhabitation of an Alaskan glacier (which can be considered as one of the simplest possible ecosystems) by using metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA recovered from ice/snow samples. Somewhat contrary to our expectations and earlier estimates, a rich and diverse microbial population of more than 2,500 species was revealed including several species of Archaea that has been identified for the first time in the glaciers of the Northern hemisphere. The most prominent bacterial groups found were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Firmicutes were not reported in large numbers in a previously studied Alpine glacier but were dominant in an Antarctic subglacial lake. Representatives of Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes were among the most numerous, likely reflecting the dependence of the ecosystem on the energy obtained through photosynthesis and close links with the microbial community of the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) of nucleotide word frequency revealed distinct sequence clusters for different taxonomic groups in the Alaskan glacier community and separate clusters for the glacial communities from other regions of the world. Comparative analysis of the community composition and bacterial diversity present in the Byron glacier in Alaska with other environments showed larger overlap with an Arctic soil than with a high Arctic lake, indicating patterns of community exchange and suggesting that these bacteria may play an important role in soil development during glacial retreat.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences with VISTA

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dubchak, Inna

    VISTA is a comprehensive suite of programs and databases developed by and hosted at the Genomics Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They provide information and tools designed to facilitate comparative analysis of genomic sequences. Users have two ways to interact with the suite of applications at the VISTA portal. They can submit their own sequences and alignments for analysis (VISTA servers) or examine pre-computed whole-genome alignments of different species. A key menu option is the Enhancer Browser and Database at http://enhancer.lbl.gov/. The VISTA Enhancer Browser is a central resource for experimentally validated human noncoding fragments with gene enhancer activity as assessed in transgenic mice. Most of these noncoding elements were selected for testing based on their extreme conservation with other vertebrates. The results of this enhancer screen are provided through this publicly available website. The browser also features relevant results by external contributors and a large collection of additional genome-wide conserved noncoding elements which are candidate enhancer sequences. The LBL developers invite external groups to submit computational predictions of developmental enhancers. As of 10/19/2009 the database contains information on 1109 in vivo tested elements - 508 elements with enhancer activity.

  14. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  15. Ring current dynamics in moderate and strong storms: Comparative analysis of TWINS and IMAGE/HENA data with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; McComas, D. J.; Brandt, P. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a comparative study of ring current dynamics during strong and moderate storms. The ring current during the strong storm is studied with IMAGE/HENA data near the solar cycle maximum in 2000. The ring current during the moderate storm is studied using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data from the Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission during the solar minimum in 2008. For both storms, the local time distributions of ENA emissions show signatures of postmidnight enhancement (PME) during the main phases. To model the ring current and ENA emissions, we use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM). CRCM results show that the main-phase ring current pressure peaks in the premidnight-dusk sector, while the most intense CRCM-simulated ENA emissions show PME signatures. We analyze two factors to explain this difference: the dependence of charge-exchange cross section on energy and pitch angle distributions of ring current. We find that the IMF By effect (twisting of the convection pattern due to By) is not needed to form the PME. Additionally, the PME is more pronounced for the strong storm, although relative shielding and hence electric field skewing is well developed for both events.

  16. Ring Current Dynamics in Moderate and Strong Storms: Comparative Analysis of TWINS and IMAGE/HENA Data with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; McComas, D. J.; Brandt, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a comparative study of ring current dynamics during strong and moderate storms. The ring current during the strong storm is studied with IMAGE/HENA data near the solar cycle maximum in 2000. The ring current during the moderate storm is studied using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data from the Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral- Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission during the solar minimum in 2008. For both storms, the local time distributions of ENA emissions show signatures of postmidnight enhancement (PME) during the main phases. To model the ring current and ENA emissions, we use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM). CRCM results show that the main-phase ring current pressure peaks in the premidnight-dusk sector, while the most intense CRCM-simulated ENA emissions show PME signatures. We analyze two factors to explain this difference: the dependence of charge-exchange cross section on energy and pitch angle distributions of ring current. We find that the IMF By effect (twisting of the convection pattern due to By) is not needed to form the PME. Additionally, the PME is more pronounced for the strong storm, although relative shielding and hence electric field skewing is well developed for both events.

  17. Process modeling and analysis of pulp mill-based integrated biorefinery with hemicellulose pre-extraction for ethanol production: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hua-Jiang; Ramaswamy, Shri; Al-Dajani, Waleed Wafa; Tschirner, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Pulp and paper mills represent a major platform to use more effectively an abundant, renewable bio-resource - wood. Modification of the modern day pulp mills into integrated forest biorefineries (IFBR) presents an excellent opportunity to produce, in addition to valuable cellulose fiber, co-products including fuel grade ethanol and additional energy, thus resulting in increased revenue streams and profitability and potentially lower the greenhouse gas emissions. A process model to simulate the integrate forest biorefinery manufacturing pulp and other co-products has been developed. This model has been used to compare three integrated biorefinery scenarios: the conventional Kraft pulping process, the pulp mill-based IFBR with hemicelluloses extraction prior to pulping for ethanol production, and the pulp mill-based IFBR with both pre-extracted hemicelluloses and the short fiber for ethanol production. Based on a fixed feedstock throughput of 2000 dry Mg wood/day, results show that the pulp mill-based IFBR with both pre-extracted hemicelluloses and the short fiber cellulose converted to ethanol can produce 0.038 MM m(3) (10.04 MM gal) ethanol per year at a minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) of $491/m(3) ($1.86/gal). The economic feasibility of IFBR can be further improved by using further improvements in the pre-extraction process, other biomass such as corn stover for producing ethanol, and taking advantage of the economies of scale.

  18. Comparative modeling of UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-glycyl-D-glutamate-2, 6-diaminopimelate ligase from Mycobacterium leprae and analysis of its binding features through molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Anusuya; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The increasing drug and multi-drug resistance of M. leprae enforce the importance of finding new drug targets. Mycobacterium has unusually impermeable cell wall that contributes to considerable resistance to many drugs. Peptidoglycan is an important component of the cell wall of M. leprae. UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-glycyl-D-glutamate-2, 6-diaminopimelate ligase (MurE) plays a crucial role in the peptidoglycan biosynthesis and hence it could be considered as a potential drug target for leprosy. Structure of this enzyme for M. leprae has not yet been elucidated. We modeled the three-dimensional structure of MurE from M. leprae using comparative modeling methods based on the X-ray crystal structure of MurE from E. coli and validated. The 3D-structure of M. leprae MurE enzyme was docked with its substrates meso-diaminopimelic acid (A2pm) and UDP-N-acetyl muramoyl-glycyl-D- glutamate (UMGG) and its product UDP-N-acetyl muramoyl-glycyl-D-glu-meso-A(2)pm (UTP) and also with ATP. The docked complexes reveal the amino acids responsible for binding the substrates. Superposition of these complex structures suggests that carboxylic acid group of UMGG is positioned in proximity to γ-phosphate of the ATP to facilitate the formation of acylphosphate intermediate. The orientation of an amino group of A(2)pm facilitates the nucleophilic attack to form the product. Overall, the proposed model together with its binding features gained from docking studies could help to design a truly selective ligand inhibitor specific to MurE for the treatment of leprosy.

  19. Predictive and comparative analysis of Ebolavirus proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-01-01

    Ebolavirus is the pathogen for Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF). This disease exhibits a high fatality rate and has recently reached a historically epidemic proportion in West Africa. Out of the 5 known Ebolavirus species, only Reston ebolavirus has lost human pathogenicity, while retaining the ability to cause EHF in long-tailed macaque. Significant efforts have been spent to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structures of Ebolavirus proteins, to study their interaction with host proteins, and to identify the functional motifs in these viral proteins. Here, in light of these experimental results, we apply computational analysis to predict the 3D structures and functional sites for Ebolavirus protein domains with unknown structure, including a zinc-finger domain of VP30, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic domain and a methyltransferase domain of protein L. In addition, we compare sequences of proteins that interact with Ebolavirus proteins from RESTV-resistant primates with those from RESTV-susceptible monkeys. The host proteins that interact with GP and VP35 show an elevated level of sequence divergence between the RESTV-resistant and RESTV-susceptible species, suggesting that they may be responsible for host specificity. Meanwhile, we detect variable positions in protein sequences that are likely associated with the loss of human pathogenicity in RESTV, map them onto the 3D structures and compare their positions to known functional sites. VP35 and VP30 are significantly enriched in these potential pathogenicity determinants and the clustering of such positions on the surfaces of VP35 and GP suggests possible uncharacterized interaction sites with host proteins that contribute to the virulence of Ebolavirus. PMID:26158395

  20. Comparing modelled fire dynamics with charcoal records for the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücher, Tim; Brovkin, Victor; Kloster, Silvia; Marlon, Jennifer; Power, Mitch

    2014-05-01

    An Earth System model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2, and land surface model JSBACH that includes dynamic vegetation, carbon cycle, and fire regime are used for simulation of natural fire dynamics through the last 8,000 years. To compare the fire model results with the charcoal reconstructions, several output variables of the fire model (burned area, carbon emissions) and several approaches of model output processing are tested. The z-scores out of charcoal dataset have been calculated for the period 8,000 to 200 BP to exclude a period of strong anthropogenic forcing during the last two centuries. The model analysis points mainly to an increasing fire activity during the Holocene for most of the investigated areas, which is in good correspondence to reconstructed fire trends out of charcoal data for most of the tested regions, while for few regions such as Europe the simulated trend and the reconstructed trends are different. The difference between the modeled and reconstructed fire activity could be due to absence of the anthropogenic forcing in the model simulations, but also due to limitations of model assumptions for modeling fire dynamics. For the model trends, the usage of averaging or z-score processing of model output resulted in similar directions of trend. Therefore, the approach of fire model output processing does not effect results of the model-data comparison. Global fire modeling is still in its infancy; improving our representations of fire through validation exercises such as what we present here is thus essential before testing hypotheses about the effects of extreme climate changes on fire behavior and potential feedbacks that result from those changes. Brücher, T., Brovkin, V., Kloster, S., Marlon, J. R., and Power, M. J.: Comparing modelled fire dynamics with charcoal records for the Holocene, Clim. Past Discuss., 9, 6429-6458, doi:10.5194/cpd-9-6429-2013, 2013.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of prion genes

    PubMed Central

    Premzl, Marko; Gamulin, Vera

    2007-01-01

    Background The homologues of human disease genes are expected to contribute to better understanding of physiological and pathogenic processes. We made use of the present availability of vertebrate genomic sequences, and we have conducted the most comprehensive comparative genomic analysis of the prion protein gene PRNP and its homologues, shadow of prion protein gene SPRN and doppel gene PRND, and prion testis-specific gene PRNT so far. Results While the SPRN and PRNP homologues are present in all vertebrates, PRND is known in tetrapods, and PRNT is present in primates. PRNT could be viewed as a TE-associated gene. Using human as the base sequence for genomic sequence comparisons (VISTA), we annotated numerous potential cis-elements. The conserved regions in SPRNs harbour the potential Sp1 sites in promoters (mammals, birds), C-rich intron splicing enhancers and PTB intron splicing silencers in introns (mammals, birds), and hsa-miR-34a sites in 3'-UTRs (eutherians). We showed the conserved PRNP upstream regions, which may be potential enhancers or silencers (primates, dog). In the PRNP 3'-UTRs, there are conserved cytoplasmic polyadenylation element sites (mammals, birds). The PRND core promoters include highly conserved CCAAT, CArG and TATA boxes (mammals). We deduced 42 new protein primary structures, and performed the first phylogenetic analysis of all vertebrate prion genes. Using the protein alignment which included 122 sequences, we constructed the neighbour-joining tree which showed four major clusters, including shadoos, shadoo2s and prion protein-likes (cluster 1), fish prion proteins (cluster 2), tetrapode prion proteins (cluster 3) and doppels (cluster 4). We showed that the entire prion protein conformationally plastic region is well conserved between eutherian prion proteins and shadoos (18–25% identity and 28–34% similarity), and there could be a potential structural compatibility between shadoos and the left-handed parallel beta-helical fold

  2. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  3. Uses of phage display in agriculture: sequence analysis and comparative modeling of late embryogenesis abundant client proteins suggest protein-nucleic acid binding functionality.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A Bruce; Payne, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins-Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins-has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules.

  4. Dynamic response of the Trinity River Relief Bridge to controlled pile damage: modeling and experimental data analysis comparing Fourier and Hilbert Huang techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ray Ruichong; King, Robert; Olson, Larry; Xu, You-Lin

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents the implementation of a method for nonlinear, nonstationary data processing, namely the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) in traditional vibration-based approaches to characterizing structural damage and shows the frequency signature of local structural damage in nonstationary vibration recordings. In particular, following the review of traditional approaches to characterizing structural damage from nonstationary vibration recordings, this study first offers the justifications of the HHT as an alternative and complementary data process in addressing the nonstationarity of the vibration. With the use of recordings from controlled field vibration tests of substructures in the Trinity River Relief Bridge in Texas in its intact, minor- and severe-damage pile states, this study then shows that the HHT-based approach can single out some natural frequencies of the structure from a mixed frequency content in recordings that also contain the time-dependent excitation and noise frequencies. Subsequently, this study exposes that the frequency downshift for the damaged pile relative to the undamaged one is an indicative index for the damage extent. The above results are also validated by an ANSYS model-based analysis. Finally, a comprehensive HHT-based characterization of structural damage is discussed, and the potential use for cost-effective, efficient structural damage diagnosis procedures and health-monitoring systems is provided.

  5. Breastfeeding policy: a globally comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raub, Amy; Earle, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the extent to which national policies guaranteeing breastfeeding breaks to working women may facilitate breastfeeding. Methods An analysis was conducted of the number of countries that guarantee breastfeeding breaks, the daily number of hours guaranteed, and the duration of guarantees. To obtain current, detailed information on national policies, original legislation as well as secondary sources on 182 of the 193 Member States of the United Nations were examined. Regression analyses were conducted to test the association between national policy and rates of exclusive breastfeeding while controlling for national income level, level of urbanization, female percentage of the labour force and female literacy rate. Findings Breastfeeding breaks with pay are guaranteed in 130 countries (71%) and unpaid breaks are guaranteed in seven (4%). No policy on breastfeeding breaks exists in 45 countries (25%). In multivariate models, the guarantee of paid breastfeeding breaks for at least 6 months was associated with an increase of 8.86 percentage points in the rate of exclusive breastfeeding (P < 0.05). Conclusion A greater percentage of women practise exclusive breastfeeding in countries where laws guarantee breastfeeding breaks at work. If these findings are confirmed in longitudinal studies, health outcomes could be improved by passing legislation on breastfeeding breaks in countries that do not yet ensure the right to breastfeed. PMID:24052676

  6. Construction of a Seasonal Difference-Geographically and Temporally Weighted Regression (SD-GTWR) Model and Comparative Analysis with GWR-Based Models for Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS) in Hubei Province (China)

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Zhao, Youlin; Sheng, Zhongjie; Wang, Ning; Zhou, Kui; Mu, Xiangming; Guo, Liqiang; Wang, Teng; Yang, Zhanqiu; Huo, Xixiang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is considered a globally distributed infectious disease which results in many deaths annually in Hubei Province, China. In order to conduct a better analysis and accurately predict HFRS incidence in Hubei Province, a new model named Seasonal Difference-Geographically and Temporally Weighted Regression (SD-GTWR) was constructed. The SD-GTWR model, which integrates the analysis and relationship of seasonal difference, spatial and temporal characteristics of HFRS (HFRS was characterized by spatiotemporal heterogeneity and it is seasonally distributed), was designed to illustrate the latent relationships between the spatio-temporal pattern of the HFRS epidemic and its influencing factors. Experiments from the study demonstrated that SD-GTWR model is superior to traditional models such as GWR- based models in terms of the efficiency and the ability of providing influencing factor analysis. PMID:27801870

  7. Towards an integrative model of C4 photosynthetic subtypes: insights from comparative transcriptome analysis of NAD-ME, NADP-ME, and PEP-CK C4 species

    PubMed Central

    Bräutigam, Andrea; Schliesky, Simon; Külahoglu, Canan; Osborne, Colin P.; Weber, Andreas P.M.

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis affords higher photosynthetic carbon conversion efficiency than C3 photosynthesis and it therefore represents an attractive target for engineering efforts aiming to improve crop productivity. To this end, blueprints are required that reflect C4 metabolism as closely as possible. Such blueprints have been derived from comparative transcriptome analyses of C3 species with related C4 species belonging to the NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) and NADP-ME subgroups of C4 photosynthesis. However, a comparison between C3 and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK) subtype of C4 photosynthesis is still missing. An integrative analysis of all three C4 subtypes has also not been possible to date, since no comparison has been available for closely related C3 and PEP-CK C4 species. To generate the data, the guinea grass Megathyrsus maximus, which represents a PEP-CK species, was analysed in comparison with a closely related C3 sister species, Dichanthelium clandestinum, and with publicly available sets of RNA-Seq data from C4 species belonging to the NAD-ME and NADP-ME subgroups. The data indicate that the core C4 cycle of the PEP-CK grass M. maximus is quite similar to that of NAD-ME species with only a few exceptions, such as the subcellular location of transfer acid production and the degree and pattern of up-regulation of genes encoding C4 enzymes. One additional mitochondrial transporter protein was associated with the core cycle. The broad comparison identified sucrose and starch synthesis, as well as the prevention of leakage of C4 cycle intermediates to other metabolic pathways, as critical components of C4 metabolism. Estimation of intercellular transport fluxes indicated that flux between cells is increased by at least two orders of magnitude in C4 species compared with C3 species. In contrast to NAD-ME and NADP-ME species, the transcription of photosynthetic electron transfer proteins was unchanged in PEP-CK. In summary, the PEP-CK blueprint of M

  8. Comparative analysis of the immunologic response induced by the Sterne 34F2 live spore Bacillus anthracis vaccine in a ruminant model.

    PubMed

    Ndumnego, Okechukwu C; Köhler, Susanne M; Crafford, Jannie; van Heerden, Henriette; Beyer, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The Sterne 34F2 live spore vaccine (SLSV) developed in 1937 is the most widely used veterinary vaccine against anthrax. However, literature on the immunogenicity of this vaccine in a target ruminant host is scarce. In this study, we evaluated the humoral response to the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (rPA), a recombinant bacillus collagen-like protein of anthracis (rBclA), formaldehyde inactivated spores (FIS) prepared from strain 34F2 and a vegetative antigen formulation prepared from a capsule and toxin deficient strain (CDC 1014) in Boer goats. The toxin neutralizing ability of induced antibodies was evaluated using an in vitro toxin neutralization assay. The protection afforded by the vaccine was also assessed in vaccinates. Anti-rPA, anti-FIS and lethal toxin neutralizing titres were superior after booster vaccinations, compared to single vaccinations. Qualitative analysis of humoral responses to rPA, rBclA and FIS antigens revealed a preponderance of anti-FIS IgG titres following either single or double vaccinations with the SLSV. Antibodies against FIS and rPA both increased by 350 and 300-fold following revaccinations respectively. There was no response to rBclA following vaccinations with the SLSV. Toxin neutralizing titres increased by 80-fold after single vaccination and 700-fold following a double vaccination. Lethal challenge studies in naïve goats indicated a minimum infective dose of 36 B. anthracis spores. Single and double vaccination with the SLSV protected 4/5 and 3/3 of goats challenged with>800 spores respectively. An early booster vaccination following the first immunization is suggested in order to achieve a robust immunity. Results from this study indicate that this crucial second vaccination can be administered as early as 3 months after the initial vaccination.

  9. Developmental changes in hepatic glucose metabolism in a newborn piglet model: A comparative analysis for suckling period and early weaning period.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunyan; Wang, Qinhua; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Fan, Zhiyong; Deng, Ze-yuan; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-19

    The liver glucose metabolism, supplying sufficient energy for glucose-dependent tissues, is important in suckling or weaned animals, although there are few studies with piglet model. To better understand the development of glucose metabolism in the piglets during suckling period and early weaning period, we determined the hepatic glycogen content, and investigated the relative protein expression of key enzymes of glucogenesis (GNG) and mRNA levels of some glucose metabolism-related genes. During suckling period, the protein level of G6Pase in the liver of suckling piglets progressively declined with day of age compared with that of newborn piglets (at 1 day of age), whereas the PEPCK level stabilized until day 21 of age, indicating that hepatic GNG capacity gradually weakened in suckling piglets. The synthesis of hepatic glycogen, which was consistent with the fluctuation of glycolytic key genes PFKL and PKLR that gradually decreased after birth and was more or less steady during latter suckling period, although both the mRNA levels of GCK and key glucose transporter GLUT2 presented uptrend in suckling piglets. However, early weaning significantly suppressed the hepatic GNG in the weaned piglets, especially at d 3-5 of weaning period, then gradually recovered at d 7 of weaning period. Meanwhile, PFKL, PKLR and GLUT2 showed the similar trend during weaning period. On the contrast, the hepatic glycogen reached the maximum value when the G6Pase and PEPCK protein expression were at the lowest level, although the GCK level maintained increasing through 7 days of weaning period. Altogether, our study provides evidence that hepatic GNG and glycolysis in newborn piglets were more active than other days during suckling period, and early weaning could significantly suppressed glucose metabolism in liver, but this inhibition would progressively recover at day 7 after weaning.

  10. Comparing Results from Constant Comparative and Computer Software Methods: A Reflection about Qualitative Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putten, Jim Vander; Nolen, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared qualitative research results obtained by manual constant comparative analysis with results obtained by computer software analysis of the same data. An investigated about issues of trustworthiness and accuracy ensued. Results indicated that the inductive constant comparative data analysis generated 51 codes and two coding levels…

  11. Comparative Modelling of the Spectra of Cool Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Heiter, U.; Abia, C.; Eriksson, K.; Ireland, M.; Neilson, H.; Nowotny, W; Maldonado, J; Merle, T.; Peterson, R.; Plez, B.; Short, C. I.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Worley, C.; Aringer, B.; Bladh, S.; de Laverny, P.; Goswami, A.; Mora, A.; Norris, R. P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Scholz, M.; Thevenin, F.; Tsuji, T.; Kordopatis, G.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to extract information from the spectra of stars depends on reliable models of stellar atmospheres and appropriate techniques for spectral synthesis. Various model codes and strategies for the analysis of stellar spectra are available today. Aims. We aim to compare the results of deriving stellar parameters using different atmosphere models and different analysis strategies. The focus is set on high-resolution spectroscopy of cool giant stars. Methods. Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. Results. We present the results from the different groups, as well as an additional experiment comparing the synthetic spectra produced by various codes for a given set of stellar parameters. Similarities and differences of the results are discussed. Conclusions. Several valid approaches to analyze a given spectrum of a star result in quite a wide range of solutions. The main causes for the differences in parameters derived by different groups seem to lie in the physical input data and in the details of the analysis method. This clearly shows how far from a definitive abundance analysis we still are.

  12. [Comparative analysis of 3D data visibility of the prepared tooth finishing line on a synthetic jaw model, captured by international scanners in a laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Ryakhovsky, A N; Kostyukova, V V

    The aim of the study was to compare accuracy of digital impression's finishing line and the zone under it taken by different intraoral scanning systems. Parameters of comparison were: different level of the finishing line to the gingiva and width of sulcus after retraction. For this purpose two synthetic jaw models with prepared teeth were scanned using intraoral scanning systems: 3D Progress (MHT S.P.A., IT - MHT Optic Research AG, CH); True Definition (3M ESPE, USA); Trios (3Shape A/S, DNK); CEREC AC Bluecam, CEREC Omnicam (Sirona Dental System GmbH, DE); Planscan (Planmeca, FIN) (each n=10). Reference-scanning was done by ATOS Core (GOM mbH, DE). The resulting digital impressions were superimposed with the master-scan. The lowest measured deviations (trueness) for intraoral scanners, where the finishing line was 0.5 mm above gingiva were with scanner True Definition - 18.8±6.63 (on the finishing line) and 51.0±14.33 µm (0.3 mm under the finishing line). In conditions where finishing line was on the same level with gingiva, scanner Trios showed the best results: 17.0±3.96 and 52.7±6.52 µm. When the finishing line was 0.5 mm under gingiva, none of the testing scanners could visualize the zone 0.3 mm lower the finishing line. The best results for accuracy o the finishing line in that circumstances showed Trios: 15.1±5.05 µm. The optimum visualization of the finishing line and the zone under it was reached when the sulcus was 0.3 mm after retraction. Thus, the best accuracy was obtained with Trios: 10.3±2.69 (on the finishing line) and 57.2±13.58 µm (0.3 mm under finishing line). The results show that intraoral scanners also provide enough accuracy for indicating finishing line and the zone under it in different conditions of preparation and gingiva retraction. However, not all of the testing scanners can properly indicate finishing line and the zone under it when shoulder is below gingiva and the width of sulcus is less than 0.2 mm.

  13. Human Capital Development: Comparative Analysis of BRICs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardichvili, Alexandre; Zavyalova, Elena; Minina, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article is to conduct macro-level analysis of human capital (HC) development strategies, pursued by four countries commonly referred to as BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is based on comparisons of macro indices of human capital and innovativeness of the economy and a…

  14. Compare and Contrast Program Planning Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper will examine the differences and similarities between two program planning models, Tyler and Caffarella, to reveal their strengths and weaknesses. When adults are involved in training sessions, there are various program planning models that can be used, depending on the goal of the training session. Researchers developed these models…

  15. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  16. Question analysis for Indonesian comparative question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saelan, A.; Purwarianti, A.; Widyantoro, D. H.

    2017-01-01

    Information seeking is one of human needs today. Comparing things using search engine surely take more times than search only one thing. In this paper, we analyzed comparative questions for comparative question answering system. Comparative question is a question that comparing two or more entities. We grouped comparative questions into 5 types: selection between mentioned entities, selection between unmentioned entities, selection between any entity, comparison, and yes or no question. Then we extracted 4 types of information from comparative questions: entity, aspect, comparison, and constraint. We built classifiers for classification task and information extraction task. Features used for classification task are bag of words, whether for information extraction, we used lexical, 2 previous and following words lexical, and previous label as features. We tried 2 scenarios: classification first and extraction first. For classification first, we used classification result as a feature for extraction. Otherwise, for extraction first, we used extraction result as features for classification. We found that the result would be better if we do extraction first before classification. For the extraction task, classification using SMO gave the best result (88.78%), while for classification, it is better to use naïve bayes (82.35%).

  17. MANAGEMENT AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DATASET ENSEMBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Geveci, Berk

    2010-05-17

    The primary Phase I technical objective was to develop a prototype that demonstrates the functionality of all components required for an end-to-end meta-data management and comparative visualization system.

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals vertebrate phylotypic period during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    One of the central issues in evolutionary developmental biology is how we can formulate the relationships between evolutionary and developmental processes. Two major models have been proposed: the 'funnel-like' model, in which the earliest embryo shows the most conserved morphological pattern, followed by diversifying later stages, and the 'hourglass' model, in which constraints are imposed to conserve organogenesis stages, which is called the phylotypic period. Here we perform a quantitative comparative transcriptome analysis of several model vertebrate embryos and show that the pharyngula stage is most conserved, whereas earlier and later stages are rather divergent. These results allow us to predict approximate developmental timetables between different species, and indicate that pharyngula embryos have the most conserved gene expression profiles, which may be the source of the basic body plan of vertebrates. PMID:21427719

  19. Atmosphere of Mars: Mariner IV Models Compared.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, G; Fjeldbo, W C; Eshleman, V R

    1966-09-23

    Three classes of models for the atmosphere of Mars differ in identifying the main ionospheric layer measured by Mariner IV as being analogous to a terrestrial F(2), F(1), or E layer. At an altitude of several hundred kilometers, the relative atmospheric mass densities for these models (in the order named) are approximately 1, 10(2), and 10(4), and the temperatures are roughly 100 degrees , 200 degrees , and 400 degrees K. Theory and observation are in best agreement for an F, s model, for which photodissociation of CO(2), and diffusive separation result in an atomic-oxygen upper atmosphere, with O(+) being the principal ion in the isothermal topside of the ionosphere. The mesopause temperature minimum would be at or below the freezing point of CO(2), and dry ice particles would be expected to form. However, an F(1) model, with molecular ions in a mixed and warmer upper atmosphere, might result if photodissociation and diffusive separation are markedly less than would be expected from analogy with Earth's upper atmosphere. The E model proposed by Chamberlain and McElroy appears very unlikely; it is not compatible with the measured ionization profile unless rather unlikely assumptions are made about the values, and changes with height, of the effective recombination coefficient and the average ion mass. Moreover our theoretical heat-budget computations for the atmospheric region probed by Mariner IV indicate markedly lower temperatures and temperature gradients than were obtained for the E model.

  20. Comparative Rural Landscapes: A Conceptual Geographic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbrink, John E.

    The geography unit is designed for use in upper elementary grades. The unit objective is to help the student learn facts about the landscapes of the United States, the Netherlands, Australia, Russia, and Central Africa, and acquire generic ideas which he can apply to the analysis and comparison of other landscapes. The unit is an attempt to apply…

  1. A multi-template combination algorithm for protein comparative modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianlin

    2008-01-01

    Background Multiple protein templates are commonly used in manual protein structure prediction. However, few automated algorithms of selecting and combining multiple templates are available. Results Here we develop an effective multi-template combination algorithm for protein comparative modeling. The algorithm selects templates according to the similarity significance of the alignments between template and target proteins. It combines the whole template-target alignments whose similarity significance score is close to that of the top template-target alignment within a threshold, whereas it only takes alignment fragments from a less similar template-target alignment that align with a sizable uncovered region of the target. We compare the algorithm with the traditional method of using a single top template on the 45 comparative modeling targets (i.e. easy template-based modeling targets) used in the seventh edition of Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP7). The multi-template combination algorithm improves the GDT-TS scores of predicted models by 6.8% on average. The statistical analysis shows that the improvement is significant (p-value < 10-4). Compared with the ideal approach that always uses the best template, the multi-template approach yields only slightly better performance. During the CASP7 experiment, the preliminary implementation of the multi-template combination algorithm (FOLDpro) was ranked second among 67 servers in the category of high-accuracy structure prediction in terms of GDT-TS measure. Conclusion We have developed a novel multi-template algorithm to improve protein comparative modeling. PMID:18366648

  2. Comparative Analysis of Monographic Collections in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Virginia M.; And Others

    The results of a project comparing the nursing monograph collections of academic health science center libraries in the Southwest are reported. Records for nursing monographs from the TALON (South Central Regional Medical Library Program) Union Catalog of Monographs from 1977-1983 were analyzed to reveal the distribution by year, publisher, and…

  3. Comparative Naval Architecture Analysis of Diesel Submarines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    mission, cost, or other factors affect the architecture? This study examines and compares the naval architecture of selected diesel submarines from...79 A ppendix E : Subm arine Shape Factors ................................................................................... 90 5 List of...country. Do factors such as mission, cost, or tradition 10 affect submarine naval architecture? An in depth comparison is performed of six diesel

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Speed Profile Models for Ankle Pointing Movements: Evidence that Lower and Upper Extremity Discrete Movements are Controlled by a Single Invariant Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Vaisman, Lev; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about whether our knowledge of how the central nervous system controls the upper extremities (UE), can generalize, and to what extent to the lower limbs. Our continuous efforts to design the ideal adaptive robotic therapy for the lower limbs of stroke patients and children with cerebral palsy highlighted the importance of analyzing and modeling the kinematics of the lower limbs, in general, and those of the ankle joints, in particular. We recruited 15 young healthy adults that performed in total 1,386 visually evoked, visually guided, and target-directed discrete pointing movements with their ankle in dorsal–plantar and inversion–eversion directions. Using a non-linear, least-squares error-minimization procedure, we estimated the parameters for 19 models, which were initially designed to capture the dynamics of upper limb movements of various complexity. We validated our models based on their ability to reconstruct the experimental data. Our results suggest a remarkable similarity between the top-performing models that described the speed profiles of ankle pointing movements and the ones previously found for the UE both during arm reaching and wrist pointing movements. Among the top performers were the support-bounded lognormal and the beta models that have a neurophysiological basis and have been successfully used in upper extremity studies with normal subjects and patients. Our findings suggest that the same model can be applied to different “human” hardware, perhaps revealing a key invariant in human motor control. These findings have a great potential to enhance our rehabilitation efforts in any population with lower extremity deficits by, for example, assessing the level of motor impairment and improvement as well as informing the design of control algorithms for therapeutic ankle robots. PMID:25505881

  5. Comparative Lifecycle Energy Analysis: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jeffrey; Canzoneri, Diana

    1992-01-01

    Explores the position that more energy is conserved through recycling secondary materials than is generated from municipal solid waste incineration. Discusses one component of a lifecycle analysis--a comparison of energy requirements for manufacturing competing products. Includes methodological issues, energy cost estimates, and difficulties…

  6. Comparative molecular analysis of endoevaporitic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Jason W; Pace, Norman R; Spear, John R

    2008-10-01

    A phylogenetic comparison of microbial communities in hypersaline evaporites was conducted on crusts from Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and Lindsey Lake, New Mexico, using culture-independent rRNA gene sequence analysis. Many sequences were shared between evaporites, which suggests that similar environments select for specific microbial lineages from a global metacommunity.

