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Sample records for comparative plant uptake

  1. Comparative studies on heavy metal uptake by plants from anaerobically and aerobically digested sludge-amended soil

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, K.T.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to compare and contrast the effects of cropland application of varying quantities of anaerobically and aerobically digested sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, on the uptake of certain heavy metals such as Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb by six different types of plants (bean, tomato, carrot, cucumber, cantaloupe and sweet corn) grown on the sludge-applied soil and the accumulation of these metals in the sludge-amended soil. The main aspects of the study were the evaluation of 1) the extent of bioconcentration of heavy metals by the different kinds of plants, and 2) the availability of the metals from soil to plants, following sludge application. Field investigations involving plot-scale gardening were conducted using the two types of sludge, at application rates of 0, 2.2, 4.4, 8.8, 17.6 and 70.4 tons/acre. At application rates of 17.6 and 70.4 tons/acre, delays in germination of seeds were observed in some instances, with no apparent adverse effects on the plant's later stages of life and the yield produced. The uptake of heavy metals from sludge-amended soil by plants did not increase in direct proportion to the increase in rate of sludge application and plant species differ considerably in their uptake of heavy metals from soil which received the same amount of sludge. In general, plants grown on anaerobically digested sludge-applied soil showed higher uptake of heavy metals than those grown on aerobically digested sludge. Among the plants investigated, sweet corn was identified to be the low accumulator of heavy metals in the edible part of the plant.

  2. Nitrogen uptake and utilization by intact plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.; Tolley-Henry, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of experiments support the proposed conceptual model that relates nitrogen uptake activity by plants as a balanced interdependence between the carbon-supplying function of the shoot and the nitrogen-supplying function of the roots. The data are being used to modify a dynamic simulation of plant growth, which presently describes carbon flows through the plant, to describe nitrogen uptake and assimilation within the plant system. Although several models have been proposed to predict nitrogen uptake and partitioning, they emphasize root characteristics affecting nutrient uptake and relay on empirical methods to describe the relationship between nitrogen and carbon flows within the plant. Researchers, on the other hand, propose to continue to attempt a mechanistic solution in which the effects of environment on nitrogen (as well as carbon) assimilation are incorporated through their direct effects on photosynthesis, respiration, and aging processes.

  3. Amino Acid Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Matthew D.; Garcia, Maria O.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the extent to which arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi root improved the acquisition of simple organic nitrogen (ON) compounds by their host plants. In a greenhouse-based study, we used quantum dots (fluorescent nanoparticles) to assess uptake of each of the 20 proteinaceous amino acids by AM-colonized versus uncolonized plants. We found that AM colonization increased uptake of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine; and reduced uptake of aspartic acid. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had the greatest effect on uptake of amino acids that are relatively rare in proteins. In addition, AM fungi facilitated uptake of neutral and positively-charged amino acids more than negatively-charged amino acids. Overall, the AM fungi used in this study appeared to improve access by plants to a number of amino acids, but not necessarily those that are common or negatively-charged. PMID:23094070

  4. Uptake of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) by several plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimang, Ralf; Folkers, Achim; Kleffmann, Jörg; Kleist, Einhard; Miebach, Marco; Wildt, Jürgen

    Uptake of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) by sunflower ( Heliantus annuus L. var. gigantheus), tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3), castor ( Rhicinus communis L. var. Carmencita), and birch ( Betula pendula L.) was studied under controlled conditions in a continuously stirred tank reactor. Exposing plants to HONO at concentrations between 60 ppt and 10 ppb led to significant uptake by the plants. The uptake was proportional to HONO concentrations and linearly related to stomatal conductivity. HONO losses at the cuticle were of minor importance. Our data imply a quick metabolism of HONO and it is concluded that the uptake of HONO by plants is only limited by diffusion of HONO through the plants stomata. Comparing results from measurements with and without plants in the chamber it is furthermore concluded that a compensation point for HONO uptake is below 20 ppt if it exists at all. Heterogeneous formation of HONO by reactions of NO 2 on the plant surfaces was either not effective or compensated by the stomatal uptake of HONO. The data of the present study imply that plant surfaces represent a sink for HONO. Therefore, it was concluded that processes on plant surfaces cannot explain HONO formation on ground surfaces as observed in field studies.

  5. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.A. ); Walton, B.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  6. Endocytotic uptake of nutrients in carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Bauer, Sonja; Koshkin, Edith; Lendl, Thomas; Lichtscheidl, Irene K

    2012-07-01

    Carnivorous plants trap, digest and absorb animals in order to supplement their mineral nutrition. Nutrients absorbed by the plant include different nitrogen species, phosphate, potassium, trace elements and small organic compounds. Uptake is usually thought to be performed via specific channels, but this study provides evidence that endocytosis is involved as well. Traps of the carnivorous plants Nepenthes coccinea, Nepenthes ventrata, Cephalotus follicularis, Drosophyllum lusitanicum, Drosera capensis, Dionaea muscipula, Aldrovanda vesiculosa, Genlisea violacea × lobata, Sarracenia psittacina and Sarracenia purpurea were stained with methylene blue in order to identify possible sites of uptake. The permeable parts of the traps were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and other fluorescent endocytosis markers, combined with the soluble protein BSA or respiratory inhibitors. Uptake was studied by confocal microscopy. In Nepenthes, small fluorescent vesicles became visible 1 h after incubation with FITC-BSA. These vesicles fused to larger compartments within 30 h. A similar behaviour was found in the related genera Drosera, Dionaea, Aldrovanda and Drosophyllum but also in Cephalotus with glands of different evolutionary origin. In Genlisea and Sarracenia, no evidence for endocytosis was found. We propose that in many carnivorous plants, nutrient uptake by carriers is supplemented by endocytosis, which enables absorption and intracellular digestion of whole proteins. The advantage for the plant of reducing secretion of enzymes for extracellular digestion is evident.

  7. Plant-uptake of uranium: Hydroponic and soil system studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramaswami, A.; Carr, P.; Burkhardt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available on screening and selection of terrestrial plants for uptake and translocation of uranium from soil. This article evaluates the removal of uranium from water and soil by selected plants, comparing plant performance in hydroponic systems with that in two soil systems (a sandy-loam soil and an organic-rich soil). Plants selected for this study were Sunflower (Helianthus giganteus), Spring Vetch (Vicia sativa), Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa), Juniper (Juniperus monosperma), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea), and Bush Bean (Phaseolus nanus). Plant performance was evaluated both in terms of the percent uranium extracted from the three systems, as well as the biological absorption coefficient (BAC) that normalized uranium uptake to plant biomass. Study results indicate that uranium extraction efficiency decreased sharply across hydroponic, sandy and organic soil systems, indicating that soil organic matter sequestered uranium, rendering it largely unavailable for plant uptake. These results indicate that site-specific soils must be used to screen plants for uranium extraction capability; plant behavior in hydroponic systems does not correlate well with that in soil systems. One plant species, Juniper, exhibited consistent uranium extraction efficiencies and BACs in both sandy and organic soils, suggesting unique uranium extraction capabilities.

  8. Plant Water Uptake in Drying Soils1

    PubMed Central

    Lobet, Guillaume; Couvreur, Valentin; Meunier, Félicien; Javaux, Mathieu; Draye, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, investigations on root water uptake have evolved toward a deeper integration of the soil and roots compartment properties, with the goal of improving our understanding of water acquisition from drying soils. This evolution parallels the increasing attention of agronomists to suboptimal crop production environments. Recent results have led to the description of root system architectures that might contribute to deep-water extraction or to water-saving strategies. In addition, the manipulation of root hydraulic properties would provide further opportunities to improve water uptake. However, modeling studies highlight the role of soil hydraulics in the control of water uptake in drying soil and call for integrative soil-plant system approaches. PMID:24515834

  9. Plant uptake of sludge-borne PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, G.A.; Kiehl, D.; Eiceman, G.A.; Ryan, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Plant uptake of sludge-borne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (similar to Aroclor 1248) was evaluated in a greenhouse study with two food-chain crops and a grass species. Polychlorinated biphenyl loading to two soils was varied in one experiment by adding different rates of a municipal sewage sludge heavily contaminated (52 mg/kg) with PCBs. In a second experiment, Aroclor 1248 was spiked into unamended soils or soils amended with another sludge containing <1mg/kg PCBs. Analysis of PCBs was by GC/MS with a reliable detection limit in plants of 20 microg/kg for individual chlorinated classes (tri, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyls) and total PCBs. Only carrots (Daucus carota) were contaminated with PCBs, and contamination was restricted to carrot peels. Current USEPA guidelines for land application of sludges based on sludge PCB content are shown to be extremely conservative.

  10. Expanding the menu for carnivorous plants: uptake of potassium, iron and manganese by carnivorous pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Steinhauser, Georg; Peroutka, Marianne; Musilek, Andreas; Sterba, Johannes H; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Bichler, Max

    2009-12-01

    Carnivorous plants use animals as fertiliser substitutes which allow them to survive on nutrient deficient soils. Most research concentrated on the uptake of the prey's nitrogen and phosphorus; only little is known on the utilisation of other elements. We studied the uptake of three essential nutrients, potassium, iron and manganese, in three species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Cephalotus follicularis LaBilladiere, Sarracenia purpureaL., Heliamphora nutans Bentham). Using relatively short-lived and gamma-emitting radiotracers, we significantly improved the sensitivity compared to conventional protocols and gained the following results. We demonstrated the uptake of trace elements like iron and manganese. In addition, we found direct evidence for the uptake of potassium into the pitcher tissue. Potassium and manganese were absorbed to virtually 100% if offered in physiological concentrations or below in Cephalotus. Analysis of pitcher fluid collected in the natural habitat showed that uptake was performed here as efficiently as in the laboratory. The absorption of nutrients is an active process depending on living glandular cells in the pitcher epidermis and can be inhibited by azide. Unphysiologically high amounts of nutrients were taken up for a short time, but after a few hours the absorbing cells were damaged, and uptake stopped. Absorption rates of pitcher leaves from plants under controlled conditions varied highly, indicating that each trap is functionally independent. The comparison of minerals in typical prey with the plants' tissues showed that a complete coverage of the plants' needs by prey capture is improbable.

  11. Preferential uptake of soil nitrogen forms by grassland plant species.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Alexandra; Bol, Roland; Bardgett, Richard D

    2005-02-01

    In this study, we assessed whether a range of temperate grassland species showed preferential uptake for different chemical forms of N, including inorganic N and a range of amino acids that commonly occur in temperate grassland soil. Preferential uptake of dual-labelled (13C and 15N) glycine, serine, arginine and phenylalanine, as compared to inorganic N, was tested using plants growing in pots with natural field soil. We selected five grass species representing a gradient from fertilised, productive pastures to extensive, low productivity pastures (Lolium perenne, Holcus lanatus, Anthoxanthum odoratum, Deschampsia flexuosa, and Nardus stricta). Our data show that all grass species were able to take up directly a diversity of soil amino acids of varying complexity. Moreover, we present evidence of marked inter-species differences in preferential use of chemical forms of N of varying complexity. L. perenne was relatively more effective at using inorganic N and glycine compared to the most complex amino acid phenylalanine, whereas N. stricta showed a significant preference for serine over inorganic N. Total plant N acquisition, measured as root and shoot concentration of labelled compounds, also revealed pronounced inter-species differences which were related to plant growth rate: plants with higher biomass production were found to take up more inorganic N. Our findings indicate that species-specific differences in direct uptake of different N forms combined with total N acquisition could explain changes in competitive dominance of grass species in grasslands of differing fertility.

  12. Evolution of Plant Sucrose Uptake Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Anke; Sivitz, Alicia B.; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    In angiosperms, sucrose uptake transporters (SUTs) have important functions especially in vascular tissue. Here we explore the evolutionary origins of SUTs by analysis of angiosperm SUTs and homologous transporters in a vascular early land plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and a non-vascular plant, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, the charophyte algae Chlorokybus atmosphyticus, several red algae and fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Plant SUTs cluster into three types by phylogenetic analysis. Previous studies using angiosperms had shown that types I and II are localized to the plasma membrane while type III SUTs are associated with vacuolar membrane. SUT homologs were not found in the chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean algae Chlorokybus atmosphyticus contains a SUT homolog (CaSUT1) and phylogenetic analysis indicated that it is basal to all other streptophyte SUTs analyzed. SUTs are present in both red algae and S. pombe but they are less related to plant SUTs than CaSUT1. Both Selaginella and Physcomitrella encode type II and III SUTs suggesting that both plasma membrane and vacuolar sucrose transporter activities were present in early land plants. It is likely that SUT transporters are important for scavenging sucrose from the environment and intracellular compartments in charophyte and non-vascular plants. Type I SUTs were only found in eudicots and we conclude that they evolved from type III SUTs, possibly through loss of a vacuolar targeting sequence. Eudicots utilize type I SUTs for phloem (vascular tissue) loading while monocots use type II SUTs for phloem loading. We show that HvSUT1 from barley, a type II SUT, reverted the growth defect of the Arabidopsis atsuc2 (type I) mutant. This indicates that type I and II SUTs evolved similar (and interchangeable) phloem loading transporter capabilities independently. PMID:22639641

  13. Plant growth regulators enhance gold uptake in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manoj G; Stirk, Wendy A; Southway, Colin; Papenfus, Heino B; Swart, Pierre A; Lux, Alexander; Vaculík, Marek; Martinka, Michal; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The use of plant growth regulators is well established and they are used in many fields of plant science for enhancing growth. Brassica juncea plants were treated with 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 microM auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), which promotes rooting. The IBA-treated plants were also sprayed with 100 microM gibberellic acid (GA3) and kinetin (Kin) to increase leaf-foliage. Gold (I) chloride (AuCl) was added to the growth medium of plants to achieve required gold concentration. The solubilizing agent ammonium thiocyanate (1 g kg(-1)) (commonly used in mining industries to solubilize gold) was added to the nutrient solution after six weeks of growth and, two weeks later, plants were harvested. Plant growth regulators improved shoot and root dry biomass of B. juncea plants. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry analysis showed the highest Au uptake for plants treated with 5.0 microM IBA. The average recovery of Au with this treatment was significantly greater than the control treatment by 45.8 mg kg(-1) (155.7%). The other IBA concentrations (2.5 and 7.5 microM) also showed a significant increase in Au uptake compared to the control plants by 14.7 mg kg(-1) (50%) and 42.5 mg kg(-1) (144.5%) respectively. A similar trend of Au accumulation was recorded in the roots of B. juncea plants. This study conducted in solution culture suggests that plant growth regulators can play a significant role in improving phytoextraction of Au.

  14. Plant uptake of radionuclides in lysimeter experiments.

    PubMed

    Gerzabek, M H; Strebl, F; Temmel, B

    1998-01-01

    The results of seven years lysimeter experiments to determine the uptake of 60Co, 137Cs and 226Ra into agricultural crops (endive, maize, wheat, mustard, sugarbeet, potato, Faba bean, rye grass) are described. The lysimeter consists of twelve monolithic soil profiles (four soil types and three replicates) and is located in Seibersdorf/Austria, a region with a pannonian climate (pronounced differences between hot and semi-arid summers and humid winter conditions, annual mean of precipitation: 517 mm, mean annual temperature: 9.8 degrees C). Besides soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF), fluxes were calculated taking into account biomass production and growth time. Total median values of TF's (dry matter basis) for the three radionuclides decreased from 226Ra (0.068 kg kg(-1)) to 137Cs (0.043 kg kg(-1)) and 60Co (0.018 kg kg(-1)); flux values exhibited the same ranking. The varying physical and chemical properties of the four experimental soils resulted in statistically significant differences in transfer factors or fluxes between the investigated soils for 137Cs and 226Ra, but not for 60Co. Differences in transfer between plant species and plant parts are distinct, with graminaceous species showing, on average, TF values 5.8 and 15 times lower than dicotyledonous species for 137Cs and 60Co, respectively. This pattern was not found for 226Ra. It can be concluded that 137Cs transfer is heavily influenced by soil characteristics, whilst the plant-specific factors are the main source of TF variability for 60Co. The variability of 226Ra transfer originates both from soil properties and plant species behaviour.

  15. Dieldrin uptake and translocation in plants growing in hydroponic medium.

    PubMed

    Murano, Hirotatsu; Otani, Takashi; Seike, Nobuyasu; Sakai, Mizuki

    2010-01-01

    It has been known that the Cucurbitaceae family takes up a large amount of persistent organic pollutants from soils and that the translocation of those compounds in cucurbits is higher than those in non-cucurbits. To understand the persistent organic pollutant uptake mechanisms of plant species, we compared the dieldrin absorption and transportation potentials of several plants in hydroponic medium. Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Moench), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), soybean (Glycine max), komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. peruviridis), white-flowered gourd (Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were grown in a dieldrin-added hydroponic medium for 10 d, and then the amount of dieldrin in their shoots and roots was measured. All of the roots contained dieldrin, whereas only the cucurbits (white-flowered gourd, cucumber, and zucchini) contained considerable amounts of dieldrin in their shoots. The dieldrin uptake to the roots depended on the concentration of the n-hexane soluble components in the roots, regardless of whether the dieldrin in the roots was translocated to shoots or not. The dieldrin uptake from the solution to the roots was thought to be due to a passive response, such as adsorption on the roots. The translocation of dieldrin from the roots to the shoots was probably through the xylems. The amounts of dieldrin in the shoots per transpiration rates were higher for cucurbits than for non-cucurbits. It seems likely that cucurbits have uptake mechanisms for hydrophobic organic chemicals.

  16. Foliar heavy metal uptake, toxicity and detoxification in plants: A comparison of foliar and root metal uptake.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Dumat, Camille; Khalid, Sana; Schreck, Eva; Xiong, Tiantian; Niazi, Nabeel Khan

    2017-03-05

    Anthropologic activities have transformed global biogeochemical cycling of heavy metals by emitting considerable quantities of these metals into the atmosphere from diverse sources. In spite of substantial and progressive developments in industrial processes and techniques to reduce environmental emissions, atmospheric contamination by toxic heavy metals and associated ecological and health risks are still newsworthy. Atmospheric heavy metals may be absorbed via foliar organs of plants after wet or dry deposition of atmospheric fallouts on plant canopy. Unlike root metal transfer, which has been largely studied, little is known about heavy metal uptake by plant leaves from the atmosphere. To the best of our understanding, significant research gaps exist regarding foliar heavy metal uptake. This is the first review regarding biogeochemical behaviour of heavy metals in atmosphere-plant system. The review summarizes the mechanisms involved in foliar heavy metal uptake, transfer, compartmentation, toxicity and in plant detoxification. We have described the biological and environmental factors that affect foliar uptake of heavy metals and compared the biogeochemical behaviour (uptake, translocation, compartmentation, toxicity and detoxification) of heavy metals for root and foliar uptake. The possible health risks associated with the consumption of heavy metal-laced food are also discussed.

  17. Warming decreased and grazing increased plant uptake of amino acids in an alpine meadow.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuang; Zhu, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Lirong; Che, Rongxiao; Wang, Fang; Liu, Hanke; Niu, Haishan; Wang, Shiping; Cui, Xiaoyong

    2015-09-01

    Organic nitrogen (N) uptake by plants has been recognized as a significant component of terrestrial N cycle. Several studies indicated that plants have the ability to switch their preference between inorganic and organic forms of N in diverse environments; however, research on plant community response in organic nitrogen uptake to warming and grazing is scarce. Here, we demonstrated that organic N uptake by an alpine plant community decreased under warming with (13)C-(15)N-enriched glycine addition method. After 6 years of treatment, warming decreased plant organic N uptake by 37% as compared to control treatment. Under the condition of grazing, warming reduced plant organic N uptake by 44%. Grazing alone significantly increased organic N absorption by 15%, whereas under warming condition grazing did not affect organic N uptake by the Kobresia humilis community on Tibetan Plateau. Besides, soil NO 3-N content explained more than 70% of the variability observed in glycine uptake, and C:N ratio in soil dissolved organic matter remarkably increased under warming treatment. These results suggested warming promoted soil microbial activity and dissolved organic N mineralization. Grazing stimulated organic N uptake by plants, which counteracted the effect of warming.

  18. Comparison of theoretical and experimental values for plant uptake of pesticide from soil

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-In; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Jang-Eok

    2017-01-01

    Pesticides that persist in soils may be taken up by the roots of plants. One way to assess plant uptake is to theoretically predict the extent of plant uptake using a mathematical model. In this study, a model was developed to predict plant uptake of pesticide residues in soils using various parameters, such as pesticide mobility within soil, plant transpiration stream, root–soil transfer rate, plant growth, and pesticide dissipation in either soils or plants. The accuracy of the model was evaluated by comparing the modeled concentrations with measured uptake concentrations of chlorpyrifos (CP) in lettuce, grown on treated soils with concentrations of approximately 10 and 20 mg kg-1 CP. Measured concentrations of CP in lettuce at 21, 30, and 40 d after planting were between the 5th and 95th percentiles of model variation. A high correlation coefficient of > 0.97 between modeled and measured concentrations was found. Coefficients of variation of mean factors to residual errors were between 25.3 and 48.2%. Overall, modeling results matched the experimental results well. Therefore, this plant uptake model could be used as an assessment tool to predict the extent of plant uptake of pesticide residues in soils. PMID:28212386

  19. Improvement of HSPF watershed model in plant uptake and DIN export from forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Linker, L. C.

    2001-12-01

    Correct simulation of nutrient export in response to flow is important in watershed models. In HSPF, plant uptake of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) affects the export of DIN from sloped soil layers to a stream. Plant uptake depends on soil moisture. When moisture is deficient, increasing moisture may increase mass uptake; when moisture is over-sufficient, increasing moisture may dilute solution concentrations and decrease mass uptake in unit time. Detailed analysis of the effect of moisture on plant uptake and DIN export is presented. The two different relationships of soil moisture and uptake can be simulated by using the Michaelis-Menton saturation kinetics with two different mechanisms by applying different units of the maximum plant uptake rate, respectively. HSPF version 11 uses a single mechanism for all ranges of moisture conditions. This paper firstly compares two methods in plant uptakes. 1) The HSPF version 11 uses concentration (per unit time) as the unit of maximum uptake rate, which results in higher uptake in higher moisture conditions. It is good in moisture deficient condition, but is not good for moisture over-sufficient condition and results in some strange high DIN loads in some moderate low flow days. 2) The Alternative Method uses mass (per unit area per unit time) as the unit of maximum uptake rate, which is good in moisture sufficient condition and results in a better DIN load-flow relationship, because significant DIN load is usually associated with excessive moisture conditions. However, it overestimates uptake in moisture deficient condition and slightly underestimates DIN load associated with some very low flows. A sensitivity analysis is conducted with different precipitation factors to generate different flows. The HSPF version 11 yields lower yearly loads in the runs with greater precipitation factors, whereas, the Alternative Method yields higher load in the runs with greater factors. Overall, the Alternative Method provides

  20. Zinc uptake by young wheat plants under two transpiration regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Grifferty, A.; Barrington, S.

    2000-04-01

    Treated wastewater for crop irrigation is an alternative for countries with a shortage of fresh water. Such practice requires strict wastewater application criteria and a better understanding of the effects of transpiration rate on plant heavy metal uptake. The experiment measured Zn uptake by young wheat plants (Triticum aestvum L.) grown in triplicated experimental pots and held in two growth chambers with constant environmental conditions (relative humidity, light and temperature) but with a different air water vapor pressure deficit to produce two different transpiration rates. After 5 wk of growth in a greenhouse, the plants were transferred to the controlled chambers and irrigated using a fertilized solution with five different levels of Zn: 0, 2, 10, 25, and 50 mg/L. These Zn levels were low enough to have no significant effect on plant growth and transpiration rate. The wheat plants started to produce their grain at 6 wk. Plants were collected at 0, 3, and 10 d of incubation in the controlled chambers and analyzed for dry matter and total Zn content. The pots were weighed daily to measure their transpiration rates. On Day 10, the remaining plants were collected and their roots, shoots, and grain were separated, weighed, dried, and analyzed for total Zn. Time and plant transpiration rate were found to affect significantly plant Zn uptake. The higher transpiration rate enhanced plant Zn uptake. The roots had the highest Zn uptake followed by the shoots and then the grain.

  1. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  2. Allometric scaling laws for water uptake by plant roots.

    PubMed

    Biondini, Mario

    2008-03-07

    This paper develops scaling laws for plant roots of any arbitrary volume and branching configuration that maximize water uptake. Water uptake can occur along any part of the root network, and thus there is no branch-to-branch fluid conservation. Maximizing water uptake, therefore, involves balancing two flows that are inversely related: axial and radial conductivity. The scaling laws are tested against the root data of 1759 plants from 77 herbaceous species, and compared with those from the WBE model. I further discuss whether the scaling laws are invariant to soil water distribution. A summary of some of the results follows. (1) The optimal radius for a single root (no branches) scales with volume as r approximately volume(2/(8+a))(0

  3. Mapping the Metal Uptake in Plants from Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Allison

    2015-08-24

    Serpentine soil originates in the Earth’s mantle and contains high concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals. Although serpentine soil limits plant growth, endemic and adapted plants at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, located behind SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, can tolerate these conditions. Serpentine soil and seeds belonging to native California and invasive plants were collected at Jasper Ridge. The seeds were grown hydroponically and on serpentine and potting soil to examine the uptake and distribution of ions in the roots and shoots using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results were used to determine differences between serpentinetolerant plants. Rye grown on potting soil was enriched in Ni, Fe, Mn, and Cr compared to purple needlegrass grown on serpentine soil. Serpentine vegetation equally suppressed the uptake of Mn, Ni, and Fe in the roots and shoots. The uptake of Ca and Mg affected the uptake of other elements such as K, S, and P.

  4. Plant water relations I: uptake and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants, like all living things, are mostly water. Water is the matrix of life, and its availability determines the distribution and productivity of plants on earth. Vascular plants evolved structures that enable them to transport water long distances with little input of energy, but the hollow trach...

  5. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  6. A phospholipid uptake system in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; López-Marqués, Rosa L; Pedas, Pai R; McDowell, Stephen C; Brown, Elizabeth; Kunze, Reinhard; Harper, Jeffrey F; Pomorski, Thomas G; Palmgren, Michael

    2015-07-27

    Plants use solar energy to produce lipids directly from inorganic elements and are not thought to require molecular systems for lipid uptake from the environment. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Aminophospholipid ATPase10 (ALA10) is a P4-type ATPase flippase that internalizes exogenous phospholipids across the plasma membrane, after which they are rapidly metabolized. ALA10 expression and phospholipid uptake are high in the epidermal cells of the root tip and in guard cells, the latter of which regulate the size of stomatal apertures to modulate gas exchange. ALA10-knockout mutants exhibit reduced phospholipid uptake at the root tips and guard cells and are affected in growth and transpiration. The presence of a phospholipid uptake system in plants is surprising. Our results suggest that one possible physiological role of this system is to internalize lysophosphatidylcholine, a signalling lipid involved in root development and stomatal control.

  7. Stomatal uptake and stomatal deposition of ozone in isoprene and monoterpene emitting plants.

    PubMed

    Fares, S; Loreto, F; Kleist, E; Wildt, J

    2008-01-01

    Volatile isoprenoids were reported to protect plants against ozone. To understand whether this could be the result of a direct scavenging of ozone by these molecules, the stomatal and non-stomatal uptake of ozone was estimated in plants emitting isoprene or monoterpenes. Ozone uptake by holm oak (Quercus ilex, a monoterpene emitter) and black poplar (Populus nigra, an isoprene emitter) was studied in whole plant enclosures (continuously stirred tank reactors, CSTR). The ozone uptake by plants was estimated measuring ozone concentration at the inlet and outlet of the reactors, after correcting for the uptake of the enclosure materials. Destruction of ozone at the cuticle or at the plant stems was found to be negligible compared to the ozone uptake through the stomata. For both plant species, a relationship between stomatal conductance and ozone uptake was found. For the poplar, the measured ozone losses were explained by the uptake of ozone through the stomata only, and ozone destruction by gas phase reactions with isoprene was negligible. For the oak, gas phase reactions of ozone with the monoterpenes emitted by the plants contributed significantly to ozone destruction. This was confirmed by two different experiments showing a) that in cases of high stomatal conductance but under low CO(2) concentration, a reduction of monoterpene emission was still associated with reduced O(3) uptake; and b) that ozone losses due to the gas phase reactions only can be measured when using the exhaust from a plant chamber to determine the gas phase reactivity in an empty reaction chamber. Monoterpenes can therefore relevantly scavenge ozone at leaf level contributing to protection against ozone.

  8. Nitrogen Uptake Preferences by Plants in Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macko, S.; Wang, L.; D'Odorico, P.

    2005-12-01

    In arid and semiarid ecosystems like African savannas, nutrient availability varies spatially and temporally and nutrients are considered to be a major limiting factor for growth in addition to water availability. Preference for different nitrogen forms presumably enhances the survivorship and fitness of plants since the relative abundances of nitrate and ammonium varies between drier and wetter areas. To test the hypothesis that species developing in dry areas will prefer nitrate whereas species growing in wet areas will prefer ammonium, a controlled experiment using a greenhouse was undertaken. Six native African grass species from different precipitation regimes were used in this study. Two species were from relatively wet areas (Pandamatenga, Botswana, precipitation = 698 mm/year), two were from relatively dry areas (Tshane, Botswana, precipitation = 232 mm/year) and other two were from intermediate environments (Ghanzi, Botswana, precipitation = 400 mm/year). The grass seeds were collected in the field during the dry season of 2004 and using germination pans, were grown in a greenhouse. When individuals were mature, they were transferred into plastic pots (one individual per pot) containing commercial sand. After one week period of adjustment, a 15N labeled fertilizer (NH4NO3) was applied. The total N applied as fertilizer was comparable to the mineralized field N based on a calculated rate for the top 15 cm of soil. A pair of individual plants was treated as an experimental unit. Each plant received the same amount of total N fertilizer, but one was 15NO3 labeled and another was 15NH4 labeled. Nutrient uptake preference was determined by the 15N difference between pairs. The preliminary results with three species shows that, the individuals from dry area ( Enneapogon cenchroides from Tshane) has significantly higher foliar 15N signatures in the 15NO3 labeling treatment (p = 0.0103) and no difference in root 15N signatures. Whereas individuals from the wet

  9. [Carbonyl compounds emission and uptake by plant: Research progress].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Cai, Jing; Yan, Liu-Shui; Li, Ling-Na; Tao, Min

    2013-02-01

    This paper reviewed the researches on the carbonyl compounds emission and uptake by plants, and discussed the compensation point of the bidirectional exchange of carbonyl compounds between plants and atmosphere. The uptake by leaf stomata and stratum corneum is the principal way for the purification of air aldehydes by plants. After entering into plant leaves, most parts of carbonyl compounds can be metabolized into organic acid, glucide, amino acid, and carbon dioxide, etc. , by the endoenzymes in leaves. The exchange direction of the carbonyl compounds between plants and atmosphere can be preliminarily predicted by the compensation point and the concentrations of ambient carbonyl compounds. This paper summarized the analytical methods such as DNPH/HPLC/UV and PFPH/GC/MS used for the determination of carbonyl compounds emitted from plants or in plant leaves. The main research interests in the future were pointed out, e. g. , to improve and optimize the analytical methods for the determination of carbonyl compounds emitted from plants and the researches on systems (e. g. , plant-soil system), to enlarge the detection species of carbonyl compounds emitted from plants, to screen the plant species which can effectively metabolize the pollutants, and to popularize the phytoremediation techniques for atmospheric

  10. Myo-Inositol-Dependent Sodium Uptake in Ice Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Donald E.; Koukoumanos, Michelle; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    In salt-stressed ice plants (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), sodium accumulates to high concentrations in vacuoles, and polyols (myo-inositol, d-ononitol, and d-pinitol) accumulate in the cytosol. Polyol synthesis is regulated by NaCl and involves induction and repression of gene expression (D.E. Nelson, B. Shen, and H.J. Bohnert [1998] Plant Cell 10: 753–764). In the study reported here we found increased phloem transport of myo-inositol and reciprocal increased transport of sodium and inositol to leaves under stress. To determine the relationship between increased translocation and sodium uptake, we analyzed the effects of exogenous application of myo-inositol: The NaCl-inducible ice plant myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase is repressed in roots, and sodium uptake from root to shoot increases without stimulating growth. Sodium uptake and transport through the xylem was coupled to a 10-fold increase of myo-inositol and ononitol in the xylem. Seedlings of the ice plant are not salt-tolerant, and yet the addition of exogenous myo-inositol conferred upon them patterns of gene expression and polyol accumulation observed in mature, salt-tolerant plants. Sodium uptake and transport through the xylem was enhanced in the presence of myo-inositol. The results indicate an interdependence of sodium uptake and alterations in the distribution of myo-inositol. We hypothesize that myo-inositol could serve not only as a substrate for the production of compatible solutes but also as a leaf-to-root signal that promotes sodium uptake. PMID:9880357

  11. Uptake of tritium by plants from atmosphere and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H; Garten Jr, Charles T

    1991-01-01

    Uptake of tritiated water (HTO) by plants was examined under field conditions when tritium was available to leaves from only the atmosphere and when tritium was available from both the soil (root uptake) and the atmosphere. Maple, oak, and elm trees, planted in clean soil, were transported to a tritium-contaminated forest, where the atmospheric tritium concentration was elevated, to examine HTO uptake by tree leaves when the source was only in the atmosphere. The results partially agreed with a diffusion model of tritium uptake by plants. Discrepancies found between predicted and measured leaf HTO/air HTO ratios should be attributed to the existence of some isolated water, which is isolated from the transpiration stream in the leaves, that was not available for rapid turnover. The uptake of tritium by trees, when the source was both in the soil and atmosphere, was also examined using deciduous trees (maple and elm) resident to the tritium-contaminated forest. The results were in agreement with a prediction model.

  12. Interaction of carbon nanohorns with plants: Uptake and biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiani, Mohamed H.; Chen, Jihua; Irin, Fahmida; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Green, Micah J.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.

    2014-10-07

    Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns (SWCNHs) are a unique carbon-based nanomaterial with promising application in different fields including, medicine, genetic engineering and horticulture. Here, we investigated the biological response of six crop species (barley, corn, rice, soybean, switchgrass, tomato) and tobacco cell culture to the exposure of SWCNHs. We found that SWCNHs can activate seed germination of selected crops and enhance growth of different organs of corn, tomato, rice and soybean. At cellular level, growth of tobacco cells was increased in response to exposure of SWCNHs (78% increase compared to control). Uptake of SWCNHs by exposed crops and tobacco cells was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantified by microwave induced heating (MIH) technique. At genetic level, SWCNHs were able to affect expression of a number of tomato genes that are involved in stress responses, cellular responses and metabolic processes. Our conclusion is that SWCNHs can be used as plant growth regulators and have the potential for plant-related applications.

  13. Interaction of carbon nanohorns with plants: Uptake and biological effects

    DOE PAGES

    Lahiani, Mohamed H.; Chen, Jihua; Irin, Fahmida; ...

    2014-10-07

    Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns (SWCNHs) are a unique carbon-based nanomaterial with promising application in different fields including, medicine, genetic engineering and horticulture. Here, we investigated the biological response of six crop species (barley, corn, rice, soybean, switchgrass, tomato) and tobacco cell culture to the exposure of SWCNHs. We found that SWCNHs can activate seed germination of selected crops and enhance growth of different organs of corn, tomato, rice and soybean. At cellular level, growth of tobacco cells was increased in response to exposure of SWCNHs (78% increase compared to control). Uptake of SWCNHs by exposed crops and tobacco cells was confirmedmore » by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantified by microwave induced heating (MIH) technique. At genetic level, SWCNHs were able to affect expression of a number of tomato genes that are involved in stress responses, cellular responses and metabolic processes. Our conclusion is that SWCNHs can be used as plant growth regulators and have the potential for plant-related applications.« less

  14. Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium uptake by tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Soudek, Petr; Kufner, Daniel; Petrová, Sárka; Mihaljevič, Martin; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2013-08-01

    The ability of thorium uptake as well as responses to heavy metal stress were tested in tobacco cultivar La Burley 21. Thorium was accumulated preferentially in the root system. The presence of citric, tartaric and oxalic acids in hydroponic medium increased thorium accumulation in all plant organs. On the other hand, the addition of diamines and polyamines, the important antioxidants in plants, resulted in decrease of thorium accumulation, especially in the root system. Negative correlation was found between putrescine concentration and thorium accumulation. Nevertheless, the most important factor influencing the accumulation of thorium was the absence of phosphate ions in a hydroponic medium that caused more than 10-fold increase of thorium uptake in all plant parts. Accumulation and distribution of thorium was followed in six cultivars and 14 selected transformants. Cultivar La Barley 21 represented an average between the tested genotypes, having a very good distribution ratio between roots, stems and leaves.

  15. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  16. Plant uptake of pentachlorophenol from sludge-amended soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bellin, C.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal {sup 14}C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were <0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge.

  17. Plant uptake and determination of arsenic species in soil solution under flooded conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Onken, B.M.; Hossner, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    Previous studies have not identified the different As species present in soil systems and determined if effective differences exist between As species with respect to plant parameters such as growth rate and As uptake. This study determined the species and concentrations of As present in soil solution of flooded soils and correlated them to As concentration, P concentration, an growth rate of plants grown in treated soils. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) was grown in two soils treated with 0, 5, 25, 35, and 45 mg As kg{sup -1} soil added as either Na-arsenate or Na-arsenite. Soil solution samples and plant samples were collected over a period of 60 d. The As concentration of rice plants best correlated to the mean soil solution arsenate concentration in a Beaumont clay (fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Entic Pelludert) and to the mean soil solution arsenite concentration in a Midland silt loam (fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Typic Ochraqualf). In both soils, plant P concentration was best correlated to the amount of As added to the soil rather than any soil solution As concentration. Plant weight was best correlated to the mean soil solution arsenate concentration in both soils. The rate of As uptake by plants increased as the rate of plant growth increased. Plants grown in soils treated with As had higher rates of As uptake for similar rates of growth when compared with plants in untreated soils. However, growth per unit of As uptake was higher for plants in untreated soils than plants in As treated soils. 31 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Natural colloidal P and its contribution to plant P uptake.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, Daniela; Degryse, Fien; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2015-03-17

    Phosphorus (P) bioavailability depends on its concentration and speciation in solution. Andisols and Oxisols have very low soil solution concentration of free orthophosphate, as they contain high concentrations of strongly P-sorbing minerals (Al/Fe oxyhydroxides, allophanes). Free orthophosphate is the form of P taken up by plants, but it is not the only P species present in the soil solution. Natural colloidal P (P associated with Al, Fe, and organic matter of sizes ranging from 1 to 1000 nm) constitutes an important fraction of soil solution P in these soils; however, its availability has not been considered. We measured the uptake of P by wheat (Triticum aestivum) from radiolabeled nonfiltered (colloid-containing) and 3-kDa filtered (nearly colloid-free) soil-water extracts from Andisols and Oxisols. In the Andisol extracts, P uptake was up to 5-fold higher from the nonfiltered solutions than the corresponding 3-kDa filtered solutions. In the Oxisol extract, no difference in P uptake between both solutions was observed. Also the diffusional flux of P as measured with the DGT technique was larger in the nonfiltered than in the 3-kDa filtered solutions. Our results suggest that colloidal P from Andisols is not chemically inert and contributes to plant uptake of P.

  19. Uptake of antibiotics from irrigation water by plants.

    PubMed

    Azanu, David; Mortey, Christiana; Darko, Godfred; Weisser, Johan Juhl; Styrishave, Bjarne; Abaidoo, Robert Clement

    2016-08-01

    The capacity of carrot (Daucus corota L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), two plants that are usually eaten raw, to uptake tetracycline and amoxicillin (two commonly used antibiotics) from irrigated water was investigated in order to assess the indirect human exposure to antibiotics through consumption of uncooked vegetables. Antibiotics in potted plants that had been irrigated with known concentrations of the antibiotics were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction and analyzed on a liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometer. The plants absorbed the antibiotics from water in all tested concentrations of 0.1-15 mg L(-1). Tetracycline was detected in all plant samples, at concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 28.3 ng/g in lettuce and 12.0-36.8 ng g(-1) fresh weight in carrots. Amoxicillin showed absorption with concentrations ranging from 13.7 ng g(-1) to 45.2 ng g(-1) for the plant samples. The mean concentration of amoxicillin (27.1 ng g(-1)) in all the samples was significantly higher (p = 0.04) than that of tetracycline (20.2 ng g(-1)) indicating higher uptake of amoxicillin than tetracycline. This suggests that the low antibiotic concentrations found in plants could be important for causing antibiotics resistance when these levels are consumed.

  20. Uptake and Metabolism of Phthalate Esters by Edible Plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianqiang; Wu, Xiaoqin; Gan, Jay

    2015-07-21

    Phthalate esters (PAEs) are large-volume chemicals and are found ubiquitously in soil as a result of widespread plasticulture and waste disposal. Food plants such as vegetables may take up and accumulate PAEs from soil, potentially imposing human health risks through dietary intake. In this study, we carried out a cultivation study using lettuce, strawberry, and carrot plants to determine the potential of plant uptake, translocation, and metabolism of di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and their primary metabolites mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP). All four compounds were detected in the plant tissues, with the bioconcentration factors (BCFs) ranging from 0.16 ± 0.01 to 4.78 ± 0.59. However, the test compounds were poorly translocated from roots to leaves, with a translocation factor below 1. Further, PAEs were readily transformed to their monoesters following uptake. Incubation of PAEs and monoalkyl phthalate esters (MPEs) in carrot cell culture showed that DnBP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than DEHP, while the monoesters were transformed more quickly than their parent precursors. Given the extensive metabolism of PAEs to monoesters in both whole plants and plant cells, metabolism intermediates such as MPEs should be considered when assessing human exposure via dietary intake of food produced from PAE-contaminated soils.

  1. Selected Phytochemicals and Culinary Plant Extracts Inhibit Fructose Uptake in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yurim; Lim, Yeni; Kwon, Oran

    2015-09-18

    This study compared the ability of nine culinary plant extracts containing a wide array of phytochemicals to inhibit fructose uptake and then explored the involvement of intestinal fructose transporters and phytochemicals for selected samples. The chemical signature was characterized by high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Inhibition of [(14)C]-fructose uptake was tested by using human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Then, the relative contribution of the two apical-facing intestinal fructose transporters, GLUT2 and GLUT5, and the signature components for fructose uptake inhibition was confirmed in naive, phloretin-treated and forskolin-treated Caco-2 cells. HPLC/MS analysis of the chemical signature revealed that guava leaf contained quercetin and catechin, and turmeric contained curcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin and dimethoxycurcumin. Similar inhibition of fructose uptake (by ~50%) was observed with guava leaf and turmeric in Caco-2 cells, but with a higher contribution of GLUT2 for turmeric and that of GLUT5 for guava leaf. The data suggested that, in turmeric, demethoxycurcumin specifically contributed to GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, and curcumin did the same to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, but GLUT2 inhibition was more potent. By contrast, in guava leaf, catechin specifically contributed to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, and quercetin affected both GLUT5- and GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, resulting in the higher contribution of GLUT5. These results suggest that demethoxycurcumin is an important contributor to GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition for turmeric extract, and catechin is the same to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition for guava leaf extract. Quercetin, curcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin contributed to both GLUT5- and GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, but the contribution to GLUT5 inhibition was higher than the contribution to GLUT2 inhibition.

  2. Plant traits related to nitrogen uptake influence plant-microbe competition.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Delphine; Pivato, Barbara; Bru, David; Busset, Hugues; Deau, Florence; Faivre, Céline; Matejicek, Annick; Strbik, Florence; Philippot, Laurent; Mougel, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Plant species are important drivers of soil microbial communities. However, how plant functional traits are shaping these communities has received less attention though linking plant and microbial traits is crucial for better understanding plant-microbe interactions. Our objective was to determine how plant-microbe interactions were affected by plant traits. Specifically we analyzed how interactions between plant species and microbes involved in nitrogen cycling were affected by plant traits related to 'nitrogen nutrition in interaction with soil nitrogen availability. Eleven plant species, selected along an oligotrophic-nitrophilic gradient, were grown individually in a nitrogen-poor soil with two levels of nitrate availability. Plant traits for both carbon and nitrogen nutrition were measured and the genetic structure and abundance of rhizosphere. microbial communities, in particular the ammonia oxidizer and nitrate reducer guilds, were analyzed. The structure of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere differed significantly between plant species and these differences depended on nitrogen availability. The results suggest that the rate of nitrogen uptake per unit of root biomass and per day is a key plant trait, explaining why the effect of nitrogen availability on the structure of the bacterial community depends on the plant species. We also showed that the abundance of nitrate reducing bacteria always decreased with increasing nitrogen uptake per unit of root biomass per day, indicating that there was competition for nitrate between plants and nitrate reducing bacteria. This study demonstrates that nitrate-reducing microorganisms may be adversely affected by plants with a high nitrogen uptake rate. Our work puts forward the role of traits related to nitrogen in plant-microbe interactions, whereas carbon is commonly considered as the main driver. It also suggests that plant traits related to ecophysiological processes, such as nitrogen uptake rates, are more

  3. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate in soybean plants: uptake during reproductive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Henry, L. T.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Net uptake of NO3- by non-nodulated soybean plants [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Ransom] growing in flowing hydroponic culture was measured daily during a 63 d period of reproductive development between the first florally inductive photoperiod and [unknown word] seed growth. Removal of NO3- from a replenished solution containing 1.0 mol m-3 NO3- was determined by ion chromatography. Uptake of NO3- continued throughout reproductive development. The net uptake rate of NO3- cycled between maxima and minima with a periodicity of oscillation of 3 to 7 d during the floral stage and about 6 d during the fruiting stage. Coupled with increasing concentrations of carbon and C : N ratios in tissues, the oscillations in net uptake rates of NO3- are evidence that the demand for carbohydrate by reproductive organs is contingent on the availability of nitrogen in the shoot pool rather than that the demand for nitrogen follows the flux of carbohydrate into reproductive tissues.

  4. Quantitative Understanding of Nanoparticle Uptake in Watermelon Plants

    PubMed Central

    Raliya, Ramesh; Franke, Christina; Chavalmane, Sanmathi; Nair, Remya; Reed, Nathan; Biswas, Pratim

    2016-01-01

    The use of agrochemical-nutrient fertilizers has come under scrutiny in recent years due to concerns that they damage the ecosystem and endanger public health. Nanotechnology offers many possible interventions to mitigate these risks by use of nanofertilizers, nanopesticides, and nanosensors; and concurrently increases profitability, yields, and sustainability within the agricultural industry. Aerosol based foliar delivery of nanoparticles may help to enhance nanoparticle uptake and reduce environmental impacts of chemical fertilizers conventionally applied through a soil route. The purpose of this work was to study uptake, translocation, and accumulation of various gold nanostructures, 30–80 nm, delivered by aerosol application to a watermelon plant. Cellular uptake and accumulation of gold nanoparticles were quantified by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Observations suggested that nanoparticles could be taken up by the plant through direct penetration and transport through the stomatal opening. Observed translocation of nanoparticles from leaf to root shows evidence that nanoparticles travel by the phloem transport mechanism. Accumulation and transport of nanoparticles depend on nanoparticle shape, application method, and nature of plant tissues. PMID:27617020

  5. Uptake of cyantraniliprole into tomato fruit and foliage under hydroponic conditions: application to calibration of a plant/soil uptake model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey J; Bookhart, S Wingard; Clark, Jonathan M; Jernberg, Kathryn M; Kingston, Coleen K; Snyder, Nathan; Wallick, Kevin; Watson, Lawrence J

    2013-09-25

    Measured uptake of cyantraniliprole (3-bromo-1-(3-chloro-2-pyridinyl)-N-[4-cyano-2-methyl-6-[(methylamino)carbonyl]phenyl]-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide) into tomatoes following hydroponic exposure allowed calibration of a novel soil uptake model. The total mass of plant parts in treated plants was derived from the weights of successively harvested control plants (no cyantraniliprole provided) over 18 days following the first sampling of ripe tomatoes. Transpired water measured during plant growth was coupled with the calculated increase in plant mass to determine a transpiration coefficient constant (L/kg plant fresh weight) for use in the model. Cyantraniliprole concentrations in mature fruit, fresh foliage, and plant uptake solutions were used as the basis for a nonlinear least-squares optimization that consistently resolved to values that were empirically valid compared to metabolism studies in whole plants. This calibrated reference model adequately described uptake from soil pore water into plant fruit, and served as the basis for describing residues in fruit following commercial greenhouse growing conditions.

  6. Uptake and distribution of ceria nanoparticles in cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Zhang, Haifeng; Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Peng; Ding, Yayun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-08-01

    The presence and release of nanoparticles (NPs) into the environment have important implications for human health and the environment. A critical aspect of the risk assessment of nanoparticles is to understand the interactions of manufactured nanoparticles with plants. In this study, the uptake and distribution characteristics of two types of ceria nanoparticles with sizes of ca. 7 nm and 25 nm in cucumber plants were investigated using a radiotracer method and other techniques. With increasing concentration of the nanoparticles, concentration dependent absorption by the plant roots was noticed, but the majority of the particles only loosely adhered to the root surface. The seedlings treated with 7 nm ceria particles showed significantly higher ceria contents in both roots and shoots than those exposed to 25 nm ceria particles at all test concentrations (2, 20, and 200 mg L(-1)). Only very limited amounts of ceria nanoparticles could be transferred from the roots to shoots because the entry of nanoparticles into the roots was difficult. However, the results of tissue distributions of ceria nanoparticles in the plants and two dimensional distributions of the particles in the leaves imply that once they have entered into the vascular cylinder, ceria nanoparticles could move smoothly to the end of the vascular bundle along with water flow. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of uptake and distribution of metal oxide nanoparticles in plants.

  7. Uptake of Pharmaceuticals Influences Plant Development and Affects Nutrient and Hormone Homeostases.

    PubMed

    Carter, Laura J; Williams, Mike; Böttcher, Christine; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-10-20

    The detection of a range of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the soil environment has led to a number of publications demonstrating uptake by crops, however very few studies have explored the potential for impacts on plant development as a result of API uptake. This study investigated the effect of carbamazepine and verapamil (0.005-10 mg/kg) on a range of plant responses in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo). Uptake increased in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum leaf concentrations of 821.9 and 2.2 mg/kg for carbamazepine and verapamil, respectively. Increased carbamazepine uptake by zucchini resulted in a decrease in above (<60%) and below (<30%) ground biomass compared to the controls (p < 0.05). At soil concentrations >4 mg/kg the mature leaves suffered from burnt edges and white spots as well as a reduction in photosynthetic pigments but no such effects were seen for verapamil. For both APIs, further investigations revealed significant differences in the concentrations of selected plant hormones (auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid and jasmonates), and in the nutrient composition of the leaves in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05). This is some of the first research to demonstrate that the exposure of plants to APIs is likely to cause impacts on plant development with unknown implications.

  8. Kinetic and phylogenetic analysis of plant polyamine uptake transporters.

    PubMed

    Mulangi, Vaishali; Chibucos, Marcus C; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Morris, Paul F

    2012-10-01

    The rice gene Polyamine Uptake Transporter1 (PUT1) was originally identified based on its homology to the polyamine uptake transporters LmPOT1 and TcPAT12 in Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi, respectively. Here we show that five additional transporters from rice and Arabidopsis that cluster in the same clade as PUT1 all function as high affinity spermidine uptake transporters. Yeast expression assays of these genes confirmed that uptake of spermidine was minimally affected by 166 fold or greater concentrations of amino acids. Characterized polyamine transporters from both Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa along with the two polyamine transporters from L. major and T. cruzi were aligned and used to generate a hidden Markov model. This model was used to identify significant matches to proteins in other angiosperms, bryophytes, chlorophyta, discicristates, excavates, stramenopiles and amoebozoa. No significant matches were identified in fungal or metazoan genomes. Phylogenic analysis showed that some sequences from the haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi, as well as sequences from oomycetes and diatoms clustered closer to sequences from plant genomes than from a homologous sequence in the red algal genome Galdieria sulphuraria, consistent with the hypothesis that these polyamine transporters were acquired by horizontal transfer from green algae. Leishmania and Trypansosoma formed a separate cluster with genes from other Discicristates and two Entamoeba species. We surmise that the genes in Entamoeba species were acquired by phagotrophy of Discicristates. In summary, phylogenetic and functional analysis has identified two clades of genes that are predictive of polyamine transport activity.

  9. Effect of Plant Uptake on Perchlorate Isotopic Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, N. L.; Jackson, W. A.; Bohlke, J. K.; Sturchio, N. C.; Gu, B.; Rao, B.; Hatzinger, P. B.; Harvey, G.; Burkey, K.; McGrath, M. T.; Sevanthi, R.

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the environment is attributed to both synthetic and natural sources. Unlike anthropogenic ClO4-, natural ClO4- exhibits a wide range in isotopic compositions, suggesting that natural ClO4- is formed through more than one pathway and/or undergoes post-depositional isotopic fractionation processes. One of these processes could be plant uptake and metabolism. Plants are known to reversibly accumulate ClO4-. However, there is little information available regarding the ability for plants to isotopically fractionate ClO4-. Plants could alter ClO4-isotopic composition either by mass dependent fractionation via transport carriers in the root, diffusion limitations through the root, translocation within the plant, reduction of ClO4- by plant enzymes, or non-specific exchange of oxygen in ClO4- catalyzed by plant compounds/processes. We examined the potential for plants to alter the isotopic composition of ClO4- (δ37Cl, δ18O, and Δ17O) in both hydroponic and field scale experiments. Hydroponically grown snap bean plants were exposed to variable ClO4-concentrations (2mg/L and 10mg/L) in solutions prepared from ClO4- with both normal and anomalous O isotopic abundances. At maturity, we evaluated the uptake of ClO4-relative to other anions and the isotopic compositions of ClO4- in both plants and growth solutions. Additional experiments involved field scale exposures of snap beans to irrigation water containing low levels (< 10 ug/L) of ClO4-. The majority of the initial mass of ClO4- for both the low and high exposure hydroponic treatments was recovered in the growth solutions (20-40%) or plant compartments (40-60%), while some mass was not recovered (~20%). ClO4- isotopic compositions were essentially identical between recovered ClO4- in the plant tissues and hydroponic solutions. Anion ratios indicate that ClO4-was accumulated similarly to NO3- but preferentially to Cl- (~4X). In field experiments, the isotopic composition of ClO4

  10. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake, and transport infectious prions.

    PubMed

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-05-26

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrP(Sc)) to plants. Small quantities of PrP(Sc) contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrP(Sc) for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease.

  11. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake and transport infectious prions

    PubMed Central

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C.; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrPSc) to plants. Small quantities of PrPSc contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrPSc for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease. PMID:25981035

  12. A Comparative Study of Iron Uptake Rates and Mechanisms amongst Marine and Fresh Water Cyanobacteria: Prevalence of Reductive Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Hagar; Kranzler, Chana; Keren, Nir; Shaked, Yeala

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, we address the question of iron bioavailability to cyanobacteria by measuring Fe uptake rates and probing for a reductive uptake pathway in diverse cyanobacterial species. We examined three Fe-substrates: dissolved inorganic iron (Fe') and the Fe-siderophores Ferrioxamine B (FOB) and FeAerobactin (FeAB). In order to compare across substrates and strains, we extracted uptake rate constants (kin = uptake rate/[Fe-substrate]). Fe' was the most bioavailable Fe form to cyanobacteria, with kin values higher than those of other substrates. When accounting for surface area (SA), all strains acquired Fe' at similar rates, as their kin/SA were similar. We also observed homogeneity in the uptake of FOB among strains, but with 10,000 times lower kin/SA values than Fe'. Uniformity in kin/SA suggests similarity in the mechanism of uptake and indeed, all strains were found to employ a reductive step in the uptake of Fe' and FOB. In contrast, different uptake pathways were found for FeAB along with variations in kin/SA. Our data supports the existence of a common reductive Fe uptake pathway amongst cyanobacteria, functioning alone or in addition to siderophore-mediated uptake. Cyanobacteria combining both uptake strategies benefit from increased flexibility in accessing different Fe-substrates. PMID:25768677

  13. Foliar water uptake: a common water acquisition strategy for plants of the redwood forest.

    PubMed

    Limm, Emily Burns; Simonin, Kevin A; Bothman, Aron G; Dawson, Todd E

    2009-09-01

    Evaluations of plant water use in ecosystems around the world reveal a shared capacity by many different species to absorb rain, dew, or fog water directly into their leaves or plant crowns. This mode of water uptake provides an important water subsidy that relieves foliar water stress. Our study provides the first comparative evaluation of foliar uptake capacity among the dominant plant taxa from the coast redwood ecosystem of California where crown-wetting events by summertime fog frequently occur during an otherwise drought-prone season. Previous research demonstrated that the dominant overstory tree species, Sequoia sempervirens, takes up fog water by both its roots (via drip from the crown to the soil) and directly through its leaf surfaces. The present study adds to these early findings and shows that 80% of the dominant species from the redwood forest exhibit this foliar uptake water acquisition strategy. The plants studied include canopy trees, understory ferns, and shrubs. Our results also show that foliar uptake provides direct hydration to leaves, increasing leaf water content by 2-11%. In addition, 60% of redwood forest species investigated demonstrate nocturnal stomatal conductance to water vapor. Such findings indicate that even species unable to absorb water directly into their foliage may still receive indirect benefits from nocturnal leaf wetting through suppressed transpiration. For these species, leaf-wetting events enhance the efficacy of nighttime re-equilibration with available soil water and therefore also increase pre-dawn leaf water potentials.

  14. Evaluating stomatal ozone fluxes in WRF-Chem: Comparing ozone uptake in Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydsaa, J. H.; Stordal, F.; Gerosa, G.; Finco, A.; Hodnebrog, Ø.

    2016-10-01

    The development of modelling tools for estimating stomatal uptake of surface ozone in vegetation is important for the assessment of potential damage induced due to both current and future near surface ozone concentrations. In this study, we investigate the skill in estimating ozone uptake in plants by the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) V3.6.1, with the Wesely dry deposition scheme. To validate the stomatal uptake of ozone, the model simulations were compared with field measurements of three types of Mediterranean vegetation, over seven different periods representing various meteorological conditions. Some systematic biases in modelled ozone fluxes are revealed; the lack of an explicit and time varying dependency on plants' water availability results in overestimated daytime ozone stomatal fluxes particularly in dry periods. The optimal temperature in the temperature response function is likely too low for the woody species tested here. Also, too low nighttime stomatal conductance leads to underestimation of ozone uptake during night. We demonstrate that modelled stomatal ozone flux is improved by accounting for vapor pressure deficit in the ambient air. Based on the results of the overall comparison to measured fluxes, we propose that additional improvements to the stomatal conductance parameterization should be implemented before applying the modelling system for estimating ozone doses and potential damage to vegetation.

  15. Factors affecting the uptake of 14C-labeled organic chemicals by plants from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, E.; Scheunert, I.; Attar, A.; Korte, F.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of /sup 14/C from various /sup 14/C-labeled organic chemicals from different chemical classes by barley and cress seedlings from soil was studied for 7 days in a closed aerated laboratory apparatus. Uptake by roots and by leaves via the air was determined separately. Although comparative long-term outdoor studies showed that an equilibrium is not reached within a short time period, plant concentration factors after 7 days could be correlated to some physicochemical and structural substance properties. Barley root concentration factors due to root uptake, expressed as concentration in roots divided by concentration in soil, gave a fairly good negative correlation to adsorption coefficients based on soil organic carbon. Barley root concentration factors, expressed as concentration in roots divided by concentration in soil liquid, gave a positive correlation to the n-octanol/water partition coefficients. Uptake of chemicals by barley leaves via air was strongly positively correlated to volatilization of chemicals from soil. Both root and foliar uptake by barley could be correlated well to the molecular weight of 14 chemicals. Uptake of chemicals by cress differed from that by barley, and correlations to physicochemical substance properties mostly were poor.

  16. [Study on the nitrogen and phosphorus uptake ability of four plants cultivated on floating-bed].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Min; Wu, Jian; Jiang, Yue; Sun, Cong-Jun; Cao, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Plant floating-bed tested engineering was constructed for eutrophication control in Dian-shan Lake, the characteristics and nutrient uptake abilities of Canna indica, Iris pseudacorus, Thalia dealbata and Lythrum salicaria were compared. It shows that using upper and lower nylon nets to fix the plants on the floating-bed is beneficial for them to grow and reproduce rapidly. Survival rates of Canna indica, lris pseudacorus, Thalia dealbata and Lythrum salicaria are 83.33%, 83.33%, 76.67% and 53.33% respectively. Ramets of Canna indica and Thalia dealbata are 64 and 78 respectively in November, and the biomass (fresh weight) of these two plants are 32.0 and 38.6 kg per individual plant. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) content in stems/leaves of Canna indica and Thalia dealbata are greater than those in roots. The ratio between stems/leaves and roots of N, P content in Canna indica are 1.40 and 1.21 respectively, while 1.59 and 1.08 in Thalia dealbata. The difference of cumulative N, P content in plants is mostly on account of different plant biomass. N uptake ability of Thalia dealbata is the highest, which is 457.11 g per square; Canna indica has the highest P uptake ability, which is 41.29 g per square. N, P uptake ability of stems/leaves in Canna indica are 2.17 and 1.86 times higher than that of roots, while 1.73 and 1.17 times higher respectively in Thalia dealbata. Thus, Canna indica and Thalia dealbata are recommended as the floating-bed plants to control the eutrophication in Dian-shan Lake.

  17. How do microorganisms influence trace element uptake by plants? Screening in an agar model rhizosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M.; Robinson, B. H.; Evangelou, M. W. H.; Vachey, A.; Schwitzguebel, J. P.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Schulin, R.

    2009-04-01

    sterile, transparent plastic boxes, whose lid was equipped with a filter allowing gas exchanges without contamination by external microorganisms. The seed surface was sterilised and the plants grew one week in agar before their rhizosphere was inoculated with LB broth containing a pure bacterial strain or agar plugs colonized by fungal hyphae. We tested 14 strains, with 5 replicates per treatment and a control where the system was inoculated with sterile LB broth. The plants grew for 2 weeks in a climate chamber and their shoots were analysed for their TEs by ICP-OES. Samples of agar and roots were collected to confirm microbial colonization of the rhizosphere, respectively sterile conditions in the control treatments. Concerning the method development, the plants grew without visible toxicity in all the boxes, and the analysis of root and agar samples indicated that the controls were sterile and the strains inoculated were growing along the roots. More than 90% of the TE and nutrients added to the system were in the liquid fraction of the agar medium, thus available for root uptake. The screening showed that the microorganisms in general decreased TE uptake by wheat and sunflower, although some of them had an opposite effect on the plants. However, with the same plant species, the microorganisms had a consistent effect on all TE tested, i.e. a given single strain caused the same effect (increase or decrease of TE uptake) on all TE tested. In sunflower, 3 microorganisms (Paenibacillus polymyxa, Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani) decreased Cu and Zn uptake by 50% compared to the control treatment. These three species are common soil microorganisms. All three are known to exude auxin, a phytohormone. This hormone can modify root morphology and physiology and thus may affect TE uptake by plants. R. solani and P. ultimum are root pathogens. Their effect was opposite to what we expected. If roots are damaged, TE should have flooded into the plant and accumulate in the

  18. Approaches in the determination of plant nutrient uptake and distribution in space flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyenga, A. G.; Forsman, A.; Stodieck, L. S.; Hoehn, A.; Kliss, M.

    2000-01-01

    The effective growth and development of vascular plants rely on the adequate availability of water and nutrients. Inefficiency in either the initial absorption, transportation, or distribution of these elements are factors which impinge on plant structure and metabolic integrity. The potential effect of space flight and microgravity conditions on the efficiency of these processes is unclear. Limitations in the available quantity of space-grown plant material and the sensitivity of routine analytical techniques have made an evaluation of these processes impractical. However, the recent introduction of new plant cultivating methodologies supporting the application of radionuclide elements and subsequent autoradiography techniques provides a highly sensitive investigative approach amenable to space flight studies. Experiments involving the use of gel based 'nutrient packs' and the radionuclides calcium-45 and iron-59 were conducted on the Shuttle mission STS-94. Uptake rates of the radionuclides between ground and flight plant material appeared comparable.

  19. Approaches in the Determination of Plant Nutrient Uptake and Distribution in Space Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyenga, A. G.; Forsman, A.; Stodieck, L. S.; Hoehn, A.; Kliss, Mark

    1998-01-01

    The effective growth and development of vascular plants rely on the adequate availability of water and nutrients. Inefficiency in either the initial absorption, transportation, or distribution of these elements are factors which may impinge on plant structure and metabolic integrity. The potential effect of space flight and microgravity conditions on the efficiency of these processes is unclear. Limitations in the available quantity of space-grown plant material and the sensitivity of routine analytical techniques have made an evaluation of these processes impractical. However, the recent introduction of new plant cultivating methodologies supporting the application of radionuclide elements and subsequent autoradiography techniques provides a highly sensitive investigative approach amenable to space flight studies. Experiments involving the use of gel based 'nutrient packs' and the nuclides Ca45 and Fe59 were conducted on the Shuttle mission STS-94. Uptake rates of the radionuclides between ground and flight plant material appeared comparable.

  20. Metabolization of the bacteriostatic agent triclosan in edible plants and its consequences for plant uptake assessment.

    PubMed

    Macherius, André; Eggen, Trine; Lorenz, Wilhelm; Moeder, Monika; Ondruschka, Jelka; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2012-10-02

    Persistent environmental contaminants may enter agricultural fields via the application of sewage sludge, by irrigation with treated municipal wastewater or by manuring. It has been shown that such contaminants can be incorporated into crop plants. The metabolism of the bacteriostatic agents triclocarban, triclosan, and its transformation product methyl triclosan was investigated after their uptake into carrot cell cultures. A fast metabolization of triclosan was observed and eight so far unknown phase II metabolites, conjugates with saccharides, disaccharides, malonic acid, and sulfate, were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Triclocarban and methyl triclosan lack a phenolic group and remained unaltered in the cell cultures. Phase I metabolization was not observed for any of the compounds. All eight triclosan conjugates identified in the cell cultures were also detected in extracts of intact carrot plants cultivated on triclosan contaminated soils. Their total amount in the plants was assessed to exceed the amount of the triclosan itself by a factor of 5. This study shows that a disregard of conjugates in studies on plant uptake of environmental contaminants may severely underestimates the extent of uptake into plants and, eventually, the potential human exposure to contaminants via food of plant origin.

