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Sample records for comparative transduction mechanisms

  1. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. 1: Responses to intracellular current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus are specifically adapted to sense small-amplitude, high-frequency linear accelerations. These hair cells display many properties that are undesirable or inappropriate for hair cells that must provide static gravity sensitivity. This study resulted in part due to an interest in seeing how the transduction mechanisms of hair cells in a gravity-sensing otolith endorgan would differ from those in the bullfrog sacculus. The bullfrog utriculus is an appropriate model for these studies, because its structure is representative of higher vertebrates in general and its function as a sensor of static gravity and dynamic linear acceleration is well known. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus, classifiable as Type 2 by cell body and synapse morphology, differ markedly in hair bundle morphology from those in the bullfrog sacculus. Moreover, the hair bundle morphologies of utricular hair cells, unlike those in the sacculus, differ in different membrane regions.

  2. Comparative mechanisms of protein transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty Revon; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial and archaeal cell envelopes are complex multilayered barriers that serve to protect these microorganisms from their extremely harsh and often hostile environments. Import of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles into cells is important for biotechnological applications in prokaryotes. In this report, we demonstrate that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), both bacteria-expressed nona-arginine peptide (R9) and synthetic R9 (SR9), are able to deliver noncovalently associated proteins or quantum dots into four representative species of prokaryotes: cyanobacteria (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5α and Arthrobacter ilicis D-50), and archaea (Thermus aquaticus). Although energy-dependent endocytosis is generally accepted as a hallmark that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes, cellular uptake of uncomplexed green fluorescent protein (GFP) by cyanobacteria was mediated by classical endocytosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that macropinocytosis plays a critical and major role in CPP-mediated protein transduction in all four prokaryotes. Membrane damage was not observed when cyanobacterial cells were treated with R9/GFP complexes, nor was cytotoxicity detected when bacteria or archaea were treated with SR9/QD complexes in the presence of macropinocytic inhibitors. These results indicate that the uptake of protein is not due to a compromise of membrane integrity in cyanobacteria, and that CPP can be an effective and safe carrier for membrane trafficking in prokaryotic cells. Our investigation provides important new insights into the transport of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles across the complex membrane systems of prokaryotes.

  3. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog uticulus. 2: Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was motivated by an interest in seeing whether hair cell types in the bullfrog utriculus might differ in their voltage responses to hair bundle displacement. Particular interest was in assessing the contributions of two factors to the responses of utricular hair cells. First, interest in examining the effect of hair bundle morphology on the sensitivity of hair cells to natural stimulation was motivated by the observation that vestibular hair cells, unlike many auditory hair cells, are not free-standing but rather linked to an accessory cupular or otolithic membrane via the tip of their kinocilium. Interest also laid in examining the contribution, if any, of adaptation to the response properties of utricular hair cells. Hair cells in auditory and vibratory inner ear endorgans adapt to maintained displacements of their hair bundles, sharply limiting their low frequency sensitivity. This adaptation is mediated by a shift in the displacement-response curve (DRC) of the hair cell along the displacement axis. Observations suggest that the adaptation process occurs within the hair bundle and precedes mechanoelectric transduction. Recent observations of time-dependent changes in hair bundle stiffness are consistent with this conclusion. Adaptation would be expected to be most useful in inner ear endorgans in which hair cells are subject to large static displacements that could potentially saturate their instantaneous response and compromise their sensitivity to high frequency stimulation. The adaptation process also permits hair cells to maintain their sensory hair bundle in the most sensitive portion of their DRC. In vestibular otolith organs in which static sensitivity is desirable, any adaptation process in the hair cells may be undesirable. The rate and extent of the decline of the voltage responses was measured of utricular hair cells to step and sinusoidal hair bundle displacements. Then for similar resting potentials and response amplitudes, the

  4. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. II. Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    lever arm between kinociliary and stereociliary displacement; 2) tip link extension/linear displacement, largely a function of stereociliary height and separation; and 3) stereociliary number, an estimate of the number of transduction channels, were considered in this analysis. The first of these factors was quantitatively more important than the latter two factors and their total contribution was largest in Type B and Type C cells. Theoretical models were also used to calculate the relation between rotary and linear displacement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  5. Transduction of mechanical strain in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    One physiologic consequence of extended periods of weightlessness is the rapid loss of bone mass associated with skeletal unloading. Conversely, mechanical loading has been shown to increase bone formation and stimulate osteoblastic function. The mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction, or how the osteoblast senses and converts biophysical stimuli into cellular responses has yet to be determined. For non-innervated mechanosensitive cells like the osteoblast, mechanotransduction can be divided into four distinct phases: 1) mechanocoupling, or the characteristics of the mechanical force applied to the osteoblast, 2) biochemical coupling, or the mechanism through which mechanical strain is transduced into a cellular biochemical signal, 3) transmission of signal from sensor to effector cell and 4) the effector cell response. This review examines the characteristics of the mechanical strain encountered by osteoblasts, possible biochemical coupling mechanisms, and how the osteoblast responds to mechanical strain. Differences in osteoblastic responses to mechanical strain are discussed in relation to the types of strain encountered and the possible transduction pathways involved.

  6. Signal transduction mechanisms in plants: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Thompson, G. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an overview on recent advances in some of the basic signalling mechanisms that participate in a wide variety of stimulus-response pathways. The mechanisms include calcium-based signalling, G-protein-mediated-signalling and signalling involving inositol phospholipids, with discussion on the role of protein kinases and phosphatases interspersed. As a further defining feature, the article highlights recent exciting findings on three extracellular components that have not been given coverage in previous reviews of signal transduction in plants, extracellular calmodulin, extracellular ATP, and integrin-like receptors, all of which affect plant growth and development.

  7. Mechanisms of sensory transduction in the skin.

    PubMed

    Lumpkin, Ellen A; Caterina, Michael J

    2007-02-22

    Sensory neurons innervating the skin encode the familiar sensations of temperature, touch and pain. An explosion of progress has revealed unanticipated cellular and molecular complexity in these senses. It is now clear that perception of a single stimulus, such as heat, requires several transduction mechanisms. Conversely, a given protein may contribute to multiple senses, such as heat and touch. Recent studies have also led to the surprising insight that skin cells might transduce temperature and touch. To break the code underlying somatosensation, we must therefore understand how the skin's sensory functions are divided among signalling molecules and cell types.

  8. Mechanical transduction mechanisms of RecA-like molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jung-Chi

    2011-12-01

    A majority of ATP-dependent molecular motors are RecA-like proteins, performing diverse functions in biology. These RecA-like molecular motors consist of a highly conserved core containing the ATP-binding site. Here I examined how ATP binding within this core is coupled to the conformational changes of different RecA-like molecular motors. Conserved hydrogen bond networks and conformational changes revealed two major mechanical transduction mechanisms: (1) intra-domain conformational changes and (2) inter-domain conformational changes. The intra-domain mechanism has a significant hydrogen bond rearrangement within the domain containing the P-loop, causing relative motion between two parts of the protein. The inter-domain mechanism exhibits little conformational change in the P-loop domain. Instead, the major conformational change is observed between the P-loop domain and an adjacent domain or subunit containing the arginine finger. These differences in the mechanical transduction mechanisms may link to the underlying energy surface governing a Brownian ratchet or a power stroke.

  9. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  10. A unifying metric for comparing thermomagnetic transduction utilizing magnetic entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzlar, Kyle P.; Keller, Scott M.; Phillips, Makita R.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2016-12-01

    A method to compare the thermal to magnetic transduction efficiencies of different thermomagnetic systems was developed. The efficiencies of operating about a spin reorientation transition and the alternative ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transformation at the Curie point were directly compared. A case study was performed comparing Gd operating about its spin reorientation temperature and its Curie point. Additionally, a case study on NdCo5 operating about its spin reorientation temperature using experimentally derived values of the materials' temperature dependent magnetic properties was conducted. Analysis suggests that choosing the appropriate material and operating it about its transition produces considerable efficiencies (˜22%) as well as large harvestable energy densities (˜2.6 MJ/m3), which is an order of magnitude larger than Gd single domains operating about their Curie point (˜100 kJ/m3).

  11. Exploring transduction mechanisms of protein transduction domains (PTDs) in living cells utilizing single-quantum dot tracking (SQT) technology.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs) can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs), we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP) in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT), to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  12. Mechanical transduction by ion channels: A cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical transduction by ion channels occurs in all cells. The physiological functions of these channels have just begun to be elaborated, but if we focus on the upper animal kingdom, these channels serve the common sensory services such as hearing and touch, provide the central nervous system with information on the force and position of muscles and joints, and they provide the autonomic system with information about the filling of hollow organs such as blood vessels. However, all cells of the body have mechanosensitive channels (MSCs), including red cells. Most of these channels are cation selective and are activated by bilayer tension. There are also K+ selective MSCs found commonly in neurons where they may be responsible for both general anesthesia and knockout punches in the boxing ring by hyperpolarizing neurons to reduce excitability. The cationic MSCs are typically inactive under normal mechanical stress, but open under pathologic stress. The channels are normally inactive because they are shielded from stress by the cytoskeleton. The cationic MSCs are specifically blocked by the externally applied peptide GsMtx4 (aka, AT-300). This is the first drug of its class and provides a new approach to many pathologies since it is nontoxic, non-immunogenic, stable in a biological environment and has a long pharmacokinetic lifetime. Pathologies involving excessive stress are common. They produce cardiac arrhythmias, contraction in stretched dystrophic muscle, xerocytotic and sickled red cells, etc. The channels seem to function primarily as “fire alarms”, providing feedback to the cytoskeleton that a region of the bilayer is under excessive tension and needs reinforcing. The eukaryotic forms of MSCs have only been cloned in recent years and few people have experience working with them. “Newbies” need to become aware of the technology, potential artifacts, and the fundamentals of mechanics. The most difficult problem in studying MSCs is that the actual

  13. Mechanical regulation of a molecular clutch defines force transmission and transduction in response to matrix rigidity.

    PubMed

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Oria, Roger; Chen, Yunfeng; Kosmalska, Anita; Pérez-González, Carlos; Castro, Natalia; Zhu, Cheng; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2016-05-01

    Cell function depends on tissue rigidity, which cells probe by applying and transmitting forces to their extracellular matrix, and then transducing them into biochemical signals. Here we show that in response to matrix rigidity and density, force transmission and transduction are explained by the mechanical properties of the actin-talin-integrin-fibronectin clutch. We demonstrate that force transmission is regulated by a dynamic clutch mechanism, which unveils its fundamental biphasic force/rigidity relationship on talin depletion. Force transduction is triggered by talin unfolding above a stiffness threshold. Below this threshold, integrins unbind and release force before talin can unfold. Above the threshold, talin unfolds and binds to vinculin, leading to adhesion growth and YAP nuclear translocation. Matrix density, myosin contractility, integrin ligation and talin mechanical stability differently and nonlinearly regulate both force transmission and the transduction threshold. In all cases, coupling of talin unfolding dynamics to a theoretical clutch model quantitatively predicts cell response.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of gravity perception and signal transduction in plants.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Yaroslav S; Kretynin, Serhiy V; Volotovsky, Igor D; Kordyum, Elizabeth L; Ruelland, Eric; Kravets, Volodymyr S

    2016-07-01

    Gravity is one of the environmental cues that direct plant growth and development. Recent investigations of different gravity signalling pathways have added complexity to how we think gravity is perceived. Particular cells within specific organs or tissues perceive gravity stimulus. Many downstream signalling events transmit the perceived information into subcellular, biochemical, and genomic responses. They are rapid, non-genomic, regulatory, and cell-specific. The chain of events may pass by signalling lipids, the cytoskeleton, intracellular calcium levels, protein phosphorylation-dependent pathways, proteome changes, membrane transport, vacuolar biogenesis mechanisms, or nuclear events. These events culminate in changes in gene expression and auxin lateral redistribution in gravity response sites. The possible integration of these signalling events with amyloplast movements or with other perception mechanisms is discussed. Further investigation is needed to understand how plants coordinate mechanisms and signals to sense this important physical factor.

  15. Mechanical code comparator

    DOEpatents

    Peter, Frank J.; Dalton, Larry J.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of mechanical code comparators is described which have broad potential for application in safety, surety, and security applications. These devices can be implemented as micro-scale electromechanical systems that isolate a secure or otherwise controlled device until an access code is entered. This access code is converted into a series of mechanical inputs to the mechanical code comparator, which compares the access code to a pre-input combination, entered previously into the mechanical code comparator by an operator at the system security control point. These devices provide extremely high levels of robust security. Being totally mechanical in operation, an access control system properly based on such devices cannot be circumvented by software attack alone.

  16. Insect sound production: transduction mechanisms and impedance matching.

    PubMed

    Bennet-Clark, H C

    1995-01-01

    The chain of sound production in insects can be summarised as: (1) muscle power-->(2) mechanical vibration of the sound-producing structure-->(3) acoustic loading of this source-->(4) sound radiation. At each link (-->) optimal impedance matching is desirable but, to meet other acoustic requirements, each stage has special properties. The properties of sound waves are discussed in the context of impedance matching between sources of different sizes or configurations and the surrounding fluid medium. Muscles produce high pressures over small areas, but sound sources produce low pressures over large areas. Link 1-->2 requires a change in the force: area ratio between the muscle and the sound source. Because the source size is necessarily small, sounds tend to be produced at a higher frequency than that of the driving muscle contraction, so link 1-->2 may involve a frequency multiplication mechanism. This can also be regarded as a mechanism of impedance matching between the aqueous muscle and the structure from which the insect produces sound. Stage 2 typically involves a resonant structure that determines the song frequency and is excited by link 1-->2. If link 2-->3 provides good impedance matching, the mechanical resonance is likely to be damped, with loss of song purity. So it is desirable for the stage 2 resonance to be sustained by coherent excitation and for the acoustic loading (link 2-->3) to maintain the dominant frequency between stages 2 and 4. Examples where this occurs are cricket wings and cicadas. At stage 3, the source size or configuration should allow impedance matching between the sound source (3) and its load (4). A variety of acoustic devices are exploited, leading to loud, efficient sound production. Examples that use resonant loads, tuned to the insects' song frequency, are the burrows of mole crickets and the abdomens of cicadas. Overall, the mechanisms of sound production of many insects are capable of producing songs of high species

  17. Cerebral Artery Signal Transduction Mechanisms: Developmental Changes in Dynamics and Ca2+ Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Lawrence D.; Goyal, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    As compared to the adult, the developing fetus and newborn infant are at much greater risk for dysregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF), with complications such as intraventricular and germinal matrix hemorrhage with resultant neurologic sequelae. To minimize this dysregulation and its consequences presents a major challenge. Although in many respects the fundamental signal transduction mechanisms that regulate relaxation and contraction pathways, and thus cerebrovascular tone and CBF in the immature organism are similar to those of the adult, the individual elements, pathways, and roles differ greatly. Here, we review aspects of these maturational changes of relaxation/contraction mechanisms in terms of both electro-mechanical and pharmaco-mechanical coupling, their biochemical pathways and signaling networks. In contrast to the adult cerebrovasculature, in addition to attenuated structure with differences in multiple cytoskeletal elements, developing cerebrovasculature of fetus and newborn differs in many respects, such as a strikingly increased sensitivity to [Ca2+]i and requirement for extracellular Ca2+ for contraction. In essence, the immature cerebrovasculature demonstrates both “hyper-relaxation” and “hypo-contraction”. A challenge is to unravel the manner in which these mechanisms are integrated, particularly in terms of both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent pathways to increase Ca2+ sensitivity. Gaining an appreciation of these significant age-related differences in signal mechanisms also will be critical to understanding more completely the vulnerability of the developing cerebral vasculature to hypoxia and other stresses. Of vital importance, a more complete understanding of these mechanisms promises hope for improved strategies for therapeutic intervention and clinical management of intensive care of the premature newborn. PMID:24063382

  18. Plasma membrane poration by opioid neuropeptides: a possible mechanism of pathological signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Maximyuk, O; Khmyz, V; Lindskog, C-J; Vukojević, V; Ivanova, T; Bazov, I; Hauser, K F; Bakalkin, G; Krishtal, O

    2015-03-12

    Neuropeptides induce signal transduction across the plasma membrane by acting through cell-surface receptors. The dynorphins, endogenous ligands for opioid receptors, are an exception; they also produce non-receptor-mediated effects causing pain and neurodegeneration. To understand non-receptor mechanism(s), we examined interactions of dynorphins with plasma membrane. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and patch-clamp electrophysiology, we demonstrate that dynorphins accumulate in the membrane and induce a continuum of transient increases in ionic conductance. This phenomenon is consistent with stochastic formation of giant (~2.7 nm estimated diameter) unstructured non-ion-selective membrane pores. The potency of dynorphins to porate the plasma membrane correlates with their pathogenic effects in cellular and animal models. Membrane poration by dynorphins may represent a mechanism of pathological signal transduction. Persistent neuronal excitation by this mechanism may lead to profound neuropathological alterations, including neurodegeneration and cell death.

  19. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ai-fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-hua; Hu, Chao-qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model. PMID:27994518

  20. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ai-Fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model.

  1. Comparative Transduction Mechanisms of Vestibular Otolith Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs regenerate following aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Hair cells in these organs are differentially sensitive to gentamicin, with saccular hair cells and hair cells in the utricular striola being damaged at lower gentamicin concentrations than hair cells in the utricular extrastriola. Regenerating hair cells in these organs have short hair bundles and can be classified into a number of phenotypes using the same morphological criteria used to identify their mature counterparts. Our studies suggest that some supporting cells can convert, or transdifferentiate,into hair cells without an intervening cell division. By stimulating these processes in humans, clinicians may be able to alleviate human deafness and peripheral vestibular disorders by regenerating and replacing lost hair cells. In vivo and in vitro studies were done on cell proliferation and hair cell regeneration.

  2. Mechanism of active transport: free energy dissipation and free energy transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C

    1982-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathway for "chemiosmotic" free energy transduction in active transport is discussed with an ATP-driven Ca2+ pump as an illustrative example. Two innovations are made in the analysis. (i) Free energy dissipated as heat is rigorously excluded from overall free energy bookkeeping by focusing on the dynamic equilibrium state of the chemiosmotic process. (ii) Separate chemical potential terms for free energy donor and transported ions are used to keep track of the thermodynamic state of each substrate through the reaction cycle. These procedures clarify the mechanism of free energy transduction, even without step-by-step analysis. The results show that free energy exchange must occur in its entirety among protein-bound species. Imposition of conditions for an adequate rate of physiological function further indicates (i) that the standard free energy of hydrolysis of protein-bound ATP (to yield protein-bound products) needs to differ substantially from the standard free energy of hydrolysis in solution and (ii) that binding sites for the transported ions must have different affinities when facing opposite sides of the membrane. The results also demonstrate that step-by-step "basic" free energy changes (often used in the form of free energy level diagrams) are inherently unsuited for analysis of the mechanism of free energy transduction. PMID:6216483

  3. Do certain signal transduction mechanisms explain the comorbidity of epilepsy and mood disorders?

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Alcántara-González, David; Cruzblanca, Humberto; Castro, Elena

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that mood disorders are highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy. Although several studies have aimed to characterize alterations in different types of receptors associated with both disturbances, there is a lack of studies focused on identifying the causes of this comorbidity. Here, we described some changes at the biochemical level involving serotonin, dopamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors as well as signal transduction mechanisms that may explain the coexistence of both epilepsy and mood disorders. Finally, the identification of common pathophysiological mechanisms associated with receptor-receptor interaction (heterodimers) could allow designing new strategies for treatment of patients with epilepsy and comorbid mood disorders.

  4. Keratinocyte galvanotaxis in combined DC and AC electric fields supports an electromechanical transduction sensing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hart, Francis X; Laird, Mhairi; Riding, Aimie; Pullar, Christine E

    2013-02-01

    Sedentary keratinocytes at the edge of a skin wound migrate into the wound, guided by the generation of an endogenous electric field (EF) generated by the collapse of the transepithelial potential. The center of the wound quickly becomes more negative than the surrounding tissue and remains the cathode of the endogenous EF until the wound is completely re-epithelialized. This endogenous guidance cue can be studied in vitro. When placed in a direct current (DC) EF of physiological strength, 100 V/m, keratinocytes migrate directionally toward the cathode in a process known as galvanotaxis. Although a number of membrane-bound (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), integrins) and cytosolic proteins (cAMP, ERK, PI3K) are known to play a role in the downstream signaling mechanisms underpinning galvanotaxis, the initial sensing mechanism for this response is not understood. To investigate the EF sensor, we studied the migration of keratinocytes in a DC EF of 100 V/m, alternating current (AC) EFs of 40 V/m at either 1.6 or 160 Hz, and combinations of DC and AC EFs. In the AC EFs alone, keratinocytes migrated randomly. The 1.6 Hz AC EF combined with the DC EF suppressed the direction of migration but had no effect on speed. In contrast, the 160 Hz AC EF combined with the DC EF did not affect the direction of migration but increased the migration speed compared to the DC EF alone. These results can be understood in terms of an electromechanical transduction model, but not an electrodiffusion/osmosis or a voltage-gated channel model.

  5. Hair cell mechano-transduction: its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ.

    PubMed

    van Netten, S M

    1997-10-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles, on the mechanical properties of accessory structures driving them. This allows for the possibility to investigate, under in vivo conditions, the mechanical gating machinery of ion channels via the dynamics of accessory structures. We have performed such studies on the lateral line organ of fish and were thus able to relate the mechanics of elementary molecular events to the macroscopical dynamics of an intact organ.

  6. External Mechanical Work and Pendular Energy Transduction of Overground and Treadmill Walking in Adolescents with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Zollinger, Marie; Degache, Francis; Currat, Gabriel; Pochon, Ludmila; Peyrot, Nicolas; Newman, Christopher J.; Malatesta, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Motor impairments affect functional abilities and gait in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Improving their walking is an essential objective of treatment, and the use of a treadmill for gait analysis and training could offer several advantages in adolescents with CP. However, there is a controversy regarding the similarity between treadmill and overground walking both for gait analysis and training in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of these two types of gait modalities at standard and preferred walking speeds in adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) and typically developing (TD) adolescents matched on age, height and body mass. Methods: Spatiotemporal parameters, external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of walking were computed using two inertial sensors equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and gyroscope and compared in 10 UCP (14.2 ± 1.7 year) and 10 TD (14.1 ± 1.9 year) adolescents during treadmill and overground walking at standard and preferred speeds. Results: The treadmill induced almost identical mechanical changes to overground walking in TD adolescents and those with UCP, with the exception of potential and kinetic vertical and lateral mechanical works, which are both significantly increased in the overground-treadmill transition only in UCP (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Adolescents with UCP have a reduced adaptive capacity in absorbing and decelerating the speed created by a treadmill (i.e., dynamic stability) compared to TD adolescents. This may have an important implication in rehabilitation programs that assess and train gait by using a treadmill in adolescents with UCP. PMID:27148062

  7. A Genetic Approach to Identifying Signal Transduction Mechanisms Initiated by Receptors for TGF-B-Related Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    resistant to TGF-ß-induced growth arrest suggest that both types of receptors are required for signaling (Boyd and Massague, 1989; Laiho et ah, 1990...II in TGF-ß- resistant cell mutants implicates both receptor types in signal transduction. J. Biol. Chem. 265, 18518-18524. Lechleider, R. J., de...I-1 « -J AD GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-94-J-4339 TITLE: A Genetic Approach to Identifying Signal Transduction Mechanisms Initiated by Receptors

  8. Novel optical methodologies in studying mechanical signal transduction in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    For the last 3 decades evidence has been accumulating that some types of mammalian cells respond to their mechanically active environment by altering their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism. The study of such responses is very important in understanding, physiological and pathological conditions ranging from bone formation to atherosclerosis. Obtaining this knowledge has been the goal for an active research area in bioengineering termed cell mechanotransduction. The advancement of optical methodologies used in cell biology research has given the tools to elucidate cellular mechanisms that would otherwise be impossible to visualize. Combined with molecular biology techniques, they give engineers invaluable tools in understanding the chemical pathways involved in mechanotransduction. Herein we briefly review the current knowledge on mechanical signal transduction in mammalian cells, focusing on the application of novel optical techniques in the ongoing research.

  9. Lessons in Fundamental Mechanisms and Diverse Adaptations from the 2015 Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Prüβ, Birgit M.; Liu, Jun; Higgs, Penelope I.

    2015-01-01

    In response to rapid changes in their environment, bacteria control a number of processes, including motility, cell division, biofilm formation, and virulence. Research presented in January 2015 at the biennial Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST) meeting in Tucson, AZ, illustrates the elegant complexity of the nanoarrays, nanomachines, and networks of interacting proteins that mediate such processes. Studies employing an array of biophysical, genetic, cell biology, and mathematical methods are providing an increasingly detailed understanding of the mechanisms of these systems within well-studied bacteria. Furthermore, comparisons of these processes in diverse bacterial species are providing insight into novel regulatory and functional mechanisms. This review summarizes research presented at the BLAST meeting on these fundamental mechanisms and diverse adaptations, including findings of importance for applications involving bacteria of medical or agricultural relevance. PMID:26195592

  10. Transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes in solid-contact ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Bobacka, Johan; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-01-15

    Porous carbon materials and carbon nanotubes were recently used as solid contacts in ion-selective electrodes (ISE), and the signal transduction mechanism of these carbon-based materials is therefore of great interest. In this work the ion-to-electron transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes is studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are deposited on glassy carbon (GC) disk electrodes by repetitive spraying, resulting in SWCNT layers with thicknesses of 10, 35, and 50 mum. The impedance spectra of these GC/SWCNT electrodes in contact with aqueous electrolyte solution show a very small resistance and a large bulk capacitance that is related to a large effective double layer at the SWCNT/electrolyte interface. Interestingly, the impedance response of GC/SWCNT is very similar to that of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film electrodes studied earlier under the same experimental conditions. The same equivalent circuit is valid for both types of materials. The reason is that both materials can be described schematically as an asymmetric capacitor where one side is formed by electronic charge (electrons/holes) in the SWCNT wall or along the conjugated polymer chain of PEDOT and the other side is formed by ions (anions/cations) in the solution (or in the ion-selective membrane when used as a solid contact in ISE).