  7. Spontaneous remission from the problematic use of substances: an inductive model derived from a comparative analysis of the alcohol, opiate, tobacco, and food/obesity literatures.

    PubMed

    Stall, R; Biernacki, P

    1986-01-01

    Despite obvious theoretical and treatment implications, the study of how individuals end the "compulsive" use of substances without formal treatment ("spontaneous remission") remains a relatively neglected topic. This paper reviews the literature germane to spontaneous remission from four substances (opiates, alcohol, food/obesity, and tobacco) selected for their widely variant meanings within the mainstream North American culture. Common processes important to spontaneous remission from these four substances are identified and form the basis of an inductively derived model of spontaneous remission behavior. This model, relevant to interactionist theory, is offered for further, empirical testing.

  8. A comparative modeling of supernova 1993J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinnikov, Sergei; Eastman, Ron; Bartunov, Oleg; Popolitov, Vlad; Woosley, Stan

    1997-01-01

    The light curve of Supernova 1993J is calculated using two computational radiation transport approaches. The two approaches are represented by the computer codes STELLA and EDDINGTON. The emphasis is on the shock breakout and the photometry in the U, B and V bands during the first 120 days of the supernova. The STELLA model includes implicit hydrodynamics and is able to model early supernova evolution before the expansion is homologous. The STELLA model employs multi-group photonics and is able to follow the radiation as it decouples from the matter. The EDDINGTON code uses an algorithm for integrating the transport equation which assumes homologous expansion and uses a finer frequency resolution. The agreement between the two codes is considered to be satisfactory only in the case where compatible physical assumptions are made concerning the opacity. The assumptions are justified. The continuum spectrum for SN 1993J is predicted near the shock breakout to be superior to that predicted by standard single energy group hydrocodes. The uncertainties involved in current time dependent models of supernova light curves are discussed.

  9. A Comparative Study of Some Dynamic Stall Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1987-01-01

    Three semi-empirical aerodynamic stall models are compared with respect to their lift and moment hysteresis loop prediction, limit cycle behavior, easy implementation, and feasibility in developing the parameters required for stall flutter prediction of advanced turbines. For the comparison of aeroelastic response prediction including stall, a typical section model and a plate structural model are considered. The response analysis includes both plunging and pitching motions of the blades. In model A, a correction to the angle of attack is applied when the angle of attack exceeds the static stall angle. In model B, a synthesis procedure is used for angles of attack above static stall angles and the time history effects are accounted through the Wagner function. In both models the life and moment coefficients for angle of attack below stall are obtained from tabular data for a given Mach number and angle of attack. In model C, referred to an the ONERA model, the life and moment coefficients are given in the form of two differential equations, one for angles below stall, and the other for angles above stall. The parameters of those equations are nonlinear functions of the angle of attack.

  10. A COMPARATIVE RISK REDUCTION ANALYSIS OF THE OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE'S WASTE MINIMIZATION PRIORITY CHEMICALS INITIATIVE USING THE 3MRA MULTIMEDIA MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was initiated by the EPA/ORD National Exposure Research Lab (NERL) in FY05 to quantify risk reduction resulting from this national EPA initiative to reduce WMPC disposal. Using the 3MRA modeling system, which was recommended for use by the EPA Science Advisory Board for ...

  11. Performance of several Saccharomyces strains for the alcoholic fermentation of sugar-sweetened high-strength wastewaters: Comparative analysis and kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Comelli, Raúl N; Seluy, Lisandro G; Isla, Miguel A

    2016-12-25

    This work focuses on the performance of ten commercial Saccharomyces yeast strains in the batch alcoholic fermentation of sugars contained in selected industrial wastewaters from the soft drink industry. Fermentation has been applied successfully to treat these effluents prior to their disposal. Although many strains were investigated, similar behaviour was observed between all of the Saccharomyces strains tested. When media were inoculated with 2gL(-1) of yeast, all strains were able to completely consume the available sugars in less than 14h. Thus, any of the strains studied in this work could be used in non-conventional wastewater treatment processes based on alcoholic fermentation. However, ethanol production varied between strains, and these differences could be significant from a production point of view. Saccharomyces bayanus produced the most ethanol, with a mean yield of 0.44gethanolgsugarconsumed(-1) and an ethanol specific production rate of 5.96gethanol (Lh)(-1). As the assayed soft drinks wastewaters contain about 105gsugar/L of fermentable sugars, the concentration of ethanol achieved after the fermentations process was 46.2gethanol/L. A rigorous kinetic modelling methodology was used to model the Saccharomyces bayanus fermentation process. The kinetic model included coupled mass balances and a minimal number of parameters. A simple unstructured model based on the Andrews equation (substrate inhibition) was developed. This model satisfactorily described biomass growth, sugar consumption and bioethanol production. In addition to providing insights into the fermentative performance of potentially relevant strains, this work can facilitate the design of large-scale ethanol production processes that use wastewaters from the sugar-sweetened beverage industry as feedstock.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Treatment Costs in EUROHOPE.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Tor; Aas, Eline; Rosenqvist, Gunnar; Häkkinen, Unto

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the challenges of estimating risk-adjusted treatment costs in international comparative research, specifically in the European Health Care Outcomes, Performance, and Efficiency (EuroHOPE) project. We describe the diverse format of resource data and challenges of converting these data into resource use indicators that allow meaningful cross-country comparisons. The three cost indicators developed in EuroHOPE are then described, discussed, and applied. We compare the risk-adjusted mean treatment costs of acute myocardial infarction for four of the seven countries in the EuroHOPE project, namely, Finland, Hungary, Norway, and Sweden. The outcome of the comparison depends on the time perspective as well as on the particular resource use indicator. We argue that these complementary indicators add to our understanding of the variation in resource use across countries.

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Reinforcement Learning Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    reinforcement learning for both programming and adapting situated agents. In the first part of the paper we discuss two specific reinforcement learning algorithms: Q-learning and the Bucket Brigade. We introduce a special case of the Bucket Brigade, and analyze and compare its performance to Q-learning in a number of experiments. The second part of the paper discusses the key problems of reinforcement learning : time and space complexity, input generalization, sensitivity to parameter values, and selection of the reinforcement

  14. Comparative analysis of plant oil based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziejewski, M.; Goettler, H.J.; Haines, H.; Huong, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the evaluation results from the analysis of different blends of fuels using the 13-mode standard SAE testing method. Six high oleic safflower oil blends, six ester blends, six high oleic sunflower oil blends, and six sunflower oil blends were used in this portion of the investigation. Additionally, the results from the repeated 13-mode tests for all the 25/75% mixtures with a complete diesel fuel test before and after each alternative fuel are presented.

  15. Comparing prediction models for radiographic exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, W.; Robinson, J.; McEntee, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    During radiographic exposures the milliampere-seconds (mAs), kilovoltage peak (kVp) and source-to-image distance can be adjusted for variations in patient thicknesses. Several exposure adjustment systems have been developed to assist with this selection. This study compares the accuracy of four systems to predict the required mAs for pelvic radiographs taken on a direct digital radiography system (DDR). Sixty radiographs were obtained by adjusting mAs to compensate for varying combinations of source-to-image distance (SID), kVp and patient thicknesses. The 25% rule, the DuPont Bit System and the DigiBit system were compared to determine which of these three most accurately predicted the mAs required for an increase in patient thickness. Similarly, the 15% rule, the DuPont Bit System and the DigiBit system were compared for an increase in kVp. The exposure index (EI) was used as an indication of exposure to the DDR. For each exposure combination the mAs was adjusted until an EI of 1500+/-2% was achieved. The 25% rule was the most accurate at predicting the mAs required for an increase in patient thickness, with 53% of the mAs predictions correct. The DigiBit system was the most accurate at predicting mAs needed for changes in kVp, with 33% of predictions correct. This study demonstrated that the 25% rule and DigiBit system were the most accurate predictors of mAs required for an increase in patient thickness and kVp respectively. The DigiBit system worked well in both scenarios as it is a single exposure adjustment system that considers a variety of exposure factors.

  16. Enabling comparative modeling of closely related genomes: Example genus Brucella

    DOE PAGES

    Faria, José P.; Edirisinghe, Janaka N.; Davis, James J.; ...

    2014-03-08

    For many scientific applications, it is highly desirable to be able to compare metabolic models of closely related genomes. In this study, we attempt to raise awareness to the fact that taking annotated genomes from public repositories and using them for metabolic model reconstructions is far from being trivial due to annotation inconsistencies. We are proposing a protocol for comparative analysis of metabolic models on closely related genomes, using fifteen strains of genus Brucella, which contains pathogens of both humans and livestock. This study lead to the identification and subsequent correction of inconsistent annotations in the SEED database, as wellmore » as the identification of 31 biochemical reactions that are common to Brucella, which are not originally identified by automated metabolic reconstructions. We are currently implementing this protocol for improving automated annotations within the SEED database and these improvements have been propagated into PATRIC, Model-SEED, KBase and RAST. This method is an enabling step for the future creation of consistent annotation systems and high-quality model reconstructions that will support in predicting accurate phenotypes such as pathogenicity, media requirements or type of respiration.« less

  17. Comparative Analysis of GOCI Ocean Color Products

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Lewis, Mark David; Lawson, Adam; Gould, Richard W.; Martinolich, Paul; Li, Rong-Rong; Ladner, Sherwin; Gallegos, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) is the first geostationary ocean color sensor in orbit that provides bio-optical properties from coastal and open waters around the Korean Peninsula at unprecedented temporal resolution. In this study, we compare the normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) products generated by the Naval Research Laboratory Automated Processing System (APS) with those produced by the stand-alone software package, the GOCI Data Processing System (GDPS), developed by the Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI). Both results are then compared to the nLw measured by the above water radiometer at the Ieodo site. This above-water radiometer is part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AeroNET). The results indicate that the APS and GDPS processed nLw correlates well within the same image slot where the coefficient of determination (r2) is higher than 0.84 for all the bands from 412 nm to 745 nm. The agreement between APS and the AeroNET data is higher when compared to the GDPS results. The Root-Mean-Squared-Error (RMSE) between AeroNET and APS data ranges from 0.24 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 555 nm to 0.52 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 412 nm while RMSE between AeroNET and GDPS data ranges from 0.47 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 443 nm to 0.69 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 490 nm. PMID:26473861

  18. [Amaranth flour: characteristics, comparative analysis, application possibilities].

    PubMed

    Zharkov, I M; Miroshnichenko, L A; Zviagin, A A; Bavykina, I A

    2014-01-01

    Amaranth flour--a product of amaranth seeds processing--is a valuable industrial raw material that has an unique chemical composition and may be used for nutrition of people suffering from intolerance to traditional cereals protein, including celiac disease patients. The research aim was to study the composition of amaranth flour of two types compared with semolina which is traditionally used for nutrition by Russian population, as well as to compare the composition of milk amaranth flour porridge with milk semolina porridge. The composition of amaranth whole-ground flour and amaranth flour of premium grade processed from amaranth seeds grown in Voronezh region has been researched. It is to be noted that protein content in amaranth flour was 10.8-24.3% higher than in semolina, and its biological value and NPU-coefficient were higher by 22.65 and 46.51% respectively; lysine score in amaranth flour protein of premium grade came up to 107.54%, and in semolina protein only 40.95%. The level of digestible carbohydrates, including starch, was lower in amaranth flour than in semolina by 2.79-12.85 and 4.76-15.85% respectively, while fiber content was 15.5-30 fold higher. Fat content in amaranth flour of premium grade was 2,4 fold lower than in whole-ground amaranth flour but it was 45% higher than in semolina. The main advantage of amaranth flour protein compared to wheat protein is the predominance of albumins and globulins and a minimal content of prolamines and alpha-gliadin complete absence. The specifics of chemical composition allow the amaranth flour to be recommended for being included into nutrition of both healthy children and adults and also celiac disease patients.

  19. Image Analysis and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research program on Image Analysis and Modeling supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency...The objective is to achieve a better understanding of image structure and to use this knowledge to develop improved image models for use in image ... analysis and processing tasks such as information extraction, image enhancement and restoration, and coding. The ultimate objective of this research is

  20. Comparative analysis of binding affinities to epidermal growth factor receptor of monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using different experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Ledón, N; Casacó, A; Casanova, E; Beausoleil, I

    2011-07-01

    Although pharmaco/toxicological studies have always been conducted in pharmacologically relevant species in which the test material is pharmacologically active, the very specificity of many biopharmaceuticals could present challenges in the identification of a relevant species for pharmaco/toxicological studies. Alternative approaches may improve the predictive value of preclinical assessments of species-specific biopharmaceuticals. This could lead to improved decision-making, reduce the number of experimental animals by eliminating non-relevant studies, and decrease the time and cost involved in the drug development process. As an alternative to utilizing traditional animal models, this study investigated the activity of human EGF and the anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using the placenta microsomal fraction of different experimental animals. Ligand-receptor binding curves were obtained from the different experimental animal models, and binding constants were calculated based on the Scatchard plots. The constants for human and monkey EGF receptor expressed on the placental extract showed a K(a)<10(-8)M, while rabbits, mice and rats showed a K(a)>10(-8)M. The K(a) values obtained from animal placentas show that Macaca fascicularis and Cercopitecus aethiops monkeys are relevant species for studying the pharmaco/toxicological properties of nimotuzumab and cetuximab.

  1. A comparative study of two statistical approaches for the analysis of real seismicity sequences and synthetic seismicity generated by a stick-slip experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Marquez, Leticia Elsa; Ramirez Rojaz, Alejandro; Telesca, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    The study of two statistical approaches is analyzed for two different types of data sets, one is the seismicity generated by the subduction processes occurred at south Pacific coast of Mexico between 2005 and 2012, and the other corresponds to the synthetic seismic data generated by a stick-slip experimental model. The statistical methods used for the present study are the visibility graph in order to investigate the time dynamics of the series and the scaled probability density function in the natural time domain to investigate the critical order of the system. This comparison has the purpose to show the similarities between the dynamical behaviors of both types of data sets, from the point of view of critical systems. The observed behaviors allow us to conclude that the experimental set up globally reproduces the behavior observed in the statistical approaches used to analyses the seismicity of the subduction zone. The present study was supported by the Bilateral Project Italy-Mexico Experimental Stick-slip models of tectonic faults: innovative statistical approaches applied to synthetic seismic sequences, jointly funded by MAECI (Italy) and AMEXCID (Mexico) in the framework of the Bilateral Agreement for Scientific and Technological Cooperation PE 2014-2016.

  2. Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids: comparative analysis by colloid titration and potentiometric titration with continuous pK-distribution function model.

    PubMed

    Bratskaya, S; Golikov, A; Lutsenko, T; Nesterova, O; Dudarchik, V

    2008-09-01

    Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids of a different origin (inshore soils, peat, marine sediments, and soil (lysimetric) waters) were evaluated by means of two alternative methods - colloid titration and potentiometric titration. In order to elucidate possible limitations of the colloid titration as an express method of analysis of low content of humic substances we monitored changes in acid-base properties and charge densities of humic substances with soil depth, fractionation, and origin. We have shown that both factors - strength of acidic groups and molecular weight distribution in humic and fulvic acids - can affect the reliability of colloid titration. Due to deviations from 1:1 stoichiometry in interactions of humic substances with polymeric cationic titrant, the colloid titration can underestimate total acidity (charge density) of humic substances with domination of weak acidic functional groups (pK>6) and high content of the fractions with molecular weight below 1kDa.

  3. Comparative LIBS Analysis Of Calcified Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Salam, Z. A.; Harith, M. A.

    2008-09-23

    Signal enhancement, limits of detection, and relevance to environmental concentration for element in calcified tissues using LIBS with single and double laser pulses will be presented. These measurements were performed on three calcified tissues representing different matrices, namely enamel of human teeth, shells and eggshells. This method depends on the role of the laser induced shock wave on the ionization rate of the ablated target material atoms. The effect of the laser single and double pulse on the ionic to atomic ratio of calcium and magnesium spectral emission lines, CaII/CaI and MgII/MgI, will be presented and compared with the previous results and its relevance to the target material hardness. The results show that in case of single pulse the intensity ratios in calcium are higher than the double pulse while there is no appreciable difference between both in case of magnesium.

  4. Comparative analysis of Debrecen sunspot catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Győri, L.; Ludmány, A.; Baranyi, T.

    2017-02-01

    Sunspot area data are important for studying solar activity and its long-term variations. At the Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory, we compiled three sunspot catalogues: the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD), the SDO/HMI Debrecen Data (HMIDD) and the SOHO/MDI Debrecen Data. For comparison, we also compiled an additional sunspot catalogue, the Greenwich Photoheliographic Data, from the digitized Royal Greenwich Observatory images for 1974-76. By comparing these catalogues when they overlap in time, we can investigate how various factors influence the measured area of sunspots, and, in addition, we can derive area cross-calibration factors for these catalogues. The main findings are as follows. Poorer seeing increases the individual corrected spot areas and decreases the number of small spots. Interestingly, the net result of these two effects for the total corrected spot area is zero. DPD daily total corrected sunspot areas are 5 per cent smaller than the HMIDD ones. Revised DPD daily total corrected umbra areas are 9 per cent smaller than those of HMIDD. The Greenwich photoheliographic areas are only a few per cent smaller than DPD areas. A 0.2° difference between the north directions of the DPD and MDI images is found. This value is nearly the same as was found (0.22°) by us in a previous paper comparing HMI and MDI images. The area measurement practice (spots smaller than 10 mh were not directly measured but an area of 2 mh was assigned to each) of the Solar Observing Optical Network cannot explain the large area deficit of the Solar Observing Optical Network.

  5. The digital storytelling process: A comparative analysis from various experts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Hashiroh; Shiratuddin, Norshuhada

    2016-08-01

    Digital Storytelling (DST) is a method of delivering information to the audience. It combines narrative and digital media content infused with the multimedia elements. In order for the educators (i.e the designers) to create a compelling digital story, there are sets of processes introduced by experts. Nevertheless, the experts suggest varieties of processes to guide them; of which some are redundant. The main aim of this study is to propose a single guide process for the creation of DST. A comparative analysis is employed where ten DST models from various experts are analysed. The process can also be implemented in other multimedia materials that used the concept of DST.

  6. Fos and pERK immunoreactivity in spinal cord slices: Comparative analysis of in vitro models for testing putative antinociceptive molecules.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, Francesco; Russo, Arianna; Salio, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    To detect central neuron activation, expression of the transcription factor Fos and phosphorylation of the protein kinase ERK (pERK) can be visualized by immunocytochemistry. These approaches have been extensively used to quantify the activation of nociceptive neurons in the spinal dorsal horn (DH) following peripheral stimulation in vivo. Here we propose an alternative and simplified in vitro model to investigate Fos and pERK expression based on the stimulation of acutely dissected spinal cord slices to mimic acute inflammatory changes in DH. Transverse slices were obtained from postnatal (P8-P12) CD1 mice and were treated for 5 min with capsaicin (CAP, 2 μM). CAP induces a strong release of glutamate from primary afferent terminals which, in turn, excites spinal DH neurons. Since ERK phosphorylation and Fos expression occur following different time frames, two distinct protocols were used to detect their activation. Thus, for studying Fos immunoreactivity CAP-treated slices were left for 3h in Krebs solution after stimulation. Instead, for studying pERK immunoreactivity slices were maintained in Krebs solution for only 15 min after stimulation. Both Fos and pERK were significantly up-regulated following CAP challenge. To validate our model we tested the efficacy of octreotide (OCT, 1 μM) in preventing the CAP effect on Fos and pERK expression. OCT is a synthetic antinociceptive analog of somatostatin, one of the neuropeptides involved in the negative modulation of pain signals in DH. After CAP, OCT reduced the response to both Fos and pERK. Our data validate the use of Fos and pERK immunoreactivity in vitro to investigate the activation of spinal nociceptive pathways and testing potentially antinociceptive molecules.

  7. Recognizing chemicals in patents: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Maryam; Wiegandt, David Luis; Schmedding, Florian; Leser, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, methods for Chemical Named Entity Recognition (NER) have gained substantial interest, driven by the need for automatically analyzing todays ever growing collections of biomedical text. Chemical NER for patents is particularly essential due to the high economic importance of pharmaceutical findings. However, NER on patents has essentially been neglected by the research community for long, mostly because of the lack of enough annotated corpora. A recent international competition specifically targeted this task, but evaluated tools only on gold standard patent abstracts instead of full patents; furthermore, results from such competitions are often difficult to extrapolate to real-life settings due to the relatively high homogeneity of training and test data. Here, we evaluate the two state-of-the-art chemical NER tools, tmChem and ChemSpot, on four different annotated patent corpora, two of which consist of full texts. We study the overall performance of the tools, compare their results at the instance level, report on high-recall and high-precision ensembles, and perform cross-corpus and intra-corpus evaluations. Our findings indicate that full patents are considerably harder to analyze than patent abstracts and clearly confirm the common wisdom that using the same text genre (patent vs. scientific) and text type (abstract vs. full text) for training and testing is a pre-requisite for achieving high quality text mining results.

  8. Comparative analysis of de novo transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Kaitlin; Yang, Yi; Marsh, Ronald; Xie, Linglin; Zhang, Ke K

    2013-02-01

    The fast development of next-generation sequencing technology presents a major computational challenge for data processing and analysis. A fast algorithm, de Bruijn graph has been successfully used for genome DNA de novo assembly; nevertheless, its performance for transcriptome assembly is unclear. In this study, we used both simulated and real RNA-Seq data, from either artificial RNA templates or human transcripts, to evaluate five de novo assemblers, ABySS, Mira, Trinity, Velvet and Oases. Of these assemblers, ABySS, Trinity, Velvet and Oases are all based on de Bruijn graph, and Mira uses an overlap graph algorithm. Various numbers of RNA short reads were selected from the External RNA Control Consortium (ERCC) data and human chromosome 22. A number of statistics were then calculated for the resulting contigs from each assembler. Each experiment was repeated multiple times to obtain the mean statistics and standard error estimate. Trinity had relative good performance for both ERCC and human data, but it may not consistently generate full length transcripts. ABySS was the fastest method but its assembly quality was low. Mira gave a good rate for mapping its contigs onto human chromosome 22, but its computational speed is not satisfactory. Our results suggest that transcript assembly remains a challenge problem for bioinformatics society. Therefore, a novel assembler is in need for assembling transcriptome data generated by next generation sequencing technique.

  9. Community detection algorithms: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; Fortunato, Santo

    2009-11-01

    Uncovering the community structure exhibited by real networks is a crucial step toward an understanding of complex systems that goes beyond the local organization of their constituents. Many algorithms have been proposed so far, but none of them has been subjected to strict tests to evaluate their performance. Most of the sporadic tests performed so far involved small networks with known community structure and/or artificial graphs with a simplified structure, which is very uncommon in real systems. Here we test several methods against a recently introduced class of benchmark graphs, with heterogeneous distributions of degree and community size. The methods are also tested against the benchmark by Girvan and Newman [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 7821 (2002)] and on random graphs. As a result of our analysis, three recent algorithms introduced by Rosvall and Bergstrom [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 7327 (2007); Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 1118 (2008)], Blondel [J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2008), P10008], and Ronhovde and Nussinov [Phys. Rev. E 80, 016109 (2009)] have an excellent performance, with the additional advantage of low computational complexity, which enables one to analyze large systems.

  10. Impact of a novel, antimicrobial dressing on in vivo, Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound biofilm: quantitative comparative analysis using a rabbit ear model.

    PubMed

    Seth, Akhil K; Zhong, Aimei; Nguyen, Khang T; Hong, Seok J; Leung, Kai P; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    The importance of bacterial biofilms to chronic wound pathogenesis is well established. Different treatment modalities, including topical dressings, have yet to show consistent efficacy against wound biofilm. This study evaluates the impact of a novel, antimicrobial Test Dressing on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-infected wounds. Six-mm dermal punch wounds in rabbit ears were inoculated with 10(6) colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa. Biofilm was established in vivo using our published model. Dressing changes were performed every other day with either Active Control or Test Dressings. Treated and untreated wounds were harvested for several quantitative endpoints. Confirmatory studies were performed to measure treatment impact on in vitro P. aeruginosa and in vivo polybacterial wounds containing P. aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The Test Dressing consistently decreased P. aeruginosa bacterial counts, and improved wound healing relative to Inactive Vehicle and Active Control wounds (p < 0.05). In vitro bacterial counts were also significantly reduced following Test Dressing therapy (p < 0.05). Similarly, improvements in bacterial burden and wound healing were also achieved in polybacterial wounds (p < 0.05). This study represents the first quantifiable and consistent in vivo evidence of a topical antimicrobial dressing's impact against established wound biofilm. The development of clinically applicable therapies against biofilm such as this is critical to improving chronic wound care.

  11. Comparative analysis of gingival phenotype in animal and human experimental models using optical coherence tomography in a non-invasive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Fernandes, Luana O.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Feitosa, Daniela S.; Cimões, Renata; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2015-06-01

    Imaging methods are widely used in diagnostic and among the diversity of modalities, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is nowadays commercially available and considered the most innovative technique used for imaging applications, in both medical and non-medical applications. In this study, we exploit the OCT technique in the oral cavity for identification and differentiation between free and attached gingiva, as well as determining the gingival phenotype, an important factor to determination of periodontal prognosis in patients. For the animal studies, five porcine jaws were analyzed using a Swept Source SS-OCT system operating at 1325nm and stereomicroscope, as gold pattern. The SSOCT at 1325nm was chosen due to the longer central wavelength, that allows to deeper penetration imaging, and the faster image acquisition, an essential factor for clinical setting. For the patient studies, a total of 30 males and female were examined using the SS-OCT at 1325nm and computer controlled periodontal probing. 2D and 3D images of tooth/gingiva interface were performed, and quantitative measurements of the gingival sulcus could be noninvasively obtained. Through the image analysis of the animals jaws, it was possible to quantify the free gingiva and the attached gingiva, the calculus deposition over teeth surface and also the subgingival calculus. For the patient's studies, we demonstrated that the gingival phenotype could be measured without the periodontal probe introduction at the gingival sulcus, confirming that OCT can be potentially useful in clinic for direct observation and quantification of gingival phenotype in a non-invasive approach.

  12. Comparative analysis of QSAR models for predicting pK(a) of organic oxygen acids and nitrogen bases from molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiying; Kühne, Ralph; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2010-11-22

    For 1143 organic compounds comprising 580 oxygen acids and 563 nitrogen bases that cover more than 17 orders of experimental pK(a) (from -5.00 to 12.23), the pK(a) prediction performances of ACD, SPARC, and two calibrations of a semiempirical quantum chemical (QC) AM1 approach have been analyzed. The overall root-mean-square errors (rms) for the acids are 0.41, 0.58 (0.42 without ortho-substituted phenols with intramolecular H-bonding), and 0.55 and for the bases are 0.65, 0.70, 1.17, and 1.27 for ACD, SPARC, and both QC methods, respectively. Method-specific performances are discussed in detail for six acid subsets (phenols and aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids with different substitution patterns) and nine base subsets (anilines, primary, secondary and tertiary amines, meta/para-substituted and ortho-substituted pyridines, pyrimidines, imidazoles, and quinolines). The results demonstrate an overall better performance for acids than for bases but also a substantial variation across subsets. For the overall best-performing ACD, rms ranges from 0.12 to 1.11 and 0.40 to 1.21 pK(a) units for the acid and base subsets, respectively. With regard to the squared correlation coefficient r², the results are 0.86 to 0.96 (acids) and 0.79 to 0.95 (bases) for ACD, 0.77 to 0.95 (acids) and 0.85 to 0.97 (bases) for SPARC, and 0.64 to 0.87 (acids) and 0.43 to 0.83 (bases) for the QC methods, respectively. Attention is paid to structural and method-specific causes for observed pitfalls. The significant subset dependence of the prediction performances suggests a consensus modeling approach.