  1. Uptake, translocation and metabolism of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in seven aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Deng, Daiyong; Liu, Jin; Xu, Meiying; Zheng, Guolu; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial plant uptake of PBDEs from contaminated soils has been widely reported recently. In this study the fate of deca-BDE within a plant/PBDEs/aquatic environment system was investigated through simulated pot experiments. Accumulations of the total PBDEs and deca-BDE were observed in tissues of seven test aquatic plant species, namely Phragmites australis, Cyperus papyrus, Alternanthera philoxeroides, Colocasia esculenta, Scirpus validus, Acorus calamus and Oryza sativa. In all seven plants, O. sativa leads the uptake and accumulation both in the total PBDEs (444.8 ng g(-1)) and deca-BDE (368.0 ng g(-1)) in roots. Among the six common phytoremediation aquatic plants, A. calamus leads the uptake (236.2 ng g(-1)), and P. australis leads the translocation (Cshoot/Croot = 0.35), while A. philoxeroides (43.4%) and P. australis (80.0%) lead in the metabolism efficiencies in the root and shoot, respectively. The detection of seventeen lesser brominated PBDE congeners provided the debromination evidence, and the specific PBDEs profiles in test plant species indicated there is no common metabolic pattern. Furthermore, a relative high proportion of lesser brominated PBDE congeners in shoots suggested the possible metabolic difference between roots and shoots. Finally, a noticeable percentage of penta- and octa-BDE derived from deca-BDE also hint the ecological risk in deca-BDE use. This comparative research on the aquatic plants provide a broad vision on the understanding of plant/PBDEs/aquatic environment interaction system, and may be applied to remediate PBDEs in contaminated waters and sediments.

  2. Nickel in plants: I. Uptake kinetics using intact soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, D A; Garland, T R; Wildung, R E

    1978-10-01

    The absorption of Ni(2+) by 21-day-old soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Williams) was investigated with respect to its concentration dependence, transport kinetics, and interactions with various nutrient cations. Nickel absorption, measured as a function of concentration (0.02 to 100 mum), demonstrated the presence of multiple absorption isotherms. Each of the three isotherms conforms to Michaelis-Menten kinetics; kinetic constants are reported for uptake by the intact plant and for transfer from root to shoot tissues. The absorption of Ni(2+) by the intact plant and its transfer from root to shoot were inhibited by the presence of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Co(2+). Competition kinetic studies showed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) to inhibit Ni(2+) absorption competitively, suggesting that Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) are absorbed using the same carrier site. Calculated K(m) and K(i) constants for Ni(2+) in the presence and absence of Cu(2+) were 6.1 and 9.2 mum, respectively, whereas K(m) and K(i) constants were calculated to be 6.7 and 24.4 mum, respectively, for Ni(2+) in the presence and absence of Zn(2+). The mechanism of inhibition of Ni(2+) in the presence of Fe(2+) and Co(2+) was not resolved by classical kinetic relationships.

  3. Effect, uptake and disposition of nitrobenzene in several terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, C.; Pfleeger, T.; Fletcher, J.

    1990-01-01

    Eight species of plants were exposed to nitrobenzene in a hydroponic solution. Four species experienced no depression of either transpiration or photosynthetic rates, while one was rapidly killed and the other three were temporarily affected but recovered from the treatment. Uptake of nitrobenzene was passive and was shown to be proportional to the rate of water flux in each species. The transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF) was 0.72. The root concentration factor (RCF) was variable between the species and was higher than expected, presumably due to deposits of insoluble metabolic products. All of the species examined displayed a capacity to chemically alter nonpolar nitrobenzene into both polar and insoluble products. Volatilization of nitrobenzene from the leaves was a major route of chemical loss.

  4. Plant uptake and enhanced dissipation of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in spiked soils by different plant species.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Wen; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui; Zeng, Qiao-Yun; Lü, Huixiong; Li, Qu-Sheng; Xu, Guo-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the uptake, accumulation and the enhanced dissipation of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) spiked in soil (with a concentration of 117.4 +/- 5.2 mg kg(-1)) by eleven plants including eight maize (Zea mays) cultivars and three forage species (alfalfa, ryegrass and teosinte). The results showed that, after 40 days of treatment, the removal rates of DEHP ranged from 66.8% (for the control) to 87.5% (for the maize cultivar of Huanong-1). Higher removal rate was observed during the first 10 days than the following days. Plants enhanced significantly the dissipation of DEHP in soil. Enhanced dissipation amount in planted soil was 13.3-122 mg pot(-1) for DEHP, and a net removal of 2.2%-20.7% of the initial DEHP was obtained compared with non-plant soil. The contribution of plant uptake to the total enhanced dissipation was < 0.3%, and the enhanced dissipation of soil DEHP might be derived from plant-promoted biodegradation and sorption stronger to the soil. Nevertheless, the capability in accumulation and enhanced dissipation of DEHP from spiked soils varied within different species and cultivars.

  5. Dredged Illinois River Sediments: Plant Growth and Metal Uptake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darmody, R.G.; Marlin, J.C.; Talbott, J.; Green, R.A.; Brewer, E.F.; Stohr, C.

    2004-01-01

    Sedimentation of the Illinois River in central Illinois has greatly diminished the utility and ecological value of the Peoria Lakes reach of the river. Consequently, a large dredging project has been proposed to improve its wildlife habitat and recreation potential, but disposal of the dredged sediment presents a challenge. Land placement is an attractive option. Previous work in Illinois has demonstrated that sediments are potentially capable of supporting agronomic crops due to their high natural fertility and water holding capacity. However, Illinois River sediments have elevated levels of heavy metals, which may be important if they are used as garden or agricultural soil. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine if these sediments could serve as a plant growth medium. A secondary objective was to determine if plants grown on sediments accumulated significant heavy metal concentrations. Our results indicated that lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), tomato (Lycopersicon lycopersicum L.), and snap bean (Phaseolus vulagaris L. var. humillis) grown in sediment and a reference topsoil did not show significant or consistent differences in germination or yields. In addition, there was not a consistent statistically significant difference in metal content among tomatoes grown in sediments, topsoil, or grown locally in gardens. In the other plants grown on sediments, while Cd and Cu in all cases and As in lettuce and snap bean were elevated, levels were below those considered excessive. Results indicate that properly managed, these relatively uncontaminated calcareous sediments can make productive soils and that metal uptake of plants grown in these sediments is generally not a concern.

  6. Novel Therapeutics for Diabetes: Uptake, Usage Trends, and Comparative Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Vishal; Chou, Chia-Hung

    2016-06-01

    The number of available therapies for treating type 2 diabetes has grown considerably in recent years. This growth has been fueled by availability of newer medications, whose benefits and risks have not been fully established. In this study, we review and synthesize the existing literature on the uptake, efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of novel antidiabetic agents. Specifically, we focus on three drug classes that were introduced in the market recently: thiazolidinediones (TZDs), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. Not surprisingly, we find that the usage trends reflect the efficacy and safety profile of these novel drugs. The use of TZDs increased initially but decreased after a black-box warning was issued for rosiglitazone in 2007 that highlighted the cardiovascular risks associated with using the drug. Conversely, DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists gained market shares due to their efficacy in glycemic control as an add-on treatment to metformin. DPP-4 inhibitors were the most commonly prescribed agents among the three novel drug classes, likely because they are relatively less expensive, have better safety profile, are administered orally, and are weight neutral. Sitagliptin was the most preferred DPP-4 inhibitor. The level of evidence on the comparative effectiveness, safety, and cost implications of using novel antidiabetic agents remains low and further studies with long-term follow-ups are needed.

  7. Interactions between nitrate and ammonium in their uptake, allocation, assimilation, and signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Takushi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-12-21

    Nitrogen (N) availability is a major factor determining plant growth and productivity. Plants acquire inorganic N from the soil, mainly in the form of nitrate and ammonium. To date, researchers have focused on these N sources, and demonstrated that plants exhibit elaborate responses at both physiological and morphological levels. Mixtures of nitrate and ammonium are beneficial in terms of plant growth, as compared to nitrate or ammonium alone, and therefore synergistic responses to both N sources are predicted at different steps ranging from acquisition to assimilation. In this review, we summarize interactions between nitrate and ammonium with respect to uptake, allocation, assimilation, and signaling. Given that cultivated land often contains both nitrate and ammonium, a better understanding of the synergism between these N sources should help to identify targets with the potential to improve crop productivity.

  8. Simultaneous monitoring of electrical capacitance and water uptake activity of plant root system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, Imre; Takács, Tünde; Füzy, Anna; Rajkai, Kálmán

    2014-10-01

    Pot experiments were designed to test the applicability of root electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of root water uptake activity by growing cucumber and bean cultivars in a growth chamber. Half of the plants were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, while the other half served as non-infected controls. Root electrical capacitance and daily transpiration were monitored during the whole plant ontogeny. Phenology-dependent changes of daily transpiration (related to root water uptake) and root electrical capacitance proved to be similar as they showed upward trends from seedling emergence to the beginning of flowering stage, and thereafter decreased continuously during fruit setting. A few days after arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-colonization, daily transpiration and root electrical capacitance of infected plants became significantly higher than those of non-infected counterparts, and the relative increment of the measured parameters was greater for the more highly mycorrhizal-dependent bean cultivar compared to that of cucumber. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization caused 29 and 69% relative increment in shoot dry mass for cucumbers and beans, respectively. Mycorrhization resulted in 37% increase in root dry mass for beans, but no significant difference was observed for cucumbers. Results indicate the potential of root electrical capacitance measurements for monitoring the changes and differences of root water uptake rate.

  9. Enhancement of cadmium uptake by Amaranthus caudatus, an ornamental plant, using tea saponin.

    PubMed

    Cay, Seydahmet

    2016-06-01

    In this study, tea saponin (TS) was extracted from tea camellia seed by microwave-assisted extraction. The potential of TS was compared with ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), which is used as a common chemical agent to enhance uptake of cadmium (Cd) by Amaranthus caudatus, an ornamental plant in the natural vegetation of Turkey under pot conditions. The enrichment coefficient (EC) and translocation factor (TF) values were calculated to evaluate the removal efficiency of the TS and EDTA. The results showed that an increase in both TS and EDTA concentration significantly increased Cd uptake by A. caudatus, accumulating Cd in different parts of the plant. Higher EC and TF values obtained from stems, leaves, and inflorescences of A. caudatus showed that this plant might be cultivated and used as a hyperaccumulator in the uptake of Cd from the Cd contaminated soils. Thus, the present technique can efficiently reduce the metal load in the food chain; hence, it could be applied in catchment areas of urban cities where Cd contamination has become an unavoidable factor.

  10. Comparative uptake and translocation of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) by common vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Ernst, Frederick; Conkle, Jeremy L; Gan, Jay

    2013-10-01

    Reuse of treated wastewater to irrigate agricultural crops is increasing in many arid and semi-arid areas around the world. The presence of numerous pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in treated wastewater and their potential transfer into food produce such as vegetables poses an unknown human health risk. The goal of this study was to identify PPCPs that have a comparatively high potential for plant uptake and translocation. A total of 20 frequently-occurring PPCPs were compared for their accumulation into four staple vegetables (lettuce, spinach, cucumber, and pepper) grown in nutrient solutions containing PPCPs at 0.5 or 5μgL(-1). Triclocarban, fluoxetine, triclosan, and diazepam were found at high levels in roots, while meprobamate, primidone, carbamazepine, dilantin, and diuron exhibited more active translocation from roots to leaves. Root uptake of neutral PPCPs was positively correlated with the pH adjusted log Kow(i.e., log Dow), and was likely driven by chemical adsorption onto the root surfaces. In contrast, translocation from roots to leaves was negatively related to log Dow, suggesting hydrophilicity-regulated transport via xylems. Compounds preferentially sorbed to roots should be further evaluated for their uptake in tuber vegetables (e.g., carrot, radish) under field conditions, while those easily translocated into leaves (e.g., carbamazepine, dilantin) merit focused consideration for leafy and other vegetables (e.g., lettuce, cucumber). However, estimation of dietary intake by humans suggested the implied risks from exposure to PPCPs via wastewater irrigation to be negligible.

  11. Enhancement of lead uptake by alfalfa (Medicago sativa) using EDTA and a plant growth promoter.

    PubMed

    López, Martha L; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Benitez, Tenoch; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2005-10-01

    Phytoremediation is a novel cleanup technology for the removal of contaminants from polluted waters and soils. In phytoremediation, the plant uptake capability and the availability of the pollutant in the media are important. Here we show the results of a study on the combined effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on Pb uptake by Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Plants were grown in hydroponics media containing a nutrient solution amended with Pb at 0.2mM and different combinations of EDTA, and IAA. After 10d of treatment, the Pb content in plant tissues was quantified using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP/OES). The results showed that the combination of 100 microM IAA/0.2 mM EDTA increased the Pb accumulation in leaves by about 2800% and by about 600%, as compared to Pb content in leaves of plants exposed to Pb alone and those cultivated with Pb/EDTA, respectively. These results indicate that non-metal hyperaccumulator plants could increase their hyperaccumulating potential without genetic manipulation.

  12. Relative importance of plant uptake and plant associated denitrification for removal of nitrogen from mine drainage in sub-arctic wetlands.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Sara; Hellman, Maria; Choudhury, Maidul I; Ecke, Frauke

    2015-11-15

    Reactive nitrogen (N) species released from undetonated ammonium-nitrate based explosives used in mining or other blasting operations are an emerging environmental problem. Wetlands are frequently used to treat N-contaminated water in temperate climate, but knowledge on plant-microbial interactions and treatment potential in sub-arctic wetlands is limited. Here, we compare the relative importance of plant uptake and denitrification among five plant species commonly occurring in sub-arctic wetlands for removal of N in nitrate-rich mine drainage in northern Sweden. Nitrogen uptake and plant associated potential denitrification activity and genetic potential for denitrification based on quantitative PCR of the denitrification genes nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII were determined in plants growing both in situ and cultivated in a growth chamber. The growth chamber and in situ studies generated similar results, suggesting high relevance and applicability of results from growth chamber experiments. We identified denitrification as the dominating pathway for N-removal and abundances of denitrification genes were strong indicators of plant associated denitrification activity. The magnitude and direction of the effect differed among the plant species, with the aquatic moss Drepanocladus fluitans showing exceptionally high ratios between denitrification and uptake rates, compared to the other species. However, to acquire realistic estimates of N-removal potential of specific wetlands and their associated plant species, the total plant biomass needs to be considered. The species-specific plant N-uptake and abundance of denitrification genes on the root or plant surfaces were affected by the presence of other plant species, which show that both multi- and inter-trophic interactions are occurring. Future studies on N-removal potential of wetland plant species should consider how to best exploit these interactions in sub-arctic wetlands.

  13. Anomalous uptake and circulatory characteristics of the plant-based small RNA MIR2911

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Hotz, Tremearne; Broadnax, LaCassidy; Yarmarkovich, Mark; Elbaz-Younes, Ismail; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent detection of plant-based dietary small RNAs in circulation has thwarted the use of dietary RNA therapeutics. Here we demonstrate mice consuming diets rich in vegetables displayed enhanced serum levels of the plant specific small RNA MIR2911. Differential centrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, and proteinase K treatment of plant extracts suggest this RNA resides within a proteinase K-sensitive complex. Plant derived MIR2911 was more bioavailable than the synthetic RNA. Furthermore, MIR2911 exhibited unusual digestive stability compared with other synthetic plant microRNAs. The characteristics of circulating MIR2911 were also unusual as it was not associated with exosomes and fractionated as a soluble complex that was insensitive to proteinase K treatment, consistent with MIR2911 being stabilized by modifications conferred by the host. These results indicate that intrinsic stability and plant-based modifications orchestrate consumer uptake of this anomalous plant based small RNA and invite revisiting plant-based microRNA therapeutic approaches. PMID:27251858

  14. Regional investigations of soil and overburden analysis and plant uptake of metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.

    1984-01-01

    Regional studies on the bioavailability of metals at native and disturbed sites were conducted over the past seven years by the USGS. The work was concentrated in the Fort Union, Powder River, and Green River coal resource regions where measures of extractable metals in soils were found to have limited use in predicting metal levels in plants. Correlations between Cu, Fe, and Zn in plants and extractable (DTPA, EDTA, and oxalate) or total levels in native A- and C-horizons of soil were occasionally significant. A simple linear model is generally not adequate, however, in estimating element uptake by plants. Prediction capabilities were improved when a number of soil chemical and physical parameters were included as independent variables in a stepwise linear multiple regression analysis; however, never more than 54% of the total variability in the data was explained by the equations for these metals. Soil pH was the most important variable relating soil chemistry to plant chemistry. This relation was always positive and apparently a response to soil levels of metal carbonates and not Fe and Mn oxides. Studies that compared the metal uptake by rehabilitation species to extractable (DTPA) metal levels in mice soils produced similar results. ?? 1984 Science and Technology Letters.

  15. Gramene database: navigating plant comparative genomics resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online, open source, curated resource for plant comparative genomics and pathway analysis designed to support researchers working in plant genomics, breeding, evolutionary biology, system biology, and metabolic engineering. It exploits phylogenetic relationship...

  16. Plant iodine-131 uptake in relation to root concentration as measured in minirhizotron by video camera:

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, K.J.

    1990-09-01

    Glass viewing tubes (minirhizotrons) were placed in the soil beneath native perennial bunchgrass (Agropyron spicatum). The tubes provided access for observing and quantifying plant roots with a miniature video camera and soil moisture estimates by neutron hydroprobe. The radiotracer I-131 was delivered to the root zone at three depths with differing root concentrations. The plant was subsequently sampled and analyzed for I-131. Plant uptake was greater when I-131 was applied at soil depths with higher root concentrations. When I-131 was applied at soil depths with lower root concentrations, plant uptake was less. However, the relationship between root concentration and plant uptake was not a direct one. When I-131 was delivered to deeper soil depths with low root concentrations, the quantity of roots there appeared to be less effective in uptake than the same quantity of roots at shallow soil depths with high root concentration. 29 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Integrating Vegetation, Soil and Topography to Assess the Impact of Lateral Flow on Plant Solute Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebel, K. T.; Riha, S. J.; Stedinger, J. R.

    2005-05-01

    Simulation of solute uptake by vegetation in complex terrain typically fails to account for subsurface lateral movement of solutes. This study uses a spatially explicit plant-soil-water simulation model to investigate whether subsurface lateral flow at the sand-clay interface impacts tritium uptake by mixed forest vegetation. Ten hectares of a mixed pine - laurel oak forest on Coastal Plain soils periodically received irrigation with tritium-enriched water (activity ranged from 5,000 to 20,000 pCi/ml) over a three year time period. To simulate water and tritium fluxes we developed a spatially explicit water balance model. Tritium was completely mixed daily with water in each soil layer. Vertical flow of water was simulated using a capacitance model with lateral flow dependent on head development and the local slope of the impeding clay layer. The model was evaluated by comparing biweekly measurements of tritium activity (measured to 3 meter depth) and soil water content (measured to 2 meter depth) in 18 measurement clusters distributed over the catchment. We evaluated the importance of including subsurface flow in model simulations. Lateral flow was locally important (mean distance tritium traveled laterally was 1.35 m). However, after three years of simulation, the maximum predicted lateral movement of tritium did not exceed 70 meters. On the catchment scale, the average simulated amount of tritium taken up by vegetation was not impacted by lateral flow, but smaller scale spatial variability in tritium uptake increased with the inclusion of lateral flow. Simulated tritium uptake was most sensitive to changes in vegetation cover, and was less sensitive to differences in soil properties (e.g. field capacity, hydraulic conductivity and root distribution). When integrated over the study area, the simulation of solute uptake by a mixed forest in Coastal Pain soils was not sensitive to inclusion of subsurface lateral flow of water.

  18. Plant uptake of explosives from contaminated soil at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Zellmer, S.D.; Schneider, J.F.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Banwart, W.L.; Chen, D.

    1995-04-01

    Explosives and their degradation products may enter the animal and human food chains through plants grown on soils contaminated with explosives. Soil and plant samples were collected from the Group 61 area at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant and analyzed to determine the extent to which 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its degradation products are taken up by existing vegetation and crops growing on contaminated soils. Neither TNT nor its degradation products was detected in any of the aboveground plant organs of existing vegetation. Oat (Avena sativa L.) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) were planted on TNT-contaminated soils amended with three levels of chopped grass hay. Extractable TNT concentrations in hay-amended soils were monitored for almost 1 year. Crop establishment and growth improved with increased levels of hay amendment, but TNT uptake was not affected or detected in any aboveground crop organs. Evidence was found to indicate that soil manipulation and hay addition may reduce extractable TNT concentration in soils, but the wide variations in TNT concentrations in these soils prevented development of conclusive evidence regarding reduction of extractable TNT concentrations. Results from this study suggest that vegetation grown on TNT-contaminated soils is not a major health concern because TNT and its degradation products were not detected in aboveground plant organs. However, low concentrations of TNT, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene were detected in or on some existing vegetation and crop roots. 21 refs., 10 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Nematodes enhance plant growth and nutrient uptake under C and N-rich conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremikael, Mesfin T.; Steel, Hanne; Buchan, David; Bert, Wim; de Neve, Stefaan

    2016-09-01

    The role of soil fauna in crucial ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling remains poorly quantified, mainly because of the overly reductionistic approach adopted in most experimental studies. Given that increasing nitrogen inputs in various ecosystems influence the structure and functioning of soil microbes and the activity of fauna, we aimed to quantify the role of the entire soil nematode community in nutrient mineralization in an experimental set-up emulating nutrient-rich field conditions and accounting for crucial interactions amongst the soil microbial communities and plants. To this end, we reconstructed a complex soil foodweb in mesocosms that comprised largely undisturbed native microflora and the entire nematode community added into defaunated soil, planted with Lolium perenne as a model plant, and amended with fresh grass-clover residues. We determined N and P availability and plant uptake, plant biomass and abundance and structure of the microbial and nematode communities during a three-month incubation. The presence of nematodes significantly increased plant biomass production (+9%), net N (+25%) and net P (+23%) availability compared to their absence, demonstrating that nematodes link below- and above-ground processes, primarily through increasing nutrient availability. The experimental set-up presented allows to realistically quantify the crucial ecosystem services provided by the soil biota.

  20. Nematodes enhance plant growth and nutrient uptake under C and N-rich conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gebremikael, Mesfin T.; Steel, Hanne; Buchan, David; Bert, Wim; De Neve, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    The role of soil fauna in crucial ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling remains poorly quantified, mainly because of the overly reductionistic approach adopted in most experimental studies. Given that increasing nitrogen inputs in various ecosystems influence the structure and functioning of soil microbes and the activity of fauna, we aimed to quantify the role of the entire soil nematode community in nutrient mineralization in an experimental set-up emulating nutrient-rich field conditions and accounting for crucial interactions amongst the soil microbial communities and plants. To this end, we reconstructed a complex soil foodweb in mesocosms that comprised largely undisturbed native microflora and the entire nematode community added into defaunated soil, planted with Lolium perenne as a model plant, and amended with fresh grass-clover residues. We determined N and P availability and plant uptake, plant biomass and abundance and structure of the microbial and nematode communities during a three-month incubation. The presence of nematodes significantly increased plant biomass production (+9%), net N (+25%) and net P (+23%) availability compared to their absence, demonstrating that nematodes link below- and above-ground processes, primarily through increasing nutrient availability. The experimental set-up presented allows to realistically quantify the crucial ecosystem services provided by the soil biota. PMID:27605154

  1. Mercury uptake and translocation in Impatiens walleriana plants grown in the contaminated soil from Oak Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pant, P; Allen, M; Tansel, B

    2011-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) contaminated soils from Oak Ridge, Tennessee were investigated for phytoavailability of mercury as measured by degree of Hg translocation in aboveground biomass of Impatiens walleriana plants grown in the soils. After 90 days of incubation, results revealed a higher concentration of total Hg in the leaves than in the flowers or the stems. Plants that were grown in the soils with higher Hg concentrations showed significantly higher Hg uptake and translocation in the aboveground plant-biomass, and the correlation with the initial soil-Hg was significant for the leaves and the stems in the plants that were tested. On an average, only 4.06 microg of Hg could be found in the above ground plant biomass of all the plants, compared to an average 3673.50 microg of initial total Hg concentrations in these soils. Statistical analysis revealed a greater affinity of Hg for the soil carbon, which supported the finding of this study on low soil Hg bioavailability.

  2. Solute movement in the rhizosphere with the effect of soil moisture and plant uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Linker, L. C.

    2004-05-01

    Nutrient loads from land to a water body effects the eutrophication processes. The assessment of leakage of dissolve inorganic nitrogen (DIN) solute from land provides useful information for nutrient management. Solute transport in the rhizosphere is a complicate process, which depends on solute property, water supply and movement, soil physiologic property, plant transpiration and uptake, etc. This presentation focuses on the effect of soil moisture and plant uptake on DIN leakage from soil. Plant nitrogen uptake is not a monotonic function with soil moisture. When moisture is deficient, increasing moisture will increase water uptake and increase nitrogen uptake; when moisture is sufficient (e.g., at the field capacity), increasing it may dilute the solution, decrease nitrogen uptake, and increase nitrogen export. Under moisture over-sufficient conditions, anaerobiosis may harm plant and cause even lower nitrogen uptake. In nutrient management, it is important to know how flow affects nutrient leakage from the land. A proper mathematic function describing such processes is desirable to establish a correct mathematical model for nutrient management. A mechanistic computer model procedure for DIN uptake as a function of soil moisture is also presented.

  3. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR THE UPTAKE, TRANSLOCATION, AND ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple mathematical model is being developed to describe the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. The model defines a plant as a set of compartments, consisting of mass balance differential equations and plant-specific physiological paramet...

  4. Barriers, pathways and processes for uptake, translocation and accumulation of nanomaterials in plants--Critical review.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Fabienne; Zhai, Guangshu; Kern, Meaghan; Turner, Amalia; Schnoor, Jerald L; Wiesner, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Uptake, transport and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into plant cells are complex processes that are currently still not well understood. Parts of this problem are the multifaceted plant anatomy, and analytical challenges to visualize and quantify ENMs in plants. We critically reviewed the currently known ENM uptake, translocation, and accumulation processes in plants. A vast number of studies showed uptake, clogging, or translocation in the apoplast of plants, most notably of nanoparticles with diameters much larger than the commonly assumed size exclusion limit of the cell walls of ∼5-20 nm. Plants that tended to translocate less ENMs were those with low transpiration, drought-tolerance, tough cell wall architecture, and tall growth. In the absence of toxicity, accumulation was often linearly proportional to exposure concentration. Further important factors strongly affecting ENM internalization are the cell wall composition, mucilage, symbiotic microorganisms (mycorrhiza), the absence of a cuticle (submerged plants) and stomata aperture. Mostly unexplored are the roles of root hairs, leaf repellency, pit membrane porosity, xylem segmentation, wounding, lateral roots, nodes, the Casparian band, hydathodes, lenticels and trichomes. The next steps towards a realistic risk assessment of nanoparticles in plants are to measure ENM uptake rates, the size exclusion limit of the apoplast and to unravel plant physiological features favoring uptake.

  5. The shoot is important for high-affinity nitrate uptake in Egeria densa, a submerged vascular plant.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Shu; Takagi, Yuma; Shimizu, Akifumi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms of nitrate uptake by submerged vascular plants, a cDNA for a high-affinity nitrate transporter, NRT2, was isolated from Egeria densa, a submerged monocot. The deduced EdNRT2 protein was similar to the proteins of a conserved NRT2 group in higher plants. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that after feeding whole plants with 0.2 mM nitrate, the EdNRT2 transcripts were induced in both shoots and roots within 0.5 h, reached the maximum by 1-3 h and then decreased. The EdNRT2 transcript levels in shoots were comparable to those in roots. When nitrate was applied separately to shoots and roots, the EdNRT2 transcripts were induced only in nitrate-treated organs and reached the maximum levels comparable to those in organs when nitrate was applied to whole plants. (15)N-nitrate feeding experiments demonstrated that both shoots and roots are responsible for nitrate uptake and that biomass and (15)N content in shoots was even higher than that in roots. We concluded that EdNRT2 is involved in high-affinity nitrate uptake by shoots and roots of E. densa, that nitrate is taken up independently by shoots and roots and that shoots play an important role in nitrate uptake from aquatic ecosystem.

  6. UPTAKE AND PHYTOTRANSFORMATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES BY AXENICALLY CULTIVATED AQUATIC PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The uptake and phytotransformation of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides (malathion, demeton-S-methyl, and crufomate) was investigated in vitro using the axenically aquatic cultivated plants parrot feather (Myriophyllum aquaticum), duckweed (Spirodela oligorrhiza L.), and elodea (E...

  7. Improving prediction of metal uptake by Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis L.) based on a soil-plant stepwise analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sha; Song, Jing; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Lv, Ming-Chao; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Gan; Pan, Yun-Yu; Christie, Peter; Sun, Wenjie

    2016-11-01

    It is crucial to develop predictive soil-plant transfer (SPT) models to derive the threshold values of toxic metals in contaminated arable soils. The present study was designed to examine the heavy metal uptake pattern and to improve the prediction of metal uptake by Chinese cabbage grown in agricultural soils with multiple contamination by Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn. Pot experiments were performed with 25 historically contaminated soils to determine metal accumulation in different parts of Chinese cabbage. Different soil bioavailable metal fractions were determined using different extractants (0.43M HNO3, 0.01M CaCl2, 0.005M DTPA, and 0.01M LWMOAs), soil moisture samplers, and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), and the fractions were compared with shoot metal uptake using both direct and stepwise multiple regression analysis. The stepwise approach significantly improved the prediction of metal uptake by cabbage over the direct approach. Strongly pH dependent or nonlinear relationships were found for the adsorption of root surfaces and in root-shoot uptake processes. Metals were linearly translocated from the root surface to the root. Therefore, the nonlinearity of uptake pattern is an important explanation for the inadequacy of the direct approach in some cases. The stepwise approach offers an alternative and robust method to study the pattern of metal uptake by Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis L.).

  8. Relation of organic contaminant equilibrium sorption and kinetic uptake in plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, H.; Sheng, G.; Chiou, C.T.; Xu, O.

    2005-01-01

    Plant uptake is one of the environmental processes that influence contaminant fate. Understanding the magnitude and rate of plant uptake is critical to assessing potential crop contamination and the development of phytoremediation technologies. We determined (1) the partition-dominated equilibrium sorption of lindane (LDN) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) by roots and shoots of wheat seedlings, (2) the kinetic uptake of LDN and HCB by roots and shoots of wheat seedlings, (3) the kinetic uptake of HCB, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE) by roots and shoots of ryegrass seedlings, and (4) the lipid, carbohydrate, and water contents of the plants. Although the determined sorption and the plant composition together suggest the predominant role of plant lipids for the sorption of LDN and HCB, the predicted partition with lipids of LDN and HCB using the octanol-water partition coefficients is notably lower than the measured sorption, due presumably to underestimation of the plant lipid contents and to the fact that octanol is less effective as a partition medium than plant lipids. The equilibrium sorption or the estimated partition can be viewed as the kinetic uptake limits. The uptakes of LDN, PCE, and TCE from water at fixed concentrations increased with exposure time in approach to steady states. The uptake of HCB did not reach a plateau within the tested time because of its exceptionally high partition coefficient. In all of the cases, the observed uptakes were lower than their respective limits, due presumably to contaminant dissipation in and limited water transpiration by the plants. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  9. Glycine uptake in heath plants and soil microbes responds to elevated temperature, CO 2 and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven; Beier, Claus; Ambus, Per

    2009-11-01

    Temperate terrestrial ecosystems are currently exposed to climatic and air quality changes with increased atmospheric CO 2, increased temperature and prolonged droughts. The responses of natural ecosystems to these changes are focus for research, due to the potential feedbacks to the climate. We here present results from a field experiment in which the effects of these three climate change factors are investigated solely and in all combinations at a temperate heath dominated by heather ( Calluna vulgaris) and wavy hair-grass ( Deschampsia flexuosa). Climate induced increases in plant production may increase plant root exudation of dissolved organic compounds such as amino acids, and the release of amino acids during decomposition of organic matter. Such free amino acids in soil serve as substrates for soil microorganisms and are also acquired as nutrients directly by plants. We investigated the magnitude of the response to the potential climate change treatments on uptake of organic nitrogen in an in situ pulse labelling experiment with 15N 13C 2-labelled glycine (amino acid) injected into the soil. In situ root nitrogen acquisition by grasses responded significantly to the climate change treatments, with larger 15N uptake in response to warming and elevated CO 2 but not additively when the treatments were combined. Also, a larger grass leaf biomass in the combined T and CO 2 treatment than in individual treatments suggest that responses to combined climate change factors cannot be predicted from the responses to single factors treatments. The soil microbes were superior to plants in the short-term competition for the added glycine, as indicated by an 18 times larger 15N recovery in the microbial biomass compared to the plant biomass. The soil microbes acquired glycine largely as an intact compound (87%), with no effects of the multi factorial climate change treatment through one year.

  10. Hydraulic resistance of a plant root to water-uptake: A slender-body theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang Ping

    2016-05-07

    A slender-body theory for calculating the hydraulic resistance of a single plant root is developed. The work provides an in-depth discussion on the procedure and the assumptions involved in calculating a root׳s internal hydraulic resistance as well as the physical and the mathematical aspects of the external three-dimensional flow around the tip of a root in a saturated soil and how this flow pattern enhances uptake and reduces hydraulic resistance. Analytical solutions for the flux density distribution on the stele-cortex interface, local water-uptake profile inside the stele core, the overall water-uptake at the base of the stele, and the total hydraulic resistance of a root are obtained in the slender-body limit. It is shown that a key parameter controlling a root's hydraulic resistance is the dimensionless axial conductivity in the stele, which depends on the permeabilities of the stele and the cortex as well as the root's radial and axial dimensions. Three-dimensional tip effect reduces a root's hydraulic resistance by as much as 36% when compared to the radial flow theory of Landsberg and Fowkes. In addition, the total hydraulic resistance cannot be generally decomposed into the direct sum of a radial resistance and an axial resistance.

  11. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths.

  12. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths. PMID:25335512

  13. A series RCL circuit theory for analyzing non-steady-state water uptake of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-10-22

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths.

  14. Utilization of a Model for Uptake of Cadmium by Plants as a Phytoremediation Assessment Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Furbish, D. J.; Clarke, J.

    2008-12-01

    Some traditional methods of environmental remediation, such as removal and disposal of contaminated soil, are loosing economic favor and public acceptance, while others, such as in situ phytoremediation, are being carefully examined because of their attractiveness as environmentally friendly, low-cost solutions to site clean-up. The success of phytoremediation strategies, however, hinges on the ability of selected plants, or plant communities, to effectively uptake, accumulate and tolerate targeted contaminants. Heavy metals, specifically cadmium (Cd), are not essential nutrients to plants. However, chemically similar zinc (Zn) is a micronutrient and is actively taken up by hyperaccumulators. For this reason, the mechanisms involved in uptake of Cd parallel those of Zn. Ideally, Cd would be allocated to the stem, leaf, and/or flower, where it becomes harvestable. Our modeling work simulates the uptake and the storage of Cd in a growing hyperaccumulator. After uptake, Cd is partitioned between adsorption to plant tissue and upward movement to leaves driven by transpiration. Uptake, adsorption and transport are also regulated by phytotoxicity. Simulations suggest that a young plant with small biomass can quickly reach phytotoxicity, which shuts down the normal operation of the plant. Conversely, mature plants on a mildly contaminated site, if harvested before the plants die due to phytotoxicity or natural cause, not only survive but may occasionally thrive. The immediate aim is to estimate the effectiveness and limitations of Cd uptake by hyperaccumulators. The eventual goal of this study is to expand the model in spatial and temporal scales, from individual plants to the community scale, and from one harvest interval to several generations. Understanding the interface between physical and biological processes, specifically the uptake and release of contaminants, provides scientists and engineers tools to assess whether phytoremediation is a reasonable strategy for a

  15. Uptake and translocation of plutonium in two plant species using hydroponics.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Hossner, L R; Attrep, M; Kung, K S

    2002-01-01

    This study presents determinations of the uptake and translocation of Pu in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) from Pu contaminated solution media. The initial activity levels of Pu were 18.50 and 37.00 Bq ml(-1), for Pu-nitrate [239Pu(NO3)4] and for Pu-citrate [239Pu(C6H5O7)+] in nutrient solution. Plutonium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA: [239Pu-C14H23O10N3] solution was prepared by adding 0, 5, 10, and 50 microg of DTPA ml(-1) with 239Pu(NO3)4 in nutrient solution. Concentration ratios (CR, Pu concentration in dry plant material/Pu concentration in nutrient solution) and transport indices (Tl, Pu content in the shoot/Pu content in the whole plant) were calculated to evaluate Pu uptake and translocation. All experiments were conducted in hydroponic solution in an environmental growth chamber. Plutonium concentration in the plant tissue was increased with increased Pu contamination. Plant tissue Pu concentration for Pu-nitrate and Pu-citrate application was not correlated and may be dependent on plant species. For plants receiving Pu-DTPA, the Pu concentration was increased in the shoots but decreased in the roots resulting in a negative correlation between the Pu concentrations in the plant shoots and roots. The Pu concentration in shoots of Indian mustard was increased for application rates up to 10 microg DTPA ml(-1) and up to 5 microg DTPA ml(-1) for sunflower. Similar trends were observed for the CR of plants compared to the Pu concentration in the shoots and roots, whereas the Tl was increased with increasing DTPA concentration. Plutonium in shoots of Indian mustard was up to 10 times higher than that in shoots of sunflower. The Pu concentration in the apparent free space (AFS) of plant root tissue of sunflower was more affected by concentration of DTPA than that of Indian mustard.

  16. Phytofiltration of arsenic and cadmium by using an aquatic plant, Micranthemum umbrosum: phytotoxicity, uptake kinetics, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shariful; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are noxious and carcinogenic pollutants that can be removed from water by using emerging, ecofriendly, phytofiltration technology that employs Micranthemum umbrosum. After culturing M. umbrosum for 7 days in a hydroponic experiment, accumulation of 1219±44.11 µg As g(-1) and 799.40±30.95 µg Cd g(-1) were observed in the leaves, from 1000 µg As L(-1) and 1000 µg Cd L(-1) of water, respectively. Plant and water samples were analyzed for assessing the As and Cd accumulations, translocations, phytotoxic effects, uptake mechanisms and kinetics, and for evaluating the potential of M. umbrosum in As and Cd phytofiltration. The uptake pattern was leaf>stem>root for both pollutants. The plant showed higher resistance to As than to that to Cd. Uptake of inorganic As species was much greater than that of organic As and was found at above the substrate concentration. However, Cd showed similar uptake pattern to that of inorganic As species, and the data was better fit to a non-linear than a linear model. Low molecular weight substances that have thiol group(s) may be responsible for the binding of As in plants whereas Cd showed a different mechanism to that of As. M. umbrosum showed good As phytofiltration capabilities without any phytotoxic effects, but it was found to be a moderate accumulator of Cd with some phytotoxic effect compare to some other previously studied plant.

  17. Modeling the effects of organic nitrogen uptake by plants on the carbon cycling of boreal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.

    2013-08-01

    Boreal forest and tundra are the major ecosystems in the northern high latitudes in which a large amount of carbon is stored. These ecosystems are nitrogen-limited due to slow mineralization rate of the soil organic nitrogen. Recently, abundant field studies have found that organic nitrogen is another important nitrogen supply for boreal ecosystems. In this study, we incorporated a mechanism that allowed boreal plants to uptake small molecular amino acids into a process-based biogeochemical model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to evaluate the impact of organic nitrogen uptake on ecosystem carbon cycling. The new version of the model was evaluated at both boreal forest and tundra sites. We found that the modeled organic nitrogen uptake accounted for 36-87% of total nitrogen uptake by plants in tundra ecosystems and 26-50% for boreal forests, suggesting that tundra ecosystem might have more relied on the organic form of nitrogen than boreal forests. The simulated monthly gross ecosystem production (GPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) tended to be larger with the new version of the model since the plant uptake of organic nitrogen alleviated the soil nitrogen limitation especially during the growing season. The sensitivity study indicated that the most important factors controlling the plant uptake of organic nitrogen were the maximum root uptake rate (Imax) and the radius of the root (r0) in our model. The model uncertainty due to uncertain parameters associated with organic nitrogen uptake at tundra ecosystem was larger than at boreal forest ecosystems. This study suggests that considering the organic nitrogen uptake by plants is important to boreal ecosystem carbon modeling.

  18. Plant uptake of pesticides and human health: dynamic modeling of residues in wheat and ingestion intake.

    PubMed

    Fantke, Peter; Charles, Raphaël; de Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Friedrich, Rainer; Jolliet, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Human intake of pesticide residues from consumption of processed food plays an important role for evaluating current agricultural practice. We take advantage of latest developments in crop-specific plant uptake modeling and propose an innovative dynamic model to estimate pesticide residues in the wheat-environment system, dynamiCROP. We used this model to analyze uptake and translocation of pesticides in wheat after foliar spray application and subsequent intake fractions by humans. Based on the evolution of residues in edible parts of harvested wheat we predict that between 22 mg and 2.1 g per kg applied pesticide are taken in by humans via consumption of processed wheat products. Model results were compared with experimentally derived concentrations in wheat ears and with estimated intake via inhalation and ingestion caused by indirect emissions, i.e. the amount lost to the environment during pesticide application. Modeled and measured concentrations in wheat fitted very well and deviate from less than a factor 1.5 for chlorothalonil to a maximum factor 3 for tebuconazole. Main aspects influencing pesticide fate behavior are degradation half-life in plant and time between pesticide application and crop harvest, leading to variations in harvest fraction of at least three orders of magnitude. Food processing may further reduce residues by approximately 63%. Intake fractions from residues in sprayed wheat were up to four orders of magnitude higher than intake fractions estimated from indirect emissions, thereby demonstrating the importance of exposure from consumption of food crops after direct pesticide treatment.

  19. Copper speciation and isotopic fractionation in plants: uptake and translocation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Brooke M; Kirby, Jason K; Degryse, Fien; Harris, Hugh; McLaughlin, Mike J; Scheiderich, Kathleen

    2013-07-01

    The fractionation of stable copper (Cu) isotopes during uptake into plant roots and translocation to shoots can provide information on Cu acquisition mechanisms. Isotope fractionation ((65) Cu/(63) Cu) and intact tissue speciation techniques (X-ray absorption spectroscopy, XAS) were used to examine the uptake, translocation and speciation of Cu in strategy I (tomato-Solanum lycopersicum) and strategy II (oat-Avena sativa) plant species. Plants were grown in controlled solution cultures, under varied iron (Fe) conditions, to test whether the stimulation of Fe-acquiring mechanisms can affect Cu uptake in plants. Isotopically light Cu was preferentially incorporated into tomatoes (Δ(65) Cu(whole plant-solution ) = c. -1‰), whereas oats showed minimal isotopic fractionation, with no effect of Fe supply in either species. The heavier isotope was preferentially translocated to shoots in tomato, whereas oat plants showed no significant fractionation during translocation. The majority of Cu in the roots and leaves of both species existed as sulfur-coordinated Cu(I) species resembling glutathione/cysteine-rich proteins. The presence of isotopically light Cu in tomatoes is attributed to a reductive uptake mechanism, and the isotopic shifts within various tissues are attributed to redox cycling during translocation. The lack of isotopic discrimination in oat plants suggests that Cu uptake and translocation are not redox selective.

  20. Phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake: Modeling ecohydrological feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Rasmussen, Nikolaj F.; Feificova, Dagmar; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    A new model of phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake is presented and is coupled to an existing three-dimensional groundwater simulation model. The implementation of phytotoxicity and salt uptake relationships is based on experimental findings from willow trees grown in hydroponic solution. The data confirm an s-shaped phytotoxicity relationship as found in previous studies. Uptake data were explained assuming steady state salt concentration in plant roots, passive salt transport into the roots, and active enzymatic removal of salt from plant roots. On the one hand, transpiration strongly depends on groundwater salinity (phytotoxicity); on the other hand, transpiration significantly changes the groundwater salinity (uptake). This feedback loop generates interesting dynamic phenomena in hydrological systems that are dominated by transpiration and are influenced by significant salinity gradients. Generic simulations are performed for the Okavango island system and are shown to reproduce essential phenomena observed in nature.

  1. Mapping the metal uptake in plants from Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Allison

    2015-08-20

    Serpentine soil originates in the Earth’s mantle and contains high concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals. Although serpentine soil limits plant growth, endemic and adapted plants at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, located behind SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, can tolerate these conditions. Serpentine soil and seeds belonging to native California and invasive plants were collected at Jasper Ridge. The seeds were grown hydroponically and on serpentine and potting soil to examine the uptake and distribution of ions in the roots and shoots using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results were used to determine differences between serpentine-tolerant plants. Rye grown on potting soil was enriched in Ni, Fe, Mn, and Cr compared to purple needlegrass grown on serpentine soil. Serpentine vegetation equally suppressed the uptake of Mn, Ni, and Fe in the roots and shoots. The uptake of Ca and Mg affected the uptake of other elements such as K, S, and P.

  2. An Overview of Selenium Uptake, Metabolism, and Toxicity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Meetu; Gupta, Shikha

    2017-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, but lead to toxicity when taken in excessive amounts. Plants are the main source of dietary Se, but essentiality of Se for plants is still controversial. However, Se at low doses protects the plants from variety of abiotic stresses such as cold, drought, desiccation, and metal stress. In animals, Se acts as an antioxidant and helps in reproduction, immune responses, thyroid hormone metabolism. Selenium is chemically similar to sulfur, hence taken up inside the plants via sulfur transporters present inside root plasma membrane, metabolized via sulfur assimilatory pathway, and volatilized into atmosphere. Selenium induced oxidative stress, distorted protein structure and function, are the main causes of Se toxicity in plants at high doses. Plants can play vital role in overcoming Se deficiency and Se toxicity in different regions of the world, hence, detailed mechanism of Se metabolism inside the plants is necessary for designing effective Se phytoremediation and biofortification strategies. PMID:28123395

  3. Plant uptake and dissipation of PBDEs in the soils of electronic waste recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Honglin; Zhang, Shuzhen; Christie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Plant uptake and dissipation of weathered PBDEs in the soils of e-waste recycling sites were investigated in a greenhouse study. Eighteen PBDE congeners (tri- through deca-) were detected in the plant tissues. The proportion of lower brominated PBDEs (mono- through hexa-) in plant roots was higher than that in the soils. A concentration gradient was observed of PBDEs in plants with the highest concentrations in the roots followed by the stems and lowest in the leaves. Reduction rates of the total PBDEs in the soils ranged from 13.3 to 21.7% after plant harvest and lower brominated PBDEs were associated with a higher tendency to dissipate than the higher brominated PBDEs. This study provides the first evidence for plant uptake of weathered PBDEs in the soils of e-waste recycling sites and planting contributes to the removal of PBDEs in e-waste contaminated soils.

  4. Plant uptake of pharmaceutical chemicals detected in recycled organic manure and reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Rumi; Sato, Yuri; Motoyama, Miki; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Shinohara, Ryota; Nomiyama, Kei

    2012-10-17

    Land application of recycled manure produced from biosolids and reclaimed wastewater can transfer pharmaceutical chemicals to terrestrial environments, giving rise to potential accumulation of these residues in edible plants. In this study, the potential for plant uptake of 13 pharmaceutical chemicals, and the relation between the accumulation features within the plant and the physicochemical properties were examined by exposing pea and cucumber to an aqueous solution containing pharmaceutical chemicals. Ten of 13 compounds tested were detected in plant leaves and stems. Comparison of the plant uptake characteristics and the octanol-water partition coefficient of pharmaceutical chemicals showed that compounds with an intermediate polarity such as carbamazepine and crotamiton could be easily transported to plant shoots. Moreover, these results suggest the possibility of highly hydrophilic pharmaceutical chemicals such as trimethoprim and sulfonamides to be accumulated in plant roots owing to their low permeability in root cell membranes.

  5. Isotopic discrimination of zinc during root-uptake and cellular incorporation in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. F.; Weiss, D. J.; Coles, B. J.; Horstwood, M.; Parrish, R. R.; Zhao, F. J.; Kirk, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    solutions, the depletion from root to shoot is significantly larger with the former (at -0.15 to -0.25 ppm pamu compared with -0.13 to -0.18 ppm pamu). For rice plants cultivated on zinc-sufficient soils, isotopic enrichment from soil to root (+0.25 ppm pamu), and depletion from root to shoot (-0.11 ppm pamu) were observed. However, under zinc-deficient conditions no significant isotopic shifts between soil, root and shoot were found. From these results it is apparent that two or more processes are controlling the zinc isotopic composition of the plant materials: one that favours isotopically heavy zinc (which we tentatively link to isotopic partitioning between species within the nutrient/soil-solutions), and one that favours isotopically light zinc (which is consistent with biologically-mediated uptake and cellular incorporation by plants). The lack of isotopic variability in the zinc-deficient soil system may indicate the predominance of a high-affinity zinc uptake pathway that is not isotopically selective.

  6. Role of ploidy in cadmium and nickel uptake by Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    PubMed

    Kovácik, Jozef; Klejdus, Borivoj; Grúz, Jirí; Malcovská, Silvia; Hedbavny, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium and nickel uptake by diploid and tetraploid chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) cultivars (Novbona and Lutea, respectively) exposed to 60 microM solutions of individual metals over 7 days was studied. Diploid plants accumulated higher amount of Cd in both shoots and roots compared to tetraploid plants while Ni accumulation was ploidy-independent. Cd presence caused higher accumulation of total soluble phenols and flavonoids and higher phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and guaiacol-peroxidase activities in diploid cultivar in comparison with tetraploid but phenolic acids did not show direct correlation with metal accumulation and even decreased in the leaves of Ni-exposed plants. Lignin content was preferentially elevated in the roots of diploid cultivar. Among 17 free amino acids, their sum increased mainly in the leaves of Cd-exposed plants (owing to increase in serine, alanine and proline). Potassium decrease in both cultivars in response to Cd was ploidy-independent and Ca, Mg and Fe accumulation were almost unaffected. It is concluded that Cd accumulation in chamomile may be mediated by the accumulation of phenols but they have no active role in shoot Ni accumulation. Present findings in the context of our previous studies and limited available literature about ploidy effect on metal accumulation are discussed.

  7. Impact of FGD gypsum on soil fertility and plant nutrient uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of FGD gypsum is thought to improve soil productivity and increase plant production. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the effects of FGD gypsum on yield, plant nutrient uptake and soil productivity. The study was conducted on an established bermudagrass pasture. Poultry litter was applied...

  8. Scaling plant nitrogen use and uptake efficiencies in response to nutrient addition in peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Colleen M; Bridgham, Scott; Kellogg, Laurie E.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in many terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore plant production per unit N taken up (i.e., N use efficiency, NUE) is a fundamentally important component of ecosystem function. Nitrogen use efficiency comprises two components: N productivity (AN, plant production per peak biomass N content) and the mean residence time of N in plant biomass (MRTN). We utilized a five-year fertilization experiment to examine the manner in which increases in N and phosphorus (P) availability affected plant NUE at multiple biological scales (i.e., from leaf to community level). We fertilized a natural gradient of nutrient-limited peatland ecosystems in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, with 6 g Nm2yr1, 2 g Pm2yr1, or a combination of N and P. Our objectives were to determine how changes in carbon and N allocation within a plant to leaf and woody tissue and changes in species composition within a community, both above- and belowground, would affect (1) NUE; (2) the adaptive trade-off between the components of NUE; (3) the efficiency with which plants acquired N from the soil (N uptake efficiency); and (4) plant community production per unit soil N availability (N response efficiency, NRE). As expected, N and P addition generally increased aboveground production and N uptake. In particular, P availability strongly affected the way in which plants took up and used N. Nitrogen use efficiency response to nutrient addition was not straightforward. Nitrogen use efficiency differed between leaf and woody tissue, among species, and across the ombrotrophic minerotrophic gradient because plants and communities were adapted to maximize either AN or MRTN, but not both concurrently. Increased N availability strongly decreased plant and community N uptake efficiency, while increased P availability increased N uptake efficiency, particularly in a nitrogen-fixing shrub. Nitrogen uptake efficiency was more important in controlling overall plant

  9. Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,THERESA J.; WIRTH,SHARON

    1999-09-01

    This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model presented here

  10. Scaling plant nitrogen use and uptake efficiencies in response to nutrient addition in peatlands.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Colleen M; Bridgham, Scott D; Kellogg, Laurie E

    2010-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in many terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore plant production per unit N taken up (i.e., N use efficiency, NUE) is a fundamentally important component of ecosystem function. Nitrogen use efficiency comprises two components: N productivity (A(N), plant production per peak biomass N content) and the mean residence time of N in plant biomass (MRT(N)). We utilized a five-year fertilization experiment to examine the manner in which increases in N and phosphorus (P) availability affected plant NUE at multiple biological scales (i.e., from leaf to community level). We fertilized a natural gradient of nutrient-limited peatland ecosystems in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, with 6 g N x m(-2) x yr(-1), 2 g P x m(-2) x yr(-1), or a combination of N and P. Our objectives were to determine how changes in carbon and N allocation within a plant to leaf and woody tissue and changes in species composition within a community, both above- and belowground, would affect (1) NUE; (2) the adaptive trade-off between the components of NUE; (3) the efficiency with which plants acquired N from the soil (N uptake efficiency); and (4) plant community production per unit soil N availability (N response efficiency, NRE). As expected, N and P addition generally increased aboveground production and N uptake. In particular, P availability strongly affected the way in which plants took up and used N. Nitrogen use efficiency response to nutrient addition was not straightforward. Nitrogen use efficiency differed between leaf and woody tissue, among species, and across the ombrotrophic-minerotrophic gradient because plants and communities were adapted to maximize either A(N) or MRT(N), but not both concurrently. Increased N availability strongly decreased plant and community N uptake efficiency, while increased P availability increased N uptake efficiency, particularly in a nitrogen-fixing shrub. Nitrogen uptake efficiency was more important

  11. Modeling Plant Uptake of Metal in Constructed Wetlands Supported by Experimentally Derived Uptake Rates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    stress to a system and could eventually induce chronic effects such as decreased species diversity and biomass , altered biogeochemical nutrient...erosion Remove accumulated solids in forebay and near outlet Clean pretreatment devices; clean forebay once every five years or when sediment exceeds...Sagua la Grande river basin near a chlor- alkali plant and other industrial plants differed by location. Highest concentrations were found in the zone

  12. Investigation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toxicity and uptake by plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, C.; Khodja, H.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Brisset, F.; Flank, A. M.; Fayard, B.; Chaillou, S.; Carrière, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are introduced in a growing number of commercial products and their production may lead to their release in the environment. Plants may be a potential entry point for NP in the food chain. Up to now, results describing NP phytotoxical effects and plant accumulation are scarce and contradictory. To increase knowledge on titanium dioxide NP (TiO2-NPs) accumulation and impact on plants, we designed a study on three plant species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum), oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants were exposed in hydroponics to a panel of well-characterized TiO2-NPs, with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. Their accumulation in plant tissues is currently being assessed by complementary imaging techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF) imaging and micro-particle induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) imaging. Moreover, the impact of TiO2-NP exposure on germination rate, root elongation, dry biomass and evapotranspiration is evaluated. Preliminary results are presented here, with data collected on wheat plants exposed to 12 nm and 25 nm anatase TiO2-NPs. These results show that TiO2-NPs are taken up by plants, and do not significantly alter their germination and root elongation. These results underline the necessity of deeper evaluation of nanoparticle ecotoxicity, and particularly on their interaction with plants.

  13. How to put plant root uptake into a soil water flow model

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    The need for improved crop water use efficiency calls for flexible modeling platforms to implement new ideas in plant root uptake and its regulation mechanisms. This paper documents the details of modifying a soil infiltration and redistribution model to include (a) dynamic root growth, (b) non-uniform root distribution and water uptake, (c) the effect of water stress on plant water uptake, and (d) soil evaporation. The paper also demonstrates strategies of using the modified model to simulate soil water dynamics and plant transpiration considering different sensitivity of plants to soil dryness and different mechanisms of root water uptake. In particular, the flexibility of simulating various degrees of compensated uptake (whereby plants tend to maintain potential transpiration under mild water stress) is emphasized. The paper also describes how to estimate unknown root distribution and rooting depth parameters by the use of a simulation-based searching method. The full documentation of the computer code will allow further applications and new development. PMID:27909573

  14. Biotechnology of nutrient uptake and assimilation in plants.

    PubMed

    López-Arredondo, Damar L; Leyva-González, Marco A; Alatorre-Cobos, Fulgencio; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Plants require a complex balance of mineral nutrients to reproduce successfully. Because the availability of many of these nutrients in the soil is compromised by several factors, such as soil pH, cation presence, and microbial activity, crop plants depend directly on nutrients applied as fertilizers to achieve high yields. However, the excessive use of fertilizers is a major environmental concern due to nutrient leaching that causes water eutrophication and promotes toxic algae blooms. This situation generates the urgent need for crop plants with increased nutrient use efficiency and better-designed fertilization schemes. The plant biology revolution triggered by the development of efficient gene transfer systems for plant cells together with the more recent development of next-generation DNA and RNA sequencing and other omics platforms have advanced considerably our understanding on the molecular basis of plant nutrition and how plants respond to nutritional stress. To date, genes encoding sensors, transcription factors, transporters, and metabolic enzymes have been identified as potential candidates to improve nutrient use efficiency. In addition, the study of other genetic resources, such as bacteria and fungi, allows the identification of alternative mechanisms of nutrient assimilation, which are potentially applicable in plants. Although significant progress in this respect has been achieved by conventional breeding, in this review we focus on the biotechnological approaches reported to date aimed at boosting the use of the three most limiting nutrients in the majority of arable lands: nitrogen, phosphorus, and iron.

  15. The influence of biological soil crusts on mineral uptake by associated vascular plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, K.T.; Belnap, Jayne

    2001-01-01

    Soil surfaces dominated by cyanobacteria and cyanolichens (such as Collema sp.) are widespread in deserts of the world. The influence of these biological soil crusts on the uptake of bioessential elements is reported for the first time for six seed plants of the deserts of Utah. This sample almost doubles the number of species for which the influence of biological soil crusts on mineral uptake of associated vascular plants is known. These new case studies, and others previously published, demonstrate that cyanobacterial or cyanobacteria- Collema crusts significantly alter uptake by plants of many bioessential elements. In studies now available, these crusts always increase the N content of associated seed plants. Uptake of Cu, K, Mg, and Zn is usually (>70% of reported cases) increased in the presence of the biological soil crusts. Soil crusts are generally negatively associated with Fe and P levels in associated seed plant tissue, while plant tissue levels of Ca, Mn, and Na are positively as often as negatively associated with the presence of soil crusts. Increases in bioessential elements in vascular plant tissue from biologically-crusted areas are greatest for short-lived herbs that are rooted primarily within the surface soil, the horizon most influenced by crustal organisms. The mineral content of a deeply rooted shrub (Coleogyne ramosissima) was less influenced by co-occurrence of biological soil crusts.

  16. A Transmissible Plant Shoot Factor Promotes Uptake Hydrogenase Activity in Rhizobium Symbionts 1

    PubMed Central

    Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1984-01-01

    Shoot/root grafting studies showed organ and host cultivar effects on net H2 evolution from Pisum sativum L. root nodules. Net H2 evolution from those nodules represents the sum of H2 formed by Rhizobium nitrogenase and H2 oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in the bacteria. Grafts between pea cultivars `JI1205' or `Alaska' and `Feltham First' in symbioses with R. leguminosarum 128C53 showed that shoots of both JI1205 and Alaska increased H2 uptake significantly (P ≤ 0.05) in Feltham First root nodules. The same plants also had less net H2 evolution at similar rates of C2H2 reduction than plants formed by grafting Feltham First shoots on Feltham First roots. Although JI1205 and Alaska shoots increased H2-uptake activity of Feltham First root nodules 28 days after the graft was made, intermediate to high levels of H2 uptake activity were still present in nodules on roots of both JI1205 and Alaska grafted to Feltham First shoots. These results indicate the presence of a transmissible shoot factor(s) which can increase uptake hydrogenase activity in a Rhizobium symbiont and show that root genotype also can influence that parameter. Parallel grafting experiments using the same pea cultivars in symbioses with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity, suggested that a transmissible shoot factor(s) altered H2 formation from nitrogenase by changing the electron allocation coefficient of that enzyme complex. The root and shoot factor(s) detected in this study had no permanent effect on strain 128C53. Bacterial cells isolated from Feltham First nodules with low H2 uptake activity formed root nodules on JI1205 and Alaska with high H2 uptake activity. Bacteroids isolated from nodules on intact JI1205, Alaska, or Feltham First plants with high, medium, or low H2 uptake activity, respectively, maintained those phenotypes during in vitro assays. PMID:16663677

  17. A transmissible plant shoot factor promotes uptake hydrogenase activity in Rhizobium symbionts.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Phillips, D A

    1984-07-01

    Shoot/root grafting studies showed organ and host cultivar effects on net H(2) evolution from Pisum sativum L. root nodules. Net H(2) evolution from those nodules represents the sum of H(2) formed by Rhizobium nitrogenase and H(2) oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in the bacteria. Grafts between pea cultivars ;JI1205' or ;Alaska' and ;Feltham First' in symbioses with R. leguminosarum 128C53 showed that shoots of both JI1205 and Alaska increased H(2) uptake significantly (P plants also had less net H(2) evolution at similar rates of C(2)H(2) reduction than plants formed by grafting Feltham First shoots on Feltham First roots. Although JI1205 and Alaska shoots increased H(2)-uptake activity of Feltham First root nodules 28 days after the graft was made, intermediate to high levels of H(2) uptake activity were still present in nodules on roots of both JI1205 and Alaska grafted to Feltham First shoots. These results indicate the presence of a transmissible shoot factor(s) which can increase uptake hydrogenase activity in a Rhizobium symbiont and show that root genotype also can influence that parameter.Parallel grafting experiments using the same pea cultivars in symbioses with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity, suggested that a transmissible shoot factor(s) altered H(2) formation from nitrogenase by changing the electron allocation coefficient of that enzyme complex.The root and shoot factor(s) detected in this study had no permanent effect on strain 128C53. Bacterial cells isolated from Feltham First nodules with low H(2) uptake activity formed root nodules on JI1205 and Alaska with high H(2) uptake activity. Bacteroids isolated from nodules on intact JI1205, Alaska, or Feltham First plants with high, medium, or low H(2) uptake activity, respectively, maintained those phenotypes during in vitro assays.

  18. Arsenic Uptake by Muskmelon (Cucumis melo) Plants from Contaminated Water.

    PubMed

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; Martin, Kirt; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogenic element that occurs naturally in the environment. High levels of arsenic are found in water in some parts of the world, including Texas. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of arsenic in muskmelon (Cucumis melo) plants accumulated from arsenic spiked water and to observe effects on plant biomass. Plants were grown and irrigated using water spiked with variable concentrations of arsenic. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify arsenic in different parts of the plant and fruit. Under all conditions tested in this study, the highest concentrations of arsenic were found in the leaves, soil, and roots. Arsenic in the water had no significant effect on plant biomass. Fruits analyzed in this study had arsenic concentrations of 101 μg/kg or less. Consuming these fruits would result in less arsenic exposure than drinking water at recommended levels.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizae enhance metal lead uptake and growth of host plants under a sand culture experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Wu, Chunhua; Tang, Jianjun; Hu, Shuijin

    2005-07-01

    A sand culture experiment was conducted to investigate whether mycorrhizal colonization and mycorrhizal fungal vesicular numbers were influenced by metal lead, and whether mycorrhizae enhance host plants tolerance to metal lead. Metal lead was applied as Pb(NO3)2 in solution at three levels (0, 300 and 600 mg kg(-1) sand). Five mycorrhizal host plant species, Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl, Ixeris denticulate L., Lolium perenne L., Trifolium repens L. and Echinochloa crusgalli var. mitis were used to examine Pb-mycorrhizal interactions. The arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculum consisted of mixed spores of mycorrhizal fungal species directly isolated from orchard soil. Compared to the untreated control, both Pb concentrations reduced mycorrhizal colonization by 3.8-70.4%. Numbers of AM fungal vesicles increased by 13.2-51.5% in 300 mg Pb kg(-1) sand but decreased by 9.4-50.9% in 600 mg Pb kg(-1) sand. Mycorrhizae significantly enhanced Pb accumulation both in shoot by 10.2-85.5% and in root by 9.3-118.4%. Mycorrhizae also enhanced shoot biomass and shoot P concentration under both Pb concentrations. Root/shoot ratios of Pb concentration were higher in highly mycorrhizal plant species (K.striata, I. denticulate, and E. crusgalli var. mitis) than that in poorly mycorrhizal ones (L. perenne and T. repens,). Mycorrhizal inoculation increased the root/shoot ratio of Pb concentration of highly mycorrhizal plant species by 7.6-57.2% but did not affect the poorly mycorrhizal ones. In the treatments with 300 Pb mg kg(-1) sand, plant species with higher vesicular numbers tended to show higher root/shoot ratios of the Pb concentration. We suggest that under an elevated Pb condition, mycorrhizae could promote plant growth by increasing P uptake and mitigate Pb toxicity by sequestrating more Pb in roots.