  11. The Clickable Guard Cell, Version II: Interactive Model of Guard Cell Signal Transduction Mechanisms and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kwak, June M; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-01-01

    Guard cells are located in the leaf epidermis and pairs of guard cells surround and form stomatal pores, which regulate CO(2) influx from the atmosphere into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation. Stomatal guard cells also regulate water loss of plants via transpiration to the atmosphere. Signal transduction mechanisms in guard cells integrate a multitude of different stimuli to modulate stomatal apertures. Stomata open in response to light. Stomata close in response to drought stress, elevated CO(2), ozone and low humidity. In response to drought, plants synthesize the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) that triggers closing of stomatal pores. Guard cells have become a highly developed model system for dissecting signal transduction mechanisms in plants and for elucidating how individual signaling mechanisms can interact within a network in a single cell. Many new findings have been made in the last few years. This chapter is an update of an electronic interactive chapter in the previous edition of The Arabidopsis Book (Mäser et al. 2003). Here we focus on mechanisms for which genes and mutations have been characterized, including signaling components for which there is substantial signaling, biochemical and genetic evidence. Ion channels have been shown to represent targets of early signal transduction mechanisms and provide functional signaling and quantitative analysis points to determine where and how mutations affect branches within the guard cell signaling network. Although a substantial number of genes and proteins that function in guard cell signaling have been identified in recent years, there are many more left to be identified and the protein-protein interactions within this network will be an important subject of future research. A fully interactive clickable electronic version of this publication can be accessed at the following web site: http://www-biology.ucsd.edu/labs/schroeder/clickablegc2/. The interactive clickable version includes the following

  12. Signal Transduction Mechanisms of Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Emerging Role of Lipin-1

    PubMed Central

    You, Min; Jogasuria, Alvin; Lee, Kwangwon; Wu, Jiashin; Zhang, Yanqiao; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Sadana, Prabodh

    2016-01-01

    Lipin-1, a mammalian phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP), is a bi-functional molecule involved in various signaling pathways via its function as a PAP enzyme in the triglyceride synthesis pathway and in the nucleus as a transcriptional co-regulator. In the liver, lipin-1 is known to play a vital role in controlling the lipid metabolism and inflammation process at multiple regulatory levels. Alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) is one of the earliest forms of liver injury and approximately 8–20% of patients with simple steatosis can develop into more severe forms of liver injury, including steatohepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The signal transduction mechanisms for alcohol-induced detrimental effects in liver involves alteration of complex and multiple signaling pathways largely governed by a central and upstream signaling system, namely, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-AMP activated kinase (AMPK) axis. Emerging evidence suggests a pivotal role of lipin-1 as a crucial downstream regulator of SIRT1-AMPK signaling system that is likely to be ultimately responsible for development and progression of AFLD. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that ethanol exposure significantly induces lipin-1 gene and protein expression levels in cultured hepatocytes and in the livers of rodents, induces lipin-1-PAP activity, impairs the functional activity of nuclear lipin-1, disrupts lipin-1 mRNA alternative splicing and induces lipin-1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Such impairment in response to ethanol leads to derangement of hepatic lipid metabolism, and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines in the livers of the rodents and human alcoholics. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of lipin-1 in the pathogenesis of AFLD and its potential signal transduction mechanisms. PMID:26278388

  13. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  14. Walking at non-constant speeds: mechanical work, pendular transduction, and energy congruity.

    PubMed

    Balbinot, G

    2017-05-01

    Although almost half of all walking bouts in urban environments consist of less than 12 consecutive steps and several day-to-day gait activities contain transient gait responses, in most studies gait analysis is performed at steady-state. This study aimed to analyze external (Wext ) and internal mechanical work (Wint ), pendulum-like mechanics, and elastic energy usage during constant and non-constant speeds. The mechanical work, pendular transduction, and energy congruity (an estimate of storage and release of elastic energy) during walking were computed using two force platforms. We found that during accelerating gait (+NCS) energy recovery is maintained, besides extra W(+)ext , for decelerating gait (-NCS) poor energy recovery was counterbalanced by W(-)ext and C% predominance. We report an increase in elastic energy usage with speed (4-11%). Both W(-)ext and %C suggests that elastic energy usage is higher at faster speeds and related to -NCS (≈20% of elastic energy usage). This study was the first to show evidences of elastic energy usage during constant and non-constant speeds.

  15. [Mechanism of gravi-sensing and -transduction in gravitropism of higher plants].

    PubMed

    Morita, Miyo Terao; Tasaka, Masao

    2003-08-01

    In higher plants, some organs such as roots, hypocotyls, and stems, can sense the direction of gravity to regulate their orientation. Gravitropic response is composed of four steps; 1. gravity sensing and conversion of physical stimuli to biochemical signals, 2. intracellular signal transduction in gravity sensing cells, 3. signal transmitting to responding tissues, 4. differential growth of organs. Here we focus on the former two steps. Recent studies using modern technique have gradually unveiled early events and mechanism of gravitropic response. Genetic approach provided evidences that strongly support the classical theory for gravity sensing (step 1). Computational analysis suggested the existence of another gravity sensing mechanism in roots. Spatial and temporal ion imaging in living organs in real time provided information on step 2. In addition, reverse genetic approach suggested asymmetrical intracellular distribution of auxin transporter [correction of transpoter] is a possible link between step 2 and 3. However, molecular basis of the signaling mechanism remains unknown. We believe extensive molecular genetic approach combined with recent techniques cited here shed the light to this ambiguous area of research.

  16. A γ-Secretase-independent Mechanism of Signal Transduction by the Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Yankner, Bruce A.

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that γ-secretase-mediated release of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular domain (AICD) results in nuclear translocation and signaling through a complex with the adaptor protein Fe65 and the histone acetyltransferase Tip60. Here, we show that APP and Fe65 activate transcription through a Gal4-Tip60 reporter in presenilin-1/2-deficient cells lacking generation of AICD. APP and Fe65 also activated transcription in the presence of γ-secretase inhibitors that prevent amyloid β-peptide production in human embryonic kidney 293 and SH-SY5Y cells. In contrast to the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain, expression of AICD did not activate transcription. An alternative mechanism for APP signal transduction is suggested by the identification of essential cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) phosphorylation sites in Tip60. Mutation of these Tip60 phosphorylation sites or treatment with the CDK inhibitor roscovitine blocked the ability of APP to signal through Tip60. Moreover, APP stabilized Tip60 through CDK-dependent phosphorylation. Subcellular fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence showed that APP recruited Tip60 to membrane compartments. Thus, APP may signal to the nucleus by a γ-secretase-independent mechanism that involves membrane sequestration and phosphorylation of Tip60. PMID:16103124

  17. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  18. Comparative Transduction Efficiency of AAV Vector Serotypes 1–6 in the Substantia Nigra and Striatum of the Primate Brain

    PubMed Central

    Markakis, Eleni A; Vives, Kenneth P; Bober, Jeremy; Leichtle, Stefan; Leranth, Csaba; Beecham, Jeff; Elsworth, John D; Roth, Robert H; Samulski, R Jude; Redmond, D Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) are promising candidates for neural cell transduction in vivo because they are nonpathogenic and achieve long-term transduction in the central nervous system. AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) is the most widely used AAV vector in clinical trials based largely on its ability to transduce neural cells in the rodent and primate brain. Prior work in rodents suggests that other serotypes might be more efficient; however, a systematic evaluation of vector transduction efficiency has not yet been performed in the primate brain. In this study, AAV viral vectors of serotypes 1–6 with an enhanced green-fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were generated at comparable titers, and injected in equal amounts into the brains of Chlorocebus sabaeus. Vector injections were placed in the substantia nigra (SN) and the caudate nucleus (CD). One month after injection, immunohistochemistry for GFP was performed and the total number of GFP+ cells was calculated using unbiased stereology. AAV5 was the most efficient vector, not only transducing significantly more cells than any other serotype, but also transducing both NeuN+ and glial-fibrillary-acidic protein positive (GFAP+) cells. These results suggest that AAV5 is a more effective vector than AAV2 at delivering potentially therapeutic transgenes to the nigrostriatal system of the primate brain. PMID:20010918

  19. The effect of flavonoids on transduction mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide-treated human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Jiménez-Estrada, Manuel; Maldonado, Silvia

    2007-09-01

    Periodontal disease comprises a group of infections that lead to inflammation of the gingival and destruction of periodontal tissues and is accompanied by the loss of the alveolar bone with eventual exfoliation of the teeth. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative bacteria obtained from the periodontal pocket of patients with aggressive and chronic periodontitis. This bacteria presents in the external membrane lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Flavonoids are molecules obtained from plants and possess anti-inflammatory properties. Herein we characterize the effect of the flavonoids quercetin, genistein, luteolin, and quercetagetin on LPS-activated transduction mechanism regulation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). In this study, we investigated the role of the previously mentioned flavonoids on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation induced by LPS obtained from P. gingivalis. Our results showed that LPS treatment induces activation of extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, and c-jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). All flavonoids demonstrated an inhibitory effect on MAPK activation, interleukin, 1beta, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, IL-1beta and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. The most active flavonoid was quercetagetin. Finally we found that the treatment with quercetagetin had no effect on cellular viability or in genetic material integrity.

  20. The ABA signal transduction mechanism in commercial crops: learning from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-08-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) affects a wide range of stages of plant development as well as the plant's response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Manipulation of ABA signaling in commercial crops holds promising potential for improving crop yields. Several decades of research have been invested in attempts to identify the first components of the ABA signaling cascade. It was only in 2009, that two independent groups identified the PYR/PYL/RCAR protein family as the plant ABA receptor. This finding was followed by a surge of studies on ABA signal transduction, many of them using Arabidopsis as their model. The ABA signaling cascade was found to consist of a double-negative regulatory mechanism assembled from three protein families. These include the ABA receptors, the PP2C family of inhibitors, and the kinase family, SnRK2. It was found that ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and that PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. Researchers today are examining how the elucidation of the ABA signaling cascade in Arabidopsis can be applied to improvements in commercial agriculture. In this article, we have attempted to review recent studies which address this issue. In it, we discuss various approaches useful in identifying the genetic and protein components involved. Finally, we suggest possible commercial applications of genetic manipulation of ABA signaling to improve crop yields.

  1. Conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of signal transduction among mammalian Notch family members

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tomohiko; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Aoki, Tomokazu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Honjo, Tasuku

    2001-01-01

    Mouse Notch1, which plays an important role in cell fate determination in development, is proteolytically processed within its transmembrane domain by unidentified γ-secretase-like activity that depends on presenilin. To study this proteolytic event, we established a cell-free Notch cleavage assay system using the membrane fraction of fibroblast transfectants of various Notch constructs with deletion of the extracellular portion (Notch ΔE). The cytoplasmic portion of Notch1 ΔE was released from the membrane upon incubation at 37°C, which was inhibited by the specific γ-secretase inhibitor, MW167, or by overexpression of dominant negative presenilin1. Likewise, other members of mouse Notch family were proteolytically cleaved in a presenilin-dependent, MW167-sensitive manner in vivo as well as in the cell-free Notch ΔE cleavage assay system. All four members of the mouse Notch family migrated to the nucleus and activated the transcription from the promoter carrying the RBP-J consensus sequences after they were released from the membrane. These results demonstrate the conserved biochemical mechanism of signal transduction among mammalian Notch family members. PMID:11459941

  2. Gene transfer to pre-hematopoietic and committed hematopoietic precursors in the early mouse Yolk Sac: a comparative study between in situ electroporation and retroviral transduction

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, Sébastien JD; Alves-Leiva, Celmar; Lécluse, Yann; Martin, Patrick; Albagli, Olivier; Godin, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic development in vertebrate embryos results from the sequential contribution of two pools of precursors independently generated. While intra-embryonic precursors harbour the features of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), precursors formed earlier in the yolk sac (YS) display limited differentiation and self-renewal potentials. The mechanisms leading to the generation of the precursors in both sites are still largely unknown, as are the molecular basis underlying their different potential. A possible approach to assess the role of candidate genes is to transfer or modulate their expression/activity in both sites. We thus designed and compared transduction protocols to target either native extra-embryonic precursors, or hematopoietic precursors. Results One transduction protocol involves transient modification of gene expression through in situ electroporation of the prospective blood islands, which allows the evolution of transfected mesodermal cells in their "normal" environment, upon organ culture. Following in situ electroporation of a GFP reporter construct into the YS cavity of embryos at post-streak (mesodermal/pre-hematopoietic precursors) or early somite (hematopoietic precursors) stages, high GFP expression levels as well as a good preservation of cell viability is observed in YS explants. Moreover, the erythro-myeloid progeny typical of the YS arises from GFP+ mesodermal cells or hematopoietic precursors, even if the number of targeted precursors is low. The second approach, based on retroviral transduction allows a very efficient transduction of large precursor numbers, but may only be used to target 8 dpc YS hematopoietic precursors. Again, transduced cells generate a progeny quantitatively and qualitatively similar to that of control YS. Conclusion We thus provide two protocols whose combination may allow a thorough study of both early and late events of hematopoietic development in the murine YS. In situ electroporation constitutes

  3. The analysis of the mechanosensory origin of the infrared sensilla in Melanophila acuminata (Coeloptera; Buprestidae) adduces new insight into the transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anke; Sehrbrock, Angelika; Schmitz, Helmut

    2007-09-01

    The thoracic infrared (IR) sensilla of the pyrophilous jewel beetle Melanophila acuminata most likely have evolved from hair mechanoreceptors (sensilla trichodea). To further elucidate the sensory transduction mechanism, the morphology of IR sensilla and of neighbouring hair mechanoreceptors was investigated by using conventional electron microscopical techniques (SEM, TEM) in combination with focused ion beam milling (FIB). It was assumed that any deviation from the bauplan of a sensillum trichodeum is of particular concern for the transduction of IR radiation into a mechanical stimulus. Thus, the structures supposed to be relevant for stimulus uptake and transduction were homologized. Compared to a hair mechanoreceptor, an IR sensillum shows the following special features: (i) the formation of a complex cuticular sphere instead of the bristle; the sphere consists of an outer exocuticular shell as well as of an inner porous mesocuticular part. (ii) The enclosure of the dendritic tip of the mechanosensitive neuron inside the sphere in a fluid-filled inner pressure chamber which is connected with a system of microcavities and nanocanals in the mesocuticular part. Hence we propose that an IR sensillum most probably acts as a microfluidic converter of infrared radiation into an increase in internal pressure inside the sphere which is measured by the mechanosensitive neuron.

  4. An investigation into membrane bound redox carriers involved in energy transduction mechanism in Brevibacterium linens DSM 20158 with unsequenced genome.

    PubMed

    Shabbiri, Khadija; Botting, Catherine H; Adnan, Ahmad; Fuszard, Matthew; Naseem, Shahid; Ahmed, Safeer; Shujaat, Shahida; Syed, Quratulain; Ahmad, Waqar

    2014-04-01

    Brevibacterium linens (B. linens) DSM 20158 with an unsequenced genome can be used as a non-pathogenic model to study features it has in common with other unsequenced pathogens of the same genus on the basis of comparative proteome analysis. The most efficient way to kill a pathogen is to target its energy transduction mechanism. In the present study, we have identified the redox protein complexes involved in the electron transport chain of B. linens DSM 20158 from their clear homology with the shot-gun genome sequenced strain BL2 of B. linens by using the SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with nano LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. B. linens is found to have a branched electron transport chain (Respiratory chain), in which electrons can enter the respiratory chain either at NADH (Complex I) or at Complex II level or at the cytochrome level. Moreover, we are able to isolate, purify, and characterize the membrane bound Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase), Complex III (menaquinone cytochrome c reductase cytochrome c subunit, Complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and Complex V (ATP synthase) of B. linens strain DSM 20158.

  5. Mechanisms of signal transduction by ethylene: overlapping and non-overlapping signalling roles in a receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Wang, Xiaomin; Binder, Brad M.; Schaller, G. Eric

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene regulates growth and development as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Over the last few decades, key elements involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified through genetic approaches, these elements defining a pathway that extends from initial ethylene perception at the endoplasmic reticulum to changes in transcriptional regulation within the nucleus. Here, we present our current understanding of ethylene signal transduction, focusing on recent developments that support a model with overlapping and non-overlapping roles for members of the ethylene receptor family. We consider the evidence supporting this model for sub-functionalization within the receptor family, and then discuss mechanisms by which such a sub-functionalization may occur. To this end, we consider the importance of receptor interactions in modulating their signal output and how such interactions vary in the receptor family. In addition, we consider evidence indicating that ethylene signal output by the receptors involves both phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent mechanisms. We conclude with a current model for signalling by the ethylene receptors placed within the overall context of ethylene signal transduction. PMID:23543258

  6. Studies of Membrane Associated Energy Transduction Mechanisms in Pathological States: Chemical and Biochemical Studies of PGB sub x.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-30

    count and aastric acid secretion are evaluated. As shown in Table I the bleedinq score in the groups given P(M in doses of 1 to 5 mxAg were...gastric acid output of the 1 mg/g PGBx group was -21 - -= :’r 0.236 + 0.173 meq/three hours and the control group was 0.189 + 0.139 per three hours. The t...AD-AlSO 289 HMNNEMANN MEDICAL COLL AND HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA PA -ETC F/6 6/ 1 STUDIES OF MERANE ASSOCIATED ENERGY TRANSDUCTION MECHANISMS I-ETCfU) AUG

  7. Retroviral Transduction of Helper T Cells as a Genetic Approach to Study Mechanisms Controlling their Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yogesh; Garden, Oliver A.; Lang, Florian; Cobb, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Helper T cell development and function must be tightly regulated to induce an appropriate immune response that eliminates specific pathogens yet prevents autoimmunity. Many approaches involving different model organisms have been utilized to understand the mechanisms controlling helper T cell development and function. However, studies using mouse models have proven to be highly informative due to the availability of genetic, cellular, and biochemical systems. One genetic approach in mice used by many labs involves retroviral transduction of primary helper T cells. This is a powerful approach due to its relative ease, making it accessible to almost any laboratory with basic skills in molecular biology and immunology. Therefore, multiple genes in wild type or mutant forms can readily be tested for function in helper T cells to understand their importance and mechanisms of action. We have optimized this approach and describe here the protocols for production of high titer retroviruses, isolation of primary murine helper T cells, and their transduction by retroviruses and differentiation toward the different helper subsets. Finally, the use of this approach is described in uncovering mechanisms utilized by microRNAs (miRNAs) to regulate pathways controlling helper T cell development and function. PMID:27842353

  8. TRPV Ion Channels and Sensory Transduction of Osmotic and Mechanical Stimuli in Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedtke, Wolfgang

    In signal transduction in metazoan cells, ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family have been identified as responding to diverse external and internal stimuli, amongst them osmotic stimuli. This chapter will highlight findings on the TRP vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily - both vertebrate and invertebrate members. Of the six mammalian TRPV channels, TRPV1, 2 and 4 have been demonstrated to function in transduction of osmotic stimuli. TRPV channels have been found to function in cellular as well as systemic osmotic homeostasis in vertebrates. Invertebrate TRPV channels - five in Caenorhabditis elegans and two in Drosophila - have been shown to play a role in mechanosensation such as hearing and proprioception in Drosophila and nose touch in C. elegans, and in the response to osmotic stimuli in C. elegans. In a striking example of evolutionary conservation of function, mammalian TRPV4 has been found to rescue osmo- and mechano-sensory deficits of the TRPV mutant strain osm-9 in C. elegans, despite the fact that the respective proteins share not more than 26% orthology.

  9. Comparative RNA-sequencing analysis of mthl1 functions and signal transductions in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Wu, Wei; Sang, Ming; Liu, Xing; Hu, Xingxing; Yun, Xiaopei; Li, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Methuselah-like 1 of Tribolium castaneum (TcMthl1) has been reported to play crucial roles in development, lifespan, stress resistance and reproduction. However, the signaling system of TcMthl1 is unknown. Thus, we compare the transcriptome profile of RNAi treated larvae (ds-Tcmthl1) and control larvae of T. castaneum by RNA-sequencing, and obtained 14,613,514 sequence reads aligned with 13,533 genes; 812 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. These DEGs were classified into 47 GO functional groups, including such functions as the immune system process, the response to stimulus, the developmental process and reproduction. Interestingly, knock-down of Tcmthl1 suppressed both of Toll and IMD immunity pathways which most likely modulated the effects of Tcmthl1 on lifespan and stress resistance. Additionally, the DEGs encoding Blimp-1, Ftz-F1, E74 and Timeless may participate in the development and reproduction of ds-Tcmthl1 insects. The findings of these DEGs and pathways will provide valuable insight into TcMthl1 signaling and regulation system.

  10. Comparative Genomics of the Vertebrate Insulin/TOR Signal Transduction Pathway: A Network-Level Analysis of Selective Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Ponce, David; Aguadé, Montserrat; Rozas, Julio

    2011-01-01

    Complexity of biological function relies on large networks of interacting molecules. However, the evolutionary properties of these networks are not fully understood. It has been shown that selective pressures depend on the position of genes in the network. We have previously shown that in the Drosophila insulin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signal transduction pathway there is a correlation between the pathway position and the strength of purifying selection, with the downstream genes being most constrained. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary dynamics of this well-characterized pathway in vertebrates. More specifically, we determined the impact of natural selection on the evolution of 72 genes of this pathway. We found that in vertebrates there is a similar gradient of selective constraint in the insulin/TOR pathway to that found in Drosophila. This feature is neither the result of a polarity in the impact of positive selection nor of a series of factors affecting selective constraint levels (gene expression level and breadth, codon bias, protein length, and connectivity). We also found that pathway genes encoding physically interacting proteins tend to evolve under similar selective constraints. The results indicate that the architecture of the vertebrate insulin/TOR pathway constrains the molecular evolution of its components. Therefore, the polarity detected in Drosophila is neither specific nor incidental of this genus. Hence, although the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear, these may be similar in both vertebrates and Drosophila. PMID:21149867

  11. Two interacting olfactory transduction mechanisms have linked polarities and dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster antennal basiconic sensilla neurons.

    PubMed

    Schuckel, Julia; Torkkeli, Päivi H; French, Andrew S

    2009-07-01

    We measured frequency response functions between concentrations of fruit odorants and individual action potentials in large basiconic sensilla of the Drosophila melanogaster antenna. A new method of randomly varying odorant concentration was combined with rapid, continuous measurement of concentration at the antenna by a miniature photoionization detector. All frequency responses decreased progressively at frequencies approaching 100 Hz, providing an upper limit for the dynamics of Drosophila olfaction. We found two distinct response patterns: excitatory band-pass frequency responses were seen with ethyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, and hexanol, whereas inhibitory low-pass responses were seen with methyl salicylate and phenylethyl acetate. Band-pass responses peaked at 1-10 Hz. Frequency responses could be well fitted by simple linear filter equations, and the fitted parameters were consistent within each of the two types of responses. Experiments with equal mixtures of excitatory and inhibitory odorants gave responses that were characteristic of the inhibitory components, indicating that interaction during transduction causes inhibitory odorants to suppress the responses to excitatory odorants. Plots of response amplitude versus odorant concentration indicated that the odorant concentrations used were within approximately linear regions of the dose response relationships. We also estimated linear information capacity from the coherence function of each recording. Although coherence was relatively high, indicating a large signal-to-noise ratio, information capacity for olfaction was much lower than comparable estimates for mechanotransduction or visual transduction because of the limited bandwidth of olfaction. These data offer new insights into transduction by primary chemoreceptors and place temporal constraints on Drosophila olfactory behavior.

  12. Structure and mechanism of the essential two-component signal-transduction system WalKR in Staphylococcus aureus

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Quanjiang; Chen, Peter J.; Qin, Guangrong; ...

    2016-03-18

    Most low GC Gram-positive bacteria possess an essential walKR two-component system (TCS) for signal transduction involved in regulating cell wall homoeostasis. Despite the well-established intracellular regulatory mechanism, the role of this TCS in extracellular signal recognition and factors that modulate the activity of this TCS remain largely unknown. Here we identify the extracellular receptor of the kinase ‘WalK’ (erWalK) as a key hub for bridging extracellular signal input and intracellular kinase activity modulation in Staphylococcus aureus. Characterization of the crystal structure of erWalK revealed a canonical Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain for signal sensing. Single amino-acid mutation of potential signal-transduction residues resultedmore » in severely impaired function of WalKR. A small molecule derived from structure-based virtual screening against erWalK is capable of selectively activating the walKR TCS. Lastly, the molecular level characterization of erWalK will not only facilitate exploration of natural signal(s) but also provide a template for rational design of erWalK inhibitors.« less

  13. Structure and mechanism of the essential two-component signal-transduction system WalKR in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Quanjiang; Chen, Peter J.; Qin, Guangrong; Deng, Xin; Hao, Ziyang; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Yeo, Won-Sik; Quang, Jenny Winjing; Cho, Hoonsik; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Weng, Xiaocheng; You, Qiancheng; Luan, Chi-Hao; Yang, Xiaojing; Bae, Taeok; Yu, Kunqian; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Most low GC Gram-positive bacteria possess an essential walKR two-component system (TCS) for signal transduction involved in regulating cell wall homoeostasis. Despite the well-established intracellular regulatory mechanism, the role of this TCS in extracellular signal recognition and factors that modulate the activity of this TCS remain largely unknown. Here we identify the extracellular receptor of the kinase ‘WalK' (erWalK) as a key hub for bridging extracellular signal input and intracellular kinase activity modulation in Staphylococcus aureus. Characterization of the crystal structure of erWalK revealed a canonical Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain for signal sensing. Single amino-acid mutation of potential signal-transduction residues resulted in severely impaired function of WalKR. A small molecule derived from structure-based virtual screening against erWalK is capable of selectively activating the walKR TCS. The molecular level characterization of erWalK will not only facilitate exploration of natural signal(s) but also provide a template for rational design of erWalK inhibitors. PMID:26987594

  14. Potential insight for drug discovery from high fidelity receptor-mediated transduction mechanisms in insects

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B.; Raffa, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is a pervasive and growing concern about the small number of new pharmaceutical agents. There are many proposed explanations for this trend that do not involve the drug-discovery process per se, but the discovery process itself has also come under scrutiny. If the current paradigms are indeed not working, where are novel ideas to come from? Perhaps it is time to look to novel sources. Areas covered The receptor-signaling and 2nd-messenger transduction processes present in insects are quite similar to those in mammals (involving G proteins, ion channels, etc.). However, a review of these systems reveals an unprecedented degree of high potency and receptor selectivity to an extent greater than that modeled in most current drug-discovery approaches. Expert opinion A better understanding of insect receptor pharmacology could stimulate novel theoretical and practical ideas in mammalian pharmacology (drug discovery) and, conversely, the application of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry principles could stimulate novel advances in entomology (safer and more targeted control of pest species). PMID:21984882

  15. Toward Quantifying the Electrostatic Transduction Mechanism in Carbon Nanotube Biomolecular Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Kybert, Nicholas; Mendoza, Ryan; Dailey, Jennifer; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2013-03-01

    Despite the great promise of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) for applications in chemical and biochemical detection, a quantitative understanding of sensor responses is lacking. To explore the role of electrostatics in sensor transduction, experiments were conducted with a set of similar compounds designed to adsorb onto the CNT FET via a pyrene linker group and take on a set of known charge states under ambient conditions. Acidic and basic species were observed to induce threshold voltage shifts of opposite sign, consistent with gating of the CNT FET by local charges due to protonation or deprotonation of the pyrene compounds by interfacial water. The magnitude of the gate voltage shift was controlled by the distance between the charged group and the CNT. Additionally, functionalization with an uncharged pyrene compound showed a threshold shift ascribed to its molecular dipole moment. This work illustrates a method for producing CNT FETs with controlled values of the turnoff gate voltage, and more generally, these results will inform the development of quantitative models for the response of CNT FET chemical and biochemical sensors. As an example, the results of an experiment detecting biomarkers of Lyme disease will be discussed in the context of this model.