  13. Domain analysis of 3 Keto Acyl-CoA synthase for structural variations in Vitis vinifera and Oryza brachyantha using comparative modelling.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Mamta; Pandey, Neetesh; Qamar, Naseha; Singh, Brijendra; Shukla, Akanksha

    2015-03-01

    The long chain fatty acids incorporated into plant lipids are derived from the iterative addition of C2 units which is provided by malonyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA after interactions with 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), found in several plants. This study provides functional characterization of three 3 ketoacyl CoA synthase like proteins in Vitis vinifera (one) and Oryza brachyantha (two proteins). Sequence analysis reveals that protein of Oryza brachyantha shows 96% similarity to a hypothetical protein in Sorghum bicolor; total 11 homologs were predicted in Sorghum bicolor. Conserved domain prediction confirm the presence of FAE1/Type III polyketide synthase-like protein, Thiolase-like, subgroup; Thiolase-like and 3-Oxoacyl-ACP synthase III, C-terminal and chalcone synthase like domain but very long chain 3-keto acyl CoA domain is absent. All three proteins were found to have Chalcone and stilbene synthases C terminal domain which is similar to domain of thiolase and β keto acyl synthase. Its N terminal domain is absent in J3M9Z7 protein of Oryza brachyantha and F6HH63 protein of Vitis vinifera. Differences in N-terminal domain is responsible for distinguish activity. The J3MF16 protein of Oryza brachyantha contains N terminal domain and C terminal domain and characterized using annotation of these domains. Domains Gcs (streptomyces coelicolor) and Chalcone-stilbene synthases (KAS) in 2-pyrone synthase (Gerbera hybrid) and chalcone synthase 2 (Medicago sativa) were found to be present in three proteins. This similarity points toward anthocyanin biosynthetic process. Similarity to chalcone synthase 2 reveals its possible role in Naringenine and Chalcone synthase like activity. In 3 keto acyl CoA synthase of Oryza brachyantha. Active site residues C-240, H-407, N-447 are present in J3MF16 protein that are common in these three protein at different positions. Structural variations among dimer interface, product binding site, malonyl-CoA binding sites, were predicted in

  14. Comparative Modeling Studies of Boreal Water and Carbon Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coughlan, J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The coordination of the modeling and field efforts for an Intensive Field Campaign (IFC) may resemble the chicken and egg dilemma. This session's theme advocates that early and proactive involvement by modeling teams can produce a scientific and operational benefit for the IFC and Experiment. This talk will provide some examples and suggestions originating from the NASA funded IFC's of the FIFE First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment, Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) and predominately Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Experiments. In February 1994 and prior to the final selection of the BOREAS study sites, a group of funded BOREAS investigators agreed to run their models with data for five community types representing the proposed tower flux sites. All participating models were given identical initial values and boundary conditions and driven with identical climate data. The objectives of the intercomparison exercise were: 1) compare simulation results of participating terrestrial, hydrological, and atmospheric models over selected time frames; 2) learn about model behavior and sensitivity to estimated boreal site and vegetation definitions; 3) prioritize BOREAS field data collection efforts supporting modeling studies; 4) identify individual model deficiencies as early as possible. Out of these objectives evolved some important coordination and science issues for the BOREAS Experiment that can be generalized to IFCs and long term archiving of the data. Some problems are acceptable because they are endemic to maintaining fair and open competition prior to the peer review process. Others are logistical and addressable through application of planning, management, and information sciences. This investigator has identified one source of measurement and model incompatibility that is manifest in the IFC scaling approach. Although intuitively obvious, scaling problems are already more formally defined in

  15. A comparative analysis of Media Lengua and Quichua vowel production.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of F1 and F2 vowel frequencies from Pijal Media Lengua (PML) and Imbabura Quichua. Mixed-effects models are used to test Spanish-derived high and low vowels against their Quichua-derived counterparts for statistical significance. Spanish-derived and Quichua-derived high vowels are also tested against Spanish-derived mid vowels. This analysis suggests that PML may be manipulating as many as eight vowels where Spanishderived high and low vowels coexist as near-mergers with their Quichua-derived counterparts, while high and mid vowels coexist with partial overlap. Quichua, traditionally viewed as a three-vowel system, shows similar results and may be manipulating as many as six vowels.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Vertebrate Diurnal/Circadian Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Greg; Richter, Kerstin; Priest, Henry D.; Traver, David; Mockler, Todd C.; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kay, Steve A.

    2017-01-01

    From photosynthetic bacteria to mammals, the circadian clock evolved to track diurnal rhythms and enable organisms to anticipate daily recurring changes such as temperature and light. It orchestrates a broad spectrum of physiology such as the sleep/wake and eating/fasting cycles. While we have made tremendous advances in our understanding of the molecular details of the circadian clock mechanism and how it is synchronized with the environment, we still have rudimentary knowledge regarding its connection to help regulate diurnal physiology. One potential reason is the sheer size of the output network. Diurnal/circadian transcriptomic studies are reporting that around 10% of the expressed genome is rhythmically controlled. Zebrafish is an important model system for the study of the core circadian mechanism in vertebrate. As Zebrafish share more than 70% of its genes with human, it could also be an additional model in addition to rodent for exploring the diurnal/circadian output with potential for translational relevance. Here we performed comparative diurnal/circadian transcriptome analysis with established mouse liver and other tissue datasets. First, by combining liver tissue sampling in a 48h time series, transcription profiling using oligonucleotide arrays and bioinformatics analysis, we profiled rhythmic transcripts and identified 2609 rhythmic genes. The comparative analysis revealed interesting features of the output network regarding number of rhythmic genes, proportion of tissue specific genes and the extent of transcription factor family expression. Undoubtedly, the Zebrafish model system will help identify new vertebrate outputs and their regulators and provides leads for further characterization of the diurnal cis-regulatory network. PMID:28076377

  17. Statistical correlation analysis for comparing vibration data from test and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.; Strang, R. F.; Purves, L. R.; Hershfeld, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A theory was developed to compare vibration modes obtained by NASTRAN analysis with those obtained experimentally. Because many more analytical modes can be obtained than experimental modes, the analytical set was treated as expansion functions for putting both sources in comparative form. The dimensional symmetry was developed for three general cases: nonsymmetric whole model compared with a nonsymmetric whole structural test, symmetric analytical portion compared with a symmetric experimental portion, and analytical symmetric portion with a whole experimental test. The theory was coded and a statistical correlation program was installed as a utility. The theory is established with small classical structures.

  18. Noncoding RNA gene detection using comparative sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Elena; Eddy, Sean R

    2001-01-01

    Background Noncoding RNA genes produce transcripts that exert their function without ever producing proteins. Noncoding RNA gene sequences do not have strong statistical signals, unlike protein coding genes. A reliable general purpose computational genefinder for noncoding RNA genes has been elusive. Results We describe a comparative sequence analysis algorithm for detecting novel structural RNA genes. The key idea is to test the pattern of substitutions observed in a pairwise alignment of two homologous sequences. A conserved coding region tends to show a pattern of synonymous substitutions, whereas a conserved structural RNA tends to show a pattern of compensatory mutations consistent with some base-paired secondary structure. We formalize this intuition using three probabilistic "pair-grammars": a pair stochastic context free grammar modeling alignments constrained by structural RNA evolution, a pair hidden Markov model modeling alignments constrained by coding sequence evolution, and a pair hidden Markov model modeling a null hypothesis of position-independent evolution. Given an input pairwise sequence alignment (e.g. from a BLASTN comparison of two related genomes) we classify the alignment into the coding, RNA, or null class according to the posterior probability of each class. Conclusions We have implemented this approach as a program, QRNA, which we consider to be a prototype structural noncoding RNA genefinder. Tests suggest that this approach detects noncoding RNA genes with a fair degree of reliability. PMID:11801179

  19. Comparative Statistical Analysis of Auroral Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    3 . This accounts for the characteristic shape of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF), which permeates the entire solar system...boundary of the oval changes requires knowledge of the solar wind and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF), the individual and coupled dynamics of the...this point occurs: 3 | | ( 3 ) 14 where is the kinetic energy perpendicular to the magnetic field and is the convective electric field

  20. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared wery well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  1. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared very well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  2. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Radicella, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    In the last couple of years an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available through the Internet to the scientific community. This kind of data is particularly important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work analyses the behavior of the NeQuick and IRI models, adopted by the ITU-R recommendation P.531-5, with respect to the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos-1809 satellites. Experimental total electron content (TEC) from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above that peak have been compared with values computed with the models. A wide range of different conditions (solar activity, local time, geographical and geomagnetic position has been considered). The analysis done allows to point out the behavior of the models and the improvement needed to allow a better reproduction of the experimental results.

  3. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  4. Comparing Poisson Sigma Model with A-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonechi, F.; Cattaneo, A. S.; Iraso, R.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the A-model as a gauge fixing of the Poisson Sigma Model with target a symplectic structure. We complete the discussion in [4], where a gauge fixing defined by a compatible complex structure was introduced, by showing how to recover the A-model hierarchy of observables in terms of the AKSZ observables. Moreover, we discuss the off-shell supersymmetry of the A-model as a residual BV symmetry of the gauge fixed PSM action.

  5. Comparing turbulence models for flow through a rigid glottal model.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jungsoo; Frankel, Steven H

    2008-03-01

    Flow through a rigid model of the human vocal tract featuring a divergent glottis was numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach. A number of different turbulence models, available in a widely used commercial computational fluid dynamics code, were tested to determine their ability to capture various flow features recently observed in laboratory experiments and large eddy simulation studies. The study reveals that results from unsteady simulations employing the k-omega shear stress transport model were in much better agreement with previous measurements and predictions with regard to the ability to predict glottal jet skewing due to the Coanda effect and the intraglottal pressure distribution or related skin friction coefficient, than either steady or unsteady simulations using the Spalart-Allmaras model or any other two-equation turbulence model investigated in this study.

  6. A comparative analysis of biclustering algorithms for gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Eren, Kemal; Deveci, Mehmet; Küçüktunç, Onur; Çatalyürek, Ümit V

    2013-05-01

    The need to analyze high-dimension biological data is driving the development of new data mining methods. Biclustering algorithms have been successfully applied to gene expression data to discover local patterns, in which a subset of genes exhibit similar expression levels over a subset of conditions. However, it is not clear which algorithms are best suited for this task. Many algorithms have been published in the past decade, most of which have been compared only to a small number of algorithms. Surveys and comparisons exist in the literature, but because of the large number and variety of biclustering algorithms, they are quickly outdated. In this article we partially address this problem of evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of existing biclustering methods. We used the BiBench package to compare 12 algorithms, many of which were recently published or have not been extensively studied. The algorithms were tested on a suite of synthetic data sets to measure their performance on data with varying conditions, such as different bicluster models, varying noise, varying numbers of biclusters and overlapping biclusters. The algorithms were also tested on eight large gene expression data sets obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis was performed on the resulting biclusters, and the best enrichment terms are reported. Our analyses show that the biclustering method and its parameters should be selected based on the desired model, whether that model allows overlapping biclusters, and its robustness to noise. In addition, we observe that the biclustering algorithms capable of finding more than one model are more successful at capturing biologically relevant clusters.

  7. A Statistical Test for Comparing Nonnested Covariance Structure Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy; Hancock, Gregory R.

    While statistical procedures are well known for comparing hierarchically related (nested) covariance structure models, statistical tests for comparing nonhierarchically related (nonnested) models have proven more elusive. While isolated attempts have been made, none exists within the commonly used maximum likelihood estimation framework, thereby…

  8. Comparative analysis of solid waste management in 20 cities.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David C; Rodic, Ljiljana; Scheinberg, Anne; Velis, Costas A; Alabaster, Graham

    2012-03-01

    This paper uses the 'lens' of integrated and sustainable waste management (ISWM) to analyse the new data set compiled on 20 cities in six continents for the UN-Habitat flagship publication Solid Waste Management in the World's Cities. The comparative analysis looks first at waste generation rates and waste composition data. A process flow diagram is prepared for each city, as a powerful tool for representing the solid waste system as a whole in a comprehensive but concise way. Benchmark indicators are presented and compared for the three key physical components/drivers: public health and collection; environment and disposal; and resource recovery--and for three governance strategies required to deliver a well-functioning ISWM system: inclusivity; financial sustainability; and sound institutions and pro-active policies. Key insights include the variety and diversity of successful models - there is no 'one size fits all'; the necessity of good, reliable data; the importance of focusing on governance as well as technology; and the need to build on the existing strengths of the city. An example of the latter is the critical role of the informal sector in the cities in many developing countries: it not only delivers recycling rates that are comparable with modern Western systems, but also saves the city authorities millions of dollars in avoided waste collection and disposal costs. This provides the opportunity for win-win solutions, so long as the related wider challenges can be addressed.

  9. White matter degeneration in schizophrenia: a comparative diffusion tensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura A.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Kim, Jinsuh; Alexander, Andrew L.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2010-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious and disabling mental disorder. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies performed on schizophrenia have demonstrated white matter degeneration either due to loss of myelination or deterioration of fiber tracts although the areas where the changes occur are variable across studies. Most of the population based studies analyze the changes in schizophrenia using scalar indices computed from the diffusion tensor such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and relative anisotropy (RA). The scalar measures may not capture the complete information from the diffusion tensor. In this paper we have applied the RADTI method on a group of 9 controls and 9 patients with schizophrenia. The RADTI method converts the tensors to log-Euclidean space where a linear regression model is applied and hypothesis testing is performed between the control and patient groups. Results show that there is a significant difference in the anisotropy between patients and controls especially in the parts of forceps minor, superior corona radiata, anterior limb of internal capsule and genu of corpus callosum. To check if the tensor analysis gives a better idea of the changes in anisotropy, we compared the results with voxelwise FA analysis as well as voxelwise geodesic anisotropy (GA) analysis.

  10. AIR Model Preflight Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) ER-2 preflight analysis, one of the first attempts to obtain a relatively complete measurement set of the high-altitude radiation level environment, is described in this paper. The primary thrust is to characterize the atmospheric radiation and to define dose levels at high-altitude flight. A secondary thrust is to develop and validate dosimetric techniques and monitoring devices for protecting aircrews. With a few chosen routes, we can measure the experimental results and validate the AIR model predictions. Eventually, as more measurements are made, we gain more understanding about the hazardous radiation environment and acquire more confidence in the prediction models.

  11. Comparing soil moisture memory in satellite observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacke, Tobias; Hagemann, Stefan; Loew, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    A major obstacle to a correct parametrization of soil processes in large scale global land surface models is the lack of long term soil moisture observations for large parts of the globe. Currently, a compilation of soil moisture data derived from a range of satellites is released by the ESA Climate Change Initiative (ECV_SM). Comprising the period from 1978 until 2010, it provides the opportunity to compute climatological relevant statistics on a quasi-global scale and to compare these to the output of climate models. Our study is focused on the investigation of soil moisture memory in satellite observations and models. As a proxy for memory we compute the autocorrelation length (ACL) of the available satellite data and the uppermost soil layer of the models. Additional to the ECV_SM data, AMSR-E soil moisture is used as observational estimate. Simulated soil moisture fields are taken from ERA-Interim reanalysis and generated with the land surface model JSBACH, which was driven with quasi-observational meteorological forcing data. The satellite data show ACLs between one week and one month for the greater part of the land surface while the models simulate a longer memory of up to two months. Some pattern are similar in models and observations, e.g. a longer memory in the Sahel Zone and the Arabian Peninsula, but the models are not able to reproduce regions with a very short ACL of just a few days. If the long term seasonality is subtracted from the data the memory is strongly shortened, indicating the importance of seasonal variations for the memory in most regions. Furthermore, we analyze the change of soil moisture memory in the different soil layers of the models to investigate to which extent the surface soil moisture includes information about the whole soil column. A first analysis reveals that the ACL is increasing for deeper layers. However, its increase is stronger in the soil moisture anomaly than in its absolute values and the first even exceeds the

  12. Transcription factor motif quality assessment requires systematic comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kibet, Caleb Kipkurui; Machanick, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site prediction remains a challenge in gene regulatory research due to degeneracy and potential variability in binding sites in the genome. Dozens of algorithms designed to learn binding models (motifs) have generated many motifs available in research papers with a subset making it to databases like JASPAR, UniPROBE and Transfac. The presence of many versions of motifs from the various databases for a single TF and the lack of a standardized assessment technique makes it difficult for biologists to make an appropriate choice of binding model and for algorithm developers to benchmark, test and improve on their models. In this study, we review and evaluate the approaches in use, highlight differences and demonstrate the difficulty of defining a standardized motif assessment approach. We review scoring functions, motif length, test data and the type of performance metrics used in prior studies as some of the factors that influence the outcome of a motif assessment. We show that the scoring functions and statistics used in motif assessment influence ranking of motifs in a TF-specific manner. We also show that TF binding specificity can vary by source of genomic binding data. We also demonstrate that information content of a motif is not in isolation a measure of motif quality but is influenced by TF binding behaviour. We conclude that there is a need for an easy-to-use tool that presents all available evidence for a comparative analysis. PMID:27092243

  13. Texture analysis of multiple sclerosis: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tong, Longzheng; Wang, Lei; Li, Ning

    2008-10-01

    The difficulty of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to support early diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) stems from the subtle pathological changes in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, texture analysis was performed on MR images of MS patients and normal controls and a combined set of texture features were explored in order to better discriminate tissues between MS lesions, normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and normal white matter (NWM). Features were extracted from gradient matrix, run-length (RL) matrix, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), autoregressive (AR) model and wavelet analysis, and were selected based on greatest difference between different tissue types. The results of the combined set of texture features were compared with our previous results of GLCM-based features alone. The results of this study demonstrated that (1) with the combined set of texture features, classification was perfect (100%) between MS lesions and NAWM (or NWM), less successful (88.89%) among the three tissue types and worst (58.33%) between NAWM and NWM; (2) compared with GLCM-based features, the combined set of texture features were better at discriminating MS lesions and NWM, equally good at discriminating MS lesions and NAWM and at all three tissue types, but less effective in classification between NAWM and NWM. This study suggested that texture analysis with the combined set of texture features may be equally good or more advantageous than the commonly used GLCM-based features alone in discriminating MS lesions and NWM/NAWM and in supporting early diagnosis of MS.

  14. Runoff-rainfall (sic!) modelling: Comparing two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrnegger, Mathew; Schulz, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall is an important input variable for many applications. However, the estimation of areal rainfall is afflicted with significant uncertainties, since it exhibits a large spatio-temporal variability, especially in Alpine areas. Additionally the density of the monitoring network is frequently low and measurements are subject to major errors. The most reliable hydrological information that is available refers to runoff. Kirchner (2009) presented a method to infer catchment rainfall from streamflow fluctuations. The approach is however limited to catchments, where discharge is determined by the volume of water in storage and which can be characterized as simple first-order nonlinear dynamical systems. The model has recently been applied to several catchments in France and Luxembourg (Adamovic et. al., 2014; Krier et al., 2012). In Herrnegger et al. (2014) a different technique to calculate mean areal rainfall on the basis of an inverse conceptual rainfall-runoff model and runoff observations was presented. Thereby a conceptual model is embedded in an iteration algorithm, in which for every time step a rainfall value is determined, which results in a simulated runoff value that corresponds to the observation. The two modelling approaches differ substantially, not only concerning the model concepts, but especially in the number of model parameters. The Kirchner (2009) model (when deriving the storage-discharge relationship directly from runoff data) only has a single parameter. In contrast, the Herrnegger et al. (2014) model uses 10 parameters that have to be calibrated initially, but will offer more degrees of freedom and flexibility in describing more complex catchment responses. In this contribution, we present the application and comparison of both models in the Krems catchment (38.4 km²) located at the foothills of the Northern Austrian Alps. Apart from comparing the performance of the runoff simulations, the focus of this paper lies in evaluating the inverse

  15. Parmodel: a web server for automated comparative modeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Uchôa, Hugo Brandão; Jorge, Guilherme Eberhart; Freitas Da Silveira, Nelson José; Camera, João Carlos; Canduri, Fernanda; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-24

    Parmodel is a web server for automated comparative modeling and evaluation of protein structures. The aim of this tool is to help inexperienced users to perform modeling, assessment, visualization, and optimization of protein models as well as crystallographers to evaluate structures solved experimentally. It is subdivided in four modules: Parmodel Modeling, Parmodel Assessment, Parmodel Visualization, and Parmodel Optimization. The main module is the Parmodel Modeling that allows the building of several models for a same protein in a reduced time, through the distribution of modeling processes on a Beowulf cluster. Parmodel automates and integrates the main softwares used in comparative modeling as MODELLER, Whatcheck, Procheck, Raster3D, Molscript, and Gromacs. This web server is freely accessible at .

  16. EMERGY ANALYSIS AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our mission at USEPA is to protect human health and safeguard the natural environment. We aim to base our environmental regulations and policies on sound scientific and, where appropriate, economic analyses. Although EPA has conducted analysis of the impact of regulations on ...

  17. The use of antioptimization to compare alternative structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangadharan, S. N.; Nikolaidis, E.; Lee, K.; Haftka, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Structural models are usually tested by comparing their response with that of a reference structure (an actual structure or a more refined model) to a limited number of arbitrary loads. This test is not always reliable because the loads are arbitrary. An antioptimization-based method is proposed to test structural models. This method compares a structural model with a reference model or an actual structure under the worst loading case that maximizes the error in the model. Specifically, the method identifies the loading case that maximizes the difference between the responses of two models of the same structure using optimization. This method can be used to design experiments in order to validate a structural model. It can also be applied to identify damage in a structure by determining the load that maximizes the difference in the behavior of the damaged and the intact structure. The proposed method is illustrated by applying it to a plate and an automotive structure.

  18. Decision analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis for comparative effectiveness research--a primer.

    PubMed

    Sher, David J; Punglia, Rinaa S

    2014-01-01

    Although the analysis of real-world data is the foundation of comparative effectiveness analysis, not all clinical questions are easily approached with patient-derived information. Decision analysis is a set of modeling and analytic tools that simulate treatment and disease processes, including the incorporation of patient preferences, thus generating optimal treatment strategies for varying patient, disease, and treatment conditions. Although decision analysis is informed by evidence-derived outcomes, its ability to test treatment strategies under different conditions that are realistic but not necessarily reported in the literature makes it a useful and complementary technique to more standard data analysis. Similarly, cost-effectiveness analysis is a discipline in which the relative costs and benefits of treatment alternatives are rigorously compared. With the well-recognized increase in highly technical, costly radiation therapy technologies, the cost-effectiveness of these different treatments would come under progressively more scrutiny. In this review, we discuss the theoretical and practical aspects of decision analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis, providing examples that highlight their methodology and utility.

  19. Models to compare management options for a protogynous fish.

    PubMed

    Heppell, Selina S; Heppell, Scott A; Coleman, Felicia C; Koenig, Christopher C

    2006-02-01

    Populations of gag (Mycteroperca microlepis), a hermaphroditic grouper, have experienced a dramatic shift in sex ratio over the past 25 years due to a decline in older age classes. The highly female-skewed sex ratio can be predicted as a consequence of increased fishing mortality that truncates the age distribution, and raises some concern about the overall fitness of the population. Management efforts may need to be directed toward maintenance of sex ratio as well as stock size, with evaluations of recruitment based on sex ratio or male stock size in addition to the traditional female-based stock-recruitment relationship. We used two stochastic, age-structured models to heuristically compare the effects of reducing fishing mortality on different life history stages and the relative impact of reductions in fertilization rates that may occur with highly skewed sex ratios. Our response variables included population size, sex ratio, lost egg fertility, and female spawning stock biomass. Population growth rates were highest for scenarios that reduced mortality for female gag (nearshore closure), while improved sex ratios were obtained most quickly with spawning reserves. The effect of reduced fertility through sex ratio bias was generally low but depended on the management scenario employed. Our results demonstrate the utility of evaluation of fishery management scenarios through model analysis and simulation, the synergistic interaction of life history and response to changes in mortality rates, and the importance of defining management goals.

  20. Ion channel gates: comparative analysis of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Tai, Kaihsu; Haider, Shozeb; Grottesi, Alessandro; Sansom, Mark S P

    2009-04-01

    The energetic profile of an ion translated along the axis of an ion channel should reveal whether the structure corresponds to a functionally open or closed state of the channel. In this study, we explore the combined use of Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and evaluation of van der Waals interactions between ion and pore to provide an initial appraisal of the gating state of a channel. This approach is exemplified by its application to the bacterial inward rectifier potassium channel KirBac3.1, where it reveals the closed gate to be formed by a ring of leucine (L124) side chains. We have extended this analysis to a comparative survey of gating profiles, including model hydrophobic nanopores, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and a number of potassium channel structures and models. This enables us to identify three gating regimes, and to show the limitation of this computationally inexpensive method. For a (closed) gate radius of 0.4 nm < R < 0.8 nm, a hydrophobic gate may be present. For a gate radius of 0.2 nm < R < 0.4 nm, both electrostatic and van der Waals interactions will contribute to the barrier height. Below R = 0.2 nm, repulsive van der Waals interactions are likely to dominate, resulting in a sterically occluded gate. In general, the method is more useful when the channel is wider; for narrower channels, the flexibility of the protein may allow otherwise-unsurmountable energetic barriers to be overcome.

  1. Comparative analysis of ATRX, a chromatin remodeling protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel J; Pask, Andrew J; Huynh, Kim; Renfree, Marilyn B; Harley, Vincent R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2004-09-15

    The ATRX protein, associated with X-linked alpha-thalassaemia, mental retardation and developmental abnormalities including genital dysgenesis, has been proposed to function as a global transcriptional regulator within a multi-protein complex. However, an understanding of the composition and mechanics of this machinery has remained elusive. We applied inter-specific comparative analysis to identify conserved elements which may be involved in regulating the conformation of chromatin. As part of this study, we cloned and sequenced the entire translatable coding region (7.4 kb) of the ATRX gene from a model marsupial (tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii). We identify an ATRX ancestral core, conserved between plants, fish and mammals, comprising the cysteine-rich and SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like regions and protein interaction domains. Our data are consistent with the model of the cysteine-rich region as a DNA-binding zinc finger adjacent to a protein-binding (plant homeodomain-like) domain. Alignment of vertebrate ATRX sequences highlights other conserved elements, including a negatively charged mammalian sequence which we propose to be involved in binding of positively charged histone tails.

  2. Engine System Loads Analysis Compared to Hot-Fire Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Jennings, John M.; Mims, Katherine; Brunty, Joseph; Christensen, Eric R.; McConnaughey, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Early implementation of structural dynamics finite element analyses for calculation of design loads is considered common design practice for high volume manufacturing industries such as automotive and aeronautical industries. However with the rarity of rocket engine development programs starts, these tools are relatively new to the design of rocket engines. In the NASA MC-1 engine program, the focus was to reduce the cost-to-weight ratio. The techniques for structural dynamics analysis practices, were tailored in this program to meet both production and structural design goals. Perturbation of rocket engine design parameters resulted in a number of MC-1 load cycles necessary to characterize the impact due to mass and stiffness changes. Evolution of loads and load extraction methodologies, parametric considerations and a discussion of load path sensitivities are important during the design and integration of a new engine system. During the final stages of development, it is important to verify the results of an engine system model to determine the validity of the results. During the final stages of the MC-1 program, hot-fire test results were obtained and compared to the structural design loads calculated by the engine system model. These comparisons are presented in this paper.

  3. Comparing pion production models to MiniBooNE data

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2015-05-15

    Predictions for neutrino-induced charged- and neutral-current single pion production on CH{sub 2} from theoretical models and Monte Carlo event generators are compared with the cross section measurements from the MiniBooNE experiment.

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Charter Schools and Traditional Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jodi Renee Abbott

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this descriptive research study was to compare charter and traditional public schools on the academic knowledge of fifth grade students as measured by Arizona's Instrument to Measure Standards (AIMS) in a suburb of a large southwestern city. This analysis also compared charter and traditional public schools on AYP status. It was…

  5. The Constant Comparative Analysis Method Outside of Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fram, Sheila M.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary addresses the gap in the literature regarding discussion of the legitimate use of Constant Comparative Analysis Method (CCA) outside of Grounded Theory. The purpose is to show the strength of using CCA to maintain the emic perspective and how theoretical frameworks can maintain the etic perspective throughout the analysis. My…

  6. SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-05

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and

  7. MODBASE, a database of annotated comparative protein structure models.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Stuart, Ashley C; Ilyin, Valentin A; Sali, Andrej

    2002-01-01

    MODBASE (http://guitar.rockefeller.edu/modbase) is a relational database of annotated comparative protein structure models for all available protein sequences matched to at least one known protein structure. The models are calculated by MODPIPE, an automated modeling pipeline that relies on PSI-BLAST, IMPALA and MODELLER. MODBASE uses the MySQL relational database management system for flexible and efficient querying, and the MODVIEW Netscape plugin for viewing and manipulating multiple sequences and structures. It is updated regularly to reflect the growth of the protein sequence and structure databases, as well as improvements in the software for calculating the models. For ease of access, MODBASE is organized into different datasets. The largest dataset contains models for domains in 304 517 out of 539 171 unique protein sequences in the complete TrEMBL database (23 March 2001); only models based on significant alignments (PSI-BLAST E-value < 10(-4)) and models assessed to have the correct fold are included. Other datasets include models for target selection and structure-based annotation by the New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium, models for prediction of genes in the Drosophila melanogaster genome, models for structure determination of several ribosomal particles and models calculated by the MODWEB comparative modeling web server.

  8. Reciprocal Ontological Models Show Indeterminism Comparable to Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Banik, Manik; Bhattacharya, Some Sankar; Ghosh, Sibasish; Kar, Guruprasad; Mukherjee, Amit; Roy, Arup

    2017-02-01

    We show that within the class of ontological models due to Harrigan and Spekkens, those satisfying preparation-measurement reciprocity must allow indeterminism comparable to that in quantum theory. Our result implies that one can design quantum random number generator, for which it is impossible, even in principle, to construct a reciprocal deterministic model.

  9. Decision Analysis Tool to Compare Energy Pathways for Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    With the goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, oil imports, and energy costs, a wide variety of automotive technologies are proposed to replace the traditional gasoline-powered internal combustion engine (g-ICE). A prototype model, Analytica Transportation Energy Analysis Model (ATEAM), has been developed using the Analytica decision modeling environment, visualizing the structure as a hierarchy of influence diagrams. The report summarized the FY2010 ATEAM accomplishments.

  10. Model Analysis ToolKit

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Dylan R.

    2015-05-15

    MATK provides basic functionality to facilitate model analysis within the Python computational environment. Model analysis setup within MATK includes: - define parameters - define observations - define model (python function) - define samplesets (sets of parameter combinations) Currently supported functionality includes: - forward model runs - Latin-Hypercube sampling of parameters - multi-dimensional parameter studies - parallel execution of parameter samples - model calibration using internal Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - model calibration using lmfit package - model calibration using levmar package - Markov Chain Monte Carlo using pymc package MATK facilitates model analysis using: - scipy - calibration (scipy.optimize) - rpy2 - Python interface to R

  11. Reproducibility and Comparability of Computational Models for Astrocyte Calcium Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Manninen, Tiina; Havela, Riikka; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2017-01-01

    The scientific community across all disciplines faces the same challenges of ensuring accessibility, reproducibility, and efficient comparability of scientific results. Computational neuroscience is a rapidly developing field, where reproducibility and comparability of research results have gained increasing interest over the past years. As the number of computational models of brain functions is increasing, we chose to address reproducibility using four previously published computational models of astrocyte excitability as an example. Although not conventionally taken into account when modeling neuronal systems, astrocytes have been shown to take part in a variety of in vitro and in vivo phenomena including synaptic transmission. Two of the selected astrocyte models describe spontaneous calcium excitability, and the other two neurotransmitter-evoked calcium excitability. We specifically addressed how well the original simulation results can be reproduced with a reimplementation of the models. Additionally, we studied how well the selected models can be reused and whether they are comparable in other stimulation conditions and research settings. Unexpectedly, we found out that three of the model publications did not give all the necessary information required to reimplement the models. In addition, we were able to reproduce the original results of only one of the models completely based on the information given in the original publications and in the errata. We actually found errors in the equations provided by two of the model publications; after modifying the equations accordingly, the original results were reproduced more accurately. Even though the selected models were developed to describe the same biological event, namely astrocyte calcium excitability, the models behaved quite differently compared to one another. Our findings on a specific set of published astrocyte models stress the importance of proper validation of the models against experimental wet

  12. Comparing estimates of genetic variance across different relationship models.

    PubMed

    Legarra, Andres

    2016-02-01

    Use of relationships between individuals to estimate genetic variances and heritabilities via mixed models is standard practice in human, plant and livestock genetics. Different models or information for relationships may give different estimates of genetic variances. However, comparing these estimates across different relationship models is not straightforward as the implied base populations differ between relationship models. In this work, I present a method to compare estimates of variance components across different relationship models. I suggest referring genetic variances obtained using different relationship models to the same reference population, usually a set of individuals in the population. Expected genetic variance of this population is the estimated variance component from the mixed model times a statistic, Dk, which is the average self-relationship minus the average (self- and across-) relationship. For most typical models of relationships, Dk is close to 1. However, this is not true for very deep pedigrees, for identity-by-state relationships, or for non-parametric kernels, which tend to overestimate the genetic variance and the heritability. Using mice data, I show that heritabilities from identity-by-state and kernel-based relationships are overestimated. Weighting these estimates by Dk scales them to a base comparable to genomic or pedigree relationships, avoiding wrong comparisons, for instance, "missing heritabilities".