  20. Identification of weed plants excluding the uptake of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Zhou, Qixing; Wang, Xin

    2005-08-01

    Using the field pot-culture and sample-analysis method, 54 weed species belonging to 20 families and 31 weed species belonging to 17 families were systematically examined as to whether they can exclude the uptake of heavy metals. After a systematic identification, it was determined that Oenothera biennis and Commelina communis were Cd-excluders and Taraxacum mongolicum was a Zn-excluder. O. biennis is a potential Cd-excluder, but also a potential Cu-excluder. The research raises the possibility of making a major breakthrough in the application of metal excluders for safe agro-production in the future.

  1. Nitrogen deposition and prey nitrogen uptake control the nutrition of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia.

    PubMed

    Millett, J; Foot, G W; Svensson, B M

    2015-04-15

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has important negative impacts on natural and semi-natural ecosystems, impacting on biotic interactions across trophic levels. Low-nutrient systems are particularly sensitive to changes in N inputs and are therefore more vulnerable to N deposition. Carnivorous plants are often part of these ecosystems partly because of the additional nutrients obtained from prey. We studied the impact of N deposition on the nutrition of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia growing on 16 ombrotrophic bogs across Europe. We measured tissue N, phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) concentrations and prey and root N uptake using a natural abundance stable isotope approach. Our aim was to test the impact of N deposition on D. rotundifolia prey and root N uptake, and nutrient stoichiometry. D. rotundifolia root N uptake was strongly affected by N deposition, possibly resulting in reduced N limitation. The contribution of prey N to the N contained in D. rotundifolia ranged from 20 to 60%. N deposition reduced the maximum amount of N derived from prey, but this varied below this maximum. D. rotundifolia tissue N concentrations were a product of both root N availability and prey N uptake. Increased prey N uptake was correlated with increased tissue P concentrations indicating uptake of P from prey. N deposition therefore reduced the strength of a carnivorous plant-prey interaction, resulting in a reduction in nutrient transfer between trophic levels. We suggest that N deposition has a negative impact on D. rotundifolia and that responses to N deposition might be strongly site specific.

  2. Some heavy metals in soils treated with sewage sludge, their effects on yield, and their uptake by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Valdares, J.M.A.S.; Gal, M.; Mingelgrin, U.; Page, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    The possible use of sludge with high heavy metal concentrations and at high rates in calcareous soil was demonstrated in this study. Mixtures of two sludges were added to soils in various proportions up to 4% sludge content. One sludge was rich in Ni and Cd, while the other was relatively poor in heavy metals. Three soils varying in pH from 7.7 to 5.5 were tested. The concentrations of Cd, Ni, Cu and Zn in the DTPA and saturation extracts of the soil-sludge mixtures were determined and correlated with their uptake by plants and the yield of Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L., cv. Ford Hook Giant) grown on these mixtures. The metal-poor sludge hardly affected the yield of the relatively salt-resistant Swiss chard. The metal-rich sludge reduced the yield drastically in noncalcareous soils after a critical amount of that sludge (1.5%) was added to the soils. Yet, even 4% of this metal-rich sludge increased the yield of Swiss chard, as compared with the sludge-free control in a calcareous soil. The best fit to yield was obtained by multiple regression with metal content in the soil saturation extract. The solubility in soil solution of Cd, Ni and Zn was strongly affected by the pH. The uptake of Ni and Zn by plants was significantly larger in the acid soil than in the calcareous soil. The difference in the uptake of Cd and Cu between the soils was smaller. Plant uptake of the metals was generally predicted better by the total metal addition or concentration in the DPTA extract than by metal concentration in the soil saturation extract. In noncalcaeous soils the total metal addition correlated as well as metal content in the DTPA extracts with the metal concentration in the soil solution, with the uptake by plants and with the yield.

  3. Toxicity, Uptake, and Translocation of Engineered Nanomaterials in Vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Pola; Church, Tamara L; Harris, Andrew T

    2012-09-04

    To exploit the promised benefits of engineered nanomaterials, it is necessary to improve our knowledge of their bioavailability and toxicity. The interactions between engineered nanomaterials and vascular plants are of particular concern, as plants closely interact with soil, water, and the atmosphere, and constitute one of the main routes of exposure for higher species, i.e. accumulation through the food chain. A review of the current literature shows contradictory evidence on the phytotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials. The mechanisms by which engineered nanomaterials penetrate plants are not well understood, and further research on their interactions with vascular plants is required to enable the field of phytotoxicology to keep pace with that of nanotechnology, the rapid evolution of which constantly produces new materials and applications that accelerate the environmental release of nanomaterials.

  4. [Lead uptake by plants inoculated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in heavy metal-contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Shabaev, V P

    2014-01-01

    The effects of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria of the genus Pseudomonas on the growth and elemental composition of barley plants were examined in pot experiments under artificial contamination of soil with water-soluble Pb compounds. Bacterial inoculation reduced Pb uptake by plants at the beginning and in the first half of the growing season due to the binding of the heavy metal in organic compounds and stable complexes in the rhizosphere soil without changes in the soil medium reaction. The bacterium P. fluorescens 21 had a maximum capacity for Pb immobilization and contributed to the minimum metal uptake into plants. Application of bacterium P. fluorescens 21 eliminated Pb toxicity and increased the plant weight to the level characteristic of the uncontaminated soil.

  5. Uptake of trichloroethylene by hybrid poplar trees grown hydroponically in flow-through plant growth chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Orchard, B.J.; Doucette, W.J.; Chard, J.K.; Bugbee, B.

    2000-04-01

    Phytoremediation in being promoted as a cost-effective treatment option for shallow groundwater and soils contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). However, its effectiveness is difficult to assess due to contradictory reports regarding the magnitude of plant uptake and phytovolatilization. Experimental artifacts and plants stress, resulting from the use of static or low-flow plants growth laboratory systems, may account for part of the discrepancy. High exposure concentrations and short durations may also cause artifacts in laboratory studies. A dual-chamber plant growth system designed to minimize experimental artifacts was used to determine the uptake of [{sup 14}C] TCE by hydroponically grown hybrid poplar as a function of plant stress, exposure concentration, and exposure duration. The [{sup 14}]TCE recoveries ranged from 92 to 101% in 11 dosed chambers. Trichloroethylene mass equivalent concentrations in the shoot tissue were dependent on the amount of water transpired and the exposure concentration. Root-zone oxygen status die not significantly impact TCE uptake. Transpiration stream concentration factors (TSCFs) determined in these studies were independent of exposure duration and are much lower than those previously reported and predicted. The role of TSCF and other factors in estimating the significance of plant uptake in the phytoremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater is discussed.

  6. Growth, nitrogen uptake and flow in maize plants affected by root growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liangzheng; Niu, Junfang; Li, Chunjian; Zhang, Fusuo

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of a reduced maize root-system size on root growth and nitrogen (N) uptake and flow within plants. Restriction of shoot-borne root growth caused a strong decrease in the absorption of root: shoot dry weight ratio and a reduction in shoot growth. On the other hand, compensatory growth and an increased N uptake rate in the remaining roots were observed. Despite the limited long-distance transport pathway in the mesocotyl with restriction of shoot-borne root growth, N cycling within these plants was higher than those in control plants, implying that xylem and phloem flow velocities via the mesocotyl were considerably higher than in plants with an intact root system. The removal of the seminal roots in addition to restricting shoot-borne root development did not affect whole plant growth and N uptake, except for the stronger compensatory growth of the primary roots. Our results suggest that an adequate N supply to maize plant is maintained by compensatory growth of the remaining roots, increased N uptake rate and flow velocities within the xylem and phloem via the mesocotyl, and reduction in the shoot growth rate.

  7. [Research advances in uptake, translocation, accumulation and detoxification of Pb in plants].

    PubMed

    Duan, De-Chao; Yu, Ming-Ge; Shi, Ji-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of soils by lead (Pb) is of widespread occurrence because of the industrialization, urbanization, mining, and many other anthropogenic activities. It is urgent and necessary for scientists to uncover the mechanisms of uptake, translocation, accumulation and detoxification of Pb in plants for the following two reasons. First, it helps target and regulate the key process of Pb uptake by crops and vegetables and minimize the threat of Pb introduction to the food chain. Second, it helps cultivate Pb hyperaccumulating plants that can absorb and sequester excessive amounts from contaminated soils in their biomass without incurring damage to basic metabolic functions. The purpose of this review was to summarize the research advances in uptake, translocation and accumulation of Pb in plants and address the mechanisms by which plants or plant systems detoxify Pb. The further researches on the foliar uptake, the interactions between soil components and plant cell wall, as well as the integrated technologies for phytoremediation of Pb-contaminated soils were prospected.

  8. Using measured soil water contents to estimate evapotranspiration and root water uptake profiles - a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guderle, M.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of plants in soil water relations, and thus ecosystem functioning, requires information about root water uptake. We evaluated four different complex water balance methods to estimate sink term patterns and evapotranspiration directly from soil moisture measurements. We tested four methods. The first two take the difference between two measurement intervals as evapotranspiration, thus neglecting vertical flow. The third uses regression on the soil water content time series and differences between day and night to account for vertical flow. The fourth accounts for vertical flow using a numerical model and iteratively solves for the sink term. None of these methods requires any a priori information of root distribution parameters or evapotranspiration, which is an advantage compared to common root water uptake models. To test the methods, a synthetic experiment with numerical simulations for a grassland ecosystem was conducted. Additionally, the time series were perturbed to simulate common sensor errors, like those due to measurement precision and inaccurate sensor calibration. We tested each method for a range of measurement frequencies and applied performance criteria to evaluate the suitability of each method. In general, we show that methods accounting for vertical flow predict evapotranspiration and the sink term distribution more accurately than the simpler approaches. Under consideration of possible measurement uncertainties, the method based on regression and differentiating between day and night cycles leads to the best and most robust estimation of sink term patterns. It is thus an alternative to more complex inverse numerical methods. This study demonstrates that highly resolved (temporally and spatially) soil water content measurements may be used to estimate the sink term profiles when the appropriate approach is used.

  9. Contaminated agricultural soils: Trace-elements speciation their phytoavailability and their uptake by flax plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legras, M.; Kharbouch, F.; Giron, F.; Bert, F.; Llorens, J.-M.

    2003-05-01

    Flax seeds are used in animal food because of their high content in Omega 3. A number of trace-elements (TEs) - essential as micronutrients, however toxic at supraoptimal concentrations - can accumulate in this plant at quantities incompatible with their introduction in food chain. In order to control this risk and evaluate the uptake of TEs, it is necessary to assess the contents of various species of TEs in soils and plants (each organ and total contents). We were mainly interested in evaluating the availability of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in soils on which flax were grown. Two situations have been compared: the first corresponds to fields into which some sewage sludge were brought in agronomie doses and the second corresponds to plots of land irrigated by waste water over a 100 years period. We are currently performing TEs extractions from soils and plants using different methods : the data of sequential and total extractions (assisted by microwaves) are presented. We have studied two flax varieties in four stages of culture (sowing, stage 10cm. tlowering, maturation). The content, speciation of TEs in soils as well as their transfer in flax seeds are discussed.

  10. Binding, distribution, and plant uptake of mercury in a soil from Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengxiang X; Su, Yi; Monts, David L; Waggoner, Charles A; Plodinec, M John

    2006-09-15

    A large amount of mercury has been discharged on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Site (Tennessee) as a part of the U.S. nuclear weapon program during the 1950s through the early 1960s. Increases in mercury concentration in fish and in lower East Fork Poplar Creek of Oak Ridge have been recently reported. This is an experimental study mimicking the initial stage of transformation and redistribution of mercury in soils, which are comparable to those of the Oak Ridge site. The objectives of this study were to investigate potential transformation, distribution, and plant uptake of mercury compounds in soils. Results show that the H(2)O(2)-oxidizable mercury fraction (organically bound mercury) was the major solid-phase fraction in soils freshly contaminated with soluble mercury compounds, while cinnabar fraction was the major solid phase fraction in soils contaminated with HgS. Langmuir relationships were found between mercury concentrations in plant shoots and in soil solid-phase components. Mercury in HgS-contaminated soils was to some extent phytoavailable to plants. Mercury transformation occurred from more labile fractions into more stable fractions, resulting in strong binding of mercury and decreasing its phytoavailability in soils. In addition, high mercury losses from soils contaminated with soluble mercury compounds were observed during a growing season through volatilization, accounting for 20-62% of the total initial mercury in soils.

  11. Effect of selenite and selenate on plant uptake of cadmium by maize (zea mays)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, K.; Mishra, S.; Srivastava, S.

    1996-03-01

    Selenium has been reported to confer tolerance to toxicity of heavy metals including cadmium, a highly toxic and non essential heavy metal, which enters the food chain via plant uptake from soils. Selenium reduces availability of cadmium to plants along with other aspects of its toxicokinetics. When plants are supplied with selenite, selenium concentrations in the xylem exudate are lower than selenate. Most of the selenate was transported as selenate and unidentified organic Se compounds. In contrast, Se distribution among various Se fractions within plants does not depend significantly on whether selenite or selenate was used. Selenium has a strong tendency to form complexes with heavy metals like Cd, Hg, Ag and Tl. It has been suggested that the protective effects of selenium are due to the formation of non toxic Se-metal complexes, although the mechanism by which this protective effect is exerted remains unclear. Studies on the effect of selenium (selenite) and cadmium additions to the soil on their concentrations in lettuce and wheat has indicated the role of selenite in reduction of cadmium uptake. The cletoxifying effect of sodium selenite on cadmium ion in the freshwater fish Potyacuthus cupanus has been reported. The discovery that an element like selenium counteracts the toxicity, chemical carcinogenesis and reduces the plant uptake of other toxic metals, highlights the possibility of existence of a Se-metal interaction mechanism in soil plant systems. The uptake and translocation of root-absorbed chromium supplied through irrigation in the trivalent and hexavalant states in various parts of the onion plant (Allium cepa) grown in soil and sand culture has been recently reported by us. In continuation of that, this preliminary report describes the effect of selenite and selenate pretreatment on the uptake of cadmium in the maize plant (Zea mays).

  12. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  13. Phytoremediation: modeling plant uptake and contaminant transport in the soil plant atmosphere continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Ying

    2002-09-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses plants and their associated rhizospheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, detoxify, or contain contaminants located in the soil, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and even the atmosphere. This study investigates phytoremediation of 1,4-dioxane from a contaminated sandy soil by a poplar cutting, which is associated with water flow in the soil as well as water movement and 1,4-dioxane translocation in the xylem and phloem systems. An existing one-dimensional mathematical model for coupled transport of water, heat, and solutes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (CTSPAC) is modified for the purpose of this study. The model is calibrated with the laboratory experimental measurements prior to its applications. A simulation scenario is then performed to investigate phytoremediation of 1,4-dioxane by a poplar cutting in response to daily water flow and 1,4-dioxane transport for a simulation period of 7 days. Simulation shows that 1,4-dioxane concentration is high in leaves and low in roots with the stem in between. However, 1,4-dioxane mass in the stem (60%) is higher than that of leaves (28%) and roots (12%). This occurs because the stem volume used in this study is larger than those of leaves and roots. The simulation further reveals that about 30% of the soil 1,4-dioxane is removed within 7 days, resulting mainly from root uptake. A plot of the 1,4-dioxane concentrations in plant compartments as a function of time shows that the highest concentration in leaves is about 2600 μg/cm 3 and the lowest concentration in roots is about 350 μg/cm 3 at the end of the simulation. Results indicate that leaves are an important compartment for 1,4-dioxane accumulation and transpiration. This study suggests that the modified CTSPAC model could be a useful tool for phytoremediation estimations.

  14. The uptake of TcO-4 by plants: A mathematical description

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loon, L.R.; Desmet, G.M.; Cremers, A. )

    1989-08-01

    A model describing the uptake of TcO-4 by spinach plants was developed. The equation relates both plant and soil parameters (e.g., growth, metabolism, concentration of TcO-4 and composition of the growth medium) to the concentration of Tc in the shoot of the plant. As the soil solution is the medium from which plants obtain nutrients and non-nutrients, the modeling parameters have been obtained from uptake experiments using nutrient solutions (= simulated soil solutions) as the growth medium. Two important model assumptions are: (1) that an equilibrium exists between TcO-4 in the plant and the growth medium and (2) that the leaf TcO-4 metabolism is a pseudofirst order reaction occurring in a non-constant volume.

  15. Plant uptake and transport of /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Mueller, R.T. Sr.; soufi, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    We conducted several experiments with /sup 241/Am to obtain a more complete understanding of how this transuranium element is absorbed and transported in plants. In a plant species (Tamarix pentandra Pall.) that has salt glands in the leaves excreting NaCl and other ions, /sup 241/Am was not pumped through these glands. Cyanide, which forms complexes with any metals, when applied to a calcareous soil, greatly increased the transport of /sup 241/Am into stems and leaves of bush bean plants. Radioactive cyanide (/sup 14/C) was also transported to leaves and stems. When radish was grown in both calcareous and noncalcareous soils, /sup 241/Am appeared to be fixed on the peel so firmly that it was resistant to removal by HNO/sub 3/ washing. The chelating agent DTPA induced increased transport of /sup 241/Am to leaves and into the fleshy roots of the radish.

  16. Mesoscopic aspects of root water uptake modeling - Hydraulic resistances and root geometry interpretations in plant transpiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-02-01

    In the context of soil water flow modeling, root water uptake is often evaluated based on water potential difference between the soil and the plant (the water potential gradient approach). Root water uptake rate is modulated by hydraulic resistance of both the root itself, and the soil in the root vicinity. The soil hydraulic resistance is a function of actual soil water content and can be assessed assuming radial axisymmetric water flow toward a single root (at the mesoscopic scale). In the present study, three approximate solutions of mesoscopic root water uptake - finite difference approximation, steady-state solution, and steady-rate solution - are examined regarding their ability to capture the pressure head variations in the root vicinity. Insignificance of their differences when implemented in the macroscopic soil water flow model is demonstrated using the critical root water uptake concept. Subsequently, macroscopic simulations of coupled soil water flow and root water uptake are presented for a forest site under temperate humid climate. Predicted soil water pressure heads and actual transpiration rates are compared with observed data. Scenario simulations illustrate uncertainties associated with estimates of root geometrical and hydraulic properties. Regarding the actual transpiration prediction, the correct characterization of active root system geometry and hydraulic properties seems far more important than the choice of a particular mesoscopic model.

  17. Plant uptake of cations under nutrient limitation: An environmental tracer study using Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.; Keller, C. K.; Stacks, D.; Grant, M.; Harsh, J. B.; Letourneau, M.; Gill, R. A.; Balogh-Brunstad, Z.; Thomashow, L.; Dohnalkova, A.

    2012-12-01

    Vascular plant growth builds soils and ecosystem nutrient capital by sequestering and partitioning atmospheric CO2 into organic matter and continental runoff and driving terrestrial water and energy balances. Plant root-system functions, e.g. nutrient mobilization and uptake, are altered by environmental stress. However, the stress-response relationships are poorly understood. Chemical tracers have potential for assessing contributions of nutrients from various nutrient pools. Our objective is to quantitatively study how varying degrees of nutrient limitation (and corresponding needs to extract base cations from mineral sources) influence Ca and K uptake functions in a plant-root-mineral system. We are studying plant-driven mineral weathering in column experiments with red pine (Pinus resinosa) seedlings. The columns contain quartz sand amended with anorthite and biotite that constitute the sole mineral sources of Ca and K. These minerals also contain known amounts of Sr and Rb, which exhibit chemical behavior similar to Ca and K, respectively. The solution source of Ca and K was varied by adding 0% (no dissolved Ca and K), 10%, 30%, or 100% of a full strength Ca and K nutrient solution through irrigation water in which both Sr and Rb concentrations were negligible. Selected columns were destructively sampled at 3, 6 and 9 months to harvest biomass and measure plant uptake of cations. We used Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results to estimate the contributions of Ca and K from mineral and solution sources. For the 0% nutrient treatment, the Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratios in total biomass at 3 months, compared with those in the mineral phases, suggested preferential uptake of Ca and K over Sr and Rb, respectively, and allowed us to determine uptake discrimination factors for both cations. The K/Rb ratios in total biomass increased with greater K availability in the solution source, as expected, but Ca/Sr ratios did not show any dependence on Ca availability in the solution source

  18. Uptake and physiological response of crop plants irrigated with water containing RDX and TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Simini, M.; Checkai, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Regulatory agencies have expressed concern about possible bioconcentration of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) in food and forage crops irrigated with contaminated groundwater. Field and home-garden crops grown in site-collected soil were irrigated with water containing RDX and TNT to simulate field conditions at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CAAP), Nebraska. Pots were watered in an environment-controlled greenhouse to field capacity throughout the life-cycle of each crop with 2, 20, and 100 ppb RDX; 2, 100, and 800 ppb TNT; 100 ppb RDX + 800 ppb TNT; or uncontaminated water in response to evapo-transpirative demand. Uptake of RDX in lettuce leaves, corn stover, and alfalfa shoots was positively correlated with treatment level, however, concentrations of RDX in these crops were generally equal to or below soil loading concentrations. RDX was not significantly (p = 0.05) taken up into tomato fruit, bush bean seeds and pods, radish roots, and soybean seeds. TNT was not significantly take up into tissues of any of the crops analyzed in this study. Yield and biomass of tomato fruit, bush bean fruit, corn stover, and soybean seeds were significantly (p = 0.05) less when irrigated with the RDX + TNT treatment compared to controls. Lettuce leaf, radish root, and alfalfa shoot yield and biomass were unaffected by treatment level. For site-specific criteria used in this study, RDX and TNT did not bioconcentrate in edible plant tissues. This is the first controlled study to investigate uptake of RDX and TNT in crops irrigated with water containing explosives concentrations commonly found in contaminated groundwater.

  19. Uptake, metabolism, and volatilization of selenium by terrestrial plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The green technology of phytoremediation has being developed for the management of metal(loid)-contaminated soils and waters via the processes of phytoextraction, and phytovolatilization. Based upon these processes a plant management remediation strategy for selenium (Se) has been developed for the ...

  20. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate of soybean plants: ammonium as a nitrogen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr

    1989-01-01

    When NO3- is the sole nitrogen source in flowing solution culture, the net rate of nitrogen uptake by nonnodulated soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Ransom) plants cycles between maxima and minima with a periodicity of oscillation that corresponds with the interval of leaf emergence. Since soybean plants accumulate similar quantities of nitrogen when either NH4+ or NO3- is the sole source in solution culture controlled at pH 6.0, an experiment was conducted to determine if the oscillations in net rate of nitrogen uptake also occur when NH4+ is the nitrogen source. During a 21-day period of vegetative development, net uptake of NH4+ was measured daily by ion chromatography as depletion of NH4+ from a replenished nutrient solution containing 1.0 millimolar NH4+. The net rate of NH4+ uptake oscillated with a periodicity that was similar to the interval of leaf emergence. Instances of negative net rates of uptake indicate that the transition between maxima and minima involved changes in influx and efflux components of net NH4+ uptake.

  1. Investigating the Toxicity, Uptake, Nanoparticle Formation and Genetic Response of Plants to Gold

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  2. Mechanism of Iron Uptake by Peanut Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Römheld, Volker; Marschner, Horst

    1983-01-01

    Iron deficiency in peanuts (Arachis hypogeae L.) caused an increase in release of caffeic acid, a higher rate of FeIII reduction, and increased rates of both FeIII chelate splitting and iron uptake. Experiments on FeIII reduction by phenolics (in vitro experiments) and by roots of Fe-deficient peanuts exclude the direct involvement of released phenolics in FeIII reduction by roots: FeIII reduction by phenolics had a pH optimum higher than 8.0 and was strongly dependent on the concentration and the stability of the supplied FeIII chelates. In contrast, FeIII reduction by roots of Fe-deficient peanuts had a pH optimum of about 5.0 and was less dependent on the stability of the supplied FeIII chelates. Furthermore, the observed release of phenolics into nutrient solution would have to be at least 200 times higher to attain the reduction rates of roots of Fe-deficient peanuts. The results of these experiments support the idea of an enzymic reduction of FeIII on the plasmalemma of cortical cells of roots. PMID:16662934

  3. Application of microbial inoculants promote plant growth, increased nutrient uptake and improve root morphology of corn plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing fertilizers impacts from agriculture is a world-wide concern, both from an environmental and human health perspective. One way to reduce impacts of fertilizers is by enhancing plant uptake which improves nutrient use efficiency and also potentially reduce the amounts of fertilizer needed. ...

  4. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Zellmer, S.D.; Banwart, W.L.; Houser, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This study examines the uptake of explosives by vegetation growing on soils contaminated by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in Group 61 at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP). Plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled and analyzed to determine TNT uptake under natural field conditions. Standard USATHAMA methods were used to determine concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. No- explosives were detected in the aboveground portion of any plant sample. However, results indicate that TNT, 2-aminodinitrotoluene (2-ADNT), and/or 4-ADNT were present in some root samples. The presence of 2-ADNT and 4-ADNT increases the likelihood that explosives were taken up by plant roots, as opposed to their presence resulting from external soil contamination.

  5. Do anthropogenic aerosols enhance CO2 uptake by plants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.

    2013-12-01

    Plant productivity (photosynthesis) is tightly connected to the supply of solar radiation and water and to surface temperature. Solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface and the water cycle are strongly modified by anthropogenic aerosols. Aerosols reduce the amount of global radiation and surface temperature, and they modify the partitioning between direct and diffuse radiation. Moreover, they modify cloud radiative properties and lifetime. These aerosols effects may influence Gross Primary Productivity (GPP): (1) by intensifying the diffuse-radiation fertilization effect (i.e. plant productivity is more efficient under diffuse light whose amount may increase due to aerosol loading); (2) by modifying water supply through suppression/enhancement of rainfall; (3) by reducing surface temperature. Among aerosol impacts on GPP, it is unclear if there exists a prevailing one, or if the prevailing impact varies across ecosystems. Feedbacks to GPP from the effects of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formed from vegetation reactive carbon emissions have not been investigated. Moreover, human-made pollution and biomass burning induce high ozone concentrations that simultaneously reduce plant productivity. We apply satellite observations and global model simulations to investigate the spatial pattern in the relationship between aerosols and plant productivity across different ecosystems, and whether plants control their diffuse radiation environment through the reactive carbon emissions. We quantify the correlation between MODIS GPP and: (1) fine-fraction Aerosol Optical Depth from MODIS (fAOD); (2) ozone levels in the middle troposphere from TES. The analysis of satellite data reveals strong positive correlation between GPP and fAOD in temperate and boreal ecosystems, and strong negative correlation in tropical ecosystems. The tropical ecosystem also presents strong negative correlation between GPP and O3. Simulations using Yale-E2 global carbon

  6. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Dommering, Charlotte J; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jonker, Marianne A; Tops, Carli M J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Redeker, Egbert J W; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Moll, Annette C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands. Uptake for retinoblastoma (Rb) was compared with uptake for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC). A questionnaire was completed by all nine DNA-diagnostic laboratories assessing the number of independent mutation-positive families identified from the start of diagnostic testing until May 2013, and the number of PNDs performed for these syndromes within these families. Of 187 families with a known Rb-gene mutation, 22 had performed PND (11.8%), this was significantly higher than uptake for FAP (1.6%) and HBOC (<0.2%). For VHL (6.5%) and LFS (4.9%) the difference was not statistically significant. PND for Rb started 3 years after introduction of diagnostic DNA testing and remained stable over the years. For the other cancer syndromes PND started 10-15 years after the introduction and uptake for PND showed an increase after 2009. We conclude that uptake of PND for Rb was significantly higher than for FAP and HBOC, but not different from VHL and LFS. Early onset, high penetrance, lack of preventive surgery and perceived burden of disease may explain these differences.

  7. Gramene 2013: Comparative plant genomics resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is a curated online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species, currently hosting 27 fully and 10 partially sequenced reference genomes in its build number 38. Its strength derives from the application of a phylogenetic framework fo...

  8. Gramene: a growing plant comparative genomics resource

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gramene (www.gramene.org) is a curated genetic, genomic and comparative genome analysis resource for the major crop species, such as rice, maize, wheat and many other plant (mainly grass) species. Gramene is an open-source project, with all data and software freely downloadable through the ftp site ...

  9. Nutrient uptake and loss by container-grown deciduous and evergreen Rhododendron nursery plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of N fertilizer application on plant uptake and demand for other nutrients was evaluated from May 2005 to February 2006 in container-grown evergreen Rhododendron ‘P.J.M. Compact’ (PJM) and ‘English Roseum’ (ER) and deciduous Rhododendron ‘Gibraltar’ (AZ). Increased N-availability incre...

  10. Effects of light regime, temperature, and plant age on uptake of arsenic by Spartina pectinata and Carex stricta.

    PubMed

    Rofkar, Jordan R; Dwyer, Daryl F

    2011-07-01

    We report here on efforts to show that a combination of native wetland plant species might perform better than a monoculture in wetlands designed for arsenic remediation by supplementing weaknesses. Carex stricta and Spartina pectinata were used in hydroponic experiments. (i) Arsenic uptake was first assessed at two ages via exposure to control or arsenic-laden solutions (0 or 1.5 mg As L(-1) as Na2HAsO4) for two weeks. Age had no significant effect on arsenic concentrations in roots, but translocation factors were greater in older plants of C. stricta and S. pectinata (0.45 and 0.07, respectively) than in younger plants (0.10 and 0.01, respectively). (ii) Seasonal effects were assessed by determining uptake kinetics for both species in conditions representative of spring temperatures (15/5 degrees C) and light regimes (1050 micromol m(-2) s(-1), 13 h day(-1)) and summer temperatures (28/17 degrees C) and light regimes (1300 micromol m(-2) s(-1), 15 h day(-1)). Both species had comparable rates of arsenic uptake into roots in summer conditions (44.0 and 46.5 mg As kg(-1) dry wt. h(-1) in C. stricta and S. pectinata, respectively), but C. stricta had a higher maximum net influx rate in spring conditions (24.5 versus 10.4 mg As kg(-1) dry wt. h(-1)).

  11. Effect of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria inoculation on cadmium (Cd) uptake by Eruca sativa.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Muhammad Aqeel; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Munis, Muhammad Farooq Hussain; Chaudhary, Hassan Javed

    2015-06-01

    Microbe-assisted phyto-remediation approach is widely applied and appropriate choice to reduce the environmental risk of heavy metals originated from contaminated soils. The present study was designed to screen out the nested belongings of Eruca sativa plants and Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 39213) at varying cadmium (Cd) levels and their potential to deal with Cd uptake from soils. We carried out pot trial experiment by examining the soil containing E. sativa seedlings either treated with P. putida and/or untreated plants subjected to three different levels (ppm) of Cd (i.e., 150, 250, and 500). In all studied cases, we observed an increase in Cd uptake for E. sativa plants inoculated with P. putida than those of un-inoculated plants. Cd toxicity was assessed by recording different parameters including stunted shoot growth, poor rooting, and Cd residual levels in the plants that were not inoculated with P. putida. Significant difference (p < 0.05) of different growth parameters for inoculated vs non-inoculated plants was observed at all given treatments. However, among the different treatments, E. sativa exhibited increased values for different growth parameters (except proline contents) at lower Cd levels than those of their corresponding higher levels, shoot length (up to 27 %), root length (up to 32 %), whole fresh plant (up to 40 %), dry weight (up to 22 %), and chlorophyll contents (up to 26 %). Despite the hyperaccumulation of Cd in whole plant of E. sativa, P. putida improved the plant growth at varying levels of Cd supply than those of associated non-inoculated plants. Present results indicated that inoculation with P. putida enhanced the Cd uptake potential of E. sativa and favors the healthy growth under Cd stress.

  12. Plant uptake of elements in soil and pore water: field observations versus model assumptions.

    PubMed

    Raguž, Veronika; Jarsjö, Jerker; Grolander, Sara; Lindborg, Regina; Avila, Rodolfo

    2013-09-15

    Contaminant concentrations in various edible plant parts transfer hazardous substances from polluted areas to animals and humans. Thus, the accurate prediction of plant uptake of elements is of significant importance. The processes involved contain many interacting factors and are, as such, complex. In contrast, the most common way to currently quantify element transfer from soils into plants is relatively simple, using an empirical soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF). This practice is based on theoretical assumptions that have been previously shown to not generally be valid. Using field data on concentrations of 61 basic elements in spring barley, soil and pore water at four agricultural sites in mid-eastern Sweden, we quantify element-specific TFs. Our aim is to investigate to which extent observed element-specific uptake is consistent with TF model assumptions and to which extent TF's can be used to predict observed differences in concentrations between different plant parts (root, stem and ear). Results show that for most elements, plant-ear concentrations are not linearly related to bulk soil concentrations, which is congruent with previous studies. This behaviour violates a basic TF model assumption of linearity. However, substantially better linear correlations are found when weighted average element concentrations in whole plants are used for TF estimation. The highest number of linearly-behaving elements was found when relating average plant concentrations to soil pore-water concentrations. In contrast to other elements, essential elements (micronutrients and macronutrients) exhibited relatively small differences in concentration between different plant parts. Generally, the TF model was shown to work reasonably well for micronutrients, whereas it did not for macronutrients. The results also suggest that plant uptake of elements from sources other than the soil compartment (e.g. from air) may be non-negligible.

  13. Uptake of Uranium and Other Elements of Concern by Plants Growing on Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, C. N.; Waugh, W.; Glenn, E.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for long-term stewardship of disposal cells for uranium mill tailings throughout the United States. Rock-armored disposal cell covers create favorable habitat for deep-rooted plants by reducing soil evaporation, increasing soil water storage, and trapping windblown dust, thereby providing water and nutrients for plant germination and establishment. DOE is studying the tradeoffs of potential detrimental and beneficial effects of plants growing on disposal cell covers to develop a rational and consistent vegetation management policy. Plant roots often extend vertically through disposal cell covers into underlying tailings, therefore, uptake of tailings contaminants and dissemination through animals foraging on stems and leaves is a possible exposure pathway. The literature shows that plant uptake of contaminants in uranium mill tailings occurs, but levels can vary widely depending on plant species, tailings and soil chemistry, and cover soil hydrology. Our empirical field study measured concentrations of uranium, radium, thorium, molybdenum, selenium, manganese, lead, and arsenic in above ground tissues harvested from plants growing on disposal cells near Native American communities in western states that represent a range of climates, cover designs, cover soil types, and vegetation types. For risk screening, contaminant levels in above ground tissues harvested from plants on disposal cells were compared to Maximum Tolerance Levels (MTLs) set for livestock by the National Research Council, and to tissue levels in the same plant species growing in reference areas near disposal cells. Although tailings were covered with uncontaminated soils, for 14 of 46 comparisons, levels of uranium and other contaminants were higher in plants growing on disposal cells compared to reference area plants, indicating possible mobilization of these elements from the tailing into plant tissues. However, with one exception, all plant

  14. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate of soybean plants: effects of external nitrate concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolley-Henry, L.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Granato, T. C.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Net uptake of NO3- by non-nodulated soybean plants [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Ransom] growing in flowing hydroponic cultures containing 0.5, 1.0 and 10.0 mol m-3 NO3- was measured daily during a 24-d period of vegetative development to determine if amplitude of maximum and minimum rates of net NO3- uptake are responsive to external concentrations of NO3-. Removal of NO3- from the replenished solutions during each 24-h period was determined by ion chromatography. Neither dry matter accumulation nor the periodicity of oscillations in net uptake rate was altered by the external NO3- concentrations. The maxima of the oscillations in net uptake rate, however, increased nearly 3-fold in response to external NO3- concentrations. The maxima and minima, respectively, changed from 4.0 and 0.6 mmol NO3- per gram root dry weight per day at an external solution level of 0.5 mol m-3 NO3- to 15.2 and -2.7 mmol NO3- per gram root dry weight per day at an external solution level of 10.0 mol m-3 NO3-. The negative values for minimum net uptake rate from 10.0 mol m-3 NO3- solutions show that net efflux was occurring and indicate that the magnitude of the efflux component of net uptake was responsive to external concentration of NO3-.

  15. Copper-resistant bacteria reduces oxidative stress and uptake of copper in lentil plants: potential for bacterial bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Faisal; Yasmeen, Tahira; Ali, Qasim; Mubin, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Hussain, Sabir; Riaz, Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat

    2016-01-01

    For effective microbe-assisted bioremediation, metal-resistant plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) must facilitate plant growth by restricting excess metal uptake in plants, leading to prevent its bio-amplification in the ecosystem. The aims of our study were to isolate and characterize copper (Cu)-resistant PGPB from waste water receiving contaminated soil. In addition, we investigated the phytotoxic effect of copper on the lentil plants inoculated with copper-resistant bacteria Providencia vermicola, grown in copper-contaminated soil. Copper-resistant P. vermicola showed multiple plant growth promoting characteristics, when used as a seed inoculant. It protected the lentil plants from copper toxicity with a considerable increase in root and shoot length, plant dry weight and leaf area. A notable increase in different gas exchange characteristics such as A, E, C i , g s , and A/E, as well as increase in N and P accumulation were also recorded in inoculated plants as compared to un-inoculated copper stressed plants. In addition, leaf chlorophyll content, root nodulation, number of pods, 1,000 seed weight were also higher in inoculated plants as compared with non-inoculated ones. Anti-oxidative defense mechanism improved significantly via elevated expression of reactive oxygen species -scavenging enzymes including ascorbate peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase with alternate decrease in malondialdehyde and H2O2 contents, reduced electrolyte leakage, proline, and total phenolic contents suggesting that inoculation of P. vermicola triggered heavy metals stress-related defense pathways under copper stress. Overall, the results demonstrated that the P. vermicola seed inoculation confer heavy metal stress tolerance in lentil plant which can be used as a potent biotechnological tool to cope with the problems of copper pollution in crop plants for better yield.

  16. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Zellmer, S.D.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Rastorier, J.R.; Chen, D.; Banwart, W.L.

    1995-02-01

    This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in soils contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitro-3,5-triazine (RDX) in three areas at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP). To determine explosives uptake under natural environmental conditions, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled at different locations in each area, and plant materials were separated by species. Standard methods were used to determine the concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. The compound TNT was not detected in the aboveground portion of plants, and vegetation growing on TNT-contaminated soils is not considered a health hazard. However, soil and plant roots may contain TNT degradation products that may be toxic; hence, their consumption is not advised. The compound RDX was found in the tops and roots of plants growing on RDX-contaminated soils at all surveyed sites. Although RDX is not a listed carcinogen, several of its potentially present degradation products are carcinogens. Therefore, the consumption of any plant tissues growing on RDX-contaminated sites should be considered a potential health hazard.

  17. Vanadium uptake and translocation in dominant plant species on an urban coastal brownfield site.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu; Gallagher, Frank J; Feng, Huan; Wu, Meiyin; Zhu, Qingzhi

    2014-04-01

    This study, conducted at a brownfield site in New Jersey, USA, investigated factors controlling V uptake and translocation in naturally assembled plant species. Six dominant species were collected from 22 stations in the study area. We found that V concentration in the plants decreased in a sequence of root>leaf>stem. No significant differences were found among the six dominant plant species in terms of root V uptake efficiency (V BCF) and V root to shoot translocation (V TF). Although soil pH and TOC did not show significant impact on V accumulation in the roots, soil labile V content showed significant positive linear correlation (p<0.05) with plant root V. Non-linear regression analysis indicates that V translocation efficiency decreases with increasing concentration in the soil, implying that excessive V in the soil might inhibit its absorption by the plant roots. Leaf V concentration was constant in all the plant species regardless of the variation in soil V concentration. The study shows that the six dominant plant species on site had limited amount of V translocated to the aerial part of the plant.

  18. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Zellmer, S.D.; Banwart, W.L. |

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in TNT-contaminated soils on Group 61 at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP). The soils in this group were contaminated more than 40 years ago. In this study, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled from 15 locations and analyzed to determine TNT uptake by plants under natural field conditions. Plant materials were separated by species if more than one species was present at a sampling location. Standard methods were used to determine concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. No. explosives were detected in the aboveground portion of any plant sample. However, the results indicate that TNT, 2-amino DNT, and/or 4-amino DNT were found in some root samples of false boneset (Kuhnia eupatorioides), teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris), and bromegrass (Bromus inermis). It is possible that slight soil contamination remained on the roots, especially in the case of the very fine roots for species like bromegrass, where washing was difficult. The presence of 2-amino DNT and 4-amino DNT, which could be plant metabolites of TNT, increases the likelihood that explosives were taken up by plant roots, as opposed to their presence resulting from external soil contamination.

  19. Functional biology of plant phosphate uptake at root and mycorrhiza interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential plant nutrient and one of the most limiting in natural habitats as well as in agricultural production world-wide. The control of P acquisition efficiency and its subsequent uptake and translocation in vascular plants is complex. The physiological role of key cellular structures in plant P uptake and underlying molecular mechanisms are discussed in this review, with emphasis on phosphate transport across the cellular membrane at the root and arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) interfaces. The tools of molecular genetics have facilitated novel approaches and provided one of the major driving forces in the investigation of the basic transport mechanisms underlying plant P nutrition. Genetic engineering holds the potential to modify the system in a targeted way at the root-soil or AM symbiotic interface. Such approaches should assist in the breeding of crop plants that exhibit improved P acquisition efficiency and thus require lower inputs of P fertilizer for optimal growth. Whether engineering of P transport systems can contribute to enhanced P uptake will be discussed.

  20. NPKS uptake, sensing, and signaling and miRNAs in plant nutrient stress.

    PubMed

    Nath, Manoj; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-05-01

    Sessile nature of higher plants consequently makes it highly adaptable for nutrient absorption and acquisition from soil. Plants require 17 essential elements for their growth and development which include 14 minerals (macronutrients: N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S; micronutrients: Cl, Fe, B, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mo) and 3 non-mineral (C, H, O) elements. The roots of higher plants must acquire these macronutrients and micronutrients from rhizosphere and further allocate to other plant parts for completing their life cycle. Plants evolved an intricate series of signaling and sensing cascades to maintain nutrient homeostasis and to cope with nutrient stress/availability. The specific receptors for nutrients in root, root system architecture, and internal signaling pathways help to develop plasticity in response to the nutrient starvation. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and sulfur (S) are essential for various metabolic processes, and their deficiency negatively effects the plant growth and yield. Genes coding for transporters and receptors for nutrients as well as some small non-coding RNAs have been implicated in nutrient uptake and signaling. This review summarizes the N, P, K, and S uptake, sensing and signaling events in nutrient stress condition especially in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and involvement of microRNAs in nutrient deficiency. This article also provides a framework of uptake, sensing, signaling and to highlight the microRNA as an emerging major players in nutrient stress condition. Nutrient-plant-miRNA cross talk may help plant to cope up nutrient stress, and understanding their precise mechanism(s) will be necessary to develop high yielding smart crop with low nutrient input.

  1. Molecular and physiological interactions of urea and nitrate uptake in plants

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Roberto; Tomasi, Nicola; Zanin, Laura

    2016-01-01

    While nitrate acquisition has been extensively studied, less information is available on transport systems of urea. Furthermore, the reciprocal influence of the two sources has not been clarified, so far. In this review, we will discuss recent developments on plant response to urea and nitrate nutrition. Experimental evidence suggests that, when urea and nitrate are available in the external solution, the induction of the uptake systems of each nitrogen (N) source is limited, while plant growth and N utilization is promoted. This physiological behavior might reflect cooperation among acquisition processes, where the activation of different N assimilatory pathways (cytosolic and plastidic pathways), allow a better control on the nutrient uptake. Based on physiological and molecular evidence, plants might increase (N) metabolism promoting a more efficient assimilation of taken-up nitrogen. The beneficial effect of urea and nitrate nutrition might contribute to develop new agronomical approaches to increase the (N) use efficiency in crops. PMID:26338073

  2. Uptake and transformation of benzene and toluene by plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Ugrekhelidze, D; Korte, F; Kvesitadze, G

    1997-06-01

    The [1-6(14)C]benzene and [1-(14)C]toluene vapors penetrate into hypostomatous leaves of Acer campestre, Malus domestica, and Vitis vinifera from both sides, whereas hydrocarbons are more intensively absorbed by the stomatiferous side and more actively taken up by young leaves. Benzene and toluene conversion in leaves occurs with the aromatic ring cleavage and their carbon atoms are mainly incorporated into nonvolatile organic acids, while their incorporation into amino acids is less intensive. Intact spinach chloroplasts oxidize benzene, and this process is strongly stimulated in light. Oxidation of benzene by spinach chloroplasts or by enzyme preparation from spinach leaves is almost completely inhibited by 8-oxyquinoline or sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, and slightly affected by alpha, alpha'-dipyridyl. Benzene oxidation by enzyme preparation is significantly stimulated by NADH and NADPH; in their presence, the benzene hydroxylation product, phenol, is formed in a determinable amount. It is supposed that the enzyme performing the first step of oxidative transformation of benzene in plant leaves contains copper as the prosthetic group.

  3. Environmental dependencies of plant CO2 uptake in theory, data, and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Prentice, Colin; Keenan, Trevor; Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Cornwell, William; Davis, Tyler; Wright, Ian; Peng, Changhui

    2016-04-01

    The rate of carbon uptake by land plants depends on the light use efficiency (LUE) of photosynthesis. LUE is the ratio of primary production to light absorbed by foliage. This in turn depends on the ratio of leaf-internal to ambient carbon dioxide partial pressures (χ). However, current state-of-the-art land ecosystem models represent the environmental dependencies of these two key quantities in an empirical and incomplete way. Their modeled values have not been systematically tested against observations, a situation contributing to the many uncertainties afflicting current model estimates and future projections of terrestrial carbon uptake. We present a theory for the dependencies of χ and LUE on growing-season air temperature, vapour pressure deficit (VPD), CO2 concentration and elevation based on two hypotheses rooted in eco-physiological optimality. Theoretically derived environmental dependencies of χ and LUE are shown to be precisely and quantitatively consistent with global data sets of (a) stable carbon isotope measurements, and (b) gross primary production derived from CO2 flux measurements. The modeled environmental dependencies of χ and LUE according to seven state-of-the-art land ecosystem models participating in the TRENDY2 model intercomparison project are then derived from model outputs and compared with the theoretical relationships as a benchmark. The results show large discrepancies among model-predicted relationships of χ and LUE to temperature and VPD both in spatial and temporal dimensions. The influence of elevation on χ and LUE is also inconsistent among models, as is their predicted sensitivity to CO2 enrichment. This work suggests that a top-priority task for land ecosystem models should be to reformulate the environmental drivers of χ and LUE relationships to be consistent with observations. It also indicates that eco-physiological optimality hypotheses provide a promising route to an improved predictive understanding of terrestrial

  4. Uptake of Cadmium by Flue-Cured Tobacco Plants: Exploring Bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, I.; Robarge, W. P.; Vann, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific understanding of cadmium (Cd) cycling in North Carolina tobacco plants and soils has lagged, even as production of flue-cured tobacco remains an important part of the NC economy ($903 million in 2014). Cd is considered a tobacco contaminant. When tobacco is burned, Cd can exist as a fine aerosol and subsequent inhalation is linked to cancer. Tobacco root exudates enhance Cd uptake, even though the Cd concentration in NC soils is <0.1 mg/kg. Quantifying Cd concentrations in tobacco plants is crucial to understanding Cd bioavailability and implementing soil remediation efforts. The objective of this study was to develop a Cd mass balance for flue-cured tobacco grown under field conditions in NC. Whole plant samples were collected at transplanting and every 2 weeks thereafter until harvest. Individual plants were segregated into root, stalk and individual leaves (n = 15 whole plants/sampling date; composite samples were taken early in the growing season). After recording dry mass, samples were analyzed using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry or ion-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lower leaves contained the highest Cd concentrations ( 7-10 mg/kg). Leaves occupying the upper 50% of the plant had Cd concentrations of 2 mg/kg. Uptake rate was greatest from day 27 to 66 ( 21.5 μg Cd/day). Selective Cd uptake appears evident between day 27 and 43, but overall the relative rate of Cd uptake was similar to other trace metals and micronutrients. Cd distribution within the plants mirrored the distribution of calcium, a macronutrient. Of the 8 mg of soil extractable Cd (0.075 mg/kg) in the rooting zone, 15.0% (1203 μg) is removed by uptake. Of this 15%, 64.2% (772.2 μg) is exported at harvest, and 35.8% (430.8 μg; lower leaves, roots, stalks) is returned to the soil. This study must be replicated to account for seasonal and soil variations. These results do inform selection of tobacco strains that limit uptake of trace metals, particularly Cd.

  5. K+ uptake in plant roots. The systems involved, their regulation and parallels in other organisms.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2014-05-15

    Potassium (K(+)) is an essential macronutrient for plants. It is taken into the plant by the transport systems present in the plasma membranes of root epidermal and cortical cells. The identity of these systems and their regulation is beginning to be understood and the systems of K(+) transport in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana remain far better characterized than in any other plant species. Roots can activate different K(+) uptake systems to adapt to their environment, important to a sessile organism that needs to cope with a highly variable environment. The mechanisms of K(+) acquisition in the model species A. thaliana are the best characterized at the molecular level so far. According to the current model, non-selective channels are probably the main pathways for K(+) uptake at high concentrations (>10mM), while at intermediate concentrations (1mM), the inward rectifying channel AKT1 dominates K(+) uptake. Under lower concentrations of external K(+) (100μM), AKT1 channels, together with the high-affinity K(+) uptake system HAK5 contribute to K(+) acquisition, and at extremely low concentrations (<10μM) the only system capable of taking up K(+) is HAK5. Depending on the species the high-affinity system has been named HAK5 or HAK1, but in all cases it fulfills the same functions. The activation of these systems as a function of the K(+) availability is achieved by different mechanisms that include phosphorylation of AKT1 or induction of HAK5 transcription. Some of the characteristics of the systems for root K(+) uptake are shared by other organisms, whilst others are specific to plants. This indicates that some crucial properties of the ancestral of K(+) transport systems have been conserved through evolution while others have diverged among different kingdoms.

  6. Species-specific effects of live roots and shoot litter on soil decomposer abundances do not forecast plant litter-nitrogen uptake.

    PubMed

    Saj, Stéphane; Mikola, Juha; Ekelund, Flemming

    2009-08-01

    Plant species produce litter of varying quality and differ in the quality and quantity of compounds they release from live roots, which both can induce different decomposer growth in the soil. To test whether differences in decomposer growth can forecast the amount of N species acquire from plant litter, as suggested by theory, we grew individuals of three grassland plants-Holcus lanatus, Plantago lanceolata and Lotus corniculatus-in soils into which (15)N-labelled litter of either Holcus, Plantago or Lotus was added. We measured the effects of live roots and litter of each species on soil microbes and their protozoan and nematode feeders, and to link decomposer growth and plant nutrient uptake, we measured the amount of N taken up by plants from the added litter. We hypothesised that those species that induce the highest growth of microbes, and especially that of microbial feeders, will also take up the highest amount of N from the litter. We found, however, that although numbers of bacterial-feeding Protozoa and nematodes were on average lower after addition of Holcus than Plantago or Lotus litter, N uptake was higher from Holcus litter. Further, although the effects on Protozoa and bacterial- and fungal-feeding nematodes did not differ between the live plants, litter-N uptake differed, with Holcus being the most efficient compared to Plantago and Lotus. Hence, although microbes and their feeders unquestionably control N mineralization in the soil, and their growth differs among plant species, these differences cannot predict differences in litter-N uptake among plant species. A likely reason is that for nutrient uptake, other species-specific plant traits, such as litter chemistry, root proliferation ability and competitiveness for soil N, override in significance the species-specific ability of plants to induce decomposer growth.

  7. A review of plant-pharmaceutical interactions: from uptake and effects in crop plants to phytoremediation in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Pedro N; Basto, M Clara P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Brix, Hans

    2014-10-01

    Pharmaceuticals are commonly found both in the aquatic and the agricultural environments as a consequence of the human activities and associated discharge of wastewater effluents to the environment. The utilization of treated effluent for crop irrigation, along with land application of manure and biosolids, accelerates the introduction of these compounds into arable lands and crops. Despite the low concentrations of pharmaceuticals usually found, the continuous introduction into the environment from different pathways makes them 'pseudo-persistent'. Several reviews have been published regarding the potential impact of veterinary and human pharmaceuticals on arable land. However, plant uptake as well as phytotoxicity data are scarcely studied. Simultaneously, phytoremediation as a tool for pharmaceutical removal from soils, sediments and water is starting to be researched, with promising results. This review gives an in-depth overview of the phytotoxicity of pharmaceuticals, their uptake and their removal by plants. The aim of the current work was to map the present knowledge concerning pharmaceutical interactions with plants in terms of uptake and the use of plant-based systems for phytoremediation purposes.

  8. Differential uptake and translocation of β-HCH and dieldrin by several plant species from hydroponic medium.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Sayuri; Otani, Takashi; Seike, Nobuyasu; Satoh, Shinobu

    2015-03-01

    To compare the uptake and translocation of hydrophobic organic chemicals by plant species, the authors performed uptake experiments with β-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) and 1,2,3,4,10,10-Hexachloro-6,7-epoxy-1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-endo-1,4-exo-5,8-dimethanonaphthalene (dieldrin) using 5 species: Hordeum vulgare, Glycine max, Solanum lycopersicum, Brassica oleracea, and Cucurbita pepo. The present study evaluated uptake ability using root concentration factor (RCF) and translocation ability by transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF). The RCFs of β-HCH and dieldrin did not differ remarkably among species, except that the RCF of β-HCH in B. oleracea was high. The TSCFs of β-HCH and dieldrin were high in C. pepo, which was not superior in uptake as estimated by RCF. The TSCF of dieldrin in C. pepo was decreased in darkness and was markedly decreased by heating of roots. These results support the hypothesis that transport proteins produced in the root contribute to dieldrin translocation. In contrast, TSCF of β-HCH was not decreased by these treatments. Therefore, translocation of β-HCH might not need the contribution of transport proteins. It is possible that C. pepo has a certain function to transport hydrophobic organic chemicals smoothly in root tissues.

  9. Cadmium Bioavailability, Uptake, Toxicity and Detoxification in Soil-Plant System.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Dumat, Camille; Khalid, Sana; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Antunes, Paula M C

    This review summarizes the findings of the most recent studies, published from 2000 to 2016, which focus on the biogeochemical behavior of Cd in soil-plant systems and its impact on the ecosystem. For animals and people not subjected to a Cd-contaminated environment, consumption of Cd contaminated food (vegetables, cereals, pulses and legumes) is the main source of Cd exposure. As Cd does not have any known biological function, and can further cause serious deleterious effects both in plants and mammalian consumers, cycling of Cd within the soil-plant system is of high global relevance.The main source of Cd in soil is that which originates as emissions from various industrial processes. Within soil, Cd occurs in various chemical forms which differ greatly with respect to their lability and phytoavailability. Cadmium has a high phytoaccumulation index because of its low adsorption coefficient and high soil-plant mobility and thereby may enter the food chain. Plant uptake of Cd is believed to occur mainly via roots by specific and non-specific transporters of essential nutrients, as no Cd-specific transporter has yet been identified. Within plants, Cd causes phytotoxicity by decreasing nutrient uptake, inhibiting photosynthesis, plant growth and respiration, inducing lipid peroxidation and altering the antioxidant system and functioning of membranes. Plants tackle Cd toxicity via different defense strategies such as decreased Cd uptake or sequestration into vacuoles. In addition, various antioxidants combat Cd-induced overproduction of ROS. Other mechanisms involve the induction of phytochelatins, glutathione and salicylic acid.

  10. Plant diversity effects on ecosystem evapotranspiration and carbon uptake: a controlled environment (Ecotron) and modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milcu, Alexandru; Roy, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Effects of species and functional diversity of plants on ecosystem evapotranspiration and carbon fluxes have been rarely assessed simultaneously. Here we present the results from an experiment that combined a lysimeter setup in a controlled environment facility (Ecotron) with large ecosystem samples/ monoliths originating from a long-term biodiversity experiment ("The Jena Experiment") and a modelling approach. We aimed at (1) quantifying the impact of plant species richness (4 vs. 16 species) on day- and night-time ecosystem water vapor fluxes and carbon uptake, (2) partitioning ecosystem evapotranspiration into evaporation and plant transpiration using the Shuttleworth and Wallace (SW) energy partitioning model, and (3) identifying the most parsimonious predictors of water vapor vapor and CO2 fluxes using plant functional trait-based metrics such as functional diversity and community weighted means. The SW model indicated that at low plant species richness, a higher proportion of the available energy was diverted to evaporation (a non-productive flux), while at higher species richness the proportion of ecosystem transpiration (a production-related water flux) increased. This led to an increased carbon gain per amount of water vapor loss (i.e. increased water use efficiency). While the LAI controlled the carbon and water fluxes, we also found that the diversity of plant functional traits, and in particular of leaf nitrogen concentration are potential important predictors of ecosystem transpiration and carbon uptake and consequently significantly contributed to increase in water use efficiency in communities with higher plant diversity.

  11. Evaluation of drug uptake and deactivation in plant: Fate of albendazole in ribwort plantain (Plantago laceolata) cells and regenerants.

    PubMed

    Stuchlíková Raisová, Lucie; Podlipná, Radka; Szotáková, Barbora; Syslová, Eliška; Skálová, Lenka

    2017-03-13

    Albendazole (ABZ) is a benzimidazole anthelmintic widely used especially in veterinary medicine. Along with other drugs, anthelmintics have become one of a new class of micro-pollutants that disturb the environment but the information about their fate in plants remains limited. The present study was designed to test the uptake and biotransformation of ABZ in the ribwort plantain (Plantago lancelota), a common meadow plant, which can come into contact with this anthelmintic through the excrements of treated animals in pastures. Two model systems were used and compared: cell suspensions and whole plant regenerants. In addition, time-dependent changes in occurrence of ABZ and its metabolites in roots, basal parts of the leaves and tops of the leaves were followed up. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with high mass accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) led to the identification of 18 metabolites of ABZ formed in the ribwort. In both model systems, the same types of ABZ biotransformation reactions were found, but the spectrum and abundance of the ABZ metabolites detected in cell suspensions and regenerants differed significantly. Cell suspensions seem to be suitable only for qualitative estimations of drug biotransformation reactions while regenerants were shown to represent an adequate model for the qualitative as well as quantitative evaluation of drug uptake and metabolism in plants.

  12. Iron Uptake and Transport in Plants: The Good, the Bad, and the Ionome

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, J.; Guerinot, M

    2009-01-01

    Fe is essential for plant growth. At the same time, Fe is highly reactive and toxic via the Fenton reaction. Consequently, plants tightly control Fe homeostasis and react to Fe deficiency as well as Fe overload. The ability of plants to respond to Fe availability ultimately affects human nutrition, both in terms of crop yield and the Fe concentration of edible tissues. Thus, elucidating the mechanisms of Fe uptake and transport is essential for the breeding of crops that are more nutrient rich and more tolerant of Fe-limited soils.This review covers Fe transport and homeostasis in plants, focusing on the research published in the past five years. Because Fe transporters often have a broad range of substrates, we also examine the relationship between Fe and the toxic metals that often accompany Fe uptake, namely Cd, Co, and Ni. We begin by discussing Fe uptake into the root, then long-distance transport to the shoot, and finally, the loading of Fe into seeds. And, as Fe is essential to the metabolism of the mitochondria and chloroplast, we also look at the recent discoveries in Fe transport and homeostasis at the intracellular level. We do not cover the regulation of these transporters as this topic has been recently reviewed.

  13. Cytochrome b5 Reductase 1 Triggers Serial Reactions that Lead to Iron Uptake in Plants.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Jun; Kim, Hanul; Seo, Sung Hee; Hwang, Bae Geun; Chang, Yoon Seok; Lee, Junho; Lee, Dong Wook; Sohn, Eun Ju; Lee, Sang Joon; Lee, Youngsook; Hwang, Inhwan

    2016-04-04

    Rhizosphere acidification is essential for iron (Fe) uptake into plant roots. Plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPases play key roles in rhizosphere acidification. However, it is not fully understood how PM H(+)-ATPase activity is regulated to enhance root Fe uptake under Fe-deficient conditions. Here, we present evidence that cytochrome b5 reductase 1 (CBR1) increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids, which stimulate PM H(+)-ATPase activity and thus lead to rhizosphere acidification. CBR1-overexpressing (CBR1-OX) Arabidopsis thaliana plants had higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids (18:2 and 18:3), higher PM H(+)-ATPase activity, and lower rhizosphere pH than wild-type plants. By contrast, cbr1 loss-of-function mutant plants showed lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and lower PM H(+)-ATPase activity but higher rhizosphere pH. Reduced PM H(+)-ATPase activity in cbr1 could be restored in vitro by addition of unsaturated fatty acids. Transcript levels of CBR1, fatty acids desaturase2 (FAD2), and fatty acids desaturase3 (FAD3) were increased under Fe-deficient conditions. We propose that CBR1 has a crucial role in increasing the levels of unsaturated fatty acids, which activate the PM H(+)-ATPase and thus reduce rhizosphere pH. This reaction cascade ultimately promotes root Fe uptake.

  14. Uptake of toluene and ethylbenzene by plants: removal of volatile indoor air contaminants.

    PubMed

    Sriprapat, Wararat; Suksabye, Parinda; Areephak, Sirintip; Klantup, Polawat; Waraha, Atcharaphan; Sawattan, Anuchit; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2014-04-01

    Air borne uptake of toluene and ethylbenzene by twelve plant species was examined. Of the twelve plant species examined, the highest toluene removal was found in Sansevieria trifasciata, while the ethylbenzene removal from air was with Chlorophytum comosum. Toluene and ethylbenzene can penetrate the plant׳s cuticle. However, the removal rates do not appear to be correlated with numbers of stomata per plant. It was found that wax of S. trifasciata and Sansevieria hyacinthoides had greater absorption of toluene and ethylbenzene, and it contained high hexadecanoic acid. Hexadecanoic acid might be involved in toluene and ethylbenzene adsorption by cuticles wax of plants. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis or the potential quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) in toluene exposed plants showed no significant differences between the control and the treated plants, whereas plants exposed to ethylbenzene showed significant differences or those parameters, specifically in Dracaena deremensis (Lemon lime), Dracaena sanderiana, Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, and Cordyline fruticosa. The Fv/Fm ratio can give insight into the ability of plants to tolerate (indoor) air pollution by volatile organic chemicals (VOC). This index can be used for identification of suitable plants for treating/sequestering VOCs in contaminated air.

  15. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-05

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs(+)) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs(+) uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs(+), chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs(+) tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs(+) concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs(+). Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs(+) tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs(+) by inhibiting Cs(+) entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  16. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs+) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs+ uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs+, chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs+ tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs+ concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs+. Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs+ tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs+ by inhibiting Cs+ entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  17. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-12-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were compared in both isolated rat Kupffer cells and elicited rat peritoneal cells. Both types of cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semisynthetic AIN-76 5% saturated-fat diet either by peritoneal lavage for peritoneal cells or by collagenase perfusion followed by purification on a 17.5% metrizamide gradient for Kupffer cells. Hot phenol water-extracted S. minnesota LPS was labeled with iodine by the chloramine-T method following a reaction with methyl-p-hydroxybenzimidate. The in vitro uptake of [125I]LPS by Kupffer cells was unsaturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms/ml, while peritoneal cells became saturated at between 16.67 and 25 micrograms of LPS per ml. Uptake by both types of cells could be inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabeled LPS. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation, while peritoneal cells were saturable after 40 min of incubation. Pretreatment with 75 mM colchicine inhibited uptake by peritoneal cells but not Kupffer cells, while pretreatment with 12 mM 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake by Kupffer cells but not peritoneal cells. These results are consistent with a process of receptor-mediated endocytosis for peritoneal cells, while Kupffer cells may internalize endotoxins by absorptive pinocytosis. These results suggest that studies of peritoneal cell-endotoxin interactions do not accurately describe the physiologic process within the liver, the major site for the

  18. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-01-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were compared in both isolated rat Kupffer cells and elicited rat peritoneal cells. Both types of cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semisynthetic AIN-76 5% saturated-fat diet either by peritoneal lavage for peritoneal cells or by collagenase perfusion followed by purification on a 17.5% metrizamide gradient for Kupffer cells. Hot phenol water-extracted S. minnesota LPS was labeled with iodine by the chloramine-T method following a reaction with methyl-p-hydroxybenzimidate. The in vitro uptake of [125I]LPS by Kupffer cells was unsaturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms/ml, while peritoneal cells became saturated at between 16.67 and 25 micrograms of LPS per ml. Uptake by both types of cells could be inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabeled LPS. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation, while peritoneal cells were saturable after 40 min of incubation. Pretreatment with 75 mM colchicine inhibited uptake by peritoneal cells but not Kupffer cells, while pretreatment with 12 mM 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake by Kupffer cells but not peritoneal cells. These results are consistent with a process of receptor-mediated endocytosis for peritoneal cells, while Kupffer cells may internalize endotoxins by absorptive pinocytosis. These results suggest that studies of peritoneal cell-endotoxin interactions do not accurately describe the physiologic process within the liver, the major site for the

  19. Comparative uptake of grepafloxacin and ciprofloxacin by a human monocytic cell line, THP-1.

    PubMed

    Hara, T; Takemura, H; Kanemitsu, K; Yamamoto, H; Shimada, J

    2000-09-01

    The present study was designed to compare the uptake of grepafloxacin by a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, with that of ciprofloxacin. THP-1 cells were incubated with 20 microg/ml of either drug, and the entry of the drugs into the cells was determined using a velocity gradient centrifugation technique and HPLC assay. Antibiotic uptake by the cells was expressed as the ratio of the intracellular to the extracellular drug concentration (IC/EC). Grepafloxacin entered THP-1 cells readily within 5 min, and at steady-state (37 degrees C; 60 min), the IC/EC ratio of grepafloxacin (11.9 +/- 1.7; n = 13) was about 2.4-fold higher than that of ciprofloxacin (5.0 +/- 1.3; n = 13). The ratios decreased at low incubation temperature (4 degrees C), in paraformaldehyde-treated dead cells, and at low extracellular pH (pH 6.0), but were not influenced by high extracellular pH (pH, 9.0). Characterization of fluoroquinolone uptake suggests that these drugs penetrate the THP-1 membrane by passive diffusion, and also, in part, via an active transport system. We also examined the uptake of the two fluoroquinolones in phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated adherent THP-1 cells (THP-1 macrophages). The IC/EC ratios for both fluoroquinolones in the THP-1 macrophages were significantly higher than those in the THP-1 monocytes. Further the uptake of three other fluoroquinolones, levofloxacin, tosufloxacin, and sparfloxacin, by THP-1 monocytes was examined in comparative studies. The IC/EC ratio of grepafloxacin was comparable to that of sparfloxacin and significantly higher than that of the other fluoroquinolones. Our results indicate that grepafloxacin exhibits better intracellular accumulation than ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones in human monocytic and macrophage-like cells.