  16. Interaction of the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT with heparan sulfate: binding mechanism and thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, André; Seelig, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The positively charged protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 TAT protein (TAT-PTD; residues 47-57 of TAT) rapidly translocates across the plasma membrane of living cells. This property is exploited for the delivery of proteins, drugs, and genes into cells. The mechanism of this translocation is, however, not yet understood. Recent theories for translocation suggest binding of the protein transduction domain (PTD) to extracellular glycosaminoglycans as a possible mechanism. We have studied the binding equilibrium between TAT-PTD and three different glycosaminoglycans with high sensitivity isothermal titration calorimetry and provide the first quantitative thermodynamic description. The polysulfonated macromolecules were found to exhibit multiple identical binding sites for TAT-PTD with only small differences between the three species as far as the thermodynamic parameters are concerned. Heparan sulfate (HS, molecular weight, 14.2 +/- 2 kDa) has 6.3 +/- 1.0 independent binding sites for TAT-PTD which are characterized by a binding constant K0 = (6.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(5) M(-1) and a reaction enthalpy deltaHpep0 = -4.6 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol at 28 degrees C. The binding affinity, deltaGpep0, is determined to equal extent by enthalpic and entropic contributions. The HS-TAT-PTD complex formation entails a positive heat capacity change of deltaCp0 = +135 cal/mol peptide, which is characteristic of a charge neutralization reaction. This is in contrast to hydrophobic binding reactions which display a large negative heat capacity change. The stoichiometry of 6-7 TAT-PTD molecules per HS corresponds to an electric charge neutralization. Light scattering data demonstrate a maximum scattering intensity at this stoichiometric ratio, the intensity of which depends on the order of mixing of the two components. The data suggest cross-linking and/or aggregation of HS-TAT-PTD complexes. Two other glycosaminoglycans, namely heparin and chondroitin sulfate B, were also studied with isothermal

  17. The mechanism of sensory transduction in a mechanoreceptor. Functional stages in campaniform sensilla during the molting cycle

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the ultrastructural modifications that cockroach campaniform sensilla undergo at three major stages in the molting cycle and finds that the sensilla are physiological functional at all developmental stages leading to ecdysis. Late stage animals on the verge of ecdysis have two completely separate cuticles. The campaniform sensillum sends a 220-mum extension of the sensory process through a hole in its cap in the new (inner) cuticle across a fluid-filled molting space to its functional insertion in the cap in the old (outer) cuticle. Mechanical stimulation of the old cap excites the sensillum. The ultrastructural geometry of late stage sensilla, coupled with the observation they are physiolgically functional, supports the hypotheses (a) that sensory transduction occurs at the tip of the sensory process, and (b) that cap identation causes the cap cuticle to pinch the tip of the sensory process, thereby stimulating the sensillum. PMID:993271

  18. Novel effects of Helicobacter pylori CagA on key genes of gastric cancer signal transduction: a comparative transfection study.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Farzam; Peerayeh, Shahin N; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Maghsoudi, Nader; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Siadat, Seyed D; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is now recognized as a worldwide problem. Helicobacter pylori CagA is the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified in relation to human cancer. Helicobacter pylori CagA is noted for structural diversity in its C-terminal region (contains EPIYA motifs), with which CagA interacts with numerous host cell proteins. Deregulation of host signaling by translocated bacterial proteins provides a new aspect of microbial-host cell interaction. The aim of this study is to compare the cellular effects of two different CagA EPIYA motifs on identified signaling pathways involve in gastric carcinogenesis. To investigate the effects of CagA protein carboxyl region variations on the transcription of genes involved in gastric epithelial carcinogenesis pathways, the eukaryotic vector carrying the cagA gene (ABC and ABCCC types) was transfected into gastric cancer cell line. The 42 identified key genes of signal transduction involved in gastric cancer were analyzed at the transcription level by real-time PCR. The results of real-time PCR provide us important clue that the ABCCC oncoprotein variant can change the fate of the cell completely different from ABC type. In fact, these result proposed that the ABCCC type can induce the intestinal metaplasia, IL-8, perturbation of Crk adaptor proteins, anti-apoptotic effect and carcinogenic effect more significantly than ABC type. These data support our hypothesis of a complex interaction of host cell and these two different H. pylori effector variants that determines host cellular fate.

  19. A local difference in Hedgehog signal transduction increases mechanical cell bond tension and biases cell intercalations along the Drosophila anteroposterior compartment boundary.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Katrin; Umetsu, Daiki; Aliee, Maryam; Sui, Liyuan; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian

    2015-11-15

    Tissue organization requires the interplay between biochemical signaling and cellular force generation. The formation of straight boundaries separating cells with different fates into compartments is important for growth and patterning during tissue development. In the developing Drosophila wing disc, maintenance of the straight anteroposterior (AP) compartment boundary involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell bonds along the boundary. The biochemical signals that regulate mechanical tension along the AP boundary, however, remain unknown. Here, we show that a local difference in Hedgehog signal transduction activity between anterior and posterior cells is necessary and sufficient to increase mechanical tension along the AP boundary. This difference in Hedgehog signal transduction is also required to bias cell rearrangements during cell intercalations to keep the characteristic straight shape of the AP boundary. Moreover, severing cell bonds along the AP boundary does not reduce tension at neighboring bonds, implying that active mechanical tension is upregulated, cell bond by cell bond. Finally, differences in the expression of the homeodomain-containing protein Engrailed also contribute to the straight shape of the AP boundary, independently of Hedgehog signal transduction and without modulating cell bond tension. Our data reveal a novel link between local differences in Hedgehog signal transduction and a local increase in active mechanical tension of cell bonds that biases junctional rearrangements. The large-scale shape of the AP boundary thus emerges from biochemical signals inducing patterns of active tension on cell bonds.

  20. Amiloride-Insensitive Salt Taste Is Mediated by Two Populations of Type III Taste Cells with Distinct Transduction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Sunil K.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Responses in the amiloride-insensitive (AI) pathway, one of the two pathways mediating salty taste in mammals, are modulated by the size of the anion of a salt. This “anion effect” has been hypothesized to result from inhibitory transepithelial potentials (TPs) generated across the lingual epithelium as cations permeate through tight junctions and leave their larger and less permeable anions behind (Ye et al., 1991). We tested directly the necessity of TPs for the anion effect by measuring responses to NaCl and Na-gluconate (small and large anion sodium salts, respectively) in isolated taste cells from mouse circumvallate papillae. Using calcium imaging, we identified AI salt-responsive type III taste cells and demonstrated that they compose a subpopulation of acid-responsive taste cells. Even in the absence of TPs, many (66%) AI salt-responsive type III taste cells still exhibited the anion effect, demonstrating that some component of the transduction machinery for salty taste in type III cells is sensitive to anion size. We hypothesized that osmotic responses could explain why a minority of type III cells (34%) had AI salt responses but lacked anion sensitivity. All AI type III cells had osmotic responses to cellobiose, which were significantly modulated by extracellular sodium concentration, suggesting the presence of a sodium-conducting osmotically sensitive ion channel. However, these responses were significantly larger in AI type III cells that did not exhibit the anion effect. These findings indicate that multiple mechanisms could underlie AI salt responses in type III taste cells, one of which may contribute to the anion effect. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the mechanisms underlying salty taste will help inform strategies to combat the health problems associated with NaCl overconsumption by humans. Of the two pathways underlying salty taste in mammals, the amiloride-insensitive (AI) pathway is the least understood. Using calcium imaging of

  1. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  2. In situ tip-recordings found no evidence for an Orco-based ionotropic mechanism of pheromone-transduction in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Andreas; Funk, Nico W; Mukunda, Latha; Gawalek, Petra; Werckenthin, Achim; Hansson, Bill S; Wicher, Dieter; Stengl, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of insect odor transduction are still controversial. Insect odorant receptors (ORs) are 7TM receptors with inverted membrane topology. They colocalize with a conserved coreceptor (Orco) with chaperone and ion channel function. Some studies suggest that insects employ exclusively ionotropic odor transduction via OR-Orco heteromers. Other studies provide evidence for different metabotropic odor transduction cascades, which employ second messenger-gated ion channel families for odor transduction. The hawkmoth Manduca sexta is an established model organism for studies of insect olfaction, also due to the availability of the hawkmoth-specific pheromone blend with its main component bombykal. Previous patch-clamp studies on primary cell cultures of M. sexta olfactory receptor neurons provided evidence for a pheromone-dependent activation of a phospholipase Cβ. Pheromone application elicited a sequence of one rapid, apparently IP3-dependent, transient and two slower Ca(2+)-dependent inward currents. It remains unknown whether additionally an ionotropic pheromone-transduction mechanism is employed. If indeed an OR-Orco ion channel complex underlies an ionotropic mechanism, then Orco agonist-dependent opening of the OR-Orco channel pore should add up to pheromone-dependent opening of the pore. Here, in tip-recordings from intact pheromone-sensitive sensilla, perfusion with the Orco agonist VUAA1 did not increase pheromone-responses within the first 1000 ms. However, VUAA1 increased spontaneous activity of olfactory receptor neurons Zeitgebertime- and dose-dependently. We conclude that we find no evidence for an Orco-dependent ionotropic pheromone transduction cascade in M. sexta. Instead, in M. sexta Orco appears to be a slower, second messenger-dependent pacemaker channel which affects kinetics and threshold of pheromone-detection via changes of intracellular Ca(2+) baseline concentrations.

  3. Forward and reverse transduction at the limit of sensitivity studied by correlating electrical and mechanical fluctuations in frog saccular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Denk, W; Webb, W W

    1992-06-01

    The spontaneous fluctuations of the intracellular voltage and the position of the sensory hairbundle were measured concurrently using intracellular microelectrodes and an optical differential micro interferometer. Magnitude and frequency distribution of the hair bundles' spontaneous motion suggest that it consists mostly of Brownian motion. The electrical noise, however, exceeds the value expected for thermal Johnson noise by several orders of magnitude, and its frequency distribution reflects the transduction tuning properties of the hair cells. Frequently, a strong correlation was observed between the fluctuations of the hair bundle position and the intracellular electrical noise. From the properties of the correlation and from experiments involving mechanical stimulation we conclude that in most cases mechano-electrical transduction of the bundles' Brownian motion causes this correlation. Small signal transduction sensitivities ranged from 18 to 500 microV/nm. Bundle motion that was observed in response to current injection in more than half of the cells suggests the existence of a fast reverse (electro-mechanical) transduction mechanism to be common in these cells. The sensitivities could be as high as 600 pm of bundle deflection per millivolt of membrane potential change. In a significant minority (4 in 44) of cells, all showing excess electrical noise, we found 'non-causal' components of the electro-mechanical correlation, and in two of those cells narrow-band bundle motion in excess of their thermal motion at frequencies coincident with peaks in the intracellular noise was observed.

  4. Lung epithelium as a sentinel and effector system in pneumonia--molecular mechanisms of pathogen recognition and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hippenstiel, Stefan; Opitz, Bastian; Schmeck, Bernd; Suttorp, Norbert

    2006-07-08

    Pneumonia, a common disease caused by a great diversity of infectious agents is responsible for enormous morbidity and mortality worldwide. The bronchial and lung epithelium comprises a large surface between host and environment and is attacked as a primary target during lung infection. Besides acting as a mechanical barrier, recent evidence suggests that the lung epithelium functions as an important sentinel system against pathogens. Equipped with transmembranous and cytosolic pathogen-sensing pattern recognition receptors the epithelium detects invading pathogens. A complex signalling results in epithelial cell activation, which essentially participates in initiation and orchestration of the subsequent innate and adaptive immune response. In this review we summarize recent progress in research focussing on molecular mechanisms of pathogen detection, host cell signal transduction, and subsequent activation of lung epithelial cells by pathogens and their virulence factors and point to open questions. The analysis of lung epithelial function in the host response in pneumonia may pave the way to the development of innovative highly needed therapeutics in pneumonia in addition to antibiotics.

  5. The human brain endothelial barrier: transcytosis of AAV9, transduction by AAV2: An Editorial Highlight for 'Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells'.

    PubMed

    Weber-Adrian, Danielle; Heinen, Stefan; Silburt, Joseph; Noroozian, Zeinab; Aubert, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Read the highlighted article 'Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells' on page 216.

  6. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin-focal adhesion kinase signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer.

  7. Snapshots of Conformational Changes Shed Light into the NtrX Receiver Domain Signal Transduction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ignacio; Otero, Lisandro H; Klinke, Sebastián; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2015-10-09

    Brucella abortus is an important pathogenic bacterium that has to overcome oxygen deficiency in order to achieve a successful infection. Previously, we proved that a two-component system formed by the histidine kinase NtrY and the response regulator NtrX is essential to achieve an adaptive response to low oxygen tension conditions. Even though the relevance of this signaling pathway has already been demonstrated in other microorganisms, its molecular activation mechanism has not yet been described in detail. In this article, we report the first crystal structures from different conformations of the NtrX receiver domain from B. abortus, and we propose a sequence of events to explain the structural rearrangements along the activation process. The analysis of the structures obtained in the presence of the phosphoryl group analog beryllofluoride led us to postulate that changes in the interface formed by the α4 helix and the β5 strand are important for the activation, producing a reorientation of the α5 helix. Also, a biochemical characterization of the NtrX receiver domain enzymatic activities was performed, describing its autophosphorylation and autodephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, the role of H85, an important residue, was addressed by site-directed mutagenesis. Overall, these results provide significant structural basis for understanding the response regulator activation in this bacterial two-component system.

  8. Control of CREB expression in tumors: from molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Steven, André; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) protein has pleiotropic activities in physiologic processes. Due to its central position downstream of many growth signaling pathways CREB has the ability to influence cell survival, growth and differentiation of normal, but also of tumor cells suggesting an oncogenic potential of CREB. Indeed, increased CREB expression and activation is associated with tumor progression, chemotherapy resistance and reduced patients' survival. We summarize here the different cellular functions of CREB in tumors of distinct histology as well as its use as potential prognostic marker. In addition, the underlying molecular mechanisms to achieve constitutive activation of CREB including structural alterations, such as gene amplification and chromosomal translocation, and deregulation, which could occur at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level, will be described. Since downregulation of CREB by different strategies resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion and induction of apoptosis, the role of CREB as a promising target for cancer therapy will be also discussed. PMID:26934558

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the precise transduction mechanism in giant magnetoresistive biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Sato, Noriyuki; Bechstein, Daniel J. B.; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Wang, Junyi; Gani, Adi Wijaya; Hall, Drew A.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors consisting of many rectangular stripes are being developed for high sensitivity medical diagnostics of diseases at early stages, but many aspects of the sensing mechanism remain to be clarified. Using e-beam patterned masks on the sensors, we showed that the magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm located between the stripes predominantly determine the sensor signals over those located on the sensor stripes. Based on computational analysis, it was confirmed that the particles in the trench, particularly those near the edges of the stripes, mainly affect the sensor signals due to additional field from the stripe under an applied field. We also demonstrated that the direction of the average magnetic field from the particles that contributes to the signal is indeed the same as that of the applied field, indicating that the particles in the trench are pivotal to produce sensor signal. Importantly, the same detection principle was validated with a duplex protein assay. Also, 8 different types of sensor stripes were fabricated and design parameters were explored. According to the detection principle uncovered, GMR biosensors can be further optimized to improve their sensitivity, which is highly desirable for early diagnosis of diseases. PMID:26728870

  10. Multisite interaction with Sufu regulates Ci/Gli activity through distinct mechanisms in Hh signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuhong; Shi, Qing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-05-19

    The tumor suppressor protein Suppressor of fused (Sufu) plays a conserved role in the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway by inhibiting Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors, but the molecular mechanism by which Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity remains poorly understood. Here we show that Sufu can bind Ci/Gli through a C-terminal Sufu-interacting site (SIC) in addition to a previously identified N-terminal site (SIN), and that both SIC and SIN are required for optimal inhibition of Ci/Gli by Sufu. We show that Sufu can sequester Ci/Gli in the cytoplasm through binding to SIN while inhibiting Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus depending on SIC. We also find that binding of Sufu to SIC and the middle region of Ci can impede recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by masking its binding site in the C-terminal region of Ci. Indeed, moving the CBP-binding site to an "exposed" location can render Ci resistant to Sufu-mediated inhibition in the nucleus. Hence, our study identifies a previously unidentified and conserved Sufu-binding motif in the C-terminal region of Ci/Gli and provides mechanistic insight into how Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus.

  11. Molecular transduction mechanisms of cytokine-hormone interactions: role of gp130 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Gerez, Juan; Bonfiglio, José; Sosa, Sebastian; Giacomini, Damiana; Acuña, Matias; Nagashima, Alberto Carbia; Perone, Marcelo J; Silberstein, Susana; Renner, Ulrich; Stalla, Günter K; Arzt, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms confer on the immune system the capacity to respond with a certain degree of autonomy. However, the final outcome of an immune response depends on the interaction of the immune system with other systems. The immune and neuroendocrine systems have an intimate cross-communication that makes possible a satisfactory response to environmental changes. Part of this interaction occurs through cytokines and steroid hormones. The last step of this cross-talk is the molecular level. As a model of interaction, this review focuses on the gp130 cytokine family. These cytokines, as well as their receptors, are expressed in pituitary cells. They regulate hormone production as well as growth of pituitary cells. During acute or chronic inflammation or infection, systemic, hypothalamic and hypophyseal gp130 cytokines act on anterior pituitary cells, integrating the neuroendocrine-immune response. Disruptions of these pathways may lead not only to abnormal growth of pituitary cells but also to immune disorders, for which, based on recent findings, targeting these cytokines might be a novel therapeutic approach.

  12. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the precise transduction mechanism in giant magnetoresistive biosensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Sato, Noriyuki; Bechstein, Daniel J B; Osterfeld, Sebastian J; Wang, Junyi; Gani, Adi Wijaya; Hall, Drew A; Wang, Shan X

    2016-01-05

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors consisting of many rectangular stripes are being developed for high sensitivity medical diagnostics of diseases at early stages, but many aspects of the sensing mechanism remain to be clarified. Using e-beam patterned masks on the sensors, we showed that the magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm located between the stripes predominantly determine the sensor signals over those located on the sensor stripes. Based on computational analysis, it was confirmed that the particles in the trench, particularly those near the edges of the stripes, mainly affect the sensor signals due to additional field from the stripe under an applied field. We also demonstrated that the direction of the average magnetic field from the particles that contributes to the signal is indeed the same as that of the applied field, indicating that the particles in the trench are pivotal to produce sensor signal. Importantly, the same detection principle was validated with a duplex protein assay. Also, 8 different types of sensor stripes were fabricated and design parameters were explored. According to the detection principle uncovered, GMR biosensors can be further optimized to improve their sensitivity, which is highly desirable for early diagnosis of diseases.

  13. Ionic mechanisms for the transduction of acidic stimuli in rabbit carotid body glomus cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rocher, A; Obeso, A; Gonzalez, C; Herreros, B

    1991-01-01

    1. The release of [3H]dopamine (DA) in response to inhibition of the Na+ pump or to intracellular acid load was studied in rabbit carotid bodies (CB) previously incubated with the precursor [3H]tyrosine. The ionic requirements of the release response and the involvement of specific ion transport systems were investigated. 2. Inhibition of the Na+ pump, by incubating the CB with ouabain or in K(+)-free medium, evokes a DA release response which requires the presence of Na+ and Ca2+ in the medium and is insensitive to nisoldipine. This suggests that the response is triggered by entry of external Ca2+ through Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange, a consequence of the increase in intracellular Na+ resulting from inhibition of the pump. 3. Incubation of the CB in medium equilibrated with 20% CO2 at pH 6.6, or in medium containing the protonophore dinitrophenol (DNP) or the weak acid propionate, elicits a DA release response which requires also the presence of Na+ and Ca2+ in the medium and is insensitive to dihydropyridines. 4. Ethylisopropylamiloride (EIPA), an inhibitor of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger, markedly decreases the release response elicited by DNP or propionate in bicarbonate-free medium, but has not any effect in bicarbonate-buffered medium. In the latter condition, the EIPA-insensitive release of DA is inhibited by reducing the HCO3- concentration in the medium to 2 mM or by removal of Cl-, suggesting that in bicarbonate-buffered medium a Na(+)-dependent HCO3(-)-Cl- exchanger is involved in the release response. 5. It is concluded that the release of DA by the chemoreceptor cells in response to acidic stimulation is triggered by entry of external Ca2+ through Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange. This exchange is promoted by the increase of intracellular Na+ that results from the operation of Na(+)-coupled H(+)-extruding mechanisms activated by the acid load. PMID:1668755

  14. Signal transduction mechanisms within the entorhinal cortex that support latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael C; Gould, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Latent inhibition is a phenomenon by which pre-exposure to a conditioned-stimulus (CS), prior to subsequent pairings of that same CS with an unconditioned-stimulus (US), results in decreased conditioned responding to the CS. Previous work in our laboratory has suggested that the entorhinal cortex is critically involved in the establishment of latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Furthermore, utilizing systemic pharmacology, we have demonstrated a role for of NMDA receptors, protein kinase A (PKA), and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK, also known as ERK) in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning, but until now, where these cell signaling cascades are critically activated during latent inhibition of cued fear was unknown. Here, we use direct drug infusion to demonstrate that cell signaling via NMDA receptors, the cAMP/PKA pathway, and the MAPK pathway within the entorhinal cortex are critically involved in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. In the present study, CS pre-exposed mice received 20 CS pre-exposures 24h prior to two pairings of the same CS with a 0.53 mA foot shock US, while control animals receive no pre-exposure to the CS. The NMDA antagonist APV (0.25 or 2.5 microg/side), the cAMP inhibitor Rp-cAMP (1.8 or 18.0 microg/side), or the MAPK inhibitor U0126 (0.1 or 1.0 microg/side) were directly infused into the entorhinal cortex prior to pre-exposure. All three drugs produced dose-dependent disruptions in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Importantly, none of the drugs had any effect on cued fear conditioning when administered on training day, suggesting that the effects of each of the drugs were specific to CS pre-exposure. These results are discussed in relation to the potential mechanisms of plasticity that support latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning.

  15. Receptor subtypes and signal transduction mechanisms contributing to the estrogenic attenuation of cannabinoid-induced changes in energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Neal; Borgquist, Amanda; Wang, Kate; Jeffery, Garrett S.; Kelly, Martin J.; Wagner, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the receptor subtypes and signal transduction mechanisms contributing to the estrogenic modulation of cannabinoid-induced changes in energy balance. Food intake and, in some cases, O2 consumption, CO2 production and the respiratory exchange ratio, were evaluated in ovariectomized female guinea pigs treated s.c. with the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 or its cremephor/ethanol/0.9% saline vehicle, and either with estradiol benzoate (EB), the estrogen receptor (ER)α agonist PPT, the ERβ agonist DPN, the Gq-coupled membrane ER agonist STX, the GPR30 agonist G-1 or their respective vehicles. Patch-clamp recordings were performed in hypothalamic slices. EB, STX, PPT and G-1 decreased daily food intake. Of these, EB, STX and PPT blocked the WIN 55,212-2-induced increase in food intake within 1-4 hr. The estrogenic diminution of cannabinoid-induced hyperphagia correlated with a rapid (within 15 min) attenuation of cannabinoid-mediated decreases in glutamatergic synaptic input onto arcuate neurons, which was completely blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) and attenuated by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). STX, but not PPT, mimicked this rapid estrogenic effect. However, PPT abolished the cannabinoid-induced inhibition of glutamatergic neurotransmission in cells from animals treated 24 hr prior. The estrogenic antagonism of this presynaptic inhibition was observed in anorexigenic POMC neurons. These data reveal that estrogens negatively modulate cannabinoid-induced changes in energy balance via Gq-coupled membrane ER- and ERα-mediated mechanisms involving activation of PKC and PKA. As such, they further our understanding of the pathways through which estrogens act to temper cannabinoid sensitivity in regulating energy homeostasis in females. PMID:22538462

  16. Two-component signal transduction in Agaricus bisporus: a comparative genomic analysis with other basidiomycetes through the web-based tool BASID2CS.

    PubMed

    Lavín, José L; García-Yoldi, Alberto; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A

    2013-06-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are signal transduction mechanisms present in many eukaryotes, including fungi that play essential roles in the regulation of several cellular functions and responses. In this study, we carry out a genomic analysis of the TCS proteins in two varieties of the white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The genomes of both A. bisporus varieties contain eight genes coding for TCS proteins, which include four hybrid Histidine Kinases (HKs), a single histidine-containing phosphotransfer (HPt) protein and three Response Regulators (RRs). Comparison of the TCS proteins among A. bisporus and the sequenced basidiomycetes showed a conserved core complement of five TCS proteins including the Tco1/Nik1 hybrid HK, HPt protein and Ssk1, Skn7 and Rim15-like RRs. In addition, Dual-HKs, unusual hybrid HKs with 2 HK and 2 RR domains, are absent in A. bisporus and are limited to various species of basidiomycetes. Differential expression analysis showed no significant up- or down-regulation of the Agaricus TCS genes in the conditions/tissue analyzed with the exception of the Skn7-like RR gene (Agabi_varbisH97_2|198669) that is significantly up-regulated on compost compared to cultured mycelia. Furthermore, the pipeline web server BASID2CS (http://bioinformatics.unavarra.es:1000/B2CS/BASID2CS.htm) has been specifically designed for the identification, classification and functional annotation of putative TCS proteins from any predicted proteome of basidiomycetes using a combination of several bioinformatic approaches.