  13. Comparing interval estimates for small sample ordinal CFA models

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Prathiba

    2015-01-01

    Robust maximum likelihood (RML) and asymptotically generalized least squares (AGLS) methods have been recommended for fitting ordinal structural equation models. Studies show that some of these methods underestimate standard errors. However, these studies have not investigated the coverage and bias of interval estimates. An estimate with a reasonable standard error could still be severely biased. This can only be known by systematically investigating the interval estimates. The present study compares Bayesian, RML, and AGLS interval estimates of factor correlations in ordinal confirmatory factor analysis models (CFA) for small sample data. Six sample sizes, 3 factor correlations, and 2 factor score distributions (multivariate normal and multivariate mildly skewed) were studied. Two Bayesian prior specifications, informative and relatively less informative were studied. Undercoverage of confidence intervals and underestimation of standard errors was common in non-Bayesian methods. Underestimated standard errors may lead to inflated Type-I error rates. Non-Bayesian intervals were more positive biased than negatively biased, that is, most intervals that did not contain the true value were greater than the true value. Some non-Bayesian methods had non-converging and inadmissible solutions for small samples and non-normal data. Bayesian empirical standard error estimates for informative and relatively less informative priors were closer to the average standard errors of the estimates. The coverage of Bayesian credibility intervals was closer to what was expected with overcoverage in a few cases. Although some Bayesian credibility intervals were wider, they reflected the nature of statistical uncertainty that comes with the data (e.g., small sample). Bayesian point estimates were also more accurate than non-Bayesian estimates. The results illustrate the importance of analyzing coverage and bias of interval estimates, and how ignoring interval estimates can be misleading

  14. A comparative quadrant analysis of turbulence in a plant canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Wusi; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.; Zhu, Weihong; van Hout, René; Katz, Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulence in plant canopies has traditionally been validated using bulk statistical quantities such as mean velocity and variance profiles. However, turbulent exchanges between a plant canopy and the atmosphere are dominated by large-scale coherent structures, and therefore LES must also be validated using statistical tools that are sensitive to details of coherent structures. In this study, LES and measurements using particle image velocimetry (PIV) are compared near the top of the canopy by means of a quadrant-hole analysis of turbulent kinetic energy, vorticity, and dissipation rate. The LES resolves coarse features of individual corn plants and uses the Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic subgrid model. At the measurement location, there is good agreement between the LES predictions and the field data in terms of most conditionally sampled quantities, confirming the applicability of LES for fundamental studies of vegetation-air interactions and coherent structures. The simulation results confirm that sweeps (the fourth-quadrant events) contribute the largest fraction of turbulent kinetic energy, vorticity, and dissipation rate inside the plant canopy. The magnitudes of the vorticity and dissipation rate at the top of the canopy are highest in the first quadrant (rare events of outward interactions).

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Life-Cycle Assessment Tools for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We identified and evaluated five life-cycle assessment tools that community decision makers can use to assess the environmental and economic impacts of end-of-life (EOL) materials management options. The tools evaluated in this report are waste reduction mode (WARM), municipal solid waste-decision support tool (MSW-DST), solid waste optimization life-cycle framework (SWOLF), environmental assessment system for environmental technologies (EASETECH), and waste and resources assessment for the environment (WRATE). WARM, MSW-DST, and SWOLF were developed for US-specific materials management strategies, while WRATE and EASETECH were developed for European-specific conditions. All of the tools (with the exception of WARM) allow specification of a wide variety of parameters (e.g., materials composition and energy mix) to a varying degree, thus allowing users to model specific EOL materials management methods even outside the geographical domain they are originally intended for. The flexibility to accept user-specified input for a large number of parameters increases the level of complexity and the skill set needed for using these tools. The tools were evaluated and compared based on a series of criteria, including general tool features, the scope of the analysis (e.g., materials and processes included), and the impact categories analyzed (e.g., climate change, acidification). A series of scenarios representing materials management problems currently relevant to c

  16. A comparative analysis of metacommunity types in the freshwater realm.

    PubMed

    Heino, Jani; Soininen, Janne; Alahuhta, Janne; Lappalainen, Jyrki; Virtanen, Risto

    2015-04-01

    Most metacommunity studies have taken a direct mechanistic approach, aiming to model the effects of local and regional processes on local communities within a metacommunity. An alternative approach is to focus on emergent patterns at the metacommunity level through applying the elements of metacommunity structure (EMS; Oikos, 97, 2002, 237) analysis. The EMS approach has very rarely been applied in the context of a comparative analysis of metacommunity types of main microbial, plant, and animal groups. Furthermore, to our knowledge, no study has associated metacommunity types with their potential ecological correlates in the freshwater realm. We assembled data for 45 freshwater metacommunities, incorporating biologically highly disparate organismal groups (i.e., bacteria, algae, macrophytes, invertebrates, and fish). We first examined ecological correlates (e.g., matrix properties, beta diversity, and average characteristics of a metacommunity, including body size, trophic group, ecosystem type, life form, and dispersal mode) of the three elements of metacommunity structure (i.e., coherence, turnover, and boundary clumping). Second, based on those three elements, we determined which metacommunity types prevailed in freshwater systems and which ecological correlates best discriminated among the observed metacommunity types. We found that the three elements of metacommunity structure were not strongly related to the ecological correlates, except that turnover was positively related to beta diversity. We observed six metacommunity types. The most common were Clementsian and quasi-nested metacommunity types, whereas Random, quasi-Clementsian, Gleasonian, and quasi-Gleasonian types were less common. These six metacommunity types were best discriminated by beta diversity and the first axis of metacommunity ecological traits, ranging from metacommunities of producer organisms occurring in streams to those of large predatory organisms occurring in lakes. Our results showed

  17. Comparative analysis of genomic signal processing for microarray data clustering.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, Robert S H; Sungoor, Ala; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Genomic signal processing is a new area of research that combines advanced digital signal processing methodologies for enhanced genetic data analysis. It has many promising applications in bioinformatics and next generation of healthcare systems, in particular, in the field of microarray data clustering. In this paper we present a comparative performance analysis of enhanced digital spectral analysis methods for robust clustering of gene expression across multiple microarray data samples. Three digital signal processing methods: linear predictive coding, wavelet decomposition, and fractal dimension are studied to provide a comparative evaluation of the clustering performance of these methods on several microarray datasets. The results of this study show that the fractal approach provides the best clustering accuracy compared to other digital signal processing and well known statistical methods.

  18. Comparing global soil models to soil carbon profile databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koven, C. D.; Harden, J. W.; He, Y.; Lawrence, D. M.; Nave, L. E.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Treat, C.; Sulman, B. N.; Kane, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    As global soil models begin to consider the dynamics of carbon below the surface layers, it is crucial to assess the realism of these models. We focus on the vertical profiles of soil C predicted across multiple biomes form the Community Land Model (CLM4.5), using different values for a parameter that controls the rate of decomposition at depth versus at the surface, and compare these to observationally-derived diagnostics derived from the International Soil Carbon Database (ISCN) to assess the realism of model predictions of carbon depthattenuation, and the ability of observations to provide a constraint on rates of decomposition at depth.

  19. Operations and Modeling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The Reliability and Maintainability Analysis Tool (RMAT) provides NASA the capability to estimate reliability and maintainability (R&M) parameters and operational support requirements for proposed space vehicles based upon relationships established from both aircraft and Shuttle R&M data. RMAT has matured both in its underlying database and in its level of sophistication in extrapolating this historical data to satisfy proposed mission requirements, maintenance concepts and policies, and type of vehicle (i.e. ranging from aircraft like to shuttle like). However, a companion analyses tool, the Logistics Cost Model (LCM) has not reached the same level of maturity as RMAT due, in large part, to nonexistent or outdated cost estimating relationships and underlying cost databases, and it's almost exclusive dependence on Shuttle operations and logistics cost input parameters. As a result, the full capability of the RMAT/LCM suite of analysis tools to take a conceptual vehicle and derive its operations and support requirements along with the resulting operating and support costs has not been realized.

  20. CRITICA: coding region identification tool invoking comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badger, J. H.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Gene recognition is essential to understanding existing and future DNA sequence data. CRITICA (Coding Region Identification Tool Invoking Comparative Analysis) is a suite of programs for identifying likely protein-coding sequences in DNA by combining comparative analysis of DNA sequences with more common noncomparative methods. In the comparative component of the analysis, regions of DNA are aligned with related sequences from the DNA databases; if the translation of the aligned sequences has greater amino acid identity than expected for the observed percentage nucleotide identity, this is interpreted as evidence for coding. CRITICA also incorporates noncomparative information derived from the relative frequencies of hexanucleotides in coding frames versus other contexts (i.e., dicodon bias). The dicodon usage information is derived by iterative analysis of the data, such that CRITICA is not dependent on the existence or accuracy of coding sequence annotations in the databases. This independence makes the method particularly well suited for the analysis of novel genomes. CRITICA was tested by analyzing the available Salmonella typhimurium DNA sequences. Its predictions were compared with the DNA sequence annotations and with the predictions of GenMark. CRITICA proved to be more accurate than GenMark, and moreover, many of its predictions that would seem to be errors instead reflect problems in the sequence databases. The source code of CRITICA is freely available by anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu in/pub/critica) and on the World Wide Web (http:/(/)rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu).

  1. Computational Methods for the Analysis of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Raj; Lockwood, William W.; Lam, Wan L.

    2006-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) is a technique for assaying the copy number status of cancer genomes. The widespread use of this technology has lead to a rapid accumulation of high throughput data, which in turn has prompted the development of computational strategies for the analysis of array CGH data. Here we explain the principles behind array image processing, data visualization and genomic profile analysis, review currently available software packages, and raise considerations for future software development. PMID:17992253

  2. Gap Analysis Comparing LLNL ISMS and ISO 14001

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, T B

    2004-08-09

    A gap analysis was conducted comparing the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) with the international standard ISO 14001 Environmental Management System and with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. This analysis was accomplished as part of LLNL's assessment of the impacts of adopting DOE Order 450.1 and comprises a portion of its continuous improvement efforts under ISMS.

  3. Comparing the line broadened quasilinear model to Vlasov code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, K.; Berk, H. L.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2014-03-01

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) model is revisited to study its predicted saturation level as compared with predictions of a Vlasov solver BOT [Lilley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 195003 (2009) and M. Lilley, BOT Manual. The parametric dependencies of the model are modified to achieve more accuracy compared to the results of the Vlasov solver both in regards to a mode amplitude's time evolution to a saturated state and its final steady state amplitude in the parameter space of the model's applicability. However, the regions of stability as predicted by LBQ model and BOT are found to significantly differ from each other. The solutions of the BOT simulations are found to have a larger region of instability than the LBQ simulations.

  4. Accuracy of functional surfaces on comparatively modeled protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieling; Dundas, Joe; Kachalo, Sema; Ouyang, Zheng; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein functional surfaces are important for predicting protein function, understanding enzyme mechanism, and docking small compounds to proteins. As the rapid speed of accumulation of protein sequence information far exceeds that of structures, constructing accurate models of protein functional surfaces and identify their key elements become increasingly important. A promising approach is to build comparative models from sequences using known structural templates such as those obtained from structural genome projects. Here we assess how well this approach works in modeling binding surfaces. By systematically building three-dimensional comparative models of proteins using Modeller, we determine how well functional surfaces can be accurately reproduced. We use an alpha shape based pocket algorithm to compute all pockets on the modeled structures, and conduct a large-scale computation of similarity measurements (pocket RMSD and fraction of functional atoms captured) for 26,590 modeled enzyme protein structures. Overall, we find that when the sequence fragment of the binding surfaces has more than 45% identity to that of the tempalte protein, the modeled surfaces have on average an RMSD of 0.5 Å, and contain 48% or more of the binding surface atoms, with nearly all of the important atoms in the signatures of binding pockets captured. PMID:21541664

  5. Comparative and Familial Analysis of Handedness in Great Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, population-level handedness has been considered a hallmark of human evolution. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit population-level handedness remains a topic of considerable debate. This paper summarizes published data on handedness in great apes. Comparative analysis indicated that chimpanzees and bonobos show population-level right…

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Three Unique Theories of Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present three classical theories on organizational learning and conduct a comparative analysis that highlights their strengths, similarities, and differences. Two of the theories -- experiential learning theory and adaptive -- generative learning theory -- represent the thinking of the cognitive perspective, while…

  7. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India). This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can't do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good result. For Large city

  8. Comparative Analysis of Cryptography Library in IoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Uday; Borgohain, Tuhin; Sanyal, Sugata

    2015-05-01

    The paper aims to do a survey along with a comparative analysis of the various cryptography libraries that are applicable in the field of Internet of Things (IoT). The first half of the paper briefly introduces the various cryptography libraries available in the field of cryptography along with a list of all the algorithms contained within the libraries. The second half of the paper deals with cryptography libraries specifically aimed for application in the field of Internet of Things. The various libraries and their performance analysis listed down in this paper are consolidated from various sources with the aim of providing a single comprehensive repository for reference to the various cryptography libraries and the comparative analysis of their features in IoT.

  9. Comparing Spatial and Multilevel Regression Models for Binary Outcomes in Neighborhood Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    The standard multilevel regressions that are widely used in neighborhood research typically ignore potential between-neighborhood correlations due to underlying spatial processes, and hence produce inappropriate inferences about neighborhood effects. In contrast, spatial models make estimations and predictions across areas by explicitly modeling the spatial correlations among observations in different locations. A better understanding of the strengths and limitations of spatial models as compared to the standard multilevel model is needed to improve the research on neighborhood and spatial effects. This research systematically compares model estimations and predictions for binary outcomes between (distance- and lattice-based) spatial and the standard multilevel models in the presence of both within- and between-neighborhood correlations, through simulations. Results from simulation analysis reveal that the standard multilevel and spatial models produce similar estimates of fixed effects, but different estimates of random effects variances. Both the standard multilevel and pure spatial models tend to overestimate the corresponding random effects variances, compared to hybrid models when both non-spatial within neighborhood and spatial between-neighborhood effects exist. Spatial models also outperform the standard multilevel model by a narrow margin in case of fully out-of-sample predictions. Distance-based spatial models provide extra spatial information and have stronger predictive power than lattice-based models under certain circumstances. These merits of spatial modeling are exhibited in an empirical analysis of the child mortality data from 1880 Newark, New Jersey. PMID:25284905

  10. Case Problems for Problem-Based Pedagogical Approaches: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbagh, Nada; Dass, Susan

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of 51 case problems used in five problem-based pedagogical models was conducted to examine whether there are differences in their characteristics and the implications of such differences on the selection and generation of ill-structured case problems. The five pedagogical models were: situated learning, goal-based scenario,…

  11. Comparing new models of transverse instability with simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz M.

    2012-05-20

    Recently, Balbekov and Burov have produced an ordinary integro-differential equation that approximates the Vlasov equation for beams with wakefields and large space charge tune shift. The present work compares this model with simulations. In particular, the claim that certain types of transverse wakes cannot lead to mode coupling instabilities is explored.

  12. Conceptualizations of Creativity: Comparing Theories and Models of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Angie L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews seven different theories of giftedness that include creativity as a component, comparing and contrasting how each one conceptualizes creativity as a part of giftedness. The functions of creativity vary across the models, suggesting that while the field of gifted education often cites the importance of creativity, the…

  13. Comparative Analysis on Time Series with Included Structural Break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeski, Cvetko J.; Vasant, Pandian

    2009-08-01

    The time series analysis (ARIMA models) is a good approach for identification of time series. But, if we have structural break in the time series, we cannot create only one model of time series. Further more, if we don't have enough data between two structural breaks, it's impossible to create valid time series models for identification of the time series. This paper explores the possibility of identification of the inflation process dynamics via of the system-theoretic, by means of both Box-Jenkins ARIMA methodologies and artificial neural networks.

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Day Care Licensing Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Head Start Research and Evaluation Center.

    This report focuses on the major similarities and differences of three sets of day care licensing standards (model, state, and federal) in order to provide an information base for isolating the problems, concerns, and issues involved in day care licensing. Sets of standards compared are: (1) "OCD Guides for Day Care Licensing," 1973…

  15. Video Analysis and Modeling in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Doug

    2008-03-01

    The Tracker video analysis program allows users to overlay simple dynamical models on a video clip. Video modeling offers advantages over both traditional video analysis and animation-only modeling. In traditional video analysis, for example, students measure ``g'' by tracking a dropped or tossed ball, constructing a position or velocity vs. time graph, and interpreting the graphs to obtain initial conditions and acceleration. In video modeling, by contrast, the students interactively construct theoretical force expressions and define initial conditions for a dynamical particle model that synchs with and draws itself on the video. The behavior of the model is thus compared directly with that of the real-world motion. Tracker uses the Open Source Physics code library so sophisticated models are possible. I will demonstrate and compare video modeling with video analysis and I will discuss the advantages of video modeling over animation-only modeling. The Tracker video analysis program is available at: http://www.cabrillo.edu/˜dbrown/tracker/.

  16. The pathology of comparative animal models of human haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Klopfleisch, R; Olias, P

    2012-11-01

    Haemochromatosis is one of the most common human hereditary diseases. It is defined as a pathological condition with normal iron-driven erythropoiesis, but toxic accumulation of iron in vital organs, which is caused by mutations in any gene that encodes a protein involved in limiting the entry of iron into the blood. Iron storage diseases have also been described in several mammalian and avian species and these have been proposed as comparative animal models for human haemochromatosis. Genetically engineered mouse strains with mutations in iron metabolism genes model several aspects of human haemochromatosis and study of these animals has facilitated understanding of the disease. Spontaneously arising iron storage diseases in non-murine species also overlap in some clinicopathological aspects with human haemochromatosis. However, the lack of conclusive information on the molecular biology of theses species-specific diseases and the common impact of dietary iron concentration on disease progression in most species limit their usefulness as comparative models.

  17. Dermoscopy analysis of RGB-images based on comparative features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myakinin, Oleg O.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Neretin, Evgeny Y.; Kozlov, Sergey V.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for color and texture analysis for dermoscopic images of human skin based on Haar wavelets, Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and Histogram Analysis. This approach is a modification of «7-point checklist» clinical method. Thus, that is an "absolute" diagnostic method because one is using only features extracted from tumor's ROI (Region of Interest), which can be selected manually and/or using a special algorithm. We propose additional features extracted from the same image for comparative analysis of tumor and healthy skin. We used Euclidean distance, Cosine similarity, and Tanimoto coefficient as comparison metrics between color and texture features extracted from tumor's and healthy skin's ROI separately. A classifier for separating melanoma images from other tumors has been built by SVM (Support Vector Machine) algorithm. Classification's errors with and without comparative features between skin and tumor have been analyzed. Significant increase of recognition quality with comparative features has been demonstrated. Moreover, we analyzed two modes (manual and automatic) for ROI selecting on tumor and healthy skin areas. We have reached 91% of sensitivity using comparative features in contrast with 77% of sensitivity using the only "absolute" method. The specificity was the invariable (94%) in both cases.

  18. Evaluating the Risks of Clinical Research: Direct Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdoler, Emily; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Pine, Daniel S.; Wendler, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Many guidelines and regulations allow children and adolescents to be enrolled in research without the prospect of clinical benefit when it poses minimal risk. However, few systematic methods exist to determine when research risks are minimal. This situation has led to significant variation in minimal risk judgments, raising concern that some children are not being adequately protected. To address this concern, we describe a new method for implementing the widely endorsed “risks of daily life” standard for minimal risk. This standard defines research risks as minimal when they do not exceed the risks posed by daily life activities or routine examinations. Methods: This study employed a conceptual and normative analysis, and use of an illustrative example. Results: Different risks are composed of the same basic elements: Type, likelihood, and magnitude of harm. Hence, one can compare the risks of research and the risks of daily life by comparing the respective basic elements with each other. We use this insight to develop a systematic method, direct comparative analysis, for implementing the “risks of daily life” standard for minimal risk. The method offers a way of evaluating research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities, such as the risk of experiencing anxiety, stress, or other psychological harm. We thus illustrate how direct comparative analysis can be applied in practice by using it to evaluate whether the anxiety induced by a respiratory CO2 challenge poses minimal or greater than minimal risks in children and adolescents. Conclusions: Direct comparative analysis is a systematic method for applying the “risks of daily life” standard for minimal risk to research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities. It thereby offers a method to protect children and adolescents in research, while ensuring that important studies are not blocked because of unwarranted concerns about

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian interferon-γ-inducible GTPases.

    PubMed

    Premzl, Marko

    2012-11-01

    The interferon-γ-inducible GTPases, IFGGs, are intracellular proteins involved in immune response against pathogens. A comprehensive comparative genomic review and analysis of eutherian IFGGs was carried out using public genomic sequences. The 64 eutherian IFGG genes were examined in detail and annotated. The eutherian IFGG promoter types were first catalogued followed by a phylogenetic analysis of eutherian IFGGs, which described five major IFGG clusters. The patterns of differential gene expansions and protein regions that may regulate IFGG catalytic features suggested a new classification of eutherian IFGGs. This mini-review has also provided new tests of reliability of public genomic sequences as well as tests of protein molecular evolution.

  20. Comparative analysis of two DOPA dioxygenases from Phytolacca Americana.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kana; Yoshida, Kazuko; Sakuta, Masaaki

    2015-05-01

    The comparative analysis of two Phytolacca americana DOPA dioxygenases (PaDOD1 and PaDOD2) that may be involved in betalain biosynthesis was carried out. The recombinant protein of PaDOD catalyzed the conversion of DOPA to betalamic acid, whereas DOD activity was not detected in PaDOD2 in vitro. The role of DOD genes is discussed in the evolutionary context using phylogenetic analysis, suggesting that DOD might have been duplicated early in evolution and that accumulation of base substitutions could have led to the different characteristics of DODs within the betalain-producing Caryophyllales.

  1. High-resolution comparative modeling with RosettaCM.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Kim, David; Miles, Chris; Brunette, Tj; Thompson, James; Baker, David

    2013-10-08

    We describe an improved method for comparative modeling, RosettaCM, which optimizes a physically realistic all-atom energy function over the conformational space defined by homologous structures. Given a set of sequence alignments, RosettaCM assembles topologies by recombining aligned segments in Cartesian space and building unaligned regions de novo in torsion space. The junctions between segments are regularized using a loop closure method combining fragment superposition with gradient-based minimization. The energies of the resulting models are optimized by all-atom refinement, and the most representative low-energy model is selected. The CASP10 experiment suggests that RosettaCM yields models with more accurate side-chain and backbone conformations than other methods when the sequence identity to the templates is greater than ∼15%.

  2. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Hydrologic Ecosystem Service Estimates: Comparing Two Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennedy-Frank, P. J.; Ghile, Y.; Gorelick, S.; Logsdon, R. A.; Chaubey, I.; Ziv, G.

    2014-12-01

    We compare estimates of the spatial distribution of water quantity provided (annual water yield) from two ecohydrologic models: the widely-used Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the much simpler water models from the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) toolbox. These two models differ significantly in terms of complexity, timescale of operation, effort, and data required for calibration, and so are often used in different management contexts. We compare two study sites in the US: the Wildcat Creek Watershed (2083 km2) in Indiana, a largely agricultural watershed in a cold aseasonal climate, and the Upper Upatoi Creek Watershed (876 km2) in Georgia, a mostly forested watershed in a temperate aseasonal climate. We evaluate (1) quantitative estimates of water yield to explore how well each model represents this process, and (2) ranked estimates of water yield to indicate how useful the models are for management purposes where other social and financial factors may play significant roles. The SWAT and InVEST models provide very similar estimates of the water yield of individual subbasins in the Wildcat Creek Watershed (Pearson r = 0.92, slope = 0.89), and a similar ranking of the relative water yield of those subbasins (Spearman r = 0.86). However, the two models provide relatively different estimates of the water yield of individual subbasins in the Upper Upatoi Watershed (Pearson r = 0.25, slope = 0.14), and very different ranking of the relative water yield of those subbasins (Spearman r = -0.10). The Upper Upatoi watershed has a significant baseflow contribution due to its sandy, well-drained soils. InVEST's simple seasonality terms, which assume no change in storage over the time of the model run, may not accurately estimate water yield processes when baseflow provides such a strong contribution. Our results suggest that InVEST users take care in situations where storage changes are significant.

  4. Comparative Genomics via Wavelet Analysis for Closely Related Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jiuzhou; Ware, Tony; Liu, Shu-Lin; Surette, M.

    2004-12-01

    Comparative genomics has been a valuable method for extracting and extrapolating genome information among closely related bacteria. The efficiency of the traditional methods is extremely influenced by the software method used. To overcome the problem here, we propose using wavelet analysis to perform comparative genomics. First, global comparison using wavelet analysis gives the difference at a quantitative level. Then local comparison using keto-excess or purine-excess plots shows precise positions of inversions, translocations, and horizontally transferred DNA fragments. We firstly found that the level of energy spectra difference is related to the similarity of bacteria strains; it could be a quantitative index to describe the similarities of genomes. The strategy is described in detail by comparisons of closely related strains: S.typhi CT18, S.typhi Ty2, S.typhimurium LT2, H.pylori 26695, and H.pylori J99.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Patrick; Logan, Jeffrey; Bird, Lori; Short, Walter

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.; Logan, J.; Bird, L.; Short, W.

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  7. A Statistical Word-Level Translation Model for Comparable Corpora

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    readily available resources such as corpora, thesauri, bilingual and multilingual lexicons and dictionaries. The acquisition of such resources has...could aid in Monolingual Information Retrieval (MIR) by methods of query expansion, and thesauri construction. To date, most of the existing...testing the limits of its performance. Future directions include testing the model with a monolingual comparable corpus, e.g. WSJ [42M] and either IACA/B

  8. Comparative protein modelling by satisfaction of spatial restraints.

    PubMed

    Sali, A; Blundell, T L

    1993-12-05

    We describe a comparative protein modelling method designed to find the most probable structure for a sequence given its alignment with related structures. The three-dimensional (3D) model is obtained by optimally satisfying spatial restraints derived from the alignment and expressed as probability density functions (pdfs) for the features restrained. For example, the probabilities for main-chain conformations of a modelled residue may be restrained by its residue type, main-chain conformation of an equivalent residue in a related protein, and the local similarity between the two sequences. Several such pdfs are obtained from the correlations between structural features in 17 families of homologous proteins which have been aligned on the basis of their 3D structures. The pdfs restrain C alpha-C alpha distances, main-chain N-O distances, main-chain and side-chain dihedral angles. A smoothing procedure is used in the derivation of these relationships to minimize the problem of a sparse database. The 3D model of a protein is obtained by optimization of the molecular pdf such that the model violates the input restraints as little as possible. The molecular pdf is derived as a combination of pdfs restraining individual spatial features of the whole molecule. The optimization procedure is a variable target function method that applies the conjugate gradients algorithm to positions of all non-hydrogen atoms. The method is automated and is illustrated by the modelling of trypsin from two other serine proteinases.

  9. Comparing the agreement among alternative models in evaluating HMO efficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, C L; Engberg, J B; Wholey, D R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the efficiency of HMOs and to test the robustness of these findings across alternative models of efficiency. This study examines whether these models, when constructed in parallel to use the same information, provide researchers with the same insights and identify the same trends. DATA SOURCES: A data set containing 585 HMOs operating from 1985 through 1994. Variables include enrollment, utilization, and financial information compiled primarily from Health Care Investment Analysts, InterStudy HMO Census, and Group Health Association of America. STUDY DESIGN: We compute three estimates of efficiency for each HMO and compare the results in terms of individual performance and industry-wide trends. The estimates are then regressed against measures of case mix, quality, and other factors that may be related to the model estimates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The three models identify similar trends for the HMO industry as a whole; however, they assess the relative technical efficiency of individual firms differently. Thus, these techniques are limited for either benchmarking or setting rates because the firms identified as efficient may be a consequence of model selection rather than actual performance. CONCLUSIONS: The estimation technique to evaluate efficient firms can affect the findings themselves. The implications are relevant not only for HMOs, but for efficiency analyses in general. Concurrence among techniques is no guarantee of accuracy, but it is reassuring; conversely, radically distinct inferences across models can be a warning to temper research conclusions. PMID:10857474

  10. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections: Comparing Observations and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Orlove, Matthew; SaintCyr, O.; Mays, L.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1996, the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs have detected "halo" CMEs that appear to be directed toward Earth, but information about the size and speed of these events seen face-on has been limited. From a single vantage point along the Sun-Earth line, the primary limitation has been ambiguity in fitting the cone model (or other forward-modeling techniques, e.g., Thernisian et al., 2006). But in the past few years, the STEREO mission has provided a view of Earth-directed events from the side. These events offer the opportunity to compare measurements (width and speed) of halo CMEs observed by STEREO with models that derive halo CME properties. We report here results of such a comparison on a large sample of LASCO CMEs in the STEREO era.

  11. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  12. Comparing Supply-Side Specifications in Models of Global Agriculture and the Food System

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sherman; van Meijl, Hans; Willenbockel, Dirk; Valin, Hugo; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Masui, Toshihiko; Sands, Ronald; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Havlik, Petr; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Tabeau, Andrzej; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Schmitz, Christoph; Dietrich, Jan P.; von Lampe, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the theoretical specification of production and technical change across the partial equilibrium (PE) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models of the global agricultural and food system included in the AgMIP model comparison study. The two modeling approaches have different theoretical underpinnings concerning the scope of economic activity they capture and how they represent technology and the behavior of supply and demand in markets. This paper focuses on their different specifications of technology and supply behavior, comparing their theoretical and empirical treatments. While the models differ widely in their specifications of technology, both within and between the PE and CGE classes of models, we find that the theoretical responsiveness of supply to changes in prices can be similar, depending on parameter choices that define the behavior of supply functions over the domain of applicability defined by the common scenarios used in the AgMIP comparisons. In particular, we compare the theoretical specification of supply in CGE models with neoclassical production functions and PE models that focus on land and crop yields in agriculture. In practice, however, comparability of results given parameter choices is an empirical question, and the models differ in their sensitivity to variations in specification. To illustrate the issues, sensitivity analysis is done with one global CGE model, MAGNET, to indicate how the results vary with different specification of technical change, and how they compare with the results from PE models.