  20. Nitrogen uptake, assimilation and remobilization in plants: challenges for sustainable and productive agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise; Dechorgnat, Julie; Chardon, Fabien; Gaufichon, Laure; Suzuki, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Background Productive agriculture needs a large amount of expensive nitrogenous fertilizers. Improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of crop plants is thus of key importance. NUE definitions differ depending on whether plants are cultivated to produce biomass or grain yields. However, for most plant species, NUE mainly depends on how plants extract inorganic nitrogen from the soil, assimilate nitrate and ammonium, and recycle organic nitrogen. Efforts have been made to study the genetic basis as well as the biochemical and enzymatic mechanisms involved in nitrogen uptake, assimilation, and remobilization in crops and model plants. The detection of the limiting factors that could be manipulated to increase NUE is the major goal of such research. Scope An overall examination of the physiological, metabolic, and genetic aspects of nitrogen uptake, assimilation and remobilization is presented in this review. The enzymes and regulatory processes manipulated to improve NUE components are presented. Results obtained from natural variation and quantitative trait loci studies are also discussed. Conclusions This review presents the complexity of NUE and supports the idea that the integration of the numerous data coming from transcriptome studies, functional genomics, quantitative genetics, ecophysiology and soil science into explanatory models of whole-plant behaviour will be promising. PMID:20299346

  1. The impact of biomass harvesting on phosphorus uptake by wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, S Y; Geary, P M

    2001-01-01

    Two species of macrophytes, Baumea articulata and Schoenoplectus mucronatus, were examined for their capacity to remove phosphorus under nutrient-rich conditions. Forty large bucket systems with the two different species growing in two types of substrate received artificial wastewaters for nine months, simulating a constructed wetland (CW) under high loading conditions. Half of the plants growing in the topsoil and gravel substrates were periodically harvested whereas the other half remained intact. Plant tissue and substrate samples were regularly analysed to determine their phosphorus concentrations. With respect to phosphorus uptake and removal, the Schoenoplectus in the topsoil medium performed better than the Baumea. Biomass harvesting enhanced P uptake in the Schoenoplectus, however the effect was not significant enough to make an improvement on the overall P removal, due to the slow recovery of plants and regrowth of biomass after harvesting. From P partitioning, it was found that the topsoil medium was the major P pool, storing most of total P present in the system. Plant parts contributed only minor storage with approximately half of that P stored below ground in the plant roots. The overall net effect of harvesting plant biomass was to only remove less than 5% of total phosphorus present in the system.

  2. Mercury uptake and phytotoxicity in terrestrial plants grown naturally in the Gumuskoy (Kutahya) mining area, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sasmaz, Merve; Akgül, Bunyamin; Yıldırım, Derya; Sasmaz, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated mercury (Hg) uptake and transport from the soil to different plant parts by documenting the distribution and accumulation of Hg in the roots and shoots of 12 terrestrial plant species, all of which grow naturally in surface soils of the Gumuskoy Pb-Ag mining area. Plant samples and their associated soils were collected and analyzed for Hg content by ICP-MS. Mean Hg values in the soils, roots, and shoots of all plants were 6.914, 460, and 206 µg kg(-1), respectively and lower than 1. The mean enrichment factors for the roots (ECR) and shoots (ECS) of these plants were 0.06 and 0.09, respectively and lower than 1. These results show that the roots of the studied plants prevented Hg from reaching the aerial parts of the plants. The mean translocation factor (TLF) was 1.29 and higher than 1. The mean TLF values indicated that all 12 plant species had the ability to transfer Hg from the roots to the shoots but that transfer was more efficient in plants with higher ECR and ECS. Therefore, these plants could be useful for the biomonitoring of environmental pollution and for rehabilitating areas contaminated by Hg.

  3. Tracking the diurnal signal of plant water uptake through the hydrologic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; Hassler, Sibylle; Heidbüchel, Ingo; Weiler, Markus; Simard, Sonia; Güntner, Andreas; Heinrich, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Plant water uptake during summer is characterized by strong diurnal fluctuations. As a result a diurnal sink term is imposed on catchment storage, affecting the unsaturated zone, sometimes the saturated zone and even streamflow. Detecting this signal and understanding its propagation through the hydrological system may help to better quantify eco-hydrological connectivity. The extent and strength of the propagation of this signal from plant to soil to ground- and stream water was investigated with a unique setup of 46 field sites in Luxemburg and 15 field sites in Germany. These sites cover a range of geologies, soils, topographies and types of vegetation. Vegetation types include grassland, pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 3-5 soil moisture profiles, matrix potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors (as proxy for plant water uptake) as well as standard climate data. At sites with access to a stream, discharge or water level is also recorded. Signal strength (amplitude of diurnal fluctuations) can thus be traced through the system and gives an indication of the physical sphere of influence of plant water uptake i.e. the "eco-hydro-connectivity". Temporal dynamics of signal strength furthermore suggest a shifting spatial distribution of root water uptake with time. The analysis of time lags (or phase shifts) between daily fluctuations in temperature, radiation, sapflow, soil water, groundwater and streamflow gives further insights into the processes driving and propagating these signals and inter-site comparison allows for the investigation of local controls.

  4. [Uptake and accumulation characteristics of silicon and other nutritional elements in different age Phyllostachys praecox plants].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhang-Ting; Jiang, Pei-Kun; Song, Zhao-Liang; Meng, Ci-Fu; Wu, Jia-Sen

    2013-05-01

    The samples of different age (1-4 years old) Phyllostachys praecox plants and their organs (leaf, branch, and culm) were collected from their main production area in Lin' an County, Zhejiang Province of East China to study the contents and the uptake and accumulation characteristics of silicon and other nutritional elements, as well as the interrelations between Si and other nutrient elements. In the P. praecox plants, the C content in aboveground part was in the order of culm > branch> leaf, whereas the Si, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe and Mn contents were in the order of leaf > branch > culm. Mn was mainly accumulated in leaf, while the other nine nutrient elements were mainly accumulated in the culm of 1-year old plants. The average Si content in the aboveground part of 3-4 year old plants was 13.66 g x kg(-1), suggesting that P. praecox belonged to Si accumulation plant. The leaf N, P, K, and Mg contents decreased, while the C, Al, and Mn contents increased with increasing plant age. The Si uptake by the aboveground part was mainly occurred in the second year (57.1%), while the N and K uptake was mainly in the first two years (67.7% - 93.7%). Thereafter, the N and K flowed out from the aboveground part, with the outflow rates reached 19.1% - 39.1% of the total accumulated amounts. The Si in P. praecox was significantly correlated with Ca, Al, and Mn, and negatively correlated with N, P, K, and Mg.

  5. Predicting metal uptake by wetland plants under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    van der Welle, Marlies E W; Roelofs, Jan G M; Op Den Camp, Huub J M; Lamers, Leon P M

    2007-04-01

    Metal pollution can be a serious threat to ecosystems at a global scale. Although the bioavailability of potentially toxic metals is determined by many biotic and abiotic factors, including pH and redox potential, total metal concentrations in the soil are used widely to assess or predict toxicity. In the present study we tested the effect of desiccation of soils differing in acidification potential and total heavy metal contamination on the growth and metal uptake of three typical, common wetland species: Caltha palustris, Juncus effusus, and Rumex hydrolapathum. We found that plant growth in wet soils mainly was determined by nutrient availability, though in dry soils the combined effects of acidification and increased metal availability prevailed. Metal uptake under anaerobic conditions was best predicted by the acidification potential (sediment S/[Ca + Mg] ratio), not by total metal concentrations. We propose that this is related to radial oxygen loss by wetland plant roots, which leads to acidification of the rhizosphere. Under aerobic conditions, plant metal uptake was best predicted by the amount of CaCl2-extractable metals. We conclude that total metal concentrations are not suitable for predicting bioavailability and that the above diagnostic parameters will provide insight into biogeochemical processes involved in toxicity assessment and soil policy.

  6. On the formation and extent of uptake of silver nanoparticles by live plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew T.; Bali, Roza

    2008-04-01

    In this work we investigate the limits of uptake of metallic silver by two common metallophytes, Brassica juncea (BJ) and Medicago sativa (MS) and assess the form and distribution of the metal once sequestered by the plants. BJ accumulated up to 12.4 wt.% silver when exposed to an aqueous substrate containing 1,000 ppm AgNO3 for 72 h, however silver uptake was largely independent of exposure time and substrate silver concentration. MS accumulated up to 13.6 wt.% silver when exposed to an aqueous substrate containing 10,000 ppm AgNO3 for 24 h. In contrast to BJ there was a general trend for MS showing an increase in metal uptake with a corresponding increase in the substrate metal concentration and exposure time. In both cases the silver was stored as discrete nanoparticles, with a mean size of ˜50 nm. According to the hyperaccumulation definition of Brooks et al. (Brooks RR, Chambers MF, Nicks LJ, Robinson BH (1998) Phytomining. Trends Plant Sci 3:359-362), this is the first report of the hyperaccumulation of silver in any plant species.

  7. How does altered precipitation and annual grass invasion affect plant N uptake in a native semi-arid shrub community?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritz, M.; Lipson, D.; Cleland, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    concentrations are more variable in grasses which could indicate higher plasticity in grass N uptake compared to shrubs. Resin N supports the 15N patterns. Resin N declined more rapidly under grasses and was lower than under shrubs, presumably due to high grass N uptake. Resin N was particularly high under shrubs in wetter conditions indicating that shrubs could not take advantage of high N supply. Together the 15N and resin N patterns indicate that grasses accumulate more N and begin N uptake earlier in the season than shrubs. Although 15N did not differ in response to rainfall, invasion alters the distribution of N in the system. Rain was only manipulated for one growing season; multiple years of altered precipitation may yield significant differences. Early season N uptake by grasses, the low variability in shrub 15N and low shrub 15N in wetter conditions, despite high resin N, indicates that N competition between invasive grasses and native shrubs is weak. If N supply is sufficient for shrub demands, invasive grasses and shrubs could coexist. This study contributes to a broader understanding of how changes in resource supply, plant phenology and functional type interact and respond to climate change.

  8. Increased plant growth and copper uptake of host and non-host plants by metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Leni; Wang, Xiaohan; Li, Ya

    2016-01-01

    The effects of inoculation with two metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria (Burkholderia sp. GL12 and Bacillus megaterium JL35) were evaluated on the plant growth and Cu uptake in their host Elsholtzia splendens and non-host Brassica napus plants grown in natural Cu-contaminated soil. The two strains showed a high level of ACC deaminase activities. In pot experiments, inoculation with strain GL12 significantly increased root and above-ground tissue dry weights of both plants, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of E. splendens and Brassica napus by 132% and 48.2% respectively. Inoculation with strain JL35 was found to significantly increase not only the biomass of B. napus, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of B. napus by 31.3%, but Cu concentration of E. splendens for above-ground tissues by 318% and roots by 69.7%, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of E. splendens by 223%. The two strains could colonize the rhizosphere soils and root interiors of both plants. Notably, strain JL35 could colonize the shoot tissues and significantly increase the translocation factors and bioaccumulation factors of E. splendens. These results suggested that Burkholderia sp. GL12 and B. megaterium JL35 were valuable bacterial resource which had the potential in improving the efficiency of Cu phytoextraction by E. splendens and B. napus in a natural Cu-contaminated soil.

  9. Heavy Metal Uptake by C. esculentus, S. alterniflora and Agronomic Plants from Contaminated Soils and Sediments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-28

    HEAVY METAL UPTAKE BY C ESCULENTUS S ALIERNIFLORA ANDAGRONOIC PLANTS FR,, U’ UNIVERSITY COLL OF WALES ABERYSTWYTH DEPT OF GEOGRAPHY 6 E DAVIES 20 FE...uu-~~ HEAVY METAL UP TAKE BY C.* escu lentus, S.* a iter-nif cra AND AGRONOIMIC PLANTS FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SEDIMENTSj PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR Dr...comprising a range of heavy metal contents. Analytical data for the selected soils are:- EDTA extract: jig/g soilLime Requirement AREA pH (cwt/acre) Pb

  10. Selenium uptake and volatilization from plants growing in soil. [Astragalus bisulcatus

    SciTech Connect

    Duckhart, E.C.; Waldron, L.J.; Donner, H.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Selenium volatilization rates from plants and soil confined in a closed transparent chamber varied greatly among five plant species over 3- to 6-day collection periods. Astragalus bisulcatus and broccoli showed the highest rates of volatilization, 1.7 and 1.1 {mu}g Se/kg dry soil/day, respectively. Volatilization rates for soil only, tomato, tall fescue, and alfalfa were 0.7, 0.5, 0.3, and 0.2 {mu}g/kg/day, respectively. Although it was not possible to separate plant and soil microbial volatilization, the large differences between plant species suggest a significant role for plants in Se volatilization from soils. Se(VI) added to soil as sodium selenate was rapidly taken up by all five plant types to the extent that plant uptake dominated Se removal from the soil. Volatilization accounted for only 0.5% (alfalfa) to 6.1% (Astragalus bis.) of the selenium lost from the soil. Although Astragalus had the highest tissue selenium concentration and selenium volatilization rates, it ranked fourth behind broccoli, tomato, and alfalfa in order of selenium removal because of its small biomass at 15 weeks. Alfalfa accumulated 22.1 {mu}g Se/g plant tissue from the Se(VI) amended soil, a concentration exceeded only by Astragalus (80.6) and broccoli (22.3). However, alfalfa had the lowest short-term net volatilization rate of the five plant types.

  11. Uptake and metabolism of diclofenac in Typha latifolia--how plants cope with human pharmaceutical pollution.

    PubMed

    Bartha, Bernadett; Huber, Christian; Schröder, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The fate of pharmaceuticals in our environment is a very important issue for environmental and health research. Although these substances have been detected in environmental compartments in low concentration until now, they will pose considerable environmental risk to ecosystems, animals and human due to their biological activity. Alternative plant based removal technologies that make use of some potential wetland species like Phragmites or Typha within traditional wastewater treatment plants have to be established to cope with this "new generation" of pollutants. We investigated uptake and translocation of diclofenac (1mgl(-1)) in the macrophyte Typha latifolia L. during one week exposure in greenhouse experiments. Detoxification products and involved key enzymatic processes were identified. We also examined the oxidative stress induced by the treatment and the defense capacity of the plants. Rapid uptake and effective metabolism were observed, where glycoside and glutathione conjugates represent dominant metabolites. Up to seven-fold induction of glycosyltransferase activity was observed in roots, but not in shoots. Glutathione S-transferase activity was also induced, but to a lower extent. The activity changes of defense enzymes points to oxidative stress in the plants. Our results show that human pharmaceuticals can be metabolized by plants similar to xenobiotics, but that similarities to human metabolism are limited.

  12. Plant Nitrogen Acquisition Under Low Availability: Regulation of Uptake and Root Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Kiba, Takatoshi; Krapp, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability is a major factor determining plant growth and productivity. Plants acquire nitrogen nutrients from the soil through their roots mostly in the form of ammonium and nitrate. Since these nutrients are scarce in natural soils, plants have evolved adaptive responses to cope with the environment. One of the most important responses is the regulation of nitrogen acquisition efficiency. This review provides an update on the molecular determinants of two major drivers of the nitrogen acquisition efficiency: (i) uptake activity (e.g. high-affinity nitrogen transporters) and (ii) root architecture (e.g. low-nitrogen-availability-specific regulators of primary and lateral root growth). Major emphasis is laid on the regulation of these determinants by nitrogen supply at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which enables plants to optimize nitrogen acquisition efficiency under low nitrogen availability. PMID:27025887

  13. Plant Nitrogen Acquisition Under Low Availability: Regulation of Uptake and Root Architecture.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Takatoshi; Krapp, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen availability is a major factor determining plant growth and productivity. Plants acquire nitrogen nutrients from the soil through their roots mostly in the form of ammonium and nitrate. Since these nutrients are scarce in natural soils, plants have evolved adaptive responses to cope with the environment. One of the most important responses is the regulation of nitrogen acquisition efficiency. This review provides an update on the molecular determinants of two major drivers of the nitrogen acquisition efficiency: (i) uptake activity (e.g. high-affinity nitrogen transporters) and (ii) root architecture (e.g. low-nitrogen-availability-specific regulators of primary and lateral root growth). Major emphasis is laid on the regulation of these determinants by nitrogen supply at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which enables plants to optimize nitrogen acquisition efficiency under low nitrogen availability.

  14. Rhizosphere Microbial Community Composition Affects Cadmium and Zinc Uptake by the Metal-Hyperaccumulating Plant Arabidopsis halleri

    PubMed Central

    Muehe, E. Marie; Weigold, Pascal; Adaktylou, Irini J.; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The remediation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction depends on plant growth and plant metal accessibility. Soil microorganisms can affect the accumulation of metals by plants either by directly or indirectly stimulating plant growth and activity or by (im)mobilizing and/or complexing metals. Understanding the intricate interplay of metal-accumulating plants with their rhizosphere microbiome is an important step toward the application and optimization of phytoremediation. We compared the effects of a “native” and a strongly disturbed (gamma-irradiated) soil microbial communities on cadmium and zinc accumulation by the plant Arabidopsis halleri in soil microcosm experiments. A. halleri accumulated 100% more cadmium and 15% more zinc when grown on the untreated than on the gamma-irradiated soil. Gamma irradiation affected neither plant growth nor the 1 M HCl-extractable metal content of the soil. However, it strongly altered the soil microbial community composition and overall cell numbers. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons of DNA extracted from rhizosphere samples of A. halleri identified microbial taxa (Lysobacter, Streptomyces, Agromyces, Nitrospira, “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium”) of higher relative sequence abundance in the rhizospheres of A. halleri plants grown on untreated than on gamma-irradiated soil, leading to hypotheses on their potential effect on plant metal uptake. However, further experimental evidence is required, and wherefore we discuss different mechanisms of interaction of A. halleri with its rhizosphere microbiome that might have directly or indirectly affected plant metal accumulation. Deciphering the complex interactions between A. halleri and individual microbial taxa will help to further develop soil metal phytoextraction as an efficient and sustainable remediation strategy. PMID:25595759

  15. Aridity and plant uptake interact to make dryland soils hotspots for nitric oxide (NO) emissions.

    PubMed

    Homyak, Peter M; Blankinship, Joseph C; Marchus, Kenneth; Lucero, Delores M; Sickman, James O; Schimel, Joshua P

    2016-05-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important trace gas and regulator of atmospheric photochemistry. Theory suggests moist soils optimize NO emissions, whereas wet or dry soils constrain them. In drylands, however, NO emissions can be greatest in dry soils and when dry soils are rewet. To understand how aridity and vegetation interact to generate this pattern, we measured NO fluxes in a California grassland, where we manipulated vegetation cover and the length of the dry season and measured [δ(15)-N]NO and [δ(18)-O]NO following rewetting with (15)N-labeled substrates. Plant N uptake reduced NO emissions by limiting N availability. In the absence of plants, soil N pools increased and NO emissions more than doubled. In dry soils, NO-producing substrates concentrated in hydrologically disconnected microsites. Upon rewetting, these concentrated N pools underwent rapid abiotic reaction, producing large NO pulses. Biological processes did not substantially contribute to the initial NO pulse but governed NO emissions within 24 h postwetting. Plants acted as an N sink, limiting NO emissions under optimal soil moisture. When soils were dry, however, the shutdown in plant N uptake, along with the activation of chemical mechanisms and the resuscitation of soil microbial processes upon rewetting, governed N loss. Aridity and vegetation interact to maintain a leaky N cycle during periods when plant N uptake is low, and hydrologically disconnected soils favor both microbial and abiotic NO-producing mechanisms. Under increasing rates of atmospheric N deposition and intensifying droughts, NO gas evasion may become an increasingly important pathway for ecosystem N loss in drylands.

  16. Aridity and plant uptake interact to make dryland soils hotspots for nitric oxide (NO) emissions

    PubMed Central

    Blankinship, Joseph C.; Marchus, Kenneth; Lucero, Delores M.; Sickman, James O.; Schimel, Joshua P.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important trace gas and regulator of atmospheric photochemistry. Theory suggests moist soils optimize NO emissions, whereas wet or dry soils constrain them. In drylands, however, NO emissions can be greatest in dry soils and when dry soils are rewet. To understand how aridity and vegetation interact to generate this pattern, we measured NO fluxes in a California grassland, where we manipulated vegetation cover and the length of the dry season and measured [δ15-N]NO and [δ18-O]NO following rewetting with 15N-labeled substrates. Plant N uptake reduced NO emissions by limiting N availability. In the absence of plants, soil N pools increased and NO emissions more than doubled. In dry soils, NO-producing substrates concentrated in hydrologically disconnected microsites. Upon rewetting, these concentrated N pools underwent rapid abiotic reaction, producing large NO pulses. Biological processes did not substantially contribute to the initial NO pulse but governed NO emissions within 24 h postwetting. Plants acted as an N sink, limiting NO emissions under optimal soil moisture. When soils were dry, however, the shutdown in plant N uptake, along with the activation of chemical mechanisms and the resuscitation of soil microbial processes upon rewetting, governed N loss. Aridity and vegetation interact to maintain a leaky N cycle during periods when plant N uptake is low, and hydrologically disconnected soils favor both microbial and abiotic NO-producing mechanisms. Under increasing rates of atmospheric N deposition and intensifying droughts, NO gas evasion may become an increasingly important pathway for ecosystem N loss in drylands. PMID:27114523

  17. Prediction of Heavy Metal Uptake by Marsh Plants Based on Chemical Extraction of Heavy Metals from Dredged Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    A field and laboratory study was conducted to establish the extent of heavy metal absorption and uptake by marsh plant species from dredged material...emphasizes the need for a method to predict heavy metal availability from dredged material to plants. DTPA extraction of heavy metals gave the best correlations with actual heavy metal concentrations in marsh plants.

  18. Silicon modifies root anatomy, and uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in young maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Vaculík, Marek; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria; Luxová, Miroslava; Stoláriková, Miroslava; Lux, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Methods Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 µm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of 109Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Key Results Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Conclusions Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots. PMID:22455991

  19. An expanding role for purine uptake permease-like transporters in plant secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jelesko, John G.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, our understanding of the plant purine uptake permease (PUP) transporter family was primarily oriented on purine nucleobase substrates and their tissue-specific expression patterns in Arabidopsis. However, a tobacco PUP-like homolog demonstrating nicotine uptake permease activity was recently shown to affect both nicotine metabolism and root cell growth. These new findings expand the physiological role for PUP-like transporters to include plant secondary metabolism. Molecular evolution analyses of PUP-like transporters indicate they are distinct group within an ancient super family of drug and metabolite transporters (DMTs). The PUP-like family originated during terrestrial plant evolution sometime between the bryophytes and the lycophytes. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the PUP-like transporters were likely derived from a pre-existing nucleotide-sugar transporter family within the DMT super family. Within the lycophyte Selaginella, there are three paralogous groups of PUP-like transporters. One of the three PUP-like paralogous groups showed an extensive pattern of gene duplication and diversification within the angiosperm lineage, whereas the more ancestral PUP-like paralogous groups did not. Biochemical characterization of four closely related PUP-like paralogs together with model-based phylogenetic analyses indicate both subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization during the molecular evolution of angiosperm PUP-like transporters. These findings suggest that members of the PUP-like family of DMT transporters are likely involved in diverse primary and secondary plant metabolic pathways. PMID:22639664

  20. Comparative uptake of uranium, thorium, and plutonium by biota inhabiting a contaminated Tennessee floodplain

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Bondietti, E.A.; Walker, R.L.

    1981-04-01

    The uptake of /sup 238/U, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 239/Pu from soil by fescue, grasshoppers, and small mammals was compared at the contaminated White Oak Creek floodplain in East Tennessee. Comparisons of actinide uptake were based on analyses of radionuclide ratios (U/Pu and Th/Pu) in soil and biota. U:Pu ratios in small mammal carcasses (shrews, mice, and rats) and bone samples from larger mammals (rabbit, woodchuck, opossum, and raccoon) were significantly greater (P less than or equal to 0.05) than U/Pu ratios in soil (based on 8M HNO/sub 3/ extractable). There was no significant difference between Th/Pu ratios in animals and soil. The order of actinide accumulation by biota from the site relative to contaminated soil was U > Th approx. = Pu.

  1. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) uptake by vegetation controlled by atmospheric concentrations and plant stomatal aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro-Suarez, I. G.; Meixner, F. X.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exchange between the atmosphere and five European tree species was investigated in the laboratory using a dynamic branch enclosure system (consisting of two cuvettes) and a highly specific NO2 analyzer. NO2 measurements were performed with a sensitive gas phase chemiluminescence NO detector combined with a NO2 specific (photolytic) converter, both from Eco-Physics (Switzerland). This highly specific detection system excluded bias from other nitrogen compounds. Investigations were performed at two light intensities (Photosynthetic Active Radiation, PAR, 450 and 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and NO2 concentrations between 0 and 5 ppb. Ambient parameters (air temperature and relative humidity) were held constant. The data showed dominant NO2 uptake by the respective tree species under all conditions. The results did not confirm the existence of a compensation point within a 95% confidence level, though we cannot completely exclude emission of NO2 under very low atmospheric concentrations. Induced stomatal stricture, or total closure, by changing light conditions, as well as by application of the plant hormone ABA (Abscisic Acid) caused a corresponding decrease of NO2 uptake. No loss of NO2 to plant surfaces was observed under stomatal closure and species dependent differences in uptake rates could be clearly related to stomatal behavior.

  2. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria affect the growth and nutrient uptake of Fraxinus americana container seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangchun; Xing, Shangjun; Ma, Hailin; Du, Zhenyu; Ma, Bingyao

    2013-05-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are important catalysts that regulate the functional properties of agricultural systems. However, there is little information on the effect of PGPR inoculation on the growth and nutrient accumulation of forest container seedlings. This study determined the effects of a growth medium inoculated with PGPR on the nutrient uptake, nutrient accumulation, and growth of Fraxinus americana container seedlings. PGPR inoculation with fertilizer increased the dry matter accumulation of the F. americana aerial parts with delayed seedling emergence time. Under fertilized conditions, the accumulation time of phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) in the F. americana aerial parts was 13 days longer due to PGPR inoculation. PGPR increased the maximum daily P and K accumulations in fertilized seedlings by 9.31 and 10.44 %, respectively, but had little impact on unfertilized ones. Regardless of fertilizer application, the root exudates, namely sugars, amino acids, and organic acids significantly increased because of PGPR inoculation. PGPR inoculation with fertilizer increased the root, shoot, and leaf yields by 19.65, 22.94, and 19.44 %, respectively, as well as the P and K contents by 8.33 and 10.60 %, respectively. Consequently, the N, P, and K uptakes increased by 19.85, 31.97, and 33.95 %, respectively. Hence, PGPR inoculation with fertilizer can be used as a bioenhancer for plant growth and nutrient uptake in forest container seedling nurseries.

  3. Effects of VA mycorrhiza formation on plant nitrogen uptake and rhizosphere bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal sorghum plants were grown in pots at three levels of fertilizer nitrogen ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) which had been enriched with /sup 15/N. Root colonization by Glomus mosseae did not affect plant growth or total N uptake, but significant reductions in mycorrhizal plant /sup 15/N:/sup 14/N ratios and increased 'A' values were found. This suggested that mycorrhizal plants had access to an N source which was less available to nonmycorrhizal plants. In two additional experiments, mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal celery plants were grown in pots which allowed VAM fungal hyphae, but not roots, to have direct access to /sup 15/N-enriched organic or inorganic N sources. Root dry weight was significantly reduced in mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal plants had significantly greater shoot and root /sup 15/N content than nonmycorrhizal plants. Number and length of VAM fungal hyphae crossing into the area of /sup 15/N placement were positively correlated with mycorrhizal plant /sup 15/N content in the inorganic-N but not organic-N treatment. In a fourth experiment, the effect of G. mosseae on the rhizosphere populations of five bacterial isolates associated with blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) was examined. No significant differences in bacterial populations were found in nonrhizosphere soil samples from pots of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants. One bacterial isolate was significantly increased in number, while a different isolate and total bacterial populations were significantly reduced by the presence of the mycorrhizal fungus. The results suggest that root colonization by VAM fungi can alter rhizosphere bacterial populations.

  4. Modeling the effects of organic nitrogen uptake by plants on the carbon cycling of boreal forest and tundra ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Boreal forest and tundra are the major ecosystems in the northern high latitudes in which a large amount of carbon is stored. These ecosystems are nitrogen-limited due to slow mineralization rate of the soil organic nitrogen. Recently, abundant field studies have found that organic nitrogen is another important nitrogen supply for boreal forest and tundra ecosystems. In this study, we incorporated a mechanism that allowed boreal plants to uptake small molecular amino acids into a process-based biogeochemical model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to evaluate the impact of organic nitrogen uptake on ecosystem carbon cycling. The new version of the model was evaluated for both boreal forest and tundra sites. We found that the modeled organic nitrogen uptake accounted for 36-87% of total nitrogen uptake by plants in tundra ecosystems and 26-50% for boreal forests, suggesting that tundra ecosystem might have more relied on the organic form of nitrogen than boreal forests. The simulated monthly gross ecosystem production (GPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) tended to be larger with the new version of the model since the plant uptake of organic nitrogen alleviated the soil nitrogen limitation especially during the growing season. The sensitivity study indicated that the most important factors controlling the plant uptake of organic nitrogen was the soil amino acid diffusion coefficient (De) in our model, suggesting that the organic nitrogen uptake by plants is likely to be regulated by the edaphic characteristics of diffusion. The model uncertainty due to uncertain parameters associated with organic nitrogen uptake of the tundra ecosystem was larger than the boreal forest ecosystems. This study suggests that considering the organic nitrogen uptake by plants is important to carbon modeling of boreal forest and tundra ecosystems.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae contribute to the uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by plant roots.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanzheng; Cheng, Zhaoxia; Ling, Wanting; Huang, Jing

    2010-09-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphae-mediated uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by the roots of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was investigated using three-compartment systems. Glomus mosseae and Glomus etunicatum were chosen, and fluorene and phenanthrene were used as representative PAHs. When roots were grown in un-spiked soils, AM hyphae extended into PAH-spiked soil and clearly absorbed and transported PAHs to roots, resulting in high concentrations of fluorene and phenanthrene in roots. This was further confirmed by the batch equilibration experiment, which revealed that the partition coefficients (K(d)) of tested PAHs by mycorrhizal hyphae were 270-356% greater than those by roots, suggesting the great potential of hyphae to absorb PAHs. Because of fluorene's lower molecular weight and higher water solubility, its translocation by hyphae was greater than that of phenanthrene. These results provide new perspectives on the AM hyphae-mediated uptake by plants of organic contaminants from soil.

  6. Stimulation of Cadmium Uptake in Relation to the Cadmium Content of Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Charles M.; Ringoet, Arthur; Myttenaere, Constant

    1978-01-01

    The time course of cadmium uptake by the roots of intact tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was measured in a nutrient solution with a micromolar cadmium concentration until all cadmium in the medium was exhausted. Exhaustion taking a few hours, cadmium was repeatedly added to the nutrient solution. The initial rate of cadmium uptake was computed for each cadmium addition. This rate sharply increased and ultimately leveled off, the maximum value being about three times higher than the value measured after the first cadmium addition. The stimulating effect of cadmium was associated with an inhibitory effect at higher levels of cadmium concentrations. An increase in the net cadmium influx with time could not be explained by the binding of heavy metal to a fixed number of organic compounds. Conceivably, the production of binding sites could be increased and cadmium might play a part in controlling the rate of sites production. PMID:16660557

  7. Mathematical modelling of the uptake and transport of salt in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kylie J; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2013-11-07

    In this paper, we present and discuss a mathematical model of ion uptake and transport in roots of plants. The underlying physical model of transport is based on the mechanisms of forced diffusion and convection. The model can take account of local variations in effective ion and water permeabilities across the major tissue regions of plant roots, represented through a discretized coupled system of governing equations including mass balance, forced diffusion, convection and electric potential. We present simulation results of an exploration of the consequent enormous parameter space. Among our findings we identify the electric potential as a major factor affecting ion transport across, and accumulation in, root tissues. We also find that under conditions of a constant but realistic level of bulk soil salt concentration and plant-soil hydraulic pressure, diffusion plays a significant role even when convection by the water transpiration stream is operating.

  8. Phytoremediation of Metal Contaminated Soil Using Willow: Exploiting Plant-Associated Bacteria to Improve Biomass Production and Metal Uptake.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Jolien; Weyens, Nele; Croes, Sarah; Beckers, Bram; Meiresonne, Linda; Van Peteghem, Pierre; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) of willow and poplar is proposed for economic valorization and concurrently as remediation strategy for metal contaminated land in northeast-Belgium. However, metal phytoextraction appears insufficient to effectuate rapid reduction of soil metal contents. To increase both biomass production and metal accumulation of SRC, two strategies are proposed: (i) in situ selection of the best performing clones and (ii) bioaugmentation of these clones with beneficial plant-associated bacteria. Based on field data, two experimental willow clones, a Salix viminalis and a Salix alba x alba clone, were selected. Compared to the best performing commercial clones, considerable increases in stem metal extraction were achieved (up to 74% for Cd and 91% for Zn). From the selected clones, plant-associated bacteria were isolated and identified. All strains were subsequently screened for their plant growth-promoting and metal uptake enhancing traits. Five strains were selected for a greenhouse inoculation experiment with the selected clones planted in Cd-Zn-Pb contaminated soil. Extraction potential tended to increase after inoculation of S. viminalis plants with a Rahnella sp. strain due to a significantly increased twig biomass. However, although bacterial strains showing beneficial traits in vitro were used for inoculation, increments in extraction potential were not always observed.

  9. Comparative studies on phosphorus uptake and growth kinetics of the microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis and the macroalga Ulva pertusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Chunrong; Dong, Shuanglin

    2004-04-01

    Short-term uptake experiments and long-term semicontinuous culture experiments were performed under the condition of phosphorus (P) limitation to estimate and compare the P uptake and growth kinetics of the microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis and the macroalga Ulva pertusa. Two new parameters, the maximum specific uptake rate ( V {m/sp}) and the maximal growth efficiency (β), are introduced to achieve uniformity for the comparison of nutrient uptake and growth efficiency between microalgae and macroalgae. T. subcordiformis possesses 3 times lower half saturation uptake constant, 4 times higher maximal growth rate and 20 times higher maximum specific uptake rate than U. pertusa, while U. pertusa possesses 4 times higher maximal growth efficiency than T. subcordiformis.

  10. A New Oidiodendron maius Strain Isolated from Rhododendron fortunei and its Effects on Nitrogen Uptake and Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiangying; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Chunying; Pan, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    A new mycorrhizal fungal strain was isolated from hair roots of Rhododendron fortunei Lindl. grown in Huading Forest Park, Zhejiang Province, China. Morphological characterization and internal transcribed spacer rDNA analysis suggested that it belongs to Oidiodendron maius Barron, and we designated it as strain Om19. Methods for culturing Om19 were established, and the ability of Om19 to form mycorrhizae on R. fortunei was evaluated in a peat-based substrate. Microscopic observations showed hyaline hyphae on the surface of hair roots and crowded hyphal complexes (hyphal coils) inside root cortical cells of R. fortunei after inoculation, indicating that the roots were well colonized by Om19. In a second experiment, fresh and dry weight of R. fortunei 2 months after Om19 inoculation were greater than uninoculated plants, and the total nitrogen absorbed by plants inoculated with Om19 was greater than the uninoculated controls. qRT-PCR analysis of five genes related to N uptake and metabolism (two nitrate transporters, an ammonium transporter, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase) showed that these genes were highly upregulated with twofold to ninefold greater expression in plants inoculated with Om19 compared to uninoculated plants. In the third experiment, Om19 was inoculated into the peat-based substrate for growing Formosa azalea (Rhododendron indica ‘Formosa’). ‘Formosa’ azalea plants grown in the inoculated substrate had larger canopies and root systems compared to uninoculated plants. Our results show that Om19 could be an important microbial tool for improving production of Rhododendron plants. PMID:27602030

  11. Is nutrient uptake by plant roots sensitive to the rate of mass flow? Reappraisal of an old chestnut for spatially distributed root systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrie, R. E.; Näsholm, T.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous modelling papers have considered the contribution of mass flow to nutrient uptake by a single plant root, but few have evaluated its contribution at the scale of an entire root system. We derive equations for nitrogen (N) influx per unit root surface area (J) and N uptake by a single root (U) as functions of soil nitrogen supply, root-length density (RLD) and the velocity of water at the root surface (vo). This model of N uptake by a single root can be used to evaluate N uptake by an entire root system if spatial distributions are known for soil N supply, root biomass and water-uptake velocity. In this paper we show that spatial distributions of RLD and vo can be estimated simultaneously under an optimisation hypothesis (MaxNup, McMurtrie et al. 2012), according to which total root mass and total water uptake are distributed vertically in order to maximise total N uptake. The MaxNup hypothesis leads to equations for optimal vertical profiles of RLD, vo, J and U, maximum rooting depth and the fraction of total available soil nitrogen taken up by the root system. Predicted values of vo are enhanced at depths where nitrogen influx per unit root surface area (J) is more sensitive to vo and diminished at depths where J is less sensitive to vo. Predicted vo is largest at the base of the root system where RLD is lowest, and is smallest in upper soil layers where RLD is highest. MaxNup thus predicts that water uptake will be distributed preferentially to soil depths where it will enhance nitrogen uptake U; this tendency will amplify the sensitivity of total N uptake to total water uptake, compared with strategies where vo is the same for all roots, or where vo is elevated for roots in upper soil layers. Reference McMurtrie RE, Iversen CM, Dewar RC, Medlyn BE, Näsholm T, Pepper DA, Norby RJ. 2012. Plant root distributions and nitrogen uptake predicted by a hypothesis of optimal root foraging. Ecology and Evolution 2: 1235-1250.

  12. Magnetite nanoparticle (NP) uptake by wheat plants and its effect on cadmium and chromium toxicological behavior.

    PubMed

    López-Luna, J; Silva-Silva, M J; Martinez-Vargas, S; Mijangos-Ricardez, O F; González-Chávez, M C; Solís-Domínguez, F A; Cuevas-Díaz, M C

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work was to assess the uptake of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) by wheat plants and its effect on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of individual and joint Cd(2+) and Cr(6+) levels. Seven-day assays were conducted using quartz sand as the plant growth substrate. The endpoints measured were seed germination, root and shoot lengths, and heavy metal accumulation. Magnetite exhibited very low toxicity, regardless of the wheat seedling NP uptake and distribution into roots and shoots. The seed germination and shoot length were not sensitive enough, while the root length was a more sensitive toxicity endpoint. The root length of wheat seedlings exposed to individual metals decreased by 50% at 2.67mgCd(2)(+)kg(-1) and 5.53mgCr(6+)kg(-1). However, when magnetite NPs (1000mgkg(-1)) were added, the root length of the plants increased by 25 and 50%. Cd(2+) and Cr(6+) showed similar and noninteractive joint action, but strongly impaired the wheat seedlings. In contrast, an interactive infra-additive or antagonistic effect was observed upon adding magnetite NPs. Thus, cadmium and chromium accumulation in vegetable tissues was considerately diminished and the toxicity alleviated.

  13. IRT1, an Arabidopsis transporter essential for iron uptake from the soil and for plant growth.

    PubMed

    Vert, Grégory; Grotz, Natasha; Dédaldéchamp, Fabienne; Gaymard, Frédéric; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2002-06-01

    Plants are the principal source of iron in most diets, yet iron availability often limits plant growth. In response to iron deficiency, Arabidopsis roots induce the expression of the divalent cation transporter IRT1. Here, we present genetic evidence that IRT1 is essential for the uptake of iron from the soil. An Arabidopsis knockout mutant in IRT1 is chlorotic and has a severe growth defect in soil, leading to death. This defect is rescued by the exogenous application of iron. The mutant plants do not take up iron and fail to accumulate other divalent cations in low-iron conditions. IRT1-green fluorescent protein fusion, transiently expressed in culture cells, localized to the plasma membrane. We also show, through promoter::beta-glucuronidase analysis and in situ hybridization, that IRT1 is expressed in the external cell layers of the root, specifically in response to iron starvation. These results clearly demonstrate that IRT1 is the major transporter responsible for high-affinity metal uptake under iron deficiency.

  14. Uptake of munitions materiels (TNT, RDX) by crop plants and potential interactions of nitrogen nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A.; Mitchell, W.

    1995-12-31

    Munitions materiel such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and their combustion/decomposition products can accumulate/cycle in terrestrial environs. High soil organic matter and fertility have been previously shown to negatively correlate with both TNT or RDX uptake in plants such as grass, wheat, and bean. The present study was therefore conducted using low fertility soil to assess uptake and distribution patterns of C-radiolabelled TNT and RDX (15 and 30 {micro}g/g) within corn (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), carrot (Daucus carota), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown to maturity in growth chambers. Uptake by the plants at maturity (90- to 120-days) ranged from 1.8 to 2.7% of total amended {sup 14}C-TNT for carrots and corn respectively and 17 to 33% of total amended {sup 14}C-RDX for corn and carrots respectively. Distribution patterns of total radiolabel indicate that the TNT-derived label was primarily retained within the roots (60 to 85%) while the RDX-derived label was distributed to the shoots (85 to 97%). Less than 0.01 {micro}g/g dry wt. TNT was found in all analyzed shoot tissues with > 90% of the TNT-derived radiolabel in the form of polar metabolites. Concentrations of RDX in shoot tissues of corn exceeded 180 {micro}g/g dry wt. Alfalfa grown in unfertilized, fertilized (NO{sub 3}), or unfertilized-inoculated (Rhizobia) soil exhibited a 70 to 100% increase in dry wt. after 45 days in the TNT-amended (15 {micro}g/g) fertilized and unfertilized-inoculated plants versus the controls. A potential TNT/nitrogen interaction will be discussed.

  15. Analysing global ecosystem CO2 uptake capacity with plant trait data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Weg, Martine; Sadat Musavi, Talie; van Bodegom, Peter; Kattge, Jens; Mahecha, Miguel; Reichstein, Markus; Bahn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Given the modulating role of vegetation in the global carbon cycle, there is a demand for simple and general scaling relationships of vegetation characteristics and ecosystem CO2-uptake and emissions. On a leaf level, is it well established that plant trait foliar nitrogen (N) relates strongly with leaf level CO2. Furthermore, ecosystem productivity or CO2 uptake capacity have been related directly with whole-canopy N concentrations for a variety of ecosystems such as grasslands, and boreal, temporal and tropical forests. However, studies on the global validity of these leaf and ecosystem level relationships have been lacking up to date. The arrival of the large plant trait database TRY database offers the opportunity to link plant trait and ecosystem functioning on a global scale. In this study, we used CO2 flux data from the FLUXNET database, with plant trait (Narea) data from TRY and Narea measurements from a selection of FLUXNET sites as well. For 83 global FLUXNET sites, which had information available on species composition, we derived the light saturated gross primary productivity (GPP1000). We used MODIS LAI and fPAR, together with the species' relative height and abundance data, to up-scale the TRY derived Narea values to a canopy value per site (Ncanopy). For this calculation we assumed that top canopy leaves contribute more to CO2 uptake, and used a Lambert-Beer canopy light extinction principle to weigh the relative contribution per species to the final Ncanopy value. For our analyses, we divided the sites in five different vegetation classes: broad leaved forests, needle leaved forests, grasslands, crops and (sub)arctic non-forest vegetation. Site-measured Nareadata corroborated well with TRY derived Narea data, giving confidence in using a database such as TRY for global analyses like ours. Ncanopy alone explained 18 % of the observed variation in maximum (90th percentile) GPP1000 with a linear model. When adding the different vegetation types as a

  16. Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and remote sensing of plant CO2 uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penuelas, J.; Garbulsky, M. F.; Filella, I.

    2011-12-01

    An accurate continuous quantification of the role of terrestrial ecosystems as carbon sinks everywhere constitutes a key issue in the face of ongoing environmental disturbance and climate change. The emerging consistency of the relationship between Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and light use efficiency at the leaf, canopy and ecosystem scales offers promising prospects for continuous global monitoring of plant primary productivity from space. We will present and discuss this consistency. This reflectance index is based on the short term reversible xanthophyll pigment changes accompanying plant stress. It also behaves as an index of the chlorophyll:carotenoid ratios and therefore of the photosynthetic activities associated with their changes with leaf development, aging or stress at longer term. At the leaf and canopy levels, the PRI has been extensively found adequate to estimate LUE and thus photosynthetic performance, i.e. gross primary productivity, and its use has been extended increasingly in the last few years both in natural and semi-natural vegetation and in crops. The results of these studies confirm an exponential relationship between LUE and PRI over a wide range of species and conditions, hence suggesting that the overall photosynthetic system is often sufficiently regulated to maintain consistent relationships between the pigment, morphological and physiological changes linked to PRI and the changes in CO2 fixation. In a further step forward, with the availability of the MODIS sensor on TERRA and AQUA satellites, PRI is now increasingly used also at the ecosystem scale. The results of our study comparing PRI data from MODIS and CO2 exchange data from eddy covariance towers show that there may even be a common exponential relationship for all of forests. The emerging consistency of the relationship between PRI, LUE and ecosystem CO2 uptake increasingly found in these studies suggests a surprising degree of "functional convergence" of biochemical

  17. Comparative uptake of trace elements in vines and olive trees over calcareous soils in western La Mancha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángel Amorós, José; Higueras, Pablo; Pérez-de-los-Reyes, Caridad; Jesús García, Francisco; Villaseñor, Begoña; Bravo, Sandra; Losilla, María Luisa; María Moreno, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and olive-tree (Olea europea L.) are very important cultures in Castilla-La Mancha for its extension and contribution to the regional economy. This study was carried out in the municipality of Carrión de Calatrava (Ciudad Real) where the variability of soils of different geological origin, with different evolutions giving a great diversity of soils. The metabolism of trace elements in plants has been extensively studied although each soil-plant system must be investigated, especially since small variations in composition can lead to marked differences. It can be stated that the composition of the plant reflects the environment where it is cultivated and the products of the plant (leaves, fruits, juices, etc…) will be influenced by the composition of the soil. The main aim of the work was to compare the uptake of 24 trace elements in grapevine and olive-tree cultivated in the same soil. Samples from surface soils and plant material (leaf) have been analyzed by X-ray fluorescence, obtaining trace elements in mg/kg. It can be concluded that the leaves of grapevines in the studied plots have shown content in elements: -Similar to the olive-tree in case of: Co, Ga, Y, Ta, Th, U y Nd. -Over to the olive-tree in: Sc, V, Cr, Ni, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, Ce, Hf y W. -Below to the olive-tree in: Cu, Zn, Cs y Pb. Keywords: woody culture soils, mineral nutrition, X-ray fluorescence.

  18. Changes in Sb speciation with waterlogging of shooting range soils and impacts on plant uptake.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao-ming; Tandy, Susan; Hockmann, Kerstin; Schulin, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the solubility and redox species of antimony (Sb) in a relocated shooting range soil and its uptake by Lolium perenne L. and Holcus lanatus L. under different water regimes. After 1-week waterlogging, the total Sb concentration in soil solution decreased from ∼110 μg L(-1) to <20 μg L(-1), and slowly increased over the following 4 weeks, with the dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides. In this process, half of the Sb in soil solution was reduced to Sb(III), which greatly affected the plant uptake of Sb. Waterlogging increased shoot Sb concentrations of L. perenne by ∼10 fold but decreased uptake in H. lanatus by 80%. Results indicate that Sb might primarily be taken up as Sb(III) by L. perenne and as Sb(V) by H. lanatus. Temporary waterlogging of soil may increase the risk of trace elements entering the food chain.

  19. Use of Gold Nanoparticles to Detect Water Uptake in Vascular Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bae Geun; Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualization of water-conducting pathways and sap flows in xylem vessels is important for understanding the physiology of vascular plants and their sap ascent. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with synchrotron X-ray imaging technique is a new promising tool for investigating plant hydraulics in opaque xylem vessels of vascular plants. However, in practical applications of AuNPs for real-time quantitative visualization of sap flows, their interaction with a vascular network needs to be verified in advance. In this study, the effect of AuNPs on the water-refilling function of xylem vessels is experimentally investigated with three monocot species. Discrepancy in the water uptakes starts to appear at about 20 min to 40 min after the supply of AuNP solution to the test plant by the possible gradual accumulation of AuNPs on the internal structures of vasculature. However conclusively, it is observed that the water-refilling speeds in individual xylem vessels are virtually unaffected by hydrophilically surface-modified AuNPs (diameter ∼20 nm). Therefore, the AuNPs can be effectively used as flow tracers in the xylem vessels in the first 20∼30 min without any physiological barrier. As a result, AuNPs are found to be useful for visualizing various fluid dynamic phenomena occurring in vascular plants. PMID:25502567

  20. Use of gold nanoparticles to detect water uptake in vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bae Geun; Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualization of water-conducting pathways and sap flows in xylem vessels is important for understanding the physiology of vascular plants and their sap ascent. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with synchrotron X-ray imaging technique is a new promising tool for investigating plant hydraulics in opaque xylem vessels of vascular plants. However, in practical applications of AuNPs for real-time quantitative visualization of sap flows, their interaction with a vascular network needs to be verified in advance. In this study, the effect of AuNPs on the water-refilling function of xylem vessels is experimentally investigated with three monocot species. Discrepancy in the water uptakes starts to appear at about 20 min to 40 min after the supply of AuNP solution to the test plant by the possible gradual accumulation of AuNPs on the internal structures of vasculature. However conclusively, it is observed that the water-refilling speeds in individual xylem vessels are virtually unaffected by hydrophilically surface-modified AuNPs (diameter ∼20 nm). Therefore, the AuNPs can be effectively used as flow tracers in the xylem vessels in the first 20∼30 min without any physiological barrier. As a result, AuNPs are found to be useful for visualizing various fluid dynamic phenomena occurring in vascular plants.

  1. Uptake of airborne semivolatile organic compounds in agricultural plants: Field measurements of interspecies variability

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, F.; Welsch-Pausch, K.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1999-06-01

    The accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) in plants is important because plants are the major vector of these compounds into terrestrial food chains and because plants play an important role in scavenging SOCs from the atmosphere and transferring them to the soil. Agricultural plants are of particular interest because they are a key link in the atmosphere-fodder-milk/beef food chain that accounts for much of background human exposure to persistent lipophilic organic pollutants such as PCBs and PCDD/Fs. In this study the accumulation of PCBs, PCDD/Fs, PAHs, and some chlorobenzenes was determined in eight grassland species as well as maize and sunflower leaves collected simultaneously at a semirural site in Central Europe. Air samples were collected at the same site during the growth of these plants, and the particle-bound and gaseous concentrations were determined. A newly developed interpretive framework was employed to analyze the data, and it was established whether the accumulation of a given compound was due primarily to equilibrium partitioning, kinetically limited gaseous deposition, or particle-bound deposition. The interspecies variability in uptake was then examined, and it was found that for those compounds which had accumulated primarily via kinetically limited gaseous deposition and particle-bound deposition the variation among the 10 species was generally a factor of <4.

  2. Plant chromium uptake and transport, physiological effects and recent advances in molecular investigations.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Angélica da Conceição; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; Suzuki, Marina Satika; Vitória, Angela Pierre

    2017-06-01

    Increasingly, anthropogenic perturbations of the biosphere manifest in a broad array of global phenomena, causing widespread contamination of most ecosystems, with high dispersion rates of many contaminants throughout different environmental compartments, including metals. Chromium (Cr) contamination in particular, is, increasingly, posing a serious threat to the environment, emerging as a major health hazard to the biota. However, although the molecular and physiological mechanisms of plant responses to many heavy metals, especially lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd), have been focused upon in recent years, chromium has attracted significantly less attention. In this context, this review discusses aspects of Cr uptake and transport, some physiological and biochemical effects of Cr exposure in plants, and molecular defense mechanisms against this metal. Recent advances in determining these responses, in fields of knowledge such as genomics, proteomics and metallomics, are discussed herein.

  3. Effects of Posidonia oceanica beach-cast on germination, growth and nutrient uptake of coastal dune plants.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Silvia; Marbà, Núria; Acosta, Alicia; Vignolo, Clara; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Seagrass meadows play an important role in marine ecosystems. A part of seagrass production is also exported to adjacent coastal terrestrial systems, possibly influencing their functioning. In this work we experimentally analyzed the effect of Posidonia oceanica beach-cast on plant germination, growth, and nutrient uptake of two plant species (Cakile maritima and Elymus farctus) that grow on upper beaches and fore dunes along the Mediterranean coasts. We compared plants growing in simple sand (control) with those growing in a substrate enriched with P. oceanica wrack (treatment) in laboratory. P. oceanica wrack doubled the N substrate pool and kept the substrate humid. Plants growing in the treated substrate grew faster, were twice as large as those growing in the control substrate, while tissues were enriched in N and P (Cakile by the 1.3 fold in N and 2.5 fold in P; Elymus by 1.5 fold in N and 2 fold in P). Our results suggest a positive effect of seagrass litter for the enhancing of dune species, highlighting its role for the conservation of coastal dune ecosystems.

  4. Phytotoxicity, uptake and metabolism of 1,4-dichlorobenzene by plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.J. |; Bokern, M.; Boehme, C.; Harms, H.; Jones, K.C.

    1996-07-01

    Phytotoxicity, uptake, and metabolism of 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) by carrot (Daucus carota L.), soybean (Glycine max. L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and red goosefoot (Chenopodiun rubrum L.) cell suspension cultures were studied. Sealed glass systems were utilized for the investigation because 1,4-DCB is volatile. The sealed systems affect the growth of plant cells, but do not provide different results when testing xenobiotic uptake and metabolism. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene (40 {micro}g in 40 ml medium) was taken up by carrot (49%), soybean (50%), and red goosefoot (62%) cells. Only the soybean cell cultures provided evidence of the existence of metabolites of this compound, probably conjugates of chlorophenols. Conditions for phytotoxicity tests were modified because the growth of cell cultures was affected when sealed for longer than 2 d. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene is toxic to cell cultures of the three tested plant species (tomato, soybean, and carrot). Concentrations of 0.5 mM caused 50% growth inhibition in carrot and soybean cultures. The tomato cultures were more sensitive, with 0.05 mM causing 50% growth inhibition.

  5. Soil- and plant- water uptake in saline environments and their consequences to plant adaptation in fluctuating climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Albertson, J. D.; Katul, G. G.; Marani, M.

    2010-12-01

    Ecological processes determining plant colonization are quite peculiar and competition among different species is governed by a set of unique adaptations to stress conditions caused by drought, hypoxic or hyper-saline conditions. These adaptations and possible positive feedbacks often lead to the formation of patterns of vegetation colonization and spatial heterogeneity (zonation), and play a primary role in the stabilization of sediments. It is these issues that frame the scope of this study. The main objective of this work is to track one of the fundamental pathways between plant adaptation (quantified in terms of physiological and ecological attributes such as leaf area or root density profile) and feedbacks (quantified by plant-mediated alterations to water availability and salinity levels): root water uptake. Because root-water uptake is the main conduit connecting transpiring leaves to reservoirs of soil water, the means by which salinity modifies the processes governing its two end-points and any two-way interactions between them serves as a logical starting point. Salinity effects on leaf transpiration and photosynthesis are first explored via stomatal optimization principles that maximize carbon gain at a given water loss for autonomous leaves. Salinity directly affects leaf physiological attributes such as mesophyll conductance and photosynthetic parameters and hence over-all conductance to transpiration as well as different strategies to cope with the high salinity (e.g. through salt seclusion, compartmentation and osmotic adjustments). A coupled model of subsurface flow based on a modified Richards’ equation that accounts for the effects of increasing salinity, anaerobic conditions, water stress and compensation factors is developed. Plant water uptake is considered as a soil moisture sink term with a potential rate dictated by the carbon demands of the leaves, and an actual rate that accounts for both - hydraulic and salinity limitations. Using this

  6. Soil temperature and plant growth stage influence nitrogen uptake and amino acid concentration of apple during early spring growth.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Scagel, C F; Cheng, L; Fuchigami, L H; Rygiewicz, P T

    2001-05-01

    In spring, nitrogen (N) uptake by apple roots begins about 3 weeks after bud break. We used 1-year-old 'Fuji' Malus domestica Borkh on M26 bare-root apple trees to determine whether the onset of N uptake in spring is dependent solely on the growth stage of the plant or is a function of soil temperature. Five times during early season growth, N uptake and total amino acid concentration were measured in trees growing at aboveground day/night temperatures of 23/15 degrees C and belowground temperatures of 8, 12, 16 or 20 degrees C. We used (15NH4)(15NO3) to measure total N uptake and rate of uptake and found that both were significantly influenced by both soil temperature and plant growth stage. Rate of uptake of 15N increased with increasing soil temperature and changed with plant growth stage. Before bud break, 15N was not detected in trees growing in the 8 degrees C soil treatment, whereas 15N uptake increased with increasing soil temperatures between 12 and 20 degrees C. Ten days after bud break, 15N was still not detected in trees growing in the 8 degrees C soil treatment, although total 15N uptake and uptake rate continued to increase with increasing soil temperatures between 12 and 20 degrees C. Twenty-one days after bud break, trees in all temperature treatments were able to acquire 15N from the soil, although the amount of uptake increased with increasing soil temperature. Distribution of 15N in trees changed as plants grew. Most of the 15N absorbed by trees before bud break (approximately 5% of 15N supplied per tree) remained in the roots. Forty-six days after bud break, approximately one-third of the 15N absorbed by the trees in the 12-20 degrees C soil temperature treatments remained in the roots, whereas the shank, stem and new growth contained about two-thirds of the 15N taken up by the roots. Total amino acid concentration and distribution of amino acids in trees changed with plant growth stage, but only the amino acid concentration in new growth and

  7. Mercury emission and plant uptake of trace elements during early stage of soil amendment using flue gas desulfurization materials.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Min; Chang, Yung-Nan; Sistani, Karamat R; Wang, Yen-Wen; Lu, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Chia-Wei; Dong, Jing-Hong; Hu, Chih-Chung; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2012-02-01

    A pilot-scale field study was carried out to investigate the distribution of Hg and other selected elements (i.e., As, B, and Se), i.e., emission to ambient air, uptake by surface vegetation, and/or rainfall infiltration, after flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material is applied to soil. Three FGD materials collected from two power plants were used. Our results show Hg released into the air and uptake in grass from all FGD material-treated soils were all higher (P < 0.1) than the amounts observed from untreated soil. Hg in the soil amended with the FGD material collected from a natural oxidation wet scrubber (i.e., SNO) was more readily released to air compared to the other two FGD materials collected from the synthetic gypsum dewatering vacuum belt (i.e., AFO-gypsum) and the waste water treatment plant (i.e., AFO-CPS) of a forced oxidation FGD system. No Hg was detected in the leachates collected during the only 3-hour, 1-inch rainfall event that occurred throughout the 4-week testing period. For every kilogram of FGD material applied to soil, AFO-CPS released the highest amount of Hg, B, and Se, followed by SNO, and AFO gypsum. Based on the same energy production rate, the land application of SNO FGD material from Plant S released higher amounts of Hg and B into ambient air and/or grass than the amounts released when AFO-gypsum from Plant A was used. Using FGD material with lower concentration levels of Hg and other elements of concern does not necessary post a lower environmental risk. In addition, this study demonstrates that considering only the amounts of trace elements uptake in surface vegetation may under estimate the overall release of the trace elements from FGD material-amended soils. It also shows, under the same soil amendment conditions, the mobility of trace elements varies when FGD materials produced from different processes are used.

  8. [Pb, Zn accumulation and nutrient uptake of 15 plant species grown in abandoned mine tailings].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang; Chen, Yi-Tai; Wang, Shu-Feng; Li, Jiang-Chuan

    2012-06-01

    Vegetation restoration field test was carried out in the abandoned lead-zinc tailings for 3 years. The study showed that accumulation of lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and nutrient uptake differed with plant species and organs, heavy metals, and planting time. Pb was mainly accumulated in tree roots, and its content distribution in tree organs was generally in the order of roots > leaves > stems. But Zn concentrations in leaves of several tree species were higher than those in roots and stems. Within the tested 15 species, Cercis Canadensis had the highest concentrations of Pb and Zn in roots (1 803 and 2120 mg x kg(-1), respectively). Rhus chinensis had the highest Pb concentration in stems and leaves (280 and 546 mg x kg(-1), respectively) and Zn concentration (1 507 mg x kg(-1)) in leaves. Zn concentration in stems and leaves of Salix matsudana (729 and 1 153 mg x kg(-1), respectively) were the highest. Among the tested 15 species, TF values for Pb of Liquidambar formosana, Medicago sativa, and for Zn of Salix matsudana, Rhus chinensis, Medicago sativa were higher than 1. BCF values for Pb were all lower than 0.17, while that for Zn were all lower than 0.44. The N contents in nitrogen-fixing plants, P contents in Rhus typhina and Ailanthus altissima, and K content in Nerium indicum were significantly higher than those in other plants. With the increase of planting time, concentrations of heavy metal in plant body increased significantly; however the inverse trend were observed in nutritional element content. The species have higher metal accumulation capacity, such as Rhus chinensis, Salix matsudana and those nitrogen-fixing plants have higher tolerance to metal contamination and nutrient deficiency, such as Amorpha fruticosa, Medicago sativa, Lespedeza cuneata, and Alnus cremastogyne, they were suitable as the phytostabilizers in abandoned mine tailings.

  9. Plant nitrogen uptake drives rhizosphere bacterial community assembly during plant growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When plant species establish in novel environments, they often modify microbial communities and soil properties in ways that enhance their own success. Upon invasion, the C3 annual grass Bromus tectorum appears to support soil microbial communities that have higher soil nitrogen (N) mineralization r...

  10. Land application of domestic effluent onto four soil types: plant uptake and nutrient leaching.

    PubMed

    Barton, L; Schipper, L A; Barkle, G F; McLeod, M; Speir, T W; Taylor, M D; McGill, A C; van Schaik, A P; Fitzgerald, N B; Pandey, S P

    2005-01-01

    Land application has become a widely applied method for treating wastewater. However, it is not always clear which soil-plant systems should be used, or why. The objectives of our study were to determine if four contrasting soils, from which the pasture is regularly cut and removed, varied in their ability to assimilate nutrients from secondary-treated domestic effluent under high hydraulic loadings, in comparison with unirrigated, fertilized pasture. Grassed intact soil cores (500 mm in diameter by 700 mm in depth) were irrigated (50 mm wk(-1)) with secondary-treated domestic effluent for two years. Soils included a well-drained Allophanic Soil (Typic Hapludand), a poorly drained Gley Soil (Typic Endoaquept), a well-drained Pumice Soil formed from rhyolitic tephra (Typic Udivitrand), and a well-drained Recent Soil formed in a sand dune (Typic Udipsamment). Effluent-irrigated soils received between 746 and 815 kg N ha(-1) and 283 and 331 kg P ha(-1) over two years of irrigation, and unirrigated treatments received 200 kg N ha(-1) and 100 kg P ha(-1) of dissolved inorganic fertilizer over the same period. Applying effluent significantly increased plant uptake of N and P from all soil types. For the effluent-irrigated soils plant N uptake ranged from 186 to 437 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), while plant P uptake ranged from 40 to 88 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1) for the effluent-irrigated soils. Applying effluent significantly increased N leaching losses from Gley and Recent Soils, and after two years ranged from 17 to 184 kg N ha(-1) depending on soil type. Effluent irrigation only increased P leaching from the Gley Soil. All P leaching losses were less than 49 kg P ha(-1) after two years. The N and P leached from effluent treatments were mainly in organic form (69-87% organic N and 35-65% unreactive P). Greater N and P leaching losses from the irrigated Gley Soil were attributed to preferential flow that reduced contact between the effluent and the soil matrix. Increased N leaching from

  11. Impact of soil water regime on degradation and plant uptake behaviour of the herbicide isoproturon in different soil types.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, Sabine; Doerfler, Ulrike; Munch, Jean Charles; Ruth, Bernhard; Schroll, Reiner

    2011-03-01

    The environmental fate of the worldwide used herbicide isoproturon was studied in four different, undisturbed lysimeters in the temperate zone of Middle Europe. To exclude climatic effects due to location, soils were collected at different regions in southern Germany and analyzed at a lysimeter station under identical environmental conditions. (14)C-isoproturon mineralization varied between 2.59% and 57.95% in the different soils. Barley plants grown on these lysimeters accumulated (14)C-pesticide residues from soil in partially high amounts and emitted (14)CO(2) in an extent between 2.01% and 13.65% of the applied (14)C-pesticide. Plant uptake and (14)CO(2) emissions from plants were inversely linked to the mineralization of the pesticide in the various soils: High isoproturon mineralization in soil resulted in low plant uptake whereas low isoproturon mineralization in soil resulted in high uptake of isoproturon residues in crop plants and high (14)CO(2) emission from plant surfaces. The soil water regime was identified as an essential factor that regulates degradation and plant uptake of isoproturon whereby the intensity of the impact of this factor is strongly dependent on the soil type.