  17. Gαi2-protein-mediated signal transduction: central nervous system molecular mechanism countering the development of sodium-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wainford, Richard D; Carmichael, Casey Y; Pascale, Crissey L; Kuwabara, Jill T

    2015-01-01

    Excess dietary salt intake is an established cause of hypertension. At present, our understanding of the neuropathophysiology of salt-sensitive hypertension is limited by a lack of identification of the central nervous system mechanisms that modulate sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in response to dietary salt intake. We hypothesized that impairment of brain Gαi2-protein-gated signal transduction pathways would result in increased sympathetically mediated renal sodium retention, thus promoting the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. To test this hypothesis, naive or renal denervated Dahl salt-resistant and Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats were assigned to receive a continuous intracerebroventricular control scrambled or a targeted Gαi2-oligodeoxynucleotide infusion, and naive Brown Norway and 8-congenic DSS rats were fed a 21-day normal or high-salt diet. High salt intake did not alter blood pressure, suppressed plasma norepinephrine, and evoked a site-specific increase in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus Gαi2-protein levels in naive Brown Norway, Dahl salt-resistant, and scrambled oligodeoxynucleotide-infused Dahl salt-resistant but not DSS rats. In Dahl salt-resistant rats, Gαi2 downregulation evoked rapid renal nerve-dependent hypertension, sodium retention, and sympathoexcitation. In DSS rats, Gαi2 downregulation exacerbated salt-sensitive hypertension via a renal nerve-dependent mechanism. Congenic-8 DSS rats exhibited sodium-evoked paraventricular nucleus-specific Gαi2-protein upregulation and attenuated hypertension, sodium retention, and global sympathoexcitation compared with DSS rats. These data demonstrate that paraventricular nucleus Gαi2-protein-gated pathways represent a conserved central molecular pathway mediating sympathoinhibitory renal nerve-dependent responses evoked to maintain sodium homeostasis and a salt-resistant phenotype. Impairment of this mechanism contributes to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  18. Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Steven F; Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Mu, Dakai; Hudry, Eloise; Hyman, Bradley T; Maguire, Casey A; Ramirez, Servio H

    2017-01-01

    Developing therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases is exceedingly difficult because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Notably, emerging technologies may provide promising new options for the treatment of CNS disorders. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to transduce cells in the CNS following intravascular administration in rodents, cats, pigs, and non-human primates. These results suggest that AAV9 is capable of crossing the BBB. However, mechanisms that govern AAV9 transendothelial trafficking at the BBB remain unknown. Furthermore, possibilities that AAV9 may transduce brain endothelial cells or affect BBB integrity still require investigation. Using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells as a model of the human BBB, we performed transduction and transendothelial trafficking assays comparing AAV9 to AAV2, a serotype that does not cross the BBB or transduce endothelial cells effectively in vivo. Results of our in vitro studies indicate that AAV9 penetrates brain microvascular endothelial cells barriers more effectively than AAV2, but has reduced transduction efficiency. In addition, our data suggest that (i) AAV9 penetrates endothelial barriers through an active, cell-mediated process, and (ii) AAV9 fails to disrupt indicators of BBB integrity such as transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction protein expression/localization, and inflammatory activation status. Overall, this report shows how human brain endothelial cells configured in BBB models can be utilized for evaluating transendothelial movement and transduction kinetics of various AAV capsids. Importantly, the use of a human in vitro BBB model can provide import insight into the possible effects that candidate AVV gene therapy vectors may have on the status of BBB integrity. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 192.

  19. The HDAC inhibitor FK228 enhances adenoviral transgene expression by a transduction-independent mechanism but does not increase adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Angelika; Dzojic, Helena; Rashkova, Victoria; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Essand, Magnus

    2011-02-17

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228 has previously been shown to enhance adenoviral transgene expression when cells are pre-incubated with the drug. Upregulation of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR), leading to increased viral transduction, has been proposed as the main mechanism. In the present study, we found that the highest increase in transgene expression was achieved when non-toxic concentrations of FK228 were added immediately after transduction, demonstrating that the main effect by which FK228 enhances transgene expression is transduction-independent. FK228 had positive effects both on Ad5 and Ad5/f35 vectors with a variety of transgenes and promoters, indicating that FK228 works mainly by increasing transgene expression at the transcriptional level. In some cases, the effects were dramatic, as demonstrated by an increase in CD40L expression by FK228 from 0.3% to 62% when the murine prostate cancer cell line TRAMP-C2 was transduced with Ad[CD40L]. One unexpected finding was that FK228 decreased the transgene expression of an adenoviral vector with the prostate cell-specific PPT promoter in the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-346C. This is probably a consequence of alteration of the adenocarcinoma cell lines towards a neuroendocrine differentiation after FK228 treatment. The observations in this study indicate that FK228 enhances adenoviral therapy by a transduction-independent mechanism. Furthermore, since histone deacetylase inhibitors may affect the differentiation of cells, it is important to keep in mind that the activity and specificity of tissue- and tumor-specific promoters may also be affected.

  20. The HDAC Inhibitor FK228 Enhances Adenoviral Transgene Expression by a Transduction-Independent Mechanism but Does Not Increase Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Angelika; Dzojic, Helena; Rashkova, Victoria; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Essand, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228 has previously been shown to enhance adenoviral transgene expression when cells are pre-incubated with the drug. Upregulation of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR), leading to increased viral transduction, has been proposed as the main mechanism. In the present study, we found that the highest increase in transgene expression was achieved when non-toxic concentrations of FK228 were added immediately after transduction, demonstrating that the main effect by which FK228 enhances transgene expression is transduction-independent. FK228 had positive effects both on Ad5 and Ad5/f35 vectors with a variety of transgenes and promoters, indicating that FK228 works mainly by increasing transgene expression at the transcriptional level. In some cases, the effects were dramatic, as demonstrated by an increase in CD40L expression by FK228 from 0.3% to 62% when the murine prostate cancer cell line TRAMP-C2 was transduced with Ad[CD40L]. One unexpected finding was that FK228 decreased the transgene expression of an adenoviral vector with the prostate cell-specific PPT promoter in the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-346C. This is probably a consequence of alteration of the adenocarcinoma cell lines towards a neuroendocrine differentiation after FK228 treatment. The observations in this study indicate that FK228 enhances adenoviral therapy by a transduction-independent mechanism. Furthermore, since histone deacetylase inhibitors may affect the differentiation of cells, it is important to keep in mind that the activity and specificity of tissue- and tumor-specific promoters may also be affected. PMID:21379379

  1. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  2. Comparative spring mechanics in mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Rosario, M V; Taylor, J R A

    2013-04-01

    Elastic mechanisms are fundamental to fast and efficient movements. Mantis shrimp power their fast raptorial appendages using a conserved network of exoskeletal springs, linkages and latches. Their appendages are fantastically diverse, ranging from spears to hammers. We measured the spring mechanics of 12 mantis shrimp species from five different families exhibiting hammer-shaped, spear-shaped and undifferentiated appendages. Across species, spring force and work increase with size of the appendage and spring constant is not correlated with size. Species that hammer their prey exhibit significantly greater spring resilience compared with species that impale evasive prey ('spearers'); mixed statistical results show that species that hammer prey also produce greater work relative to size during spring loading compared with spearers. Disabling part of the spring mechanism, the 'saddle', significantly decreases spring force and work in three smasher species; cross-species analyses show a greater effect of cutting the saddle on the spring force and spring constant in species without hammers compared with species with hammers. Overall, the study shows a more potent spring mechanism in the faster and more powerful hammering species compared with spearing species while also highlighting the challenges of reconciling within-species and cross-species mechanical analyses when different processes may be acting at these two different levels of analysis. The observed mechanical variation in spring mechanics provides insights into the evolutionary history, morphological components and mechanical behavior, which were not discernible in prior single-species studies. The results also suggest that, even with a conserved spring mechanism, spring behavior, potency and component structures can be varied within a clade with implications for the behavioral functions of power-amplified devices.

  3. A Drosophila mechanosensory transduction channel.

    PubMed

    Walker, R G; Willingham, A T; Zuker, C S

    2000-03-24

    Mechanosensory transduction underlies a wide range of senses, including proprioception, touch, balance, and hearing. The pivotal element of these senses is a mechanically gated ion channel that transduces sound, pressure, or movement into changes in excitability of specialized sensory cells. Despite the prevalence of mechanosensory systems, little is known about the molecular nature of the transduction channels. To identify such a channel, we analyzed Drosophila melanogaster mechanoreceptive mutants for defects in mechanosensory physiology. Loss-of-function mutations in the no mechanoreceptor potential C (nompC) gene virtually abolished mechanosensory signaling. nompC encodes a new ion channel that is essential for mechanosensory transduction. As expected for a transduction channel, D. melanogaster NOMPC and a Caenorhabditis elegans homolog were selectively expressed in mechanosensory organs.

  4. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms.

  5. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  6. Comparative physiology of renal tubular transport mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Long, S.; Giebisch, G.

    1979-01-01

    This manuscript discusses current concepts of glomerular filtration and tubular transport of sodium, water, potassium, and urinary acidification by vertebrate kidneys in a comparative context. Work in mammalian and amphibian nephrons receives major emphasis due to our interest in application of new techniques for investigation of cellular mechanisms; when available, data from other vertebrate classes are discussed. Images FIG. 3 PMID:395765

  7. Comparative studies of gene regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pai, Athma A; Gilad, Yoav

    2014-12-01

    It has become increasingly clear that changes in gene regulation have played an important role in adaptive evolution both between and within species. Over the past five years, comparative studies have moved beyond simple characterizations of differences in gene expression levels within and between species to studying variation in regulatory mechanisms. We still know relatively little about the precise chain of events that lead to most regulatory adaptations, but we have taken significant steps towards understanding the relative importance of changes in different mechanisms of gene regulatory evolution. In this review, we first discuss insights from comparative studies in model organisms, where the available experimental toolkit is extensive. We then focus on a few recent comparative studies in primates, where the limited feasibility of experimental manipulation dictates the approaches that can be used to study gene regulatory evolution.

  8. GABAB receptor transduction mechanisms, and cross-talk between protein kinases A and C, in GABAergic terminals synapsing onto neurons of the rat nucleus basalis of Meynert

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Hisahiko; Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Murakami, Nobuya; Koga, Hitoshi; Akaike, Norio

    2003-01-01

    The transduction mechanisms underlying presynaptic GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition of transmitter release have been characterized for a variety of synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). These studies have suggested a range of transduction mechanisms, including a role for second messengers such as protein kinases A (PKA) and C (PKC). In the present study, we have examined the intracellular signalling pathways underlying baclofen-induced inhibition of GABA release from terminals synapsing onto rat basalis of Meynert neurons using patch-clamp recordings. Baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist, reversibly decreased both evoked and spontaneous, miniature, GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs and mIPSCs, respectively). Such baclofen actions were completely abolished by CGP55845A, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist, and by staurosporine, a non-selective PKA and PKC inhibitor. The mIPSC frequency was still decreased by baclofen even in the presence of 4 AP, a K+ channel blocker, and Cd2+, a voltage-dependent calcium channel blocker. Pharmacological activation or inhibition of PKC activity affected basal GABA release and mildly affected the response to baclofen. Inhibition of the cAMP/PKA cascade also affected basal GABA release and, in a subset of neurons, occluded the effects of baclofen, suggesting that the GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory action on GABA release was mediated via decreases in PKA activity. In addition, PKA inhibition occluded the effects of PKC modulation on both basal GABA release and on the response to baclofen. Our results characterize the transduction pathway of baclofen at these nucleus basalis of Maynert (nBM) synapses and show, for the first time, some cross-talk between the cAMP/PKA and PKC pathways in mammalian presynaptic nerve terminals. PMID:12815184

  9. Activation of the cAMP transduction cascade contributes to the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    1997-11-01

    1. The spinal role of the cAMP transduction cascade in nociceptive processing was investigated in awake behaving rats (male, Sprague-Dawley) by activating or inhibiting this pathway spinally. Microdialysis fibres were implanted into the dorsal horn to infuse drugs directly to the spinal cord. 2. Animals, without peripheral tissue injury, were tested for responses to repeated applications (10 trials) of von Frey filaments and threshold to mechanical stimulation before and after infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP. In this group of animals treated spinally with 8-br-cAMP (1-10 mM) a dose-dependent hyperalgesia and allodynia were produced. This was manifested as an increased number of responses to 10 trials of von Frey filaments (10, 50, 150, 250 mN) and a decrease in mechanical threshold. 3. A second series of experiments studied the manipulation of the cAMP pathway spinally in a model of tissue injury induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin. Animals were either pre- or post-treated spinally with the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, tetrahydrofuryl adenine (THFA) or the protein kinase A inhibitor, myrosilated protein kinase (14-22) amide (PKI). Injection of capsaicin resulted in an increased number of responses to repeated applications of von Frey filaments and a decrease in threshold to mechanical stimuli outside the site of injection, secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. 4. Pre-treatment with either THFA (1 mM) or PKI (5 mM) had no effect on the capsaicin-evoked secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia. 5. In contrast, post-treatment spinally with THFA (0.01-1 mM) or PKI (0.05-50 mM) dose-dependently reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia produced by capsaicin injection. Furthermore, the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia blocked by the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, THFA (1 mM), was reversed by infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP (0.01-10 mM) in a dose-dependent manner. 6. Thus, this study demonstrates that activation of the cAMP transduction cascade at the spinal

  10. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway in depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yingquan; Qiao, Mingqi

    2013-03-25

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  11. Structure and mechanism of the essential two-component signal-transduction system WalKR in Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Quanjiang; Chen, Peter J.; Qin, Guangrong; Deng, Xin; Hao, Ziyang; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Yeo, Won -Sik; Quang, Jenny Winjing; Cho, Hoonsik; Luo, Guan -Zheng; Weng, Xiaocheng; You, Qiancheng; Luan, Chi -Hao; Yang, Xiaojing; Bae, Taeok; Yu, Kunqian; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2016-03-18

    Most low GC Gram-positive bacteria possess an essential walKR two-component system (TCS) for signal transduction involved in regulating cell wall homoeostasis. Despite the well-established intracellular regulatory mechanism, the role of this TCS in extracellular signal recognition and factors that modulate the activity of this TCS remain largely unknown. Here we identify the extracellular receptor of the kinase ‘WalK’ (erWalK) as a key hub for bridging extracellular signal input and intracellular kinase activity modulation in Staphylococcus aureus. Characterization of the crystal structure of erWalK revealed a canonical Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain for signal sensing. Single amino-acid mutation of potential signal-transduction residues resulted in severely impaired function of WalKR. A small molecule derived from structure-based virtual screening against erWalK is capable of selectively activating the walKR TCS. Lastly, the molecular level characterization of erWalK will not only facilitate exploration of natural signal(s) but also provide a template for rational design of erWalK inhibitors.

  12. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-03

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS.

  13. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Spedding, G R

    2003-09-29

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles.

  14. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  15. Optical racetrack resonator transduction of nanomechanical cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Sauer, V T K; Diao, Z; Freeman, M R; Hiebert, W K

    2014-02-07

    Optomechanical transduction has demonstrated its supremacy in probing nanomechanical displacements. In order to apply nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) as force and mass sensors, knowledge about the transduction responsivity (i.e. the change in measured optical transmission with nanomechanical displacement) and its tradeoffs with system design is paramount. We compare the measured responsivities of NOMS devices with varying length, optomechanical coupling strength gom, and optical cavity properties. Cantilever beams 1.5 to 5 μm long are fabricated 70 to 160 nm from a racetrack resonator optical cavity and their thermomechanical (TM) noise signals are measured. We derive a generic expression for the transduction responsivity of the NOMS in terms of optical and mechanical system parameters such as finesse, optomechanical coupling constant, and interaction length. The form of the expression holds direct insight as to how these parameters affect the responsivity. With this expression, we obtain the optomechanical coupling constants using only measurements of the TM noise power spectra and optical cavity transmission slopes. All optical pump/probe operation is also demonstrated in our side-coupled cantilever-racetrack NOMS. Finally, to assess potential operation in a gas sensing environment, the TM noise signal of a device is measured at atmospheric pressure.

  16. Erythropoietin suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition and intercepts Smad signal transduction through a MEK-dependent mechanism in pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien-Liang; Chou, Kang-Ju; Lee, Po-Tsang; Chen, Ying-Shou; Chang, Tsu-Yuan; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Huang, Wei-Chieh; Chung, Hsiao-Min; Fang, Hua-Chang

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Tumor growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) plays a pivotal role in processes like kidney epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and interstitial fibrosis, which correlate well with progression of renal disease. Little is known about underlying mechanisms that regulate EMT. Based on the anatomical relationship between erythropoietin (EPO)-producing interstitial fibroblasts and adjacent tubular cells, we investigated the role of EPO in TGF-{beta}1-mediated EMT and fibrosis in kidney injury. Methods: We examined apoptosis and EMT in TGF-{beta}1-treated LLC-PK1 cells in the presence or absence of EPO. We examined the effect of EPO on TGF-{beta}1-mediated Smad signaling. Apoptosis and cell proliferation were assessed with flow cytometry and hemocytometry. We used Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence to evaluate expression levels of TGF-{beta}1 signal pathway proteins and EMT markers. Results: We demonstrated that ZVAD-FMK (a caspase inhibitor) inhibited TGF-{beta}1-induced apoptosis but did not inhibit EMT. In contrast, EPO reversed TGF-{beta}1-mediated apoptosis and also partially inhibited TGF-{beta}1-mediated EMT. We showed that EPO treatment suppressed TGF-{beta}1-mediated signaling by inhibiting the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad 3. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK 1) either directly with PD98059 or with MEK 1 siRNA resulted in inhibition of EPO-mediated suppression of EMT and Smad signal transduction in TGF-{beta}1-treated cells. Conclusions: EPO inhibited apoptosis and EMT in TGF-{beta}1-treated LLC-PK1 cells. This effect of EPO was partially mediated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibition of Smad signal transduction.

  17. RhoA and MAPK signal transduction pathways regulate NHE1-dependent proximal tubule cell apoptosis after mechanical stretch.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Victoria; Gil Lorenzo, Andrea Fernanda; Cacciamani, Valeria; Benardón, María Eugenia; Costantino, Valeria Victoria; Vallés, Patricia G

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical deformation after congenital ureteral obstruction is traduced into biochemical signals leading to tubular atrophy due to epithelial cell apoptosis. We investigated whether Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) could be responsible for HK-2 cell apoptosis induction in response to mechanical stretch through its ability to function as a control point of RhoA and MAPK signaling pathways. When mechanical stretch was applied to HK-2 cells, cell apoptosis was associated with diminished NHE1 expression and RhoA activation. The RhoA signaling pathway was confirmed to be upstream from the MAPK cascade when HK-2 cells were transfected with the active RhoA-V14 mutant, showing higher ERK1/2 expression and decreased p38 activation associated with NHE1 downregulation. NHE1 participation in apoptosis induction was confirmed by specific small interfering RNA NHE1 showing caspase-3 activation and decreased Bcl-2 expression. The decreased NHE1 expression was correlated with abnormal NHE1 activity addressed by intracellular pH measurements. These results demonstrate that mitochondrial proximal tubule cell apoptosis in response to mechanical stretch is orchestrated by signaling pathways initiated by the small GTPase RhoA and followed by the opposing effects of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, regulating NHE1 decreased expression and activity.

  18. Adrenergic regulation of gluconeogenesis: possible involvement of two mechanisms of signal transduction in alpha 1-adrenergic action.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M

    1985-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agents on hepatocyte metabolism involve two mechanisms: (i) a calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process that is modulated by glucocorticoids and (ii) a calcium-dependent insulin-insensitive process that is modulated by thyroid hormones. We have studied the effect of epinephrine (plus propranolol) on gluconeogenesis from lactate and dihydroxyacetone. It was observed that the adrenergic stimulation of gluconeogenesis from lactate seemed to occur through both mechanisms, whereas when the substrate was dihydroxyacetone the action took place exclusively through the calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process. This effect was absent in hepatocytes from adrenalectomized rats, suggesting that it is modulated by glucocorticoids. PMID:2995981

  19. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  20. Mediator mechanisms involved in TRPV1, TRPA1 and P2X receptor-mediated sensory transduction of pulmonary ROS by vagal lung C-fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Ruan, Ting; Kou, Yu Ru

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the mediator mechanisms involved in the sensory transduction of pulmonary reactive oxygen species (ROS) by vagal lung C-fibers in anesthetized rats. Airway challenge of aerosolized H₂O₂ (0.4%) stimulated these afferent fibers. The H₂O₂-induced responses were reduced by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor or ATP scavengers and also attenuated by an antagonist of TRPV1, TRPA1 or P2X receptors. The suppressive effect of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor was not affected by a combined treatment with the TRPV1 or TRPA1 antagonist, but was amplified by a combined treatment with the P2X antagonists. The suppressive effect of ATP scavengers was not affected by a combined treatment with the P2X antagonist, but was amplified by a combined treatment with the TRPV1 or TRPA1 antagonist. Thus, the actions of cyclooxygenase metabolites are mediated through the functioning of the TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors, whereas the action of ATP is mediated through the functioning of P2X receptors.

  1. Formation of nitric oxide from L-arginine in the central nervous system: a transduction mechanism for stimulation of the soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, R G; Palacios, M; Palmer, R M; Moncada, S

    1989-01-01

    A soluble enzyme obtained from rat forebrain catalyzes the NADPH-dependent formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline from L-arginine. The NO formed stimulates the soluble guanylate cyclase and this stimulation is abolished by low concentrations of hemoglobin. The synthesis of NO and citrulline is dependent on the presence of physiological concentrations of free Ca2+ and is inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, but not by its enantiomer NG-monomethyl-D-arginine or by L-canavanine. L-Homoarginine, L-arginyl-L-aspartate, or L-arginine methyl ester can replace L-arginine as substrates for the enzyme. These results indicate that NO is formed from L-arginine in the brain through an enzymic reaction similar to that in vascular endothelial cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, adding support to our hypothesis that the formation of NO from L-arginine is a widespread transduction mechanism for the stimulation of the soluble guanylate cyclase. PMID:2567995

  2. Mutational analyses of the SOCS proteins suggest a dual domain requirement but distinct mechanisms for inhibition of LIF and IL-6 signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, S E; Willson, T A; Farley, A; Starr, R; Zhang, J G; Baca, M; Alexander, W S; Metcalf, D; Hilton, D J; Nicola, N A

    1999-01-01

    SOCS-1 (suppressor of cytokine signaling-1) is a representative of a family of negative regulators of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1 to SOCS-7 and CIS) characterized by a highly conserved C-terminal SOCS box preceded by an SH2 domain. This study comprehensively examined the ability of several SOCS family members to negatively regulate the gp130 signaling pathway. SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 inhibited both interleukin-6 (IL-6)- and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-induced macrophage differentiation of murine monocytic leukemic M1 cells and LIF induction of a Stat3-responsive reporter construct in 293T fibroblasts. Deletion of amino acids 51-78 in the N-terminal region of SOCS-1 prevented inhibition of LIF signaling. The SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 N-terminal regions were functionally interchangeable, but this did not extend to other SOCS family members. Mutation of SH2 domains abrogated the ability of both SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 to inhibit LIF signal transduction. Unlike SOCS-1, SOCS-3 was unable to inhibit JAK kinase activity in vitro, suggesting that SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 act on the JAK-STAT pathway in different ways. Thus, although inhibition of signaling by SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 requires both the SH2 and N-terminal domains, their mechanisms of action appear to be biochemically different. PMID:9889194

  3. Signal Transduction Mechanism for Serotonin 5-HT2B Receptor-Mediated DNA Synthesis and Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Adult Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kota; Tanaka, Chizuru; Mitsuhashi, Manami; Moteki, Hajime; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Natsume, Hideshi; Ogihara, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and the 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the induction of DNA synthesis and proliferation was investigated in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes to elucidate the intracellular signal transduction mechanisms. Hepatocyte parenchymal cells maintained in a serum-free, defined medium, synthesized DNA and proliferated in the presence of 5-HT or a selective 5-HT2B receptor agonist, BW723C86, but not in the presence of 5-HT2A, or 5-HT2C receptor agonists (TCB-2 and CP809101, respectively), in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A selective 5-HT2B receptor antagonist, LY272015 (10(-7) M), and a specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, U-73122 (10(-6) M), as well as specific inhibitors of growth-related signal transducers-including AG1478, LY294002, PD98059, and rapamycin-completely inhibited 5-HT (10(-6) M)- or BW723C86 (10(-6) M)-induced hepatocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Both 5-HT and BW723C86 were shown to significantly stimulate the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor (EGF)/transforming growth factor (TGF)-α receptor tyrosine kinase (p175 kDa) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 on Western blot analysis. These results suggest that the proliferative mechanism of activating 5-HT is mediated mainly through 5-HT2B receptor-stimulated Gq/PLC and EGF/TGF-α-receptor/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/ERK2/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in primary cultured hepatocytes.

  4. Mechanical diode: Comparing numerical and experimental characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Sagartz, M.J.; Segalman, D.; Simmermacher, T.

    1998-02-01

    In this introductory work, joint compliance is studied in both a numerical and experimental setting. A simple bolted interface is used as the test article and compliance is measured for the joint in both compression and in tension. This simple interface is shown to exhibit a strong non-linearity near the transition from compression to tension (or vice-versa). Modeling issues pertaining to numerically solving for the compliance are addressed. It is shown that the model predictions, in spite of convergence being very sensitive to numerical artifacts of the interface model, are in good agreement with experimentally measured strains and joint compliances. The joint behavior is a mechanical analogy to a diode, i.e., in compression, the joint is very stiff, acting almost as a rigid link, while in tension the joint is relatively soft, acting as a spring.

  5. The Cornucopia of Intestinal Chemosensory Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Paul P.

    2009-01-01

    The chemosensory transduction mechanisms that the gastrointestinal (GI) tract uses to detect chemical and nutrient stimuli are poorly understood. The GI tract is presented with a wide variety of stimuli including potentially harmful chemicals or toxins as well as ‘normal’ stimuli including nutrients, bacteria and mechanical forces. Sensory transduction is at its simplest the conversion of these stimuli into a neural code in afferent nerves. Much of the information encoded is used by the enteric nervous system to generate local reflexes while complementary information is sent to the central nervous system via afferents or by release of hormones to affect behaviour. This review focuses on the chemosensory transduction mechanisms present in the GI tract. It examines the expression and localisation of the machinery for chemosensory transduction. It summarises the types of cells which might be involved in detecting stimuli and releasing neuroactive transmitters. Finally, it highlights the idea that chemosensory transduction mechanisms in the GI tract utilise many overlapping and complementary mechanisms for detecting and transducing stimuli into reflex action. PMID:20582275

  6. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  7. Transduction in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    THORNE, C B

    1962-01-01

    Thorne, Curtis B. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.). Transduction in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 83:106-111. 1962.-A bacteriophage, SP-10, isolated from soil carries out general transduction in Bacillus subtilis. Phage propagated on a streptomycin-resistant mutant of the wild-type strain W-23 was capable of transducing to prototrophy strain 168 (indole(-)), as well as all of the auxotrophic mutants of W-23-S(r) tested, which included mutants requiring arginine, histidine, adenine, guanine, thiamine, leucine, or methionine. Although strain 168 was transduced by phage SP-10, lytic activity on this strain could not be detected and attempts to propagate the phage on it failed. Transductions occurred at frequencies in the range of 10(-6) to 10(-5) per plaque-forming unit. Homologous phage was ineffective, deoxyribonuclease had no effect on the frequency of transduction, and transduction was prevented by the addition of phage antiserum. Phage SP-10 was capable of lysogenizing strain W-23-S(r), and this condition was maintained through repeated growth and sporulation cycles in potato-extract medium. Although heating at 65 C for 60 min inactivated free phage particles, spores retained their lysogenic condition after such heat treatment. When heat-treated spores of the lysogenic cultures were used as inocula for growth in a nutrient broth-yeast extract-glucose medium, filtrates contained 10(9), or more, phage particles per ml.