  13. Model-Based Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Anjali; Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Miller, Steven P.; Whalen, Mike W.

    2006-01-01

    System safety analysis techniques are well established and are used extensively during the design of safety-critical systems. Despite this, most of the techniques are highly subjective and dependent on the skill of the practitioner. Since these analyses are usually based on an informal system model, it is unlikely that they will be complete, consistent, and error free. In fact, the lack of precise models of the system architecture and its failure modes often forces the safety analysts to devote much of their effort to gathering architectural details about the system behavior from several sources and embedding this information in the safety artifacts such as the fault trees. This report describes Model-Based Safety Analysis, an approach in which the system and safety engineers share a common system model created using a model-based development process. By extending the system model with a fault model as well as relevant portions of the physical system to be controlled, automated support can be provided for much of the safety analysis. We believe that by using a common model for both system and safety engineering and automating parts of the safety analysis, we can both reduce the cost and improve the quality of the safety analysis. Here we present our vision of model-based safety analysis and discuss the advantages and challenges in making this approach practical.

  14. Modelling effects of internalized antibody: a simple comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The modelling framework is proposed to study protection properties of antibodies to neutralize the effects of the plant toxin (ricin). The present study extends our previous work by including (i) the model of intracellular transport of toxin to the Endoplasmic Reticulum and (ii) the model of the internalised antibodies (when antibody is delivered directly into the cytosol). Method Simulation of the receptor-toxin-antibody interaction is implemented by solving the systems of PDEs (advection-diffusion models) or ODEs (rate models) for the underlying transport coupled with mass-action kinetics. Results As the main application of the enhanced framework we present a comparative study of two kinds (external and internalised) of antibodies. This comparison is based on calculation of the non-dimensional protection factor using the same set of parameters (geometry, binding constants, initial concentrations of species, and total initial amount of the antibody). Conclusion This research will provide a framework for consistent evaluation and comparison of different types of antibodies for toxicological applications. PMID:24521456

  15. Building v/s Exploring Models: Comparing Learning of Evolutionary Processes through Agent-based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Aditi

    Two strands of work motivate the three studies in this dissertation. Evolutionary change can be viewed as a computational complex system in which a small set of rules operating at the individual level result in different population level outcomes under different conditions. Extensive research has documented students' difficulties with learning about evolutionary change (Rosengren et al., 2012), particularly in terms of levels slippage (Wilensky & Resnick, 1999). Second, though building and using computational models is becoming increasingly common in K-12 science education, we know little about how these two modalities compare. This dissertation adopts agent-based modeling as a representational system to compare these modalities in the conceptual context of micro-evolutionary processes. Drawing on interviews, Study 1 examines middle-school students' productive ways of reasoning about micro-evolutionary processes to find that the specific framing of traits plays a key role in whether slippage explanations are cued. Study 2, which was conducted in 2 schools with about 150 students, forms the crux of the dissertation. It compares learning processes and outcomes when students build their own models or explore a pre-built model. Analysis of Camtasia videos of student pairs reveals that builders' and explorers' ways of accessing rules, and sense-making of observed trends are of a different character. Builders notice rules through available blocks-based primitives, often bypassing their enactment while explorers attend to rules primarily through the enactment. Moreover, builders' sense-making of observed trends is more rule-driven while explorers' is more enactment-driven. Pre and posttests reveal that builders manifest a greater facility with accessing rules, providing explanations manifesting targeted assembly. Explorers use rules to construct explanations manifesting non-targeted assembly. Interviews reveal varying degrees of shifts away from slippage in both

  16. A New Method of Comparing Forcing Agents in Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; MacMartin, Douglas; Rasch, Philip J.; Jarvis, Andrew

    2015-10-14

    We describe a new method of comparing different climate forcing agents (e.g., CO2, CH4, and solar irradiance) that avoids many of the ambiguities introduced by temperature-related climate feedbacks. This is achieved by introducing an explicit feedback loop external to the climate model that adjusts one forcing agent to balance another while keeping global mean surface temperature constant. Compared to current approaches, this method has two main advantages: (i) the need to define radiative forcing is bypassed and (ii) by maintaining roughly constant global mean temperature, the effects of state dependence on internal feedback strengths are minimized. We demonstrate this approach for several different forcing agents and derive the relationships between these forcing agents in two climate models; comparisons between forcing agents are highly linear in concordance with predicted functional forms. Transitivity of the relationships between the forcing agents appears to hold within a wide range of forcing. The relationships between the forcing agents obtained from this method are consistent across both models but differ from relationships that would be obtained from calculations of radiative forcing, highlighting the importance of controlling for surface temperature feedback effects when separating radiative forcing and climate response.

  17. Estimating, Testing, and Comparing Specific Effects in Structural Equation Models: The Phantom Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macho, Siegfried; Ledermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The phantom model approach for estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects within structural equation models (SEMs) is presented. The rationale underlying this novel method consists in representing the specific effect to be assessed as a total effect within a separate latent variable model, the phantom model that is added to the main…

  18. Comparative and Familial Analysis of Handedness in Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, population-level handedness has been considered a hallmark of human evolution. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit population-level handedness remains a topic of considerable debate. This paper summarizes published data on handedness in great apes. Comparative analysis indicated that chimpanzees and bonobos show population-level right handedness, whereas gorillas and orangutans do not. All ape species showed evidence of population-level handedness when considering specific tasks. Familial analyses in chimpanzees indicated that offspring and maternal (but not paternal) handedness was significantly positively correlated, but this finding was contingent upon the classification criteria used to evaluate hand preference. Overall, the proportion of right handedness is lower in great apes compared with humans, and various methodological and theoretical explanations for this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:16822166

  19. Stigma, sex work, and substance use: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Cecilia; McCarthy, Bill; Jansson, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Stigma is a widely used concept in social science research and an extensive literature claims that stigmatisation contributes to numerous negative health outcomes. However, few studies compare groups that vary in the extent to which they are stigmatised and even fewer studies examine stigma's independent and mediating effects. This article addresses these gaps in a comparative study of perceived stigma and drug use among three low-income feminised service occupations: sex work, food and alcoholic beverage serving, and barbering and hairstyling. An analysis of longitudinal data shows positive associations between sex work, perceived stigma, and socially less acceptable drug use (for example, heroin and cocaine), and that stigma mediates part of the link between sex work and the use of these drugs. Our overall findings suggest that perceived stigma is pronounced among those who work in the sex industry and negatively affects health independently of sex work involvement.

  20. Sequence and comparative analysis of Leuconostoc dairy bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H; Neve, Horst; Hammer, Karin; Jacobsen, Susanne; Pedersen, Per D; Sørensen, Søren J; Heller, Knut J; Vogensen, Finn K

    2014-04-17

    Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc species may significantly influence the quality of the final product. There is however limited knowledge of this group of phages in the literature. We have determined the complete genome sequences of nine Leuconostoc bacteriophages virulent to either Leuconostoc mesenteroides or Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides strains. The phages have dsDNA genomes with sizes ranging from 25.7 to 28.4 kb. Comparative genomics analysis helped classify the 9 phages into two classes, which correlates with the host species. High percentage of similarity within the classes on both nucleotide and protein levels was observed. Genome comparison also revealed very high conservation of the overall genomic organization between the classes. The genes were organized in functional modules responsible for replication, packaging, head and tail morphogenesis, cell lysis and regulation and modification, respectively. No lysogeny modules were detected. To our knowledge this report provides the first comparative genomic work done on Leuconostoc dairy phages.

  1. Comparative analysis of NDE techniques with image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Vijay R.; Anand, R. S.; Ashok, Alaknanda

    2012-12-01

    The paper reports comparative results of nondestructive testing (NDT) based experimentation done on created flaws in the casting at the Central Foundry Forge Plant (CFFP) of Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd. India (BHEL). The present experimental study is aimed at comparing the evaluation of image processing methods applied on the radiographic images of welding defects such as slag inclusion, porosity, lack-of-root penetration and cracks with other NDT methods. Different image segmentation techniques have been proposed here for identifying the above created welding defects. Currently, there is a large amount of research work going on in the field of automated system for inspection, analysis and detection of flaws in the weldments. Comparison of other NDT methods and application of image processing on the radiographic images of weld defects are aimed to detect defects reliably and to make accept/reject decisions as per the international standard.

  2. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    SciTech Connect

    Waterston, Robert H.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birney, Ewan; Rogers, Jane; Abril, Josep F.; Agarwal, Pankaj; Agarwala, Richa; Ainscough, Rachel; Alexandersson, Marina; An, Peter; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Attwood, John; Baertsch, Robert; Bailey, Jonathon; Barlow, Karen; Beck, Stephan; Berry, Eric; Birren, Bruce; Bloom, Toby; Bork, Peer; Botcherby, Marc; Bray, Nicolas; Brent, Michael R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Brown, Stephen D.; Bult, Carol; Burton, John; Butler, Jonathan; Campbell, Robert D.; Carninci, Piero; Cawley, Simon; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Church, Deanna M.; Clamp, Michele; Clee, Christopher; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, Lisa L.; Copley, Richard R.; Coulson, Alan; Couronne, Olivier; Cuff, James; Curwen, Val; Cutts, Tim; Daly, Mark; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Delehaunty, Kimberly D.; Deri, Justin; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dewey, Colin; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Diekhans, Mark; Dodge, Sheila; Dubchak, Inna; Dunn, Diane M.; Eddy, Sean R.; Elnitski, Laura; Emes, Richard D.; Eswara, Pallavi; Eyras, Eduardo; Felsenfeld, Adam; Fewell, Ginger A.; Flicek, Paul; Foley, Karen; Frankel, Wayne N.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Furey, Terrence S.; Gage, Diane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glusman, Gustavo; Gnerre, Sante; Goldman, Nick; Goodstadt, Leo; Grafham, Darren; Graves, Tina A.; Green, Eric D.; Gregory, Simon; Guigo, Roderic; Guyer, Mark; Hardison, Ross C.; Haussler, David; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hinrichs, Angela; Hlavina, Wratko; Holzer, Timothy; Hsu, Fan; Hua, Axin; Hubbard, Tim; Hunt, Adrienne; Jackson, Ian; Jaffe, David B.; Johnson, L. Steven; Jones, Matthew; Jones, Thomas A.; Joy, Ann; Kamal, Michael; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Karolchik, Donna; Kasprzyk, Arkadiusz; Kawai, Jun; Keibler, Evan; Kells, Cristyn; Kent, W. James; Kirby, Andrew; Kolbe, Diana L.; Korf, Ian; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Kulbokas III, Edward J.; Kulp, David; Landers, Tom; Leger, J.P.; Leonard, Steven; Letunic, Ivica; Levine, Rosie; et al.

    2002-12-15

    The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome and a key experimental tool for biomedical research. Here, we report the results of an international collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the two sequences. We discuss topics including the analysis of the evolutionary forces shaping the size, structure and sequence of the genomes; the conservation of large-scale synteny across most of the genomes; the much lower extent of sequence orthology covering less than half of the genomes; the proportions of the genomes under selection; the number of protein-coding genes; the expansion of gene families related to reproduction and immunity; the evolution of proteins; and the identification of intraspecies polymorphism.

  3. Establishing a framework for comparative analysis of genome sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, A.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a framework and a high-level language toolkit for comparative analysis of genome sequence alignment The framework integrates the information derived from multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree (hypothetical tree of evolution) to derive new properties about sequences. Multiple sequence alignments are treated as an abstract data type. Abstract operations have been described to manipulate a multiple sequence alignment and to derive mutation related information from a phylogenetic tree by superimposing parsimonious analysis. The framework has been applied on protein alignments to derive constrained columns (in a multiple sequence alignment) that exhibit evolutionary pressure to preserve a common property in a column despite mutation. A Prolog toolkit based on the framework has been implemented and demonstrated on alignments containing 3000 sequences and 3904 columns.

  4. [Comparative analysis of spatial organization of myoglobins. II. Secondary structure].

    PubMed

    Korobov, V N; Nazarenko, V I; Radomskiĭ, N F; Starodub, N F

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of probability of distribution curves of alpha-helical sites and bends of polypeptide chains of myoglobins in half-water mammals (beaver, nutria, muskrat, otter) carried out in comparison with those of myoglobins of the horse and Sperm whale (X-ray diffraction analysis has revealed their tertiary structure) has revealed a coincidence of the secondary structure sites end bends of the chain in the studied respiratory hemoproteins of muscles. Despite a considerable number of amino acid substitutions the profiles of alpha-helicity and B-bends of the compared proteins are practically identical. This indicates to the "resistance" of the probability curves to amino acid substitutions and to retention of the tertiary structure of myoglobins in evolutionary remote species of the animals.

  5. Comparative analysis of nonverbal interpersonal communication of schizophrenics and normals.

    PubMed

    Hardin, S B

    1980-06-01

    The nonverbal communications of schizophrenics and normals in dyadic interactions were analyzed and compared. Twelve purposively selected women were videotaped in normal-normal, normal-schizophrenic, and schizophrenic-schizophrenic communication acts for 30 minutes. Using a PLATO IV computer program and a modified Kendon Kinesic Notation System, a priori sets of nonverbal behaviors were recorded at 1-second intervals. Frequency and duration scores for the sets of nonverbal behaviors with corresponding communication meanings were totaled. A nested analysis of variance showed that the three groups differed significantly (p less than .05) in engagement and defensiveness and that the normal interactors were the least imitative of the three groups. An analysis and description of the patterns of nonverbal communication also revealed differences, lending support to the theory of dysjunctive schizophrenic communication.

  6. Feature-level sentiment analysis by using comparative domain corpora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Changqin; Ren, Fuji

    2016-06-01

    Feature-level sentiment analysis (SA) is able to provide more fine-grained SA on certain opinion targets and has a wider range of applications on E-business. This study proposes an approach based on comparative domain corpora for feature-level SA. The proposed approach makes use of word associations for domain-specific feature extraction. First, we assign a similarity score for each candidate feature to denote its similarity extent to a domain. Then we identify domain features based on their similarity scores on different comparative domain corpora. After that, dependency grammar and a general sentiment lexicon are applied to extract and expand feature-oriented opinion words. Lastly, the semantic orientation of a domain-specific feature is determined based on the feature-oriented opinion lexicons. In evaluation, we compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods (including unsupervised and semi-supervised) using a standard product review test collection. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of using comparative domain corpora.

  7. Comparative biomorphologic analysis about three dentinal adhesives of last generations.

    PubMed

    Carini, F; Varia, P; Valenza, V

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work consists in a comparative biomorphological analysis of the properties of infiltration and of adhesion to dental tissues of three among the more used enamel dentinal adhesives of the last generation known with the commercial name of Syntac, Excite and Prompt. The results have given evidence that Syntac has got short adhesion, Excite has got good capacity of infiltration and moderate adhesion, Prompt seems to possess a capacity of infiltration equal to Excite's one, but a better adhesion besides an easier modality of use.

  8. Comparative psychoacoustics: perspectives of peripheral sound analysis in mammals.

    PubMed

    Ehret, G

    1977-09-01

    Psychophysical data on hearing in mammals are summarized. The data are then correlated to the anatomy and physiology of the ear. Common mechanisms of sound transfer and analysis in the acoustic system, with stress on the auditory periphery, are discussed. In this paper an attempt is made to bring basic psychoacoustic data from man and mammals in a logical line with the anatomy, physiology, and biophysics of the ear. This comparative approach is based on man and those five mammals, including bat and dolphin, for which sufficient data are available.

  9. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  10. Comparative study of analysis methods in biospeckle phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Emerson Rodrigo; Muramatsu, Mikiya

    2008-04-01

    In this work we present a review of main statistical properties of speckle patterns and accomplish a comparative study of the more used methods for analysis and extraction of information from optical grainy. The first and second order space-time statistics are dicussed in an overview perspective. The biospeckle phenomenon has detailed attention, specially in its application on monitoring of activity in tissues. The main techniques used to obtain information from speckle patterns are presented, with special prominence to autocorrelation function, co-occurrence matrices, Fujii's method, Briers' contrast and spatial and temporal contrast analisys (LASCA and LASTCA). An incipient method for analysis, based on the study of sucessive correlations contrast, is introduced. Numerical simulations, using diferent probability density functions for velocities of scatterers, were made with two objectives: to test the analysis methods and to give subsidies for interpretation of in vivo results. Vegetable and animal tissues are investigated, achieving the monitoring of senescence process and vascularization maps on leaves, the accompaniment of fungi contamined fruits, the mapping of activity in flowers and the analisys of healing in rats subjected to abdominal surgery. Experiments using the biospeckle phenomenon in microscopy are carried out. At last, it is evaluated the potentiality of biospeckle as diagnosis tool in chronic vein ulcer cared with low intensity laser therapy and the better analysis methods for each kind of tissue are pointed.

  11. Comparative analysis of evaluation techniques for transport policies

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, David; Ryan, Lisa

    2011-04-15

    The objective of this paper is to examine and compare the use of a number of policy evaluation tools, which can be used to measure the impact of transport policies and programmes as part of a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) or sustainability appraisal. The evaluation tools that were examined include cost-benefit analysis (CBA), cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). It was concluded that both CEA and CBA are useful for estimating the costs and/or benefits associated with transport policies but are constrained by the difficulty in quantifying non-market impacts and monetising total costs and benefits. Furthermore, CEA is limited to identifying the most 'cost-effective policy' for achieving a single, narrowly defined objective, usually greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and is, therefore, not suitable for evaluating policy options with ancillary costs or a variety of potential benefits. Thus, CBA or CEA evaluation should be complemented by a complete environmental and socio-economic impact assessment approach such as MCDA. This method allows for participatory analysis and qualitative assessment but is subject to caveats such as subjectivity and value-laden judgments.

  12. CMS Analysis School Model

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  13. CMS Analysis School Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-06-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  14. Comparative studies in series of cytochrome c oxidase models.

    PubMed

    Melin, F; Trivella, A; Lo, M; Ruzié, C; Hijazi, I; Oueslati, N; Wytko, J A; Boitrel, B; Boudon, C; Hellwig, P; Weiss, J

    2012-03-01

    This study compares the behavior as cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) functional and structural models of a series of reported and unreported ligands that provide either a binding site for copper without a built-in proximal base, or both a flexible binding site for copper and a built-in proximal base, or a fixed binding site for copper with a built-in proximal base. The comparisons of the models show that the relative position of the two metal sites is not only a crucial parameter in the control of the catalytic behavior but also essential in mimicking other features of the enzyme such as CO exchange between the ferrous heme a(3) and the cuprous Cu(B) center.

  15. Burnout syndrome in psychotherapists: a comparative analysis of five nations.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ana; Yoon, Eunhui; Callueng, Carmelo; An, Sunghee; Lee, Sang Min

    2014-02-01

    Burnout is a common phenomenon among psychotherapists. The purpose of this study was to test the Counselor Burnout Inventory (CBI; Lee et al., 2007) measurement invariance, as well as compare means of five latent variables (i.e., CBI subscales of Exhaustion, Incompetence, Negative Work Environment, Devaluing Client, and Deterioration in Personal Life) across five nations (United States, Korea, Japan, Philippines, and Hong Kong) using structural equation modeling. The results indicated that the assumptions of configural, factor loading, and intercept invariance were satisfied across the five nations. When comparing means of five latent variables, the results indicated differential burnout tendencies across the five nations. Implications for psychotherapists' burnout prevention and future research are discussed.

  16. A Comparative Study on DDF Curve with Bivariate and Univariate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, K.; Choi, S.; Heo, J.

    2012-12-01

    DDF(or IDF) curve is consisted with rainfall depth(or intensity), duration and frequency, and it is useful to see how rainfall changes in various conditions. Furthermore, recently, multivariate frequency analysis is applied to hydrology because of its scalability. In this study, to obtain DDF curve, rainfall quantile is estimated by both of univariate and bivariate(rainfall depth and duration) frequency analysis. For bivariate model, three copula models which are Frank, Gumbel-Hougaard, and Joe, are used in this study. Copula model has been studied widely for various fields, and it is flexible for marginal distribution than other conventional bivariate models. Hourly recorded data(1961~2010) of Seoul weather station from Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) is applied for frequency analysis, and inter-event time definition is used for identification of rainfall events. For estimate parameters of copula models, maximum pseudo-likelihood estimation method which is semi-parametric method is used. Gumbel distribution is examined and used for rainfall depth, and generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is examined and used for duration. As a result, 4 DDF curves are obtained (univariate, 3 copula models). In compared to univariate model, rainfall quantile of bivariate model unaffected by duration. In detail, Frank model shows closest trend along the duration, and Joe model doesn`t show the little changes along the duration. Change of rainfall quantile from bivariate model along the duration is less significant than univariate model as varying nonexceedance probability.

  17. Statistical analysis plan for the family-led rehabilitation after stroke in India (ATTEND) trial: A multicenter randomized controlled trial of a new model of stroke rehabilitation compared to usual care.

    PubMed

    Billot, Laurent; Lindley, Richard I; Harvey, Lisa A; Maulik, Pallab K; Hackett, Maree L; Murthy, Gudlavalleti Vs; Anderson, Craig S; Shamanna, Bindiganavale R; Jan, Stephen; Walker, Marion; Forster, Anne; Langhorne, Peter; Verma, Shweta J; Felix, Cynthia; Alim, Mohammed; Gandhi, Dorcas Bc; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai

    2017-02-01

    Background In low- and middle-income countries, few patients receive organized rehabilitation after stroke, yet the burden of chronic diseases such as stroke is increasing in these countries. Affordable models of effective rehabilitation could have a major impact. The ATTEND trial is evaluating a family-led caregiver delivered rehabilitation program after stroke. Objective To publish the detailed statistical analysis plan for the ATTEND trial prior to trial unblinding. Methods Based upon the published registration and protocol, the blinded steering committee and management team, led by the trial statistician, have developed a statistical analysis plan. The plan has been informed by the chosen outcome measures, the data collection forms and knowledge of key baseline data. Results The resulting statistical analysis plan is consistent with best practice and will allow open and transparent reporting. Conclusions Publication of the trial statistical analysis plan reduces potential bias in trial reporting, and clearly outlines pre-specified analyses. Clinical Trial Registrations India CTRI/2013/04/003557; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN1261000078752; Universal Trial Number U1111-1138-6707.

  18. Analysis of T-RFLP data using analysis of variance and ordination methods: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Culman, S W; Gauch, H G; Blackwood, C B; Thies, J E

    2008-09-01

    The analysis of T-RFLP data has developed considerably over the last decade, but there remains a lack of consensus about which statistical analyses offer the best means for finding trends in these data. In this study, we empirically tested and theoretically compared ten diverse T-RFLP datasets derived from soil microbial communities using the more common ordination methods in the literature: principal component analysis (PCA), nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) with Sørensen, Jaccard and Euclidean distance measures, correspondence analysis (CA), detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and a technique new to T-RFLP data analysis, the Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI) model. Our objectives were i) to determine the distribution of variation in T-RFLP datasets using analysis of variance (ANOVA), ii) to determine the more robust and informative multivariate ordination methods for analyzing T-RFLP data, and iii) to compare the methods based on theoretical considerations. For the 10 datasets examined in this study, ANOVA revealed that the variation from Environment main effects was always small, variation from T-RFs main effects was large, and variation from T-RFxEnvironment (TxE) interactions was intermediate. Larger variation due to TxE indicated larger differences in microbial communities between environments/treatments and thus demonstrated the utility of ANOVA to provide an objective assessment of community dissimilarity. The comparison of statistical methods typically yielded similar empirical results. AMMI, T-RF-centered PCA, and DCA were the most robust methods in terms of producing ordinations that consistently reached a consensus with other methods. In datasets with high sample heterogeneity, NMS analyses with Sørensen and Jaccard distance were the most sensitive for recovery of complex gradients. The theoretical comparison showed that some methods hold distinct advantages for T-RFLP analysis, such as estimations of variation

  19. Investigation of pulmonary acoustic simulation: comparing airway model generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Brian; Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable spectral, spatial and/or temporal changes in lung sound production and transmission. These changes, if properly quantified, might provide additional information about the etiology, severity and location of trauma, injury, or pathology. With this in mind, the authors are developing a comprehensive computer simulation model of pulmonary acoustics, known as The Audible Human Project™. Its purpose is to improve our understanding of pulmonary acoustics and to aid in interpreting measurements of sound and vibration in the lungs generated by airway insonification, natural breath sounds, and external stimuli on the chest surface, such as that used in elastography. As a part of this development process, finite element (FE) models were constructed of an excised pig lung that also underwent experimental studies. Within these models, the complex airway structure was created via two methods: x-ray CT image segmentation and through an algorithmic means called Constrained Constructive Optimization (CCO). CCO was implemented to expedite the segmentation process, as airway segments can be grown digitally. These two approaches were used in FE simulations of the surface motion on the lung as a result of sound input into the trachea. Simulation results were compared to experimental measurements. By testing how close these models are to experimental measurements, we are evaluating whether CCO can be used as a means to efficiently construct physiologically relevant airway trees.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Gene Content Evolution in Phytoplasmas and Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas are two groups of important pathogens in the bacterial class Mollicutes. Because of their economical and clinical importance, these obligate pathogens have attracted much research attention. However, difficulties involved in the empirical study of these bacteria, particularly the fact that phytoplasmas have not yet been successfully cultivated outside of their hosts despite decades of attempts, have greatly hampered research progress. With the rapid advancements in genome sequencing, comparative genome analysis provides a new approach to facilitate our understanding of these bacteria. In this study, our main focus is to investigate the evolution of gene content in phytoplasmas, mycoplasmas, and their common ancestor. By using a phylogenetic framework for comparative analysis of 12 complete genome sequences, we characterized the putative gains and losses of genes in these obligate parasites. Our results demonstrated that the degradation of metabolic capacities in these bacteria has occurred predominantly in the common ancestor of Mollicutes, prior to the evolutionary split of phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas. Furthermore, we identified a list of genes that are acquired by the common ancestor of phytoplasmas and are conserved across all strains with complete genome sequences available. These genes include several putative effectors for the interactions with hosts and may be good candidates for future functional characterization. PMID:22479625

  1. The Comparative Analysis of Aversive and Ordinary Noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, C. Marion, Jr.

    There is a vast amount of literature concerning the psychological and physiological effects of ordinary noise on the individual. However, few publications have addressed the analysis of aversive noise. This research analyzes three noises which produce the familiar goose flesh or chilling effect responsivity. These aversive sounds which are made by chalk squeaking on the chalkboard, fingernails on the chalkboard and rubbing styrofoam against a smooth surface are digitally compared to ordinary noise to show how these aversive sounds differ from sounds which are only annoying. This work, which uses Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis is a combination with cross correlation analysis and other innovative methods to produce comparative data on noises, illustrates subtle differences between ordinary and aversive noise which may be useful for future work in acoustics or experimental psychology. The literature review shows disagreement among the numerous works on the effects of ordinary noise on human subjects. One explanation for this difference is the failure to adequately measure and define the dynamic nature of the noise used. The existing literature also establishes that a mixture of tones plus random noise is more annoying (but not aversive) than either the random noise or the tones alone. This investigation shows that one property of aversive noises is the combination of randomness plus tones which vary rapidly with time. This paper utilizes a new digital technique which improves the FFT analyzer resolution by a factor of 25. The resulting +/-2 Hz accuracy facilitated the presentation of frequency variation as a function of time data. Other computer generated graphical data includes the percent harmonic deviation as a function of time, the rate of change of fundamental frequency, and the rate of change in harmonic deviation. From these dynamic data, average values are calculated which show the aversive noise to be consistently greater in mean frequency deviation

  2. Statistical Power of Alternative Structural Models for Comparative Effectiveness Research: Advantages of Modeling Unreliability

    PubMed Central

    Iordache, Eugen; Dierker, Lisa; Fifield, Judith; Schensul, Jean J.; Suggs, Suzanne; Barbour, Russell

    2015-01-01

    The advantages of modeling the unreliability of outcomes when evaluating the comparative effectiveness of health interventions is illustrated. Adding an action-research intervention component to a regular summer job program for youth was expected to help in preventing risk behaviors. A series of simple two-group alternative structural equation models are compared to test the effect of the intervention on one key attitudinal outcome in terms of model fit and statistical power with Monte Carlo simulations. Some models presuming parameters equal across the intervention and comparison groups were underpowered to detect the intervention effect, yet modeling the unreliability of the outcome measure increased their statistical power and helped in the detection of the hypothesized effect. Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) could benefit from flexible multi-group alternative structural models organized in decision trees, and modeling unreliability of measures can be of tremendous help for both the fit of statistical models to the data and their statistical power. PMID:26640421

  3. A Comparative Meta-Analysis of 5E and Traditional Approaches in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anil, Özgür; Batdi, Veli

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the 5E learning model with traditional learning methods in terms of their effect on students' academic achievement, retention and attitude scores. In this context, the meta-analytic method known as the "analysis of analyses" was used and a review undertaken of the studies and theses (N = 14) executed…

  4. Factor Analysis with Ordinal Indicators: A Monte Carlo Study Comparing DWLS and ULS Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forero, Carlos G.; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2009-01-01

    Factor analysis models with ordinal indicators are often estimated using a 3-stage procedure where the last stage involves obtaining parameter estimates by least squares from the sample polychoric correlations. A simulation study involving 324 conditions (1,000 replications per condition) was performed to compare the performance of diagonally…

  5. Comparing Numerical Spall Simulations with a Nonlinear Spall Formation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, L.; Melosh, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Spallation accelerates lightly shocked ejecta fragments to speeds that can exceed the escape velocity of the parent body. We present high-resolution simulations of nonlinear shock interactions in the near surface. Initial results show the acceleration of near-surface material to velocities up to 1.8 times greater than the peak particle velocity in the detached shock, while experiencing little to no shock pressure. These simulations suggest a possible nonlinear spallation mechanism to produce the high-velocity, low show pressure meteorites from other planets. Here we pre-sent the numerical simulations that test the production of spall through nonlinear shock interactions in the near sur-face, and compare the results with a model proposed by Kamegai (1986 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Report). We simulate near-surface shock interactions using the SALES_2 hydrocode and the Murnaghan equation of state. We model the shock interactions in two geometries: rectangular and spherical. In the rectangular case, we model a planar shock approaching the surface at a constant angle phi. In the spherical case, the shock originates at a point below the surface of the domain and radiates spherically from that point. The angle of the shock front with the surface is dependent on the radial distance of the surface point from the shock origin. We model the target as a solid with a nonlinear Murnaghan equation of state. This idealized equation of state supports nonlinear shocks but is tem-perature independent. We track the maximum pressure and maximum velocity attained in every cell in our simula-tions and compare them to the Hugoniot equations that describe the material conditions in front of and behind the shock. Our simulations demonstrate that nonlinear shock interactions in the near surface produce lightly shocked high-velocity material for both planar and cylindrical shocks. The spall is the result of the free surface boundary condi-tion, which forces a pressure gradient

  6. Extreme storm surges: a comparative study of frequency analysis approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Y.; Bardet, L.; Duluc, C.-M.; Rebour, V.