  12. Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle in Autotrophic Plants, and Heterotrophic Microbes: A Concentric Review.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Durgesh K; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Shweta; Singh, Swati; Singh, Yashwant; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Yadav, Gaurav; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vivek K; Mishra, Rohit K; Upadhyay, R G; Dubey, Nawal K; Lee, Yonghoon; Chauhan, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a cutting-edge field of science with the potential to revolutionize today's technological advances including industrial applications. It is being utilized for the welfare of mankind; but at the same time, the unprecedented use and uncontrolled release of nanomaterials into the environment poses enormous threat to living organisms. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in several industries and its continuous release may hamper many physiological and biochemical processes in the living organisms including autotrophs and heterotrophs. The present review gives a concentric know-how of the effects of AgNPs on the lower and higher autotrophic plants as well as on heterotrophic microbes so as to have better understanding of the differences in effects among these two groups. It also focuses on the mechanism of uptake, translocation, accumulation in the plants and microbes, and resulting toxicity as well as tolerance mechanisms by which these microorganisms are able to survive and reduce the effects of AgNPs. This review differentiates the impact of silver nanoparticles at various levels between autotrophs and heterotrophs and signifies the prevailing tolerance mechanisms. With this background, a comprehensive idea can be made with respect to the influence of AgNPs on lower and higher autotrophic plants together with heterotrophic microbes and new insights can be generated for the researchers to understand the toxicity and tolerance mechanisms of AgNPs in plants and microbes.

  13. Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle in Autotrophic Plants, and Heterotrophic Microbes: A Concentric Review

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Shweta; Singh, Swati; Singh, Yashwant; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Yadav, Gaurav; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vivek K.; Mishra, Rohit K.; Upadhyay, R. G.; Dubey, Nawal K.; Lee, Yonghoon; Chauhan, Devendra K.

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a cutting-edge field of science with the potential to revolutionize today’s technological advances including industrial applications. It is being utilized for the welfare of mankind; but at the same time, the unprecedented use and uncontrolled release of nanomaterials into the environment poses enormous threat to living organisms. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in several industries and its continuous release may hamper many physiological and biochemical processes in the living organisms including autotrophs and heterotrophs. The present review gives a concentric know-how of the effects of AgNPs on the lower and higher autotrophic plants as well as on heterotrophic microbes so as to have better understanding of the differences in effects among these two groups. It also focuses on the mechanism of uptake, translocation, accumulation in the plants and microbes, and resulting toxicity as well as tolerance mechanisms by which these microorganisms are able to survive and reduce the effects of AgNPs. This review differentiates the impact of silver nanoparticles at various levels between autotrophs and heterotrophs and signifies the prevailing tolerance mechanisms. With this background, a comprehensive idea can be made with respect to the influence of AgNPs on lower and higher autotrophic plants together with heterotrophic microbes and new insights can be generated for the researchers to understand the toxicity and tolerance mechanisms of AgNPs in plants and microbes. PMID:28184215

  14. Study of element uptake in plants from the soil to assess environmental contamination by toxic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Z.; Vasidov, A.; Tsipin, V. V.; Tillaev, T.; Jumaniyazova, G. I.

    2003-06-01

    Uptake of various elements by plants through the root system from the soil was studied. Vegetation experiments with cotton and white beet were carried out in the control and test fields. The test fields were enriched with phyto-bacterial strains capable of dissolving insoluble phosphate compounds. Analytical work involved analysis of blank, control and test soil samples and analysis of plants sampled in different growing periods: periods of first sprouts, florescence and ripening of the plants. Multielement analyses of soil and plant samples were carried out by instrumental neutron activation techniques using our WWR-SM research reactor. Results of the measurements have shown that macro- and microelement composition of the analyzed soil samples were consistent to clark contents except for copper. Our experiments have resulted that the concentration levels of copper in the soils were within 300-450 mg/kg, and its average concentration in cotton leaves was about ˜35 mg/kg while in beet leaves it reached up to 500 mg/kg and higher in different growing stages. A high mobility of strontium and barium was observed for cotton as well as for white beet within the period of growing and florescence.

  15. Comparative evaluation of actinide ion uptake by polymer inclusion membranes containing TODGA as the carrier extractant.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, B N; Raut, D R; Mohapatra, P K; Das, D K; Behere, P G; Afzal, Md

    2014-06-30

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIM) containing TODGA (N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyl diglycolamide) were evaluated for the separation of actinide ions such as Am(3+), Pu(4+), UO2(2+) and Th(4+) from acidic feeds. The PIMs were prepared using cellulose triacetate (CTA) as the polymer matrix and 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) as the plasticizer along with the diglycolamide carrier extractants and were characterized by conventional techniques such as XRD, thermal analysis and AFM. The PIM composition was optimized by a series of studies which involved variation in the CTA, NPOE and carrier concentration which suggested 58% TODGA, 30% NPOE and 12% CTA to be optimum. The uptake studies were carried out using feed solutions containing varying concentrations of nitric acid and showed the trend: Am(3+)>Pu(4+)>Th(4+)>UO2(2+). Transport studies were carried out in a two-compartment cell where nitric acid concentration the feed was varied (1-3M) while the receiver compartment contained alpha-hydroxy-iso-butyric acid (AHIBA). The actinide ion transport efficiencies with TODGA containing PIMs followed the same trend as seen in the uptake studies. The AFM patterns of the PIMs changed when loaded with Eu(3+) carrier (used as a surrogate for Am(3+)) while the regenerated membranes have displayed comparable morphologies. Diffusion coefficient values were experimentally obtained from the transport studies and were found to be 8.89×10(-8) cm(2)/s for Am(3+) transport.

  16. Risk assessment of a former military base contaminated with organoarsenic-based warfare agents: uptake of arsenic by terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Pitten, F A; Müller, G; König, P; Schmidt, D; Thurow, K; Kramer, A

    1999-02-09

    Organoarsenic-based chemical warfare agents (CWAs) such as the sternutators diphenylchloroarsine (CLARK I), diphenylcyanoarsine (CLARK II) or phenyldichloroarsine (PFIFFIKUS) still pose a notable risk in countries where former military bases that have stored these weapons have not yet been reclaimed. In fact, this is the case for many countries of Eastern Europe and the CIS. One of the most important military bases of the former Third Reich, the Heeresmunitionsanstalt I and II, is situated close to the German-Polish border at Loecknitz (Fig. 1). The German army stored and decanted different compounds of CWAs at this military base until 1945. When the Soviet Army destroyed the base in 1946, large amounts of CWAs and other organoarsenic compounds polluted the soil. Today up to 250 g (!) of arsenic may be found in 1 kg of soil at some places in this area. Since 1991, a Government Working Group has been working on the risk assessment in order to define the scope of reclamation measures. This study investigates the contamination and the uptake of arsenic by plants because little is known about the bioavailability and metabolism of sternutators and their constituents. The total arsenic concentration of nine different species of terrestrial plants with at least six samples per species is presented. In spite of the considerable arsenic contamination of the soil (mean value 923 mg arsenic/kg soil) the plant contamination remained comparably low. The median value of arsenic contamination of the above-ground organs of velvet grass, Holcus lanatus, was 0.7 mg/kg dry wt. and the mean value was 4.3 mg/kg dry wt. due to some highly contaminated samples. The highest arsenic concentration registered was 26 mg/kg dry wt. in a sample of H. lanatus, which was most probably caused by soil particles adhering to the plant. The chemical structure of the arsenic compounds carried by the above-ground plant organs has been determined by gas chromatographic investigations and showed an uptake

  17. Electrophysiological approach to determine kinetic parameters of sucrose uptake by single sieve elements or phloem parenchyma cells in intact Vicia faba plants

    PubMed Central

    Hafke, Jens B.; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Kühn, Christina; van Bel, Aart J. E.

    2013-01-01

    Apart from cut aphid stylets in combination with electrophysiology, no attempts have been made thus far to measure in vivo sucrose-uptake properties of sieve elements. We investigated the kinetics of sucrose uptake by single sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells in Vicia faba plants. To this end, microelectrodes were inserted into free-lying phloem cells in the main vein of the youngest fully-expanded leaf, half-way along the stem, in the transition zone between the autotrophic and heterotrophic part of the stem, and in the root axis. A top-to-bottom membrane potential gradient of sieve elements was observed along the stem (−130 mV to −110 mV), while the membrane potential of the phloem parenchyma cells was stable (approx. −100 mV). In roots, the membrane potential of sieve elements dropped abruptly to −55 mV. Bathing solutions having various sucrose concentrations were administered and sucrose/H+-induced depolarizations were recorded. Data analysis by non-linear least-square data fittings as well as by linear Eadie–Hofstee (EH) -transformations pointed at biphasic Michaelis–Menten kinetics (2 MM, EH: Km1 1.2–1.8 mM, Km2 6.6–9.0 mM) of sucrose uptake by sieve elements. However, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) favored single MM kinetics. Using single MM as the best-fitting model, Km values for sucrose uptake by sieve elements decreased along the plant axis from 1 to 7 mM. For phloem parenchyma cells, higher Km values (EH: Km1 10 mM, Km2 70 mM) as compared to sieve elements were found. In preliminary patch-clamp experiments with sieve-element protoplasts, small sucrose-coupled proton currents (−0.1 to −0.3 pA/pF) were detected in the whole-cell mode. In conclusion (a) Km values for sucrose uptake measured by electrophysiology are similar to those obtained with heterologous systems, (b) electrophysiology provides a useful tool for in situ determination of Km values, (c) As yet, it remains unclear if one or two uptake systems are involved

  18. Electrophysiological approach to determine kinetic parameters of sucrose uptake by single sieve elements or phloem parenchyma cells in intact Vicia faba plants.

    PubMed

    Hafke, Jens B; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Kühn, Christina; van Bel, Aart J E

    2013-01-01

    Apart from cut aphid stylets in combination with electrophysiology, no attempts have been made thus far to measure in vivo sucrose-uptake properties of sieve elements. We investigated the kinetics of sucrose uptake by single sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells in Vicia faba plants. To this end, microelectrodes were inserted into free-lying phloem cells in the main vein of the youngest fully-expanded leaf, half-way along the stem, in the transition zone between the autotrophic and heterotrophic part of the stem, and in the root axis. A top-to-bottom membrane potential gradient of sieve elements was observed along the stem (-130 mV to -110 mV), while the membrane potential of the phloem parenchyma cells was stable (approx. -100 mV). In roots, the membrane potential of sieve elements dropped abruptly to -55 mV. Bathing solutions having various sucrose concentrations were administered and sucrose/H(+)-induced depolarizations were recorded. Data analysis by non-linear least-square data fittings as well as by linear Eadie-Hofstee (EH) -transformations pointed at biphasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics (2 MM, EH: K m1 1.2-1.8 mM, K m2 6.6-9.0 mM) of sucrose uptake by sieve elements. However, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) favored single MM kinetics. Using single MM as the best-fitting model, K m values for sucrose uptake by sieve elements decreased along the plant axis from 1 to 7 mM. For phloem parenchyma cells, higher K m values (EH: K m1 10 mM, K m2 70 mM) as compared to sieve elements were found. In preliminary patch-clamp experiments with sieve-element protoplasts, small sucrose-coupled proton currents (-0.1 to -0.3 pA/pF) were detected in the whole-cell mode. In conclusion (a) K m values for sucrose uptake measured by electrophysiology are similar to those obtained with heterologous systems, (b) electrophysiology provides a useful tool for in situ determination of K m values, (c) As yet, it remains unclear if one or two uptake systems are involved in sucrose

  19. Mercury and plants in contaminated soils. 1: Uptake, partitioning, and emission to the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, T.L.; Gustin, M.S.; Fernandez, G.C.J.; Taylor, G.E. Jr.

    1998-10-01

    The uptake, distribution, and subsequent emission of mercury to the atmosphere were investigated in five plant species (Lepidium latifolium [L.], Artemisia douglasiana [Bess in Hook], Caulanthus sp. [S. Watson], Fragaria vesca [L.], and Eucalyptus globulus [Labill]) with different ecological and physiological attributes. Transfer coefficients for mercury in the soil-plant system were calculated. Plant-to-atmosphere emissions of mercury were determined using a controlled environment gas-exchange system and ranged from 10 to 93 mg/m{sup 2}/h in the light; emissions in the dark were an order of magnitude less. Transfer coefficients for mercury within the soil-plant system increased acropetally (root-to-leaf axis) by orders of magnitude. Estimated mercury emissions from plants in the Carson River Drainage Basin of Nevada over the growing season (0.5 mg/m{sup 2}) add to the previously reported soil mercury emissions (8.5 mg/m{sup 2}), resulting in total landscape emissions of 9 mg/m{sup 2}. For L. latifolium, 70% of the mercury taken up by the roots during the growing season was emitted to the atmosphere. For every one molecule of mercury retained in foliage of L. latifolium, 12 molecules of mercury were emitted. Within this arid ecosystem, mercury emissions are a dominant pathway of the mercury cycle. Plants function as conduits for the interfacial transport of mercury from the geosphere to the atmosphere, and this role is undervalued in models of the behavior of mercury in terrestrial exosystems and in the atmosphere on a global scale.

  20. Comparative Metabolism of Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats, Mice and Hamsters Using Gas Uptake and PBPK Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Karla D. ); Vucelick, Mark E.; Gies, Richard A. ); Zangar, Richard C. ); Weitz, Karl K. ); Poet, Torka S. ); Springer, David L. ); Grant, Donna M. ); Benson, Janet M.

    2000-08-25

    No study has comprehensively compared the rate of metabolism of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) across species. Therefore, the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 was evaluated using groups of male animals (F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Syrian hamsters) exposed to 40-1800 ppm CCl4 in a closed, recirculating gas-uptake system. For each species, an optimal fit of the family of uptake curves was obtained by adjusting Michaelis-Menten metabolic constants Km (affinity) and Vmax (capacity) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The results show that the mouse has a slightly higher capacity and lower affinity for metabolizing CCl4 compared to the rat, while the hamster has a higher capacity and lower affinity than either rat or mouse. A comparison of the Vmax to Km ratio, normalized for mg of liver protein (L/hr/mg) across species indicates that hamsters metabolize more CCl4 than either rats or mice, and should be more susceptible to CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. These species comparisons were evaluated against toxicokinetic studies conducted in animals exposed by nose-only inhalation to 20 ppm 14C-labeled CCl4 for 4 hours. The toxicokinetic study results are consistent with the in vivo rates of metabolism, with rats eliminating less radioactivity associated with metabolism (14CO2 and urine/feces) and more radioactivity associated with the parent compound (radioactivity trapped on charcoal) compared to either hamsters or mice. The in vivo metabolic constants determined here, together with in vitro constants determined using rat, mouse, hamster and human liver microsomes, were used to estimate human in vivo metabolic rates of 1.49 mg/hr/kg body weight and 0.25 mg/L for Vmax and Km, respectively. Normalizing the rate of metabolism (Vmax/Km) by mg liver protein, the rate of metabolism of CCl4 differs across species, with hamster > mouse& > rat > human.

  1. Plant Reactome: a resource for plant pathways and comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, Sushma; Preece, Justin; D'Eustachio, Peter; Gupta, Parul; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Dharmawardhana, Palitha D.; Wu, Guanming; Fabregat, Antonio; Elser, Justin L.; Weiser, Joel; Keays, Maria; Fuentes, Alfonso Munoz-Pomer; Petryszak, Robert; Stein, Lincoln D.; Ware, Doreen; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Plant Reactome (http://plantreactome.gramene.org/) is a free, open-source, curated plant pathway database portal, provided as part of the Gramene project. The database provides intuitive bioinformatics tools for the visualization, analysis and interpretation of pathway knowledge to support genome annotation, genome analysis, modeling, systems biology, basic research and education. Plant Reactome employs the structural framework of a plant cell to show metabolic, transport, genetic, developmental and signaling pathways. We manually curate molecular details of pathways in these domains for reference species Oryza sativa (rice) supported by published literature and annotation of well-characterized genes. Two hundred twenty-two rice pathways, 1025 reactions associated with 1173 proteins, 907 small molecules and 256 literature references have been curated to date. These reference annotations were used to project pathways for 62 model, crop and evolutionarily significant plant species based on gene homology. Database users can search and browse various components of the database, visualize curated baseline expression of pathway-associated genes provided by the Expression Atlas and upload and analyze their Omics datasets. The database also offers data access via Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and in various standardized pathway formats, such as SBML and BioPAX. PMID:27799469

  2. Results of a combined model of root system growth and soil water uptake: evaluating the significance of root system architecture to plant water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, M.; Saiers, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Root system hydraulic architecture is a key determinant of plants' ability to withdraw water from the soil, satisfying transpirational demand. Presently, the representation of this component of the hydrological cycle in large-scale models is generally very simplistic, even though transpiration accounts for much of the terrestrial heat and water surface fluxes, and exercises control over photosynthetic uptake of CO2. In order to address this gap, we have developed a modelling approach that relies on several components. The first is RootGrow, original MATLAB code that simulates the stochastic growth of a root system as a function of an intrinsic set of parameters as well as its environment. We ran RootGrow coupled to the second component, a finite-element 3D simulation of the physics of water transport in the soil and root system using COMSOL, resulting in a combined model of root system development and water uptake. Model results show that root system architecture can affect water uptake by two separate mechanisms: (a) root system geometry determines the distribution of absorbing surface area throughout the soil domain, and (b) root system topology affects the water potential at the absorbing surfaces. In this study we sample the model's parameter space to demonstrate over what ranges of physically meaningful parameters (including hydraulic conductivity of plant tissues, soil type, and soil moisture level) these mechanisms significantly affect root systems' water withdrawal rate. The two mechanisms identified and our quantitative results will form the basis of a third component in this approach: developing simple analytical relationships characterising water uptake as a function of root system architecture that can be used in Ecosystem Demography Model v2.1 (ED2), a large-scale Dynamic Vegetation Model, based on a method of upscaling individual-based models of plant ecology.

  3. Transfer of (13) C between paired Douglas-fir seedlings reveals plant kinship effects and uptake of exudates by ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Pickles, Brian J; Wilhelm, Roland; Asay, Amanda K; Hahn, Aria S; Simard, Suzanne W; Mohn, William W

    2017-04-01

    Processes governing the fixation, partitioning, and mineralization of carbon in soils are under increasing scrutiny as we develop a more comprehensive understanding of global carbon cycling. Here we examined fixation by Douglas-fir seedlings and transfer to associated ectomycorrhizal fungi, soil microbes, and full-sibling or nonsibling neighbouring seedlings. Stable isotope probing with 99% (13) C-CO2 was applied to trace (13) C-labelled photosynthate throughout plants, fungi, and soil microbes in an experiment designed to assess the effect of relatedness on (13) C transfer between plant pairs. The fixation and transfer of the (13) C label to plant, fungal, and soil microbial tissue was examined in biomass and phospholipid fatty acids. After a 6 d chase period, c. 26.8% of the (13) C remaining in the system was translocated below ground. Enrichment was proportionally greatest in ectomycorrhizal biomass. The presence of mesh barriers (0.5 or 35 μm) between seedlings did not restrict (13) C transfer. Fungi were the primary recipients of (13) C-labelled photosynthate throughout the system, representing 60-70% of total (13) C-enriched phospholipids. Full-sibling pairs exhibited significantly greater (13) C transfer to recipient roots in two of four Douglas-fir families, representing three- and fourfold increases (+ c. 4 μg excess (13) C) compared with nonsibling pairs. The existence of a root/mycorrhizal exudation-hyphal uptake pathway was supported.

  4. Modeling regulation of zinc uptake via ZIP transporters in yeast and plant roots.

    PubMed

    Claus, Juliane; Chavarría-Krauser, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and plant roots (Arabidopsis thaliana) zinc enters the cells via influx transporters of the ZIP family. Since zinc is both essential for cell function and toxic at high concentrations, tight regulation is essential for cell viability. We provide new insight into the underlying mechanisms, starting from a general model based on ordinary differential equations and adapting it to the specific cases of yeast and plant root cells. In yeast, zinc is transported by the transporters ZRT1 and ZRT2, which are both regulated by the zinc-responsive transcription factor ZAP1. Using biological data, parameters were estimated and analyzed, confirming the different affinities of ZRT1 and ZRT2 reported in the literature. Furthermore, our model suggests that the positive feedback in ZAP1 production has a stabilizing function at high influx rates. In plant roots, various ZIP transporters play a role in zinc uptake. Their regulation is largely unknown, but bZIP transcription factors are thought to be involved. We set up three putative models based on: an activator only, an activator with dimerization and an activator-inhibitor pair. These were fitted to measurements and analyzed. Simulations show that the activator-inhibitor model outperforms the other two in providing robust and stable homeostasis at reasonable parameter ranges.

  5. Effects of elemental sulphur on heavy metal uptake by plants growing on municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Dede, Gulgun; Ozdemir, Saim

    2016-01-15

    In this study experiment was carried out to determine the phytoextraction potential of six plant species (Conium maculatum, Brassica oleraceae var. oleraceae, Brassica juncea, Datura stramonium, Pelargonium hortorum and Conyza canadensis) grown in a sewage sludge medium amended with metal uptake promoters. The solubility of Cu, Cd and Pb was significantly increased with the application of elemental S due to decrease of pH. Faecal coliform number was markedly decreased by addition of elemental sulphur. The extraction of Cu, Cr and Pb from sewage sludge by using B. juncea plant was observed as 65%, 65% and 54% respectively that is statistically similar to EDTA as sulphur. The bioaccumulation factors were found higher (>1) in the plants tested for Cu and Pb like B. juncea. Translocation index (TI) calculated values for Cd and Pb were greater than one (>1) in both C. maculatum and B. oleraceae var. oleraceae. The results cleared that the amendment of sludge with elemental sulphur showed potential to solubilize heavy metals in phytoremediation as much as EDTA.

  6. Plant uptake of radiocaesium from artificially contaminated soil monoliths covering major European soil types.

    PubMed

    Waegeneers, Nadia; Sauras-Yera, Teresa; Thiry, Yves; Vallejo, V Ramón; Smolders, Erik; Madoz-Escande, Chantal; Bréchignac, François

    2009-06-01

    Uptake of (137)Cs was measured in different agricultural plant species (beans, lettuce, barley and ryegrass) grown in 5 undisturbed soil monoliths covering major European soil types. The first cultivation was made three years after soil contamination and plants were grown during 3 successive years. The plant-soil (137)Cs transfer factors varied maximally 12-fold among soils and 35-fold among species when grown on the same soil. Single correlations between transfer factors and soil properties were found, but they varied widely with plant type and can hardly be used as a predictive tool because of the few soils used. The variation of (137)Cs concentrations in plants among soils was related to differences in soil solution (137)Cs and K concentrations, consistent with previous observations in hydroponics and pot trials. Absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted based on a model validated for pot trials. The (137)Cs activity concentration in soil solution decreased significantly (11- to 250-fold) for most soils in the 1997-1999 period and is partly explained by decreasing K in soil solution. Transfer factors of lettuce showed both increasing and decreasing trends between 2 consecutive years depending on soil type. The trends could be explained by the variation in (137)Cs and K concentrations in soil solution. It is concluded that differences in (137)Cs transfer factors among soils and trends in transfer factors as a function of time can be explained from soil solution composition, as shown previously for pot trials, although absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted.

  7. Short-chain oxygenated VOCs: Emission and uptake by plants and atmospheric sources, sinks, and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Roger; Peñuelas, Josep; Filella, Iolanda

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have multiple atmospheric implications and play many roles in plant physiology and ecology. Among these VOCs, growing interest is being devoted to a group of short-chain oxygenated VOCs (oxVOCs). Technology improvements such as proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry are facilitating the study of these hydrocarbons and new data regarding these compounds is continuously appearing. Here we review current knowledge of the emissions of these oxVOCs by plants and the factors that control them, and also provide an overview of sources, sinks, and concentrations found in the atmosphere. The oxVOCs reviewed here are formic and acetic acids, acetone, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. In general, because of their water solubility (low gas-liquid partitioning coefficient), the plant-atmosphere exchange is stomatal-dependent, although it can also take place via the cuticle. This exchange is also determined by atmospheric mixing ratios. These compounds have relatively long atmospheric half-lives and reach considerable concentrations in the atmosphere in the range of ppbv. Likewise, under non-stressed conditions plants can emit all of these oxVOCs together at fluxes ranging from 0.2 up to 4.8 μg(C)g -1(leaf dry weight)h -1 and at rates that increase several-fold when under stress. Gaps in our knowledge regarding the processes involved in the synthesis, emission, uptake, and atmospheric reactivity of oxVOCs precludes the clarification of exactly what is conditioning plant-atmosphere exchange—and also when, how, and why this occurs—and these lacunae therefore warrant further research in this field.

  8. Comparative physiology of elemental distributions in plants

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Simon; Gilliham, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants contain relatively few cell types, each contributing a specialized role in shaping plant function. With respect to plant nutrition, different cell types accumulate certain elements in varying amounts within their storage vacuole. The role and mechanisms underlying cell-specific distribution of elements in plants is poorly understood. Scope The phenomenon of cell-specific elemental accumulation has been briefly reviewed previously, but recent technological advances with the potential to probe mechanisms underlying elemental compartmentation have warranted an updated evaluation. We have taken this opportunity to catalogue many of the studies, and techniques used for, recording cell-specific compartmentation of particular elements. More importantly, we use three case-study elements (Ca, Cd and Na) to highlight the basis of such phenomena in terms of their physiological implications and underpinning mechanisms; we also link such distributions to the expression of known ion or solute transporters. Conclusions Element accumulation patterns are clearly defined by expression of key ion or solute transporters. Although the location of element accumulation is fairly robust, alterations in expression of certain solute transporters, through genetic modifications or by growth under stress, result in perturbations to these patterns. However, redundancy or induced pleiotropic expression effects may complicate attempts to characterize the pathways that lead to cell-specific elemental distribution. Accumulation of one element often has consequences on the accumulation of others, which seems to be driven largely to maintain vacuolar and cytoplasmic osmolarity and charge balance, and also serves as a detoxification mechanism. Altered cell-specific transcriptomics can be shown, in part, to explain some of this compensation. PMID:20410048

  9. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts.

  10. Enhancing the release and plant uptake of PAHs with a water-soluble purine alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ronald R; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Morimoto, Kengo; Tatsumi, Kenji

    2009-08-01

    The effect of a common plant alkaloid, caffeine, on the release and plant uptake of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils was investigated. Cucurbita pepo (ssp. pepo cv. Gold Rush) was grown in PAH-spiked media in the presence and absence of caffeine. Solubility tests initially confirmed the ability of caffeine to dissolve PAHs mixtures of anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[ghi]perylene. Extraction experiments also highlighted its potential as a PAH-releasing agent from an aged soil. Phytoextraction from a low organic sand medium (f(OC)=0.056+/-0.03%) indicated a significant enhancement of pyrene uptake with three weeks daily watering with 500mgL(-1) caffeine solution. The average pyrene content of roots was 35.3 and 16.0microgg(-1), in caffeine and non-caffeine set-ups, respectively. In the shoots, the corresponding values were 3.60 and 1.67microgg(-1). Both showed more than twofold increase with caffeine. Caffeine also accumulated mainly in the leaves of the treated samples at 2800mgkg(-1) dry weight. Further tests with a 1-year aged soil (f(OC)=5.2+/-1%) containing a mixture of phenanthrene and pyrene yielded parallel results. However, lower PAH content in these samples were observed due to the stronger PAHs partitioning in aged-soil matrix. After four weeks of caffeine, phenanthrene in shoots and roots increased by one and a half and four times, respectively. The corresponding enhancements for pyrene were two and a half and three and a half times.

  11. Comparative analysis of cesium and potassium uptake in onion Allium cepa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, P. Ł.; Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, G.

    2003-01-01

    Cesium uptake in onion (from 0.3 mM CsCl solution traced with 137CsCl) has been examined. The highest uptake occurred at pH 4-5 and it decreased with increasing pH. The intensity of Cs translocation depended on acidity of the solution. For acidic solutions, translocation of cesium into bulbs and leaves was greater than in case of alkaline solutions, where most of the cesium remained in the roots. Addition of potassium into the solutions (millimolar K concentrations) inhibits Cs uptake. The potassium pH-influx/efflux characteristic does not coincide with the Cs uptake.

  12. Gramene 2016: comparative plant genomics and pathway resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species. Its two main frameworks are genomes (collaboration with Ensembl Plants) and pathways (The Plant Reactome and archival BioCyc databases). Since our last NAR update, the data...

  13. Comparative effects of UW and SLS solutions on concentrative proline uptake in cold preserved rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Serrar, H; Musallam, L; Haddad, P

    1999-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that the rate of cell swelling induced by concentrative proline uptake in isolated rat hepatocytes decreased by 50 per cent after only 24 h of cold storage in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution, thereby representing a sensitive marker of alterations in hepatocyte functions after cold preservation and rewarming. We have thus used concentrative proline uptake to compare the capacity of UW and sodium-lactobionate-sucrose (SLS) solutions to maintain such differentiated hepatocyte functions. Isolated rat hepatocytes were kept at 4 degrees C for 4, 10, 24 and 48 h in UW or SLS solutions, and subsequently cultured at 37 degrees C for 1-2 h. Viability was measured by Trypan blue exclusion. After rewarming, cells were subjected to a 10 min administration of 10 mM proline and accumulation of the amino acid was assessed by changes in cell volume as measured by digital analysis of single-cell images obtained under bright-field illumination. Cell viability was reduced gradually and significantly after 0 to 48 h of preservation, and rewarming amplified this effect. However, loss of viability was similar in UW- and SLS-stored cells, as were initial steady-state cell volumes. Proline-induced swelling rate was reduced significantly by 13, 46 and by 57 per cent after 10, 24 and 48 h of preservation in UW solution, respectively. There is no significant difference between SLS- and UW-preserved hepatocyte swelling rates after 10 h and 48 h of cold preservation. However, the decline in the swelling rate of SLS-preserved hepatocytes incubated for 24 h is significantly lower than that of their UW-preserved counterparts. These results show that the SLS solution can preserve differentiated hepatic functions as well as the UW solution does.

  14. Sputnik: a database platform for comparative plant genomics.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Stephen; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2003-01-01

    Two million plant ESTs, from 20 different plant species, and totalling more than one 1000 Mbp of DNA sequence, represents a formidable transcriptomic resource. Sputnik uses the potential of this sequence resource to fill some of the information gap in the un-sequenced plant genomes and to serve as the foundation for in silicio comparative plant genomics. The complexity of the individual EST collections has been reduced using optimised EST clustering techniques. Annotation of cluster sequences is performed by exploiting and transferring information from the comprehensive knowledgebase already produced for the completed model plant genome (Arabidopsis thaliana) and by performing additional state of-the-art sequence analyses relevant to today's plant biologist. Functional predictions, comparative analyses and associative annotations for 500 000 plant EST derived peptides make Sputnik (http://mips.gsf.de/proj/sputnik/) a valid platform for contemporary plant genomics.

  15. Sputnik: a database platform for comparative plant genomics

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Stephen; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Mayer, Klaus F.X.

    2003-01-01

    Two million plant ESTs, from 20 different plant species, and totalling more than one 1000 Mbp of DNA sequence, represents a formidable transcriptomic resource. Sputnik uses the potential of this sequence resource to fill some of the information gap in the un-sequenced plant genomes and to serve as the foundation for in silicio comparative plant genomics. The complexity of the individual EST collections has been reduced using optimised EST clustering techniques. Annotation of cluster sequences is performed by exploiting and transferring information from the comprehensive knowledgebase already produced for the completed model plant genome (Arabidopsis thaliana) and by performing additional state of-the-art sequence analyses relevant to today's plant biologist. Functional predictions, comparative analyses and associative annotations for 500 000 plant EST derived peptides make Sputnik (http://mips.gsf.de/proj/sputnik/) a valid platform for contemporary plant genomics. PMID:12519965

  16. PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2011-03-01

    Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant

  17. Conocarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal availability and uptake by maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wabel, Mohammad I.; Usman, Adel R.A.; El-Naggar, Ahmed H.; Aly, Anwar A.; Ibrahim, Hesham M.; Elmaghraby, Salem; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of Concarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal accessibility and uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.). The impacts of biochar rates (0.0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0% w/w) and two soil moisture levels (75% and 100% of field capacity, FC) on immobilization and availability of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb to maize plants as well as its application effects on soil pH, EC, bulk density, and moisture content were evaluated using heavy metal-contaminated soil collected from mining area. The biochar addition significantly decreased the bulk density and increased moisture content of soil. Applying biochar significantly reduced NH4OAc- or AB-DTPA-extractable heavy metal concentrations of soils, indicating metal immobilization. Conocarpus biochar increased shoot dry biomass of maize plants by 54.5–102% at 75% FC and 133–266% at 100% FC. Moreover, applying biochar significantly reduced shoot heavy metal concentrations in maize plants (except for Fe at 75% FC) in response to increasing application rates, with a highest decrease of 51.3% and 60.5% for Mn, 28% and 21.2% for Zn, 60% and 29.5% for Cu, 53.2% and 47.2% for Cd at soil moisture levels of 75% FC and 100% FC, respectively. The results suggest that biochar may be effectively used as a soil amendment for heavy metal immobilization and in reducing its phytotoxicity. PMID:26150758

  18. Conocarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal availability and uptake by maize plants.

    PubMed

    Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Usman, Adel R A; El-Naggar, Ahmed H; Aly, Anwar A; Ibrahim, Hesham M; Elmaghraby, Salem; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of Concarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal accessibility and uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.). The impacts of biochar rates (0.0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0% w/w) and two soil moisture levels (75% and 100% of field capacity, FC) on immobilization and availability of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb to maize plants as well as its application effects on soil pH, EC, bulk density, and moisture content were evaluated using heavy metal-contaminated soil collected from mining area. The biochar addition significantly decreased the bulk density and increased moisture content of soil. Applying biochar significantly reduced NH4OAc- or AB-DTPA-extractable heavy metal concentrations of soils, indicating metal immobilization. Conocarpus biochar increased shoot dry biomass of maize plants by 54.5-102% at 75% FC and 133-266% at 100% FC. Moreover, applying biochar significantly reduced shoot heavy metal concentrations in maize plants (except for Fe at 75% FC) in response to increasing application rates, with a highest decrease of 51.3% and 60.5% for Mn, 28% and 21.2% for Zn, 60% and 29.5% for Cu, 53.2% and 47.2% for Cd at soil moisture levels of 75% FC and 100% FC, respectively. The results suggest that biochar may be effectively used as a soil amendment for heavy metal immobilization and in reducing its phytotoxicity.

  19. Increasing the Size of the Microbial Biomass Altered Bacterial Community Structure which Enhances Plant Phosphorus Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pu; Murphy, Daniel Vaughan; George, Suman J.; Lapis-Gaza, Hazel; Xu, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural production can be limited by low phosphorus (P) availability, with soil P being constrained by sorption and precipitation reactions making it less available for plant uptake. There are strong links between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability and P cycling within soil P pools, with microorganisms being an integral component of soil P cycling mediating the availability of P to plants. Here we tested a conceptual model that proposes (i) the addition of readily-available organic substrates would increase the size of the microbial biomass thus exhausting the pool of easily-available P and (ii) this would cause the microbial biomass to access P from more recalcitrant pools. In this model it is hypothesised that the size of the microbial population is regulating access to less available P rather than the diversity of organisms contained within this biomass. To test this hypothesis we added mixtures of simple organic compounds that reflect typical root exudates at different C:N ratios to a soil microcosm experiment and assessed changes in soil P pools, microbial biomass and bacterial diversity measures. We report that low C:N ratio (C:N = 12.5:1) artificial root exudates increased the size of the microbial biomass while high C:N ratio (C:N = 50:1) artificial root exudates did not result in a similar increase in microbial biomass. Interestingly, addition of the root exudates did not alter bacterial diversity (measured via univariate diversity indices) but did alter bacterial community structure. Where C, N and P supply was sufficient to support plant growth the increase observed in microbial biomass occurred with a concurrent increase in plant yield. PMID:27893833

  20. Inter-varietal variation in caesium and strontium uptake by plants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Penrose, B; Beresford, N A; Broadley, M R; Crout, N M J

    2015-01-01

    Radiocaesium and radiostrontium enter the foodchain primarily via plant root uptake. Selecting varieties of crop that display low accumulation of these radionuclides has been suggested as an economically and socially acceptable remediation strategy for radiologically contaminated land. However, there is insufficient information available to assess the feasibility of this remediation approach. This paper presents a comprehensive literature-based evaluation of inter-varietal variation in accumulation of Cs and Sr in crop plants. Thirty-seven publications studying 27 plant species were identified as appropriate for these analyses. Inter-varietal variation was expressed at the ratio of the maximum to minimum observed concentrations for a given crop species and element and ranged from 1.0 to 6.3 and from 1.0 to 4.5 for Cs and Sr respectively. This variation suggests that exploitation of inter-varietal variation could be used in some crop species to reduce the transfer of these radionuclides to a similar extent to existing remediation strategies. Low-Sr accumulating varieties were also found to have lower concentrations of Ca, whereas low Cs-accumulating varieties were not shown to have low K accumulation. Concentrations of Cs and Sr in plants were not related, suggesting that finding varieties displaying low accumulation of both Sr and Cs may not be feasible. Varietal selection could be an effective remediation strategy, and could be used in combination with other existing methods, such as fertilisation and ploughing. However, a thorough investigation of species contributing the most to ingestion doses is recommended to fully determine the feasibility of varietal selection as a remediation strategy. The reproducibility of inter-varietal variation between sites and growing seasons should be the focus of future research.

  1. Comparative genomics of the liberibacteral plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative analyses of multiple Liberibacter genomes provide significant insights into the evolutionary history, genetic diversity, and phylogenetic and metabolomic capacities among pathogenic bacteria that have caused tremendous economic losses to agricultural crops. In addition, genomic analyses ...

  2. Manganese uptake and accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. (Phytolaccaceae).

    PubMed

    Xue, S G; Chen, Y X; Reeves, Roger D; Baker, Alan J M; Lin, Q; Fernando, Denise R

    2004-10-01

    The perennial herb Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. (Phytolaccaceae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new manganese hyperaccumulator by means of field surveys on Mn-rich soils and by glasshouse experiments. This species not only has remarkable tolerance to Mn but also has extraordinary uptake and accumulation capacity for this element. The maximum Mn concentration in the leaf dry matter was 19,300 microg/g on Xiangtan Mn tailings wastelands, with a mean of 14,480 microg/g. Under nutrient solution culture conditions, P. acinosa could grow normally with Mn supplied at a concentration of 8000 micromol/l, although with less biomass than in control samples supplied with Mn at 5 micromol/l. Manganese concentration in the shoots increased with increasing external Mn levels, but the total mass of Mn accumulated in the shoots first increased and then decreased. At an Mn concentration of 5000 micromol/l in the culture solution, the Mn accumulation in the shoot dry matter was highest (258 mg/plant). However, the Mn concentration in the leaves reached its highest value (36,380 microg/g) at an Mn supply level of 12,000 micromol/l. These results confirm that P. acinosa is an Mn hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly, has substantial biomass, wide distribution and a broad ecological amplitude. This species provides a new plant resource for exploring the mechanism of Mn hyperaccumulation, and has potential for use in the phytoremediation of Mn-contaminated soils.

  3. Screening of metal uptake by plant colonizers growing on abandoned copper mine in Kapunda, South Australia.

    PubMed

    Nirola, Ramkrishna; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Aryal, Rupak; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Systematic site survey for sample collection and analysis was conducted at a derelict copper (Cu) mine at Kapunda, South Australia. Cu concentrations in the soils at this former mine ranged from 65-10107 mg kg(-1). The pH and EC varied widely in the 3.9-8.4 and 152-7311 µS ranges, respectively. Nine plant species growing over the copper mine site were selected to screen for metal uptake to determine their suitability for phytoremediation. The Australian native tree species Eucalyptus camaldulensis indicated enrichment factor (EF) of 2.17, 1.89, and 1.30 for Cu, Zn, and Pb, respectively, suggesting that this species of tree can accumulate these metals to some degree. The stress-resistant exotic olive, Olea europaea exhibited EF of ≤ 0.01 for Cu, Cd, and Pb, and 0.29 for Zn, which is characteristic of an excluder plant. Acacia pycnantha, the Australian pioneer legume species with EF 0.03, 0.80, 0.32, and 0.01 for Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb, respectively, emerged as another strong metal excluder and consequently as an ideal metal stabilizer.

  4. The uptake and distribution of selenium in three aquatic plants grown in Se(IV) solution.

    PubMed

    Mechora, Spela; Stibilj, Vekoslava; Germ, Mateja

    2013-03-15

    The uptake of Se(IV) by Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum and Potamogeton perfoliatus, and the effects of Se(IV) on their physiological and biochemical characteristics were studied. Plants were cultivated outdoors under semi-controlled conditions in water solution containing Na selenite (20 μg Se L(-1) and 10 mg Se L(-1)). The higher concentration of Se lowered the photochemical efficiency of PSII in all species studied, while the lower concentration had no effect on any species. The higher concentration of Se lowered respiratory potential in M. spicatum. The response of M. spicatum and C. demersum to Se(IV) regarding chlorophylls was variable, however in the majority of cases, there was a trend of increasing the amount of chlorophylls, while in P. perfoliatus the amount of chlorophyll a decreased. The concentration of Se in plants cultured in 10 mg Se(IV) L(-1) ranged from 436 to 839 μg Se g(-1) DM in M. spicatum, 319 to 988 μg Se g(-1) DM in C. demersum and 310 to 661 μg Se g(-1) DM in P. perfoliatus. The amount of soluble Se compounds in enzyme extracts of high Se treatment was 27% in M. spicatum, 41% in C. demersum and 35% in P. perfoliatus. Se compounds were determined using HPLC-ICP-MS. It was observed that the applied Se(IV) was mainly transformed to insoluble Se.

  5. Oxidative status of Matricaria chamomilla plants related to cadmium and copper uptake.

    PubMed

    Kovácik, Jozef; Backor, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) uptake by the plants of Matricaria chamomilla and relation to activities of guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) up to 7 days of exposure to 3, 60 and 120 microM Cd or Cu was studied. Cd content in rosettes was ca. 10-fold higher in comparison to Cu while Cu was preferentially accumulated in the roots. In line with this observation, increase of CAT and GPX activity was similar in rosettes of Cd and Cu-treated plants, indicating non-redox active properties of Cd and low Cu accumulation. In the roots, Cu showed strong pro-oxidant effect, as judged from extreme stimulation of CAT and GPX, followed by increase of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde. However, GPX seemed to be more important for alleviation of oxidative stress (ca. 93-250-fold higher activity in 120 microM Cu-treated roots). Cd had substantially lower influences and stimulated GR activity more than Cu. Activities of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzymes in relation to its accumulation are also discussed.

  6. Characterizing the Solid-Solution Coefficient and Plant Uptake Factor of As, Cd and Pb in California Croplands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In risk assessment models, the solid-solution partition coefficient (Kd), and plant uptake factor (PUF), are often employed to model the fate and transport of trace elements in soils. The trustworthiness of risk assessments depends on the reliability of the parameters used. In this study, we exami...

  7. UPTAKE AND PHYTOTRANSFORMATION OF O,P'-DDT AND P,P'-DDT BY AXENICALLY CULTIVATED AQUATIC PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The uptake and phytotransformation of o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDT were investigated in vitro using three axenically cultivated aquatic plants: parrot feather (Mariophyllum aquaticum), duckweed (Spirodela oligorrhiza), and elodea (Elodea canadensis). The decay profile of DDT from the aq...

  8. Improving Lowland Rice (O. sativa L. cv. MR219) Plant Growth Variables, Nutrients Uptake, and Nutrients Recovery Using Crude Humic Substances

    PubMed Central

    Palanivell, Perumal; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Ab Majid, Nik Muhamad; Jalloh, Mohamadu Boyie; Susilawati, Kasim

    2015-01-01

    High cation exchange capacity and organic matter content of crude humic substances from compost could be exploited to reduce ammonia loss from urea and to as well improve rice growth and soil chemical properties for efficient nutrients utilization in lowland rice cultivation. Close-dynamic air flow system was used to determine the effects of crude humic substances on ammonia volatilization. A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of crude humic substances on rice plant growth, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties using an acid soil mixed with three rates of crude humic substances (20, 40, and 60 g pot−1). Standard procedures were used to evaluate rice plant dry matter production, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties. Application of crude humic substances increased ammonia volatilization. However, the lowest rate of crude humic substances (20 g pot−1) significantly improved total dry matter, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil nutrients availability compared with crude humic substances (40 and 60 g pot−1) and the normal fertilization. Apart from improving growth of rice plants, crude humic substances can be used to ameliorate acid soils in rice cultivation. The findings of this study are being validated in our ongoing field trials. PMID:25977938

  9. Improving Lowland Rice (O. sativa L. cv. MR219) Plant Growth Variables, Nutrients Uptake, and Nutrients Recovery Using Crude Humic Substances.

    PubMed

    Palanivell, Perumal; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Ab Majid, Nik Muhamad; Jalloh, Mohamadu Boyie; Susilawati, Kasim

    2015-01-01

    High cation exchange capacity and organic matter content of crude humic substances from compost could be exploited to reduce ammonia loss from urea and to as well improve rice growth and soil chemical properties for efficient nutrients utilization in lowland rice cultivation. Close-dynamic air flow system was used to determine the effects of crude humic substances on ammonia volatilization. A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of crude humic substances on rice plant growth, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties using an acid soil mixed with three rates of crude humic substances (20, 40, and 60 g pot(-1)). Standard procedures were used to evaluate rice plant dry matter production, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties. Application of crude humic substances increased ammonia volatilization. However, the lowest rate of crude humic substances (20 g pot(-1)) significantly improved total dry matter, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil nutrients availability compared with crude humic substances (40 and 60 g pot(-1)) and the normal fertilization. Apart from improving growth of rice plants, crude humic substances can be used to ameliorate acid soils in rice cultivation. The findings of this study are being validated in our ongoing field trials.

  10. The effect of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria on the growth, physiology, and Cd uptake of Arundo donax L.

    PubMed

    Sarathambal, Chinnathambi; Khankhane, Premraj Jagoji; Gharde, Yogita; Kumar, Bhumesh; Varun, Mayank; Arun, Sellappan

    2017-04-03

    In this study, plant growth-promoting potential isolates from rhizosphere of 10 weed species grown in heavy metal-contaminated areas were identified and their effect on growth, antioxidant enzymes, and cadmium (Cd) uptake in Arundo donax L. was explored. Plant growth-promoting traits of isolates were also analyzed. These isolates were found to produce siderophores and enzymes such as 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, and aid in solubilization of mineral nutrients and modulate plant growth and development. Based on the presence of multiple plant growth-promoting traits, isolates were selected for molecular characterization and inoculation studies. Altogether, 58 isolates were obtained and 20% of them were able to tolerate Cd up to 400 ppm. The sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes indicates that the isolates belong to the phylum Firmicutes. Bacillus sp. along with mycorrhizae inoculation significantly improves the growth, the activity of antioxidants enzymes, and the Cd uptake in A. donax than Bacillus alone. Highly significant correlations were observed between Cd uptake, enzymatic activities, and plant growth characteristics at 1% level of significance. The synergistic interaction effect between these organisms helps to alleviate Cd effects on soil. Heavy metal-tolerant isolate along with arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) could be used to improve the phytoremedial potential of plants.

  11. Effect of heavy-metal-resistant bacteria on enhanced metal uptake and translocation of the Cu-tolerant plant, Elsholtzia splendens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Chen, Xincai; Duan, Dechao; Peng, Cheng; Le, Thu; Shi, Jiyan

    2015-04-01

    A hydroponics trial was employed to study the effects of Pseudomonas putida CZ1 (CZ1), a heavy-metal-resistant bacterial strain isolated from the rhizosphere of Elsholtzia splendens (E. splendens), on the uptake and translocation of copper (Cu) in E. splendens. Significant promotion of plant growth coupled with the obvious plant-growth-promoting (PGP) characters of the bacteria suggested that CZ1 would be a plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) to E. splendens under Cu stress condition. The results of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) showed that CZ1 increased the concentration of Cu in the shoots (up to 211.6% compared to non-inoculation treatment) and translocation factor (TF) (from 0.56 to 1.83%) of those exposed to Cu. The distribution of Cu in root cross section measured by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SRXRF) indicated that CZ1 promoted the transport of Cu from cortex to xylem in roots, which contributed to the accumulation of Cu in shoots. Furthermore, CZ1 improved the uptake of nutrient elements by plants to oppose to the toxicity of Cu. In summary, P. putida CZ1 acted as a PGPR in resistance to Cu and promoted the accumulation and translocation of Cu from root to shoot by element redistribution in plant root; hence, CZ1 is a promising assistance to phytoremediation.

  12. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed photosynthetic CO2 uptake in two coniferous forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Ibrom, Andreas; Jarvis, Paul G; Clement, Robert; Morgenstern, Kai; Oltchev, Alexander; Medlyn, Belinda E; Wang, Ying Ping; Wingate, Lisa; Moncrieff, John B; Gravenhorst, Gode

    2006-07-01

    Gross canopy photosynthesis (P(g)) can be simulated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon dioxide (CO2) flux measurements above the forest canopy. We compare the two estimates and illustrate our findings with two case studies. We used the three-dimensional canopy model MAESTRA to simulate P(g) of two spruce forests differing in age and structure. Model parameter acquisition and model sensitivity to selected model parameters are described, and modeled results are compared with independent flux estimates. Despite higher photon fluxes at the site, an older German Norway spruce (Picea abies L. (Karst.)) canopy took up 25% less CO2 from the atmosphere than a young Scottish Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) plantation. The average magnitudes of P(g) and the differences between the two canopies were satisfactorily represented by the model. The main reasons for the different uptake rates were a slightly smaller quantum yield and lower absorptance of the Norway spruce stand because of a more clumped canopy structure. The model did not represent the scatter in the turbulent CO2 flux densities, which was of the same order of magnitude as the non-photosynthetically-active-radiation-induced biophysical variability in the simulated P(g). Analysis of residuals identified only small systematic differences between the modeled flux estimates and turbulent flux measurements at high vapor pressure saturation deficits. The merits and limitations of comparative analysis for quality evaluation of both methods are discussed. From this analysis, we recommend use of both parameter sets and model structure as a basis for future applications and model development.

  13. Modeling the carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: Mycorrhizal trade-offs and multipath resistance uptake improve predictions of retranslocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Phillips, Richard P.

    2014-08-01

    Accurate projections of the future land carbon (C) sink by terrestrial biosphere models depend on how nutrient constraints on net primary production are represented. While nutrient limitation is nearly universal, current models do not have a C cost for plant nutrient acquisition. Also missing are symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, which can consume up to 20% of net primary production and supply up to 50% of a plant's nitrogen (N) uptake. Here we integrate simultaneous uptake and mycorrhizae into a cutting-edge plant N model—Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN)—that can be coupled into terrestrial biosphere models. The C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type, with plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae benefiting when N is relatively abundant and plants that support ectomycorrhizae benefiting when N is strongly limiting. Across six temperate forested sites (representing arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated stands and 176 site years), including multipath resistance improved the partitioning of N uptake between aboveground and belowground sources. Integrating mycorrhizae led to further improvements in predictions of N uptake from soil (R2 = 0.69 increased to R2 = 0.96) and from senescing leaves (R2 = 0.29 increased to R2 = 0.73) relative to the original model. On average, 5% and 9% of net primary production in arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated forests, respectively, was needed to support mycorrhizal-mediated acquisition of N. To the extent that resource constraints to net primary production are governed by similar trade-offs across all terrestrial ecosystems, integrating these improvements to FUN into terrestrial biosphere models should enhance predictions of the future land C sink.

  14. Comparative Proteomics of Cannabis sativa Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Raharjo, Tri J.; Widjaja, Ivy; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Comparative proteomics of leaves, flowers, and glands of Cannabis sativa have been used to identify specific tissue-expressed proteins. These tissues have significantly different levels of cannabinoids. Cannabinoids accumulate primarily in the glands but can also be found in flowers and leaves. Proteins extracted from glands, flowers, and leaves were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Over 800 protein spots were reproducibly resolved in the two-dimensional gels from leaves and flowers. The patterns of the gels were different and little correlation among the proteins could be observed. Some proteins that were only expressed in flowers were chosen for identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprint database searching. Flower and gland proteomes were also compared, with the finding that less then half of the proteins expressed in flowers were also expressed in glands. Some selected gland protein spots were identified: F1D9.26-unknown prot. (Arabidopsis thaliana), phospholipase D beta 1 isoform 1a (Gossypium hirsutum), and PG1 (Hordeum vulgare). Western blotting was employed to identify a polyketide synthase, an enzyme believed to be involved in cannabinoid biosynthesis, resulting in detection of a single protein. PMID:15190082

  15. Comparing Sediment and Pore-water Measurements as Predictors of PCB Uptake by Oligochaetes from Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing amount of chemical and biological evidence that using sediment concentrations and commonly applied Koc values frequently overpredicts interstitial water concentrations of HOCs, and thereby overestimates uptake and/or effects of those chemicals on exposed or...

  16. Effect of earthworms on plant Lantana camara Pb-uptake and on bacterial communities in root-adhering soil.

    PubMed

    Jusselme, My Dung; Poly, Franck; Miambi, Edouard; Mora, Philippe; Blouin, Manuel; Pando, Anne; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne

    2012-02-01

    The present study aimed to assess the potential abilities of Lantana camara, an invasive plant species for phytoremediation in the presence of earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus. Effects of earthworm on growth and lead (Pb) uptake by L. camara plant were studied in soil artificially contaminated at 500 or 1000mg of Pb kg(-1) soil. This species has a promising value for phytoremediation because it can uptake as much as 10% of 1000mgkg(-1) of Pb per year. Moreover, the presence of earthworms enhanced plant biomass by about 1.5-2 times and increased the uptake of lead by about 2-3 times. In the presence of earthworm, L. camara was thus able to uptake up 20% of Pb presence in the soil, corresponding to remediation time of 5 years if all organs are removed. As soil microorganisms are known to mediate many interactions between earthworms and plants, we documented the effect of earthworms on the bacterial community of root-adhering soil of L. camara. Cultivable bacterial biomass of root-adhering soil increased in the presence of earthworms. Similar trend was observed on bacterial metabolic activities. The increase of lead concentrations from 500 to 1000mgkg(-1) did not have any significant effect either on plant growth or on bacterial biomass and global activities but affected the structure and functional diversity of the bacterial community. These results showed that we should broaden the ecological context of phytoremediation by considering plant/microbial community/earthworm interactions that influence the absorption of heavy metals.

  17. Uptake and recycling of lead by boreal forest plants: Quantitative estimates from a site in northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaminder, Jonatan; Bindler, Richard; Emteryd, Ove; Renberg, Ingemar

    2005-05-01

    As a consequence of deposition of atmospheric pollution, the lead concentration in the mor layer (the organic horizon) of remote boreal forest soils in Sweden is raised far above natural levels. How the mor will respond to decreased atmospheric pollution is not well known and is dependent on future deposition rates, downward migration losses and upward fluxes in the soil profile. Plants may contribute to the upward flux of lead by 'pumping' lead back to the mor surface through root uptake and subsequent litter fall. We use lead concentration and stable isotope ( 206Pb, 207Pb and 208Pb) measurements of forest vegetation to quantify plant uptake rates from the soil and direct from the atmosphere at two sites in northern Sweden; an undisturbed mature forest and a disturbed site with Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) growing on a recently exposed mineral soil (C-horizon) containing a minimum of atmospherically derived pollution lead. Analyses of forest mosses from a herbarium collection (spanning the last ˜100 yr) and soil matrix samples suggest that the atmospheric lead deposited on plants and soil has an average 206Pb/ 207Pb ratio of 1.15, while lead derived from local soil minerals has an average ratio of ˜1.47. Since the biomass of trees and field layer shrubs has an average 206Pb/ 207Pb ratio of ˜1.25, this indicates that 70% ± 10% of the inventory of 1 ± 0.8 mg Pb m -2 stored in plants in the mature forest originates from pollution. Needles, bark and apical stemwood of the pine growing on the disturbed soil, show lower 206Pb/ 207Pb ratios (as low as 1.21) than the roots and basal stemwood (having ratios > 1.36), which indicate that plants are able to incorporate lead directly from the atmosphere (˜50% of the total tree uptake). By partitioning the total uptake of lead into uptake from the atmosphere and different soil layers using an isotopic mixing model, we estimate that ˜0.03 ± 0.01, 0.02 ± 0.01 and 0.05 ± 0.01 mg Pb m -2 yr -1 (mean ± SD), is taken up

  18. In silico comparative analysis of SSR markers in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The adverse environmental conditions impose extreme limitation to growth and plant development, restricting the genetic potential and reflecting on plant yield losses. The progress obtained by classic plant breeding methods aiming at increasing abiotic stress tolerances have not been enough to cope with increasing food demands. New target genes need to be identified to reach this goal, which requires extensive studies of the related biological mechanisms. Comparative analyses in ancestral plant groups can help to elucidate yet unclear biological processes. Results In this study, we surveyed the occurrence patterns of expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite markers for model plants. A total of 13,133 SSR markers were discovered using the SSRLocator software in non-redundant EST databases made for all eleven species chosen for this study. The dimer motifs are more frequent in lower plant species, such as green algae and mosses, and the trimer motifs are more frequent for the majority of higher plant groups, such as monocots and dicots. With this in silico study we confirm several microsatellite plant survey results made with available bioinformatics tools. Conclusions The comparative studies of EST-SSR markers among all plant lineages is well suited for plant evolution studies as well as for future studies of transferability of molecular markers. PMID:21247422

  19. Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential for use in phytoremediation. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    'In the following the author reports on progress on the Department of Energy Grant from the Office of Energy Research and Office of Environmental Management on the topic of Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential use in phytoremediation. In this research the authors are investigating the following hypotheses: (1) A novel metal transporter cDNA isolated in my lab functions as a plasma membrane heavy metal and uptake transporter in plants roots. (2.) Over-expression of this cDNA in plants can be used to enhance plasma membrane metal uptake into plant tissues.'

  20. Endophyte-assisted promotion of biomass production and metal-uptake of energy crop sweet sorghum by plant-growth-promoting endophyte Bacillus sp. SLS18.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shenglian; Xu, Taoying; Chen, Liang; Chen, Jueliang; Rao, Chan; Xiao, Xiao; Wan, Yong; Zeng, Guangming; Long, Fei; Liu, Chengbin; Liu, Yutang

    2012-02-01

    The effects of Bacillus sp. SLS18, a plant-growth-promoting endophyte, on the biomass production and Mn/Cd uptake of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), Phytolacca acinosa Roxb., and Solanum nigrum L. were investigated. SLS18 displayed multiple heavy metals and antibiotics resistances. The strain also exhibited the capacity of producing indole-3-acetic acid, siderophores, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. In pot experiments, SLS18 could not only infect plants effectively but also significantly increase the biomass of the three tested plants in the presence of Mn/Cd. The promoting effect order of SLS18 on the biomass of the tested plants was sweet sorghum > P. acinosa > S. nigrum L. In the presence of Mn (2,000 mg kg(-1)) and Cd (50 mg kg(-1)) in vermiculite, the total Mn/Cd uptakes in the aerial parts of sweet sorghum, P. acinosa, and S. nigrum L. were increased by 65.2%/40.0%, 55.2%/31.1%, and 18.6%/25.6%, respectively, compared to the uninoculated controls. This demonstrates that the symbiont of SLS18 and sweet sorghum has the potential of improving sweet sorghum biomass production and its total metal uptake on heavy metal-polluted marginal land. It offers the potential that heavy metal-polluted marginal land could be utilized in planting sweet sorghum as biofuel feedstock for ethanol production, which not only gives a promising phytoremediation strategy but also eases the competition for limited fertile farmland between energy crops and food crops.

  1. Variation in Quantum Yield for CO2 Uptake among C3 and C4 Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Ehleringer, James; Pearcy, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    The quantum yield for CO2 uptake was measured on a number of C3 and C4 monocot and dicot species. Under normal atmospheric conditions (330 microliters per liter CO2, 21% O2) and a leaf temperature of 30°C, the average quantum yields (moles CO2 per einstein) were as follows: 0.052 for C3 dicots, 0.053 for C3 grasses, 0.053 for NAD-malic enzyme type C4 dicots, 0.060 for NAD-malic enzyme type C4 grasses, 0.064 for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase type C4 grasses, 0.061 for NADP-malic enzyme C4 dicots, and 0.065 for NADP-malic enzyme type C4 grasses. The quantum yield under normal atmospheric conditions was temperature dependent in C3 species, but apparently not in C4 species. Light and temperature conditions during growth appeared not to influence quantum yield. The significance of variation in the quantum yields of C4 plants was discussed in terms of CO2 leakage from the bundle sheath cells and suberization of apoplastic regions of the bundle sheath cells. PMID:16663257

  2. Hexavalent chromium damages chamomile plants by alteration of antioxidants and its uptake is prevented by calcium.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Babula, Petr; Hedbavny, Josef; Klejdus, Bořivoj

    2014-05-30

    Toxicity of low (3μM) and high (60 and 120μM) concentrations of hexavalent chromium/Cr(VI) in chamomile plants was studied. Fluorescence staining confirmed reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Cr was mainly accumulated in the roots with translocation factor <0.007. Notwithstanding this, both shoots and roots revealed increase in oxidative stress and depletion of glutathione, total thiols, ascorbic acid and activities of glutathione reductase and partially ascorbate peroxidase mainly at 120μM Cr. Though some protective mechanisms were detected (elevation of nitric oxide, enhancement of GPX activity and increase in phenols and lignin), this was not sufficient to counteract the oxidative damage. Consequently, soluble proteins, tissue water content and biomass production were considerably depleted. Surprising increase in some mineral nutrients in roots (Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu) was also detected. Subsequent experiment confirmed that exogenous calcium suppressed oxidative symptoms and Cr uptake but growth of chamomile seedlings was not improved. Alteration of naturally present reductants could be a reason for Cr(III) signal detected using specific fluorescence reagent: in vitro assay confirmed disappearance of ascorbic acid in equimolar mixture with dichromate (>96% at pH 4 and 7) while such response of glutathione was substantially less visible.

  3. Molecular basis of nitrate uptake by the plant nitrate transporter NRT1.1

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Joanne L.; Newstead, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Summary The NRT1/PTR family of proton-coupled transporters are responsible for nitrogen assimilation in eukaryotes and bacteria through the uptake of peptides. However, in the majority of plant species members of this family have evolved to transport nitrate as well as additional secondary metabolites and hormones. In response to falling nitrate levels, NRT1.1 is phosphorylated on an intracellular threonine that switches the transporter from a low to high affinity state. Here we present both the apo and nitrate bound crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana NRT1.1, which together with in vitro binding and transport data identify a key role for His356 in nitrate binding. Our data support a model whereby phosphorylation increases structural flexibility and in turn the rate of transport. Comparison with peptide transporters further reveals how the NRT1/PTR family has evolved to recognize diverse nitrogenous ligands, whilst maintaining elements of a conserved coupling mechanism within this superfamily of nutrient transporters. PMID:24572366

  4. Effect of metabolic regulators on aluminium uptake and toxicity in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Stork, František; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Grúz, Jiři; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic metabolism of Al-exposed Matricaria chamomilla plants was modulated with four regulators: 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), salicylic acid (SA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and dithiothreitol (DTT). Physiological parameters (tissue water content, soluble proteins, reducing sugars, K+ content), root lignin content and free amino acids (increase in root proline and alanine) were the most affected in SA + Al variant, indicating negative impact of SA on Al-induced changes. SNP showed the least visible impact, suggesting protective effect of nitric oxide. Complex comparison between Al alone and combined treatments revealed that SA and DTT stimulated increase in shoot phenolic acids (mainly vanillic acid), sum of flavonols and soluble phenols but decreased the levels of coumarin-related compounds (Z- and E-2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acids), leading to elevation of shoot Al. Positive correlation between phenolic acids (mainly ferulic and chlorogenic acids), soluble phenols and total Al was found in the roots of SA and DTT variants. These events were not observed in AIP and SNP treatments. These data, to our knowledge for the first time, exactly confirm that phenolic metabolites may affect shoot Al uptake and this relation is rather positive in terms of simple phenols (and negative in terms of coumarin-related compounds).

  5. [Comparative investigations of osteotropic radionucleides. IV. The dynamics of uptake in normal and abnormal bone (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Creutzig, H; Gerdts, K G; Creutzig, A

    1977-03-01

    The dynamics of uptake of osteotropic radionucleides in normal and abnormal bone were studied by means of sequential and functional scans. Various phosphate and phosphonate complexes were compared in vivo and in vitro. Only phosphonates were considered as suitable for bone scanning. In normal bones in beagles, radioactivity after HEDP fell to 65% after two hours, but was 105% with 18F. In relation to healing fractures, the curves differ quantitatively and qualitatively. In this situation, functional curves derived from dynamic scans provide a better parallel with histological findings than does static scintigraphy with an uptake quotient. Sequential and functional scanning are able to document the therapeutic effect of irradiation of bone metastases.

  6. Influence of biologically-active substances on {sup 137}Cs and heavy metals uptake by Barley plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglov, Stanislav; Filipas, Alexander

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: When solving the problem of contaminated agricultural lands rehabilitation, most of attention is concentrated on the effective means which allow the obtaining of ecologically safe production. The minimization of radionuclides and heavy metals (HM) content in farm products on the basis of their migration characteristics in agro-landscapes and with the regard for different factors influencing contaminants behavior in the soil-plant system is of great significance. Our investigation has shown that the effect of biologically active substances (BAS) using for seeds treatment on {sup 137}Cs transfer to barley grown on Cd contaminated soil was dependent on their properties and dosage, characteristics of soil contamination and biological peculiarities of plants, including stage of plants development. Seeds treatment by plant growth regulator Zircon resulted in a significant increase in {sup 137}Cs activity in harvest (40- 50%), increase in K concentration and significant reduction in Ca concentration. Increased Cd content in soil reduced {sup 137}Cs transfer to barley plants by 30-60% (p<0,05) and Zircon application further reduced its concentration. Ambiol and El also reduced {sup 137}Cs uptake by roots and Cd and Pb phyto-toxicity. The experimental data do not make it possible to link the BAS effect on inhibition of {sup 137}Cs absorption by plants directly with their influence on HM phyto-toxicity. The dependence of Concentration Ratio of {sup 137}Cs on the Ambiol and El dose was not proportional and the most significant decrease in the radionuclide uptake by plants was reported with the use of dose showing the most pronounced stimulating effect on the barley growth and development. The pre-sowing seed treatment with Ambiol increased Pb absorption by 35-50% and, on the contrary, decreased Cd uptake by plants by 30-40%. (authors)

  7. Cuticular uptake of xenobiotics into living plants. Part 2: influence of the xenobiotic dose on the uptake of bentazone, epoxiconazole and pyraclostrobin, applied in the presence of various surfactants, into Chenopodium album, Sinapis alba and Triticum aestivum leaves.