  8. Pheromone Transduction in Moths

    PubMed Central

    Stengl, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Calling female moths attract their mates late at night with intermittent release of a species-specific sex-pheromone blend. Mean frequency of pheromone filaments encodes distance to the calling female. In their zig-zagging upwind search male moths encounter turbulent pheromone blend filaments at highly variable concentrations and frequencies. The male moth antennae are delicately designed to detect and distinguish even traces of these sex pheromones amongst the abundance of other odors. Its olfactory receptor neurons sense even single pheromone molecules and track intermittent pheromone filaments of highly variable frequencies up to about 30 Hz over a wide concentration range. In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta brief, weak pheromone stimuli as encountered during flight are detected via a metabotropic PLCβ-dependent signal transduction cascade which leads to transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Strong or long pheromone stimuli, which are possibly perceived in direct contact with the female, activate receptor-guanylyl cyclases causing long-term adaptation. In addition, depending on endogenous rhythms of the moth's physiological state, hormones such as the stress hormone octopamine modulate second messenger levels in sensory neurons. High octopamine levels during the activity phase maximize temporal resolution cAMP-dependently as a prerequisite to mate location. Thus, I suggest that sliding adjustment of odor response threshold and kinetics is based upon relative concentration ratios of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide levels which gate different ion channels synergistically. In addition, I propose a new hypothesis for the cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channel formed by insect olfactory receptor/coreceptor complexes. Instead of being employed for an ionotropic mechanism of odor detection it is proposed to control subthreshold membrane potential oscillation of sensory neurons, as a basis for temporal encoding of odors. PMID:21228914

  9. Report of an Army Workshop on Convergence Forecasting: Mechanochemical Transduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Breakout Session 1, Group 1.........................................................................10  Figure 3. Potential Ultrasound -Mediated...Capabilities in Mechanochemical Transduction ..........10  Figure 4. Factors that Limit Potential Ultrasound -Mediated Mechanochemical Transduction... ultrasound as a mechanism to induce mechanochemical reactions. If ultrasound is to be used to provide the mechanical energy for subsequent chemical

  10. Frequency of F116-mediated transduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a freshwater environment.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, W D; Miller, R V; Sayler, G S

    1978-01-01

    Transduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa streptomycin resistance by a generalized transducing phage, F116, was shown to occur during a 10-day incubation in a flow-through environmental test chamber suspended in a freshwater reservoir. Mean F116 transduction frequencies ranged from 1.4 X 10(-5) to 8.3 X 10(-2) transductants per recipient during the in situ incubation. These transduction frequencies were comparable to transduction frequencies determined in preliminary laboratory transduction experiments. The results demonstrate the potential for naturally occurring transduction in aquatic environments and concurrent environmental and ecological ramifications. Images PMID:103503

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of liver antioxidant mechanisms in Megalobrama amblycephala stimulated with dietary emodin.

    PubMed

    Song, Changyou; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Ge, Xianping; Zhao, Zhenxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Mingchun; Zhou, Qunlan; Miao, Linghong; Xu, Pao; Lin, Yan

    2017-01-13

    Oxidative stress is a toxicological endpoint that correlates with the nutrition status of fish through cellular damage, inflammation, and apoptosis. In order to understand the antioxidant mechanism induced by dietary emodin in Megalobrama amblycephala liver, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the proteome alteration under emodin administration. 27 altered protein spots were separated under 30 mg kg(-1) emodin stimulation based on 2-DE, and were all successfully identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF, representing 17 unique proteins. These proteins were functionally classified into antioxidant, metabolism, cytoskeleton, chaperone, signal transduction and cofactor groups. Network interaction and Gene Ontology annotation indicated 10 unique proteins were closely related to antioxidation and directly regulated by each other. Compared with the control group, administration of 30 mg kg(-1) emodin significantly increased the antioxidant-related mRNA expressions of GPx1, GSTm and HSP70, but decreased the mRNA expressions of GAPDH and Sord, which was consistent with the protein expression. Nevertheless, Pgk1 and Aldh8a1 were up- and down-regulated, and ALDOB was down- and up-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. These results revealed that the altered proteins enhanced antioxidation via complex regulatory mechanisms, and 30 mg kg(-1) emodin was a suitable immunostimulant for M. amblycephala.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of liver antioxidant mechanisms in Megalobrama amblycephala stimulated with dietary emodin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Changyou; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Ge, Xianping; Zhao, Zhenxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Mingchun; Zhou, Qunlan; Miao, Linghong; Xu, Pao; Lin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a toxicological endpoint that correlates with the nutrition status of fish through cellular damage, inflammation, and apoptosis. In order to understand the antioxidant mechanism induced by dietary emodin in Megalobrama amblycephala liver, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the proteome alteration under emodin administration. 27 altered protein spots were separated under 30 mg kg−1 emodin stimulation based on 2-DE, and were all successfully identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF, representing 17 unique proteins. These proteins were functionally classified into antioxidant, metabolism, cytoskeleton, chaperone, signal transduction and cofactor groups. Network interaction and Gene Ontology annotation indicated 10 unique proteins were closely related to antioxidation and directly regulated by each other. Compared with the control group, administration of 30 mg kg−1 emodin significantly increased the antioxidant-related mRNA expressions of GPx1, GSTm and HSP70, but decreased the mRNA expressions of GAPDH and Sord, which was consistent with the protein expression. Nevertheless, Pgk1 and Aldh8a1 were up- and down-regulated, and ALDOB was down- and up-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. These results revealed that the altered proteins enhanced antioxidation via complex regulatory mechanisms, and 30 mg kg−1 emodin was a suitable immunostimulant for M. amblycephala. PMID:28084435

  13. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown. PMID:19948030

  14. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2009-11-30

    In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  15. Mechano-transduction in periodontal ligament cells identifies activated states of MAP-kinases p42/44 and p38-stress kinase as a mechanism for MMP-13 expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mechano-transduction in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells is crucial for physiological and orthodontic tooth movement-associated periodontal remodelling. On the mechanistic level, molecules involved in this mechano-transduction process in PDL cells are not yet completely elucidated. Results In the present study we show by western blot (WB) analysis and/or indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) that mechanical strain modulates the amount of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-13, and induces non-coherent modulation in the amount and activity of signal transducing molecules, such as FAK, MAP-kinases p42/44, and p38 stress kinase, suggesting their mechanistic role in mechano-transduction. Increase in the amount of FAK occurs concomitant with increased levels of the focal contact integrin subunits β3 and β1, as indicated by WB or optionally by IIF. By employing specific inhibitors, we further identified p42/44 and p38 in their activated, i.e. phosphorylated state responsible for the expression of MMP-13. This finding may point to the obedience in the expression of this MMP as extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling executioner from the activation state of mechano-transducing molecules. mRNA analysis by pathway-specific RT-profiler arrays revealed up- and/or down-regulation of genes assigning to MAP-kinase signalling and cell cycle, ECM and integrins and growth factors. Up-regulated genes include for example focal contact integrin subunit α3, MMP-12, MAP-kinases and associated kinases, and the transcription factor c-fos, the latter as constituent of the AP1-complex addressing the MMP-13 promotor. Among others, genes down-regulated are those of COL-1 and COL-14, suggesting that strain-dependent mechano-transduction may transiently perturbate ECM homeostasis. Conclusions Strain-dependent mechano-/signal-transduction in PDL cells involves abundance and activity of FAK, MAP-kinases p42/44, and p38 stress kinase in conjunction with the amount of MMP-13, and integrin

  16. Falsification of the ionic channel theory of hair cell transduction

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Michelangelo

    2013-01-01

    The hair cell provides the transduction of mechanical vibrations in the balance and acoustic sense of all vertebrates that swim, walk, or fly. The current theory places hair cell transduction in a mechanically controlled ion channel. Although the theory of a mechanical input modulating the flow of ions through an ion pore has been a useful tool, it is falsified by experimental data in the literature and can be definitively falsified by a proposed experiment. PMID:24563711

  17. Separate TRP channels mediate amplification and transduction in drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Brendan P.; Baker, Allison E.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2015-12-01

    Auditory receptor cells rely on mechanically-gated channels to transform sound stimuli into neural activity. Several TRP channels have been implicated in Drosophila auditory transduction, but mechanistic studies have been hampered by the inability to record subthreshold signals from receptor neurons. We developed a non-invasive method for measuring these signals by recording from a central neuron that is electrically coupled to a genetically-defined population of auditory receptors. We find that the TRPN family member NompC, which is necessary for the active amplification of motion by the auditory organ, is not required for transduction. Instead, NompC sensitizes the transduction complex to movement and precisely regulates the static forces on the complex. In contrast, the TRPV channels Nanchung and Inactive are required for responses to sound, suggesting they are components of the transduction complex. Thus, transduction and active amplification are genetically separable processes in Drosophila hearing.

  18. Comparing Chemical Mechanisms using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. It is produced by reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight [Atkinson,2000]. The chemistry of intermediate species formed during VOC degradation show a time dependence and impacts the amount of O3 produced by the VOC [Butler et al., 2011]. Representing the intricacies of these reactions is not viable for chemical mechanisms used in global and regional models due to the computational resources available. Thus, chemical mechanisms reduce the amount of reactions either by lumping chemical species together as a model species, reducing the number of reaction pathways or both. As different chemical mechanisms use varying reduction techniques and assumptions especially with respect to the intermediate degradation species, it is important to compare the temporal evolution of ozone production obtained from differing chemical mechanisms. In this study, chemical mechanisms are compared using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials (TOPP) [Butler et al.,2011]. TOPPs measure the effect of a VOC on the odd oxygen family (Ox), which includes O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and other species whose cycling effect O3 and NO2 production. TOPP values are obtained via a boxmodel run lasting seven diurnal cycles and tagging all species produced during VOC degradation; this enables the Ox production to be attributed to the VOC. This technique enables the temporal evolution of a VOCs' Ox production to be compared between the mechanisms. Comparing the TOPP profiles of the VOCs obtained using different mechanisms shows the effect of reduction techniques implemented by the mechanism and also allows a comparison of the tropospheric chemistry represented in the mechanisms. [Atkinson,2000] Atkinson, R. (2000). Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx. Atmospheric Environment, 34:2063-2101 [Butler et al., 2011] Butler, T. M

  19. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity. PMID:27642629

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Tactile Sensation by Electrical and Mechanical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yem, Vibol; Kajimoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    An electrotactile display is a tactile interface that provides tactile perception by passing electrical current through the surface of the skin. It is actively used instead of mechanical tactile displays for tactile feedback because of several advantages such as its small and thin size, light weight, and high responsiveness. However, the similarities and differences between these sensations is still not clear. This study directly compares the intensity sensation of electrotactile stimulation to that of mechanical stimulation, and investigates the characteristic sensation of anodic and cathodic stimulation. In the experiment, participants underwent a 30 pps electrotactile stimulus every one second to their middle finger, and were asked to match this intensity by adjusting the intensity of a mechanical tactile stimulus to an index finger. The results showed that anodic stimulation mainly produced vibration sensation, whereas cathodic sensation produced both vibration and pressure sensations. Relatively low pressure sensation was also observed for anodic stimulation but it remains low, regardless of the increasing of electrical intensity.

  1. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-3, Gage Blocks, Mechanical Comparators and Electronic Comparators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This third in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes gage blocks and mechanical and electronic comparators. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6) materials needed, (7)…

  2. Mechanotransduction and auditory transduction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Maurice J

    2007-08-01

    Insects are utterly reliant on sensory mechanotransduction, the process of converting physical stimuli into neuronal receptor potentials. The senses of proprioception, touch, and hearing are involved in almost every aspect of an adult insect's complex behavioral repertoire and are mediated by a diverse array of specialized sensilla and sensory neurons. The physiology and morphology of several of these have been described in detail; genetic approaches in Drosophila, combining behavioral screens and sensory electrophysiology with forward and reverse genetic techniques, have now revealed specific proteins involved in their differentiation and operation. These include three different TRP superfamily ion channels that are required for transduction in tactile bristles, chordotonal stretch receptors, and polymodal nociceptors. Transduction also depends on the normal differentiation and mechanical integrity of the modified cilia that form the neuronal sensory endings, the accessory structures that transmit stimuli to them and, in bristles, a specialized receptor lymph and transepithelial potential. Flies hear near-field sounds with a vibration-sensitive, antennal chordotonal organ. Biomechanical analyses of wild-type antennae reveal non-linear, active mechanical properties that increase their sensitivity to weak stimuli. The effects of mechanosensory and ciliary mutations on antennal mechanics show that the sensory cilia are the active motor elements and indicate distinct roles for TRPN and TRPV channels in auditory transduction and amplification.

  3. The Molecular Basis of Mechanosensory Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kara L.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple senses including hearing, touch, and osmotic regulation, require the ability to convert force into an electrical signal: a process called mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction occurs through specialized proteins that open an ion channel pore in response to a mechanical stimulus. Many of these proteins remain unidentified in vertebrates, but known mechanotransduction channels in lower organisms provide clues into their identity and mechanism. Bacteria, fruit flies, and nematodes have all been used to elucidate the molecules necessary for force transduction. This chapter discusses many different mechanical senses and takes an evolutionary approach to review the proteins responsible for mechanotransduction in various biological kingdoms. PMID:22399400

  4. Comparing Ultrasound and Mechanical Steering in a Biodiesel Production Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.; Ferreira, Jerusa R. L.

    The analysis of the kinetics of the transesterification reaction is crucial to compare different routes or routes with different catalysts or reaction accelerators. The use of ultrasound is considereda method for accelerating the biodiesel production. However, little effort has been done and is reported in the literature about how and under what conditions the use of ultrasound really speeds up the process, or the conditions under which its use is unnecessary or even harmful, burdening the process. Two dissimilar energy injections into a typical route were tested: ultrasound (@ 1 MHz and no heating) and mechanical steering (with heating), both applied in an 8:1 ratio of soybean oil and methanol, adding 1% of KOH as catalyzer. As results, during the first 10 minutes of reaction ultrasound showed unbearable effect on the transesterification, whilst mechanical steering and heating achieved almost 70% of conversion ratio. However, during the following 10 minutes, the mechanical steering and heating got nothing more than 80% of conversion, a considerable less efficient process than ultrasound assisted one, which achieved more than 90%. The straightforward explanation is that ultrasound continually inserts energy in a slower rate, what can result in a more stable conversion scenario. On the other hand, mechanical steering and heating provides more energy at a glance, but cannot push the final conversion rate beyond a limit, as the transesterification is a double-way chemical process. The instability mechanical steering and heating settles in the reaction medium pulls the components back to their original states more than pushes than to the converted equilibrium state of the matter.

  5. Gravitational Effects on Signal Transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms by which individual cells perceive gravity and how these cells transduce and respond to gravitational stimuli is critical for the development of long-term manned space flight experiments. We now propose to use a well-characterized model erythroid cell system and to investigate gravitational perturbations of its erythropoietin (Epo) signaling pathway and gene regulation. Cells will be grown at 1-G and in simulated microgravity in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor (RWV). Cell growth and differentiation, the Epo-receptor, the protein kinase C pathway to the c-myc gene, and the protein phosphatase pathway to the c-myb gene will be studied and evaluated as reporters of gravitational stimuli. The results of these experiments will have impact on the problems of 1) gravitational sensing by individual cells, and 2) the anemia of space flight. This ground-based study also will serve as a Space Station Development Study in gravitational effects on intracellular signal transduction.

  6. Confocal Scanner for Highly Sensitive Photonic Transduction of Nanomechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Zhu; Losby, Joseph E.; Sauer, Vincent T. K.; Westwood, Jocelyn N.; Freeman, Mark R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.

    2013-06-01

    We show that a simple confocal laser scanning system can be used to couple light through grating couplers into nanophotonic circuits. The coupling efficiency is better than 15% per coupler. Our technique avoids using multi-axis fibre stages and is especially advantageous when the nanophotonic circuit is kept in vacuum, e.g., for nanomechanical resonator displacement transduction. This was demonstrated by recording the resonant response of a nanomechanical doubly clamped beam embedded in a race-track optical cavity. The nanophotonic transduction offers an increase of two orders of magnitude in transduction responsivity compared with conventional free-space optical interferometry.

  7. mTOR Signal Transduction Pathways Contribute to TN-C FNIII A1 Overexpression by Mechanical Stress in Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lianhe; Zhang, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yunfei; Wen, Yanhua; Wang, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor with a very poor prognosis. Treating osteosarcoma remains a challenge due to its high transitivity. Tenascin-C, with large molecular weight variants including different combinations of its alternative spliced FNIII repeats, is specifically over expressed in tumor tissues. This study examined the expression of Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 in osteosarcoma tissues, and estimated the effect of mechanical stimulation on A1 expression in MG-63 cells. Through immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the A1 protein was expressed at a higher level in osteosarcoma tissues than in adjacent normal tissues. By cell migration assay, we observed that there was a significant correlation between A1 expression and MG-63 cell migra-tion. The relation is that Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 can promote MG-63 cell migration. According to our further study into the effect of mechanical stimulation on A1 expression in MG-63 cells, the mRNA and protein levels of A1 were significantly up-regulated under mechanical stress with the mTOR molecule proving indispensable. Meanwhile, 4E-BP1 and S6K1 (downstream molecule of mTOR) are necessary for A1 normal expression in MG-63 cells whether or not mechanical stress has been encountered. We found that Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 is over-expressed in osteosar-coma tissues and can promote MG-63 cell migration. Furthermore, mechanical stress can facilitate MG-63 cell migration though facilitating A1 overexpression with the necessary molecules (mTOR, 4E-BP1 and S6K1). In con-clusion, high expression of A1 may promote the meta-stasis of osteosarcoma by facilitating MG-63 cell migration. Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 could be used as an indicator in metastatic osteosarcoma patients. PMID:24598996

  8. Mechano-chemical energy transduction in biological systems. The effect of mechanical stimulation on the polymerization of actin: a kinetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, A; Grazi, E

    1982-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation (forced circulation in narrow tubing) accelerates as much as 10-fold the rate of polymerization of actin. The increase in the rate is proportional to the intensity of the stimulation for flow rates between 0 and 3 cm/s. This supports the hypothesis that a statistical factor (the orientation of the flowing particles) is influenced by the flow. Comparison of the kinetics of the polymerization of resting and of mechanically stimulated actin solutions shows that both the nucleation and the elongation steps are accelerated. It is thus concluded that flow orients not only the oligomeric structures but also the actin monomers. The elongation reaction, also in the flow-stimulated samples, occurs always by the addition of ATP--G-actin (or ATP-containing oligomers) and not by the fusion of ADP-containing oligomeric structures. PMID:7138502

  9. Virtual screening of LPXTG competitive SrtA inhibitors targeting signal transduction mechanism in Bacillus anthracis: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Sivakamavalli, Jeyachandran; Baskaralingam, Vaseeharan; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Members of the sortase enzyme super family decorate the surfaces of Bacillus anthracis cell wall with proteins that play key roles in microbial pathogenesis and its biofilm formation. Bacillus anthracis Sortase-A (Ba-SrtA) is a potential target for new therapeutics as it is required for B. anthracis survival and replication within macrophages. An understanding of the binding site pocket and substrate recognition mechanism by SrtA enzymes may serve to be beneficial in the rational development of sortase inhibitors. Here, the LPXTG signal peptide-based competitive inhibitors are screened against the Ba-SrtA and compounds with reasonable inhibition, specificity, and mechanisms of inactivation of SrtA have been covered. The screened compounds are experimentally validated against the phylogenetically similar Gram-positive pathogen B. cereus. In situ microscopic visualizations suggest that these screened compounds showed the microbial and biofilm inhibitory activity against B. cereus. It facilitates the further development of these molecules into useful anti-infective agents to treat infections caused by B. anthracis and other Gram-positive pathogens. These results provide insight into basic design principles for generating new clinically relevant lead molecules. It also provides an alternative strategy where a screened ligand molecule can be used in combination to battle increasingly against the Gram-positive pathogens.

  10. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  11. Gravitational sensory transduction chain in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Earlier hypotheses have assumed that gravitactic orientation in flagellates, such as the photosynthetic unicell Euglena gracilis, is brought about by passive alignment of the cells in the water column by being tail heavy. A recent experiment on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 40) comparing immobilized cells with mobile cells demonstrated that the passive buoy effect can account for approximately 20% of the orientation of the cells in a gravity field. The cells show either positive or negative gravitaxis depending on other external or internal factors. Shortly after inoculation, the tendency of young cells to swim downward in the water column can be readily reverted by adding micromolar concentrations of some heavy metal ions including copper, cadmium or lead. The negative gravitaxis of older cells is converted into a positive one by stress factors such as increasing salinity or exposure to excessive visible or UV radiation. The mechanism for this switch seems to involve reactive oxygen species since the gravitactic sign change was suppressed when oxygen was removed by flushing the cell suspension with nitrogen. Also, the addition of radical scavengers (Trolox, ascorbic acid or potassium cyanide) abolished or reduced the gravitactic sign change. Addition of hydrogen peroxide induced a gravitactic sign change in the absence of external stress factors. The primary reception for the gravity vector seems to involve mechanosensitive ion channels which specifically gate calcium ions inward. We have identified several gene sequences for putative mechanosensory channels in Euglena and have applied RNAi to identify which of these channels are involved in graviperception. The influx of Ca 2+ activates calmodulin (CaM) which has been shown to be involved in the sensory transduction chain of graviorientation. It is known that an adenylyl cyclase is bound to the flagellar membrane in Euglena which is activated by CaM. This enzyme produces cAMP which has also been shown to be the key

  12. Cochlear transduction: an integrative model and review

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, William E.

    2009-01-01

    A model for cochlear transduction is presented that is based on considerations of the cell biology of its receptor cells, particularly the mechanisms of transmitter release at recepto-neural synapses. Two new interrelated hypotheses on the functional organization of the organ of Corti result from these considerations, one dealing with the possibility of electrotonic interaction between inner and outer hair cells and the other with a possible contributing source to acoustic emissions of cochlear origin that results from vesicular membrane turnover. PMID:6282796

  13. Specificity in stress response: epidermal keratinocytes exhibit specialized UV-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Makoto; Gazel, Alix; Pintucci, Giuseppe; Shuck, Alyssa; Shifteh, Shiva; Ginsburg, Dov; Rao, Laxmi S; Kaneko, Takehiko; Freedberg, Irwin M; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2003-10-01

    UV light, a paradigmatic initiator of cell stress, invokes responses that include signal transduction, activation of transcription factors, and changes in gene expression. Consequently, in epidermal keratinocytes, its principal and frequent natural target, UV regulates transcription of a distinctive set of genes. Hypothesizing that UV activates distinctive epidermal signal transduction pathways, we compared the UV-responsive activation of the JNK and NFkappaB pathways in keratinocytes, with the activation of the same pathways by other agents and in other cell types. Using of inhibitors and antisense oligonucleotides, we found that in keratinocytes only UVB/UVC activate JNK, while in other cell types UVA, heat shock, and oxidative stress do as well. Keratinocytes express JNK-1 and JNK-3, which is unexpected because JNK-3 expression is considered brain-specific. In keratinocytes, ERK1, ERK2, and p38 are activated by growth factors, but not by UV. UVB/UVC in keratinocytes activates Elk1 and AP1 exclusively through the JNK pathway. JNKK1 is essential for UVB/UVC activation of JNK in keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. In contrast, in HeLa cells, used as a control, crosstalk among signal transduction pathways allows considerable laxity. In parallel, UVB/UVC and TNFalpha activate the NFkappaB pathway via distinct mechanisms, as shown using antisense oligonucleotides targeted against IKKbeta, the active subunit of IKK. This implies a specific UVB/UVC responsive signal transduction pathway independent from other pathways. Our results suggest that in epidermal keratinocytes specific signal transduction pathways respond to UV light. Based on these findings, we propose that the UV light is not a genetic stress response inducer in these cells, but a specific agent to which epidermis developed highly specialized responses.

  14. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  15. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to…

  16. Mechanism of activation of PhoQ/PhoP two-component signal transduction by SafA, an auxiliary protein of PhoQ histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Eiji; Eguchi, Yoko; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQ/PhoP two-component signal transduction system in Escherichia coli is activated by SafA, a small membrane protein that modifies the PhoQ histidine kinase. The SafA C-terminal domain (41-65 aa) interacts directly with the sensory domain of PhoQ at the periplasm. We used in vitro and in vivo strategies to elucidate the way SafA modifies the PhoQ/PhoP phosphorelay system. First, the enzymatic activities of membranes from cells overexpressing PhoQ and cells expressing both PhoQ and SafA were compared in vitro. Increased autophosphorylation of PhoQ was observed in the presence of SafA, but it did not increase the dephosphorylation of phospho-PhoP by PhoQ. In addition, SafA increased the phospho-PhoP level on the phosphotransfer assay. We confirmed that induction of SafA results in an accumulation of phospho-PhoP in vivo by the Phos-tag system. Our results suggest that the accumulation of phospho-PhoP is linked to activation of PhoQ autophosphorylation by SafA.

  17. A comparative study on the synthesis mechanism, bioactivity and mechanical properties of three silicate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Najafinezhad, Aliakbar; Abdellahi, Majid; Ghayour, Hamid; Soheily, Ali; Chami, Akbar; Khandan, Amirsalar

    2017-03-01

    In the present study three akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7), diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and baghdadite (Ca3ZrSi2O9) applicable bioceramics were synthesized via a sol-gel based method. The combination of sol-gel method and the raw materials used in this study presents a new route for the synthesis of the mentioned bioceramics. By the use of thermal analysis, the mechanisms occurred during the synthesis of these bioceramics were investigated. The differences in the structural density and their relation with the degradation rate and mechanical properties of all three ceramics were studied. In vitro bioactivity and apatite formation mechanisms of the samples soaked in the simulated body fluid were considered. The results showed that baghdadite as a Zr-containing material has a more dense structure in comparison with the other ceramics, which leads to a lower degradation rate and also lower bioactivity. There were also main differences between akermanite and diopside as Mg-containing ceramics. Diopside showed a structure with lower porosity content compared to the akermanite samples which resulted in the lower degradation rate and higher compressive strength.