    2014-08-01

    In France, nuclear facilities were designed around very low probabilities of failure. Nevertheless, some extreme climatic events have given rise to exceptional observed surges (outliers) much larger than other observations, and have clearly illustrated the potential to underestimate the extreme water levels calculated with the current statistical methods. The objective of the present work is to conduct a comparative study of three approaches to extreme value analysis, including the annual maxima (AM), the peaks-over-threshold (POT) and the r-largest order statistics (r-LOS). These methods are illustrated in a real analysis case study. All data sets were screened for outliers. Non-parametric tests for randomness, homogeneity and stationarity of time series were used. The shape and scale parameter stability plots, the mean excess residual life plot and the stability of the standard errors of return levels were used to select optimal thresholds and r values for the POT and r-LOS method, respectively. The comparison of methods was based on (i) the uncertainty degrees, (ii) the adequacy criteria and tests, and (iii) the visual inspection. It was found that the r-LOS and POT methods have reduced the uncertainty on the distribution parameters and return level estimates and have systematically shown values of the 100 and 500-year return levels smaller than those estimated with the AM method. Results have also shown that none of the compared methods has allowed a good fit at the right tail of the distribution in the presence of outliers. As a perspective, the use of historical information was proposed in order to increase the representativeness of outliers in data sets. Findings are of practical relevance, not only to nuclear energy operators in France, for applications in storm surge hazard analysis and flood management, but also for the optimal planning and design of facilities to withstand extreme environmental conditions, with an appropriate level of risk.

  7. Multivariate Comparative Analysis of Stock Exchanges: The European Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralun-Bereźnicka, Julia

    The aim of the research is to perform a multivariate comparative analysis of 20 European stock exchanges in order to identify the main similarities between the objects. Due to the convergence process of capital markets in Europe the similarities between stock exchanges could be expected to increase over time. The research is meant to show whether and how these similarities change. Consequently, the distances between clusters of similar stock exchanges should become less significant, which the analysis also aims at verifying. The basis of comparison is a set of 48 monthly variables from the period January, 2003 to December, 2006. The variables are classified into three categories: size of the market, equity trading and bonds. The paper aims at identifying the clusters of alike stock exchanges and at finding the characteristic features of each of the distinguished groups. The obtained categorization to some extent corresponds with the division of the European Union into “new” and “old” member countries. Clustering method, performed for each quarter separately, also reveals that the classification is fairly stable in time. The factor analysis, which was carried out to reduce the number of variables, reveals three major factors behind the data, which are related with the earlier mentioned categories of variables.

  8. Human motion analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prussing, Keith; Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and supported the development of a physiologically-based human motion model. Subsequently this model aided the derivation and analysis of motion-based observables, particularly changes in the motion of various body components resulting from load variations. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, development of the human motion model, and use of the model in the observable analysis. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and modeling results will also be presented.

  9. Plant Reactome: a resource for plant pathways and comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, Sushma; Preece, Justin; D'Eustachio, Peter; Gupta, Parul; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Dharmawardhana, Palitha D.; Wu, Guanming; Fabregat, Antonio; Elser, Justin L.; Weiser, Joel; Keays, Maria; Fuentes, Alfonso Munoz-Pomer; Petryszak, Robert; Stein, Lincoln D.; Ware, Doreen; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Plant Reactome (http://plantreactome.gramene.org/) is a free, open-source, curated plant pathway database portal, provided as part of the Gramene project. The database provides intuitive bioinformatics tools for the visualization, analysis and interpretation of pathway knowledge to support genome annotation, genome analysis, modeling, systems biology, basic research and education. Plant Reactome employs the structural framework of a plant cell to show metabolic, transport, genetic, developmental and signaling pathways. We manually curate molecular details of pathways in these domains for reference species Oryza sativa (rice) supported by published literature and annotation of well-characterized genes. Two hundred twenty-two rice pathways, 1025 reactions associated with 1173 proteins, 907 small molecules and 256 literature references have been curated to date. These reference annotations were used to project pathways for 62 model, crop and evolutionarily significant plant species based on gene homology. Database users can search and browse various components of the database, visualize curated baseline expression of pathway-associated genes provided by the Expression Atlas and upload and analyze their Omics datasets. The database also offers data access via Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and in various standardized pathway formats, such as SBML and BioPAX. PMID:27799469

  10. Time-Series Modeling and Simulation for Comparative Cost-Effective Analysis in Cancer Chemotherapy: An Application to Platinum-Based Regimens for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chisaki, Yugo; Nakamura, Nobuhiko; Yano, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a time-series modeling and simulation (M&S) strategy for probabilistic cost-effective analysis in cancer chemotherapy using a Monte-Carlo method based on data available from the literature. The simulation included the cost for chemotherapy, for pharmaceutical care for adverse events (AEs) and other medical costs. As an application example, we describe the analysis for the comparison of four regimens, cisplatin plus irinotecan, carboplatin plus paclitaxel, cisplatin plus gemcitabine (GP), and cisplatin plus vinorelbine, for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The factors, drug efficacy explained by overall survival or time to treatment failure, frequency and severity of AEs, utility value of AEs to determine QOL, the drugs' and other medical costs in Japan, were included in the model. The simulation was performed and quality adjusted life years (QALY) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) were calculated. An index, percentage of superiority (%SUP) which is the rate of the increased cost vs. QALY-gained plots within the area of positive QALY-gained and also below some threshold values of the ICER, was calculated as functions of threshold values of the ICER. An M&S process was developed, and for the simulation example, the GP regimen was the most cost-effective, in case of threshold values of the ICER=$70000/year, the %SUP for the GP are more than 50%. We developed an M&S process for probabilistic cost-effective analysis, this method would be useful for decision-making in choosing a cancer chemotherapy regimen in terms of pharmacoeconomic.

  11. Curriculum inventory: Modeling, sharing and comparing medical education programs.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Albright, Susan; Smothers, Valerie; Cameron, Terri; Willett, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Abstract descriptions of how curricula are structured and run. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) MedBiquitous Curriculum Inventory Standard provides a technical syntax through which a wide range of different curricula can be expressed and subsequently compared and analyzed. This standard has the potential to shift curriculum mapping and reporting from a somewhat disjointed and institution-specific undertaking to something that is shared among multiple medical schools and across whole medical education systems. Given the current explosion of different models of curricula (time-free, competency-based, socially accountable, distributed, accelerated, etc.), the ability to consider this diversity using a common model has particular value in medical education management and scholarship. This article describes the development and structure of the Curriculum Inventory Standard as a way of standardizing the modeling of different curricula for audit, evaluation and research purposes. It also considers the strengths and limitations of the current standard and the implications for a medical education world in which this level of commonality, precision, and accountability for curricular practice is the norm rather than the exception.

  12. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4

  13. Comparative analysis of imaging configurations and objectives for Fourier microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kurvits, Jonathan A; Jiang, Mingming; Zia, Rashid

    2015-11-01

    Fourier microscopy is becoming an increasingly important tool for the analysis of optical nanostructures and quantum emitters. However, achieving quantitative Fourier space measurements requires a thorough understanding of the impact of aberrations introduced by optical microscopes that have been optimized for conventional real-space imaging. Here we present a detailed framework for analyzing the performance of microscope objectives for several common Fourier imaging configurations. To this end, we model objectives from Nikon, Olympus, and Zeiss using parameters that were inferred from patent literature and confirmed, where possible, by physical disassembly. We then examine the aberrations most relevant to Fourier microscopy, including the alignment tolerances of apodization factors for different objective classes, the effect of magnification on the modulation transfer function, and vignetting-induced reductions of the effective numerical aperture for wide-field measurements. Based on this analysis, we identify an optimal objective class and imaging configuration for Fourier microscopy. In addition, the Zemax files for the objectives and setups used in this analysis have been made publicly available as a resource for future studies.

  14. Adsorption modeling for macroscopic contaminant dispersal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Axley, J.W.

    1990-05-01

    Two families of macroscopic adsorption models are formulated, based on fundamental principles of adsorption science and technology, that may be used for macroscopic (such as whole-building) contaminant dispersal analysis. The first family of adsorption models - the Equilibrium Adsorption (EA) Models - are based upon the simple requirement of equilibrium between adsorbent and room air. The second family - the Boundary Layer Diffusion Controlled Adsorption (BLDC) Models - add to the equilibrium requirement a boundary layer model for diffusion of the adsorbate from the room air to the adsorbent surface. Two members of each of these families are explicitly discussed, one based on the linear adsorption isotherm model and the other on the Langmuir model. The linear variants of each family are applied to model the adsorption dynamics of formaldehyde in gypsum wall board and compared to measured data.

  15. Modeling and Analysis of Space Based Transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Liebetreu, John; Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Abbott, Ben

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the tool chain, methodology, and initial results of a study to provide a thorough, objective, and quantitative analysis of the design alternatives for space Software Defined Radio (SDR) transceivers. The approach taken was to develop a set of models and tools for describing communications requirements, the algorithm resource requirements, the available hardware, and the alternative software architectures, and generate analysis data necessary to compare alternative designs. The Space Transceiver Analysis Tool (STAT) was developed to help users identify and select representative designs, calculate the analysis data, and perform a comparative analysis of the representative designs. The tool allows the design space to be searched quickly while permitting incremental refinement in regions of higher payoff.

  16. Modeling and Analysis of Space Based Transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Abbott, Ben; Liebetreu, John; Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the tool chain, methodology, and initial results of a study to provide a thorough, objective, and quantitative analysis of the design alternatives for space Software Defined Radio (SDR) transceivers. The approach taken was to develop a set of models and tools for describing communications requirements, the algorithm resource requirements, the available hardware, and the alternative software architectures, and generate analysis data necessary to compare alternative designs. The Space Transceiver Analysis Tool (STAT) was developed to help users identify and select representative designs, calculate the analysis data, and perform a comparative analysis of the representative designs. The tool allows the design space to be searched quickly while permitting incremental refinement in regions of higher payoff.

  17. Comparing GWAS Results of Complex Traits Using Full Genetic Model and Additive Models for Revealing Genetic Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Monir, Md. Mamun; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Most of the genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for human complex diseases have ignored dominance, epistasis and ethnic interactions. We conducted comparative GWASs for total cholesterol using full model and additive models, which illustrate the impacts of the ignoring genetic variants on analysis results and demonstrate how genetic effects of multiple loci could differ across different ethnic groups. There were 15 quantitative trait loci with 13 individual loci and 3 pairs of epistasis loci identified by full model, whereas only 14 loci (9 common loci and 5 different loci) identified by multi-loci additive model. Again, 4 full model detected loci were not detected using multi-loci additive model. PLINK-analysis identified two loci and GCTA-analysis detected only one locus with genome-wide significance. Full model identified three previously reported genes as well as several new genes. Bioinformatics analysis showed some new genes are related with cholesterol related chemicals and/or diseases. Analyses of cholesterol data and simulation studies revealed that the full model performs were better than the additive-model performs in terms of detecting power and unbiased estimations of genetic variants of complex traits. PMID:28079101

  18. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (PthlA) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (Ppta-ack) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  19. Comprehensive comparative analysis of kinesins in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Dale N; Simmons, Mark P; Reddy, Anireddy SN

    2006-01-01

    Background Kinesins, a superfamily of molecular motors, use microtubules as tracks and transport diverse cellular cargoes. All kinesins contain a highly conserved ~350 amino acid motor domain. Previous analysis of the completed genome sequence of one flowering plant (Arabidopsis) has resulted in identification of 61 kinesins. The recent completion of genome sequencing of several photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes that belong to divergent lineages offers a unique opportunity to conduct a comprehensive comparative analysis of kinesins in plant and non-plant systems and infer their evolutionary relationships. Results We used the kinesin motor domain to identify kinesins in the completed genome sequences of 19 species, including 13 newly sequenced genomes. Among the newly analyzed genomes, six represent photosynthetic eukaryotes. A total of 529 kinesins was used to perform comprehensive analysis of kinesins and to construct gene trees using the Bayesian and parsimony approaches. The previously recognized 14 families of kinesins are resolved as distinct lineages in our inferred gene tree. At least three of the 14 kinesin families are not represented in flowering plants. Chlamydomonas, a green alga that is part of the lineage that includes land plants, has at least nine of the 14 known kinesin families. Seven of ten families present in flowering plants are represented in Chlamydomonas, indicating that these families were retained in both the flowering-plant and green algae lineages. Conclusion The increase in the number of kinesins in flowering plants is due to vast expansion of the Kinesin-14 and Kinesin-7 families. The Kinesin-14 family, which typically contains a C-terminal motor, has many plant kinesins that have the motor domain at the N terminus, in the middle, or the C terminus. Several domains in kinesins are present exclusively either in plant or animal lineages. Addition of novel domains to kinesins in lineage-specific groups contributed to the

  20. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed photosynthetic CO2 uptake in two coniferous forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Ibrom, Andreas; Jarvis, Paul G; Clement, Robert; Morgenstern, Kai; Oltchev, Alexander; Medlyn, Belinda E; Wang, Ying Ping; Wingate, Lisa; Moncrieff, John B; Gravenhorst, Gode

    2006-07-01

    Gross canopy photosynthesis (P(g)) can be simulated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon dioxide (CO2) flux measurements above the forest canopy. We compare the two estimates and illustrate our findings with two case studies. We used the three-dimensional canopy model MAESTRA to simulate P(g) of two spruce forests differing in age and structure. Model parameter acquisition and model sensitivity to selected model parameters are described, and modeled results are compared with independent flux estimates. Despite higher photon fluxes at the site, an older German Norway spruce (Picea abies L. (Karst.)) canopy took up 25% less CO2 from the atmosphere than a young Scottish Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) plantation. The average magnitudes of P(g) and the differences between the two canopies were satisfactorily represented by the model. The main reasons for the different uptake rates were a slightly smaller quantum yield and lower absorptance of the Norway spruce stand because of a more clumped canopy structure. The model did not represent the scatter in the turbulent CO2 flux densities, which was of the same order of magnitude as the non-photosynthetically-active-radiation-induced biophysical variability in the simulated P(g). Analysis of residuals identified only small systematic differences between the modeled flux estimates and turbulent flux measurements at high vapor pressure saturation deficits. The merits and limitations of comparative analysis for quality evaluation of both methods are discussed. From this analysis, we recommend use of both parameter sets and model structure as a basis for future applications and model development.

  1. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  2. Comparative proteomics analysis of spermary and ovary in Hyriopsis schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwu; Wang, Dexia; Zhou, Yan; Gu, Yiran; Wu, Di; Wang, Junhua; Hong, Yijiang

    2017-03-01

    We provide the first large-scale quantitative proteomics analysis in Hyriopsis schlegelii. To investigate the proteins expressed in the gonads, a quantitative proteomics approach has been utilized to analyze differentially expressed proteins between the spermary and ovary. In this study, we identified and quantified 2416 proteins in the gonads of Hyriopsis schlegelii. Of these, 559 proteins showed significantly different expression between the spermary and ovary. Some specific proteins expressed in either the spermary or ovary were identified in Hyriopsis schlegelii. In addition, a series of proteins related to gametogenesis were also identified. Compared with previous reports, many proteins in Hyriopsis schlegelii identified here have different expression patterns between the spermary and ovary. The special hermaphroditism in Hyriopsis schlegelii may contribute to these inconsistent results. The provided proteomics data could be considered as a starting point for subsequent studies focusing on the proteins involved in sexual gland development and maturity.

  3. Comparative Analysis on Nuclear Fuel Sustainability Aspect of FBR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Irwanto, Dwi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Recycle program of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will have some challanges in term of fuel cycle capability and its facilities as well as nuclear non-proliferation concern of special nuclear materials. A different analysis approach as a comparative study have been analyzed based on breeding ratio and heavy metal inventory ratio concepts in fast breeder reactor (FBR) type. Breeding ratio and heavy metal inventory obtain higher than unity which shows breeding gain or surplus inventory of heavy metals are obtained. Breeding ratio indicates the fuel conversion capability from conversion process of fertile materials into fissile material such as fertile materials of U-238, Pu-238, Pu-240 and fissile materials of Pu-239 and Pu-241. Inventory ratio approaches are appropriate to estimate some selected actinide as a mass inventory production such as plutonium inventory ratio which estimate the surplus mass inventory from the ratio of produced plutonium at the net of operation to the initial inventory ratio.

  4. A comparative analysis of soft computing techniques for gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Goel, Neelam; Singh, Shailendra; Aseri, Trilok Chand

    2013-07-01

    The rapid growth of genomic sequence data for both human and nonhuman species has made analyzing these sequences, especially predicting genes in them, very important and is currently the focus of many research efforts. Beside its scientific interest in the molecular biology and genomics community, gene prediction is of considerable importance in human health and medicine. A variety of gene prediction techniques have been developed for eukaryotes over the past few years. This article reviews and analyzes the application of certain soft computing techniques in gene prediction. First, the problem of gene prediction and its challenges are described. These are followed by different soft computing techniques along with their application to gene prediction. In addition, a comparative analysis of different soft computing techniques for gene prediction is given. Finally some limitations of the current research activities and future research directions are provided.

  5. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  6. Comparative analysis of DG and solar PV water pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharani, Kusum; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    Looking at present day electricity scenario, there is a major electricity crisis in rural areas. The farmers are still dependant on the monsoon rains for their irrigation needs and livestock maintenance. Some of the agrarian population has opted to use Diesel Generators for pumping water in their fields. But taking into consideration the economics and environmental conditions, the above choice is not suitable for longer run. An effort to shift from non-renewable sources such as diesel to renewable energy source such as solar has been highlighted. An approximate comparative analysis showing the life cycle costs of a PV pumping system with Diesel Generator powered water pumping is done using MATLAB/STMULTNK.

  7. Cardiovascular disease research in Latin America: A comparative bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jahangir, Eiman; Comandé, Daniel; Rubinstein, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the number of publications in cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Latin America and the Caribbean over the last decade. METHODS: We performed a bibliometric analysis in PubMed from 2001 to 2010 for Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and India. RESULTS: Latin America published 4% of articles compared with 26% from the United States/Canada and 42% from Europe. In CVD, Latin America published 4% of articles vs 23% from the United States/Canada and 40% from Europe. The number of publications in CVD in Latin America increased from 41 in 2001 to 726 in 2010. CONCLUSION: Latin America, while publishing more articles than previously, lags behind developed countries. Further advances in research infrastructure are necessary to develop prevention strategies for this region. PMID:22216374

  8. Command Process Modeling & Risk Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Commanding Errors may be caused by a variety of root causes. It's important to understand the relative significance of each of these causes for making institutional investment decisions. One of these causes is the lack of standardized processes and procedures for command and control. We mitigate this problem by building periodic tables and models corresponding to key functions within it. These models include simulation analysis and probabilistic risk assessment models.

  9. Extreme storm surges: a comparative study of frequency analysis approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Y.; Bardet, L.; Duluc, C.-M.; Rebour, V.

    2013-11-01

    In France, nuclear facilities were designed to very low probabilities of failure. Nevertheless, exceptional climatic events have given rise to surges much larger than observations (outliers) and had clearly illustrated the potential to underestimate the extreme water levels calculated with the current statistical methods. The objective of the present work is to conduct a comparative study of three approaches including the Annual Maxima (AM), the Peaks-Over Threshold (POT) and the r-Largest Order Statistics (r-LOS). These methods are illustrated in a real analysis case study. All the data sets were screened for outliers. Non-parametric tests for randomness, homogeneity and stationarity of time series were used. The shape and scale parameters stability plots, the mean excess residual life plot and the stability of the standard errors of return levels were used to select optimal thresholds and r values for the POT and r-LOS method, respectively. The comparison of methods was based on: (i) the uncertainty degrees, (ii) the adequacy criteria and tests and (iii) the visual inspection. It was found that the r-LOS and POT methods have reduced the uncertainty on the distributions parameters and return level estimates and have systematically shown values of the 100 and 500 yr return levels smaller than those estimated with the AM method. Results have also shown that none of the compared methods has allowed a good fitting at the right tail of the distribution in the presence of outliers. As a perspective, the use of historical information was proposed in order to increase the representativity of outliers in data sets. Findings are of practical relevance not only to nuclear energy operators in France, for applications in storm surge hazard analysis and flood management, but also for the optimal planning and design of facilities to withstand extreme environmental conditions, with an appropriate level of risk.

  10. A comparative analysis of GPU implementations of spectral unmixing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Sergio; Plaza, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Spectral unmixing is a very important task for remotely sensed hyperspectral data exploitation. It involves the separation of a mixed pixel spectrum into its pure component spectra (called endmembers) and the estimation of the proportion (abundance) of each endmember in the pixel. Over the last years, several algorithms have been proposed for: i) automatic extraction of endmembers, and ii) estimation of the abundance of endmembers in each pixel of the hyperspectral image. The latter step usually imposes two constraints in abundance estimation: the non-negativity constraint (meaning that the estimated abundances cannot be negative) and the sum-toone constraint (meaning that the sum of endmember fractional abundances for a given pixel must be unity). These two steps comprise a hyperspectral unmixing chain, which can be very time-consuming (particularly for high-dimensional hyperspectral images). Parallel computing architectures have offered an attractive solution for fast unmixing of hyperspectral data sets, but these systems are expensive and difficult to adapt to on-board data processing scenarios, in which low-weight and low-power integrated components are essential to reduce mission payload and obtain analysis results in (near) real-time. In this paper, we perform an inter-comparison of parallel algorithms for automatic extraction of pure spectral signatures or endmembers and for estimation of the abundance of endmembers in each pixel of the scene. The compared techniques are implemented in graphics processing units (GPUs). These hardware accelerators can bridge the gap towards on-board processing of this kind of data. The considered algorithms comprise the orthogonal subspace projection (OSP), iterative error analysis (IEA) and N-FINDR algorithms for endmember extraction, as well as unconstrained, partially constrained and fully constrained abundance estimation. The considered implementations are inter-compared using different GPU architectures and hyperspectral

  11. Comparative analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingming; Zeng, Qingfang; Dai, Suiping; Liang, Huixia; Dai, Fengying; Xie, Xueling; Lu, Kunlin; Gao, Chunfang

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression data of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was compared with that of cirrhosis (C) to identify critical genes in HCC. A total of five gene expression data sets were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. HCC and healthy samples were combined as dataset HCC, whereas cirrhosis samples were included in dataset C. A network was constructed for dataset HCC with the package R for performing Weighted Gene Co‑expression Network Analysis. Modules were identified by cluster analysis with the packages flashClust and dynamicTreeCut. Hub genes were screened out by calculating connectivity. Functional annotations were assigned to the hub genes using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integration Discovery, and functional annotation networks were visualized with Cytoscape. Following the exclusion of outlier samples, 394 HCC samples and 47 healthy samples were included in dataset HCC and 233 cirrhosis samples were included in dataset C. A total of 6 modules were identified in the weighted gene co‑expression network of dataset HCC (blue, brown, turquoise, green, red and yellow). Modules blue, brown and turquoise had high preservation whereas module yellow exhibited the lowest preservation. These modules were associated with transcription, mitosis, cation transportation, cation homeostasis, secretion and regulation of cyclase activity. Various hub genes of module yellow were cytokines, including chemokine (C‑C motif) ligand 22 and interleukin‑19, which may be important in the development of HCC. Gene expression profiles of HCC were compared with those of cirrhosis and numerous critical genes were identified, which may contribute to the progression of HCC. Further studies on these genes may improve the understanding of HCC pathogenesis.

  12. Bisphenol A alters gut microbiome: Comparative metagenomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keng-Po; Chung, Yan-Tung; Li, Rong; Wan, Hin-Ting; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu

    2016-11-01

    Mounting evidence has shown that an alteration of the gut microbiota is associated with diet, and plays an important role in animal health and metabolic diseases. However, little is known about the influence of environmental contaminants on the gut microbial community. Bisphenol A (BPA), which is widely used for manufacturing plastic products, has recently been classified as an environmental obesogen. Although many studies have demonstrated the metabolic-disrupting effects of BPA on liver and pancreatic functions, the possible effects of this synthetic compound on the metabolic diversity of the intestinal microbiota is unknown. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis on caecum samples of CD-1 mice, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that dietary BPA intake may influence the gut microbiota composition and functions, an important attributing factor to development of the metabolic syndrome. A high-fat diet (HFD) and high-sucrose diet (HSD) were included as the positive controls for comparing the changes in the intestinal microbial profiles. Our results demonstrated a significant reduction of species diversity in the gut microbiota of BPA-fed mice. Alpha and beta diversity analyses showed that dietary BPA intake led to a similar gut microbial community structure as that induced by HFD and HSD in mice. In addition, comparative analysis of the microbial communities revealed that both BPA and a HFD favored the growth of Proteobacteria, a microbial marker of dysbiosis. Consistently, growth induction of the family Helicobacteraceae and reduction of the Firmicutes and Clostridia populations were observed in the mice fed BPA or a HFD. Collectively, our study highlighted that the effects of dietary BPA intake on the shift of microbial community structure were similar to those of a HFD and HSD, and revealed microbial markers for the development of diseases associated with an unstable microbiota.

  13. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  14. Model building techniques for analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Henry, Ronald C.; Brooks, Sean; Martin, Wilbur D.

    2009-09-01

    The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual model-based environment whereby analysis is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) models using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the product definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid model acts as the design solid model that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. Analysis is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid model (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the analysis solid model (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER modeling techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part model. This document contains recommended modeling techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.

  15. Comparative genomics analysis in Prunoideae to identify biologically relevant polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Koepke, Tyson; Schaeffer, Scott; Harper, Artemus; Dicenta, Federico; Edwards, Mark; Henry, Robert J; Møller, Birger L; Meisel, Lee; Oraguzie, Nnadozie; Silva, Herman; Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel; Dhingra, Amit

    2013-09-01

    Prunus is an economically important genus with a wide range of physiological and biological variability. Using the peach genome as a reference, sequencing reads from four almond accessions and one sweet cherry cultivar were used for comparative analysis of these three Prunus species. Reference mapping enabled the identification of many biological relevant polymorphisms within the individuals. Examining the depth of the polymorphisms and the overall scaffold coverage, we identified many potentially interesting regions including hundreds of small scaffolds with no coverage from any individual. Non-sense mutations account for about 70 000 of the 13 million identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Blast2GO analyses on these non-sense SNPs revealed several interesting results. First, non-sense SNPs were not evenly distributed across all gene ontology terms. Specifically, in comparison with peach, sweet cherry is found to have non-sense SNPs in two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) genes and two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) genes. These polymorphisms may be at the root of the nonclimacteric ripening of sweet cherry. A set of candidate genes associated with bitterness in almond were identified by comparing sweet and bitter almond sequences. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in plants of non-sense SNP abundance in a genus being linked to specific GO terms.

  16. Medical and nursing clinical decision making: a comparative epistemological analysis.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Judy; Carnevale, F A

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this article is to explore the complex forms of knowledge involved in diagnostic and interventional decision making by comparing the processes in medicine and nursing, including nurse practitioners. Many authors assert that the practice of clinical decision making involves the application of theoretical knowledge (acquired in the classroom and textbooks) as well as research evidence, upon concrete particular cases. This approach draws on various universal principles and algorithms to facilitate the task. On the other hand, others argue that this involves an intuitive form of judgement that is difficult to teach, one that is acquired principally through experience. In an exploration of these issues, this article consists of three sections. A clarification of terms commonly used when discussing decision making is provided in the first section. In the second section, an epistemological analysis of decision making is presented by examining several perspectives and comparing them for their use in the nursing and medical literature. Bunge's epistemological framework for decision making (based on scientific realism) is explored for its fit with the aims of medicine and nursing. The final section presents a discussion of knowledge utilization and decision making as it relates to the implications for the education and ongoing development of nurse practitioners. It is concluded that Donald Schön's conception of reflective practice best characterizes the skillful conduct of clinical decision making.

  17. Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and B. mucronatus secretomes: a comparative proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Joana M. S.; Anjo, Sandra I.; Fonseca, Luís; Egas, Conceição; Manadas, Bruno; Abrantes, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, recognized as a worldwide major forest pest, is a migratory endoparasitic nematode with capacity to feed on pine tissues and also on fungi colonizing the trees. Bursaphelenchus mucronatus, the closest related species, differs from B. xylophilus on its pathogenicity, making this nematode a good candidate for comparative analyses. Secretome profiles of B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus were obtained and proteomic differences were evaluated by quantitative SWATH-MS. From the 681 proteins initially identified, 422 were quantified and compared between B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus secretomes and from these, 243 proteins were found differentially regulated: 158 and 85 proteins were increased in B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus secretomes, respectively. While increased proteins in B. xylophilus secretome revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with peptidase activity, the increased proteins in B. mucronatus secretome were mainly related to oxidative stress responses. The changes in peptidases were evaluated at the transcription level by RT-qPCR, revealing a correlation between the mRNA levels of four cysteine peptidases with secretion levels. The analysis presented expands our knowledge about molecular basis of B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus hosts interaction and supports the hypothesis of a key role of secreted peptidases in B. xylophilus pathogenicity. PMID:27941947

  18. Comparative Genomics Analysis in Prunoideae to Identify Biologically Relevant Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Koepke, Tyson; Schaeffer, Scott; Harper, Artemus; Dicenta, Federico; Edwards, Mark; Henry, Robert J.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Meisel, Lee; Oraguzie, Nnadozie; Silva, Herman; Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel; Dhingra, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Prunus is an economically important genus with a wide range of physiological and biological variability. Using the peach genome as a reference, sequencing reads from four almond accessions and one sweet cherry cultivar were used for comparative analysis of these three Prunus species. Reference mapping enabled the identification of many biological relevant polymorphisms within the individuals. Examining the depth of the polymorphisms and the overall scaffold coverage, we identified many potentially interesting regions including hundreds of small scaffolds with no coverage from any individual. Nonsense mutations account for about 70,000 of the 13 million identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Blast2GO analyses on these nonsense SNPs revealed several interesting results. First, nonsense SNPs were not evenly distributed across all gene ontology terms. Specifically, in comparison to peach, sweet cherry is found to have nonsense SNPs in two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) genes and two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) genes. These polymorphisms may be at the root of the non-climacteric ripening of sweet cherry. A set of candidate genes associated with bitterness in almond were identified by comparing sweet and bitter almond sequences. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in plants of nonsense SNP abundance in a genus being linked to specific GO terms. PMID:23763653

  19. OGRe: a relational database for comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Daniel; Gibson, Andrew P.; Hudelot, Cendrine; Higgs, Paul G.