    PubMed

    Forster, W Alison; Zabkiewicz, Jerzy A; Liu, Zhiqian

    2006-07-01

    This study has determined the uptake of three pesticides, applied as commercial or model formulations in the presence of a wide range of surfactants, into the leaves of three plant species (bentazone into Chenopodium album L. and Sinapis alba L., epoxiconazole and pyraclostrobin into Triticum aestivum L.). The results have confirmed previous findings that the initial dose (nmol mm(-2)) of xenobiotic applied to plant foliage is a strong, positive determinant of uptake. This held true for all the pesticide formulations studied, although surfactant concentration was found to have an effect. The lower surfactant concentrations studied showed an inferior relationship between the amount of xenobiotic applied and uptake. High molecular mass surfactants also produced much lower uptake than expected from the dose uptake equations in specific situations.

  8. Estimating the Contribution of Plant Groundwater Uptake to Total Evapotranspiration in a Semi-arid Oak Savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. R.; Chen, X.; Rubin, Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2008-12-01

    Since soil moisture is considered to be a primary controller of evapotranspiration in semi-arid systems, the effect of the availability of deep (>5m) water sources is often neglected in ecohydrological modeling. However, plant uptake from groundwater can contribute significantly to a site's water balance. Knowing the level of this contribution is important to predicting plant response to alternations in the hydrologic cycle, whether induced by climate change, land-use alterations, or the extraction of groundwater resources. In this study of a semi-arid oak savanna, we collect a suite of tree and stand scale ecohydrological measurements in order to quantify the proportion of evapotranspiration due to groundwater uptake by woody vegetation. The measurements, taken at half-hourly to biweekly intervals over two growing seasons, include individual tree transpiration (from sap flow), stand evapotranspiration (using the eddy-covariance method), soil moisture content, soil and leaf water potential, tree diameter, stable isotope ratios, and depth to groundwater. Analysis of this data set indicates that during the hot, dry summer months, stand evapotranspiration is greatly reduced, but groundwater uptake by vegetation can contribute up to 80 percent of the water transpired. For instance, while the total evapotranspiration was 11 mm in July 2007, 9 mm of this water came from sources below the soil zone. The timing of uptake appears to be directly related to the cessation of the rainy season and occurs when soil moisture has reached its sustained seasonal minimum, suggesting that the oaks are dependent on groundwater availability for two months of the year. When calculating uptake, assumptions about the sampling scale and the water storage properties of the soil, vegetation, and fractured rock can lead to a two-fold difference in predicted groundwater uptake, requiring increased efforts to characterize lateral root distribution, aquifer storativity, and diurnal changes in

  9. Phytozome: a comparative platform for green plant genomics.

    PubMed

    Goodstein, David M; Shu, Shengqiang; Howson, Russell; Neupane, Rochak; Hayes, Richard D; Fazo, Joni; Mitros, Therese; Dirks, William; Hellsten, Uffe; Putnam, Nicholas; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    The number of sequenced plant genomes and associated genomic resources is growing rapidly with the advent of both an increased focus on plant genomics from funding agencies, and the application of inexpensive next generation sequencing. To interact with this increasing body of data, we have developed Phytozome (http://www.phytozome.net), a comparative hub for plant genome and gene family data and analysis. Phytozome provides a view of the evolutionary history of every plant gene at the level of sequence, gene structure, gene family and genome organization, while at the same time providing access to the sequences and functional annotations of a growing number (currently 25) of complete plant genomes, including all the land plants and selected algae sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute, as well as selected species sequenced elsewhere. Through a comprehensive plant genome database and web portal, these data and analyses are available to the broader plant science research community, providing powerful comparative genomics tools that help to link model systems with other plants of economic and ecological importance.

  10. Uptake and effects of a mixture of widely used therapeutic drugs in Eruca sativa L. and Zea mays L. plants.

    PubMed

    Marsoni, Milena; De Mattia, Fabrizio; Labra, Massimo; Bruno, Antonia; Bruno, Antonella; Bracale, Marcella; Vannini, Candida

    2014-10-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds (PACs) are continuously dispersed into the environment due to human and veterinary use, giving rise to their potential accumulation in edible plants. In this study, Eruca sativa L. and Zea mays L. were selected to determine the potential uptake and accumulation of eight different PACs (Salbutamol, Atenolol, Lincomycin, Cyclophosphamide, Carbamazepine, Bezafibrate, Ofloxacin and Ranitidine) designed for human use. To mimic environmental conditions, the plants were grown in pots and irrigated with water spiked with a mixture of PACs at concentrations found in Italian wastewaters and rivers. Moreover, 10× and 100× concentrations of these pharmaceuticals were also tested. The presence of the pharmaceuticals was tested in the edible parts of the plants, namely leaves for E. sativa and grains for Z. mays. Quantification was performed by liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC/MS/MS). In the grains of 100× treated Z. mays, only atenolol, lincomycin and carbamazepine were above the limit of detection (LOD). At the same concentration in E. sativa plants the uptake of all PACs was >LOD. Lincomycin and oflaxacin were above the limit of quantitation in all conditions tested in E. sativa. The results suggest that uptake of some pharmaceuticals from the soil may indeed be a potential transport route to plants and that these environmental pollutants can reach different edible parts of the selected crops. Measurements of the concentrations of these pharmaceuticals in plant materials were used to model potential adult human exposure to these compounds. The results indicate that under the current experimental conditions, crops exposed to the selected pharmaceutical mixture would not have any negative effects on human health. Moreover, no significant differences in the growth of E. sativa or Z. mays plants irrigated with PAC-spiked vs. non-spiked water were observed.

  11. Roles for root iron plaque in sequestration and uptake of heavy metals and metalloids in aquatic and wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rudra D; Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Aradhana; Chauhan, Puneet S; Norton, Gareth J; Nautiyal, Chandra S

    2014-10-01

    Toxic metal(loid) contamination of soil and sediment poses long term risk to soil and human health through plant-human or plant-animal-human food chain pathways. Iron plaque (IP) formation is frequent in aquatic and wetland plant species and is responsible for the sequestration of various metal(loids). The presence of IP may act as a buffer or barrier and may thus enhance or reduce the uptake of potentially phytotoxic metals and metalloids by plants. If IP acts as a barrier, then low IP producing macrophytes/aquatic plants may be better accumulators of toxic metals and may find use in constructed wetlands for remediation of pollutants, while high IP forming edible plant species could be safer for human consumption. Conversely, if IP acts as a buffer for mineral nutrients and toxic elements then those cultivars may be rich in nutrients, but may also cause toxicity. However, an ecotoxicological risk is also inevitable if IP rich macrophyte roots containing heavy metals are consumed by herbivores. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of IP in metal and metalloid sequestration, uptake, and transport. Furthermore, we will address the role of root IP in Oryza sativa for arsenic (As) sequestration leading to lower grain As translocation, reducing the risk of human exposure.

  12. Soil organic matter and salinity affect copper bioavailability in root zone and uptake by Vicia faba L. plants.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Lana; Romic, Davor; Romic, Marija

    2014-10-01

    Processes that control the mobility, transformation and toxicity of metals in soil are of special importance in the root-developing zone. For this reason, there is a considerable interest in understanding trace elements (TEs) behavior in soil, emphasising the processes by which plants take them up. Increased root-zone salinity can affect plant TEs uptake and accumulation in plant tissue. Furthermore, copper (Cu) complexation by soil organic matter (SOM) is an effective mechanism of Cu retention in soils, controlling thus its bioavailability. Therefore, a greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of soil Cu contamination in a saline environment on faba bean (Vicia faba L.) element uptake. Treatment with NaCl salinity was applied (control, 50 mM NaCl and 100 mM NaCl) on faba bean plants grown in a control and in a soil spiked with Cu (250 and 500 mg kg(-1)). Low and high SOM content trial variants were studied. Cu accumulation occurred in faba bean leaf, pod and seed. Cu contamination affected plant element concentrations in leaves (Na, Ca, Mg, Mn), pod (Zn, Mn) and seed (Mn, Mo, Zn). Root-zone salinity also affected faba bean element concentrations. Furthermore, Cu contamination-salinity and salinity-SOM interactions were significant for pod Cu concentration, suggesting that Cu phytoavailability could be affected by these interactions. Future research will be focused on the mechanisms of Cu translocation in plant and adaptation aspects of abiotic stress.

  13. Impact of defoliation intensities on plant biomass, nutrient uptake and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus tenuis growing in a saline-sodic soil.

    PubMed

    García, I; Mendoza, R

    2012-11-01

    The impact of different defoliation intensities on the ability of Lotus tenuis plants to regrowth, mobilise nutrients and to associate with native AM fungi and Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil was investigated. After 70 days, plants were subjected to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% defoliation and shoot regrowth was assessed at the end of subsequent 35 days. Compared to non-defoliated plants, low or moderate defoliation up to 75% did not affect shoot regrowth. However, 100% treatment affected shoot regrowth and the clipped plants were not able to compensate the growth attained by non-defoliated plants. Root growth was more affected by defoliation than shoot growth. P and N concentrations in shoots and roots increased with increasing defoliation while Na(+) concentration in shoots of non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants was similar. Non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants prevented increases of Na(+) concentration in shoots through both reducing Na(+) uptake and Na(+) transport to shoots by accumulating Na(+) in roots. At high defoliation, the salinity tolerance mechanism is altered and Na(+) concentration in shoots was higher than in roots. Reduction in the photosynthetic capacity induced by defoliation neither changed the root length colonised by AM fungi nor arbuscular colonisation but decreased the vesicular colonisation. Spore density did not change, but hyphal density and Rhizobium nodules increased with defoliation. The strategy of the AM symbiont consists in investing most of the C resources to preferentially retain arbuscular colonisation as well as inoculum density in the soil.

  14. Active Uptake of Amino Acids by Leaves of an Epiphytic Vascular Plant, Tillandsia paucifolia (Bromeliaceae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Leslie Paul; Davis, James P.; O'Dell, Stephen J.; Arditti, Joseph; Stephens, Grover C.; Benzing, David H.

    1987-01-01

    Specialized epidermal trichomes on the leaves of the epiphyte, Tillandsia paucifolia (Bromeliaceae) accumulate amino acids from solution. Simultaneous net uptake of 17 amino acids was determined using high performance liquid chromatography. Uptake occurs against concentration gradients at least as high as 104. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16665307

  15. Iodine uptake by spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants grown in solution culture: effects of iodine species and solution concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y-G; Huang, Y-Z; Hu, Y; Liu, Y-X

    2003-04-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of iodine species and solution concentrations on iodine uptake by spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Five iodine concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 and 100 microM) for iodate (IO(3)(-)) and iodide (I(-)) were used. Results show that higher concentrations of I(-) (> or =10 microM) had some detrimental effect on plant growth, while IO(3)(-) had little effect on the biomass production of spinach plants. Increases in iodine concentration in the growth solution significantly enhanced I concentrations in plant tissues. The detrimental effect of I(-) on plant growth was probably due to the excessively high accumulation of I in plant tissues. The solution-to-spinach leaf transfer factors (TF(leaf), fresh weight basis) for plants treated with iodide were between 14.2 and 20.7 at different solution concentrations of iodide; TF(leaf) for plants treated with iodate decreased gradually from 23.7 to 2.2 with increasing solution concentrations of iodate. The distribution coefficients (DCs) of I between leaves and roots were constantly higher for plants treated with iodate than those treated with iodide. DCs for plants treated with iodide increased with increasing solution concentrations of iodide, while DCs for plants treated with iodate (around 5.5) were similar across the range of solution concentrations of iodate used in this experiment. The implications of iodine accumulation in leafy vegetables in human iodine nutrition are also discussed.

  16. Comparative cross-species alternative splicing in plants.

    PubMed

    Ner-Gaon, Hadas; Leviatan, Noam; Rubin, Eitan; Fluhr, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) can add significantly to genome complexity. Plants are thought to exhibit less AS than animals. An algorithm, based on expressed sequence tag (EST) pairs gapped alignment, was developed that takes advantage of the relatively small intron and exon size in plants and directly compares pairs of ESTs to search for AS. EST pairs gapped alignment was first evaluated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) for which annotated genome sequence is available and was shown to accurately predict splicing events. The method was then applied to 11 plant species that include 17 cultivars for which enough ESTs are available. The results show a large, 3.7-fold difference in AS rates between plant species with Arabidopsis and rice in the lower range and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in the upper range. Hence, compared to higher animals, plants show a much greater degree of variety in their AS rates and in some plant species the rates of animal and plant AS are comparable although the distribution of AS types may differ. In eudicots but not monocots, a correlation between genome size and AS rates was detected, implying that in eudicots the mechanisms that lead to larger genomes are a driving force for the evolution of AS.

  17. Gramene 2016: comparative plant genomics and pathway resources

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Ruiz, Marcela K.; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Preece, Justin; Olson, Andrew; Naithani, Sushma; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Dharmawardhana, Palitha; Jiao, Yinping; Mulvaney, Joseph; Kumari, Sunita; Chougule, Kapeel; Elser, Justin; Wang, Bo; Thomason, James; Bolser, Daniel M.; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Walts, Brandon; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Huerta, Laura; Keays, Maria; Tang, Y. Amy; Parkinson, Helen; Fabregat, Antonio; McKay, Sheldon; Weiser, Joel; D'Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln; Petryszak, Robert; Kersey, Paul J.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Ware, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species. Its two main frameworks are genomes (collaboration with Ensembl Plants) and pathways (The Plant Reactome and archival BioCyc databases). Since our last NAR update, the database website adopted a new Drupal management platform. The genomes section features 39 fully assembled reference genomes that are integrated using ontology-based annotation and comparative analyses, and accessed through both visual and programmatic interfaces. Additional community data, such as genetic variation, expression and methylation, are also mapped for a subset of genomes. The Plant Reactome pathway portal (http://plantreactome.gramene.org) provides a reference resource for analyzing plant metabolic and regulatory pathways. In addition to ∼200 curated rice reference pathways, the portal hosts gene homology-based pathway projections for 33 plant species. Both the genome and pathway browsers interface with the EMBL-EBI's Expression Atlas to enable the projection of baseline and differential expression data from curated expression studies in plants. Gramene's archive website (http://archive.gramene.org) continues to provide previously reported resources on comparative maps, markers and QTL. To further aid our users, we have also introduced a live monthly educational webinar series and a Gramene YouTube channel carrying video tutorials. PMID:26553803

  18. Gramene 2016: comparative plant genomics and pathway resources.

    PubMed

    Tello-Ruiz, Marcela K; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Preece, Justin; Olson, Andrew; Naithani, Sushma; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Dharmawardhana, Palitha; Jiao, Yinping; Mulvaney, Joseph; Kumari, Sunita; Chougule, Kapeel; Elser, Justin; Wang, Bo; Thomason, James; Bolser, Daniel M; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Walts, Brandon; Fonseca, Nuno A; Huerta, Laura; Keays, Maria; Tang, Y Amy; Parkinson, Helen; Fabregat, Antonio; McKay, Sheldon; Weiser, Joel; D'Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln; Petryszak, Robert; Kersey, Paul J; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Ware, Doreen

    2016-01-04

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species. Its two main frameworks are genomes (collaboration with Ensembl Plants) and pathways (The Plant Reactome and archival BioCyc databases). Since our last NAR update, the database website adopted a new Drupal management platform. The genomes section features 39 fully assembled reference genomes that are integrated using ontology-based annotation and comparative analyses, and accessed through both visual and programmatic interfaces. Additional community data, such as genetic variation, expression and methylation, are also mapped for a subset of genomes. The Plant Reactome pathway portal (http://plantreactome.gramene.org) provides a reference resource for analyzing plant metabolic and regulatory pathways. In addition to ∼ 200 curated rice reference pathways, the portal hosts gene homology-based pathway projections for 33 plant species. Both the genome and pathway browsers interface with the EMBL-EBI's Expression Atlas to enable the projection of baseline and differential expression data from curated expression studies in plants. Gramene's archive website (http://archive.gramene.org) continues to provide previously reported resources on comparative maps, markers and QTL. To further aid our users, we have also introduced a live monthly educational webinar series and a Gramene YouTube channel carrying video tutorials.

  19. Uptake and persistence of pesticides in plants: measurements and model estimates for imidacloprid after foliar and soil application.

    PubMed

    Juraske, Ronnie; Castells, Francesc; Vijay, Ashwin; Muñoz, Pere; Antón, Assumpció

    2009-06-15

    The uptake and persistence behaviour of the insecticide imidacloprid in tomato plants treated by (i) foliar spray application and (ii) soil irrigation was studied using two plant uptake models. In addition to a pesticide deposition model, a dynamic root uptake and translocation model was developed, and both models predict residual concentrations of pesticides in or on fruits. The model results were experimentally validated. The fraction of imidacloprid ingested by the human population is on average 10(-2) to 10(-6), depending on the time between pesticide application and ingestion, the processing step, and the application method. Model and experimentally derived intake fractions deviated by less than a factor of 2 for both application techniques. Total imidacloprid residues were up to five times higher in plants treated by foliar spray application than by soil irrigation. However, peeling tomatoes treated by spray application reduces the human intake fraction by up to three orders of magnitude. Model calculations suggest that drip-irrigation in a closed hydroponic system minimizes worker and consumer exposure to pesticides and prevents runoff of pesticide by spray drift and leaching into the environment.

  20. Earlier growing seasons and changes in migration timing influence carbon uptake and plant production in Arctic coastal wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leffler, A. J.; Beard, K. H.; Kelsey, K.; Choi, R. T.; Welker, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The wetlands of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska are important breeding areas for geese and are experiencing rapid climate change, specifically earlier onset of the growing season. Consequently, geese arrive 'later' in the growing season than in the past, potentially setting up a phenological mismatch with consequences for their nutrition, plant growth, and C and N processes in the ecosystem. We examined the interactive effects between the start of the growing season and Black Brant arrival time on these processes in a manipulative experiment. Advancing the growing season had a modest influence on CO2 exchange and plant growth. An early growing season shifted the rate of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) by 1-1.5 µmol m-2 s-1 toward a carbon (C) source. This change was driven by an increase in the rate of ecosystem respiration (ER). The advanced growing season nearly doubled the rate of leaf elongation in the early summer and this difference persisted as taller vegetation later in the year; belowground biomass was not affected. Timing of grazing had greater influence on CO2 exchange and plant growth. Grazing early in the season shifted the system to a carbon source by ca. 2 μmol m-2 s-1 while delaying grazing enhanced the carbon sink by 1 μmol m-2 s-1. Here, the influence was not through ER, but through reducing and enhancing standing leaf area, respectively. Early grazing also reduced season-long root production by over 50% while delayed grazing enhanced root production by 30%. Although delaying grazing enhanced C uptake and promoted plant growth in this ecosystem, leaf tissue in delayed-grazing plots had C:N of 16.7 compared to 14.2 in the typical-grazing plots, potentially reducing the digestibility of goose forage and slowing rates of decomposition. Biotic forcing in arctic tundra can thus be major drivers of ecosystem function and need to be considered as tundra system respond to changing conditions.

  1. Application of biosolids in mineral sands mine rehabilitation: use of stockpiled topsoil decreases trace element uptake by plants.

    PubMed

    Rate, Andrew W; Lee, Karen M; French, Peter A

    2004-02-01

    Mineral sands mining involves stripping topsoil to access heavy-mineral bearing deposits, which are then rehabilitated to their original state, commonly pasture in south-west Western Australia. Organic amendments such as biosolids (digested sewage sludge) can contribute organic carbon to the rehabilitating system and improve soil chemical fertility and physical conditions. Use of biosolids also introduces the risk of contamination of the soil-plant system with heavy metals, but may be a useful source of trace elements to plants if the concentrations of these elements are low in unamended soil. We expected that biosolids amendment of areas mined for mineral sands would result in increased concentrations of metals in soils and plants, and that metal uptake would be decreased by adding stockpiled topsoil or by liming. A glasshouse experiment growing a mixed annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum)-subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) sward was conducted using two soil materials (residue sand/clay and conserved topsoil) from a mineral sands mine amended with different rates of biosolids (0, 10, 20, 50 dry t/ha), and including a liming treatment (2 t/ha). Total concentrations of metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil increased with increasing rate of biosolids application. Metal uptake was generally lower where topsoil was present and was decreased by liming. With increasing biosolids application, plant metal concentrations increased for Cd, Ni and Zn but decreased or were erratic for other elements. In clover, biosolids application removed the Zn deficiency observed where biosolids were not applied. Plant uptake of all elements increased with increasing biosolids application, suggesting dilution by increased plant biomass was responsible for erratic metal concentration results. Despite the observed increases in uptake of metals by plants, metal concentrations in both species were low and below food standard thresholds. It is unlikely that a single

  2. Some Are More Equal - A Comparative Study on Swab Uptake and Release of Bacterial Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Warnke, Philipp; Warning, Liesa; Podbielski, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Swabs are widely used to collect samples for microbiological analyses from various clinical settings. They vary by material, size, and structure of the tip. This study investigates the uptake and release capacities for liquid and bacteria. Methods Five swabs were analyzed for their uptake and release capacities of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis suspensions. Two approaches were investigated providing volume-restricted and unrestricted amounts of bacterial suspensions to mimic various clinical situations. Volume and bacterial uptake and release were measured in milligrams and by counting colony forming units (CFU), respectively. Results Volume uptake and release in the unrestricted setting varied highly significant between 239.6 mg and 88.7 mg (p<0.001) and between 65.2 mg and 2.2 mg (p<0.001), respectively. In the volume-restricted setting the complete volume was absorbed by all swabs, volume release could only be detected for flocked swabs (2.7 mg; p<0.001). Highest amount of CFU release was detected for the MWE Dryswab in the unrestricted setting for both S. aureus and S. epidermidis with 1544 CFU and 553 CFU, respectively, lowest release for the Sarstedt neutral swab with 32 CFU and 17 CFU, respectively (p<0.001). In the volume-restricted setting MWE Σ-Swab released the highest bacterial amount with 135 CFU S. aureus and 55 CFU S. epidermidis, respectively, the lowest amount was released by Mast Mastaswab with 2 CFU S. aureus and 1 CFU S. epidermidis, respectively (p<0.001). Within the range of the utilized bacterial concentrations, uptake/release ratios were identical for the particular swab types and independent of the bacterial species. Conclusions The influence of the swab type on subsequent diagnostic results is often underestimated. Uptake and release of the investigated bacteria vary significantly between different swab types and sampling conditions. For best diagnostic outcome swabs should be chosen according to the

  3. Yield, biomass, and uptake of crop plants irrigated with TNT and RDX contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Simini, M.; Checkai, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Crops grown in site-collected soil were irrigated with water containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) to simulate field conditions at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska. Pots were watered in an environment-controlled greenhouse to field capacity throughout the life-cycle of the crop with 2, 20, and 100 ppb RDX; 2,100, and 800ppb TNT; 100ppb RDX + 800ppb TNT; or uncontaminated water. Yield and biomass of tomato fruit, bush bean fruit, corn stover, and soybean seeds were significantly (p = 0.05) less when irrigated with the RDX + TNT treatment compared to controls. Lettuce leaves and radish root yield and biomass were unaffected by treatment level. Soil loading of RDX and TNT in response to evapotranspiration was greatest for tomato, corn, soybean, bush bean, and least for radish and lettuce. Plant tissue contaminant concentrations will be presented and discussed.

  4. Prospects for optimizing soil microbial functioning to improve plant nutrient uptake and soil carbon sequestration under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, M.; Pendall, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Potential to mitigate climate change through increasing plant productivity and its carbon (C) input to soil may be limited by soil nitrogen (N) availability. Using a novel 13C-CO2 and 15N-soil dual labeling method, we investigated whether plant growth-promoting bacteria would interact with atmospheric CO2 concentration to alter plant productivity and soil C storage. We grew Bouteloua gracilis under ambient (380 ppm) or elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in climate-controlled chambers, and plant individuals were grown with or without Pseudomonas fluorescens inoculum, which can produce N catabolic enzymes. We observed that both eCO2 and P. fluorescens increased plant productivity and its C allocation to soil. P. fluorescens relative to eCO2 enhanced plant N uptake from soil organic matter, which highly correlated with soil N enzyme activities and rhizosphere exudate C. More importantly, P. fluorescens increased microbial biomass and deceased specific microbial respiration in comparison with eCO2. These results indicate that application of plant growth-promoting bacteria can increase microbial C utilization efficiency with subsequent N mineralization from soil organic matter, and may improve plant N availability and soil C sequestration. Together, our findings highlight the potential of plant growth-promoting bacteria for global change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems.

  5. Uptake by cucurbitaceae of soil-Bome contaminants depends upon plant genotype and pollutant properties.

    PubMed

    Mattina, Maryjane Incorvia; Isleyen, Mehmet; Eitzer, Brian D; Iannucci-Berger, William; White, Jason C

    2006-03-15

    Three Cucurbitaceae, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo (cv. Black Beauty, true zucchini), Cucurbita pepo L. intersubspecific cross (cv. Zephyr, summer squash), and Cucumis sativis (cv. Marketmore, cucumber), were grown in rhizotrons containing soil contaminated with three classes of highly weathered, hydrophobic organic contaminants: (1) technical chlordane, (2) dichlorodiphenylethanes (DDT and DDD) and -ethene (DDE), (3) polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metal residues. Movement of the contaminants through the soil/plant system was studied by comparing contaminant concentration in the bulk soil, the rhizosphere soil pore water, the xylem sap, and aerial tissue. This permitted, for the first time, calculation of bioconcentration factors (BCFs) based on concentration in the xylem sap versus that in the rhizosphere soil pore water. The bioconcentration factors so determined for the sum of five chlordane residues (two enantiomers of trans-chlordane, TC; two enantiomers of cis-chlordane, CC; and achiral trans-nonachlor, TN) were 36, 40, and 23 for Black Beauty, Zephyr, and Marketmore, respectively. In addition, the xylem sap of each cultivar had a consistent enantioselective profile for some of the chiral chlordane components. For the sum of dichlorodiphenylethanes and -ethene, comparable BCF values were 19, 4, and 0.8, respectively. In the case of PAHs, different BCF patterns among the cultivars were noted for three- versus four-ring compounds. Similarly, movement of heavy metals was cultivar-dependent, with cadmium BCF values 9.5, 3.5, and 0.6for Black Beauty, Zephyr, and Marketmore, respectively; the analogous BCFs for zinc were 9, 11, and 2. Thus, passage from ex planta to in planta regions of the soil/plant system is dependent not only on properties of the plant, but also on those of the pollutant. Such data will provide insight into transport mechanisms of highly hydrophobic organic contaminants, as well as heavy metal contaminants, in the soil/plant system.

  6. Enhanced Cellular Uptake of Silica-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles Compared with PEG-Coated Ones in Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Heon; Kang, Myunggoo; Lee, Hong Jai; Kim, Jeong Ah; Choi, Yun-Kyong; Cho, Hyunjin; Park, Jung-Keug; Park, Tai Hyun; Jung, Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Monodispersed magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared through the thermal decomposition method. The obtained NPs were surface modified with silica (SiO2) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), to enhance their stability in aqueous environment and their cellular uptake efficiency for biomedical applications. The NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cytotoxicity of these NPs on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) was measured by MTT assay (cell viability test) at various concentrations (2, 5, 12.5, 25, and 50 µg/mL). The cells remained more than 90% viable at concentrations as high as 50 µg/mL. To compare the cellular uptake efficiency, these NPs were treated in BM-MSCs and the Fe concentration within the cells was measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis. The uptake process displayed a time- and dose-dependency. The uptake amount of SiO2-coated Fe3O4 (Fe3O4@SiO2) NPs was about 10 times higher than that of the PEG-coated ones (Fe3O4@PEG).

  7. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate of soybean plants: effects of pH and mixed nitrogen sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Chaillou, S.

    1991-01-01

    To determine if the daily pattern of NO3- and NH4+ uptake is affected by acidity or NO3- : NH4+ ratio of the nutrient solution, non-nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max) were exposed for 21 days to replenished, complete nutrient solutions at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5 which contained either 1.0 mM NH4+, 1.0 mM NO3- [correction of NO3+], 0.67 mM NH4+ plus 0.33 mM NO3- (2:1 NH4+ : NO3-) [correction of (2:1 NH3+ : NO4-)], or 0.33 mM NH4+ plus 0.67 mM NO3- (1:2 NH4+ : NO3-). Net uptake rates of NH4+ and NO3- were measured daily by ion chromatography as depletion from the replenished solutions. When NH4+ and NO3- were supplied together, cumulative uptake of total nitrogen was not affected by pH or solution NH4+ : NO3- ratio. The cumulative proportion of nitrogen absorbed as NH4+ decreased with increasing acidity; however, the proportional uptake of NH4+ and NO3- was not constant, but varied day-to-day. This day-to-day variation in relative proportions of NH4+ and NO3- absorbed when NH4+ : NO3- ratio and pH of solution were constant indicates that the regulatory mechanism is not directly competitive. Regardless of the effect of pH on cumulative uptake of NH4+, the specific nitrogen uptake rates from mixed and from individual NH4+ and NO3- sources oscillated between maxima and minima at each pH with average periodicities similar to the expected interval of leaf emergence.

  8. Effects of Amendments on Growth and Uptake of Cd and Zn by Wetland Plants, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta from Contaminated Sediments.

    PubMed

    Chayapan, P; Kruatrachue, M; Meetam, M; Pokethitiyook, P

    2015-01-01

    A pot study was conducted to compare the effects of amendments (CaHPO4 and cow manure) on growth and uptake of Cd and Zn from contaminated sediments by two wetland plant species, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta. Contaminated sediments (Cd 33.2 mg kg(-1) and Zn 363 mg kg(-1)) were collected from Mae Tao basin, Mae Sot district, Tak province, Thailand. The experiment consisted of 4 treatments: control (uncontaminated sediment), Cd/Zn, Cd/Zn + 5% CaHPO4, and Cd/Zn + 10% cow manure. Plants were grown for 3 months in the greenhouse. The addition of CaHPO4 resulted in the highest relative growth rate (RGR) and highest Cd accumulation in both T. angustifolia and C. esculenta while the lowest RGR was found in C. esculenta grown in the cow manure treatment. Both plant species had higher concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn) in their belowground parts. None of the amendments affected Zn accumulation. C. esculenta exhibited the highest uptake of both Cd and Zn. The results clearly demonstrated the phytoremediation potential of C. esculenta and the enhancement of this potential by CaHPO4 amendment.

  9. Modulation of copper uptake and toxicity by abiotic stresses in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Hedbavny, Josef; Stork, František; Grúz, Jiří

    2012-07-11

    The impact of salinity (S) or nitrogen deficiency (-N) on copper (Cu) uptake and changes to metabolism were studied in the combined treatments after 7 days of exposure. S suppressed growth, water content, soluble proteins, and reducing sugars more negatively than -N. ROS (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide) were differentially but relatively slightly affected while peroxidase activities were strongly elevated mainly in Cu+NaCl variant. Total soluble phenols and individual phenolic acids (free and cell wall-bound fraction) were accumulated the most in Cu-N while, among free amino acids, proline sharply increased in Cu+NaCl; this suggests a compensatory mechanism between the syntheses of antioxidants aimed to maintain antioxidative protection because numerous root phenolic acids were even depressed by S. Salinity also suppressed accumulation of coumarin herniarin, but its glucosidic precursors ((Z)- and (E)-2-ß-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acids) increased. Activities of selected phenolic enzymes were rather suppressed by S after a given exposure period while lignin content increased, suggesting different time dynamics if S and -N variants are compared. Selected mineral nutrients (K, Fe, and partially Mg) were more reduced by S than by -N. Shoot and root Cu amounts were depressed by -N but elevated by S. Significance and possible role of observed metabolic changes in relation to Cu accumulation are discussed.

  10. Synergistic Effects of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and Chitosan on In Vitro Seeds Germination, Greenhouse Growth, and Nutrient Uptake of Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjato, Nadège A.; Noumavo, Pacôme A.; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Agbessi, Léonce; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of three plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and chitosan either singly or in combination on maize seeds germination and growth and nutrient uptake. Maize seeds were treated with chitosan and bacterial solution. The germination and growth tests were carried out in square Petri dishes and plastic pots. The combination chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens has increased the seeds vigor index up to 36.44% compared to the control. In comparison to the control, P. putida has significantly improved root weight (44.84%) and germinated seed weight (31.39%) whereas chitosan-P. putida has increased the shoot weight (65.67%). For the growth test, the maximal heights (17.66%) were obtained by plants treated with the combination A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida. Chitosan-P. fluorescens induced the highest increases of leaves per plant (50.09%), aerial (84.66%), and underground biomass (108.77%) production. The plants inoculated with A. lipoferum had the large leaf areas with an increase of 54.08%, while combinations P. fluorescens-P. putida and chitosan-A. lipoferum improved the aerial and underground dry matter of plants to 26.35% and 18.18%. The nitrogen content of the plants was increased by chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida with an increasing of 41.61%. The combination of chitosan and PGPR can be used as biological fertilizers to increase maize production. PMID:26904295

  11. Synergistic Effects of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and Chitosan on In Vitro Seeds Germination, Greenhouse Growth, and Nutrient Uptake of Maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Agbodjato, Nadège A; Noumavo, Pacôme A; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Agbessi, Léonce; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of three plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and chitosan either singly or in combination on maize seeds germination and growth and nutrient uptake. Maize seeds were treated with chitosan and bacterial solution. The germination and growth tests were carried out in square Petri dishes and plastic pots. The combination chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens has increased the seeds vigor index up to 36.44% compared to the control. In comparison to the control, P. putida has significantly improved root weight (44.84%) and germinated seed weight (31.39%) whereas chitosan-P. putida has increased the shoot weight (65.67%). For the growth test, the maximal heights (17.66%) were obtained by plants treated with the combination A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida. Chitosan-P. fluorescens induced the highest increases of leaves per plant (50.09%), aerial (84.66%), and underground biomass (108.77%) production. The plants inoculated with A. lipoferum had the large leaf areas with an increase of 54.08%, while combinations P. fluorescens-P. putida and chitosan-A. lipoferum improved the aerial and underground dry matter of plants to 26.35% and 18.18%. The nitrogen content of the plants was increased by chitosan-A. lipoferum-P. fluorescens-P. putida with an increasing of 41.61%. The combination of chitosan and PGPR can be used as biological fertilizers to increase maize production.

  12. Plant aquaporins: new perspectives on water and nutrient uptake in saline environment.

    PubMed

    del Martínez-Ballesta, M C; Silva, C; López-Berenguer, C; Cabañero, F J; Carvajal, M

    2006-09-01

    The mechanisms of salt stress and tolerance have been targets for genetic engineering, focusing on ion transport and compartmentation, synthesis of compatible solutes (osmolytes and osmoprotectants) and oxidative protection. In this review, we consider the integrated response to salinity with respect to water uptake, involving aquaporin functionality. Therefore, we have concentrated on how salinity can be alleviated, in part, if a perfect knowledge of water uptake and transport for each particular crop and set of conditions is available.

  13. Uptake and Bioaccumulation of Pentachlorophenol by Emergent Wetland Plant Phragmites australis (Common Reed) in Cadmium Co-contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Hechmi, Nejla; Ben Aissa, Nadhira; Abdenaceur, Hassen; Jedidi, Naceur

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies on phytoremediation of soils contaminated with either heavy metals or organics, little information is available on the effectiveness of phytoremediation of co-occurring metal and organic pollutants especially by using wetland species. Phragmites australis is a common wetland plant and its potential for phytoremediation of cadmium pentachlorophenol (Cd-PCP) co-contaminated soil was investigated. A greenhouse study was executed to elucidate the effects of Cd (0, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1)) without or with PCP (0, 50, and 250 mg kg(-1)) on the growth of the wetland plant P. australis and its uptake, accumulation and removal of pollutant from soils. After 75 days, plant biomass was significantly influenced by interaction of Cd and PCP and the effect of Cd on plant growth being stronger than that of PCP. Coexistence of PCP at low level lessened Cd toxicity to plants, resulting in improved plant growth and increased Cd accumulation in plant tissues. The dissipation of PCP in soils was significantly influenced by interactions of Cd, PCP and plant presence or absence. As an evaluation of soil biological activities after remediation soil enzyme was measured.

  14. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and their role in uptake and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in the environment.

    PubMed

    Bártíková, Hana; Skálová, Lenka; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Vokřál, Ivan; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2015-08-01

    Many various xenobiotics permanently enter plants and represent potential danger for their organism. For that reason, plants have evolved extremely sophisticated detoxification systems including a battery of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Some of them are similar to those in humans and animals, but there are several plant-specific ones. This review briefly introduces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and summarizes present information about their action toward veterinary drugs. Veterinary drugs are used worldwide to treat diseases and protect animal health. However, veterinary drugs are also unwantedly introduced into environment mostly via animal excrements, they persist in the environment for a long time and may impact on the non-target organisms. Plants are able to uptake, transform the veterinary drugs to non- or less-toxic compounds and store them in the vacuoles and cell walls. This ability may protect not only plant themselves but also other organisms, predominantly invertebrates and wild herbivores. The aim of this review is to emphasize the importance of plants in detoxification of veterinary drugs in the environment. The results of studies, which dealt with transport and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in plants, are summarized and evaluated. In conclusion, the risks and consequences of veterinary drugs in the environment and the possibilities of phytoremediation technologies are considered and future perspectives are outlined.

  15. Increase in nitrate uptake by soybean plants during interruption of the dark period with low intensity light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.

    1991-01-01

    Diurnal patterns of net NO3- uptake by nonnodulated soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Ransom] plants growing in flowing hydroponic culture at 26 and 16 degrees C root temperatures were measured at hourly intervals during alternate days of a 12-day growth period. Ion chromatography was used to determine removal of NO3- from the culture solution. Day and night periods of 9 and 15 h were used during growth. The night period included two 6-h dark periods and an intervening 3-h period of night interruption by incandescent lamps to effect a long-day photoperiod and repress floral initiation. At both root temperatures, the average specific rates of NO3- uptake were twice as great during the night interruption period as during the day period; they were greater during the day period than during the dark periods; and they were greater during the dark period immediately following the day period than during the later dark period that followed the night interruption. While these average patterns were repetitious among days, measured rates of uptake varied hourly and included intervals of net efflux scattered through the day period and more frequently through the 2 dark periods. Root temperature did not affect the average daily specific rates of uptake or the qualitative relationships among day, dark and night interruption periods of the diurnal cycle.

  16. Silicate mineral impacts on the uptake and storage of arsenic and plant nutrients in rice ( Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Fendorf, Scott

    2012-12-18

    Arsenic-contaminated rice grain may threaten human health globally. Since H₃AsO₃⁰ is the predominant As species found in paddy pore-waters, and H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ share an uptake pathway, silica amendments have been proposed to decrease As uptake and consequent As concentrations in grains. Here, we evaluated the impact of two silicate mineral additions differing in solubility (+Si(L), diatomaceous earth, 0.29 mM Si; +Si(H), Si-gel, 1.1 mM Si) to soils differing in mineralogy on arsenic concentration in rice. The +Si(L) addition either did not change or decreased As concentration in pore-water but did not change or increased grain-As levels relative to the (+As--Si) control. The +Si(H) addition increased As in pore-water, but it significantly decreased grain-As relative to the (+As--Si) control. Only the +Si(H) addition resulted in significant increases in straw- and husk-Si. Total grain- and straw-As was negatively correlated with pore-water Si, and the relationship differed between two soils exhibiting different mineralogy. These differing results are a consequence of competition between H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ for adsorption sites on soil solids and subsequent plant-uptake, and illustrate the importance of Si mineralogy on arsenic uptake.

  17. Root controls on water redistribution and carbon uptake in the soil-plant system under current and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Marani, M.; Albertson, J. D.; Katul, G.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding photosynthesis and plant water management as a coupled process remains an open scientific problem. Current eco-hydrologic models characteristically describe plant photosynthetic and hydraulic processes through ad hoc empirical parameterizations with no explicit accounting for the main pathways over which carbon and water uptake interact. Here, a soil-plant-atmosphere continuum model is proposed that mechanistically couples photosynthesis and transpiration rates, including the main leaf physiological controls exerted by stomata. The proposed approach links the soil-to-leaf hydraulic transport to stomatal regulation, and closes the coupled photosynthesis-transpiration problem by maximizing leaf carbon gain subject to a water loss constraint. The approach is evaluated against field data from a grass site and is shown to reproduce the main features of soil moisture dynamics and hydraulic redistribution. In particular, it is shown that the differential soil drying produced by diurnal root water uptake drives a significant upward redistribution of moisture both through a conventional Darcian flow and through the root system, consistent with observations. In a numerical soil drying experiment, it is demonstrated that more than 50% of diurnal transpiration is supplied by nocturnal upward water redistribution, and some 12% is provided directly through root hydraulic redistribution. For a prescribed leaf area density, the model is then used to diagnose how elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased air temperature jointly impact soil moisture, transpiration, photosynthesis, and whole-plant water use efficiency, along with compensatory mechanisms such as hydraulic lift using several canonical forms of root-density distribution.

  18. Arsenic uptake, arsenite efflux and plant growth in hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata: Role of arsenic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-He; Fu, Jing-Wei; Chen, Yanshan; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria-mediated arsenic (As) transformation and their impacts on As and P uptake and plant growth in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) were investigated under sterile condition. All As-resistant bacteria (9 endophytic and 6 rhizospheric) were As-reducers except one As-oxidizer. After growing two months in media with 37.5 mg kg(-1) AsV, As concentrations in the fronds and roots were 3655-5389 (89-91% AsIII) and 971-1467 mg kg(-1) (41-73% AsIII), corresponding to 22-52% decrease in the As in the media. Bacterial inoculation enhanced As and P uptake by up to 47 and 69%, and PV growth by 20-74%, which may be related to elevated As and P in plants (r = 0.88-0.97, p < 0.05). Though AsV was supplied, 95% of the As in the bacteria-free media was AsIII, suggesting efficient efflux of AsIII by PV roots (120 µg g(-1) root fw). This was supported by the fact that no AsV was detected in media inoculated with As-reducers while 95% of AsV was detected with As-oxidizer. Our data showed that, under As-stress, PV reduced As toxicity by efficient AsIII efflux into media and AsIII translocation to the fronds, and bacteria benefited PV growth probably via enhanced As and P uptake.

  19. Silicon cycle in rice paddy fields: insights provided by relations between silicon forms in topsoils and plant silicon uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbücher, Thimo; Marxen, Anika; Jahn, Reinhold; Vetterlein, Doris

    2016-04-01

    Silicon (Si) enhances the resistance of plants against abiotic and biotic stresses. The amounts of Si taken up by rice plants typically exceed those of major essential nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. Silicon cycling in paddy fields is, however, still poorly studied. We examined relationships between Si forms in topsoil and plant Si uptake for 4 Vietnamese regions with low, and 3 Philippine regions with high Si availability (10 fields per region). Mean rice straw Si concentrations within regions ranged from 3.0 to 8.4%. For most of the Vietnamese fields they were lower than the critical value of 5.0%, suggesting a Si limitation of plant growth. For fields with low Si availability, straw Si concentrations were positively related to acetate-extractable Si in topsoil (i.e., dissolved and adsorbed Si), while such a relationship was not found for fields with high Si availability, where straw Si concentrations were on a similar level, suggesting a maximum Si uptake capacity was reached. Mean annual Si uptake by rice within regions ranged from 0.31 to 1.40 Mg Si ha-1 year-1, i.e., values that are much larger than published values for other ecosystems. They are determined by the continuous supply of plant-available Si during the cropping season, biomass production, and number of crops per year. Weatherable silicate minerals mainly cause spatial differences in supply of plant-available Si. Regional means of concentrations of carbonate-extractable Si (i.e., amorphous Si oxides) ranged from 2.2 to 16.7 g Si kg-1. Input of phytoliths (amorphous Si bodies in straw) is presumed to be an important factor for storage of carbonate-extractable Si in topsoil. Laboratory incubation experiments showed positive relationships between concentrations of carbonate-extractable Si and the release of dissolved Si from soil, suggesting amorphous Si oxides are among the most soluble Si-containing solids in soil. Estimates suggest that up to ~20% of Si taken up by plants might derive

  20. MIPS PlantsDB: a database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Thomas; Martis, Mihaela M; Roessner, Stephan K; Pfeifer, Matthias; Bader, Kai C; Sharma, Sapna; Gundlach, Heidrun; Spannagl, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of plant genome (sequence) data enables powerful comparative analyses and integrative approaches and also requires structured and comprehensive information resources. Databases are needed for both model and crop plant organisms and both intuitive search/browse views and comparative genomics tools should communicate the data to researchers and help them interpret it. MIPS PlantsDB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/genomes.jsp) was initially described in NAR in 2007 [Spannagl,M., Noubibou,O., Haase,D., Yang,L., Gundlach,H., Hindemitt, T., Klee,K., Haberer,G., Schoof,H. and Mayer,K.F. (2007) MIPSPlantsDB-plant database resource for integrative and comparative plant genome research. Nucleic Acids Res., 35, D834-D840] and was set up from the start to provide data and information resources for individual plant species as well as a framework for integrative and comparative plant genome research. PlantsDB comprises database instances for tomato, Medicago, Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, Sorghum, maize, rice, barley and wheat. Building up on that, state-of-the-art comparative genomics tools such as CrowsNest are integrated to visualize and investigate syntenic relationships between monocot genomes. Results from novel genome analysis strategies targeting the complex and repetitive genomes of triticeae species (wheat and barley) are provided and cross-linked with model species. The MIPS Repeat Element Database (mips-REdat) and Catalog (mips-REcat) as well as tight connections to other databases, e.g. via web services, are further important components of PlantsDB.

  1. Arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata efficiently solubilized phosphate rock to sustain plant growth and As uptake.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing-Wei; Liu, Xue; Han, Yong-He; Mei, Hanyi; Cao, Yue; de Oliveira, Letuzia M; Liu, Yungen; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-01-31

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the most important nutrients for phytoremediation of arsenic (As)-contaminated soils. In this study, we demonstrated that As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata was efficient in acquiring P from insoluble phosphate rock (PR). When supplemented with PR as the sole P source in hydroponic systems, P. vittata accumulated 49% and 28% higher P in the roots and fronds than the -P treatment. In contrast, non-hyperaccumulator Pteris ensiformis was unable to solubilize P from PR. To gain insights into PR solubilization by plants, organic acids in plant root exudates were analyzed by HPLC. The results showed that phytic acid was the predominant (>90%) organic acid in P. vittata root exudates whereas only oxalic acid was detected in P. ensiformis. Moreover, P. vittata secreted more phytic acid in -P and PR treatments. Compared to oxalic acid, phytic acid was more effective in solubilizing PR, suggesting that phytic acid was critical for PR utilization. Besides, secretion of phytic acid by P. vittata was not inhibited by arsenate. Our data indicated that phytic acid played an important role in efficient use of insoluble PR by P. vittata, shedding light on using insoluble PR to enhance phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils.

  2. Isotopic Fractionation Associated With Symbiotic N2 Fixation and Uptake of NO3− by Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Daniel H.; Shearer, Georgia

    1980-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation associated with N2 fixation and NO3− uptake by plants are relevant to the accuracy of estimates of N2 fixation based on differences in the natural abundance of 15N between N2 fixing and nonfixing plants. The isotope effect on N2 fixation by soybeans (Glycine max [L] Merrill, variety Harosoy) and red clover (Trifolium pratense [L]) was determined from the difference in 15N abundance between atmospheric N2 and the total N of plants grown hydroponically with N-free nutrient solution. In soybeans the isotope effect was found to be +0.98 ± 0.18‰ (β = 0.99902). In clover the isotope effect was +1.88 ± 0.14‰ (β = 0.99812). The magnitude of these inverse isotope effects is small. However, they would lead to an underestimation of the amount of N2 fixed, since the N of atmospheric origin which finally appears in the plant is made richer in 15N by the inverse isotope effects than is atmospheric N2, and, to that degree, is attributed to soil-derived N in the calculation. Isotopic fractionation associated with NO3− uptake by plants does not have a critical effect on estimates of N2 fixation which are based on natural abundance of 15N since the 15N abundance of soil-derived N in plants is measured directly (i.e. after the N has undergone fractionation). Nevertheless, such fractionation is of some interest from the point of view of deciding upon the most appropriate sampling time. The isotope effect on NO3− uptake by a nonnodulating isoline of soybeans (variety Harosoy), marigold (Tagetes erecta [L]) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne [L]) was estimated from the difference between the 15N abundance of the total N of plants grown hydroponically and that of NO3− supplied in the medium. It was found to be about −5‰ (β = ∼1.005). PMID:16661392

  3. Monoubiquitin-dependent endocytosis of the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) transporter controls iron uptake in plants.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Robert, Stéphanie; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Curie, Cathy; Friml, Jìrí; Vert, Grégory

    2011-08-09

    Plants take up iron from the soil using the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) high-affinity iron transporter at the root surface. Sophisticated regulatory mechanisms allow plants to tightly control the levels of IRT1, ensuring optimal absorption of essential but toxic iron. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana IRT1 leads to constitutive IRT1 protein accumulation, metal overload, and oxidative stress. IRT1 is unexpectedly found in trans-Golgi network/early endosomes of root hair cells, and its levels and localization are unaffected by iron nutrition. Using pharmacological approaches, we show that IRT1 cycles to the plasma membrane to perform iron and metal uptake at the cell surface and is sent to the vacuole for proper turnover. We also prove that IRT1 is monoubiquitinated on several cytosol-exposed residues in vivo and that mutation of two putative monoubiquitination target residues in IRT1 triggers stabilization at the plasma membrane and leads to extreme lethality. Together, these data suggest a model in which monoubiquitin-dependent internalization/sorting and turnover keep the plasma membrane pool of IRT1 low to ensure proper iron uptake and to prevent metal toxicity. More generally, our work demonstrates the existence of monoubiquitin-dependent trafficking to lytic vacuoles in plants and points to proteasome-independent turnover of plasma membrane proteins.

  4. Influence of low air humidity and low root temperature on water uptake, growth and aquaporin expression in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Kuwagata, Tsuneo; Ishikawa-Sakurai, Junko; Hayashi, Hidehiro; Nagasuga, Kiyoshi; Fukushi, Keiko; Ahamed, Arifa; Takasugi, Katsuko; Katsuhara, Maki; Murai-Hatano, Mari

    2012-08-01

    The effects of low air humidity and low root temperature (LRT) on water uptake, growth and aquaporin gene expression were investigated in rice plants. The daily transpiration of the plants grown at low humidity was 1.5- to 2-fold higher than that at high humidity. LRT at 13°C reduced transpiration, and the extent was larger at lower humidity. LRT also reduced total dry matter production and leaf area expansion, and the extent was again larger at lower humidity. These observations suggest that the suppression of plant growth by LRT is associated with water stress due to decreased water uptake ability of the root. On the other hand, the net assimilation rate was not affected by low humidity and LRT, and water use efficiency was larger for LRT. We found that low humidity induced coordinated up-regulation of many PIP and TIP aquaporin genes in both the leaves and the roots. Expression levels of two root-specific aquaporin genes, OsPIP2;4 and OsPIP2;5, were increased significantly after 6 and 13 d of LRT exposure. Taken together, we discuss the possibility that aquaporins are part of an integrated response of this crop to low air humidity and LRT.

  5. Comparative uptake from sea water and tissue distribution of 60Co in marine mollusks

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, F.P.

    1987-07-01

    Five different species of marine mollusks, Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk., Tapes decussatus L., Cerastoderma (Cardium) edule (L.), Donax vittatus (da Costa) and Patella vulgata L., were exposed to /sup 60/Co-labelled sea water under laboratory conditions. After a 1-mo exposure, tested species reached different whole-body /sup 60/Co concentration factors (CF) over radioactive sea water of 73 +/- 27, 22 +/- 10, 84 +/- 25, 6.3 +/- 1.4 and 31 +/- 10, respectively, which are not dependent upon the size of mollusks. Equations for the experimental uptake curves, obtained using a multi-exponential model, indicate that /sup 60/Co uptake by mollusks involves two or three compartments, according to the species. In all species, the larger compartments turn over with long biological half-lives, dependent upon species. At the beginning of the experiment, /sup 60/CoCl2 added to sea water was mainly in cationic forms. These forms were progressively converted into anionic plus neutral forms most likely due to complex formation with organic ligands. With time this physico-chemical evolution had a lowering effect on /sup 60/Co bioaccumulation by mollusks. Analysis of /sup 60/Co in tissues revealed that Donax shell and mantle do not accumulate the radionuclide in great quantities, generating the low whole-body concentration factor found. In contrast, shell and mantle from all other species displayed variable but high CFs. Shell by itself accounts for more than half of the /sup 60/Co whole-body burden. Among soft tissues, gills and viscera displayed the highest CF and muscle the lowest. From these experiments, one may conclude that significant differences among species do exist regarding Co bioaccumulation potential.

  6. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research

    PubMed Central

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C.; Martis, Mihaela M.; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G.; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F.X.

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyword search options and a new BLAST sequence search functionality. Actively involved in corresponding sequencing consortia, PlantsDB has dedicated special efforts to the integration and visualization of complex triticeae genome data, especially for barley, wheat and rye. We enhanced CrowsNest, a tool to visualize syntenic relationships between genomes, with data from the wheat sub-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii and added functionality to the PGSB RNASeqExpressionBrowser. GenomeZipper results were integrated for the genomes of barley, rye, wheat and perennial ryegrass and interactive access is granted through PlantsDB interfaces. Data exchange and cross-linking between PlantsDB and other plant genome databases is stimulated by the transPLANT project (http://transplantdb.eu/). PMID:26527721

  7. Light quanta modulated characteristics of Ni uptake by Brassica juncea seedlings: the interdependence of plant metal concentration and biomass.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta-Schubert, N; Whelan, T; Reyes, M A; Lloren, C; Brandt, T T; Persans, M W

    2007-01-01

    The relationships between the concentration of metal in the growth medium, Cs, the concentration of metal absorbed by the plant, Cp, and the total biomass achieved, M, all of which are factors relevant to the efficiency of metal uptake and tolerance by the plant, have been investigated via the physiological response of Brassica juncea seedlings to Ni stress. The factorial growth experiments treated the Ni concentration in agar medium and the diurnal light quanta as independently variable parameters. Observations included the evidence of light enhancement of Ni toxicity in the root, as well as at the whole-plant level. The shoot mass index possibly is an indicator of the amount of shoot metal sequestration in B. juncea, as are the logarithmic variation of Cp with Cs and the power-law dependence of M on Cp. The sum total of these observations indicates that, for the Ni accumulating plant B. juncea, the overall metabolic allocation to either growth or metal tolerance of the plant is important. Neither a rapid biomass increase nor a high metal absorbed concentration favored the removal of high metal mass from the medium. Rather, the plants with a moderate rate of biomass growth and a moderate absorbed metal concentration demonstrated the ability to remove the maximum mass of metal from the medium. The implication of these results as related to the extant model of phyoextraction efficiency is discussed.

  8. Iron release and uptake by plant ferritin: effects of pH, reduction and chelation.

    PubMed Central

    Laulhere, J P; Briat, J F

    1993-01-01

    Ferritins are iron-storage proteins that accumulate in plastids during seed formation, and also in leaves during senescence or iron overload. Iron release from ferritins occurs during growth of seedlings and greening of plastids. Depending on the concentration of the reducing agent ascorbate, either an overall iron release or uptake by ferritins from iron(III) citrate may occur. We have designed methods to measure these simultaneous and independent uptake and release fluxes. Each individual step of the exchange was studied using different iron chelates and an excess of ligand. It is shown that: (i) the chelated form of iron, and not ionic Fe3+, is the substrate for iron reduction, which controls the subsequent uptake by ferritin; (ii) iron uptake by ferritins is faster at pH 8.4 than at pH 7 or 6 and is inhibited by an excess of strongly binding free ligands; and (iii) strongly binding free ligands are inhibitory during iron release by ascorbate. When reactions are allowed to proceed simultaneously, the iron chelating power is shown to be a key factor in the overall exchange. The interactions of iron chelating power, reducing capacity and pH are discussed with regard to their influence on the biochemical mobilization of iron. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8457196

  9. Nutrient uptake, biomass yield and quantitative analysis of aliphatic aldehydes in cilantro plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutrient uptake, biomass production and yield of the major compounds in the essential oil of five genotypes of Coriandrum sativum L. The treatments were four accessions donated by the National Genetic Resources Advisory Council (NGRAC), U.S. Department...

  10. Mechanisms of cuticular uptake of xenobiotics into living plants: 1. Influence of xenobiotic dose on the uptake of three model compounds applied in the absence and presence of surfactants into Chenopodium album, Hedera helix and Stephanotis floribunda leaves.

    PubMed

    Forster, W Alison; Zabkiewicz, Jerzy A; Riederer, Markus

    2004-11-01

    This study determined the uptake of three model compounds, applied in the presence and absence of surfactants, into the leaves of three plant species (Chenopodium album L, Hedera helix L and Stephanotis floribunda Brongn). The results with 2-deoxy-D-glucose, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and epoxiconazole in the presence ofsurfactants (the polyethylene glycol monododecyl ethers C12EO3, C12EO6, C12EO10 and a trisiloxane ethoxylate with mean EO of 7.5, all used at one equimolar concentration and therefore different percentage concentrations) illustrate that the initial dose (nmol mm(-2)) of xenobiotic applied to plant foliage is a strong positive determinant of uptake. This held true for all the xenobiotics studied over a wide concentration range in the presence of these surfactants. Uptake on a unit area basis (nmol mm(-2)) could be related to the initial dose of xenobiotic applied per unit area (ID) by an equation of the form: Uptake = a [ID]b at time t = 24h. ID is given by the mass of xenobiotic applied, M divided by the droplet spread area, A. Total mass uptake is then calculated from an equation of the form: Total Uptake = a [ID]b x A.

  11. Plant uptake of diclofenac in a mesocosm-scale free water surface constructed wetland by Cyperus alternifolius.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jun; Rahaman, Md Hasibur; Ji, Jiucui; Luo, Zhiyoung; Wang, Quanfeng; Xiao, Haiwen; Wang, Kunping

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the uptake of diclofenac, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical, by a macrophyte Cyperus alternifolius in a mesocosm-scale free water surface (FWS) constructed wetland. Quantitative analysis of diclofenac concentrations in water solution and plant tissues was conducted by high performance liquid chromatography analysis after sample pre-treatment with solid-phase extraction and liquid extraction, respectively. The FWS with Cyperus alternifolius obtained a maximum 69.3% diclofenac removal efficiency, while a control system without plant only had a removal efficiency of 2.7% at the end of the experiment period of 70 days. Based on mass balance study of the experimental system, it was estimated that plant uptake and in-plant conversion of diclofenac contributed about 21.4% of the total diclofenac removal in the mesocosm while the remaining 78.6% diclofenac was eliminated through biotic and abiotic conversion of diclofenac in the water phase. Diclofenac on the root surface and in roots, stems and leaves of Cyperus alternifolius was found at the concentrations of 0.15-2.59 μg/g, 0.21-2.66 μg/g, 0.06-0.53 μg/g, and 0.005-0.02 μg/g of fresh weight of plant tissues, respectively. The maximum bioaccumulation factor of diclofenac was calculated in roots (21.04) followed by root surface (20.49), stems (4.19), and leaves (0.16), respectively. Diclofenac translocation potentiality from root to stem was found below 0.5, suggesting a slow and passive translocation process of diclofenac. Current study demonstrated high potential of Cyperus alternifolius for phytoremediation of diclofenac in FWS and can be applied in other engineered ecosystems.

  12. FLAGdb(++): A Bioinformatic Environment to Study and Compare Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Tamby, Jean Philippe; Brunaud, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Today, the growing knowledge and data accumulation on plant genomes do not solve in a simple way the task of gene function inference. Because data of different types are coming from various sources, we need to integrate and analyze them to help biologists in this task. We created FLAGdb(++) ( http://tools.ips2.u-psud.fr/FLAGdb ) to take up this challenge for a selection of plant genomes. In order to enrich gene function predictions, structural and functional annotations of the genomes are explored to generate meta-data and to compare them. Since data are numerous and complex, we focused on accessibility and visualization with an original and user-friendly interface. In this chapter we present the main tools of FLAGdb(++) and a use-case to explore a gene family: structural and functional properties of this family and research of orthologous genes in the other plant genomes.

  13. The plant ontology as a tool for comparative plant anatomy and genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Laurel; Walls, Ramona L; Elser, Justin; Gandolfo, Maria A; Stevenson, Dennis W; Smith, Barry; Preece, Justin; Athreya, Balaji; Mungall, Christopher J; Rensing, Stefan; Hiss, Manuel; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Berardini, Tanya Z; Li, Donghui; Huala, Eva; Schaeffer, Mary; Menda, Naama; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Shrestha, Rosemary; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2013-02-01

    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary ('ontology') of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded to include all green plants. The PO was the first multispecies anatomy ontology developed for the annotation of genes and phenotypes. Also, to our knowledge, it was one of the first biological ontologies that provides translations (via synonyms) in non-English languages such as Japanese and Spanish. As of Release #18 (July 2012), there are about 2.2 million annotations linking PO terms to >110,000 unique data objects representing genes or gene models, proteins, RNAs, germplasm and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from 22 plant species. In this paper, we focus on the plant anatomical entity branch of the PO, describing the organizing principles, resources available to users and examples of how the PO is integrated into other plant genomics databases and web portals. We also provide two examples of comparative analyses, demonstrating how the ontology structure and PO-annotated data can be used to discover the patterns of expression of the LEAFY (LFY) and terpene synthase (TPS) gene homologs.

  14. The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Laurel; Walls, Ramona L.; Elser, Justin; Gandolfo, Maria A.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Smith, Barry; Preece, Justin; Athreya, Balaji; Mungall, Christopher J.; Rensing, Stefan; Hiss, Manuel; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Li, Donghui; Huala, Eva; Schaeffer, Mary; Menda, Naama; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Shrestha, Rosemary; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (‘ontology’) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded to include all green plants. The PO was the first multispecies anatomy ontology developed for the annotation of genes and phenotypes. Also, to our knowledge, it was one of the first biological ontologies that provides translations (via synonyms) in non-English languages such as Japanese and Spanish. As of Release #18 (July 2012), there are about 2.2 million annotations linking PO terms to >110,000 unique data objects representing genes or gene models, proteins, RNAs, germplasm and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from 22 plant species. In this paper, we focus on the plant anatomical entity branch of the PO, describing the organizing principles, resources available to users and examples of how the PO is integrated into other plant genomics databases and web portals. We also provide two examples of comparative analyses, demonstrating how the ontology structure and PO-annotated data can be used to discover the patterns of expression of the LEAFY (LFY) and terpene synthase (TPS) gene homologs. PMID:23220694

  15. Contrasting effects of biochar, compost and farm manure on alleviation of nickel toxicity in maize (Zea mays L.) in relation to plant growth, photosynthesis and metal uptake.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Muhammad Zia-Ur; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Fatima, Nida; Yousaf, Balal; Naeem, Asif; Sabir, Muhammad; Ahmad, Hamaad Raza; Ok, Yong Sik

    2016-11-01

    Nickel (Ni) toxicity in agricultural crops is a widespread problem while little is known about the role of biochar (BC) and other organic amendments like farm manure (FM) from cattle farm and compost (Cmp) on its alleviation. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of BC, Cmp and FM on physiological and biochemical characteristics of maize (Zea mays L.) under Ni stress. Maize was grown in Ni spiked soil without and with two rates of the amendments (equivalent to 1% and 2% organic carbon, OC) applied separately to the soil. After harvest, plant height, root length, dry weight, chlorophyll contents, gas exchange characteristics and trace elements in plants were determined. In addition, post-harvest soil characteristics like pHs, ECe and bioavailable Ni were also determined. Compared to the control, all of the amendments increased plant height, root length, shoot and root dry weight with the maximum increase in all parameters by FM (2% OC) treatment. Similarly, total chlorophyll contents and gas exchange characteristics significantly increased with the application of amendments being maximum with FM (2% OC) application. Amendments significantly increased copper, zinc, manganese and iron concentrations and decreased Ni concentrations in the plants. The highest reduction in shoot Ni concentration was recorded with FM (2% OC) followed by BC (2% OC) being 73.2% and 61.1% lower compared to the control, respectively. The maximum increase in soil pH and decrease in AB-DTPA extractable Ni was recorded with BC (2% OC) followed by FM (2% OC). It is concluded that FM (2% OC) was the most effective in reducing Ni toxicity to plants by reducing Ni uptake while BC (2% OC) was the most effective in decreasing bioavailable Ni in the soil through increasing soil pH. However, long-term field studies are needed to evaluate the effects of these amendments in reducing Ni toxicity in plants.

  16. Spectroscopic study of the impact of arsenic speciation on arsenic/phosphorus uptake and plant growth in tumbleweed (Salsola kali).