  18. Striatal Signal Transduction and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Philibin, Scott D.; Hernandez, Adan; Self, David W.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug addiction. PMID

  19. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis for molecular experimentation has long been an area of difficulty. Many of the traditional laboratory techniques for strain construction are laborious and hampered by poor efficiency. The ability to move chromosomal genetic markers and plasmids using bacteriophage transduction has greatly increased the speed and ease of S. epidermidis studies. These molecular genetic advances have advanced the S. epidermidis research field beyond a select few genetically tractable strains and facilitated investigations of clinically relevant isolates. PMID:24222465

  20. Effects of Electrode Surface Morphology on the Transduction of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmre, Viljar

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are innovative smart materials that exhibit electromechanical and mechanoelectrical transduction (conversion of electrical input into mechanical deformation and vice versa). Due to low driving voltage (< 5 V) and ability to operate in aqueous environment, IPMCs are attractive for developing soft actuators and sensors for underwater robots and medical devices. This dissertation focuses on investigating the effects of electrode surface morphology in the transduction of Pt and Pd-Pt electrodes-based IPMCs, with the aim to improve the electrode surface design and thereby enhance the transduction performance of the material. Firstly, the synthesis techniques are developed to control and manipulate the surface structure of the mentioned electrodes through the electroless plating process. Using these techniques, IPMCs with different electrode surface structures are fabricated. The changes in the electrode surface morphology and the resulting effects on the material's electromechanical, mechanoelectrical, electrochemical and mechanical properties area examined and analyzed. This study shows that increasing the impregnation-reduction cycles under appropriate conditions leads to the formation and growth of platinum nanoparticles with sharp tips and edges---called Pt nanothorn assemblies---at the polymer-electrode interface. IPMCs designed with such nanostructured Pt electrodes are first to be reported. The experiments demonstrate that the formation and growth of Pt nanothorn assemblies at the electrode interface increases considerably the total transported charge during the transduction, thereby increasing significantly the displacement and blocking force output of IPMC. The improvement of the mentioned electromechanical properties was 3--5 times, depending on the input voltage and frequency used. Also, the peak mechanoelectrically induced voltage increased somewhat, although the overall effect of the surface structure was relatively

  1. Epigenetic mechanisms and memory strength: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Federman, Noel; Zalcman, Gisela; de la Fuente, Verónica; Fustiñana, Maria Sol; Romano, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Memory consolidation requires de novo mRNA and protein synthesis. Transcriptional activation is controlled by transcription factors, their cofactors and repressors. Cofactors and repressors regulate gene expression by interacting with basal transcription machinery, remodeling chromatin structure and/or chemically modifying histones. Acetylation is the most studied epigenetic mechanism of histones modifications related to gene expression. This process is regulated by histone acetylases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). More than 5 years ago, we began a line of research about the role of histone acetylation during memory consolidation. Here we review our work, presenting evidence about the critical role of this epigenetic mechanism during consolidation of context-signal memory in the crab Neohelice granulata, as well as during consolidation of novel object recognition memory in the mouse Mus musculus. Our evidence demonstrates that histone acetylation is a key mechanism in memory consolidation, functioning as a distinctive molecular feature of strong memories. Furthermore, we found that the strength of a memory can be characterized by its persistence or its resistance to extinction. Besides, we found that the role of this epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression only in the formation of strongest memories is evolutionarily conserved.

  2. Comparative study on the growth mechanisms of PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Bikau; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2011-02-15

    The efficiencies of recently proposed, phenyl addition/cyclization (PAC), methyl addition/cyclization (MAC) and a popular hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition (HACA) mechanisms have been examined experimentally by detecting the gas phase reaction products of pyrolysis of toluene with/without addition of benzene + acetylene by using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) single photon ionization (SPI) time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Besides the observation of verities of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), intense mass peaks of indene, phenylacetylene and propyne confirmed a remarkable quenching of the major active species, benzyl, phenyl and methyl radicals by acetylene. In spite of quenching, only benzyl contributed products were diminished while phenyl and methyl contributed products were enhanced. Uniquely observed symmetrical PAHs; corrannulene/coronene; formed by the active involvement of PAC, HACA and/or MAC mechanisms, reflects the interdependencies of these mechanisms. Individually, PAC was found highly efficient for endless growth, HACA for filling triple fusing site and MAC for expanding cyclotetra/pentafused into benzenoid structure, respectively. (author)

  3. Signal Transduction in T Cell Activation and Tolerance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    wealth of new information regarding the mechanism by which these surface receptors influence intracellular biochemical events. Transmembrane...Ltd 98 7 1 5 Vi 86 Basic MI | I L I IF a 86 Basic Mechanisms - How can an understanding of signal transduction aid in our understand- ing of T...distribution of the r consensus sequence suggests that it may represent a common mechanism used by a variety of immune system receptors to couple to signal

  4. Comparative study of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with coal-combustion-type fluorosis with and without high hair selenium levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Zhilun; Xiong, Yongmin; Zou, Xiuzhen; Liu, Zhengwen

    2010-09-01

    Coal-combustion-type fluorosis has only been reported in China and its pathogenesis has not been fully understood. Fluoride causes chronic toxic effects and selenium modulates cellular activities through signal transduction in human cells. The present study enrolled three groups of subjects with well-defined serum and urine fluoride and hair selenium: high fluoride+high selenium group, high fluoride group and normal control group. The expressions of p38, NF-kB p65, caspase-3 and p53 genes at both protein and mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, respectively. The results showed that the expressions of p38, NF-kB p65, and caspase-3 protein in high fluoride group were higher than those in the other two groups. The mRNA level of NF-kB p65 and caspase-3 was significantly higher in high fluoride+high selenium group than control and lower than high fluoride group. The mRNA and protein level of p53 was significantly higher in high fluoride+high selenium group than that in other two groups. These results suggest that selenium may influence the protein and gene expression associated with p38 signal transduction pathway and up-regulate p53 expression in PBMCs from patients with coal-combustion-type fluorosis.

  5. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  6. Carbon Acquisition by Cyanobacteria: Mechanisms, Comparative Genomics, and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Aaron; Hagemann, Martin; Bauwe, Hermann; Kahlon, Shira; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we mainly focus on the mechanisms of inorganic carbon uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation between the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. We identify the genes involved, their regulation and phylogeny. Living in an environment where the CO₂ concentration is considerably lower than required to saturate their carboxylating enzyme, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), cyanobacteria acquired the CO₂ concentrating mechanism (CCM) that enables them to accumulate CO₂ at the carboxylation site. All the cyanobacteria examined to date are able to fix CO₂ into carbohydrates. However, in addition to variance in the range of physical growth conditions, cyanobacteria also vary substantially in their ability to consume organic carbon from their surroundings. Many strains are obligate photoautotrophs where the sole carbon source is CO₂, while others are able to perform photomixotrophic or even heterotrophic growth using a wide variety of organic substances (c.f. Rippka et al., 1979; Stal and Moezelaar, 1997b). Cyanobacteria constitute a unique case where the anabolic and catabolic carbohydrate metabolisms function in the same cellular compartment. In addition, the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways share components in the thylakoid membranes. Despite its importance to our understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the shifts between photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and photomixotrophic modes of growth, and their regulation; between the different pathways of carbohydrate breakdown- glycolysis, fermentation, the oxidative pentose phosphate, the Krebs cycle and the photorespiratory pathways. In this chapter we shall briefly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the CCM and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

  7. Carbon acquisition by Cyanobacteria: Mechanisms, Comparative Genomics and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Aaron; Hagemann, Martin; Bauwe, Hermann; Kahlon, Shira; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we mainly focus on the mechanisms of inorganic carbon uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation between the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. We identify the genes involved, their regulation and phylogeny. Living in an environment where the CO₂ concentration is considerably lower than required to saturate their carboxylating enzyme, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), cyanobacteria acquired the CO₂ concentrating mechanism (CCM) that enables them to accumulate CO₂ at the carboxylation site. All the cyanobacteria examined to date are able to fix CO₂ into carbohydrates. However, in addition to variance in the range of physical growth conditions, cyanobacteria also vary substantially in their ability to consume organic carbon from their surroundings. Many strains are obligate photoautotrophs where the sole carbon source is CO₂, while others are able to perform photomixotrophic or even heterotrophic growth using a wide variety of organic substances (c.f. Rippka et al., 1979; Stal and Moezelaar, 1997b). Cyanobacteria constitute a unique case where the anabolic and catabolic carbohydrate metabolisms function in the same cellular compartment. In addition, the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways share components in the thylakoid membranes. Despite its importance to our understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the shifts between photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and photomixotrophic modes of growth, and their regulation; between the different pathways of carbohydrate breakdown- glycolysis, fermentation, the oxidative pentose phosphate, the Krebs cycle and the photorespiratory pathways. In this chapter we shall briefly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the CCM and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

  8. A mechanical diode: Comparing numerical and experimental characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Simmermacher, T.; Segalman, D.; Sagartz, M.

    1997-12-01

    The predictive modeling of vibration of many structural systems is crippled by an inability to predictively model the mechanics of joints. The lack of understanding of joint dynamics is evidenced by the substantial uncertainty of joint compliances in the numerical models and by the complete inability to predict joint damping. The lore is that at low amplitudes, joint mechanics are associated with Coulomb friction and stick-slip phenomena and that at high amplitudes, impact processes result in dissipation as well as shift of energy to other frequencies. Inadequate understanding of the physics precludes reliable predictions. In this introductory work, joint compliance is studied in both a numerical and experimental setting. A simple bolted interface is used as the test article and compliance is measured for the joint in both compression and in tension. This simple interface is shown to exhibit a strong non-linearity near the transition from compression to tension (or vice-versa). Modeling issues pertaining to numerically solving for the compliance are addressed. It is shown that the model predicts the experimental strains and compliance fairly well. It will be seen that the joint behavior is a mechanical analogy to a diode. In compression, the joint is very stiff, acting almost as a rigid link, while in tension the joint is soft, acting as a soft spring. Although there have been many other studies performed on bolted joints, the variety of joint geometries has demonstrated large variations in behavior. This study is an attempt to quantify the behavior of typical joints found in today`s weapon systems.

  9. A comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of nanofibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubun, German P.; Bessudnova, Nadezda O.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration or replacement of lost or damaged hard tooth tissues remain a reconstructive clinical dentistry challenge. One of the most promising solutions to this problem is the development of novel concepts and methodologies of tissue engineering for the synthesis of three-dimensional graft constructs that are equivalent to original organs and tissues. This structural and functional compatibility can be reached by producing ultra-thin polymer filament scaffolds. This research aims through a series of studies to examine different methods of polymer filament material special preparation and test mechanical properties of the produced materials subjected to a tensile strain. Nanofibrous material preparation using chemically pure acetone and mixtures of ethanol/water has shown no significant changes in sample surface morphology. The high temperature impact on material morphology has resulted in the modification of fiber structure. In the course of mechanical tests it has been revealed the dependence of the material strength on the spinning solution compositions. The results achieved point to the possibility to develop nanofibrous materials with required parameters changing the methodology of spinning solution production.

  10. Transductive face sketch-photo synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Tao, Dacheng; Gao, Xinbo; Li, Xuelong; Li, Jie

    2013-09-01

    Face sketch-photo synthesis plays a critical role in many applications, such as law enforcement and digital entertainment. Recently, many face sketch-photo synthesis methods have been proposed under the framework of inductive learning, and these have obtained promising performance. However, these inductive learning-based face sketch-photo synthesis methods may result in high losses for test samples, because inductive learning minimizes the empirical loss for training samples. This paper presents a novel transductive face sketch-photo synthesis method that incorporates the given test samples into the learning process and optimizes the performance on these test samples. In particular, it defines a probabilistic model to optimize both the reconstruction fidelity of the input photo (sketch) and the synthesis fidelity of the target output sketch (photo), and efficiently optimizes this probabilistic model by alternating optimization. The proposed transductive method significantly reduces the expected high loss and improves the synthesis performance for test samples. Experimental results on the Chinese University of Hong Kong face sketch data set demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method by comparing it with representative inductive learning-based face sketch-photo synthesis methods.

  11. Comparing potential copper chelation mechanisms in Parkinson's disease protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented the nudged elastic band (NEB) as a guided dynamics framework for our real-space multigrid method of DFT-based quantum simulations. This highly parallel approach resolves a minimum energy pathway (MEP) on the energy hypersurface by relaxing intermediates in a chain-of-states. As an initial application we present an investigation of chelating agents acting on copper ion bound to α -synuclein, whose misfolding is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Copper ions are known to act as highly effective misfolding agents in a-synuclein and are thus an important target in understanding PD. Furthermore, chelation therapy has shown promise in the treatment of Alzheimer's and other neuro-degenerative diseases with similar metal-correlated pathologies. At present, our candidate chelating agents include nicotine, curcumin and clioquinol. We examine their MEP activation barriers in the context of a PD onset mechanism to assess the viability of various chelators for PD remediation.

  12. Olfactory transduction pathways in the Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Velez, Z; Hubbard, P C; Barata, E N; Canário, A V M

    2013-09-01

    This study tested whether differences in sensitivity between the upper and lower olfactory epithelia of Solea senegalensis are associated with different odorant receptors and transduction pathways, using the electro-olfactogram. Receptor mechanisms were assessed by cross-adaptation with amino acids (L-cysteine, L-phenylalanine and 1-methyl-L-tryptophan) and bile acids (taurocholic acid and cholic acid). This suggested that relatively specific receptors exist for 1-methyl-L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine (food-related odorants) in the lower epithelium, and for taurocholic acid (conspecific-derived odorant) in the upper. Inhibition by U73122 [a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor] suggested that olfactory responses to amino acids were mediated mostly, but not entirely, by PLC-mediated transduction (IC50 ; 15-55 nM), whereas bile acid responses were mediated by both PLC and adenylate cyclase-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AC-cAMP) (using SQ-22536; an AC inhibitor). Simultaneous application of both drugs rarely inhibited responses completely, suggesting possible involvement of non-PLC and non-AC mediated mechanisms. For aromatic amino acids and bile acids, there were differences in the contribution of each transduction pathway (PLC, AC and non-PLC and non-AC) between the two epithelia. These results suggest that differences in sensitivity of the two epithelia are associated with differences in odorant receptors and transduction mechanisms.

  13. The augmentation of intracellular delivery of peptide therapeutics by artificial protein transduction domains.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Sugita, Toshiki; Mukai, Yohei; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2009-07-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs), such as HIV-derived Tat, have been successfully used as functional biomaterials for intracellular delivery of anti-cancer macromolecular drugs (protein, peptides, and oligonucleotides). Although there were therefore great expectations regarding the therapeutic potential of PTDs for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics, their clinical application so far has been extremely limited because of the relatively high concentrations required to mediate any effects on cancer cells in vitro or in vivo. In this context, improving the transduction efficiency of PTDs using phage display-based molecular evolution techniques may be useful for creating artificial PTDs with high efficiency and safety. Here, we report an evaluation of transduction efficiency and toxicity of such artificial PTDs (designated mT02 and mT03) compared with Tat. The internalization of mT02 was the most rapid and efficient by a mechanism different from the usual macropinocytosis. Furthermore, we found that artificial PTDs fused with survivin antagonistic peptide potentiate tumor cell-cytostatic activity. Thus, the results of this work provide new insights for designing new-generation peptide therapeutics for a wide variety of cancers as well as those expressing survivin.

  14. Comparing alkaline and thermal disintegration characteristics for mechanically dewatered sludge.

    PubMed

    Tunçal, Tolga

    2011-10-01

    Thermal drying is one of the advanced technologies ultimately providing an alternative method of sludge disposal. In this study, the drying kinetics of mechanically dewatered sludge (MDS) after alkaline and thermal disintegration have been studied. In addition, the effect of total organic carbon (TOC) on specific resistance to filtration and sludge bound water content were also investigated on freshly collected sludge samples. The combined effect of pH and TOC on the thermal sludge drying rate for MDS was modelled using the two-factorial experimental design method. Statistical assessment of the obtained results proposed that sludge drying potential has increased exponentially for both increasing temperature and lime dosage. Execution of curve fitting algorithms also implied that drying profiles for raw and alkaline-disintegrated sludge were well fitted to the Henderson and Pabis model. The activation energy of MDS decreased from 28.716 to 11.390 kJ mol(-1) after disintegration. Consequently, the unit power requirement for thermal drying decreased remarkably from 706 to 281 W g(-1) H2O.

  15. Comparing mechanisms of host manipulation across host and parasite taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Shaw, Jenny C.

    2013-01-01

    Parasites affect host behavior in several ways. They can alter activity, microhabitats or both. For trophically transmitted parasites (the focus of our study), decreased activity might impair the ability of hosts to respond to final-host predators, and increased activity and altered microhabitat choice might increase contact rates between hosts and final-host predators. In an analysis of trophically transmitted parasites, more parasite groups altered activity than altered microhabitat choice. Parasites that infected vertebrates were more likely to impair the host’s reaction to predators, whereas parasites that infected invertebrates were more likely to increase the host’s contact with predators. The site of infection might affect how parasites manipulate their hosts. For instance, parasites in the central nervous system seem particularly suited to manipulating host behavior. Manipulative parasites commonly occupy the body cavity, muscles and central nervous systems of their hosts. Acanthocephalans in the data set differed from other taxa in that they occurred exclusively in the body cavity of invertebrates. In addition, they were more likely to alter microhabitat choice than activity. Parasites in the body cavity (across parasite types) were more likely to be associated with increased host contact with predators. Parasites can manipulate the host through energetic drain, but most parasites use more sophisticated means. For instance, parasites target four physiological systems that shape behavior in both invertebrates and vertebrates: neural, endocrine, neuromodulatory and immunomodulatory. The interconnections between these systems make it difficult to isolate specific mechanisms of host behavioral manipulation.

  16. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical-biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy.

    PubMed

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-01

    Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical-biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinput waste, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3-9.5%, 1-18% and 1-8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full

  17. High-sensitivity linear piezoresistive transduction for nanomechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansa, Marc; Fernández-Regúlez, Marta; Llobet, Jordi; San Paulo, Álvaro; Pérez-Murano, Francesc

    2014-07-01

    Highly sensitive conversion of motion into readable electrical signals is a crucial and challenging issue for nanomechanical resonators. Efficient transduction is particularly difficult to realize in devices of low dimensionality, such as beam resonators based on carbon nanotubes or silicon nanowires, where mechanical vibrations combine very high frequencies with miniscule amplitudes. Here we describe an enhanced piezoresistive transduction mechanism based on the asymmetry of the beam shape at rest. We show that this mechanism enables highly sensitive linear detection of the vibration of low-resistivity silicon beams without the need of exceptionally large piezoresistive coefficients. The general application of this effect is demonstrated by detecting multiple-order modes of silicon nanowire resonators made by either top-down or bottom-up fabrication methods. These results reveal a promising approach for practical applications of the simplest mechanical resonators, facilitating its manufacturability by very large-scale integration technologies.

  18. Calcium and signal transduction in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Reddy, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental and hormonal signals control diverse physiological processes in plants. The mechanisms by which plant cells perceive and transduce these signals are poorly understood. Understanding biochemical and molecular events involved in signal transduction pathways has become one of the most active areas of plant research. Research during the last 15 years has established that Ca2+ acts as a messenger in transducing external signals. The evidence in support of Ca2+ as a messenger is unequivocal and fulfills all the requirements of a messenger. The role of Ca2+ becomes even more important because it is the only messenger known so far in plants. Since our last review on the Ca2+ messenger system in 1987, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating various aspects of Ca(2+) -signaling pathways in plants. These include demonstration of signal-induced changes in cytosolic Ca2+, calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins, identification of different Ca2+ channels, characterization of Ca(2+) -dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) both at the biochemical and molecular levels, evidence for the presence of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, and increased evidence in support of the role of inositol phospholipids in the Ca(2+) -signaling system. Despite the progress in Ca2+ research in plants, it is still in its infancy and much more needs to be done to understand the precise mechanisms by which Ca2+ regulates a wide variety of physiological processes. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of these recent developments in Ca2+ research as it relates to signal transduction in plants.

  19. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  20. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of “teaching signal transduction.” The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the development and delivery of their teaching activities in this area. This was achieved by combining open seminars with restricted access workshops and discussion events. The results suggest ways in which systems biology, information and communication technology, Web-based investigations, and high standard illustrations might be more effectively and efficiently incorporated into modern cell biology courses. PMID:17012185

  1. Electromagnetic transduction of ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, Frank; Alers, George; Alers, Ron

    2012-05-01

    Excitation and detection of ultrasonic vibrations without physical contact has proven to be of great commercial value. First used to excite the resonant vibration of bar shaped laboratory specimens in the 1930's, it was Bruce Thompson's contributions in 1973-5 that launched their practical application to a wide range of difficult NDE problems. As a fresh PhD, he championed the use of mathematical models for the electromagnetic transduction process in order to guide the design and construction of practical transducers. His early papers presented both theoretical and experimental results that exposed the wide range of wave types that could be generated along with the environmental conditions that could be overcome. Several laboratories around the world established research programs to apply the electromagnetic transducer (EMAT) to specific NDE problems. This paper will summarize those applications made by the authors.

  2. Mimicking photosynthetic solar energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Gust, D; Moore, T A; Moore, A L

    2001-01-01

    Increased understanding of photosynthetic energy conversion and advances in chemical synthesis and instrumentation have made it possible to create artificial nanoscale devices and semibiological hybrids that carry out many of the functions of the natural process. Artificial light-harvesting antennas can be synthesized and linked to artificial reaction centers that convert excitation energy to chemical potential in the form of long-lived charge separation. Artificial reaction centers can form the basis for molecular-level optoelectronic devices. In addition, they may be incorporated into the lipid bilayer membranes of artificial vesicles, where they function as components of light-driven proton pumps that generate transmembrane proton motive force. The proton gradient may be used to synthesize adenosine triphosphate via an ATP synthase enzyme. The overall energy transduction process in the liposomal system mimics the solar energy conversion system of a photosynthetic bacterium. The results of this research illustrate the advantages of designing functional nanoscale devices based on biological paradigms.

  3. Studying Cellular Signal Transduction with OMIC Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Benjamin D.; Clarke, David C.; Lee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In the gulf between genotype and phenotype exists proteins and, in particular, protein signal transduction systems. These systems use a relatively limited parts list to respond to a much longer list of extracellular, environmental, and/or mechanical cues with rapidity and specificity. Most signaling networks function in a highly nonlinear and often contextual manner. Furthermore, these processes occur dynamically across space and time. Because of these complexities, systems and “OMIC” approaches are essential for the study of signal transduction. One challenge in using OMIC-scale approaches to study signaling is that the “signal” can take different forms in different situations. Signals are encoded in diverse ways such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activities, localizations, or post-translational modifications to proteins. Furthermore, in some cases signals may be encoded only in the dynamics, duration, or rates of change of these features. Accordingly, systems-level analyses of signaling may need to integrate multiple experimental and/or computational approaches. As the field has progressed, the non-triviality of integrating experimental and computational analyses has become apparent. Successful use of OMIC methods to study signaling will require the “right” experiments and the “right” modeling approaches, and it is critical to consider both in the design phase of the project. In this review, we discuss common OMIC and modeling approaches for studying signaling, emphasizing the philosophical and practical considerations for effectively merging these two types of approaches to maximize the probability of obtaining reliable and novel insights into signaling biology. PMID:26244521

  4. Distinct roles of TRP channels in auditory transduction and amplification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Brendan P; Baker, Allison E; Gaudry, Quentin; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Wilson, Rachel I

    2013-01-09

    Auditory receptor cells rely on mechanically gated channels to transform sound stimuli into neural activity. Several TRP channels have been implicated in Drosophila auditory transduction, but mechanistic studies have been hampered by the inability to record subthreshold signals from receptor neurons. Here, we develop a non-invasive method for measuring these signals by recording from a central neuron that is electrically coupled to a genetically defined population of auditory receptor cells. We find that the TRPN family member NompC, which is necessary for the active amplification of sound-evoked motion by the auditory organ, is not required for transduction in auditory receptor cells. Instead, NompC sensitizes the transduction complex to movement and precisely regulates the static forces on the complex. In contrast, the TRPV channels Nanchung and Inactive are required for responses to sound, suggesting they are components of the transduction complex. Thus, transduction and active amplification are genetically separable processes in Drosophila hearing.

  5. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  6. Molecular mechanisms in the selective basal activation of pyrabactin receptor 1: Comparative analysis of mutants.

    PubMed

    Dorosh, Lyudmyla; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Loewen, Michele C; Stepanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Pyrabactin receptors (PYR) play a central role in abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction; they are ABA receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C). Molecular aspects contributing to increased basal activity of PYR against PP2C are studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. An extensive series of MD simulations of the apo-form of mutagenized PYR1 as a homodimer and in complex with homology to ABA-insensitive 1 (HAB1) phosphatase are reported. In order to investigate the detailed molecular mechanisms mediating PYR1 activity, the MD data was analyzed by essential collective dynamics (ECD), a novel approach that allows the identification, with atomic resolution, of persistent dynamic correlations based on relatively short MD trajectories. Employing the ECD method, the effects of select mutations on the structure and dynamics of the PYR1 complexes were investigated and considered in the context of experimentally determined constitutive activities against HAB1. Approaches to rationally design constitutively active PYR1 constructs to increase PP2C inhibition are discussed.

  7. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  8. A possible mechanism for improvement by a cognition-enhancer nefiracetam of spatial memory function and cAMP-mediated signal transduction system in sustained cerebral ischaemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Satoshi; Niimura, Makiko; Miyake-Takagi, Keiko; Nagakura, Akira; Fukatsu, Tomoko; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Hara, Junko

    2003-02-01

    1. Accumulated evidence indicates that the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) signal transduction system may be linked to learning and memory function. 2. The effects of nefiracetam, which has been developed as a cognition enhancer, on spatial memory function and the AC/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction system in rats with sustained cerebral ischaemia were examined. 3. Microsphere embolism (ME)-induced sustained cerebral ischaemia was produced by injection of 700 microspheres (48 micro m in diameter) into the right hemisphere of rats. Daily oral administration of nefiracetam (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was started from 15 h after the operation. 4. The delayed treatment with nefiracetam attenuated the ME-induced prolongation of the escape latency in the water maze task that was examined on day 7 to 9 after ME, but it did not reduce the infarct size. 5. ME decreased Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated AC (AC-I) activity, cAMP content, cytosolic PKA Cbeta level, nuclear PKA Calpha and Cbeta levels, and reduced the phosphorylation and DNA-binding activity of CREB in the nucleus in the right parietal cortex and hippocampus on day 3 after ME. The ME-induced changes in these variables did not occur by the delayed treatment with nefiracetam. 6. These results suggest that nefiracetam preserved cognitive function, or prevented cognitive dysfunction, after sustained cerebral ischaemia and that the effect is, in part, attributable to the prevention of the ischaemia-induced impairment of the AC/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway.

  9. Blood Pressure Increases in OSA due to Maintained Neurovascular Sympathetic Transduction: Impact of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Tamisier, Renaud; Tan, Can Ozan; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Levy, Patrick; Taylor, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that greater resting sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome would not induce a lesser sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Design: Case-controlled cohort study. Participants: 33 patients with newly diagnosed OSA without comorbidities and 14 healthy controls. Interventions: 6 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for OSA patients and follow-up for 9 healthy controls. Measurements and Results: We assessed resting sympathetic outflow and sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Sympathetic activity was directly measured (microneurography) at rest and in response to sustained isometric handgrip exercise. Neurovascular transduction was derived from the relationship of sympathetic activity and blood pressure to leg blood flow during exercise. Despite an elevated sympathetic activity of ∼50% in OSA compared to controls, neurovascular transduction was not different (i.e., absence of tachyphylaxis). After six months of CPAP, there were significant declines in diastolic pressure, averaging ∼4 mm Hg, and in sympathetic activity, averaging ∼20% with no change in transduction. Conclusions: Greater sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea does not appear to be associated with lesser neurovascular transduction. Hence, elevated sympathetic outflow without lesser transduction may underlie the prevalent development of hypertension in this population that is well controlled by continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Citation: Tamisier R, Tan CO, Pepin JL, Levy P, Taylor JA. Blood pressure increases in OSA due to maintained neurovascular sympathetic transduction: impact of CPAP. SLEEP 2015;38(12):1973–1980. PMID:26039959

  10. Comparative Auditory Mechanics: From Species to Species and From Base to Apex—A Moderated Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Nigel P.; Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2011-11-01

    A discussion moderated by the authors on the topics "Comparative Auditory Mechanics" and "Mechanics in the Apex of the Cochlea" was held on 20 July 2011 at the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The paper provides an edited transcript of the session.