    2003-01-01

    Organellar Genome Retrieval (OGRe) is a relational database of complete mitochondrial genome sequences for over 250 Metazoan species. OGRe provides a resource for the comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes at several levels. At the sequence level, OGRe allows the retrieval of any selected set of mitochondrial genes from any selected set of species. Species are classified using a taxonomic system that allows easy selection of related groups of species. Sequence alignments are also available for some species. At the level of individual nucleotides, the system contains information on base frequencies and codon usage frequencies that can be compared between organisms. At the level of whole genomes, OGRe provides several ways of visualizing information on gene order. Diagrams illustrating the genome arrangement can be generated for any selected set of species automatically from the information in the database. Searches can be done based on gene arrangement to find sets of species that have the same order as one another. Diagrams for pairwise comparison of species can be produced that show the positions of break-points in the gene order and use colour to highlight the sections of the genome that have moved. OGRe is available from http://www.bioinf.man.ac.uk/ogre. PMID:12519982

  20. Comparative multiplex dosage analysis in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Calì, F; Chiavetta, V; Ragalmuto, A; Vinci, M; Ruggeri, G; Schinocca, P; Romano, V

    2013-04-12

    We developed a new application of comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA) for evaluation of the ataxin 2 gene. Expansions of the triplet CAG can cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), a neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of SCA2 is routinely based on the use of conventional PCR to detect the CAG expansion. However, PCR does not amplify an allele with an expansion of many triplets (>80), which is typically found in infantile and juvenile forms of SCA2, thus leading to false negatives. We propose the analysis of the ATXN2 gene by CMDA to complement existing methods currently used for the detection of large expansions of the CAG repeat. Using CMDA, the presence of any longer mutated allele in a heterozygous patient or fetus would be inferred due to dosage variation of the very frequent normal allele #22. CMDA can be completed in 1 day, at very low cost, and would be a useful tool for prenatal diagnosis and for diagnosis of presymptomatic forms of early-onset SCA2.

  1. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use.

  2. Comparative analysis of essential genes in prokaryotic genomic islands

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Peng, Chong; Zhang, Ge; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Essential genes are thought to encode proteins that carry out the basic functions to sustain a cellular life, and genomic islands (GIs) usually contain clusters of horizontally transferred genes. It has been assumed that essential genes are not likely to be located in GIs, but systematical analysis of essential genes in GIs has not been explored before. Here, we have analyzed the essential genes in 28 prokaryotes by statistical method and reached a conclusion that essential genes in GIs are significantly fewer than those outside GIs. The function of 362 essential genes found in GIs has been explored further by BLAST against the Virulence Factor Database (VFDB) and the phage/prophage sequence database of PHAge Search Tool (PHAST). Consequently, 64 and 60 eligible essential genes are found to share the sequence similarity with the virulence factors and phage/prophages-related genes, respectively. Meanwhile, we find several toxin-related proteins and repressors encoded by these essential genes in GIs. The comparative analysis of essential genes in genomic islands will not only shed new light on the development of the prediction algorithm of essential genes, but also give a clue to detect the functionality of essential genes in genomic islands. PMID:26223387

  3. Comparative analysis of actigraphy performance in healthy young subjects.

    PubMed

    Bellone, Giannina J; Plano, Santiago A; Cardinali, Daniel P; Chada, Daniel Pérez; Vigo, Daniel E; Golombek, Diego A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep-related health disorders are increasing worldwide; diagnosis and treatment of such sleep diseases are commonly invasive and sometimes unpractical or expensive. Actigraphy has been recently introduced as a tool for the study of sleep and circadian disorders; however, there are several devices that claim to be useful for research and have not been thoroughly tested. This comparative study provides activity, sleep and temperature information regarding several of the most commonly used actigraphers: Micro-Mini Motion Logger; Act Trust; Misfit Flash; Fitbit Flex & Thermochron. Twenty-two healthy young subjects were assessed with five different commercial actigraphs (Micro-Mini Motionlogger Watch, Condor Act Trust, MisFit Flash and Fitbit Flex) and a temperature recorder (Thermochron), and also completed a sleep diary for a week. There were not significant differences in the analysis of rest-activity pattern between devices. Temperature rhythm comparison between the Act Trust and the Thermochron showed significant differences in rhythm percentage (p<0.05) and mesor (p<0.0563) but not in amplitude or acrophase. Although data accessibility and ease of use was very different for the diverse devices, there were no significant differences for sleep onset, total sleep time and sleep efficiency recordings, where applicable. In conclusion, depending on the type of study and analysis desired (as well as cost and compliance of use), we propose some relative advantages for the different actigraphy/temperature recording devices.

  4. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms.

  5. Using the integral spleen method of radiorenogram analysis and a baboon model to compare the diagnostic usefulness of technetium-99m-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid to that of various technetium-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycene formulations and iodine-123-hippuran

    SciTech Connect

    Dormehl, I.C.; Van Wyk, A.; Pilloy, W.; Maree, M.; Knoesen, O.; De Winter, R.; Jacobs, L.; Hoppe, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    In light of the high price of commercially available mercaptoacetyltriglycene (MAG3) it was decided to attempt a local MAG3-formation and to test this against diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), /sup 123/I-Hippuran, and commercial MAG3 for diagnostic radiorenographic capabilities also in conjunction with furosemide and captopril. A baboon model (n = 6) was used, and the parameters evaluated were obtained by the integral spleen method of radiorenogram analysis. Although the images and parameters pointed to /sup 123/I-Hippuran and commercial MAG3 as the ideal renal scanning agents and to DTPA as the least so, with the local product an acceptable alternative, the differences were not significant enough to warrant either the purchase of the commercial product or the extensive development of the local product. Inexpensive /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA in conjunction with modern computer techniques will probably supply most of the answers.

  6. Comparative and pharmacophore model for deacetylase SIRT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtiniemi, Tero; Wittekindt, Carsten; Laitinen, Tuomo; Leppänen, Jukka; Salminen, Antero; Poso, Antti; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija

    2006-09-01

    Sirtuins are NAD-dependent histone deacetylases, which cleave the acetyl-group from acetylated proteins, such as histones but also the acetyl groups from several transcription factors, and in this way can change their activities. Of all seven mammalian SirTs, the human sirtuin SirT1 has been the most extensively studied. However, there is no crystal structure or comparative model reported for SirT1. We have therefore built up a three-dimensional comparison model of the SirT1 protein catalytic core (domain area from residues 244 to 498 of the full length SirT1) in order to assist in the investigation of active site-ligand interactions and in the design of novel SirT1 inhibitors. In this study we also propose the binding-mode of recently reported set of indole-based inhibitors in SirT1. The site of interaction and the ligand conformation were predicted by the use of molecular docking techniques. To distinguish between active and inactive compounds, a post-docking filter based on H-bond network was constructed. Docking results were used to investigate the pharmacophore and to identify a filter for database mining.

  7. Comparative metabolomics of drought acclimation in model and forage legumes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Diego H; Schwabe, Franziska; Erban, Alexander; Udvardi, Michael K; Kopka, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Water limitation has become a major concern for agriculture. Such constraints reinforce the urgent need to understand mechanisms by which plants cope with water deprivation. We used a non-targeted metabolomic approach to explore plastic systems responses to non-lethal drought in model and forage legume species of the Lotus genus. In the model legume Lotus. japonicus, increased water stress caused gradual increases of most of the soluble small molecules profiled, reflecting a global and progressive reprogramming of metabolic pathways. The comparative metabolomic approach between Lotus species revealed conserved and unique metabolic responses to drought stress. Importantly, only few drought-responsive metabolites were conserved among all species. Thus we highlight a potential impediment to translational approaches that aim to engineer traits linked to the accumulation of compatible solutes. Finally, a broad comparison of the metabolic changes elicited by drought and salt acclimation revealed partial conservation of these metabolic stress responses within each of the Lotus species, but only few salt- and drought-responsive metabolites were shared between all. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to the current insights into legume water stress physiology.

  8. A comparative study of prebiotic and present day translational models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rein, R.; Raghunathan, G.; Mcdonald, J.; Shibata, M.; Srinivasan, S.

    1986-01-01

    It is generally recognized that the understanding of the molecular basis of primitive translation is a fundamental step in developing a theory of the origin of life. However, even in modern molecular biology, the mechanism for the decoding of messenger RNA triplet codons into an amino acid sequence of a protein on the ribosome is understood incompletely. Most of the proposed models for prebiotic translation lack, not only experimental support, but also a careful theoretical scrutiny of their compatibility with well understood stereochemical and energetic principles of nucleic acid structure, molecular recognition principles, and the chemistry of peptide bond formation. Present studies are concerned with comparative structural modelling and mechanistic simulation of the decoding apparatus ranging from those proposed for prebiotic conditions to the ones involved in modern biology. Any primitive decoding machinery based on nucleic acids and proteins, and most likely the modern day system, has to satisfy certain geometrical constraints. The charged amino acyl and the peptidyl termini of successive adaptors have to be adjacent in space in order to satisfy the stereochemical requirements for amide bond formation. Simultaneously, the same adaptors have to recognize successive codons on the messenger. This translational complex has to be realized by components that obey nucleic acid conformational principles, stabilities, and specificities. This generalized condition greatly restricts the number of acceptable adaptor structures.

  9. In silico comparative analysis of SSR markers in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The adverse environmental conditions impose extreme limitation to growth and plant development, restricting the genetic potential and reflecting on plant yield losses. The progress obtained by classic plant breeding methods aiming at increasing abiotic stress tolerances have not been enough to cope with increasing food demands. New target genes need to be identified to reach this goal, which requires extensive studies of the related biological mechanisms. Comparative analyses in ancestral plant groups can help to elucidate yet unclear biological processes. Results In this study, we surveyed the occurrence patterns of expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite markers for model plants. A total of 13,133 SSR markers were discovered using the SSRLocator software in non-redundant EST databases made for all eleven species chosen for this study. The dimer motifs are more frequent in lower plant species, such as green algae and mosses, and the trimer motifs are more frequent for the majority of higher plant groups, such as monocots and dicots. With this in silico study we confirm several microsatellite plant survey results made with available bioinformatics tools. Conclusions The comparative studies of EST-SSR markers among all plant lineages is well suited for plant evolution studies as well as for future studies of transferability of molecular markers. PMID:21247422

  10. Hierarchical Bayesian model averaging for hydrostratigraphic modeling: Uncertainty segregation and comparative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Frank T.-C.; Elshall, Ahmed S.

    2013-09-01

    Analysts are often faced with competing propositions for each uncertain model component. How can we judge that we select a correct proposition(s) for an uncertain model component out of numerous possible propositions? We introduce the hierarchical Bayesian model averaging (HBMA) method as a multimodel framework for uncertainty analysis. The HBMA allows for segregating, prioritizing, and evaluating different sources of uncertainty and their corresponding competing propositions through a hierarchy of BMA models that forms a BMA tree. We apply the HBMA to conduct uncertainty analysis on the reconstructed hydrostratigraphic architectures of the Baton Rouge aquifer-fault system, Louisiana. Due to uncertainty in model data, structure, and parameters, multiple possible hydrostratigraphic models are produced and calibrated as base models. The study considers four sources of uncertainty. With respect to data uncertainty, the study considers two calibration data sets. With respect to model structure, the study considers three different variogram models, two geological stationarity assumptions and two fault conceptualizations. The base models are produced following a combinatorial design to allow for uncertainty segregation. Thus, these four uncertain model components with their corresponding competing model propositions result in 24 base models. The results show that the systematic dissection of the uncertain model components along with their corresponding competing propositions allows for detecting the robust model propositions and the major sources of uncertainty.

  11. A comparative analysis of the evolution of imperfect mimicry.

    PubMed

    Penney, Heather D; Hassall, Christopher; Skevington, Jeffrey H; Abbott, Kevin R; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2012-03-21

    Although exceptional examples of adaptation are frequently celebrated, some outcomes of natural selection seem far from perfect. For example, many hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) are harmless (Batesian) mimics of stinging Hymenoptera. However, although some hoverfly species are considered excellent mimics, other species bear only a superficial resemblance to their models and it is unclear why this is so. To evaluate hypotheses that have been put forward to explain interspecific variation in the mimetic fidelity of Palearctic Syrphidae we use a comparative approach. We show that the most plausible explanation is that predators impose less selection for mimetic fidelity on smaller hoverfly species because they are less profitable prey items. In particular, our findings, in combination with previous results, allow us to reject several key hypotheses for imperfect mimicry: first, human ratings of mimetic fidelity are positively correlated with both morphometric measures and avian rankings, indicating that variation in mimetic fidelity is not simply an illusion based on human perception; second, no species of syrphid maps out in multidimensional space as being intermediate in appearance between several different hymenopteran model species, as the multimodel hypothesis requires; and third, we find no evidence for a negative relationship between mimetic fidelity and abundance, which calls into question the kin-selection hypothesis. By contrast, a strong positive relationship between mimetic fidelity and body size supports the relaxed-selection hypothesis, suggesting that reduced predation pressure on less profitable prey species limits the selection for mimetic perfection.

  12. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  13. A comparative study of theoretical graph models for characterizing structural networks of human brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojin; Hu, Xintao; Jin, Changfeng; Han, Junwei; Liu, Tianming; Guo, Lei; Hao, Wei; Li, Lingjiang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated both structural and functional brain networks via graph-theoretical methods. However, there is an important issue that has not been adequately discussed before: what is the optimal theoretical graph model for describing the structural networks of human brain? In this paper, we perform a comparative study to address this problem. Firstly, large-scale cortical regions of interest (ROIs) are localized by recently developed and validated brain reference system named Dense Individualized Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL) to address the limitations in the identification of the brain network ROIs in previous studies. Then, we construct structural brain networks based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. Afterwards, the global and local graph properties of the constructed structural brain networks are measured using the state-of-the-art graph analysis algorithms and tools and are further compared with seven popular theoretical graph models. In addition, we compare the topological properties between two graph models, namely, stickiness-index-based model (STICKY) and scale-free gene duplication model (SF-GD), that have higher similarity with the real structural brain networks in terms of global and local graph properties. Our experimental results suggest that among the seven theoretical graph models compared in this study, STICKY and SF-GD models have better performances in characterizing the structural human brain network.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences Covering the Seven Cronobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Craig A.; Shih, Rita; Degoricija, Lovorka; Rico, Alain; Brzoska, Pius; Hamby, Stephen E.; Masood, Naqash; Hariri, Sumyya; Sonbol, Hana; Chuzhanova, Nadia; McClelland, Michael; Furtado, Manohar R.; Forsythe, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species of Cronobacter are widespread in the environment and are occasional food-borne pathogens associated with serious neonatal diseases, including bacteraemia, meningitis, and necrotising enterocolitis. The genus is composed of seven species: C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis, C. dublinensis, C. muytjensii, C. universalis, and C. condimenti. Clinical cases are associated with three species, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis and, in particular, with C. sakazakii multilocus sequence type 4. Thus, it is plausible that virulence determinants have evolved in certain lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated high quality sequence drafts for eleven Cronobacter genomes representing the seven Cronobacter species, including an ST4 strain of C. sakazakii. Comparative analysis of these genomes together with the two publicly available genomes revealed Cronobacter has over 6,000 genes in one or more strains and over 2,000 genes shared by all Cronobacter. Considerable variation in the presence of traits such as type six secretion systems, metal resistance (tellurite, copper and silver), and adhesins were found. C. sakazakii is unique in the Cronobacter genus in encoding genes enabling the utilization of exogenous sialic acid which may have clinical significance. The C. sakazakii ST4 strain 701 contained additional genes as compared to other C. sakazakii but none of them were known specific virulence-related genes. Conclusions/Significance Genome comparison revealed that pair-wise DNA sequence identity varies between 89 and 97% in the seven Cronobacter species, and also suggested various degrees of divergence. Sets of universal core genes and accessory genes unique to each strain were identified. These gene sequences can be used for designing genus/species specific detection assays. Genes encoding adhesins, T6SS, and metal resistance genes as well as prophages are found in only subsets of genomes and have contributed considerably to the variation of

  15. Comparative Analysis of Uninhibited and Constrained Avian Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jordan A.

    The flight of birds has intrigued and motivated man for many years. Bird flight served as the primary inspiration of flying machines developed by Leonardo Da Vinci, Otto Lilienthal, and even the Wright brothers. Avian flight has once again drawn the attention of the scientific community as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are not only becoming more popular, but smaller. Birds are once again influencing the designs of aircraft. Small UAVs operating within flight conditions and low Reynolds numbers common to birds are not yet capable of the high levels of control and agility that birds display with ease. Many researchers believe the potential to improve small UAV performance can be obtained by applying features common to birds such as feathers and flapping flight to small UAVs. Although the effects of feathers on a wing have received some attention, the effects of localized transient feather motion and surface geometry on the flight performance of a wing have been largely overlooked. In this research, the effects of freely moving feathers on a preserved red tailed hawk wing were studied. A series of experiments were conducted to measure the aerodynamic forces on a hawk wing with varying levels of feather movement permitted. Angle of attack and air speed were varied within the natural flight envelope of the hawk. Subsequent identical tests were performed with the feather motion constrained through the use of externally-applied surface treatments. Additional tests involved the study of an absolutely fixed geometry mold-and-cast wing model of the original bird wing. Final tests were also performed after applying surface coatings to the cast wing. High speed videos taken during tests revealed the extent of the feather movement between wing models. Images of the microscopic surface structure of each wing model were analyzed to establish variations in surface geometry between models. Recorded aerodynamic forces were then compared to the known feather motion and surface

  16. Efficacy of escitalopram compared to citalopram: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stuart; Hansen, Thomas; Kasper, Siegfried

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the clinical relevance of the relative antidepressant efficacy of escitalopram and citalopram by meta-analysis. Studies in major depressive disorder (MDD) with both escitalopram and citalopram treatment arms were identified. Adult patients had to meet DSM-IV criteria for MDD. The primary outcome measure was the treatment difference in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at week 8 (or last assessment if <8 wk). Secondary outcome measures were response (≥ 50% improvement from baseline) and remission (MADRS ≤ 12). A search of the literature and websites found eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and onr naturalistic trial, with a total of 2009 patients (escitalopram, n=995; citalopram, n=1014). Escitalopram was significantly more effective than citalopram in overall treatment effect, with an estimated mean treatment difference of 1.7 points at week 8 (or last assessment if <8 wk) on the MADRS (95% CI 0.8-2.6, p=0.0002) (six RCTs used the MADRS), and in responder rate (8.3 percentage points, 95% CI 4.4-12.3) (eight RCTs) and remitter rate (17.6 percentage points, 95% CI 12.1-23.1) analyses (reported for four RCTs), corresponding to number-needed-to-treat (NNT) values of 11.9 (p<0.0001) for response and 5.7 (p<0.0001) for remission. The overall odds ratios were 1.44 (p<0.0003) for response and 1.86 (p<0.0001) for remission, in favour of escitalopram. In this meta-analysis, the statistically significant superior efficacy of escitalopram compared to citalopram was shown to be clinically relevant.

  17. Spheroid model study comparing the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA.

    PubMed

    Pérard, Matthieu; Le Clerc, Justine; Watrin, Tanguy; Meary, Fleur; Pérez, Fabienne; Tricot-Doleux, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the biological effects of a new dentine substitute based on Ca₃SiO₅ (Biodentine™) for use in pulp-capping treatment, on pseudo-odontoblastic (MDPC-23) and pulp (Od-21) cells. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effects of Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on gene expression in cultured spheroids. We used the acid phosphatase assay to compare the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA. Cell differentiation was investigated by RT-qPCR. We investigated the expression of genes involved in odontogenic differentiation (Runx2), matrix secretion (Col1a1, Spp1) and mineralisation (Alp). ANOVA and PLSD tests were used for data analysis. MDPC-23 cells cultured in the presence of MTA had higher levels of viability than those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and control cells on day 7 (P = 0.0065 and P = 0.0126, respectively). For Od-21 cells, proliferation rates on day 7 were significantly lower in the presence of Biodentine or MTA than for control (P < 0.0001). Col1a1 expression levels were slightly lower in cells cultured in the presence of MTA than in those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and in control cells. Biodentine and MTA may modify the proliferation of pulp cell lines. Their effects may fluctuate over time, depending on the cell line considered. The observed similarity between Biodentine and MTA validates the indication for direct pulp-capping claimed by the manufacturers.

  18. Comparative analysis of the Monochamus alternatus immune system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiao; Zhao, Li-Lin; Yu, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Wei; Ahmad, Faheem; Hu, Song-Nian; Zou, Zhen; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2017-03-01

    The pine sawyer beetle, Monochamus alternatus, is regarded as a notorious forest pest in Asia, vectoring an invasive pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which is known to cause pine wilt disease. However, little sequence information is available for this vector beetle. This hampered the research on its immune system. Based on transcriptome of M. alternatus, we have identified and characterized 194 immunity-related genes in M. alternatus, and compared them with homologues molecules from other species known to exhibit immune responses against invading microbes. The lower number of putative immunity-related genes in M. alternatus were attributed to fewer C-type lectin, serine protease (SP) and anti-microbial peptide (AMP) genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that M. alternatus had a unique recognition gene, galectin3, orthologues of which was not identified in Tribolium castaneum, Drosophila melanogastor, Anopheles gambiae, and Apis mellifera. This suggested a lineage-specific gene evolution for coleopteran insects. Our study provides the comprehensive sequence resources of the immunity-related genes of M. alternatus, presenting valuable information for better understanding of the molecular mechanism of innate immunity processes in M. alternatus against B. xylophilus. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Tolerance among Thermoanaerobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Joana I.; Alves, M. Madalena; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Sousa, Diana Z.

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic thermophilic strain (strain PCO) was isolated from a syngas-converting enrichment culture. Syngas components cannot be used by strain PCO, but the new strain is very tolerant to carbon monoxide (pCO = 1.7 × 105 Pa, 100% CO). 16S rRNA gene analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization revealed that strain PCO is a strain of Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus. The physiology of strain PCO and other Thermoanaerobacter species was compared, focusing on their tolerance to carbon monoxide. T. thermohydrosulfuricus, T. brockii subsp. finnii, T. pseudethanolicus, and T. wiegelii were exposed to increased CO concentrations in the headspace, while growth, glucose consumption and product formation were monitored. Remarkably, glucose conversion rates by Thermoanaerobacter species were not affected by CO. All the tested strains fermented glucose to mainly lactate, ethanol, acetate, and hydrogen, but final product concentrations differed. In the presence of CO, ethanol production was generally less affected, but H2 production decreased with increasing CO partial pressure. This study highlights the CO resistance of Thermoanaerobacter species. PMID:27621723

  20. Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoliang; Lu, Lixia; Su, Hailong; Lou, Zhongzi; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yadong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of small regulatory RNAs that are involved in numerous biological processes through small RNA-induced silencing networks. In an attempt to explore the phylogeny of miRNAs across five platyhelminths, we integrated annotated miRNAs and their full genomes. We identified conserved miRNA clusters and, in particular, miR-71/2 was conserved from planarian to parasitic flatworms and was expanded in free-living Schmidtea mediterranea. Analysis of 22 miRNA loci provided compelling evidence that most known miRNAs are conserved across platyhelminths. Meanwhile, we also observed alterations of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNA(s), such as transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation, in around ~ 41% of 22 known miRNA loci. Compared with Echinococcus multilocularis, the majority of these events occurred in evolution-distant Hymenolepis microstoma, Schistosoma japonicum or/and S. mediterranea. These results imply rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

  1. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    PubMed

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice shoots exposed to high arsenate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Li, Ming; Han, Chao; Wu, Fengxia; Tu, Bingkun; Yang, Pingfang

    2013-10-01

    Consumption of arsenic contaminated water and cereals is a serious threat to humans all over the world. Rice (Oryza sativa "Nipponbare"), as a main cereal crop, can accumulate arsenic more than 10-fold that of in other cereals. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of rice subjected to 100 µM arsenate stress, a comparative proteomic analysis of rice shoots in combination with morphological and biochemical investigations have been performed in this study. The results demonstrated that arsenate suppressed the growth of rice seedlings, destroyed the cellular ultra-structure and changed the homeostasis of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, a total of 38 differentially displayed proteins, which were mainly involved in metabolism, redox and protein-metabolism, were identified. The data suggest the arsenic can inhibit rice growth through negatively affecting chloroplast structure and photosynthesis. In addition, upregulation of the proteins involved in redox and protein metabolism might help the rice to be resistant or tolerant to arsenic toxicity. In general, this study improves our understanding about the rice arsenic responsive mechanism.

  3. Comparative analysis of PSO algorithms for PID controller tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štimac, Goranka; Braut, Sanjin; Žigulić, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    The active magnetic bearing(AMB) suspends the rotating shaft and maintains it in levitated position by applying controlled electromagnetic forces on the rotor in radial and axial directions. Although the development of various control methods is rapid, PID control strategy is still the most widely used control strategy in many applications, including AMBs. In order to tune PID controller, a particle swarm optimization(PSO) method is applied. Therefore, a comparative analysis of particle swarm optimization(PSO) algorithms is carried out, where two PSO algorithms, namely (1) PSO with linearly decreasing inertia weight(LDW-PSO), and (2) PSO algorithm with constriction factor approach(CFA-PSO), are independently tested for different PID structures. The computer simulations are carried out with the aim of minimizing the objective function defined as the integral of time multiplied by the absolute value of error(ITAE). In order to validate the performance of the analyzed PSO algorithms, one-axis and two-axis radial rotor/active magnetic bearing systems are examined. The results show that PSO algorithms are effective and easily implemented methods, providing stable convergence and good computational efficiency of different PID structures for the rotor/AMB systems. Moreover, the PSO algorithms prove to be easily used for controller tuning in case of both SISO and MIMO system, which consider the system delay and the interference among the horizontal and vertical rotor axes.

  4. SRMAFTE facility checkout model flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Equipment (SRMAFTE) facility was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the internal propellant, insulation, and nozzle configurations of solid propellant rocket motor designs. This makes the characterization of the facility internal flow field very important in assuring that no facility induced flow field features exist which would corrupt the model related measurements. In order to verify the design and operation of the facility, a three-dimensional computational flow field analysis was performed on the facility checkout model setup. The checkout model measurement data, one-dimensional and three-dimensional estimates were compared, and the design and proper operation of the facility was verified. The proper operation of the metering nozzles, adapter chamber transition, model nozzle, and diffuser were verified. The one-dimensional and three-dimensional flow field estimates along with the available measurement data are compared.

  5. Jump Model / Comparability Ratio Model — Joinpoint Help System 4.4.0.0

    Cancer.gov

    The Jump Model / Comparability Ratio Model in the Joinpoint software provides a direct estimation of trend data (e.g. cancer rates) where there is a systematic scale change, which causes a “jump” in the rates, but is assumed not to affect the underlying trend.

  6. Locating Pleistocene Refugia: Comparing Phylogeographic and Ecological Niche Model Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Waltari, Eric; Hijmans, Robert J.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Nyári, Árpád S.; Perkins, Susan L.; Guralnick, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    Ecological niche models (ENMs) provide a means of characterizing the spatial distribution of suitable conditions for species, and have recently been applied to the challenge of locating potential distributional areas at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) when unfavorable climate conditions led to range contractions and fragmentation. Here, we compare and contrast ENM-based reconstructions of LGM refugial locations with those resulting from the more traditional molecular genetic and phylogeographic predictions. We examined 20 North American terrestrial vertebrate species from different regions and with different range sizes for which refugia have been identified based on phylogeographic analyses, using ENM tools to make parallel predictions. We then assessed the correspondence between the two approaches based on spatial overlap and areal extent of the predicted refugia. In 14 of the 20 species, the predictions from ENM and predictions based on phylogeographic studies were significantly spatially correlated, suggesting that the two approaches to development of refugial maps are converging on a similar result. Our results confirm that ENM scenario exploration can provide a useful complement to molecular studies, offering a less subjective, spatially explicit hypothesis of past geographic patterns of distribution. PMID:17622339

  7. Bayesian Nonparametric Models for Multiway Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zenglin; Yan, Feng; Qi, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Tensor decomposition is a powerful computational tool for multiway data analysis. Many popular tensor decomposition approaches-such as the Tucker decomposition and CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP)-amount to multi-linear factorization. They are insufficient to model (i) complex interactions between data entities, (ii) various data types (e.g., missing data and binary data), and (iii) noisy observations and outliers. To address these issues, we propose tensor-variate latent nonparametric Bayesian models for multiway data analysis. We name these models InfTucker. These new models essentially conduct Tucker decomposition in an infinite feature space. Unlike classical tensor decomposition models, our new approaches handle both continuous and binary data in a probabilistic framework. Unlike previous Bayesian models on matrices and tensors, our models are based on latent Gaussian or t processes with nonlinear covariance functions. Moreover, on network data, our models reduce to nonparametric stochastic blockmodels and can be used to discover latent groups and predict missing interactions. To learn the models efficiently from data, we develop a variational inference technique and explore properties of the Kronecker product for computational efficiency. Compared with a classical variational implementation, this technique reduces both time and space complexities by several orders of magnitude. On real multiway and network data, our new models achieved significantly higher prediction accuracy than state-of-art tensor decomposition methods and blockmodels.