    PubMed

    De la Rosa, Guadalupe; Parsons, Jason G; Martinez-Martinez, Alejandro; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2006-03-15

    This manuscript reports the toxic effects of As2O3 (arsenic trioxide) and As2O5 (arsenic pentoxide) on S. kali as well as the arsenic and phosphate uptake and arsenic coordination within plant tissues. Plants were germinated and grown for 15 days on a Hoagland-modified medium containing either As(III) (arsenic trioxide) or As(V) (arsenic pentoxide). Subsequently, the seedlings were measured and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Plants stressed with 2 mg L(-1) of whichever As(III) or As(V) concentrated 245 +/- 19, 30 +/- 1, and 60 +/- 3 mg As kg(-1) dry weight or 70 +/- 6, 10 +/- 0.3, and 27 +/- 3 mg As kg(-1) dry weight in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively. Arsenate was less toxic, and more As translocation occurred from the roots to the leaves. All treatments reduced P concentration at root level; however, only As(V) at 2 and 4 mg L(-1) reduced P concentration at leaf level. Regardless the arsenic species supplied to the plants, arsenic was found in plant tissues as As(III) coordinated to three sulfur ligands with an interatomic distance of approximately 2.25 angstroms.

  17. Mercury uptake and distribution in Lavandula stoechas plants grown in soil from Almadén mining district (Spain).

    PubMed

    Sierra, M J; Millán, R; Esteban, E

    2009-11-01

    This work studies mercury root uptake by Lavandula stoechas var. Kew Red (lavender) and the distribution of this metal through the plant under greenhouse conditions along three consecutive seasons. Mercury concentration in plant tissues and in the different products obtained from lavender plants (essential oil, toilet water and in lavender tea) was assessed in order to evaluate the possible cultivation of lavender as a profitable alternative land use to mercury mining in the Almadén area once the mine had been closed down. Mercury concentration in useful parts of the plant was low (0.03-0.55 mg kg(-1)). Likewise, the essential oil, toilet water and tea obtained from these plants presented very low mercury levels, below the detection limit of the used equipment (<0.5 microg kg(-1)). In the case of the obtained tea, according to the recommendations given by the World Health Organization, the maximum daily intake of it without intoxication risk would be 85.2l. So, although other sources of mercury intake should also be considered in order to elaborate a complete toxicological risk assessment. Lavender data, obtained under this greenhouse working conditions, shows that lavender cultivation could be an alternative crop in the Almadén area.

  18. Endophytic Cultivable Bacteria of the Metal Bioaccumulator Spartina maritima Improve Plant Growth but Not Metal Uptake in Polluted Marshes Soils

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Jennifer; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Caviedes, Miguel A.; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Pajuelo, Eloisa; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacterial population was isolated from Spartina maritima tissues, a heavy metal bioaccumulator cordgrass growing in the estuaries of Tinto, Odiel, and Piedras River (south west Spain), one of the most polluted areas in the world. Strains were identified and ability to tolerate salt and heavy metals along with plant growth promoting and enzymatic properties were analyzed. A high proportion of these bacteria were resistant toward one or several heavy metals and metalloids including As, Cu, and Zn, the most abundant in plant tissues and soil. These strains also exhibited multiple enzymatic properties as amylase, cellulase, chitinase, protease and lipase, as well as plant growth promoting properties, including nitrogen fixation, phosphates solubilization, and production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), siderophores and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. The best performing strains (Micrococcus yunnanensis SMJ12, Vibrio sagamiensis SMJ18, and Salinicola peritrichatus SMJ30) were selected and tested as a consortium by inoculating S. maritima wild plantlets in greenhouse conditions along with wild polluted soil. After 30 days, bacterial inoculation improved plant photosynthetic traits and favored intrinsic water use efficiency. However, far from stimulating plant metal uptake, endophytic inoculation lessened metal accumulation in above and belowground tissues. These results suggest that inoculation of S. maritima with indigenous metal-resistant endophytes could mean a useful approach in order to accelerate both adaption and growth of this indigenous cordgrass in polluted estuaries in restorative operations, but may not be suitable for rhizoaccumulation purposes. PMID:26733985

  19. Bioaccessibility of barium from barite contaminated soils based on gastric phase in vitro data and plant uptake.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Sedigheh; Lamb, Dane T; Palanisami, Thavamani; Kader, Mohammed; Matanitobua, Vitukawalu; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    Barite contamination of soil commonly occurs from either barite mining or explorative drilling operations. This work reported in vitro data for barite contaminated soils using the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) methodology. The existence of barite in plant tissue and the possibility of 'biomineralised' zones was also investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Soils with low barium (Ba) concentrations showed a higher proportion of Ba extractability than barite rich samples. Barium uptake to spinach from soil was different between short term spiking studies and field weathered soils. Furthermore, Ba crystals were not evident in spinach tissue or acid digest solutions grown in barium nitrate spiked soils despite high accumulation. Barite was found in the plant digest solutions from barite contaminated soils only. Results indicate that under the conservative assumptions made, a child would need to consume extreme quantities of soil over an extended period to cause chronic health problems.

  20. Biochar addition to an arsenic contaminated soil increases arsenic concentrations in the pore water but reduces uptake to tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Beesley, Luke; Marmiroli, Marta; Pagano, Luca; Pigoni, Veronica; Fellet, Guido; Fresno, Teresa; Vamerali, Teofilo; Bandiera, Marianna; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic (As) concentrations in soil, soil pore water and plant tissues were evaluated in a pot experiment following the transplantation of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plantlets to a heavily As contaminated mine soil (~6000 mg kg(-1) pseudo-total As) receiving an orchard prune residue biochar amendment, with and without NPK fertiliser. An in-vitro test was also performed to establish if tomato seeds were able to germinate in various proportions of biochar added to nutrient solution (MS). Biochar significantly increased arsenic concentrations in pore water (500 μg L(-1)-2000 μg L(-1)) whilst root and shoot concentrations were significantly reduced compared to the control without biochar. Fruit As concentrations were very low (<3 μg kg(-1)), indicating minimal toxicity and transfer risk. Fertilisation was required to significantly increase plant biomass above the control after biochar addition whilst plants transplanted to biochar only were heavily stunted and chlorotic. Given that increasing the amount of biochar added to nutrient solution in-vitro reduced seed germination by up to 40%, a lack of balanced nutrient provision from biochar could be concluded. In summary, solubility and mobility of As were increased by biochar addition to this soil, but uptake to plant was reduced, and toxicity-transfer risk was negligible. Therefore leaching rather than food chain transfer appears the most probable immediate consequence of biochar addition to As contaminated soils.

  1. Screening of medicinal plants for PPPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma activation and evaluation of their effects on glucose uptake and 3T3-L1 adipogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medicinal plants are a rich source of ligands for nuclear receptors. The present study was aimed to screen a collection of plant extracts for PPAR-alpha/gamma activating properties and identify the active extract that can stimulate cellular glucose uptake without enhancing the adipogenesis. A report...

  2. Availability Of Deep Groundwater-Derived CO2 For Plant Uptake In A Costa Rican Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberbauer, S. F.; Genereux, D. P.; Osburn, C. L.; Dierick, D.; Oviedo Vargas, D.

    2014-12-01

    The role of export of carbon via surface waters has been increasingly appreciated as an important component of ecosystem carbon budgets. However the role of deep regional groundwater as a source of carbon to ecosystems is relatively poorly known. In a lowland rainforest in Costa Rica, inputs of elevated dissolved inorganic C (DIC) in regional groundwater greatly increase stream water C concentrations. Whether that groundwater-derived carbon represents a significant source of elevated CO2 for photosynthesis of riparian plants is unknown. We compared the concentration and δ13C of CO2 in the air above two weir-equipped streams with different inputs of high-DIC regional groundwater. The Taconazo has no inputs, whereas about 40% of stream discharge of the Arboleda is a result of regional groundwater. DIC from regional groundwater experiences little to no within-watershed sequestration and thus augments the C flux out of the watershed with stream flow and possibly the degassing flux from the stream. CO2 concentrations were recorded by Vaisala GMP343 gas analyzer over 24 hr periods above the weirs and in the splash zone below the weirs as well as at a small waterfall on the Sura, the higher order stream that the Arboleda joins, approximately 250 m downstream of the junction. Samples of air δ13C-CO2 taken from unmixed (early morning) and mixed (afternoon) canopy air were measured by mass spectrometer. Concentrations of CO2 at both sites on the Taconozo remained in the normal range of canopy storage of respiratory CO2 (< 600 ppm). In contrast, [CO2] above the Arboleda weir occasionally exceeded 1000 ppm and were generally above normal values of respiratory CO2. Values below the weir by the splash zone were often higher than 1500 ppm and occasionally exceeded 2000 ppm. At the Sura waterfall pulses of high CO2 > 1000 ppm occurred regularly throughout the day. We found higher δ13C-CO2 above the Arboleda compared to the Taconazo, consistent with an enhanced flux of

  3. A partition-limited model for the plant uptake of organic contaminants from soil and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Sheng, G.; Manes, M.

    2001-01-01

    In dealing with the passive transport of organic contaminants from soils to plants (including crops), a partition-limited model is proposed in which (i) the maximum (equilibrium) concentration of a contaminant in any location in the plant is determined by partition equilibrium with its concentration in the soil interstitial water, which in turn is determined essentially by the concentration in the soil organic matter (SOM) and (ii) the extent of approach to partition equilibrium, as measured by the ratio of the contaminant concentrations in plant water and soil interstitial water, ??pt (??? 1), depends on the transport rate of the contaminant in soil water into the plant and the volume of soil water solution that is required for the plant contaminant level to reach equilibrium with the external soil-water phase. Through reasonable estimates of plant organic-water compositions and of contaminant partition coefficients with various plant components, the model accounts for calculated values of ??pt in several published crop-contamination studies, including near-equilibrium values (i.e., ??pt ??? 1) for relatively water-soluble contaminants and lower values for much less soluble contaminants; the differences are attributed to the much higher partition coefficients of the less soluble compounds between plant lipids and plant water, which necessitates much larger volumes of the plant water transport for achieving the equilibrium capacities. The model analysis indicates that for plants with high water contents the plant-water phase acts as the major reservoir for highly water-soluble contaminants. By contrast, the lipid in a plant, even at small amounts, is usually the major reservoir for highly water-insoluble contaminants.

  4. Impact of acid effluent from Kawah Ijen crater lake on irrigated agricultural soils: Soil chemical processes and plant uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rotterdam-Los, A. M. D.; Heikens, A.; Vriend, S. P.; van Bergen, M. J.; van Gaans, P. F. M.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanogenic contamination of irrigation water, caused by effluent from the hyperacid Ijen crater lake, has severely affected the properties of agricultural soils in East Java, Indonesia. From a comparison of acidified topsoil with subsoil and with top- and subsoil in a reference area, we identified processes responsible for changes in soil and soil solution chemistry induced by acid irrigation water, with emphasis on the nutrients Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn, and on Al, which may become phytotoxic under acid conditions in soils. Compositional data for bulk soil composition and selective extractions with 1 M KCl and 0.2 M acid ammonium oxalate are used in a mass balance approach to specify element fluxes, including uptake by rice plants. The results show that input via irrigation water has produced an increase in the total aluminum content in the affected topsoil, which is of the same order of magnitude as the increase in labile Al. High bioavailability of Al, as reflected by concentrations in KCl extracts, is consistent with elevated concentrations observed in rice plants. In contrast, and despite the high input via irrigation water, Ca and Mg concentrations have decreased in all measured soil fractions through dissolution of amorphous phases and minerals, and through competition of Al for adsorption sites on the exchange complex and plant roots. Strong leaching is also evident for Fe and especially Mn. In terms of the overall mass balance of the topsoil, plant uptake of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn is negligible. If the use of acid irrigation would be stopped and the soil pH were to increase to values above 4.5, the observed phytotoxicity of Al will be halted. However, crops may then become fully dependent on the input from irrigation water or fertilizer for essential elements, due to the previous removal from the topsoil through leaching.

  5. Plant selective uptake of halogenated flame retardants at an e-waste recycling site in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaorui; Wang, Yan; Luo, Chunling; Li, Jun; Yin, Hua; Zhang, Gan

    2016-07-01

    The concentrations and homolog patterns of halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) in vegetables grown at an e-waste contaminated site were investigated. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were the dominant HFRs in vegetable tissues, with concentrations ranging from 10.3 to 164 ng g(-1) and 1.16-107 ng g(-1) in shoots and roots, respectively, followed by novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and dechlorane plus (DPs). This is an indication that PBDE contamination in vegetables grown around e-waste recycling sites may pose a risk to the local terrestrial ecosystem and residents. In addition, this is the first report on the concentrations and compositions of NBFRs in vegetables around e-waste recycling sites. The HFRs concentrations in vegetables varied greatly with the vegetable species, with the highest concentrations observed in Brassica oleracea var. capitata. Root concentration factors (RCF) decreased with increasing log Kow of HFRs, which indicated that the uptake of HFRs was controlled mainly by log Kow. Dissimilar HFRs profiles in shoots and roots suggested that the uptake and translocation of HFRs by plants were selective, with lower halogenated congeners prone to accumulation in vegetable tissues. Positive relationships between PBDEs and their substitutes were observed in vegetable tissues, suggesting that the replacement of PBDEs by NBFRs has not resulted in an obvious transition in plants within the study area.

  6. Soil respiration and photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide by ground-cover plants in four ages of jack pine forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Wickland, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission (soil respiration), net CO2 exchange after photosynthetic uptake by ground-cover plants, and soil CO2 concentration versus depth below land surface were measured at four ages of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) forest in central Saskatchewan. Soil respiration was smallest at a clear-cut site, largest in an 8-year-old stand, and decreased with stand age in 20-year-old and mature (60-75 years old) stands during May-September 1994 (12.1, 34.6, 31.5, and 24.9 mol C??m-2, respectively). Simulations of soil respiration at each stand based on continuously recorded soil temperature were within one standard deviation of measured flux for 48 of 52 measurement periods, but were 10%-30% less than linear interpolations of measured flux for the season. This was probably due to decreased soil respiration at night modeled by the temperature-flux relationships, but not documented by daytime chamber measurements. CO2 uptake by ground-cover plants ranged from 0 at the clear-cut site to 29, 25, and 9% of total growing season soil respiration at the 8-year, 20-year, and mature stands. CO2 concentrations were as great as 7150 ppmv in the upper 1 m of unsaturated zone and were proportional to measured soil respiration.

  7. Behavior of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in the soil-plant system: uptake, translocation, and metabolism in plants and dissipation in soil.

    PubMed

    Huang, Honglin; Zhang, Shuzhen; Christie, Peter; Wang, Sen; Xie, Mei

    2010-01-15

    Deca-bromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is the major component of the commercial deca-BDE flame retardant. There is increasing concern over BDE-209 due to its increasing occurrence in the environment and in humans. In this study the behavior of BDE-209 in the soil-plant system was investigated. Accumulation of BDE-209 was observed in the roots and shoots of all the six plant species examined, namely ryegrass, alfalfa, pumpkin, summer squash, maize, and radish. Root uptake of BDE-209 was positively correlated with root lipid content (P < 0.001, R(2) = 0.81). The translocation factor (TF, C(shoot)/C(root)) of BDE-209 was inversely related to its concentration in roots. Nineteen lower brominated (di- to nona-) PBDEs were detected in the soil and plant samples and five hydroxylated congeners were detected in the plant samples, indicating debromination and hydroxylation of BDE-209 in the soil-plant system. Evidence of a relatively higher proportion of penta- through di-BDE congeners in plant tissues than in the soil indicates that there is further debromination of PBDEs within plants or low brominated PBDEs are more readily taken up by plants. A significant negative correlation between the residual BDE-209 concentration in soil and the soil microbial biomass measured as the total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (P < 0.05, R(2) = 0.74) suggests that microbial metabolism and degradation contribute to BDE-209 dissipation in soil. These results provide important information about the behavior of BDE-209 in the soil-plant system.

  8. Uptake, translocation, and transformation of pentachlorophenol in soybean and spinach plants

    SciTech Connect

    Casterline, J.L. Jr.; Barnett, N.M.; Ku, Y.

    1985-06-01

    Soybean plants were grown for 90 days and spinach plants for 64 days in a mixture of sterilized greenhouse soil and sand containing 10 ppm pentachlorophenol. All plant parts and soil samples were extracted and separated into nonpolar and polar fractions. Major nonpolar and polar metabolites were identified by gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Nonpolar fractions from both soybean and spinach plants were found to contain pentachlorophenol and its metabolites, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, methoxytetrachlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole, and pentachloroanisole. Cleavage of polar metabolites from the soybean plants by acid hydrolysis yielded organic solvent-extractable products. These products were identified as pentachlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, and methoxytetrachlorophenol. Cleavage of polar materials from spinach plants yielded only pentachlorophenol. The polar metabolites from the soybean plants were also subjected to enzymatic cleavage by beta-glucosidase. The conjugates consisted mostly of O-glucosides of the same metabolites released by acid hydrolysis. Failure of hydrolysis by aryl sulfatase indicated that very little or no sulfates were present. The metabolites found in the plants were not detected in soil samples obtained from pots immediately after the plants were harvested.

  9. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Audrey G; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Ryan, Michael G; Tissue, David T; Baggett, L Scott; Adams, Henry D; Maillard, Pascale; Marchand, Jacqueline; Landhäusser, Simon M; Lacointe, André; Gibon, Yves; Anderegg, William R L; Asao, Shinichi; Atkin, Owen K; Bonhomme, Marc; Claye, Caroline; Chow, Pak S; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Davies, Noel W; Dickman, L Turin; Dumbur, Rita; Ellsworth, David S; Falk, Kristen; Galiano, Lucía; Grünzweig, José M; Hartmann, Henrik; Hoch, Günter; Hood, Sharon; Jones, Joanna E; Koike, Takayoshi; Kuhlmann, Iris; Lloret, Francisco; Maestro, Melchor; Mansfield, Shawn D; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Maucourt, Mickael; McDowell, Nathan G; Moing, Annick; Muller, Bertrand; Nebauer, Sergio G; Niinemets, Ülo; Palacio, Sara; Piper, Frida; Raveh, Eran; Richter, Andreas; Rolland, Gaëlle; Rosas, Teresa; Saint Joanis, Brigitte; Sala, Anna; Smith, Renee A; Sterck, Frank; Stinziano, Joseph R; Tobias, Mari; Unda, Faride; Watanabe, Makoto; Way, Danielle A; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Wild, Birgit; Wiley, Erin; Woodruff, David R

    2015-11-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent literature could be quantitatively compared among studies. We also asked whether any differences among laboratories were related to the extraction and quantification methods used to determine starch and sugar concentrations. These questions were addressed by sending sub-samples collected from five woody plant tissues, which varied in NSC content and chemical composition, to 29 laboratories. Each laboratory analyzed the samples with their laboratory-specific protocols, based on recent publications, to determine concentrations of soluble sugars, starch and their sum, total NSC. Laboratory estimates differed substantially for all samples. For example, estimates for Eucalyptus globulus leaves (EGL) varied from 23 to 116 (mean = 56) mg g(-1) for soluble sugars, 6-533 (mean = 94) mg g(-1) for starch and 53-649 (mean = 153) mg g(-1) for total NSC. Mixed model analysis of variance showed that much of the variability among laboratories was unrelated to the categories we used for extraction and quantification methods (method category R(2) = 0.05-0.12 for soluble sugars, 0.10-0.33 for starch and 0.01-0.09 for total NSC). For EGL, the difference between the highest and lowest least squares means for categories in the mixed model analysis was 33 mg g(-1) for total NSC, compared with the range of laboratory estimates of 596 mg g(-1). Laboratories were reasonably consistent in their ranks of estimates among tissues for starch (r = 0.41-0.91), but less so for total NSC (r = 0.45-0.84) and soluble sugars (r = 0.11-0.83). Our results show that NSC estimates for woody plant tissues cannot be compared among laboratories. The relative changes in NSC between treatments measured within a laboratory

  10. A comparative quadrant analysis of turbulence in a plant canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Wusi; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.; Zhu, Weihong; van Hout, René; Katz, Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulence in plant canopies has traditionally been validated using bulk statistical quantities such as mean velocity and variance profiles. However, turbulent exchanges between a plant canopy and the atmosphere are dominated by large-scale coherent structures, and therefore LES must also be validated using statistical tools that are sensitive to details of coherent structures. In this study, LES and measurements using particle image velocimetry (PIV) are compared near the top of the canopy by means of a quadrant-hole analysis of turbulent kinetic energy, vorticity, and dissipation rate. The LES resolves coarse features of individual corn plants and uses the Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic subgrid model. At the measurement location, there is good agreement between the LES predictions and the field data in terms of most conditionally sampled quantities, confirming the applicability of LES for fundamental studies of vegetation-air interactions and coherent structures. The simulation results confirm that sweeps (the fourth-quadrant events) contribute the largest fraction of turbulent kinetic energy, vorticity, and dissipation rate inside the plant canopy. The magnitudes of the vorticity and dissipation rate at the top of the canopy are highest in the first quadrant (rare events of outward interactions).

  11. Multivariable control of grinding plants: a comparative simulation study.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Manuel; Castillo, Alejandro; Sepúlveda, Florencio; Contreras, Angel; Giménez, Patricio; Castelli, Luis

    2002-01-01

    In this paper five multivariable adaptive and classical control strategies have been studied and implemented in a simulator of the copper grinding plant of CODELCO-Andina. The strategies presented were compared and, according to theory, exhibit good behavior. The extended horizon, pole-placement and model reference multivariable adaptive control strategies were formulated in discrete-time and use a model of the plant whose parameters are updated on line using the recursive least squares method along with UD factorization of the covariance matrix and variable forgetting factor. The direct Nyquist array and sequential loop closing techniques were also studied and simulated. The two-by-two multivariable system chosen to represent the grinding plant has the percentage of solids (density) of the pulp fed to the hydrocyclones (which is highly correlated with the percentage of +65 mesh in the overflow of hydrocyclones) and the sump level as output (controlled) variables. The water flow added to the sump and the speed of the pump are its input (manipulated) variables. All the algorithms tested by simulation exhibited good performance and were able to control the grinding plant in a stable fashion. Adaptive algorithms showed better performance than classical techniques, with the extended horizon and pole-placement algorithms proving to be the best. The fact that adaptive algorithms continuously adjust their parameters renders such controllers superior to those based on fixed parameters.

  12. Root-Uptake of C-14 Acetic Acid by Various Plants and C-14 Dynamics Surrounding the Experimental Tessera

    SciTech Connect

    Ogiyama, S.; Takeda, H.; Uchida, S.; Suzuki, H.; Inubushi, K.

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-14 (C-14, t{sub 1/2} = 5.73x10{sup 3} yrs) from radioactive waste is one of the most important radioactive nuclides for environmental assessment in the context of geological disposal, and understanding the transfer of radioactive elements to plants is essential for public health safety. In order to obtain fundamental knowledge, culture experiments using marigold (Tagetes patula L.), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea S.), paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and carrot (Daucus carota L.) plants were conducted to examine root-uptake and dynamics of C-14 in the laboratory. The C-14 radioactivity in each plant part (e.g. shoot, root, edible part, etc.), medium (e.g. culture solution, sand, etc.), and air was determined. The distribution of C-14 in the plants was visualized using autoradiography. For a comparison, autoradiography was also done using Na-22. Results of the present study indicated that C-14 labeled CO{sub 2} gas was released from the culture solution to the atmosphere. Clear autoradiography images were observed in plants for the shoots and lower roots which were soaked in the culture solution. The upper roots which were not soaked in the culture solution were not clearly imaged. In the radiotracer experiment using Na-22, a clear image was observed for the whole carrot seedling, even including the upper root, on the autoradiography. However, the amounts of C-14 acetic acid absorbed by all the plants through their roots were considered to be very small. Inorganic carbon transformed from C-14 acetic acid would be taken up by plants through the roots, and some fraction of C-14 would be assimilated into the shoots by photosynthesis. (authors)

  13. Uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L.): dependence on stomatal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Kley, D.; Wildt, J.; Segschneider, H. J.; Förstel, H.

    The uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers ( Helianthus annuus L. var. giganteus) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3), using concentrations representative for moderately polluted air, has been determined by gas exchange experiments. Conductivities for these trace gases were measured at different light fluxes ranging from 820 μEm -2s -1 to darkness. The conductivities to water vapor and the trace gases are highly correlated. It is concluded that the uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers and tobacco plants is linearly dependent on stomatal opening. While the uptake of NO is limited by the mesophyll resistance, the uptake of NO 2 is only by diffusion through the stomata. Loss processes by deposition to the leaf surfaces are more pronounced for O 3 than for NO and NO 2.

  14. Inoculation of endophytic bacteria on host and non-host plants--effects on plant growth and Ni uptake.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Rajkumar, Mani; Luo, YongMing; Freitas, Helena

    2011-11-15

    Among a collection of Ni resistant endophytes isolated from the tissues of Alyssum serpyllifolium, four plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria (PGPE) were selected based on their ability to promote seedling growth in roll towel assay. Further, the PGPE screened showed the potential to produce plant growth promoting (PGP) substances and plant polymer hydrolyzing enzymes. These isolates were further screened for their PGP activity on A. serpyllifolium and Brassica juncea under Ni stress using a phytagar assay. None of the four isolates produced any disease symptoms in either plant. Further, strain A3R3 induced a maximum increase in biomass and Ni content of plants. Based on the PGP potential in phytagar assay, strain A3R3 was chosen for studying its PGP effect on A. serpyllifolium and B. juncea in Ni contaminated soil. Inoculation with A3R3 significantly increased the biomass (B. juncea) and Ni content (A. serpyllifolium) of plants grown in Ni contaminated soil. The strain also showed high level of colonization in tissue interior of both plants. By 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis, A3R3 was identified as Pseudomonas sp. Successful colonization and subsequent PGP potentiality of Pseudomonas sp. A3R3 indicate that the inoculation with PGPE might have significant potential to improve heavy metal phytoremediation.

  15. Cadmium sorption characteristics of soil amendments and its relationship with the cadmium uptake by hyperaccumulator and normal plants in amended soils.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Qi-Tang; Lee, Charles C C; Li, Baoqin; Long, Xinxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to select appropriate amendments for cropping hyperaccumulator or normal plants on contaminated soils and establish the relationship between Cd sorption characteristics of soil amendments and their capacity to reduce Cd uptake by plants, batch sorption experiments with 11 different clay minerals and organic materials and a pot experiment with the same amendments were carried out. The pot experiment was conducted with Sedum alfredii and maize (Zea mays) in a co-cropping system. The results showed that the highest sorption amount was by montmorillonite at 40.82 mg/g, while mica was the lowest at only 1.83 mg/g. There was a significant negative correlation between the n value of Freundlich equation and Cd uptake by plants, and between the logarithm of the stability constant K of the Langmuir equation and plant uptake. Humic acids (HAs) and mushroom manure increased Cd uptake by S. alfredii, but not maize, thus they are suitable as soil amendments for the co-cropping S. alfredii and maize. The stability constant K in these cases was 0.14-0.16 L/mg and n values were 1.51-2.19. The alkaline zeolite and mica had the best fixation abilities and significantly decreased Cd uptake by the both plants, with K > or = 1.49 L/mg and n > or = 3.59.

  16. Cadmium Sorption Characteristics of Soil Amendments and its Relationship with the Cadmium Uptake by Hyperaccumulator and Normal Plants in Amended Soils

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Qi-Tang; Lee, Charles C.C.; Li, Baoqin; Long, Xinxian

    2013-01-01

    In order to select appropriate amendments for cropping hyperaccumulator or normal plants on contaminated soils and establish the relationship between Cd sorption characteristics of soil amendments and their capacity to reduce Cd uptake by plants, batch sorption experiments with 11 different clay minerals and organic materials and a pot experiment with the same amendments were carried out. The pot experiment was conducted with Sedum alfredii and maize (Zea mays) in a co-cropping system. The results showed that the highest sorption amount was by montmorillonite at 40.82 mg/g, while mica was the lowest at only 1.83 mg/g. There was a significant negative correlation between the n value of Freundlich equation and Cd uptake by plants, and between the logarithm of the stability constant K of the Langmuir equation and plant uptake. Humic acids (HAs) and mushroom manure increased Cd uptake by S. alfredii, but not maize, thus they are suitable as soil amendments for the co-cropping S. alfredii and maize. The stability constant K in these cases was 0.14–0.16 L/mg and n values were 1.51–2.19. The alkaline zeolite and mica had the best fixation abilities and significantly decreased Cd uptake by the both plants, with K ≥ 1.49 L/mg and n ≥ 3.59. PMID:24912231

  17. Sustainable measures for sewage sludge treatment - evaluating the effects on P reaction in soils and plant P uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenker, Moshe; Einhoren, Hana

    2016-04-01

    Wastewater treatment, whether for water reusing or for releasing into the environment, results in sewage sludge rich in organic matter and nutrients. If free of pathogens and pollutants, this waste material is a widely used as soil amendment and source of valuable nutrients for agronomic use. Nevertheless, its P/N ratio largely exceeds plant P/N demand. Limiting its application rates according to the P demand of crops will largely limit its application rates and its beneficial effect as a soil amendment and as a source for other nutrients. An alternative approach, in which P is stabilized before application, was evaluated in this study. Anaerobically digested fresh sewage sludge (FSS) was stabilized by aluminum sulfate, ferrous sulfate, and calcium oxide (CaO), as well as by composting with shredded woody yard-waste to produce Al-FSS, Fe-FSS, CaO-FSS, and FSS-compost, respectively. Defined organic-P sources (glucose-1-phosphate and inositol-hexa-phosphate) and a P fertilizer (KH2PO4) were included as well and a control with no P amendments was included as a reference. Each material was applied at a fixed P load of 50 mg kg-1 to each of three soils and P speciation and plants P uptake were tested along 112 days of incubation at moderate (near field capacity) water content. Tomato seedlings were used for the P uptake test. The large set of data was used to evaluate the effect of each treatment on P reactions and mechanisms of retention in the tested soils and to correlate various P indices to P availability for plants. Plant P uptake was highly correlated to Olsen-P as well as to water-soluble inorganic-P, but not to water-soluble organic-P and not to total P or other experimentally-defined stable P fractions. We conclude that the P stabilization in the sludge will allow beneficial and sustainable use of sewage sludge as a soil amendment and source of nutrients, but the stabilization method should be selected in accordance with the target soil properties.

  18. Uptake of point source depleted 15N fertilizer by neighboring corn plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-based active (self-illuminating) sensors make it possible to collect canopy data that are useful for making on-the-go nitrogen (N) fertilizer application decisions. These technologies raise questions about plant-to-plant competition for targeted fertilizer N applications. This study evaluated...

  19. Anomalous uptake and circulatory characteristics of the plant-based small RNA MIR2911

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inconsistent detection of plant-based dietary small RNAs in circulation has thwarted the use of dietary RNA therapeutics. Here we demonstrate mice consuming diets rich in vegetables displayed enhanced serum levels of the plant specific small RNA MIR2911. Differential centrifugation, size-exclusion c...

  20. Uptake and partitioning of nutrients in blackberry and raspberry and evaluating plant nutrient status for accurate assessment of fertilizer requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry and blackberry plantings have relatively low nutrient requirements compared to many other perennial fruit crops. Annual total N accumulation in the aboveground plant ranged from 69-122 kg/ha and 37-44 kg/ha in field-grown red raspberry and blackberry. Primocanes rely primarily on fertilize...

  1. Influence of compost on the mobility of arsenic in soil and its uptake by bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) irrigated with arsenite-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Caporale, Antonio G; Pigna, Massimo; Sommella, Alessia; Dynes, James J; Cozzolino, Vincenza; Violante, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    The influence of compost on the growth of bean plants irrigated with As-contaminated waters and its influence on the mobility of As in the soils and the uptake of As (as NaAs(III)O2) by plant components was studied at various compost application rates (3·10(4) and 6·10(4) kg ha(-1)) and at three As concentrations (1, 2 and 3 mg kg(-1)). The biomass and As and P concentrations of the roots, shoots and beans were determined at harvest time, as well as the chlorophyll content of the leaves and nonspecific and specifically bound As in the soil. The bean plants exposed to As showed typical phytotoxicity symptoms; no plants however died over the study. The biomass of the bean plants increased with the increasing amounts of compost added to the soil, attributed to the phytonutritive capacity of compost. Biomass decreased with increasing As concentrations, however, the reduction in the biomass was significantly lower with the addition of compost, indicating that the As phytotoxicity was alleviated by the compost. For the same As concentration, the As content of the roots, shoots and beans decreased with increasing compost added compared to the Control. This is due to partial immobilization of the As by the organic functional groups on the compost, either directly or through cation bridging. Most of the As adsorbed by the bean plants accumulated in the roots, while a scant allocation of As occurred in the beans. Hence, the addition of compost to soils could be used as an effective means to limit As accumulation in crops from As-contaminated waters.

  2. Bioavailability of silver and silver sulfide nanoparticles to lettuce (Lactuca sativa): Effect of agricultural amendments on plant uptake.

    PubMed

    Doolette, Casey L; McLaughlin, Michael J; Kirby, Jason K; Navarro, Divina A

    2015-12-30

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can enter terrestrial systems as sulfidised AgNPs (Ag2S-NPs) through the application of biosolids to soil. However, the bioavailability of Ag2S-NPs in soils is unknown. The two aims of this study were to investigate (1) the bioavailability of Ag to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) using a soil amended with biosolids containing Ag2S-NPs and (2) the effect of commonly used agricultural fertilisers/amendments on the bioavailability of Ag, AgNPs and Ag2S-NPs to lettuce. The study used realistic AgNP exposure pathways and exposure concentrations. The plant uptake of Ag from biosolids-amended soil containing Ag2S-NPs was very low for all Ag treatments (0.02%). Ammonium thiosulfate and potassium chloride fertilisation significantly increased the Ag concentrations of plant roots and shoots. The extent of the effect varied depending on the type of Ag. Ag2S-NPs, the realistic form of AgNPs in soil, had the lowest bioavailability. The potential risk of AgNPs in soils is low; even in the plants that had the highest Ag concentrations (Ag(+)+thiosulfate), only 0.06% of added Ag was found in edible plant parts (shoots). Results from the study suggest that agricultural practises must be considered when carrying out risk assessments of AgNPs in terrestrial systems; such practises can affect AgNP bioavailability.

  3. pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 expression enhances nitrogen uptake efficiency and grain yield in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingguang; Fan, Xiaoru; Qian, Kaiyun; Zhang, Yong; Song, Miaoquan; Liu, Yu; Xu, Guohua; Fan, Xiaorong

    2017-02-22

    The nitrate (NO3-) transporter has been selected as an important gene maker in the process of environmental adoption in rice cultivars. In this work, we transferred another native OsNAR2.1 promoter with driving OsNAR2.1 gene into rice plants. The transgenic lines with exogenous pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 constructs showed enhanced OsNAR2.1 expression level, compared with wild type (WT), and (15) N influx in roots increased 21%-32% in response to 0.2 mm and 2.5 mm 15NO3- and 1.25 mm (15) NH4(15) NO3 . Under these three N conditions, the biomass of the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 transgenic lines increased 143%, 129% and 51%, and total N content increased 161%, 242% and 69%, respectively, compared to WT. Furthermore in field experiments we found the grain yield, agricultural nitrogen use efficiency (ANUE), and dry matter transfer of pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 plants increased by about 21%, 22% and 21%, compared to WT. We also compared the phenotypes of pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 and pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 transgenic lines in the field, found that postanthesis N uptake differed significantly between them, and in comparison with the WT. Postanthesis N uptake (PANU) increased approximately 39% and 85%, in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 and pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 transgenic lines, respectively, possibly because OsNRT2.1 expression was less in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 lines than in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 lines during the late growth stage. These results show that rice NO3(-) uptake, yield and NUE were improved by increased OsNAR2.1 expression via its native promoter.

  4. Phytozome: a Tool for Green Plant Comparative Genomics

    DOE Data Explorer

    Phytozome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst green plants. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of release v4.0, Phytozome provides access to nine sequenced and annotated green plant genomes, eight of which have been clustered into gene families at six evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, TAIR, JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. [Copied from the Overview at http://www.phytozome.net/Phytozome_info.php

  5. Removal of the pharmaceuticals ibuprofen and iohexol by four wetland plant species in hydroponic culture: plant uptake and microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Lv, Tao; Carvalho, Pedro N; Arias, Carlos A; Chen, Zhanghe; Brix, Hans

    2016-02-01

    We aimed at assessing the effects of four wetland plant species commonly used in constructed wetland systems: Typha, Phragmites, Iris and Juncus for removing ibuprofen (IBU) and iohexol (IOH) from spiked culture solution and exploring the mechanisms responsible for the removal. IBU was nearly completely removed by all plant species during the 24-day experiment, whereas the IOH removal varied between 13 and 80 %. Typha and Phragmites were the most efficient in removing IBU and IOH, respectively, with first-order removal rate constants of 0.38 and 0.06 day(-1), respectively. The pharmaceuticals were taken up by the roots and translocated to the aerial tissues. However, at the end of the experiment, plant accumulation constituted only up to 1.1 and 5.7 % of the amount of IBU and IOH spiked initially. The data suggest that the plants mainly function by facilitating pharmaceutical degradation in the rhizosphere through release of root exudates.

  6. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Comparison of the Heavy-Metal Uptake of Cyperus esculentus and of Agronomic Plants Grown on Contaminated Dutch Sediments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    under reduced (flooded) and oxidized (upland) disposal conditions was studied in the greenhouse. Heavy-metal uptake by lettuce, radish, spring wheat , and...planted in the sediments was grown to maximum vegetative growth (45 days). Seeds of lettuce, radish, spring wheat , and red fescue grass were planted...spring wheat for Ni. Both DTPA-extractable and total metal in the substrates were related to plant metal concentrations, but for Zn the best fit was

  7. Comparative patterns of plant invasions in the Mediterranean biome.

    PubMed

    Arianoutsou, Margarita; Delipetrou, Pinelopi; Vilà, Montserrat; Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G; Celesti-Grapow, Laura; Wardell-Johnson, Grant; Henderson, Lesley; Fuentes, Nicol; Ugarte-Mendes, Eduardo; Rundel, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare and contrast the patterns of alien plant invasions in the world's five mediterranean-climate regions (MCRs). We expected landscape age and disturbance history to have bearing on levels of invasion. We assembled a database on naturalized alien plant taxa occurring in natural and semi-natural terrestrial habitats of all five regions (specifically Spain, Italy, Greece and Cyprus from the Mediterranean Basin, California, central Chile, the Cape Region of South Africa and Southwestern - SW Australia). We used multivariate (hierarchical clustering and NMDS ordination) trait and habitat analysis to compare characteristics of regions, taxa and habitats across the mediterranean biome. Our database included 1627 naturalized species with an overall low taxonomic similarity among the five MCRs. Herbaceous perennials were the most frequent taxa, with SW Australia exhibiting both the highest numbers of naturalized species and the highest taxonomic similarity (homogenization) among habitats, and the Mediterranean Basin the lowest. Low stress and highly disturbed habitats had the highest frequency of invasion and homogenization in all regions, and high natural stress habitats the lowest, while taxonomic similarity was higher among different habitats in each region than among regions. Our analysis is the first to describe patterns of species characteristics and habitat vulnerability for a single biome. We have shown that a broad niche (i.e. more than one habitat) is typical of naturalized plant species, regardless of their geographical area of origin, leading to potential for high homogenization within each region. Habitats of the Mediterranean Basin are apparently the most resistant to plant invasion, possibly because their landscapes are generally of relatively recent origin, but with a more gradual exposure to human intervention over a longer period.

  8. Comparative Patterns of Plant Invasions in the Mediterranean Biome

    PubMed Central

    Arianoutsou, Margarita; Delipetrou, Pinelopi; Vilà, Montserrat; Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Celesti-Grapow, Laura; Wardell-Johnson, Grant; Henderson, Lesley; Fuentes, Nicol; Ugarte-Mendes, Eduardo; Rundel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare and contrast the patterns of alien plant invasions in the world’s five mediterranean-climate regions (MCRs). We expected landscape age and disturbance history to have bearing on levels of invasion. We assembled a database on naturalized alien plant taxa occurring in natural and semi-natural terrestrial habitats of all five regions (specifically Spain, Italy, Greece and Cyprus from the Mediterranean Basin, California, central Chile, the Cape Region of South Africa and Southwestern - SW Australia). We used multivariate (hierarchical clustering and NMDS ordination) trait and habitat analysis to compare characteristics of regions, taxa and habitats across the mediterranean biome. Our database included 1627 naturalized species with an overall low taxonomic similarity among the five MCRs. Herbaceous perennials were the most frequent taxa, with SW Australia exhibiting both the highest numbers of naturalized species and the highest taxonomic similarity (homogenization) among habitats, and the Mediterranean Basin the lowest. Low stress and highly disturbed habitats had the highest frequency of invasion and homogenization in all regions, and high natural stress habitats the lowest, while taxonomic similarity was higher among different habitats in each region than among regions. Our analysis is the first to describe patterns of species characteristics and habitat vulnerability for a single biome. We have shown that a broad niche (i.e. more than one habitat) is typical of naturalized plant species, regardless of their geographical area of origin, leading to potential for high homogenization within each region. Habitats of the Mediterranean Basin are apparently the most resistant to plant invasion, possibly because their landscapes are generally of relatively recent origin, but with a more gradual exposure to human intervention over a longer period. PMID:24244443

  9. Plant Uptake and Distribution of Endosulfan and Its Sulfate Metabolite Persisted in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-In; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Jang-Eok

    2015-01-01

    The distributions of endosulfan (ED) residues (α-, β-isomers, and sulfate-metabolite) in cucumbers grown in soils treated with ED at concentrations of 20 and 40 mg kg-1 were assessed using indoor and outdoor experiments. In all treatments, degradation rates of the α-isomer in soils were higher than that of the β-isomer. In the indoor tests, uptake amounts of total ED by cucumbers, after 15 d of growth, were 7.8 and 14.5 mg kg-1 in 20 and 40 mg kg-1-treated pots, respectively. For growth time from 15 to 30 d, uptake amounts in 20 and 40 mg kg-1-treated pots were 3.8 and 7.9 mg kg-1, respectively. Outdoor tests resulted in smaller ED residues in cucumbers than those in indoor tests. In both indoor and outdoor tests, ED residues absorbed were highest in roots, and the α-isomer was the more frequently absorbed isomer. These results will be useful for determining management criteria for soil persistent pesticides. PMID:26529511

  10. Comparative activity of biodegradable nanoparticles with aluminum adjuvants: antigen uptake by dendritic cells and induction of immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomofumi; Akagi, Takami; Toyama, Masaaki; Nishi, Yosuke; Shima, Fumiaki; Akashi, Mitsuru; Baba, Masanori

    2011-10-30

    Biodegradable poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to be an excellent antigen carrier. Antigen-carrying γ-PGA NPs were examined for their uptake by murine dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequent induction of antigen-specific immune responses in mice and compared with aluminum (AL) adjuvants. Ovalbumin (OVA)-carrying NPs (FITC-OVA-NPs) were taken up much more efficiently by DCs than OVA alone or its AL-associated form. Both OVA-NPs and OVA+AL were detected in an intracellular lysosome compartment of DCs. Furthermore, the uptake of γ-PGA NPs was inhibited in the presence of pinocytosis and phagocytosis inhibitors. Significantly higher induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells was observed in mice immunized with OVA-carrying γ-PGA NPs than in those immunized with OVA alone, OVA+AL, OVA+3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and OVA+AL+MPL. Thus, γ-PGA NPs may have great potential as an effective vaccine carrier and adjuvant for clinical use.

  11. Phytoaccumulation of trace elements by wetland plants: 3. Uptake and accumulation of ten trace elements by twelve plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.H.; Zayed, A.; Zhu, Y.L.; Yu, M.; Terry, N.

    1999-10-01

    Interest is increasing in using wetland plants in constructed wetlands to remove toxic elements from polluted wastewater. To identify those wetland plants that hyperaccumulate trace elements, 12 plant species were tested for their efficiency to bioconcentrate 10 potentially toxic trace elements including As, b, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, and Se. Individual plants were grown under carefully controlled conditions and supplied with 1 mg L{sup {minus}1} of each trace element individually for 10 d. Except B, all elements accumulated to much higher concentrations in roots than in shoots. Highest shoot tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW) of the various trace elements were attained by the following species: umbrella plant (Cyperus alternifolius L.) for Mn (198) and Cr (44); water zinnia (Wedelia trilobata Hitchc.) for Cd (148) and Ni (80); smartweed (Polygonum hydropiperoides Michx.) for Cu (95) and Pb (64); water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) for Hg (92), As (34), and Se (39); and mare's tail (hippuris vulgaris L.) for B (1132). Whereas, the following species attained the highest root tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW); stripped rush (Baumia rubiginosa) for Mn (1683); parrot's feather (Myriophyllum brasiliense Camb.) for Cd (1426) and Ni (1077); water lettuce for Cu (1038), Hg (1217), and As (177); smartweed for Cr (2980) and Pb (1882); mare's tail for B (1277); and monkey flower (Mimulus guttatus Fisch.) for Se (384). From a phytoremediation perspective, smartweed was probably the best plant species for trace element removal from wastewater due to its faster growth and higher plant density.

  12. Kinetics of the uptake of sup 14 C-labeled chlorinated benzenes from soil by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, E.; Scheunert, I.; Korte, F. )

    1989-04-01

    ({sup 14}C)Benzene, ({sup 14}C)1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, ({sup 14}C)pentachlorobenzene, and ({sup 14}C)hexachlorobenzene were applied to soils in outdoor lysimeters to a 10-cm depth (2 mg/kg dry soil); barley and cress plants were grown for one vegetation period and analyzed after varying time intervals. The bioaccumulation factors (concentration of radioactive substances in plants divided by that in soils) of barley were higher than those of cress, except for hexachlorobenzene. In barley, bioaccumulation factors increased with decreasing chlorine content of the molecules, except for benzene, whereas in cress hexachlorobenzene exhibited the highest bioaccumulation factor. The conversion ratios of chlorinated benzenes (percentage of conversion products based on total radioactivity in plants) were negatively correlated to the chlorine content of the molecules and, in barley, positively correlated with time; in general, they were higher in barley than in cress. The concentration of radioactive substances in the plants, as well as bioaccumulation factors, decreased with time, except for a slight increase in benzene-derived residues in barley after 125 days. This effect is due to growth dilution. The percentage of radioactivity in barley seeds, based on that in the whole plant, was negatively correlated to the chlorine content of the molecule.

  13. Phytotoxicity and uptake of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) by two plant species.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingmao; Gurung, Arun; Deng, Yang

    2013-01-15

    Use of nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) for the treatment of various environmental pollutants has been proven successful. However, large scale introduction of engineered nanomaterials such as nZVI into the environment has recently attracted serious concerns. There is an urgent need to investigate the environmental fate and impact of nZVI due to the scope of its application. The goal of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and accumulation of bare nZVI by two commonly encountered plant species: cattail (Typha latifolia) and hybrid poplars (Populous deltoids×Populous nigra). Plant seedlings were grown hydroponically in a greenhouse and dosed with different concentrations of nZVI (0-1000 mg/L) for four weeks. The nZVI exhibited strong toxic effect on Typha at higher concentrations (>200 mg/L) but enhanced plant growth at lower concentrations. nZVI also significantly reduced the transpiration and growth of hybrid poplars at higher concentrations. Microscopic images indicated that large amount of nZVI coated on plant root surface as irregular aggregates and some nZVI penetrated into several layers of epidermal cells. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) confirmed the internalization of nZVI by poplar root cells but similar internalization was not observed for Typha root cells. The upward transport to shoots was minimal for both plant species.

  14. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic model D-DAT was developed to study the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments in the immediate aftermath of the Fukushima accident. This dynamics is determined by the interplay between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-lives of elimination by the biota. The model calculates time-variable activity concentration of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (90)Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macroalgae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of the model is the inclusion of dynamic transfer of radionuclides to/from sediments by factorising the depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates, molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation, represented by a simple set of differential equations coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment more realistically. The model was used to assess the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the acute phase of the accident. Sediment and biota activity concentrations are within the wide range of actual monitoring data. Activity concentrations in marine biota are thus shown to be better calculated by a dynamic model than with the simpler equilibrium approach based on concentration factors, which tends to overestimate for the acute accident period. Modelled dose rates from external exposure from sediment are also significantly below equilibrium predictions. The model calculations confirm previous studies showing that radioactivity levels in marine biota have been generally below the levels necessary to cause a measurable effect on populations. The model was used in mass-balance mode to calculate total integrated releases of 103, 30 and 3 PBq for (131)I, (137)Cs and (90)Sr, reasonably in line with previous

  15. Uptake of cesium-137 and strontium-90 from contaminated soil by three plant species; application to phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Mark; Lasat, Mitch M; Ebbs, Stephen D; Kochian, Leon V; Cornish, Jay

    2002-01-01

    A field test was conducted to determine the ability of three plant species to extract 137Cs and 90Sr from contaminated soil. Redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.], and tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) were planted in a series of spatially randomized cells in soil that was contaminated in the 1950s and 1960s. We examined the potential for phytoextraction of 90Sr and 137Cs by these three species. Concentration ratios (CR) for 137Cs for redroot pigweed, Indian mustard, and tepary bean were 2.58, 0.46, and 0.17, respectively. For 90Sr they were substantially higher: 6.5, 8.2, and 15.2, respectively. The greatest accumulation of both radionuclides was obtained with redroot pigweed, even though its CR for 90Sr was the lowest, because of its relatively large biomass. There was a linear relationship between the 137Cs concentration in plants and its concentration in soil only for redroot pigweed. Uptake of 90Sr exhibits no relationship to 90Sr concentrations in the soil. Estimates of time required for removal of 50% of the two contaminants, assuming two crops of redroot pigweed per year, are 7 yr for 90Sr and 18 yr for 137Cs.

  16. Imaging of radiocesium uptake dynamics in a plant body by using a newly developed high-resolution gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Naoki; Yin, Yong-Gen; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Watabe, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujimaki, Shu

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new gamma camera specifically for plant nutritional research and successfully performed live imaging of the uptake and partitioning of (137)Cs in intact plants. The gamma camera was specially designed for high-energy gamma photons from (137)Cs (662 keV). To obtain reliable images, a pinhole collimator made of tungsten heavy alloy was used to reduce penetration and scattering of gamma photons. A single-crystal scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12, with high sensitivity, no natural radioactivity, and no hygroscopicity was used. The array block of the scintillator was coupled to a high-quantum efficiency position sensitive photomultiplier tube to obtain accurate images. The completed gamma camera had a sensitivity of 0.83 count s(-1) MBq(-1) for (137)Cs with an energy window from 600 keV to 730 keV, and a spatial resolution of 23.5 mm. We used this gamma camera to study soybean plants that were hydroponically grown and fed with 2.0 MBq of (137)Cs for 6 days to visualize and investigate the transport dynamics in aerial plant parts. (137)Cs gradually appeared in the shoot several hours after feeding, and then accumulated preferentially and intensively in growing pods and seeds; very little accumulation was observed in mature leaves. Our results also suggested that this gamma-camera method may serve as a practical analyzing tool for breeding crops and improving cultivation techniques resulting in low accumulation of radiocesium into the consumable parts of plants.

  17. Uptake of three antibiotics and an anti-epileptic drug by wheat plants spray irrigated with wastewater treatment plant effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With rising demands on water supplies necessitating water reuse, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent is often used to irrigate agricultural lands. Emerging contaminants, like pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), are frequently found in effluent due to limited removal during WWT...

  18. Transfers of iodine in the soil-plant-air system: Solid-liquid partitioning, migration, plant uptake adn volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human exposure to soil iodine depends upon the partitioning of the iodine into the, mobile, liquid and gaseous soil phases. From the liquid phase, iodine can be transported into surface- and ground-waters, plant roots, and, consequently, into the human diet. From the gaseous phase, iodine can be tra...

  19. Getting to the root of plant iron uptake and cell-cell transport: Polarity matters!

    PubMed

    Dubeaux, Guillaume; Zelazny, Enric; Vert, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins play pivotal roles in mediating responses to endogenous and environmental cues. Regulation of membrane protein levels and establishment of polarity are fundamental for many cellular processes. In plants, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) is the major root iron transporter but is also responsible for the absorption of other divalent metals such as manganese, zinc and cobalt. We recently uncovered that IRT1 is polarly localized to the outer plasma membrane domain of plant root epidermal cells upon depletion of its secondary metal substrates. The endosome-recruited FYVE1 protein interacts with IRT1 in the endocytic pathway and plays a crucial role in the establishment of IRT1 polarity, likely through its recycling to the cell surface. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of radial transport of nutrients across the different cell types of plant roots toward the vascular tissues and raises interesting parallel with iron transport in mammals.

  20. Functional components of the bacterial CzcCBA efflux system reduce cadmium uptake and accumulation in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nesler, Andrea; DalCorso, Giovanni; Fasani, Elisa; Manara, Anna; Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Argese, Emanuele; Furini, Antonella

    2017-03-25

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic trace element released into the environment by industrial and agricultural practices, threatening the health of plants and contaminating the food/feed chain. Biotechnology can be used to develop plant varieties with a higher capacity for Cd accumulation (for use in phytoremediation programs) or a lower capacity for Cd accumulation (to reduce Cd levels in food and feed). Here we generated transgenic tobacco plants expressing components of the Pseudomonas putida CzcCBA efflux system. Plants were transformed with combinations of the CzcC, CzcB and CzcA genes, and the impact on Cd mobilization was analysed. Plants expressing PpCzcC showed no differences in Cd accumulation, whereas those expressing PpCzcB or PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots, but more Cd in the roots. Plants expressing both PpCzcB and PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots and roots compared to controls, whereas plants expressing all three genes showed a significant reduction in Cd levels only in shoots. These results show that components of the CzcCBA system can be expressed in plants and may be useful for developing plants with a reduced capacity to accumulate Cd in the shoots, potentially reducing the toxicity of food/feed crops cultivated in Cd-contaminated soils.

  1. Potassium uptake supporting plant growth in the absence of AKT1 channel activity: Inhibition by ammonium and stimulation by sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Hirsch, R. E.; Lewis, D. R.; Qi, Z.; Sussman, M. R.; Lewis, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    A transferred-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks AKT1 inward-rectifying K+ channel activity in root cells was obtained previously by a reverse-genetic strategy, enabling a dissection of the K+-uptake apparatus of the root into AKT1 and non-AKT1 components. Membrane potential measurements in root cells demonstrated that the AKT1 component of the wild-type K+ permeability was between 55 and 63% when external [K+] was between 10 and 1,000 microM, and NH4+ was absent. NH4+ specifically inhibited the non-AKT1 component, apparently by competing for K+ binding sites on the transporter(s). This inhibition by NH4+ had significant consequences for akt1 plants: K+ permeability, 86Rb+ fluxes into roots, seed germination, and seedling growth rate of the mutant were each similarly inhibited by NH4+. Wild-type plants were much more resistant to NH4+. Thus, AKT1 channels conduct the K+ influx necessary for the growth of Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings in conditions that block the non-AKT1 mechanism. In contrast to the effects of NH4+, Na+ and H+ significantly stimulated the non-AKT1 portion of the K+ permeability. Stimulation of akt1 growth rate by Na+, a predicted consequence of the previous result, was observed when external [K+] was 10 microM. Collectively, these results indicate that the AKT1 channel is an important component of the K+ uptake apparatus supporting growth, even in the "high-affinity" range of K+ concentrations. In the absence of AKT1 channel activity, an NH4+-sensitive, Na+/H+-stimulated mechanism can suffice.

  2. Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Grain Protein Concentration Is Related to Early Post-Flowering Nitrate Uptake under Putative Control of Plant Satiety Level

    PubMed Central

    Taulemesse, François; Le Gouis, Jacques; Gouache, David; Gibon, Yves; Allard, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The strong negative correlation between grain protein concentration (GPC) and grain yield (GY) in bread wheat complicates the simultaneous improvement of these traits. However, earlier studies have concluded that the deviation from this relationship (grain protein deviation or GPD) has strong genetic basis. Genotypes with positive GPD have an increased ability to uptake nitrogen (N) during the post-flowering period independently of the amount of N taken up before flowering, suggesting that genetic variability for N satiety could enable the breakage of the negative relationship. This study is based on two genotypes markedly contrasted for GPD grown under semi-hydroponic conditions differentiated for nitrate availability both before and after flowering. This allows exploration of the genetic determinants of post-flowering N uptake (PANU) by combining whole plant sampling and targeted gene expression approaches. The results highlights the correlation (r² = 0.81) with GPC of PANU occurring early during grain development (flowering–flowering + 250 degree-days) independently of GY. Early PANU was in turn correlated (r² = 0.80) to the stem-biomass increment after flowering through its effect on N sink activity. Differences in early PANU between genotypes, despite comparable N statuses at flowering, suggest that genetic differences in N satiety could be involved in the establishment of the GPC. Through its strong negative correlation with genes implied in N assimilation, root nitrate concentration appears to be a good marker for evaluating instantaneous plant N demand, and may provide valuable information on the genotypic N satiety level. This trait may help breeders to identify genotypes having high GPC independently of their GY. PMID:26886933

  3. Boron distribution and the effect of lime on boron uptake by pansy, petunia, and gerbera plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reports of boron (B) deficiency have become more prevalent in pansy (Viola ×wittrockiana), petunia (Petunia ×hybrida), and gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii) plug production. When symptoms are observed in production the presence and severity of symptoms have no pattern, symptomatic plants can be located a...

  4. DIFFERENTIATION IN N15 UPTAKE AND THE ORGANIZATION OF AN ARCTIC TUNDRA PLANT COMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used N15 soil-labeling techniques to examine how the dominant species in a N-limited, tussock tundra plant community partitioned soil N, and how such partitioning may contribute to community organization. The five most abundant species were well differentiated with respect to...

  5. Phytochelatin synthesis in response to Hg uptake in aquatic plants near a chlor-alkali factory.

    PubMed

    Turull, Marta; Grmanova, Gabriela; Dago, Àngela; Ariño, Cristina; Díez, Sergi; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2017-06-01

    The effects of mercury (Hg) released from a chlor-alkali factory in aquatic plants along the Ebro River basin (NE Spain) were analysed considering the phytochelatins (PCn) and their isoforms content in these plants. These compounds were analyzed using HPLC with amperometric detection, and the macrophytes species Ceratophyllum demersum and Myriopyllum spicatum were collected in two sampling campaigns, autumn and spring, respectively. To correlate the PCn content in macrophytes with the Hg contamination, analysis of total Hg (THg) content in plants and suspended particulate matter, as well as the dissolved-bioavailable fraction of Hg in water measured by the diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) technique were done. The results confirm the presence of PC2-Ala in extracts of C. demersum and PC2-desGly in M. spicatum, and the concentration of these thiol compounds depends clearly on the distance between the hot spot and the downstream sites: the higher the levels are, the closer the hot spot is. Since most of the Hg is hypothesized to be associated with SPM and transported downstream, our results of the DGT suggest that trace amounts of Hg in water can be released as free metal ions yielding a certain accumulation in plants (reaching the ppb level) that are enough for activation of induction of PCs. A few PCs species have been determined, at different seasons, indicating that they can be used as good indicators of the presence of bioavailable Hg in aquatic media throughout the year.

  6. Influences of nitrogen uptake and partitioning on growth and composition of oat (Avena sativa L. ) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.M. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate utilization of N by oat plants when grown at different planting densities and N nutrition regimes. The latter included various N concentrations in the nutrient solution, and a treatment in which tagged N ({sup 15}N) was included in order to separate plant N taken up prior to and after anthesis. The relative grain N accumulation rate (RAR), 1/x {times} dx/dt, where x is the seed N content and t is time, was more closely related to the N taken up before than after anthesis. This relationship was also true for Mg, and to a lesser degree for P. In contrast, there was a relatively greater effect of N absorbed after anthesis on partitioning of N in grain protein, with the albumin-globulin being less responsive to nutrient solution N concentrations than the prolamin-glutelin fraction. The concentrations of N, Mg, P, and the protein fractions were generally highest at an intermediate solution N concentration. Protein in grain from plants grown at higher solution N concentrations contained higher proportions of amino acids with lower energy requirements for synthesis.

  7. Comparison of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal effects on the heavy metal uptake of a host and a non-host plant species in contact with extraradical mycelial network.

    PubMed

    Mnasri, Mejda; Janoušková, Martina; Rydlová, Jana; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2017-03-01

    The effects of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on Cd and Ni tolerance and uptake in Medicago sativa, an AM host, and Sesuvium portulacastrum, a non-host plant, were investigated in a greenhouse experiment. The plants were cultivated in sterilized sand in a two-compartmented system, which prevented root competition but enabled colonization of the whole substrate by AM fungal extraradical mycelium. M. sativa was either left non-inoculated or inoculated with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, and both plants were either cultivated without heavy metal (HM) addition or supplied with cadmium (Cd) or nickel (Ni), each in two doses. Additional pots with singly cultivated plants were established to control for the effect of the co-cultivation. AM significantly enhanced the growth of M. sativa and substantially increased its uptake of both HMs. The roots of S. portulacastrum became colonized by AM fungal hyphae and vesicles. The presence of the AM fungus in the cultivation system tended to increase the HM uptake of S. portulacastrum, but the effect was less consistent and pronounced than that in M. sativa. We conclude that AM fungal mycelium radiating from M. sativa did not negatively affect the growth and HM uptake of S. portulacastrum. On the contrary, we hypothesize that it stimulated the absorption and translocation of Cd and Ni in the non-host species. Thus, our results suggest that AM fungal mycelium radiating from mycorrhizal plants does not decrease the HM uptake of non-host plants, many of which are considered promising candidate plants for phytoremediation.

  8. Exogenous abscisic acid application decreases cadmium accumulation in Arabidopsis plants, which is associated with the inhibition of IRT1-mediated cadmium uptake.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shi Kai; Fang, Xian Zhi; Guan, Mei Yan; Ye, Yi Quan; Lin, Xian Yong; Du, Shao Ting; Jin, Chong Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination of agricultural soils is an increasingly serious problem. Measures need to be developed to minimize Cd entering the human food chain from contaminated soils. We report here that, under Cd exposure condition, application with low doses of (0.1-0.5 μM) abscisic acid (ABA) clearly inhibited Cd uptake by roots and decreased Cd level in Arabidopsis wild-type plants (Col-0). Expression of IRT1 in roots was also strongly inhibited by ABA treatment. Decrease in Cd uptake and the inhibition of IRT1 expression were clearly lesser pronounced in an ABA-insensitive double mutant snrk2.2/2.3 than in the Col-0 in response to ABA application. The ABA-decreased Cd uptake was found to correlate with the ABA-inhibited IRT1 expression in the roots of Col-0 plants fed two different levels of iron. Furthermore, the Cd uptake of irt1 mutants was barely affected by ABA application. These results indicated that inhibition of IRT1 expression is involved in the decrease of Cd uptake in response to exogenous ABA application. Interestingly, ABA application increased the iron level in both Col-0 plants and irt1 mutants, suggesting that ABA-increased Fe acquisition does not depend on the IRT1 function, but on the contrary, the ABA-mediated inhibition of IRT1 expression may be due to the elevation of iron level in plants. From our results, we concluded that ABA application might increase iron acquisition, followed by the decrease in Cd uptake by inhibition of IRT1 activity. Thus, for crop production in Cd contaminated soils, developing techniques based on ABA application potentially is a promising approach for reducing Cd accumulation in edible organs in plants.

  9. Assessment of effects of the rising atmospheric nitrogen deposition on nitrogen uptake and long-term water-use efficiency of plants using nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Yao, F Y; Wang, G A; Liu, X J; Song, L

    2011-07-15

    This study assesses the effects of the atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on the N uptake and the long-term water-use efficiency of two C(3) plants (Agropyron cristatum and Leymus chinensis) and two C(4) plants (Amaranthus retroflexus and Setaria viridis) using N and C stable isotopes. In addition, this study explores the potential correlation between leaf N isotope (δ(15)N) values and leaf C isotope (δ(13)C) values. This experiment shows that the atmospheric N deposition has significant effects on the N uptake, δ(15)N and leaf N content (N(m)) of C(3) plants. As the atmospheric N deposition rises, the proportion and the amount of N absorbed from the simulated atmospheric deposition become higher, and the δ(15)N and N(m) of the two C(3) plants both also increase, suggesting that the rising atmospheric N deposition is beneficial for C(3) plants. However, C(4) plants display different patterns in their N uptake and in their variations of δ(15)N and N(m) from those of C(3) plants. C(4) plants absorb less N from the atmospheric deposition, and the leaf N(m) does not change with the elevated atmospheric N deposition. Photosynthetic pathways may account for the differences between C(3) and C(4) plants. This study also shows that atmospheric N deposition does not play a role in determining the δ(13)C and in the long-term water-use efficiency of C(3) and C(4) plants, suggesting that the long-term water-use pattern of the plants does not change with the atmospheric N input. In addition, this study does not observe any relationship between leaf δ(15)N and leaf δ(13)C in both C(3) and C(4) plants.

  10. Metal uptake by native plants and revegetation potential of mining sulfide-rich waste-dumps.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Patrícia; Valente, Teresa; Pamplona, Jorge; Braga, Maria Amália Sequeira; Pissarra, José; Gil, José António Grande; de la Torre, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Waste dumps resulting from metal exploitation create serious environmental damage, providing soil and water degradation over long distances. Phytostabilization can be used to remediate these mining sites. The present study aims to evaluate the behavior of selected plant species (Erica arborea, Ulex europaeus, Agrostis delicatula, and Cytisus multiflorus) that grow spontaneously in three sulfide-rich waste-dumps (Lapa Grande, Cerdeirinha, and Penedono, Portugal). These sites represent different geological, climatic and floristic settings. The results indicate distinctive levels and types of metal contamination: Penedono presents highest sulfate and metal contents, especially As, with low levels of Fe. In contrast, at Lapa Grande and Cerdeirinha Fe, Mn, and Zn are the dominant metals. In accordance, each waste dump develops a typical plant community, providing a specific vegetation inventory. At Penedono, Agrostis delicatula accumulates As, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn, showing higher bioaccumulation factors (BF) for Mn (32.1) and As (24.4). At Cerdeirinha, Ulex europaeus has the highest BF for Pb (984), while at Lapa Grande, Erica arborea presents high BF for Mn (9.8) and Pb (8.1). Regarding TF, low values were obtained for most of the metals, especially As (TF < 1). Therefore, the results obtained from representative plant species suggest appropriate behavior for phytostabilization measures.