  11. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  12. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Borrisé, X.; San Paulo, A.

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  13. Generalized transduction: new aspects of the events in the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velimirov, B.; Chiura, H. X.; Kogure, K.

    2003-04-01

    Virus mediated transfer of genetic elements among bacteria in nature has become a major research topic in the last decade. Along with conjugation and transformation, transduction is a well-known mechanism resulting in horizontal gene transfer in procaryotic organisms. In the case of generalized transduction, all regions of the procaryotic chromosome or other genetic elements in the donor cell are transferred with nearly the same frequency to the recipient. The injection of this DNA induces the generation of stable transductants. Both virulent and temperate phages have the capability to induce general transduction.Within the frame of a study on intergeneric phage-mediated gene transfer between marine bacteria and enteric bacteria, namely an auxotrophic mutant of Escherichia coli (AB1157) we used virus like particles (VLPs) from an oligotrophic marine environment (Mediterranean Sea, West coast of Corsica) and obtained gene transfer frequencies ranging between 10-2 to 10-6 per viral particle. Consequently we had to assume that an important fraction of the VLPs obtained via ultrafiltration (Minitan Ultrafiltration System, Millipore, USA. 30 kDA cut-off filter) from surface seawater have the capability to induce general transduction. In the process of this investigation we made a number of new observations which were not compatible with the concept of general transduction. The obtained transductants were able to produce new VLPs, which had again the capability to induce transduction. In an attempt to characterize these particles we show that their appearance in the experiment was neither related to plaque formation nor to cell lysis and we discuss the concept of transduction in the light of new experimental evidence concerning transducing particles. Furthermore, a preliminary numerical model allowing an estimation of the transduction events, taking place in the water column within a year is presented.

  14. Hair-bundle friction from transduction channels' gating forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. We have shown recently that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle and thus provide a major source of damping [2]. We develop here a physical theory of passive hair-bundle mechanics that explains the origin of channel friction. We show that channel friction can be understood quantitatively by coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. As a result, varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. The analysis emphasizes the dual role of transduction channels' gating forces, which affect both hair-bundle stiffness and drag. Friction originating from gating of ion channels is a general concept that is relevant to all mechanosensitive channels.

  15. Microbead-assisted retroviral transduction for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Bianca; Jorritsma, Annelies; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Toebes, Mireille; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2010-10-01

    Retroviral transduction is the most commonly used strategy to obtain long-term expression of therapeutic genes. To efficiently transduce mammalian cells, a recombinant fibronectin molecule, RetroNectin, is generally used to juxtapose viral particles and cells, and thereby enhance viral uptake. Although this strategy has become widely adopted, in particular for the genetic modification of hematopoietic cells, several limitations apply. For example, it requires the use of culture systems that allow protein coating, something that is not possible for many of the closed cell culture systems that are used in clinical trials. Furthermore, efficient transduction is obtained only when culture systems can be exposed to centrifugation, an approach termed spin transduction. Here, we describe a novel and more potent strategy for the transduction of T cells that can be applied on a clinical scale. We show that RetroNectin can efficiently be coated onto epoxy-modified paramagnetic beads. After a blocking step, these beads can subsequently bind retroviral particles from viral supernatants, rendering such supernatants largely devoid of functional viral particles. Addition of these virus-loaded beads to activated T cells results in efficient retroviral infection. Importantly, transduction does not require the use of culture systems that are compatible with protein coating, nor is it dependent on centrifugation of either the viral supernatant or the cells. Finally, cell growth, phenotype, and function of spin-transduced versus bead-transduced cells are comparable. Viral coating of microbeads should facilitate the production of genetically modified cells, in particular for use in clinical trials.

  16. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture: a comparative review. Part 3: Mechanisms of acupuncture therapies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyang

    2013-06-01

    The human body is a hierarchical organism containing many levels of mutually interacting oscillatory systems. From the viewpoint of traditional Chinese medicine, health is a state of harmony emergent from the interactions of these systems and disease is a state of discord. Hence, human diseases are considered as disturbed functions rather than changed structures. Indeed, the change from normal to abnormal structure may be beneficent rather than maleficent. For example, when one kidney becomes twice the normal size following the destruction of the other kidney, it is good and not bad for us because we might be dead otherwise. Therefore, in Part 3 of this three-part series, emphasis is mainly laid on the acupuncture mechanisms of treating disturbed physiological functions rather than disordered structures. At first, the basic tenets of conventional neuroscience and cardiology are reevaluated so that clear understanding of how nervous and cardiovascular systems work together can be obtained. Then, the general principles of diagnosis and treatment in traditional Chinese medicine from the integrative perspective of complex dynamic systems are proposed. Finally, mechanisms of acupuncture therapies for treating 14 different categories of disorders will be elucidated via the magneto-electric inductive effects of the meridian system.

  17. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cultured Suspension Cells of the Halophyte Halogeton glomeratus by iTRAQ Provides Insights into Response Mechanisms to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juncheng; Yao, Lirong; Li, Baochun; Meng, Yaxiong; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Ren, Panrong; Yang, Ke; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity severely threatens land use capability and crop yields worldwide. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance in halophytes will contribute to the development of salt-tolerant crops. In this study, a combination of physiological characteristics and iTRAQ-based proteomic approaches was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the salt response of suspension cell cultures of halophytic Halogeton glomeratus. These cells showed halophytic growth responses comparable to those of the whole plant. In total, 97 up-regulated proteins and 192 down-regulated proteins were identified as common to both 200 and 400 mM NaCl concentration treatments. Such salinity responsive proteins were mainly involved in energy, carbohydrate metabolism, stress defense, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell growth, and cytoskeleton metabolism. Effective regulatory protein expression related to energy, stress defense, and carbohydrate metabolism play important roles in the salt-tolerance of H. glomeratus suspension cell cultures. However, known proteins regulating Na+ efflux from the cytoplasm and its compartmentalization into the vacuole did not change significantly under salinity stress suggesting our existing knowledge concerning Na+ extrusion and compartmentalization in halophytes needs to be evaluated further. Such data are discussed in the context of our current understandings of the mechanisms involved in the salinity response of the halophyte, H. glomeratus. PMID:26904073

  18. Gravitational Effects on Signal Transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in ground-based experiments, the effect of microgravity on in vitro erythroid differentiation triggered by the hematopoietic growth factor erythropoietin (Epo) and to begin to determine whether this is associated with the anemia of space flight. We chose to use a model cell culture system with which we have had a long and successful experience. These cells, designated Rauscher murine erythroleukemia, grow independently in suspension culture. We first compared the growth rate of Rauscher cells under conditions of simulated microgravity with that of cells grown at 1XG in standard tissue culture flasks. Therefore, since there were fewer cells in the RWV at each specified time, glucose consumption per cell was increased in simulated microgravity. We next began to study the effect of simulated microgravity on erythropoietin induced differentiation of these cells. In another experiment, we allow the cells to grown in flasks or in the RWV for 24 hours prior to the addition of Epo. We initiated studies of c-myb, a proto-oncogene the down-regulation of which is necessary for erythroid differentiation. These preliminary results suggest that simulated microgravity interferes with the signal to c-myb. This may be part of the mechanism that blocks differentiation. A flight experiment is planned within the next 18- 24 months.

  19. Melanin, Radiation, and Energy Transduction in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Cordero, Radames J B; Bryan, Ruth; Nosanchuk, Joshua; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2017-03-01

    Melanin pigments are found in many diverse fungal species, where they serve a variety of functions that promote fitness and cell survival. Melanotic fungi inhabit some of the most extreme habitats on earth such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl and the highlands of Antarctica, both of which are high-radiation environments. Melanotic fungi migrate toward radioactive sources, which appear to enhance their growth. This phenomenon, combined with the known capacities of melanin to absorb a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and transduce this radiation into other forms of energy, raises the possibility that melanin also functions in harvesting such energy for biological usage. The ability of melanotic fungi to harness electromagnetic radiation for physiological processes has enormous implications for biological energy flows in the biosphere and for exobiology, since it provides new mechanisms for survival in extraterrestrial conditions. Whereas some features of the way melanin-related energy transduction works can be discerned by linking various observations and circumstantial data, the mechanistic details remain to be discovered.

  20. EDITORIAL: Special section on signal transduction Special section on signal transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    This special section of Physical Biology focuses on multiple aspects of signal transduction, broadly defined as the study of the mechanisms by which cells communicate with their environment. Mechanisms of cell communication involve detection of incoming signals, which can be chemical, mechanical or electromagnetic, relaying these signals to intracellular processes, such as cytoskeletal networks or gene expression systems, and, ultimately, converting these signals to responses such as cell differentiation or death. Given the multiscale nature of signal transduction systems, they must be studied at multiple levels, from the identities and structures of molecules comprising signal detection and interpretation networks, to the systems-level properties of these networks. The 11 papers in this special section illustrate some of the most exciting aspects of signal transduction research. The first two papers, by Marie-Anne Félix [1] and by Efrat Oron and Natalia Ivanova [2], focus on cell-cell interactions in developing tissues, using vulval patterning in worm and cell fate specification in mammalian embryos as prime examples of emergent cell behaviors. Next come two papers from the groups of Julio Saez-Rodriguez [3] and Kevin Janes [4]. These papers discuss how the causal relationships between multiple components of signaling systems can be inferred using multivariable statistical analysis of empirical data. An authoritative review by Zarnitsyna and Zhu [5] presents a detailed discussion of the sequence of signaling events involved in T-cell triggering. Once the structure and components of the signaling systems are determined, they can be modeled using approaches that have been successful in other physical sciences. As two examples of such approaches, reviews by Rubinstein [6] and Kholodenko [7], present reaction-diffusion models of cell polarization and thermodynamics-based models of gene regulation. An important class of models takes the form of enzymatic networks

  1. Phylogenomic networks reveal limited phylogenetic range of lateral gene transfer by transduction

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ovidiu; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages are recognized DNA vectors and transduction is considered as a common mechanism of lateral gene transfer (LGT) during microbial evolution. Anecdotal events of phage-mediated gene transfer were studied extensively, however, a coherent evolutionary viewpoint of LGT by transduction, its extent and characteristics, is still lacking. Here we report a large-scale evolutionary reconstruction of transduction events in 3982 genomes. We inferred 17 158 recent transduction events linking donors, phages and recipients into a phylogenomic transduction network view. We find that LGT by transduction is mostly restricted to closely related donors and recipients. Furthermore, a substantial number of the transduction events (9%) are best described as gene duplications that are mediated by mobile DNA vectors. We propose to distinguish this type of paralogy by the term autology. A comparison of donor and recipient genomes revealed that genome similarity is a superior predictor of species connectivity in the network in comparison to common habitat. This indicates that genetic similarity, rather than ecological opportunity, is a driver of successful transduction during microbial evolution. A striking difference in the connectivity pattern of donors and recipients shows that while lysogenic interactions are highly species-specific, the host range for lytic phage infections can be much wider, serving to connect dense clusters of closely related species. Our results thus demonstrate that DNA transfer via transduction occurs within the context of phage–host specificity, but that this tight constraint can be breached, on rare occasions, to produce long-range LGTs of profound evolutionary consequences. PMID:27648812

  2. Ion channels and the transduction of light signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Studies of biological light-sensing mechanisms are revealing important roles for ion channels. Photosensory transduction in plants is no exception. In this article, the evidence that ion channels perform such signal-transducing functions in the complex array of mechanisms that bring about plant photomorphogenesis will be reviewed and discussed. The examples selected for discussion range from light-gradient detection in unicellular algae to the photocontrol of stem growth in Arabidopsis. Also included is some discussion of the technical aspects of studies that combine electrophysiology and photobiology.

  3. Soliton growth-signal transduction in topologically quantized T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsson, Leif

    1993-09-01

    A model for growth-signal transduction of the T cell and its growth factor, interleukin-2, is presented. It is obtained as a generalization of the usual rate equation and is founded on the observation that a definite number of receptor occupations must take place in order to promote transition to the S phase and subsequent DNA replication. The generalized rate equation is identified as the equation of motion of a Lagrangian field theory of Ginzburg-Landau (Goldstone) type. However it is not an ad hoc model but is a microscopic theory of the interaction of interleukin-2 and its receptor. The topological quantum number of the model is related to the observed definite number of receptor occupations required to elicit growth-signal transduction. Individual receptor quanta, up to this limit, are subjected to a type of Bose condensation. This collective excitation constitutes the growth signal in the form of a topological kink soliton which is then launched by the next potential receptor occupation that makes the interaction repulsive. The model provides a possible long-absent explanation of the triggering mechanism for growth-signal transduction by means of the ambivalent interaction, which switches sign after a definite number of receptor occupations. Moreover, it offers an explanation of how Nature screens out fractional signals in the growth-signal-transduction process of T cells. Although the model is derived for assumed point-like cells and certain other restrictions, the obtained dose-response curves are in striking agreement with proliferation data from studies of both the leukemic T cell line MLA-144 from gibbon ape and normal human T cells in, and without, the presence of monoclonal anti-Tac antibodies.

  4. Meeting report: Signal transduction meets systems biology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the 21st century, systems-wide analyses of biological processes are getting more and more realistic. Especially for the in depth analysis of signal transduction pathways and networks, various approaches of systems biology are now successfully used. The EU FP7 large integrated project SYBILLA (Systems Biology of T-cell Activation in Health and Disease) coordinates such an endeavor. By using a combination of experimental data sets and computational modelling, the consortium strives for gaining a detailed and mechanistic understanding of signal transduction processes that govern T-cell activation. In order to foster the interaction between systems biologists and experimentally working groups, SYBILLA co-organized the 15th meeting “Signal Transduction: Receptors, Mediators and Genes” together with the Signal Transduction Society (STS). Thus, the annual STS conference, held from November 7 to 9, 2011 in Weimar, Germany, provided an interdisciplinary forum for research on signal transduction with a major focus on systems biology addressing signalling events in T-cells. Here we report on a selection of ongoing projects of SYBILLA and how they were discussed at this interdisciplinary conference. PMID:22546078

  5. Signal transduction disturbance related to hepatocarcinogenesis in mouse by prolonged exposure to Nanjing drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Shupei; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2013-09-01

    Toxicogenomic approaches were used to investigate the potential hepatocarcinogenic effects on mice by oral exposure to Nanjing drinking water (NJDW). Changes in the hepatic transcriptome of 3 weeks male mice (Mus musculus) were monitored and dissected after oral exposure to NJDW for 90 days. No preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions were observed in the hepatic tissue by the end of NJDW exposure. However, total of 746 genes were changed transcriptionally. Thirty-one percent of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were associated with the functional categories of cell cycle regulation, adhesion, growth, apoptosis, and signal transduction, which are closely implicated in tumorigenesis and progression. Interrogation of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes revealed that 43 DEGs were mapped to several crucial signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In signal transduction network constructed via Genes2Networks software, Egfr, Akt1, Atf2, Ctnnb1, Hras, Mapk1, Smad2, and Ccnd1 were hubs. Direct gene-disease relationships obtained from Comparative Toxicogenomics Database and scientific literatures revealed that the hubs have direct mechanism or biomarker relationships with hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions or hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, prolonged intake of NJDW without employing any indoor water treatment strategy might predispose mouse to HCC. Furthermore, Egfr, Akt1, Ctnnb1, Hras, Mapk1, Smad2, and Ccnd1 were identified as promising biomarkers of the potential combined hepatocarcinogenicity.

  6. Piezotransistive transduction of femtoscale displacement for photoacoustic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Abdul; Faheem Khan, M.; Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas; Koley, Goutam

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of femtoscale displacements in the ultrasonic frequency range is attractive for advanced material characterization and sensing, yet major challenges remain in their reliable transduction using non-optical modalities, which can dramatically reduce the size and complexity of the transducer assembly. Here we demonstrate femtoscale displacement transduction using an AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistor-integrated GaN microcantilever that utilizes piezoelectric polarization-induced changes in two-dimensional electron gas to transduce displacement with very high sensitivity. The piezotransistor demonstrated an ultra-high gauge factor of 8,700 while consuming an extremely low power of 1.36 nW, and transduced external excitation with a superior noise-limited resolution of 12.43 fm Hz−1/2 and an outstanding responsivity of 170 nV fm−1, which is comparable to the optical transduction limits. These extraordinary characteristics, which enabled unique detection of nanogram quantity of analytes using photoacoustic spectroscopy, can be readily exploited in realizing a multitude of novel sensing paradigms. PMID:26258983

  7. Sympathetic vascular transduction is augmented in young normotensive blacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine sympathetic vascular transduction in young normotensive black and white adults. We hypothesized that blacks would demonstrate augmented transduction of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) into vascular resistance. To test this hypothesis, MSNA, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). At rest, no differences existed in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). Likewise, LBNP elicited comparable responses of these variables for blacks and whites. Baseline MSNA did not differ between blacks and whites, but whites demonstrated greater increases during LBNP (28 +/- 7 vs. 55 +/- 18%, 81 +/- 21 vs. 137 +/- 42%, 174 +/- 81 vs. 556 +/- 98% for -5, -15, and -40 mmHg LBNP, respectively; P < 0.001). Consistent with smaller increases in MSNA but similar FVR responses during LBNP, blacks demonstrated greater sympathetic vascular transduction (%FVR/%MSNA) than whites (0.95 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.82 +/- 0.07 U; 0.82 +/- 0.11 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.09 U; 0.95 +/- 0.37 vs. 0.35 +/- 0.09 U; P < 0.01). In summary, young whites demonstrate greater increases in MSNA during baroreceptor unloading than age-matched normotensive blacks. However, more importantly, for a given increase in MSNA, blacks demonstrate greater forearm vasoconstriction than whites. This finding may contribute to augmented blood pressure reactivity in blacks.

  8. The transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Gregory A; Johnson, Richard D; Davenport, Paul W

    2002-01-01

    Background Intercostal muscles are richly innervated by mechanoreceptors. In vivo studies of cat intercostal muscle have shown that there are 3 populations of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors: primary muscle spindles (1°), secondary muscle spindles (2°) and Golgi tendon organs (GTO). The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors in response to controlled length and velocity displacements of the intercostal space. Mechanoreceptors, recorded from dorsal root fibers, were localized within an isolated intercostal muscle space (ICS). Changes in ICS displacement and the velocity of ICS displacement were independently controlled with an electromagnetic motor. ICS velocity (0.5 – 100 μm/msec to a displacement of 2,000 μm) and displacement (50–2,000 μm at a constant velocity of 10 μm/msec) parameters encompassed the full range of rib motion. Results Both 1° and 2° muscle spindles were found evenly distributed within the ICS. GTOs were localized along the rib borders. The 1° spindles had the greatest discharge frequency in response to displacement amplitude followed by the 2° afferents and GTOs. The 1° muscle spindles also possessed the greatest discharge frequency in response to graded velocity changes, 3.0 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. GTOs had a velocity response of 2.4 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1 followed by 2° muscle spindles at 0.6 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. Conclusion The results of this study provide a systematic description of the mechanosenitivity of the 3 types of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors. These mechanoreceptors have discharge properties that transduce the magnitude and velocity of intercostal muscle length. PMID:12392601

  9. A comparative study of thermal and mechanical stabilities of gamma irradiated PMMA, PP and PVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güven, O.; Uzun, C.

    1993-10-01

    In this comparative study it has been tried to find a correlation between the thermal and mechanical stabilities of some γ-irradiated polymers. Among various mechanical properties evaluated, the best correlation was found between the toughness (energy to break point) and the time required for 10% weight loss (isothermally). Among three polymers irradiated up to 100 kGy in the form of thin films, the best fit was observed to be for PMMA while PVC and PP has shown poorer correlation.

  10. Transduction sites of vagal mechanoreceptors in the guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zagorodnyuk, V P; Brookes, S J

    2000-08-15

    Extrinsic afferent neurons play an essential role in both sensation and reflex control of visceral organs, but their specialized morphological peripheral endings have never been functionally identified. Extracellular recordings were made from fine nerve trunks running between the vagus nerve and esophagus of the guinea pig. Mechanoreceptors, which responded to esophageal distension, fired spontaneously, had low thresholds to circumferential stretch, and were slowly adapting. Calibrated von Frey hairs (0.12 mN) were used to probe the serosal surface at 100-200 sites, which were mapped on a video image of the live preparation. Each stretch-sensitive unit had one to three highly localized receptive fields ("hot spots"), which were marked with Indian ink applied on the tip of the von Frey hair. Recorded nerve trunks were then filled anterogradely, using biotinamide in an artificial intracellular solution. Receptive fields were consistently associated with intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) in myenteric ganglia, but not with other filled neuronal structures. The average distance of receptive fields to IGLEs was 73 +/- 14 microm (24 receptive fields, from 12 units; n = 5), compared to 374 +/- 17 microm for 240 randomly generated sites (n = 5; p < 0.001). After maintained probing on a single receptive field, spontaneous discharge of units was inhibited, as were responses to distension. During adapted discharge to maintained distension, interspike intervals were distributed in a narrow range. This indicates that multiple receptive fields interact to encode mechanical distortion in a graded manner. IGLEs are specialized transduction sites of mechanosensitive vagal afferent neurons in the guinea pig esophagus.

  11. Changes in gene expression and signal transduction in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past three decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. This laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of normal osteoblasts (MC3T3-El) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips and loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated in microgravity and collected in microgravity. The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and signal transduction. Approximately one day after growth activation significant changes were observed in gene expression in 0-G flight samples. Immediate early growth genes/growth factors cox-2, c-myc, bcl2, TGF beta1, bFGF and PCNA showed a significant diminished mRNA induction in microgravity FCS activated cells when compared to ground and 1-G flight controls. Cox-1 was not detected in any of the samples. There were no significant differences in the expression of reference gene mRNA between the ground, 0-G and 1-G samples. The data suggest that quiescent osteoblasts are slower to enter the cell cycle in microgravity and that the lack of gravity itself may be a significant factor in bone loss in spaceflight. Preliminary data from our STS 76 flight experiment support our hypothesis that a basic biological response occurs at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level in 0-G. Here we examine ground-based and space flown data to help us understand the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity.

  12. Modulation of signal transduction in cancer cells by phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Peter G; Awad, Atif B

    2010-01-01

    Phytosterols are biofactors found enriched in plant foods such as seeds, grains, and legumes. Their dietary consumption is associated with numerous health benefits. Epidemiologic and experimental animal studies indicate that phytosterols are cancer chemopreventive agents particularly against cancers of the colon, breast, and prostate. Phytosterols impede oncogenesis and prevent cancer cell proliferation and survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying these beneficial actions involve effects on signal transduction processes which regulate cell growth and apoptosis. Phytosterols increase sphingomyelin turnover, ceramide formation, and liver X receptor activation. In concert, these actions slow cell cycle progression, inhibit cell proliferation, and activate caspase cascades and apoptosis in cancer cells.

  13. Transduction of nanovolt signals: Limits of electric-field detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmijn, J.

    1989-11-01

    Life scientists discussed the extreme electrical sensitivity of marine sharks, skates, and rays. After reviewing the results of earlier studies on the electric sense at the animal and system levels, the participants discussed the basic process of signal transduction in terms of voltage-sensitive ionic channels. Struck by the small charge displacements needed for excitation, they strongly recommended that sensory biologists, physiologists, and biophysicists join in a concerted effort to initiate new research on the ionic mechanisms of electric field detection. To obtain detailed information on the electroreceptive membrane and its ionic channels, high resolution recording techniques will be mandatory.

  14. Pheromones cause disease: pheromone/odourant transduction.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B

    2001-09-01

    This paper compares two models of the sense of smell and demonstrates that the new model has advantages over the accepted model with implications for medical research. The accepted transduction model had an odourant or pheromone contacting an aqueous sensory lymph then movement through it to a receptor membrane beneath. If the odourant or pheromone were non-soluble, the odourant/pheromone supposedly would be bound to a soluble protein in the lymph to be carried across. Thus, an odourant/carrier protein complex physically moved through the receptor lymph/mucus to interact with a membrane bound receptor. After the membranous receptor interaction, the molecule would be deactivated and any odourant/pheromone-binding protein recycled. This new electrical chemosensory model being proposed here has the pheromone or other odourant generating an electrical event in the extra-cellular mucus. Before the pheromone arrives, proteins of the 'carrier class' dissolved in the receptor mucus slowly and continuously sequester ions. A sensed pheromonal chemical species sorbs to the mucus and immediately binds to the now ion-holding dissolved protein. The binding of the pheromone to the protein causes a measurable conformational change in the pheromone/odourant-binding protein, desequestering ions. Releasing the bound ions changes the potential differences across a nearby super-sensitive dendritic membrane resulting in dendrite excitation. Pheromones will be implicated in the aetiology of the infectious, psychiatric and autoimmune diseases. This is the third article in a series of twelve to systematically explore this contention (see references 1-9).

  15. A comparative study of mineralized biocomposites: Hierarchical structure, quasi-static and dynamic mechanical behavior, and toughening mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Yu

    Antlers have a primary function in combat and are designed for sustaining high impact loading and bending moment without fracture. Learning from antler may shed a new light on traumatic bone fracture prevention and development of novel fracture-resistant, impact-absorbent materials. Antlers have a similar microstructure as bones, composed mainly of type-I collagen fibrils and carbonated apatite crystals, arranged in osteons in the compact bone and trabeculae in the cancellous bone. However, antlers have lower mineral content and consist mainly of primary osteons. The structure of antler at various hierarchical levels was thoroughly characterized and examined using various techniques and compared with bovine femur. Quasi-static mechanical tests (three-point bending, compression, and nanoindentation) were conducted on elk antlers and the results were compared to reported data. The flexural strength and elastic modulus are similar to other antlers but lower than bovine femur. However, the antler has much higher work of fracture and fracture toughness compared with bone. Dynamic behavior of antler was investigated using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar system. Results showed that antler can sustain large amount of deformation without catastrophic fracture. In situ mechanical testing under ESEM was performed to examine crack propagation in the longitudinal and transverse orientations in compact antler. Nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics were applied to determine R-curves. The fracture toughness in the transverse orientation is much higher than that in the longitudinal orientation due to crack deflections/twists at the hypermineralized interface and the rising R-curve behavior was observed. Synchrotron X-ray computed tomography and SEM images showed toughening mechanisms, including crack deflections/twists, uncracked ligament and collagen fiber bridging. The structure and compressive mechanical properties of the mineral and protein constituents in cancellous antler and

  16. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  17. Efficient lentiviral gene transfer to canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol.