  8. Impact of Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) Guidelines on Peri-Anesthesia Care for Rat Models of Stroke: A Meta-Analysis Comparing the Years 2005 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aurelie; Detilleux, Johann; Flecknell, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies using rats in stroke models have failed to translate into successful clinical trials in humans. The Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) has produced guidelines on the rodent stroke model for preclinical trials in order to promote the successful translation of animal to human studies. These guidelines also underline the importance of anaesthetic and monitoring techniques. The aim of this literature review is to document whether anaesthesia protocols (i.e., choice of agents, mode of ventilation, physiological support and monitoring) have been amended since the publication of the STAIR guidelines in 2009. A number of articles describing the use of a stroke model in adult rats from the years 2005 and 2015 were randomly selected from the PubMed database and analysed for the following parameters: country where the study was performed, strain of rats used, technique of stroke induction, anaesthetic agent for induction and maintenance, mode of intubation and ventilation, monitoring techniques, control of body temperature, vascular accesses, and administration of intravenous fluids and analgesics. For each parameter (stroke, induction, maintenance, monitoring), exact chi-square tests were used to determine whether or not proportions were significantly different across year and p values were corrected for multiple comparisons. An exact p-test was used for each parameter to compare the frequency distribution of each value followed by a Bonferroni test. The level of significant set at < 0.05. Results show that there were very few differences in the anaesthetic and monitoring techniques used between 2005 and 2015. In 2015, significantly more studies were performed in China and significantly fewer studies used isoflurane and nitrous oxide. The most striking finding is that the vast majority of all the studies from both 2005 and 2015 did not report the use of ventilation; measurement of blood gases, end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration, or blood

  9. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of human and Drosophila extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Fabio Alexis; Benoit Bouvrette, Louis Philip; Perras, Lilyanne; Blanchet-Cohen, Alexis; Garnier, Delphine; Rak, Janusz; Lécuyer, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-enclosed nanoparticles containing specific repertoires of genetic material. In mammals, EVs can mediate the horizontal transfer of various cargos and signaling molecules, notably miRNA and mRNA species. Whether this form of intercellular communication prevails in other metazoans remains unclear. Here, we report the first parallel comparative morphologic and transcriptomic characterization of EVs from Drosophila and human cellular models. Electronic microscopy revealed that human and Drosophila cells release similar EVs with diameters ranging from 30 to 200 nm, which contain complex populations of transcripts. RNA-seq identified abundant ribosomal RNAs, related pseudogenes and retrotransposons in human and Drosophila EVs. Vault RNAs and Y RNAs abounded in human samples, whereas small nucleolar RNAs involved in pseudouridylation were most prevalent in Drosophila EVs. Numerous mRNAs were identified, largely consisting of exonic sequences displaying full-length read coverage and enriched for translation and electronic transport chain functions. By analogy with human systems, these sizeable similarities suggest that EVs could potentially enable RNA-mediated intercellular communication in Drosophila. PMID:27282340

  10. Delineation of Steroid-Degrading Microorganisms through Comparative Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrand, Lee H.; Cardenas, Erick; Holert, Johannes; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Steroids are ubiquitous in natural environments and are a significant growth substrate for microorganisms. Microbial steroid metabolism is also important for some pathogens and for biotechnical applications. This study delineated the distribution of aerobic steroid catabolism pathways among over 8,000 microorganisms whose genomes are available in the NCBI RefSeq database. Combined analysis of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal genomes with both hidden Markov models and reciprocal BLAST identified 265 putative steroid degraders within only Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, which mainly originated from soil, eukaryotic host, and aquatic environments. These bacteria include members of 17 genera not previously known to contain steroid degraders. A pathway for cholesterol degradation was conserved in many actinobacterial genera, particularly in members of the Corynebacterineae, and a pathway for cholate degradation was conserved in members of the genus Rhodococcus. A pathway for testosterone and, sometimes, cholate degradation had a patchy distribution among Proteobacteria. The steroid degradation genes tended to occur within large gene clusters. Growth experiments confirmed bioinformatic predictions of steroid metabolism capacity in nine bacterial strains. The results indicate there was a single ancestral 9,10-seco-steroid degradation pathway. Gene duplication, likely in a progenitor of Rhodococcus, later gave rise to a cholate degradation pathway. Proteobacteria and additional Actinobacteria subsequently obtained a cholate degradation pathway via horizontal gene transfer, in some cases facilitated by plasmids. Catabolism of steroids appears to be an important component of the ecological niches of broad groups of Actinobacteria and individual species of Proteobacteria. PMID:26956583

  11. Family policies in OECD countries: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Thévenon, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the diversity of family policy models in 28 OECD countries in terms of the balance between their different objectives and the mix of instruments adopted to implement the policies. Cross-country policy differences are investigated by applying a principal component analysis to comprehensive country-level data from the OECD Family database covering variables such as parental leave conditions, childcare service provision, and financial support to families. The results find persistent differences in the family policy patterns embedded in different contexts of work-family "outcomes." Country classifications of family policy packages only partially corroborate categorizations in earlier studies, owing to considerable within-group heterogeneity and the presence of group outliers. The Nordic countries outdistance the others with comprehensive support to working parents with very young children. Anglo-Saxon countries provide much less support for working parents with very young children, and financial support is targeted on low-income and large families and focuses on preschool and early elementary education. Continental and Eastern European countries form a more heterogeneous group, while the support received by families in Southern Europe and in Asian countries is much lower in all its dimensions.

  12. A comparative protein function analysis databaseof different Leishmania strains

    PubMed Central

    Dikhit, Manas Ranjan; Nathasharma, Yangya Prasad; Patel, Lelin; Rana, Sindhu Prava; Sahoo, Ganesh Chandra; Das, Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    A complete understanding of different protein functional families and template information opens new avenues for novel drug development. Protein identification and analysis software performs a central role in the investigation of proteins and leads to the development of refined database for description of proteins of different Leishmania strains. There are certain databases for different strains that lack template information and functional family annotation. Rajendra Memorial Research Institute of Medical Sciences (RMRIMS) has developed a web-based unique database to provide information about functional families of different proteins and its template information in different Leishmania species. Based on the template information users can model the tertiary structure of protein. The database facilitates significant relationship between template information and possible protein functional families assigned to different proteins by SVMProt. This database is designed to provide comprehensive descriptions of certain important proteins found in four different species of Leishmania i.e. L. donovani, L. infantum, L. major and L. braziliensis. A specific characterization information table provides information related to species and specific functional families. This database aims to be a resource for scientists working on proteomics. The database is freely available at http://biomedinformri.org/calp/. PMID:21464840

  13. Comparing standardized coefficients in structural equation modeling: a model reparameterization approach.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Joyce L Y; Chan, Wai

    2011-09-01

    We propose a two-stage method for comparing standardized coefficients in structural equation modeling (SEM). At stage 1, we transform the original model of interest into the standardized model by model reparameterization, so that the model parameters appearing in the standardized model are equivalent to the standardized parameters of the original model. At stage 2, we impose appropriate linear equality constraints on the standardized model and use a likelihood ratio test to make statistical inferences about the equality of standardized coefficients. Unlike other existing methods for comparing standardized coefficients, the proposed method does not require specific modeling features (e.g., specification of nonlinear constraints), which are available only in certain SEM software programs. Moreover, this method allows researchers to compare two or more standardized coefficients simultaneously in a standard and convenient way. Three real examples are given to illustrate the proposed method, using EQS, a popular SEM software program. Results show that the proposed method performs satisfactorily for testing the equality of standardized coefficients.

  14. Comparing and combining SWE estimates from the SNOW-17 model using PRISM and SWE reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raleigh, Mark S.; Lundquist, Jessica D.

    2012-01-01

    Snow models such as SNOW-17 may estimate past snow water equivalent (SWE) using either a forward configuration based on spatial extrapolation of measured precipitation, such as with the parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model (PRISM), or a reconstruction configuration based on snow disappearance timing and back-calculated snowmelt. However, little guidance exists as to which configuration is preferable. Because the two approaches theoretically have opposite sensitivities to model forcing, combining (averaging) their SWE estimates may be advantageous. Using 154 snow pillow sites located in maritime mountains of the western United States, we compared forward, reconstruction, and combined configurations of a simplified SNOW-17. We evaluated model errors in annual precipitation, peak SWE, and SWE errors during the accumulation and ablation seasons. We also conducted a separate analysis to assess the sensitivity of peak SWE to biased forcing data and model parameters. The forward model had the greatest precipitation accuracy, while the combined model had the greatest accuracy in peak SWE and SWE during the accumulation and ablation seasons. In determining peak SWE, the forward and reconstruction models demonstrated opposite sensitivities to errors in air temperature and model parameters, and the combined model minimized errors due to temperature bias and parameter uncertainty. In basins with precipitation gages, we recommend PRISM for precipitation estimation and the combined model for SWE estimation. In areas with high precipitation uncertainty, reconstruction is more viable. Accurate model parameters dramatically improved reconstruction, so more work is needed to advance parameter estimation techniques in complex terrain.

  15. Comparative chemical analysis of dew and rain water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekouch, Imad; Mileta, Marina; Muselli, Marc; Milimouk-Melnytchouk, Irène; Šojat, Višnja; Kabbachi, Belkacem; Beysens, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Dew and rain water were collected and analyzed during 3 years (2004-2006) in Zadar, Croatia. The goal was to characterize the chemical properties of dew water versus rain water (and the atmosphere in which they form) and to determine the extent to which they can be used as potable water. The corresponding parameters were measured: pH, electrical conductivity (EC), major anions (HCO 3-, Cl -, SO 42-, NO 3-), and major cations (NH 4+, Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+). The mean pH and EC values were comparable for both dew and rain water, pH = 6.7 (dew) and pH = 6.35 (rain), EC = 195 µS cm - 1 (dew) and EC = 178 µS cm - 1 (rain). The ratio (SO 42- + NO 3-)/(Ca 2+ + Mg 2+) was lower than 1, indicating the alkaline nature of both dew and rain water. Both dew and rain water exhibited low mineralization. The analysis of the major ions showed that the concentration of cations is high compared to that of anions (presumably because the NO 2-, HCOO - and CH 3COO - ions were not measured), with Ca² +, Na + and Mg 2+ as the main ions. In order to discriminate between the marine and non-marine origin of ions, the sea-salt fraction (SSF) was calculated by taking Na + as a reference. The small SSF value in dew suggests a considerable contribution of non-marine origin for components Ca ²+, K +, SO 42- and NO 3-, except Cl -. In contrast, in rain water, the values of the non sea-salt fraction (NSSF) indicate that only Ca² + and NO 3- are not influenced by sea proximity. The study of the neutralization factor, NF, reveals the descending order of the cations in dew and rain water, NF Ca²+ > NF Mg²+ > NF K+ > NF NH4+. The dew and rain water are in conformity with the World Health Organization directives for potability, except for Mg 2+.

  16. Comparing Longitudinal Coupling and Temporal Delay in a Transmission-Line Model of the Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Martin; Szalai, Robert; Champneys, Alan; Epp, Bastian

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we compare and contrast the effects of longitudinal coupling and temporal delay on a fluid-structure transmission-line model of the mammalian cochlea. This work is based on recent reports that, in order to qualitatively explain experimental data, models of the basilar membrane impedance must include an exponential term that represents a time-delayed feedback. There are also models that include, e.g., a spatial feed-forward mechanism, whose solution is often approximated by replacing the feed-forward coupling by an exponential term. We show that there is no direct equivalence between the time-delay and the longitudinal coupling mechanisms, although qualitatively similar results can be achieved, albeit in very different regions of parameter space. An investigation of the steady-state outputs shows that both models can display sharp tuning, but that the time-delay model requires negative damping for such an effect to occur. Conversely, the longitudinal coupling model provides the most promising results with small positive damping. These results are extended by a careful stability analysis. We find that, whereas a small time delay can stabilize an unstable transmission-line model (with negative damping), that the longitudinal coupling model is stable when the damping is positive. The techniques developed in the paper are directed towards a more comprehensive analysis of nonlinear models.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomes in Eustigmatophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Strnad, Hynek; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Eustigmatophyceae (Ochrophyta, Stramenopiles) is a small algal group with species of the genus Nannochloropsis being its best studied representatives. Nuclear and organellar genomes have been recently sequenced for several Nannochloropsis spp., but phylogenetically wider genomic studies are missing for eustigmatophytes. We sequenced mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of three species representing most major eustigmatophyte lineages, Monodopsis sp. MarTras21, Vischeria sp. CAUP Q 202 and Trachydiscus minutus, and carried out their comparative analysis in the context of available data from Nannochloropsis and other stramenopiles, revealing a number of noticeable findings. First, mitogenomes of most eustigmatophytes are highly collinear and similar in the gene content, but extensive rearrangements and loss of three otherwise ubiquitous genes happened in the Vischeria lineage; this correlates with an accelerated evolution of mitochondrial gene sequences in this lineage. Second, eustigmatophytes appear to be the only ochrophyte group with the Atp1 protein encoded by the mitogenome. Third, eustigmatophyte mitogenomes uniquely share a truncated nad11 gene encoding only the C-terminal part of the Nad11 protein, while the N-terminal part is encoded by a separate gene in the nuclear genome. Fourth, UGA as a termination codon and the cognate release factor mRF2 were lost from mitochondria independently by the Nannochloropsis and T. minutus lineages. Finally, the rps3 gene in the mitogenome of Vischeria sp. is interrupted by the UAG codon, but the genome includes a gene for an unusual tRNA with an extended anticodon loop that we speculate may serve as a suppressor tRNA to properly decode the rps3 gene. PMID:26872774

  18. Neuropeptidomics in Triatoma infestans. Comparative transcriptomic analysis among triatomines.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Lucila; Sierra, Ivana; Sterkel, Marcos; Francini, Flavio; Ons, Sheila

    2016-12-18

    Chagas' disease, affecting up to 6-7 million people worldwide, is transmitted to humans through the feces of triatomine kissing bugs. From these, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis are important vectors distributed throughout the Latin American subcontinent. Resistance to pyrethroids has been developed by some triatomine populations, especially T. infestans, obstructing their control. Given their role in the regulation of physiological processes, neuroendocrine-derived factors have been proposed as a source of molecular targets for new-generation insecticides. However, the involvement of neuropeptides in insecticide metabolism and resistance in insects has been poorly studied. In the present work, the sequences of 20 neuropeptide precursor genes in T. infestans, 16 in T. dimidiata, and 13 in T. pallidipennis detected in transcriptomic databases are reported, and a comparative analysis in triatomines is presented. A total of 59 neuropeptides were validated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in brain and nervous ganglia from T. infestans, revealing the existence of differential post-translational modifications, extended and truncated forms. The results suggest a high sequence conservation in some neuropeptide systems in triatomines, whereas remarkable differences occur in several others within the core domains. Comparisons of the basal expression levels for several neuropeptide precursor genes between pyrethroid sensitive and resistant population of T. infestans are also presented here, in order to introduce a proof of concept to test the involvement of neuropeptides in insecticide resistance. From the precursors tested, NVP and ITG peptides are significantly higher expressed in the resistant population. To our knowledge, this is the first report to associate differential neuropeptide expression with insecticide resistance. The information provided here contributes to creating conditions to widely

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis oculotropic and genitotropic strains.

    PubMed

    Carlson, John H; Porcella, Stephen F; McClarty, Grant; Caldwell, Harlan D

    2005-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is an important cause of preventable blindness and sexually transmitted disease (STD) in humans. C. trachomatis exists as multiple serovariants that exhibit distinct organotropism for the eye or urogenital tract. We previously reported tissue-tropic correlations with the presence or absence of a functional tryptophan synthase and a putative GTPase-inactivating domain of the chlamydial toxin gene. This suggested that these genes may be the primary factors responsible for chlamydial disease organotropism. To test this hypothesis, the genome of an oculotropic trachoma isolate (A/HAR-13) was sequenced and compared to the genome of a genitotropic (D/UW-3) isolate. Remarkably, the genomes share 99.6% identity, supporting the conclusion that a functional tryptophan synthase enzyme and toxin might be the principal virulence factors underlying disease organotropism. Tarp (translocated actin-recruiting phosphoprotein) was identified to have variable numbers of repeat units within the N and C portions of the protein. A correlation exists between lymphogranuloma venereum serovars and the number of N-terminal repeats. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis between the two genomes highlighted the minimal genetic variation. A disproportionate number of SNPs were observed within some members of the polymorphic membrane protein (pmp) autotransporter gene family that corresponded to predicted T-cell epitopes that bind HLA class I and II alleles. These results implicate Pmps as novel immune targets, which could advance future chlamydial vaccine strategies. Lastly, a novel target for PCR diagnostics was discovered that can discriminate between ocular and genital strains. This discovery will enhance epidemiological investigations in nations where both trachoma and chlamydial STD are endemic.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Morphometric Characteristics of Scorpaenidae and Gobioninae

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Seok; Gil, Hyun Woo; Oh, Ji Su; Choi, Hui Jung; Kim, Chi Hong

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of closely related sets of classical and truss dimensions were analyzed to discriminate species of scorpaenidae including the dark banded rockfish, Sebastes inermis, the black rockfish, S. schlegeli, and gobioninae including the striped shiner, Pungtungia herzi, and the slender shiner, Pseudopungtungia tenuicorpa. The measurements of the dimensions were arc sin square root transformed, and compared as a function of the standard length of each species for statistical analysis. For values of the classical dimensions of the rockfish, 6 were greater for the dark banded rockfish than for the black rockfish, 1 value was smaller for the former, and for 2 values there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). For values of the classical dimensions of the shiners, 9 values were greater for the striped shiner than for the slender shiner, 2 values were smaller for the former, and for 1 value there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.01). For values of the truss dimensions of the rockfish, 6 were greater for the dark banded rockfish than for the black rockfish, 1 was smaller for the former, and for 4 values there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). For values of the truss dimensions of the shiners, 13 values were greater for the striped shiner than for the slender shiner, 3 values were smaller for the former, and for 6 values there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.01). The dimension sets used in this study may be useful as taxonomic indicators for discriminating among fish species in Korea. PMID:27004265

  1. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica from Bovine Sources

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Cook, Shaun R.; Zaheer, Rahat; Laing, Chad; Gannon, Vick P.; Xu, Yong; Rasmussen, Jay; Potter, Andrew; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is a common health problem in beef production. The primary bacterial agent involved, Mannheimia haemolytica, is a target for antimicrobial therapy and at risk for associated antimicrobial resistance development. The role of M. haemolytica in pathogenesis is linked to serotype with serotypes 1 (S1) and 6 (S6) isolated from pneumonic lesions and serotype 2 (S2) found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 11 strains of M. haemolytica, representing all three serotypes and performed comparative genomics analysis to identify genetic features that may contribute to pathogenesis. Possible virulence associated genes were identified within 14 distinct prophage, including a periplasmic chaperone, a lipoprotein, peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase and a stress response protein. Prophage content ranged from 2–8 per genome, but was higher in S1 and S6 strains. A type I-C CRISPR-Cas system was identified in each strain with spacer diversity and organization conserved among serotypes. The majority of spacers occur in S1 and S6 strains and originate from phage suggesting that serotypes 1 and 6 may be more resistant to phage predation. However, two spacers complementary to the host chromosome targeting a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and a glycosyl transferases group 1 gene are present in S1 and S6 strains only indicating these serotypes may employ CRISPR-Cas to regulate gene expression to avoid host immune responses or enhance adhesion during infection. Integrative conjugative elements are present in nine of the eleven genomes. Three of these harbor extensive multi-drug resistance cassettes encoding resistance against the majority of drugs used to combat infection in beef cattle, including macrolides and tetracyclines used in human medicine. The findings here identify key features that are likely contributing to serotype related pathogenesis and specific targets for vaccine design intended to reduce the

  2. Comparative assessment of three-phase oil relative permeability models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Riva, Monica; Porta, Giovanni M.; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We assess the ability of 11 models to reproduce three-phase oil relative permeability (kro) laboratory data obtained in a water-wet sandstone sample. We do so by considering model performance when (i) solely two-phase data are employed to render predictions of kro and (ii) two and three-phase data are jointly used for model calibration. In the latter case, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach is used to estimate model parameters. The tested models are selected among (i) classical models routinely employed in practical applications and implemented in commercial reservoir software and (ii) relatively recent models which are considered to allow overcoming some drawbacks of the classical formulations. Among others, the latter set of models includes the formulation recently proposed by Ranaee et al., which has been shown to embed the critical effects of hysteresis, including the reproduction of oil remobilization induced by gas injection in water-wet media. We employ formal model discrimination criteria to rank models according to their skill to reproduce the observed data and use ML Bayesian model averaging to provide model-averaged estimates (and associated uncertainty bounds) of kro by taking advantage of the diverse interpretive abilities of all models analyzed. The occurrence of elliptic regions is also analyzed for selected models in the framework of the classical fractional flow theory of displacement. Our study confirms that model outcomes based on channel flow theory and classical saturation-weighted interpolation models do not generally yield accurate reproduction of kro data, especially in the regime associated with low oil saturations, where water alternating gas injection (WAG) techniques are usually employed for enhanced oil recovery. This negative feature is not observed in the model of Ranaee et al. (2015) due to its ability to embed key effects of pore-scale phase distributions, such as hysteresis effects and cycle dependency, for modeling kro observed

  3. A Comparative Metroscope Model for Urban Information Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J. H.; Shandas, V.; Beaudoin, F.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most promising ways to achieve global sustainability goals of climate stabilization, poverty reduction, and biodiversity preservation is to make the world's cities more efficient, equitable, and healthful. While each city must follow a unique and somewhat idiosyncratic path toward these linked goals based on its history, geography, demography, and politics, movement in this direction can accelerate if cities can learn from each other more effectively. Such learning requires the identification of common characteristics and methodologies. We have created a framework for organizing and applying urban information flows, which we refer to as "Metroscopes." Metroscopes, which are analogous to the large instruments that have advanced the physical and life sciences, integrate six elements: data collection and input; classification through the use of metrics; data storage and retrieval; analytics and modeling; decision support including visualization and scenario generation; and assessment of the effectiveness of policy choices. Standards for each of these elements can be agreed upon by relevant urban science and policy sub-communities, and then can evolve as technologies and practices advance. We are implementing and calibrating this approach using data and relationships from Portland (OR), Phoenix (AZ) and London (UK). Elements that are being integrated include the Global City Indicators Facility at University of Toronto, the J-Earth database system and Decision Theater from Arizona State University, urban mobility analyses performed by the SENSEable City Lab at MIT, and Portland's Ecodistrict approach for urban management. Individual Metroscopes can be compared directly from one city to another, or with larger assemblages of cities like those being classified by ICLEI's STAR program, the Clinton Climate Initiative's C40, and Siemens Green Cities Index. This large-scale integration of urban data sets and approaches and its systematic comparison are key steps

  4. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) model can provide results comparable to cadaveric models.

    PubMed

    Haher, Thomas R; Ottaviano, Danielle; DeFrancis, Jason G; Merola, Andrew; Valdevit, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    The in vitro biomechanical models using a cadaveric spine specimen have long been used in understanding normal and abnormal functions of spines as well as for strength and stability testing of the spine specimen or spinal construct. Little effort has been made to describe the similarities or differences between UHMWPE and cadaveric models. Eight cadaveric lumbar spines were harvested generating six FSU and three corpectomy models. Six UHMWPE blocks were fabricated to form FSU and corpectomy models. All were tested intact, with posterior instrumentation, and with anterior instrumentation consisting of Moss-Miami 4.0 mm stainless steel rods, uni-axial stainless steel screws and DePuy Harm's cages. All models were tested in axial compression. The cadaveric model and UHMPWE model yielded axial stiffness values of comparable magnitude with respect to instrumentation applied using the posterior approach (P>0.05). Under an FSU configuration, only in the case of anterior instrumentation without the addition of a Harm's cage did both the cadaveric and UHMPWE models provide comparable axial stiffness results (P>0.05). While in vitro cadaveric models are considered the gold standard for biomechanical testing of the spine, the data suggests that under specific approaches and surgical models UHMWPE can be used to infer mechanical performance of instrumentation in cadaveric material.

  5. Comparative analysis of multisensor satellite monitoring of Arctic sea-ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, G.I.; Mordvintsev, I.N.; Douglas, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report represents comparative analysis of nearly coincident Russian OKEAN-01 polar orbiting satellite data, Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery. OKEAN-01 ice concentration algorithms utilize active and passive microwave measurements and a linear mixture model for measured values of the brightness temperature and the radar backscatter. SSM/I and AVHRR ice concentrations were computed with NASA Team algorithm and visible and thermal-infrared wavelength AVHRR data, accordingly

  6. Highly comparative time-series analysis: the empirical structure of time series and their methods.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Ben D; Little, Max A; Jones, Nick S

    2013-06-06

    The process of collecting and organizing sets of observations represents a common theme throughout the history of science. However, despite the ubiquity of scientists measuring, recording and analysing the dynamics of different processes, an extensive organization of scientific time-series data and analysis methods has never been performed. Addressing this, annotated collections of over 35 000 real-world and model-generated time series, and over 9000 time-series analysis algorithms are analysed in this work. We introduce reduced representations of both time series, in terms of their properties measured by diverse scientific methods, and of time-series analysis methods, in terms of their behaviour on empirical time series, and use them to organize these interdisciplinary resources. This new approach to comparing across diverse scientific data and methods allows us to organize time-series datasets automatically according to their properties, retrieve alternatives to particular analysis methods developed in other scientific disciplines and automate the selection of useful methods for time-series classification and regression tasks. The broad scientific utility of these tools is demonstrated on datasets of electroencephalograms, self-affine time series, heartbeat intervals, speech signals and others, in each case contributing novel analysis techniques to the existing literature. Highly comparative techniques that compare across an interdisciplinary literature can thus be used to guide more focused research in time-series analysis for applications across the scientific disciplines.

  7. Highly comparative time-series analysis: the empirical structure of time series and their methods

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Ben D.; Little, Max A.; Jones, Nick S.

    2013-01-01

    The process of collecting and organizing sets of observations represents a common theme throughout the history of science. However, despite the ubiquity of scientists measuring, recording and analysing the dynamics of different processes, an extensive organization of scientific time-series data and analysis methods has never been performed. Addressing this, annotated collections of over 35 000 real-world and model-generated time series, and over 9000 time-series analysis algorithms are analysed in this work. We introduce reduced representations of both time series, in terms of their properties measured by diverse scientific methods, and of time-series analysis methods, in terms of their behaviour on empirical time series, and use them to organize these interdisciplinary resources. This new approach to comparing across diverse scientific data and methods allows us to organize time-series datasets automatically according to their properties, retrieve alternatives to particular analysis methods developed in other scientific disciplines and automate the selection of useful methods for time-series classification and regression tasks. The broad scientific utility of these tools is demonstrated on datasets of electroencephalograms, self-affine time series, heartbeat intervals, speech signals and others, in each case contributing novel analysis techniques to the existing literature. Highly comparative techniques that compare across an interdisciplinary literature can thus be used to guide more focused research in time-series analysis for applications across the scientific disciplines. PMID:23554344

  8. Addressing Informatics Barriers to Conducting Observational Comparative Effectiveness Research: A Comparative Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christopher P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The U.S. health care system has been under immense scrutiny for ever-increasing costs and poor health outcomes for its patients. Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) has emerged as a generally accepted practice by providers, policy makers, and scientists as an approach to identify the most clinical- and cost-effective interventions…

  9. Comparing air dispersion model predictions with measured concentrations of VOCs in urban communities.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Gregory C; Wu, Chun Yi; Bock, Don; Adgate, John L; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Stock, Thomas H; Morandi, Maria; Sexton, Ken

    2004-04-01

    Air concentrations of nine volatile organic compounds were measured over 48-h periods at 23 locations in three communities in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. Concentrations at the same times and locations were modeled using a standard regulatory air dispersion model (ISCST3). The goal of the study was to evaluate model performance by comparing predictions with measurements using linear regression and estimates of bias. The modeling, done with mobile and area source emissions resolved to the census tract level and characterized as model area sources, represents an improvement over large-scale airtoxics modeling analyses done to date. Despite the resolved spatial scale, the model did not fully capture the spatial resolution in concentrations in an area with a sharp gradient in emissions. In a census tract with a major highway at one end of the tract (i.e., uneven distribution of emissions within the tract), model predictions atthe opposite end of the tract overestimated measured concentrations. This shortcoming was seen for pollutants emitted mainly by mobile sources (benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes). We suggest that major highways would be better characterized as line sources. The model also failed to fully capture the temporal variability in concentrations, which was expected since the emissions inventory comprised annual average values. Based on our evaluation metrics, model performance was best for pollutants emitted mainly from mobile sources and poorest for pollutants emitted mainlyfrom area sources. Important sources of error appeared to be the source characterization (especially location) and emissions quantification. We expect that enhancements in the emissions inventory would give the greatest improvement in results. As anticipated for a Gaussian plume model, performance was dramatically better when compared to measurements that were not matched in space or time. Despite the limitations of our analysis, we found thatthe regulatory

  10. Methodology and comparative study of monthly water balance models in Belgium, China and Burma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewiele, G. L.; Xu, Chong-Yu; Ni-Lar-Win

    1992-06-01

    A set of new monthly rainfall runoff models (water balance models) is defined, for use in river catchments smaller than about 4000 km 2, without appreciable frost or natural or artificial lakes. The input series are areal precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. The output is riverflow. The number of parameters, used in the description of the hydrological phenomena in the catchment, is in most cases three, sometimes four. The statistical methodology use for calibrating the models of given catchment is described; it reduces essentially to regression analysis, including residual analysis, sensitivity to calibration period and extrapolation test. In particular, automatic calibration is used, excluding subjective elements. The models are applied to 79 river basins in Belgium, China and Burma. The results are compared with four similar models taken from the literature. The results of applying the new models are satisfactory from a statistical point of view and are much better than those quoted in the literature; a greater part of the observed runoff is explained and there is no residual seasonality. This results from the different mathematical structure of the models, and especially from the use, in the published models, of several storages with maximum 'capacities', with no distinction between slow and fast runoff corresponding to baseflow and direct runoff, respectively.

  11. Predicting the fate of biodiversity using species' distribution models: enhancing model comparability and repeatability.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castañeda, Genoveva; Hof, Anouschka R; Jansson, Roland; Harding, Larisa E

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution modeling (SDM) is an increasingly important tool to predict the geographic distribution of species. Even though many problems associated with this method have been highlighted and solutions have been proposed, little has been done to increase comparability among studies. We reviewed recent publications applying SDMs and found that seventy nine percent failed to report methods that ensure comparability among studies, such as disclosing the maximum probability range produced by the models and reporting on the number of species occurrences used. We modeled six species of Falco from northern Europe and demonstrate that model results are altered by (1) spatial bias in species' occurrence data, (2) differences in the geographic extent of the environmental data, and (3) the effects of transformation of model output to presence/absence data when applying thresholds. Depending on the modeling decisions, forecasts of the future geographic distribution of Falco ranged from range contraction in 80% of the species to no net loss in any species, with the best model predicting no net loss of habitat in Northern Europe. The fact that predictions of range changes in response to climate change in published studies may be influenced by decisions in the modeling process seriously hampers the possibility of making sound management recommendations. Thus, each of the decisions made in generating SDMs should be reported and evaluated to ensure conclusions and policies are based on the biology and ecology of the species being modeled.

  12. Comparative process analysis of fullerene production by the arc and the radio-frequency discharge methods.

    PubMed

    Marković, Z; Todorović-Marković, B; Mohai, I; Farkas, Z; Kovats, E; Szepvolgyi, J; Otasević, D; Scheier, P; Feil, S; Romcević, N

    2007-01-01

    In this work, comparative analysis of processes in carbon arc and radio frequency (RF) plasma during fullerene synthesis has been presented. The kinetic model of fullerene formation developed earlier has been verified in both types of plasma reactors. The fullerene yield depended on carbon concentration, velocity of plasma flame and rotational temperature of C2 radicals predominantly. When mean rotational temperature of C2 radicals was 3000 K, the fullerene yield was the highest regardless of the type of used reactor. The zone of fullerene formation is larger significantly in RF plasma reactor compared to arc reactor.

  13. Comparative structural and energetic analysis of WW domain-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Schleinkofer, Karin; Wiedemann, Urs; Otte, Livia; Wang, Ting; Krause, Gerd; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Wade, Rebecca C

    2004-11-26

    WW domains are small globular protein interaction modules found in a wide spectrum of proteins. They recognize their target proteins by binding specifically to short linear peptide motifs that are often proline-rich. To infer the determinants of the ligand binding propensities of WW domains, we analyzed 42 WW domains. We built models of the 3D structures of the WW domains and their peptide complexes by comparative modeling supplemented with experimental data from peptide library screens. The models provide new insights into the orientation and position of the peptide in structures of