  11. Regulation of plants' phosphate uptake in common mycorrhizal networks: Role of intraradical fungal phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Walder, Florian; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently identified two genes coding for inorganic phosphate transporters (Pht) in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and flax (Linum usitatissimum) that were induced in roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Mycorrhizal acquisition of inorganic phosphorus (Pi) was strongly affected by the combination of plant and AM fungal species, but the expression level of these genes coding for AM-inducible Pi transporters did not explain differences in plant phosphorus acquisition where flax and sorghum are sharing a common mycorrhizal network. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of fungal Pi transporters in the regulation of mycorrhizal Pi acquisition by measuring their expression in roots of flax and sorghum. One Pi transporter of Rhizophagus irregularis (RiPT5) showed a positive correlation with mycorrhizal Pi acquisition of sorghum. This indicates that a possible involvement in the regulation of mycorrhizal Pi acquisition. In general, expression of AMF Pi transporters was more related to mycorrhizal Pi acquisition of sorghum than of flax, indicating plant species-specific differences in the regulation of mycorrhizal Pi acquisition. PMID:26751110

  12. Tundra plant uptake of amino acid and NH{sub 4}{sup +} nitrogen in situ: Plants compete well for amino acid N{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect

    Schimel, J.P.; Chapin, F.S. III

    1996-10-01

    Traditional models of nutrient cycling assume that soil microorganisms must decompose organic matter, releasing inorganic N, to make N available to plants. Several lines of evidence have raised doubts about this assumption in arctic tundra, but no firm evidence existed. Here we demonstrate that Eriophorum vaginatum and Carex aquatilis, two tundra sedges, compete well for glycine and asparate N relative to NH{sub 4}{sup +} in situ. At relatively high concentrations (25 {mu}g N/g soil), during the peak of the season, E. vaginatum took up amino acid N more rapidly than NH{sub 4}{sup +}, while later in the season and at lower concentrations (2-4 {mu}g N/g soil) both E. vaginatum and C. aqualtilis took up glycine N and NH{sub 4}{sup +} at similar rates. These results are incompatible with a simple mechanism of amino acid mineralization followed by plant uptake of the released N. These results indicate that these tundra plants have active mechanisms for enhancing their access to amino acid N in situ. 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Rehabilitation materials from surface- coal mines in western U.S.A. III. Relations between elements in mine soil and uptake by plants.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1984-01-01

    Plant uptake of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn from mine soils was assessed using alfalfa Medicago sativa, sainfoin Onobrychis viciaefolia, smooth brome Bromus inermis, crested wheatgrass Agropyron cristatum, slender wheatgrass A. trachycaulum and intermediate wheatgrass A. intermedium; mine soil (cover-soil and spoil material) samples were collected from rehabilitated areas of 11 western US surface-coal mines in North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado. Correlations between metals in plants and DTPA-extractable metals from mine soils were generally not statistically significant and showed no consistent patterns for a single metal or for a single plant species. Metal uptake by plants, relative to amounts in DTPA extracts of mine soil, was positively related to mine soil organic matter content or negatively related to mine soil pH. DTPA-extractable metal levels were significantly correlated with mine soil pH and organic-matter content.-from Authors

  14. An updated model for nitrate uptake modelling in plants. II. Assessment of active root involvement in nitrate uptake based on integrated root system age: measured versus modelled outputs

    PubMed Central

    Malagoli, Philippe; Le Deunff, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims An updated version of a mechanistic structural–functional model was developed to predict nitrogen (N) uptake throughout the growth cycle by a crop of winter oilseed rape, Brassica napus, grown under field conditions. Methods The functional component of the model derives from a revisited conceptual framework that combines the thermodynamic Flow–Force interpretation of nitrate uptake isotherms and environmental and in planta effects on nitrate influx. Estimation of the root biomass (structural component) is based upon a combination of root mapping along the soil depth profile in the field and a relationship between the specific root length and external nitrate concentration. The root biomass contributing actively to N uptake was determined by introduction of an integrated root system age that allows assignment of a root absorption capacity at a specific age of the root. Key Results Simulations were well matched to measured data of N taken up under field conditions for three levels of N fertilization. The model outputs indicated that the two topsoil layers (0–30 and 30–60 cm) contained 75–88 % of the total root length and biomass, and accounted for 90–95 % of N taken up at harvest. Conclusions This conceptual framework provides a model of nitrate uptake that is able to respond to external nitrate fluctuations at both functional and structural levels. PMID:24709791

  15. Plant-driven removal of heavy metals from soil: uptake, translocation, tolerance mechanism, challenges, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Sveta; Singh, Lakhveer; Wahid, Zularisam Ab; Siddiqui, Muhammad Faisal; Atnaw, Samson Mekbib; Din, Mohd Fadhil Md

    2016-04-01

    Increasing heavy metal (HM) concentrations in the soil have become a significant problem in the modern industrialized world due to several anthropogenic activities. Heavy metals (HMs) are non-biodegradable and have long biological half lives; thus, once entered in food chain, their concentrations keep on increasing through biomagnification. The increased concentrations of heavy metals ultimately pose threat on human life also. The one captivating solution for this problem is to use green plants for HM removal from soil and render it harmless and reusable. Although this green technology called phytoremediation has many advantages over conventional methods of HM removal from soils, there are also many challenges that need to be addressed before making this technique practically feasible and useful on a large scale. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of HM uptake, transport, and plant tolerance mechanisms to cope with increased HM concentrations. This review article also comprehensively discusses the advantages, major challenges, and future perspectives of phytoremediation of heavy metals from the soil.

  16. Accumulation of cadmium, zinc, and copper by Helianthus annuus L.: impact on plant growth and uptake of nutritional elements.

    PubMed

    Rivelli, Anna Rita; De Maria, Susanna; Puschenreiter, Markus; Gherbin, Piergiorgio

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the effects on physiological response, trace elements and nutrients accumulation of sunflower plants grown in soil contaminated with: 5 mg kg(-1) of Cd; 5 and 300 mg kg(-1) of Cd and Zn, respectively; 5, 300, and 400 mg kg(-1) of Cd, Zn, and Cu, respectively. Contaminants applied did not produce large effects on growth, except in Cd-Zn-Cu treatment in which leaf area and total dry matter were reduced, by 15%. The contamination with Cd alone did not affect neither growth nor physiological parameters, despite considerable amounts of Cd accumulated in roots and older leaves, with a high bioconcentration factor from soil to plant. By adding Zn and then Cu to Cd in soil, significant were the toxic effects on chlorophyll content and water relations due to greater accumulation of trace elements in tissues, with imbalances in nutrients uptake. Highly significant was the interaction between shoot elements concentration (Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mg, K, Ca) and treatments. Heavy metals concentrations in roots always exceeded those in stem and leaves, with a lower translocation from roots to shoots, suggesting a strategy of sunflower to compartmentalise the potentially toxic elements in physiologically less active parts in order to preserve younger tissues.

  17. Depletion of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury by plant uptake at Mt. Changbai, Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewu; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Sommar, Jonas; Yu, Ben; Yang, Xu; Wang, Xun; Lin, Che-Jen; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-10-01

    There exists observational evidence that gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) can be readily removed from the atmosphere via chemical oxidation followed by deposition in the polar and sub-polar regions, free troposphere, lower stratosphere, and marine boundary layer under specific environmental conditions. Here we report GEM depletions in a temperate mixed forest at Mt. Changbai, Northeast China. The strong depletions occurred predominantly at night during the leaf-growing season and in the absence of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) enrichment (GOM < 3 pg m-3). Vertical gradients of decreasing GEM concentrations from layers above to under forest canopy suggest in situ loss of GEM to forest canopy at Mt. Changbai. Foliar GEM flux measurements showed that the foliage of two predominant tree species is a net sink of GEM at night, with a mean flux of -1.8 ± 0.3 ng m2 h-1 over Fraxinus mandshurica (deciduous tree species) and -0.1 ± 0.2 ng m2 h-1 over Pinus Koraiensis (evergreen tree species). Daily integrated GEM δ202Hg, Δ199Hg, and Δ200Hg at Mt. Changbai during 8-18 July 2013 ranged from -0.34 to 0.91 ‰, from -0.11 to -0.04 ‰ and from -0.06 to 0.01 ‰, respectively. A large positive shift in GEM δ202Hg occurred during the strong GEM depletion events, whereas Δ199Hg and Δ200Hg remained essentially unchanged. The observational findings and box model results show that uptake of GEM by forest canopy plays a predominant role in the GEM depletion at Mt. Changbai forest. Such depletion events of GEM are likely to be a widespread phenomenon, suggesting that the forest ecosystem represents one of the largest sinks ( ˜ 1930 Mg) of atmospheric Hg on a global scale.

  18. Impacts of C-uptake by plants on the spatial distribution of (14)C accumulated in vegetation around a nuclear facility-Application of a sophisticated land surface (14)C model to the Rokkasho reprocessing plant, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masakazu; Katata, Genki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The impacts of carbon uptake by plants on the spatial distribution of radiocarbon ((14)C) accumulated in vegetation around a nuclear facility were investigated by numerical simulations using a sophisticated land surface (14)C model (SOLVEG-II). In the simulation, SOLVEG-II was combined with a mesoscale meteorological model and an atmospheric dispersion model. The model combination was applied to simulate the transfer of (14)CO2 and to assess the radiological impact of (14)C accumulation in rice grains during test operations of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP), Japan, in 2007. The calculated (14)C-specific activities in rice grains agreed with the observed activities in paddy fields around the RRP within a factor of four. The annual effective dose delivered from (14)C in the rice grain was estimated to be less than 0.7 μSv, only 0.07% of the annual effective dose limit of 1 mSv for the public. Numerical experiments of hypothetical continuous atmospheric (14)CO2 release from the RRP showed that the (14)C-specific activities of rice plants at harvest differed from the annual mean activities in the air. The difference was attributed to seasonal variations in the atmospheric (14)CO2 concentration and the growth of the rice plant. Accumulation of (14)C in the rice plant significantly increased when (14)CO2 releases were limited during daytime hours, compared with the results observed during the nighttime. These results indicated that plant growth stages and diurnal photosynthesis should be considered in predictions of the ingestion dose of (14)C for long-term chronic releases and short-term diurnal releases of (14)CO2, respectively.

  19. Cadmium and nickel uptake are differentially modulated by salicylic acid in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    PubMed

    Kovácik, Jozef; Grúz, Jirí; Hedbavny, Josef; Klejdus, Borivoj; Strnad, Miroslav

    2009-10-28

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) is a widely used medicinal plant which also accumulates heavy metals in its above-ground organs. We investigated the effect of the important plant signaling molecule, salicylic acid (SA), on the accumulation of Ni or Cd, by exposing plants over 7 days to 60 microM solutions of individual heavy metals with or without 50 microM SA. Special emphasis was focused on phenolic metabolism-related parameters, not only because of their importance for growth and stress tolerance but also because phenolics are potent antioxidants in human diet. In combined treatments, SA stimulated an increase in soluble proteins of roots and reduced their water content. SA reduced total Cd in the shoot and increased Ni. Total and "intraroot" Ni decreased in Ni + SA treatment, while in the case of Cd, only "intraroot" content decreased in Cd + SA treatment, being correlated with cell wall-bound phenolic acids and lignin. SA was strongly accumulated in roots from the Ni + SA treatment, being correlated with an increase in hydrogen peroxide. In both Cd + SA and Ni + SA treatments, SA enhanced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity and accumulation of total soluble phenols, particularly in the roots. Here, we report for the first time that soluble phenols may be involved in Cd shoot-to-root translocation. In the case of Ni, it seems that phenols serve as a root barrier in order to prevent Ni from reaching the above-ground organs. The effects of SA on phenolic metabolism, and the signaling role of ROS in the accumulation of phenols, are discussed.

  20. Metal uptake by agricultural plant species grown in sludge-amended soil following ecosystem restoration practices

    SciTech Connect

    Peles, J.D.; Barrett, G.W.; Brewer, S.R.

    1996-12-01

    The disposal of municipal sewage sludge is an important environmental problem presently facing society. Because sludge is rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, land application as a fertilizer has been proposed as a cost-effective means of disposal. This method of disposal, however, is frequently the subject of public health concern since municipal sludge may contain heavy metals that potentially could be introduced into the human food chain. This study examined metal concentrations in two agricultural species at a study site where ecosystem restoration practices (liming and tilling) had been conducted for 5 years following 11 years of sludge enrichment. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Emissions Scavenging by Fog, Dew, and Foliage: Foliage Uptake and Consequences for Plants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-30

    AUTHORITY 3- DISTRIBUTION /IAVAILABILITY OF REPORT 2b. DECLASSIFICATON /DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE d t~~ . .n.i~td 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATiON REPORT NUMBER(S) S...ions into whole-plant leachates was observed E3UICLASIFEDAJLIMTEO0SAM ASRPT 3DIC SE- F20. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURI...CLASSIFICATION Za. NAMEOF RESPOffSBlu INDI IDUAL. 22b. TELEPHONE (Incude Area Code) I22c. OFFICE SYMBOL 0O FORW 473. 84 MAR 5 OR edition may be used

  2. Soil Sorption and Plant Uptake of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    growth , Each soil batch received 50 ug N an (NH4 ) 2 SO4 , 25 ug P as Na•l 2 PO4 , and 25 ug K as K11 per gram of soil, This corresponds to a rate of 56 kg...King 1974; Won, DiSalvo, and Ng 1976), inhibitory to plant growth (Laklings and Gan 1981; Palazzo at al. 1985; Schott and Worthly 1974), and, in some...may be magnified, Toxicity of TNT wastes to duckweed (Lemna • •r2usiAl) has been demonstrated by Schott and Worthley (1974), and depression of yields

  3. Plant steroid hormones produced under Ni stress are involved in the regulation of metal uptake and oxidative stress in Brassica juncea L.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Mukesh Kumar; Bhardwaj, Renu; Arora, Priya; Chowdhary, Sikandar Pal; Sharma, Priyanka; Kumar, Subodh

    2012-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are involved in the amelioration of various biotic and abiotic stresses. With an aim to explore the role of BRs under heavy metal stress, plants of Brassica juncea L. were grown in pots. The plants were subjected to various concentrations of Nickel metal (0.0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mM) and harvested on 60th day in order to observe the expression of these hormones. The isolated BRs from the leaves of Brassica plants characterized by GC-MS include 24-Epibrassinolide (24-EBL), Castasterone, Dolicholide and Typhasterole. The effect of isolated 24-EBL was studied on Ni metal uptake and antioxidative defense system in 60 d old plants of Brassica. It was observed that 24-EBL significantly increased the activities of stress ameliorating enzymes and lowered the metal uptake in plants. This is the first report in B. juncea L. plants showing the expression of BRs under metal treatments and effect of the isolated 24-EBL on metal uptake and in oxidative stress management.

  4. Uptake, degradation and chiral discrimination of N-acyl-D/L-homoserine lactones by barley (Hordeum vulgare) and yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) plants.

    PubMed

    Götz, Christine; Fekete, Agnes; Gebefuegi, Istvan; Forczek, Sándor T; Fuksová, Kvetoslava; Li, Xiaojing; Englmann, Matthias; Gryndler, Milan; Hartmann, Anton; Matucha, Miroslav; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schröder, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial intraspecies and interspecies communication in the rhizosphere is mediated by diffusible signal molecules. Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as autoinducers in the quorum sensing response. While bacterial signalling is well described, the fate of AHLs in contact with plants is much less known. Thus, adsorption, uptake and translocation of N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) were studied in axenic systems with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the legume yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) as model plants using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tritium-labelled AHLs. Decreases in AHL concentration due to abiotic adsorption or degradation were tolerable under the experimental conditions. The presence of plants enhanced AHL decline in media depending on the compounds' lipophilicity, whereby the legume caused stronger AHL decrease than barley. All tested AHLs were traceable in root extracts of both plants. While all AHLs except C10-HSL were detectable in barley shoots, only C6-HSL was found in shoots of yam bean. Furthermore, tritium-labelled AHLs were used to determine short-term uptake kinetics. Chiral separation by GC-MS revealed that both plants discriminated D-AHL stereoisomers to different extents. These results indicate substantial differences in uptake and degradation of different AHLs in the plants tested.

  5. Effect of aluminium uptake on physiology, phenols and amino acids in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    PubMed

    Kovácik, Jozef; Klejdus, Borivoj; Hedbavny, Josef

    2010-06-15

    Chamomile is a widely used medicinal plant and, as observed in our previous studies, also accumulates some metals in its above-ground biomass. We therefore tested selected metabolic responses after treatments with 60 and 120 microM Al for 7 days. Shoot Al content was not elevated in comparison with control (12.3-14.1 microg g(-1) DW) while total root Al increased strongly, reaching 2680 and 4400 microg g(-1) DW in 60 and 120 microM treatments, respectively. "Intra-root" Al represented 83.6 (60 microM treatment) and 75.8% (120 microM treatment) of total root Al. Soluble proteins were not significantly affected. Free amino acids were almost unaffected in shoots while in roots the highest content was found in 60 microM Al. Ascorbate- and guaiacol-peroxidase activities were the highest in 60 microM Al-exposed roots. On the other hand, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity, total soluble phenols, flavonoids, a sum of 13 phenolic acids and partially two flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) increased in the shoots. Present study has shown lower Al toxicity and unaltered shoot Al content seems to be the most positive outcome in comparison with previously tested metals (Cd, Ni and Cu). Our results indicate that phenols in shoots and free amino acids in roots are influenced by Al excess in chamomile plants. Possible mechanisms in the context of available literature are suggested and discussed.

  6. Bidirectional cross-kingdom RNAi and fungal uptake of external RNAs confer plant protection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Weiberg, Arne; Lin, Feng-Mao; Thomma, Bart; Huang, Hsien-Da; Jin, Hailing

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive fungal pathogens such as Botrytis and Verticillium spp. cause severe crop losses worldwide. We recently discovered that Botrytis cinerea delivers small RNAs (Bc-sRNAs) into plant cells to silence host immunity genes. Such sRNA effectors are mostly produced by B. cinerea Dicer-like protein 1 (Bc-DCL1) and Bc-DCL2. Here we show that expressing sRNAs that target Bc-DCL1 and Bc-DCL2 in Arabidopsis and tomato silences Bc-DCL genes and attenuates fungal pathogenicity and growth, exemplifying bidirectional cross-kingdom RNAi and sRNA trafficking between plants and fungi. This strategy can be adapted to simultaneously control multiple fungal diseases. We also show that Botrytis can take up external sRNAs and double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). Applying sRNAs or dsRNAs that target Botrytis DCL1 and DCL2 genes on the surface of fruits, vegetables, and flowers significantly inhibits gray mold disease. Such pathogen gene-targeting RNAs represent a new generation of environmentally-friendly fungicides. PMID:27643635

  7. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Munier-Lamy, C; Deneux-Mustin, S; Mustin, C; Merlet, D; Berthelin, J; Leyval, C

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil.

  8. Visual Comparative Omics of Fungi for Plant Biomass Deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Shingo; Navarro, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lipzen, Anna; Riley, Robert; Chevret, Didier; Grisel, Sacha; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    Wood-decay fungi contain the cellular mechanisms to decompose such plant cell wall components as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. A multi-omics approach to the comparative analysis of wood-decay fungi gives not only new insights into their strategies for decomposing recalcitrant plant biomass, but also an understanding of how to exploit these mechanisms for biotechnological applications. We have developed an analytical workflow, Applied Biomass Conversion Design for Efficient Fungal Green Technology (ABCDEFGT), to simplify the analysis and interpretation of transcriptomic and secretomic data. ABCDEFGT utilizes self-organizing maps for grouping genes with similar transcription patterns, and an overlay with secreted proteins. The key feature of ABCDEFGT is simple graphic outputs of genome-wide transcriptomic and secretomic topographies, which enables visual inspection without a priori of the omics data and facilitates discoveries of co-regulated genes and proteins. Genome-wide omics landscapes were built with the newly sequenced fungal species Pycnoporus coccineus, Pycnoporus sanguineus, and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus grown on various carbon sources. Integration of the post-genomic data revealed a global overlap, confirming the pertinence of the genome-wide approach. ABCDEFGT was evaluated by comparison with the latest clustering method for ease of output interpretation, and ABCDEFGT gave a better biological representation of fungal behaviors. The genome-wide multi-omics strategy allowed us to determine the potential synergy of particular enzymes decomposing cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin such as Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases, modular enzymes associated with a cellulose binding module1, and Class II Peroxidase isoforms co-regulated with oxido-reductases. Overall, ABCDEFGT was capable of visualizing genome-wide transcriptional and secretomic profiles for intuitive interpretations and is suitable for exploration of newly-sequenced organisms. PMID:27605927

  9. Remobilization and uptake of N by newly planted apple (Malus domestica) trees in response to irrigation method and timing of N application.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, D; Millard, P; Herbert, L C; Neilsen, G H; Hogue, E J; Parchomchuk, P; Zebarth, B J

    2001-05-01

    Environmentally sound management of N in apple orchards requires that N supply meets demand. In 1997, newly planted apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. var. Golden Delicious on M.9 rootstock) received daily applications of N for six weeks as Ca(15NO3)(2) through a drip irrigation system at a concentration of 112 mg l(-1) at 2-8, 5-11 or 8-14 weeks after planting. Irrigation water was applied either to meet estimated evaporative demand or at a fixed rate. In 1997, trees were harvested at 5, 8, 11 and 14 weeks after planting; and in 1998 at 3 weeks after full bloom. The amount of fertilizer N recovered was similar in trees in both irrigation treatments, but efficiency of fertilizer use was greater for trees receiving demand-controlled irrigation than fixed-rate irrigation. This was attributed to lower N inputs, greater retention time in the root zone and less N leaching in the demand-controlled irrigation treatments compared with fixed-rate irrigation treatments. Less fertilizer N was recovered by trees receiving an early application of N than a later application of N and this was related to the timing of N supply with respect to tree demand. Demand for root-supplied N was low until 11 weeks after planting, because early shoot and root growth was supported by N remobilized from woody tissue, which involved 55% of the total tree N content at planting. Rapid development of roots > 1 mm in diameter occurred between 11 and 14 weeks after planting, after remobilization ended, and was greater for trees receiving an early application of N than for trees receiving a later application of N. Late-season tree N demand was supplied by native soil N, and uptake and background soil solution N concentrations were higher for trees receiving demand-supplied irrigation compared with fixed-rate irrigation. Total annual N uptake by roots was unaffected by treatments and averaged 6-8 g tree(-1). Nitrogen applications in 1997 affected growth and N partitioning in 1998. Trees receiving

  10. A nitrite transporter associated with nitrite uptake by higher plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Miwa; Georgescu, Mihaela N; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2007-07-01

    Chloroplasts take up cytosolic nitrite during nitrate assimilation. In this study we identified a nitrite transporter located in the chloroplasts of higher plants. The transporter, CsNitr1-L, a member of the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family, was detected during light-induced chloroplast development in de-etiolating cucumber seedlings. We detected a CsNitr1-L-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein in the chloroplasts of leaf cells and found that an immunoreactive 51 kDa protein was present in the isolated inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. CsNitr1-L has an isoform, CsNitr1-S, with an identical 484 amino acid core sequence; however, in CsNitr1-S the 120 amino acid N-terminal extension is missing. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing CsNitr1-S absorbed nitrite from an acidic medium at a slower rate than mock-transformed control cells, and accumulated nitrite to only one-sixth the concentration of the control cells, suggesting that CsNitr1-S enhances the efflux of nitrite from the cell. Insertion of T-DNA in a single CsNitr1-L homolog (At1g68570) in Arabidopsis resulted in nitrite accumulation in leaves to more than five times the concentration found in the wild type. These results show that it is possible that both CsNitr1-L and CsNitr1-S encode efflux-type nitrite transporters, but with different subcellular localizations. CsNitr1-L may possibly load cytosolic nitrite into chloroplast stroma in the chloroplast envelope during nitrate assimilation. The presence of genes homologous to CsNitr1-L in the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice indicates that facilitated nitrite transport is of general physiological importance in plant nutrition.

  11. Uptake and translocation of metals in different parts of crop plants irrigated with contaminated water from DEPZ area of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Goni, M A; Ahmad, J U; Halim, M A; Mottalib, M A; Chowdhury, D A

    2014-06-01

    Metal contamination in arable soils and crops grown in and around an industrial area of Bangladesh were measured, and the transfer factor from soils to crops was calculated accordingly. The highest concentration was observed for Fe and the order of metal concentration was Fe > Zn > Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cd in soils. Bioaccumulation and translocation of metals from roots to edible parts of the crop plants were varied for almost all elements studied. Absorption of metals was significantly more in the roots compared to other plant parts. Accumulation of all metals in the edible parts of the plants was compared with the recommended maximum tolerable levels proposed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. Bioconcentration factors values based on dry weights were below one for all metals except Cu in the rice roots and decreased in the order of Cu > Zn > Fe > Pb > Ni > Cd > Cr.

  12. Schools That Make a Difference to Post-Compulsory Uptake of Physical Science Subjects: Some comparative case studies in England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Judith; Lubben, Fred; Hampden-Thompson, Gillian

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the findings of the qualitative component of a combined methods research study that explores a range of individual and school factors that influence the uptake of chemistry and physics in post-compulsory study in England. The first phase involves using the National Pupil Database to provide a sampling frame to identify four matched pairs of high-uptake and low-uptake schools by salient school factors. Case studies of these eight schools indicate that students employ selection strategies related to their career aspirations, their sense of identity and tactics, and their prior experience. The school factors influencing subject choice relate to school management, student support and guidance, and student empowerment. The most notable differences between students in high-uptake and low-uptake schools are that students in high-uptake schools appear to make a proactive choice in relation to career aspirations, rather than a reactive choice on the basis of past experience. Schools with a high uptake offer a diverse science curriculum in the final two years of compulsory study, set higher examination entry requirements for further study and, crucially, provide a range of opportunities for students to interact with the world of work and to gain knowledge and experience of science-related careers.

  13. Comparative kinetics and reciprocal inhibition of nitrate and nitrite uptake in roots of uninduced and induced barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Travis, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate and NO2- transport by roots of 8-day-old uninduced and induced intact barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) seedlings were compared to kinetic patterns, reciprocal inhibition of the transport systems, and the effect of the inhibitor, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Net uptake of NO3- and NO2- was measured by following the depletion of the ions from the uptake solutions. The roots of uninduced seedlings possessed a low concentration, saturable, low Km, possibly a constitutive uptake system, and a linear system for both NO3- and NO2-. The low Km system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and approached saturation between 40 and 100 micromolar, whereas the linear system was detected between 100 and 500 micromolar. In roots of induced seedlings, rates for both NO3- and NO2- uptake followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and approached saturation at about 200 micromolar. In induced roots, two kinetically identifiable transport systems were resolved for each anion. At the lower substrate concentrations, less than 10 micromolar, the apparent low Kms of NO3- and NO2- uptake were 7 and 9 micromolar, respectively, and were similar to those of the low Km system in uninduced roots. At substrate concentrations between 10 and 200 micromolar, the apparent high Km values of NO3- uptake ranged from 34 to 36 micromolar and of NO2- uptake ranged from 41 to 49 micromolar. A linear system was also found in induced seedlings at concentrations above 500 micromolar. Double reciprocal plots indicated that NO3- and NO2- inhibited the uptake of each other competitively in both uninduced and induced seedlings; however, Ki values showed that NO3- was a more effective inhibitor than NO2-. Nitrate and NO2- transport by both the low and high Km systems were greatly inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, whereas the linear system was only slightly inhibited.

  14. A Comparative Study on the Uptake and Toxicity of Nickel Added in the Form of Different Salts to Maize Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jing; Pan, Yuqiang; Shi, Jing; Guo, Yan; Yan, Zengguang; Duan, Xiaoli; Xu, Meng

    2015-01-01

    In soil ecotoxicological studies, a toxic metal is usually added in the form of either an inorganic or organic salt with relatively high solubility. Nitrate, chloride, acetate, or sulfate are commonly considered as valid options for that aim. However, recent studies have shown that different salts of the same metal at the same cationic concentration may exhibit different toxicities to plants and soil organisms. This information should be considered when selecting data to use for developing toxicological criteria for soil environment. A comparative study was carried out to evaluate the toxicity of five nickel (Ni) salts: NiCl2, NiSO4, Ni(II)-citrate, Ni(CH3COO)2, and Ni(II)-EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetate), on maize seedlings. The plant metrics used were plant height, shoot and root biomass, leaf soluble sugars and starch, and the Ni contents of the shoots and roots. The results indicated that when Ni was added to the soil, toxicity varied with the selected anionic partner with the following toxicity ranking NiSO4 < Ni(CH3COO)2 < Ni(II)-citrate < NiCl2 < Ni(II)-EDTA. Taking the plant-height metric as an example, the effective concentrations for 50% inhibition (EC50) were 3148 mg·kg−1 for NiSO4, 1315 mg·kg−1 for NiCl2, and 89 mg·kg−1 for Ni(II)-EDTA. Compared with the Ni in the other salts, that in Ni(II)-EDTA was taken up the most efficiently by the maize roots and, thus, resulted in the greatest toxic effects on the plants. Nickel generally reduced leaf soluble sugars, which indicated an effect on plant carbohydrate metabolism. The outcome of the study demonstrates that different salts of the same metal have quite different ecotoxicities. Therefore, the anionic counterpart of a potentially toxic metal cation must be taken into account in the development of ecotoxicological criteria for evaluating the soil environment, and a preferred approach of leaching soil to reduce the anionic partner should also be considered. PMID:26633435

  15. A Comparative Study on the Uptake and Toxicity of Nickel Added in the Form of Different Salts to Maize Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing; Pan, Yuqiang; Shi, Jing; Guo, Yan; Yan, Zengguang; Duan, Xiaoli; Xu, Meng

    2015-11-30

    In soil ecotoxicological studies, a toxic metal is usually added in the form of either an inorganic or organic salt with relatively high solubility. Nitrate, chloride, acetate, or sulfate are commonly considered as valid options for that aim. However, recent studies have shown that different salts of the same metal at the same cationic concentration may exhibit different toxicities to plants and soil organisms. This information should be considered when selecting data to use for developing toxicological criteria for soil environment. A comparative study was carried out to evaluate the toxicity of five nickel (Ni) salts: NiCl₂, NiSO₄, Ni(II)-citrate, Ni(CH₃COO)₂, and Ni(II)-EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetate), on maize seedlings. The plant metrics used were plant height, shoot and root biomass, leaf soluble sugars and starch, and the Ni contents of the shoots and roots. The results indicated that when Ni was added to the soil, toxicity varied with the selected anionic partner with the following toxicity ranking NiSO₄ < Ni(CH₃COO)₂ < Ni(II)-citrate < NiCl₂ < Ni(II)-EDTA. Taking the plant-height metric as an example, the effective concentrations for 50% inhibition (EC50) were 3148 mg·kg(-1) for NiSO₄, 1315 mg·kg(-1) for NiCl₂, and 89 mg·kg(-1) for Ni(II)-EDTA. Compared with the Ni in the other salts, that in Ni(II)-EDTA was taken up the most efficiently by the maize roots and, thus, resulted in the greatest toxic effects on the plants. Nickel generally reduced leaf soluble sugars, which indicated an effect on plant carbohydrate metabolism. The outcome of the study demonstrates that different salts of the same metal have quite different ecotoxicities. Therefore, the anionic counterpart of a potentially toxic metal cation must be taken into account in the development of ecotoxicological criteria for evaluating the soil environment, and a preferred approach of leaching soil to reduce the anionic partner should also be considered.

  16. Uptake and partitioning of nutrients in blackberry and raspberry and evaluating plant nutrient status for accurate assessment of fertilizer requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry and blackberry plantings have a relatively low nutrient requirement compared to many other perennial fruit crops. Annual total N accumulation ranged from 62-110 lb/a in red raspberry and 33-39 lb/a in blackberry. Primocanes rely primarily on fertilizer N for growth, whereas floricane growt...

  17. An updated model for nitrate uptake modelling in plants. I. Functional component: cross-combination of flow–force interpretation of nitrate uptake isotherms, and environmental and in planta regulation of nitrate influx

    PubMed Central

    Le Deunff, Erwan; Malagoli, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims In spite of major breakthroughs in the last three decades in the identification of root nitrate uptake transporters in plants and the associated regulation of nitrate transport activities, a simplified and operational modelling approach for nitrate uptake is still lacking. This is due mainly to the difficulty in linking the various regulations of nitrate transport that act at different levels of time and on different spatial scales. Methods A cross-combination of a Flow–Force approach applied to nitrate influx isotherms and experimentally determined environmental and in planta regulation is used to model nitrate in oilseed rape, Brassica napus. In contrast to ‘Enzyme–Substrate’ interpretations, a Flow–Force modelling approach considers the root as a single catalytic structure and does not infer hypothetical cellular processes among nitrate transporter activities across cellular layers in the mature roots. In addition, this approach accounts for the driving force on ion transport based on the gradient of electrochemical potential, which is more appropriate from a thermodynamic viewpoint. Key Results and Conclusions Use of a Flow–Force formalism on nitrate influx isotherms leads to the development of a new conceptual mechanistic basis to model more accurately N uptake by a winter oilseed rape crop under field conditions during the whole growth cycle. This forms the functional component of a proposed new structure–function mechanistic model of N uptake. PMID:24638820

  18. Traffic-related heavy metals uptake by wild plants grow along two main highways in Hunan Province, China: effects of soil factors, accumulation ability, and biological indication potential.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yunbo; Dai, Qingyun; Jiang, Kang; Zhu, Yun; Xu, Bibo; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Tengfei; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-07-01

    This study was performed to investigate pollution of traffic-related heavy metals (HMs-Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Cd) in roadside soils and their uptake by wild plants growing along highways in Hunan Province, China. For this, we analyzed the concentration and chemical fractionation of HMs in soils and plants. Soil samples were collected with different depths in the profile and different distances from highway edge. And leaves and barks of six high-frequency plants were collected. Results of the modified European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) showed that the mobile fraction of these HMs was in the order of Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu > Cr. A high percentage of the mobile fraction indicates Cd, Pb, and Zn were labile and available for uptake by wild plants. The total concentration and values of risk assessment code (RAC) showed that Cd was the main risk factor, which were in the range high to very high risk. The accumulation ability of HMs in plants was evaluated by the biological accumulation factor (BAF) and the metal accumulation index (MAI), and the results showed that all those plant species have good phyto-extraction ability, while accumulation capacity for most HMs plants tissues was bark > leaf. The highest MAI value (5.99) in Cinnamomum camphora (L) Presl indicates the potential for bio-monitoring and a good choice for planting along highways where there is contamination with HMs.

  19. Developing a Better Understanding of the Relationship between Transpiration and Water Uptake in Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    2003-01-01

    Suggests teaching strategies for overcoming the lack of student understanding of the principles of the bubble photometer by helping students compare the bubble photometer with the weighing method, develop the concept of assumptions, and resolve cognitive conflicts. Uses an interactive activity to help students expose their preconceptions.…

  20. Predicting plant uptake of organic chemicals from soil or air using octanol/water and octanol/air partition ratios and a molecular connectivity index

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdy, D.L.; McKone, T.E.

    1997-12-01

    A bioconcentration ratio (BCR) represents the ratio of the concentration of a chemical found in an exposed biological system, such as a plant or fish, to the concentration in the exposure medium (water, soil, or air). A comparison is made of the precision and accuracy of the molecular connectivity index (MCI) and the octanol/water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}) as predictors of BCRs from the soil matrix into above- or below-ground vegetation tissues. Calculated octanol/air partition coefficient (K{sub oa}) values are compared with calculated K{sub ow} and MCI values as predictors of measured air-to-plant BCRs. Based on a statistical evaluation of explained variance, residual error, and cross-validation, this evaluation reveals that the MCI provides higher precision, greater ease of use, and a more cost-effective method for predicting the potential bioconcentration of a chemical from soil into above-ground vegetation. Statistical analyses of the various methods reveal that both the K{sub ow} and MCI approaches have a similar level of precision for predicting BCRs from soil solution into roots and, among MCI, K{sub oa} and K{sub ow}; K{sub oa} is somewhat more precise and valid than MCI and K{sub ow} for estimating uptake, but all have limited accuracy as bioconcentration predictors. These latter results are derived mainly from the paucity of both reliable K{sub oa} values and measured air-to-plant BCRs and indicate a need for more experimental measurements from which more accurate models may be developed.

  1. Effect of iron stress on Withania somnifera L.: antioxidant enzyme response and nutrient elemental uptake of in vitro grown plants.

    PubMed

    Rout, Jyoti Ranjan; Behera, Sadhana; Keshari, Nitin; Ram, Shidharth Sankar; Bhar, Subhajit; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Sahoo, Santi Lata

    2015-03-01

    In the present study the response of antioxidant enzyme activities and the level of expression of their corresponding genes on bioaccumulation of iron (Fe) were investigated. In vitro germinated Withania somnifera L. were grown in Murashige and Skoog's liquid medium with increasing concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM) of FeSO4 for 7 and 14 days. Root and leaf tissues analyzed for catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7), have shown an increase in content with respect to exposure time. Isoforms of CAT, SOD and GPX were separated using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and observed that the isoenzymes were greatly affected by higher concentrations of Fe. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis performed by taking three pairs of genes of CAT (RsCat, Catalase1, Cat1) and SOD (SodCp, TaSOD1.2, MnSOD) to find out the differential expression of antioxidant genes under Fe excess. RsCat from CAT and MnSOD from SOD have exhibited high levels of gene expression under Fe stress, which was consistent with the changes of the activity assayed in solution after 7 days of treatment. Analysis by proton induced X-ray emission exhibited an increasing uptake of Fe in plants by suppressing and expressing of other nutrient elements. The results of the present study suggest that higher concentration of Fe causes disturbance in nutrient balance and induces oxidative stress in plant.

  2. Fate of carbamazepine, its metabolites, and lamotrigine in soils irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Sorption, leaching and plant uptake.

    PubMed

    Paz, Anat; Tadmor, Galit; Malchi, Tomer; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-10-01

    Irrigation with reclaimed wastewater may result in the ubiquitous presence of pharmaceutical compounds (PCs) and their metabolites in the agroecosystem. In this study, we focused on two highly persistent anticonvulsant drugs, lamotrigine and carbamazepine and two of its metabolites (EP-CBZ and DiOH-CBZ), aiming to elucidate their behavior in agricultural ecosystem using batch and lysimeter experiments. Sorption of the studied compounds by soils was found to be governed mainly by the soil organic matter level. Sorption affinity of compounds to soils followed the order lamotrigine > carbamazepine > EP-CBZ > DiOH-CBZ. Sorption was reversible, and no competition between sorbates in bi-solute systems was observed. The results of the lysimeter studies were in accordance with batch experiment findings, demonstrating accumulation of lamotrigine and carbamazepine in top soil layers enriched with organic matter. Detection of carbamazepine and one of its metabolites in rain-fed wheat previously irrigated with reclaimed wastewater, indicates reversibility of their sorption, resulting in their potential leaching and their availability for plant uptake. This study demonstrates the long-term implication of introduction of PCs to the agroecosystem.

  3. [Effects of applying nitrogen fertilizer and fertilizer additive on rice yield and rice plant nitrogen uptake, translocation, and utilization].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-jun; Xia, Yong-qiu; Yang, Xiao-yun; Guo, Miao; Yan, Xiao-yuan

    2011-09-01

    A field experiment was conducted in the Taihu Lake region of southern Jiangsu to study the effects of applying nitrogen (N) fertilizer and fertilizer additive on the rice yield and the rice plant N uptake, translocation, and utilization. Applying N fertilizer had significant positive effects on the rice yield, accumulative absorbed N at all growth stages and at each growth stage, and N translocation rate after anthesis (P < 0.01). However, when the N application rate exceeded 200 kg x hm(-2), its yield-increasing effect was not significant (P > 0.05). The N translocation rate after anthesis and the N fertilizer use efficiency decreased with increasing N application rate. Applying fertilizer additive further improved the rice yield, accumulative absorbed N, N translocation rate after anthesis, and N fertilizer use efficiency, and this effect was more evident when the N application rate was equal to or greater than 200 kg x hm(-2). Relatively high rice yield and N use efficiency were achieved when applying 150 kg x hm(-2) of N fertilizer without the application of fertilizer additive.

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of plants and animals: a comparative approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, J. W.; Tiffney, B. H.; Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Patterns of longevity and rate of appearance of taxa in the fossil record indicate a different evolutionary dynamic between land plants and marine invertebrates. Among marine invertebrates, rates of taxonomic turnover declined through the Phanerozoic, with increasingly extinction-resistant, long-lived, clades coming to dominate. Among terrestrial vascular plants, rates of turnover increased through the Phanerozoic, with short-lived, extinction-prone clades coming to dominate from the Devonian to the present. Terrestrial vertebrates appear to approximate the marine invertebrate pattern more closely than the plant record. We identify two features which individually or jointly may have influenced this distinction. First, land plants continuously invaded stressful environments during their evolution, while marine invertebrates and terrestrial vertebrates did not. Second, the relative structural simplicity and indeterminate mode of plant growth vs. the relative structural complexity and determinate mode of animal growth may have influenced the timing of major clade origin in the two groups.

  5. Toxicity of arsenic (III) and (V) on plant growth, element uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina).

    PubMed

    Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S; Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The effects of arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] on the growth of roots, stems, and leaves and the uptake of arsenic (As), micro- and macronutrients, and total amylolytic activity were investigated to elucidate the phytotoxicity of As to the mesquite plant (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina). The plant growth was evaluated by measuring the root and shoot length, and the element uptake was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The root and leaf elongation decreased significantly with increasing As(III) and As(V) concentrations; whereas, stem elongation remained unchanged. The As uptake increased with increasing As(III) or As(V) concentrations in the medium. Plants treated with 50 mg/L As(III) accumulated up to 920 mg/kg dry weight (d wt) in roots and 522 mg/kg d wt in leaves, while plants exposed to 50 mg/L As(V) accumulated 1980 and 210 mg/kg d wt in roots and leaves, respectively. Increasing the As(V) concentration up to 20 mg/L resulted in a decrease in the total amylolytic activity. On the contrary, total amylolytic activity in As(III)-treated plants increased with increasing As concentration up to 20 mg/L. The macro- and micronutrient concentrations changed in As-treated plants. In shoots, Mo and K were reduced but Ca was increased, while in roots Fe and Ca were increased but K was reduced. These changes reduced the size of the plants, mainly in the As(III)-treated plants; however, there were no visible sign of As toxicity.

  6. Plant Uptake of Organic Pollutants from Soil: A Critical Review ofBioconcentration Estimates Based on Modelsand Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.; Maddalena, Randy L.

    2007-01-01

    The role of terrestrial vegetation in transferring chemicals from soil and air into specific plant tissues (stems, leaves, roots, etc.) is still not well characterized. We provide here a critical review of plant-to-soil bioconcentration ratio (BCR) estimates based on models and experimental data. This review includes the conceptual and theoretical formulations of the bioconcentration ratio, constructing and calibrating empirical and mathematical algorithms to describe this ratio and the experimental data used to quantify BCRs and calibrate the model performance. We first evaluate the theoretical basis for the BCR concept and BCR models and consider how lack of knowledge and data limits reliability and consistency of BCR estimates. We next consider alternate modeling strategies for BCR. A key focus of this evaluation is the relative contributions to overall uncertainty from model uncertainty versus variability in the experimental data used to develop and test the models. As a case study, we consider a single chemical, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and focus on variability of bioconcentration measurements obtained from 81 experiments with different plant species, different plant tissues, different experimental conditions, and different methods for reporting concentrations in the soil and plant tissues. We use these observations to evaluate both the magnitude of experimental variability in plant bioconcentration and compare this to model uncertainty. Among these 81 measurements, the variation of the plant/soil BCR has a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.5 and a coefficient of variability (CV-ratio of arithmetic standard deviation to mean) of 1.7. These variations are significant but low relative to model uncertainties--which have an estimated GSD of 10 with a corresponding CV of 14.

  7. Comparative evaluation of Na(+) uptake in Cyprinodon variegatus variegatus (Lacepede) and Cyprinodon variegatus hubbsi (Carr) (Cyprinodontiformes, Teleostei): Evaluation of NHE function in high and low Na(+) freshwater.

    PubMed

    Brix, Kevin V; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Mager, Edward M; Grosell, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The euryhaline pupfish, Cyprinodon variegatus variegatus (Cvv), can successfully osmoregulate in ≥2 mM Na(+) and a freshwater population (Cyprinodon variegatus hubbsi; Cvh) osmoregulates at ≥0.1mM Na(+). We previously demonstrated that Cvv relies on an apical NKCC and NHE in the gill for Na(+) uptake in high (7mM) and intermediate (2 mM) Na(+) concentrations, while Cvh relies only on NHE for Na(+) uptake. This study investigated whether differential NHE isoform use explains differences in Na(+) uptake kinetics between these two populations. We further studied whether Cvh uses a NHE-Rh metabolon or carbonic anhydrase (CA) to overcome thermodynamic challenges of NHE function in dilute freshwater. Transfer to more dilute freshwater resulted in upregulation of nhe-2 (Cvv only) and nhe-3 (Cvv and Cvh). Relative expression of nhe-3 compared to nhe-2 was 2-fold higher in Cvv, but 200-fold higher in Cvh suggesting that nhe-3 expression is an important freshwater adaptation for Cvh. Simultaneous measurement of Na(+) and Tamm flux under various conditions provided no support for a NHE-Rh metabolon in either population. Carbonic anhydrase activity in Cvv was comparable in 7 and 2 mM Na(+) acclimated fish. In Cvh, CA activity increased by 75% in 0.1 mM Na(+) acclimated fish compared to 7 mM Na(+) fish. Ethoxzolamide had variable effects, stimulating and reducing Na(+) uptake in Cvv acclimated to 7 and 2 mM Na(+), while reducing Na(+) uptake in 7 and 0.1mM Na(+) acclimated Cvh. This suggests that CA plays important, but different roles in regulating Na(+) uptake in Cvv and Cvh.

  8. Grass species influence on plant N uptake - Determination of atmospheric N deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site using a 15N labelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Spott, Oliver; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-05-01

    Large areas of natural peat bogs in Northwestern Germany have been converted to arable land and were subjected to draining and peat cutting in the past. The few protected peatland areas remaining are affected by high nitrogen (N) deposition. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog - is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and livestock production. In this study, we used a 15N pool dilution technique called 'Integrated Total Nitrogen Input' (ITNI) to quantify annual deposition of atmospheric N into biomonitoring pots over a two-year period. Since it considers direct N uptake by plants, it was expected to result in higher N input than conventional methods for determination of N deposition (e.g. micrometeorological approaches, bulk N samplers). Using Lolium multiflorum and Eriophorum vaginatum as monitor plants and low, medium and high levels of fertilization, we aimed to simulate increasing N deposition to planted pots and to allocate airborne N after its uptake by the soil-plant system in aboveground biomass, roots and soil. Increasing N fertilization was positively correlated with biomass production of Eriophorum vaginatum, whereas atmospheric plant N uptake decreased and highest airborne N input of 899.8 ± 67.4 µg N d-1 pot-1 was found for low N fertilization. In contrast, Lolium multiflorum showed a clear dependency of N supply on plant N uptake and was highest (688.7 ± 41.4 µg N d-1 pot-1) for highly fertilized vegetation pots. Our results suggest that grass species respond differently to increasing N input. While crop grasses such as Lolium multiflorum take up N according to N availability, species adopted to nutrient-limited conditions like Eriophorum vaginatum show N saturation effects with increasing N supply. Total airborne N input ranged from about 24 to 66 kg N ha-1 yr-1 dependent on the used indicator plant and the amount of added fertilizer. Parallel determination of atmospheric N deposition using a micrometeorological approach

  9. An ontology approach to comparative phenomics in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant phenotypes (observable characteristics) are described using many different formats and specialized vocabularies or "ontologies". Similar phenotypes in different species may be given different names. These differences in terms complicate phenotype comparisons across species. This research descr...

  10. Ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus albus inoculation of Acacia spirorbis and Eucalyptus globulus grown in ultramafic topsoil enhances plant growth and mineral nutrition while limits metal uptake.

    PubMed

    Jourand, Philippe; Hannibal, Laure; Majorel, Clarisse; Mengant, Stéphane; Ducousso, Marc; Lebrun, Michel

    2014-01-15

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) isolates of Pisolithus albus (Cooke and Massee) from nickel-rich ultramafic topsoils in New Caledonia were inoculated onto Acacia spirorbis Labill. (an endemic Fabaceae) and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (used as a Myrtaceae plant host model). The aim of the study was to analyze the growth of symbiotic ECM plants growing on the ultramafic substrate that is characterized by high and toxic metal concentrations i.e. Co, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni, deficient concentrations of plant essential nutrients such as N, P, K, and that presents an unbalanced Ca/Mg ratio (1/19). ECM inoculation was successful with a plant level of root mycorrhization up to 6.7%. ECM symbiosis enhanced plant growth as indicated by significant increases in shoot and root biomass. Presence of ECM enhanced uptake of major elements that are deficient in ultramafic substrates; in particular P, K and Ca. On the contrary, the ECM symbioses strongly reduced transfer to plants of element in excess in soils; in particular all metals. ECM-inoculated plants released metal complexing molecules as free thiols and oxalic acid mostly at lower concentrations than in controls. Data showed that ECM symbiosis helped plant growth by supplying uptake of deficient elements while acting as a protective barrier to toxic metals, in particular for plants growing on ultramafic substrate with extreme soil conditions. Isolation of indigenous and stress-adapted beneficial ECM fungi could serve as a potential tool for inoculation of ECM endemic plants for the successful restoration of ultramafic ecosystems degraded by mining activities.

  11. Experimental Assessment of the Water Quality Influence on the Phosphorus Uptake of an Invasive Aquatic Plant: Biological Responses throughout Its Phenological Stage

    PubMed Central

    Baldy, Virginie; Thiebaut, Gabrielle; Fernandez, Catherine; Sagova-Mareckova, Marketa; Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Monnier, Yogan; Perez, Thierry; Tremolieres, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how an invasive plant can colonize a large range of environments is still a great challenge in freshwater ecology. For the first time, we assessed the relative importance of four factors on the phosphorus uptake and growth of an invasive macrophyte Elodea nuttallii (Planch.) St. John. This study provided data on its phenotypic plasticity, which is frequently suggested as an important mechanism but remains poorly investigated. The phosphorus uptake of two Elodea nuttallii subpopulations was experimentally studied under contrasting environmental conditions. Plants were sampled in the Rhine floodplain and in the Northern Vosges mountains, and then maintained in aquaria in hard (Rhine) or soft (Vosges) water. Under these conditions, we tested the influence of two trophic states (eutrophic state, 100 μg.l−1 P-PO43− and hypertrophic state, 300 μg.l−1 P-PO43−) on the P metabolism of plant subpopulations collected at three seasons (winter, spring and summer). Elodea nuttallii was able to absorb high levels of phosphorus through its shoots and enhance its phosphorus uptake, continually, after an increase of the resource availability (hypertrophic > eutrophic). The lowest efficiency in nutrient use was observed in winter, whereas the highest was recorded in spring, what revealed thus a storage strategy which can be beneficial to new shoots. This experiment provided evidence that generally, the water trophic state is the main factor governing P uptake, and the mineral status (softwater > hardwater) of the stream water is the second main factor. The phenological stage appeared to be a confounding factor to P level in water. Nonetheless, phenology played a role in P turnover in the plant. Finally, phenotypic plasticity allows both subpopulations to adapt to a changing environment. PMID:25785687

  12. Experimental assessment of the water quality influence on the phosphorus uptake of an invasive aquatic plant: biological responses throughout its phenological stage.

    PubMed

    Baldy, Virginie; Thiebaut, Gabrielle; Fernandez, Catherine; Sagova-Mareckova, Marketa; Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Monnier, Yogan; Perez, Thierry; Tremolieres, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how an invasive plant can colonize a large range of environments is still a great challenge in freshwater ecology. For the first time, we assessed the relative importance of four factors on the phosphorus uptake and growth of an invasive macrophyte Elodea nuttallii (Planch.) St. John. This study provided data on its phenotypic plasticity, which is frequently suggested as an important mechanism but remains poorly investigated. The phosphorus uptake of two Elodea nuttallii subpopulations was experimentally studied under contrasting environmental conditions. Plants were sampled in the Rhine floodplain and in the Northern Vosges mountains, and then maintained in aquaria in hard (Rhine) or soft (Vosges) water. Under these conditions, we tested the influence of two trophic states (eutrophic state, 100 μg x l(-1) P-PO4(3-) and hypertrophic state, 300 μg x l(-1) P-PO4(3-)) on the P metabolism of plant subpopulations collected at three seasons (winter, spring and summer). Elodea nuttallii was able to absorb high levels of phosphorus through its shoots and enhance its phosphorus uptake, continually, after an increase of the resource availability (hypertrophic > eutrophic). The lowest efficiency in nutrient use was observed in winter, whereas the highest was recorded in spring, what revealed thus a storage strategy which can be beneficial to new shoots. This experiment provided evidence that generally, the water trophic state is the main factor governing P uptake, and the mineral status (softwater > hardwater) of the stream water is the second main factor. The phenological stage appeared to be a confounding factor to P level in water. Nonetheless, phenology played a role in P turnover in the plant. Finally, phenotypic plasticity allows both subpopulations to adapt to a changing environment.

  13. On the study of plant defence and herbivory using comparative approaches: how important are secondary plant compounds.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Weber, Marjorie G

    2015-10-01

    Species comparisons are a cornerstone of biology and there is a long tradition of using the comparative framework to study the ecology and evolution of plant defensive traits. Early comparative studies led to the hypothesis that plant chemistry plays a central role in plant defence, and the evolution of plant secondary chemistry in response to insect herbivory remains a classic example of coevolution. However, recent comparative work has disagreed with this paradigm, reporting little connection between plant secondary chemicals and herbivory across distantly related plant taxa. One conclusion of this new work is that the importance of secondary chemistry in plant defence may have been generally overstated in earlier research. Here, we attempt to reconcile these contradicting viewpoints on the role of plant chemistry in defence by critically evaluating the use and interpretation of species correlations as a means to study defence-herbivory relationships. We conclude that the notion that plant primary metabolites (e.g. leaf nitrogen content) are the principal determinants of herbivory (or the target of natural selection by herbivores) is not likely to be correct. Despite the inference of recent community-wide studies of herbivory, strong evidence remains for a prime role of secondary compounds in plant defence against herbivores.

  14. Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential for use in phytoremediation. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.I.

    1998-06-01

    'Soils and waters contaminated with high levels of heavy metals such as Cadmium, Lead and Copper are detrimental to human and environmental health. Many human disorders have been attributed to environmental contamination by heavy metals. Removal of heavy metals from highly contaminated sites is therefore a very costly but necessary process that is currently being pursued. Recent research in several laboratories indicates that uptake of heavy metals into plants via the root system may provide a cost-effective approach for decontamination of certain heavy metal-laden soils and waters. Several mechanisms have been identified, which allow detoxification in the cytosol and vacuoles of plants. However, the molecular biological mechanisms by which heavy metals are transported from soils across the plasma membrane into roots have remained largely unknown. In recent research, the laboratory has cloned a cation uptake transporter cDNA from plants. Yeast cells expressing this cDNA show enhanced uptake of calcium and cadmium. The proposed research is testing the transport of toxic and nutrient metals by the encoded protein.'

  15. Delayed expression of SAGs correlates with longevity in CMS wheat plants compared to its fertile plants.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Vimal Kumar; Singh, Bhupinder; Khanna-Chopra, Renu

    2014-04-01

    Reproductive sinks regulate monocarpic senescence in crop plants. Monocarpic senescence was studied in wheat fertile (cv. HW 2041) and its isonuclear cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) line. CMS plants exhibited slower rate of senescence accompanied by longer green leaf area duration and slower deceleration in chlorophyll, protein content, PN and rubisco content coupled with lower protease activities than fertile (F) plants. CMS plants also exhibited lower ROS levels and less membrane damage than F plants. CMS plants maintained better antioxidant defense, less oxidative damage in chloroplast and higher transcript levels of both rbcL and rbcS genes during senescence than F plants. F plants exhibited early induction and higher expression of SAGs like serine and cysteine proteases, glutamine synthetases GS1 and GS2, WRKY53 transcription factor and decline in transcript levels of CAT1 and CAT2 genes than CMS plants. Hence, using genetically fertile and its CMS line of wheat it is confirmed that delayed senescence in the absence of reproductive sinks is linked with slower protein oxidation, rubisco degradation and delayed activation of SAGs. Better antioxidant defense in chloroplasts at later stages of senescence was able to mitigate the deleterious effects of ROS in CMS plants. We propose that delayed increase in ROS in cytoplasmic male sterile wheat plants resulted in delayed activation of WRKY53, SAGs and the associated biochemical changes than fertile plants.

  16. Miscellaneous additives can enhance plant uptake and affect geochemical fractions of copper in a heavily polluted riparian grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M

    2015-09-01

    The problem of copper (Cu) pollution in riverine ecosystems is world-wide and has significant environmental, eco-toxicological, and agricultural relevance. We assessed the suitability and effectiveness of application rate of 1% of activated charcoal, bentonite, biochar, cement kiln dust, chitosan, coal fly ash, limestone, nano-hydroxyapatite, organo-clay, sugar beet factory lime, and zeolite as soil amendments together with rapeseed as bioenergy crop as a possible remediation option for a heavily Cu polluted floodplain soil (total Cu=3041.9mgkg(-1)) that has a very high proportion of sorbed/carbonate fraction (484.6mgkg(-1)) and potential mobile fraction of Cu (1611.9mgkg(-1)). Application changed distribution of Cu among geochemical fractions: alkaline materials lead to increased carbonate bounded fraction and the acid rhizosphere zone might cause release of this Cu. Thus, mobilization of Cu and uptake of Cu by rapeseed were increased compared to the control (except for organo-clay) under the prevailing conditions.

  17. Comparative regulatory approaches for groups of new plant breeding techniques.

    PubMed

    Lusser, Maria; Davies, Howard V

    2013-06-25

    This manuscript provides insights into ongoing debates on the regulatory issues surrounding groups of biotechnology-driven 'New Plant Breeding Techniques' (NPBTs). It presents the outcomes of preliminary discussions and in some cases the initial decisions taken by regulators in the following countries: Argentina, Australia, Canada, EU, Japan, South Africa and USA. In the light of these discussions we suggest in this manuscript a structured approach to make the evaluation more consistent and efficient. The issue appears to be complex as these groups of new technologies vary widely in both the technologies deployed and their impact on heritable changes in the plant genome. An added complication is that the legislation, definitions and regulatory approaches for biotechnology-derived crops differ significantly between these countries. There are therefore concerns that this situation will lead to non-harmonised regulatory approaches and asynchronous development and marketing of such crops resulting in trade disruptions.

  18. Comparable light stimulation of organic nutrient uptake by SAR11 and Prochlorococcus in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pereira, Paola R; Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Tarran, Glen A; Martin, Adrian P; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Scanlan, David J; Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2013-03-01

    Subtropical oceanic gyres are the most extensive biomes on Earth where SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacterioplankton numerically dominate the surface waters depleted in inorganic macronutrients as well as in dissolved organic matter. In such nutrient poor conditions bacterioplankton could become photoheterotrophic, that is, potentially enhance uptake of scarce organic molecules using the available solar radiation to energise appropriate transport systems. Here, we assessed the photoheterotrophy of the key microbial taxa in the North Atlantic oligotrophic gyre and adjacent regions using (33)P-ATP, (3)H-ATP and (35)S-methionine tracers. Light-stimulated uptake of these substrates was assessed in two dominant bacterioplankton groups discriminated by flow cytometric sorting of tracer-labelled cells and identified using catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridisation. One group of cells, encompassing 48% of all bacterioplankton, were identified as members of the SAR11 clade, whereas the other group (24% of all bacterioplankton) was Prochlorococcus. When exposed to light, SAR11 cells took 31% more ATP and 32% more methionine, whereas the Prochlorococcus cells took 33% more ATP and 34% more methionine. Other bacterioplankton did not demonstrate light stimulation. Thus, the SAR11 and Prochlorococcus groups, with distinctly different light-harvesting mechanisms, used light equally to enhance, by approximately one-third, the uptake of different types of organic molecules. Our findings indicate the significance of light-driven uptake of essential organic nutrients by the dominant bacterioplankton groups in the surface waters of one of the less productive, vast regions of the world's oceans-the oligotrophic North Atlantic subtropical gyre.

  19. Cellular sites of estrogen and antiestrogen uptake, retention and action: comparative autoradiographic studies in the immature rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism of action of antiestrogens: agents used for treating breast cancer and as probes for studying the mechanisms of action of estrogen. Nuclear uptake and retention of estrogen and antiestrogen were determined in the different cell types of the immature rat uterus, by quantitative autoradiography, after an injection of tritiated hydroxytamoxifen ((/sup 3/H)TAM(OH)) or tritiated estradiol ((/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/). The effect of TAM(OH) and E/sub 2/ on progesterone receptor content was assessed in the different cell types by determining nuclear uptake of the synthetic progestin (/sup 3/H)Org 2058. The results indicate that antiestrogen and estrogen localize to nuclei of the same uterine cell types, but that this nuclear uptake differs among the uterine tissue compartments, that antiestrogen is taken up considerably slower and retained longer than estrogen and that antiestrogen and estrogen differentially affect progesterone receptor content in the different cell types. The results further suggest that antiestrogen-specific binding sites exist in the cytoplasm of uterine luminal epithelium.

  20. Dependence of Plant Uptake and Diffusion of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on the Leaf Surface Morphology and Micro-structures of Cuticular Waxes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingqing; Li, Yungui; Zhu, Lizhong; Xing, Baoshan; Chen, Baoliang

    2017-01-01

    The uptake of organic chemicals by plants is considered of great significance as it impacts their environmental transport and fate and threatens crop growth and food safety. Herein, the dependence of the uptake, penetration, and distribution of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the morphology and micro-structures of cuticular waxes on leaf surfaces was investigated. Plant surface morphologies and wax micro-structures were examined by scanning emission microscopy, and hydrophobicities of plant surfaces were monitored through contact angle measurements. PAHs in the cuticles and inner tissues were distinguished by sequential extraction, and the cuticle was verified to be the dominant reservoir for the accumulation of lipophilic pollutants. The interspecies differences in PAH concentrations cannot be explained by normalizing them to the plant lipid content. PAHs in the inner tissues became concentrated with the increase of tissue lipid content, while a generally negative correlation between the PAH concentration in cuticles and the epicuticular wax content was found. PAHs on the adaxial and abaxial sides of a leaf were differentiated for the first time, and the divergence between these two sides can be ascribed to the variations in surface morphologies. The role of leaf lipids was redefined and differentiated. PMID:28393859

  1. Foliar application of microbial and plant based biostimulants increases growth and potassium uptake in almond (Prunus dulcis [Mill.] D. A. Webb).

    PubMed

    Saa, Sebastian; Olivos-Del Rio, Andres; Castro, Sebastian; Brown, Patrick H

    2015-01-01

    The use of biostimulants has become a common practice in agriculture. However, there is little peer-reviewed research on this topic. In this study we tested, under controlled and replicated conditions, the effect of one biostimulant derived from seaweed extraction (Bio-1) and another biostimulant derived from microbial fermentation (Bio-2). This experiment utilized 2-years-old almond plants over two growing seasons in a randomized complete design with a full 2 × 4 factorial structure with two soil potassium treatments (125 μg g(-1) of K vs. 5 μg g(-1)) and four foliar treatments (No spray, Foliar-K, Bio-1, Bio-2). Rubidium was utilized as a surrogate for short-term potassium uptake and plant growth, nutrient concentration, and final plant biomass were evaluated. There was a substantial positive effect of both biostimulant treatments on total shoot leaf area, and significant increases in shoot length and biomass under adequate soil potassium supply with a positive effect of Bio-1 only under low K supply. Rubidium uptake was increased by Bio-1 application an effect that was greater under the low soil K treatment. Though significant beneficial effects of the biostimulants used on plant growth were observed, it is not possible to determine the mode of action of these materials. The results presented here illustrate the promise and complexity of research involving biostimulants.

  2. Foliar application of microbial and plant based biostimulants increases growth and potassium uptake in almond (Prunus dulcis [Mill.] D. A. Webb)

    PubMed Central

    Saa, Sebastian; Olivos-Del Rio, Andres; Castro, Sebastian; Brown, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biostimulants has become a common practice in agriculture. However, there is little peer-reviewed research on this topic. In this study we tested, under controlled and replicated conditions, the effect of one biostimulant derived from seaweed extraction (Bio-1) and another biostimulant derived from microbial fermentation (Bio-2). This experiment utilized 2-years-old almond plants over two growing seasons in a randomized complete design with a full 2 × 4 factorial structure with two soil potassium treatments (125 μg g-1 of K vs. 5 μg g-1) and four foliar treatments (No spray, Foliar-K, Bio-1, Bio-2). Rubidium was utilized as a surrogate for short-term potassium uptake and plant growth, nutrient concentration, and final plant biomass were evaluated. There was a substantial positive effect of both biostimulant treatments on total shoot leaf area, and significant increases in shoot length and biomass under adequate soil potassium supply with a positive effect of Bio-1 only under low K supply. Rubidium uptake was increased by Bio-1 application an effect that was greater under the low soil K treatment. Though significant beneficial effects of the biostimulants used on plant growth were observed, it is not possible to determine the mode of action of these materials. The results presented here illustrate the promise and complexity of research involving biostimulants. PMID:25755660

  3. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.