    PubMed

    Horn, Peter A; Keyser, Kirsten A; Peterson, Laura J; Neff, Tobias; Thomasson, Bobbie M; Thompson, Jesse; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-15

    The use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of hematopoietic stem cells has evoked much interest owing to their ability to stably integrate into the genome of nondividing cells. However, published large animal studies have reported highly variable gene transfer rates of typically less than 1%. Here we report the use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of canine CD34(+) hematopoietic repopulating cells using a very short, 18-hour transduction protocol. We compared lentiviral transduction of hematopoietic repopulating cells from either stem cell factor (SCF)- and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed marrow or mobilized peripheral blood in a competitive repopulation assay in 3 dogs. All dogs engrafted rapidly within 9 days. Transgene expression was detected in all lineages (B cells, T cells, granulocytes, and red blood cells as well as platelets) indicating multilineage engraftment of transduced cells, with overall long-term marking levels of up to 12%. Gene transfer levels in mobilized peripheral blood cells were slightly higher than in primed marrow cells. In conclusion, we show efficient lentiviral transduction of canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol. These results have important implications for the design of stem cell gene therapy protocols, especially for those diseases in which the maintenance of stem cells in culture is a major limitation.

  18. Evidence that membrane transduction of oligoarginine does not require vesicle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen Weichiang . E-mail: weishen@usc.edu

    2005-07-01

    The involvement of vesicular formation processes in the membrane transduction and nuclear transport of oligoarginine is currently a subject of controversy. In this report, a novel quantitative method which allows for the selective measurement of membrane transduction excluding concurrent endocytosis was used to determine the effects of temperature, endosomal acidification, endosomolysis, and several known inhibitors of endocytic pathways on the internalization of oligoarginine. The results show that, unlike endocytosis, transduction of oligoarginine was not affected by incubation at 16 deg. C as compared to the 37 deg. C control, and was only partially inhibited at 4 deg. C incubation. Additionally, membrane transduction was not inhibited to the same extent as endocytosis following treatment with ammonium chloride, hypertonic medium, amiloride, or filipin. The endosomolytic activity of oligoarginine was investigated by examining the leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosolic compartment, which was not higher in the presence of oligoarginine. Furthermore, ammonium chloride showed no effect on the nuclear transport of oligoarginine. The data presented in this report indicate that membrane transduction is likely to occur at the plasma membrane without the formation of membrane vesicles, and the nuclear localization involves membrane transduction, rather than endocytosis of oligoarginine.

  19. A comparative mechanical analysis of plant and animal cells reveals convergence across kingdoms.

    PubMed

    Durand-Smet, Pauline; Chastrette, Nicolas; Guiroy, Axel; Richert, Alain; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Szecsi, Judit; Boudaoud, Arezki; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Bendhamane, Mohammed; Hamant, Oliver; Asnacios, Atef

    2014-11-18

    Plant and animals have evolved different strategies for their development. Whether this is linked to major differences in their cell mechanics remains unclear, mainly because measurements on plant and animal cells relied on independent experiments and setups, thus hindering any direct comparison. In this study we used the same micro-rheometer to compare animal and plant single cell rheology. We found that wall-less plant cells exhibit the same weak power law rheology as animal cells, with comparable values of elastic and loss moduli. Remarkably, microtubules primarily contributed to the rheological behavior of wall-less plant cells whereas rheology of animal cells was mainly dependent on the actin network. Thus, plant and animal cells evolved different molecular strategies to reach a comparable cytoplasmic mechanical core, suggesting that evolutionary convergence could include the internal biophysical properties of cells.

  20. A comparative study between axial and radial fluxfocusing magnetic gear topologies and mechanical gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, Matthew

    A variety of magnetic gear topologies have been investigated in recent years as alternatives to traditional mechanical gearboxes. In general these magnetic gears offer advantages in the non-contact transmission of torque including inherent overload protection, reduced acoustic emissions, and a reduction in the number of contacting components subject to wear. The earliest magnetic gear designs however suffered from low volumetric torque densities, which limited their utility for industrial applications. Research into flux focusing magnetic gearbox topologies has resulted in increased volumetric torque densities by actively engaging all of the magnets in the transmission of torque throughout the process. This research compared the volumetric torque density of axial and radial flux focusing magnetic gearbox designs and prototypes to planetary, cycloidal, and harmonic mechanical gearboxes. The rare earth scaled up radial and axial flux focusing topologies were found to have consistently higher volumetric torque densities than planetary gearboxes of comparable diameter. The cycloidal and harmonic gearboxes had comparable volumetric torque densities, with greater volumetric torque densities for some models and lesser volumetric torque densities for others. The expectation is that further improvements in volumetric torque density are possible for flux focusing magnetic gears with additional refinement and optimization of the designs. The current study does show that flux focusing magnetic gear topologies are a plausible future alternative to mechanical gearboxes in applications where their unique torque transmission mechanism would be advantageous.

  1. Insect mandibles--comparative mechanical properties and links with metal incorporation.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Bronwen W; Stewart, Aaron; Huang, Han; Truss, Rowan; Noller, Barry; Rasch, Ronald; Zalucki, Myron P

    2008-01-01

    A number of arthropod taxa contain metals in their mandibles (jaws), such as zinc, manganese, iron, and calcium. The occurrence of zinc and its co-located halogen chlorine have been studied in relation to the mechanical properties and shown to be linked in a direct fashion with increasing concentration. Hardness along with elastic modulus (stiffness) has also been linked to zinc and halogen concentration in some marine polychaete worms. The metal appears to be incorporated within the biological matrix, possibly bonding with proteins. However, the comparative advantage of metal inclusion has not been tested. It is possible that without metals, alternative mechanisms are used to achieve hardness of equal value in similar 'tools' such as mandibles. This question has direct bearing on the significance of metal hardening. In the present article, we compare across mandibles from six termite species, including samples with major zinc concentration, minor manganese, and no metals. Nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and electron microanalysis are used to assess metal concentration, form, and mechanical properties. The data demonstrate that termite mandibles lacking metals when fully developed have lower values for hardness and elastic modulus. Zinc is linked to a relative 20% increase in hardness when compared with mandibles devoid of metals. The similar transition metal, manganese, found in minor concentrations, is not linked to any significant increase in these mechanical properties. This raises the question of the function of manganese, which is as commonly found in insect mandibles as zinc and often located in the same mandibles.

  2. [Kidney preservation by mechanical perfusion and by hypothermic storage: a comparative study].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, R; Eichmann, J; Strümper, R; Pichlmaier, H

    1977-04-01

    72 dog kidneys were stored under hypothermia as described by COLLINS and SACKS between 24 and 72 hrs and then transplanted. The immediate function of the kidneys was measured by PAH and inulin clearances. 24 hrs proved to be the maximum safe preservation time with both methods. The immediate function of the kidneys stored under hypothermia could not be improved by the addition of furosemide to the flushing solution. These results were compared with those gained by mechanical perfusion of the organ: kidney function after 72 hrs of hypothermic mechanical perfusion was significantly better than after 24 hrs of hypothermic storage.

  3. Comparing the microstructure and mechanical properties of Bombyx mori and Antheraea pernyi cocoon composites.

    PubMed

    Guan, Juan; Zhu, Wenshu; Liu, Binghe; Yang, Kang; Vollrath, Fritz; Xu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Silkworm cocoon material is a natural composite consisting of silk fibres and sericin glues. Both domestic and wild silkworms produce cocoons but with different functionality - one selected by man for textile manufacture whereas the other selected by Nature to provide damage-tolerant housing. To understand the structure--property relationship of cocoons, we evaluated and compared the microstructure and mechanical properties of two representative cocoon walls. It appears that a "brittle and weak" composite is produced by domestic Bombyx mori (B. mori) while a "tough and strong" composite is made by wild Antheraea pernyi (A. pernyi). The superior mechanical performance of A. pernyi cocoons can be attributed to both the material properties and the fibre network microstructures. Failure mechanisms and different failure modes for cocoon fibre composites were also proposed. A finite element model revealed qualitatively the effect of fibre properties and inter-fibre bonding strength on the mechanical properties of the fibre network. It emerged that both good mechanical properties of fibres and robust inter-fibre bonding were required for tough and strong fibre composites. The new insights could inspire new designs of synthetic fibre composites with enhanced mechanical properties.

  4. Signal transduction abnormalities in suicide: focus on phosphoinositide signaling system.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2013-11-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern and each year about one million people die by suicide worldwide. Recent studies suggest that suicide may be associated with specific neurobiological abnormalities. Earlier studies of neurobiology of suicide focused on abnormalities of the serotonergic mechanism. These studies suggested that some serotonin receptor subtypes may be abnormal in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Since these receptors are linked to signal transduction pathways, abnormalities of signaling mechanisms have been recently studied in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Of particular interest is the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor-linked phosphoinositide signaling system. Several studies have focused on the abnormalities on the component of this signaling system and these studies suggest the abnormalities of G proteins, the effectors phospholipase C and the second or the third messenger systems, such as protein kinase A. Further studies revealed abnormalities in the downstream transcription factors such as the cyclic AMP response element binding protein and some of the targeted genes of these transcription factors. The most important gene in this aspect which has been studied in the suicide is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Here we critically review the studies focusing on these components of the phosphoinositide signaling system in the postmortem brain of both adult and teenage suicide victims. These studies provide a better understanding of the signal transduction abnormalities in suicide focusing on the phosphoinositide signaling pathway. These studies may lead to new therapeutic agents targeting specific sites in this signaling cascade.

  5. Modeling of nociceptor transduction in skin thermal pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Xu, F; Wen, T; Lu, T J; Seffen, K A

    2008-08-01

    All biological bodies live in a thermal environment with the human body as no exception, where skin is the interface with protecting function. When the temperature moves out of normal physiological range, skin fails to protect and pain sensation is evocated. Skin thermal pain is one of the most common problems for humans in everyday life as well as in thermal therapeutic treatments. Nocicetors (special receptor for pain) in skin play an important role in this process, converting the energy from external noxious thermal stimulus into electrical energy via nerve impulses. However, the underlying mechanisms of nociceptors are poorly understood and there have been limited efforts to model the transduction process. In this paper, a model of nociceptor transduction in skin thermal pain is developed in order to build direct relationship between stimuli and neural response, which incorporates a skin thermomechanical model for the calculation of temperature, damage and thermal stress at the location of nociceptor and a revised Hodgkin-Huxley form model for frequency modulation. The model qualitatively reproduces measured relationship between spike rate and temperature. With the addition of chemical and mechanical components, the model can reproduce the continuing perception of pain after temperature has returned to normal. The model can also predict differences in nociceptor activity as a function of nociceptor depth in skin tissue.

  6. Characterization of the ABA signal transduction pathway in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-05-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants including the response to abiotic stress. ABA signal transduction consists of a double-negative regulatory mechanism, whereby ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. We studied and analyzed the various genes participating in the ABA signaling cascade of the grape (Vitis vinifera). The grape ABA signal transduction consists of at least six SnRK2s. Yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between core components of grape ABA signal transduction. We found that a total of forty eight interactions can occur between the various components. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stresses such as drought, high salt concentration and cold, were applied to vines growing in a hydroponic system. These stresses regulated the expression of various grape SnRK2s as well as ABFs in leaves and roots. Based on the interactions between SnRK2s and its targets and the expression pattern, we suggest that VvSnRK2.1 and VvSnRK2.6, can be considered the major VvSnRK2 candidates involved in the stomata response to abiotic stress. Furthermore, we found that the expression pattern of the two grape ABF genes indicates organ specificity of these genes. The key role of ABA signaling in response to abiotic stresses makes the genes involve in this signaling potential candidates for manipulation in programs designed to improve fruit tree performance in extreme environments.

  7. The Physiology of Mechanoelectrical Transduction Channels in Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Fettiplace, Robert; Kim, Kyunghee X.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about the mechanotransducer (MT) channels mediating transduction in hair cells of the vertrbrate inner ear. With the use of isolated preparations, it is experimentally feasible to deliver precise mechanical stimuli to individual cells and record the ensuing transducer currents. This approach has shown that small (1–100 nm) deflections of the hair-cell stereociliary bundle are transmitted via interciliary tip links to open MT channels at the tops of the stereocilia. These channels are cation-permeable with a high selectivity for Ca2+; two channels are thought to be localized at the lower end of the tip link, each with a large single-channel conductance that increases from the low- to high-frequency end of the cochlea. Ca2+ influx through open channels regulates their resting open probability, which may contribute to setting the hair cell resting potential in vivo. Ca2+ also controls transducer fast adaptation and force generation by the hair bundle, the two coupled processes increasing in speed from cochlear apex to base. The molecular intricacy of the stereocilary bundle and the transduction apparatus is reflected by the large number of single-gene mutations that are linked to sensorineural deafness, especially those in Usher syndrome. Studies of such mutants have led to the discovery of many of the molecules of the transduction complex, including the tip link and its attachments to the stereociliary core. However, the MT channel protein is still not firmly identified, nor is it known whether the channel is activated by force delivered through accessory proteins or by deformation of the lipid bilayer. PMID:24987009

  8. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  9. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture-a comparative review. Part 1: the meridian system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyang

    2012-12-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), acupuncture has been used to heal various diseases and physiologic malfunctions in clinical practice for more than 2500 years. Due to its efficacy, acupuncture has been recommended by the World Health Organization in 1980 as an effective alternative therapy for 43 different disorders. Over the past few decades, various theories of the meridian system and mechanisms have been proposed to explain how acupuncture might work. Most of these mechanisms, however, cannot yet explain conclusively why acupuncture is efficacious in treating so many different diseases. A plausible mechanism has been unavailable until recently. This is the first of a three-part series that aims to provide a comparative review of the aforementioned topics. Part 1 reviews the current indications for acupuncture, basic concepts of TCM, and the essence of the meridian system. To establish a mathematically rigorous framework of TCM, the chaotic wave theory of fractal continuum is proposed. This theory is then applied to characterize the essence of the meridian system. Parts 2 and 3 will review the possible mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and acupuncture therapies, respectively, based on biochemical, bioelectromagnetic, chaotic wave, and neurophysiologic approaches. It is sincerely hoped that this series of review articles can promote an understanding of the meridian system and acupuncture mechanisms to help patients in a logical and passionate way.

  10. Comparative assessment of intrinsic mechanical stimuli on knee cartilage and compressed agarose constructs.

    PubMed

    Completo, A; Bandeiras, C; Fonseca, F

    2017-03-17

    A well-established cue for improving the properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is mechanical stimulation. However, the explicit ranges of mechanical stimuli that correspond to favorable metabolic outcomes are elusive. Usually, these outcomes have only been associated with the applied strain and frequency, an oversimplification that can hide the fundamental relationship between the intrinsic mechanical stimuli and the metabolic outcomes. This highlights two important key issues: the firstly is related to the evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical stimuli of native cartilage; the second, assuming that the intrinsic mechanical stimuli will be important, deals with the ability to replicate them on the tissue-engineered constructs. This study quantifies and compares the volume of cartilage and agarose subjected to a given magnitude range of each intrinsic mechanical stimulus, through a numerical simulation of a patient-specific knee model coupled with experimental data of contact during the stance phase of gait, and agarose constructs under direct-dynamic compression. The results suggest that direct compression loading needs to be parameterized with time-dependence during the initial culture period in order to better reproduce each one of the intrinsic mechanical stimuli developed in the patient-specific cartilage. A loading regime which combines time periods of low compressive strain (5%) and frequency (0.5Hz), in order to approach the maximal principal strain and fluid velocity stimulus of the patient-specific cartilage, with time periods of high compressive strain (20%) and frequency (3Hz), in order to approach the pore pressure values, may be advantageous relatively to a single loading regime throughout the full culture period.

  11. Signal transduction in T lymphocytes in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1997-01-01

    More than 120 experiments conducted in space in the last 15 years have shown that dramatic changes are occurring in several types of single cells during their exposure to microgravity. One focus of today's research on cells in space is on signal transduction, especially those steps involving the cytoskeleton and cell-cell interactions. Signal transduction is often altered in microgravity as well as in hypergravity. This leads to changes in cell proliferation, genetic expression and differentiation. Interesting examples are leukocytes, HeLa cells, epidermoid cells and osteoblastic cells. Signalling pathways were studied in T lymphocytes in microgravity by several investigators after the discovery that mitogenic activation in vitro is virtually nil at 0g. T cells are a good model to study signal transduction because three extracellular signals (mitogen, IL-1 and IL-2) are required for full activation, and two classical pathways (via proteins G and PKC) are activated within the cell. In addition, low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins (Ras and Rap) are interacting with the cytoskeleton. The data at 0g support the notion that the expression of IL-2 receptor is inhibited at 0g, while mitogen binding and the transmission of IL-1 by accessory cells occur normally. In addition, alterations of the cytoskeleton suggest that the interaction with Rap proteins is disturbed. Data obtained with phorbol esters indicate that the function of PKC is changed in microgravity. Similar conclusions are drawn from the results with epidermoid cells A431.

  12. Comparative transcriptomics implicates mechanisms of evolved pollution tolerance in a killifish population.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, A; Triant, D A; Champlin, D; Nacci, D

    2010-12-01

    Wild populations of the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus resident in heavily contaminated North American Atlantic coast estuaries have recently and independently evolved dramatic, heritable, and adaptive pollution tolerance. We compared physiological and transcriptome responses to embryonic polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures between one tolerant population and a nearby sensitive population to gain insight into genomic, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of evolved tolerance in killifish, which are currently unknown. The PCB exposure concentrations at which developmental toxicity emerged, the range of developmental abnormalities exhibited, and global as well as specific gene expression patterns were profoundly different between populations. In the sensitive population, PCB exposures produced dramatic, dose-dependent toxic effects, concurrent with the alterations in the expression of many genes. For example, PCB-mediated cardiovascular system failure was associated with the altered expression of cardiomyocyte genes, consistent with sarcomere mis-assembly. In contrast, genome-wide expression was comparatively refractory to PCB induction in the tolerant population. Tolerance was associated with the global blockade of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signalling pathway, the key mediator of PCB toxicity, in contrast to the strong dose-dependent up-regulation of AHR pathway elements observed in the sensitive population. Altered regulation of signalling pathways that cross-talk with AHR was implicated as one candidate mechanism for the adaptive AHR signalling repression and the pollution tolerance that it affords. In addition to revealing mechanisms of PCB toxicity and tolerance, this study demonstrates the value of comparative transcriptomics to explore molecular mechanisms of stress response and evolved adaptive differences among wild populations.

  13. Mechanistic Insights in Ethylene Perception and Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chuanli; Chang, Caren

    2015-09-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene profoundly affects plant growth, development, and stress responses. Ethylene perception occurs at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and signal transduction leads to a transcriptional cascade that initiates diverse responses, often in conjunction with other signals. Recent findings provide a more complete picture of the components and mechanisms in ethylene signaling, now rendering a more dynamic view of this conserved pathway. This includes newly identified protein-protein interactions at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, as well as the major discoveries that the central regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2) is the long-sought phosphorylation substrate for the CONSTITUTIVE RESPONSE1 protein kinase, and that cleavage of EIN2 transmits the signal to the nucleus. In the nucleus, hundreds of potential gene targets of the EIN3 master transcription factor have been identified and found to be induced in transcriptional waves, and transcriptional coregulation has been shown to be a mechanism of ethylene cross talk.

  14. Mechanical and wear characteristics of epoxy composites filled with industrial wastes: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, A.; Satapathy, A.

    2017-02-01

    Use of industrial wastes, such as slag and sludge particles, as filler in polymers is not very common in the field of composite research. Therefore in this paper, a comparison of mechanical characteristics of epoxy based composites filled with LD sludge, BF slag and LD slag (wastes generated in iron and steel industries) were presented. A comparative study among these composites in regard to their dry sliding wear characteristics under similar test conditions was also included. Composites with different weight proportions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.%) of LD sludge were fabricated by solution casting technique. Mechanical properties were evaluated as per ASTM test standards and sliding wear test was performed following a design of experiment approach based on Taguchi’s orthogonal array. The test results for epoxy-LD sludge composites were compared with those of epoxy-BF slag and epoxy-LD slag composites reported by previous investigators. The comparison reveals that epoxy filled with LD sludge exhibits superior mechanical and wear characteristics among the three types of composites considered in this study.

  15. Phosphoglycerolipids are master players in plant hormone signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Janda, Martin; Planchais, Severine; Djafi, Nabila; Martinec, Jan; Burketova, Lenka; Valentova, Olga; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Phosphoglycerolipids are essential structural constituents of membranes and some also have important cell signalling roles. In this review, we focus on phosphoglycerolipids that are mediators in hormone signal transduction in plants. We first describe the structures of the main signalling phosphoglycerolipids and the metabolic pathways that generate them, namely the phospholipase and lipid kinase pathways. In silico analysis of Arabidopsis transcriptome data provides evidence that the genes encoding the enzymes of these pathways are transcriptionally regulated in responses to hormones, suggesting some link with hormone signal transduction. The involvement of phosphoglycerolipid signalling in the early responses to abscisic acid, salicylic acid and auxins is then detailed. One of the most important signalling lipids in plants is phosphatidic acid. It can activate or inactivate protein kinases and/or protein phosphatases involved in hormone signalling. It can also activate NADPH oxidase leading to the production of reactive oxygen species. We will interrogate the mechanisms that allow the activation/deactivation of the lipid pathways, in particular the roles of G proteins and calcium. Mediating lipids thus appear as master players of cell signalling, modulating, if not controlling, major transducing steps of hormone signals.

  16. Transduction of resistance to some macrolide antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    PATTEE, P A; BALDWIN, J N

    1962-11-01

    Pattee, P. A. (Iowa State University, Ames) and J. N. Baldwin. Transduction of resistance to some macrolide antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus. J. Bacteriol. 84:1049-1055. 1962.-By use of phage 80 of the International Typing Series, propagated on appropriate strains of Staphylococcus aureus, two related markers controlling resistance to certain macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, and carbomycin) were transduced among a variety of strains of S. aureus. Unlike the markers controlling penicillinase production and resistance to chlortetracycline and novobiocin, the determinants of resistance to the macrolide antibiotics were transduced at normal frequencies (at least 300 transductants per 10(9) phage) only to certain of the recipient strains. One of the markers studied appears to control an inducible enzyme system which is specifically induced by sub-inhibitory concentrations of erythromycin and which controls resistance to erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, and carbomycin. The other marker examined confers resistance to erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, and carbomycin, and shows no evidence of being dependent upon an inducible mechanism.

  17. A transductive neuro-fuzzy controller: application to a drilling process.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Agustín; Haber, Rodolfo E; Vega, Pastora I; Alique, José R

    2010-07-01

    Recently, new neuro-fuzzy inference algorithms have been developed to deal with the time-varying behavior and uncertainty of many complex systems. This paper presents the design and application of a novel transductive neuro-fuzzy inference method to control force in a high-performance drilling process. The main goal is to study, analyze, and verify the behavior of a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference system for controlling this complex process, specifically addressing the dynamic modeling, computational efficiency, and viability of the real-time application of this algorithm as well as assessing the topology of the neuro-fuzzy system (e.g., number of clusters, number of rules). A transductive reasoning method is used to create local neuro-fuzzy models for each input/output data set in a case study. The direct and inverse dynamics of a complex process are modeled using this strategy. The synergies among fuzzy, neural, and transductive strategies are then exploited to deal with process complexity and uncertainty through the application of the neuro-fuzzy models within an internal model control (IMC) scheme. A comparative study is made of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and the suggested method inspired in a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference strategy. The two neuro-fuzzy strategies are evaluated in a real drilling force control problem. The experimental results demonstrated that the transductive neuro-fuzzy control system provides a good transient response (without overshoot) and better error-based performance indices than the ANFIS-based control system. In particular, the IMC system based on a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference approach reduces the influence of the increase in cutting force that occurs as the drill depth increases, reducing the risk of rapid tool wear and catastrophic tool breakage.

  18. Co-ordination of osmotic stress responses through osmosensing and signal transduction events in fishes.

    PubMed

    Evans, T G

    2010-05-01

    This review centres upon the molecular regulation of osmotic stress responses in fishes, focusing on how osmosensing and signal transduction events co-ordinate changes in the activity and abundance of effector proteins during osmotic stress and how these events integrate into osmotic stress responses of varying magnitude. The concluding sections discuss the relevance of osmosensory signal transduction to the evolution of euryhalinity and present experimental approaches that may best stimulate future research. Iterating the importance of osmosensing and signal transduction during fish osmoregulation may be pertinent amidst the increased use of genomic technologies that typically focus solely on changes in the abundances of gene products, and may limit insight into critical upstream events that occur mainly through post-translational mechanisms.

  19. Comparative developmental biology of the uterus: insights into mechanisms and developmental disruption.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Thomas E; Dunlap, Kathrin A; Filant, Justyna

    2012-05-06

    The uterus is an essential organ for reproduction in mammals that derives from the Müllerian duct. Despite the importance of the uterus for the fertility and health of women and their offspring, relatively little is known about the hormonal, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate development of the Müllerian duct and uterus. This review aims to summarize the hormonal, cellular and molecular mechanisms and pathways governing development of the Müllerian duct and uterus as well as highlight developmental programming effects of endocrine disruptor compounds. Organogenesis, morphogenesis, and functional differentiation of the uterus are complex, multifactorial processes. Disruption of uterine development in the fetus and neonate by genetic defects and exposure to endocrine disruptor compounds can cause infertility and cancer in the adult and their offspring via developmental programming. Clear conservation of some factors and pathways are observed between species; therefore, comparative biology is useful to identify candidate genes and pathways underlying congenital abnormalities in humans.

  20. Mechano-chemo-transduction in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T

    2017-01-18

    The heart has the ability to adjust to changing mechanical loads. The Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect describe exquisite intrinsic mechanisms the heart has for autoregulating the force of contraction to maintain cardiac output under preload and afterload. Although these mechanisms have been known for more than a century, their cellular and molecular underpinnings are still debated. How does the cardiac myocyte sense a change in preload or afterload? How does the myocyte adjust its response to compensate for such changes? In cardiac myocytes Ca(2+) is a crucial regulator of contractile force and in this review we compare and contrast recent results from different labs that address two important questions. The "dimensionality" of the mechanical milieu under which experiments are carried out provide important clues to the location of the mechanosensors and the kinds of mechanical forces they can sense and respond to. As a first approximation, sensors inside the myocyte appear to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) while sensors on the cell surface appear to also modulate nitric oxide (NO) signalling; both signalling pathways affect Ca(2+) handling. Undoubtedly, further studies will add layers to this simplified picture. Clarifying the intimate links from cellular mechanics to ROS and NO signalling and to Ca(2+) handling will deepen our understanding of the Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect, and also provide a unified view on how arrhythmias may arise in seemingly disparate diseases that have in common altered myocyte mechanics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The Stacked HYBATS (Hybrid Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative strain components and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive strain and negative strain components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented hybrid actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative strain component will contract, and the positive strain component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative strain component, the area of the cross-section for the negative strain component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive strain components. The transverse strain is negative and longitudinal strain positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative strain or positive strain at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric

  2. A comparative analysis of three self-balancing wheelchair balancing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Olson, Zachery L; Van Moorhem, William K; Roemer, Robert B

    2006-12-01

    In the last 20 years, three different basic, dynamic balancing designs have been proposed for a self-balancing wheelchair (SBW) that allows the wheelchair user to transition from driving on all four wheels to driving while balanced on the two large rear wheels. The dynamic performance of these three SBW designs, the hanging pendulum counterweight (HPC), the single inverted pendulum (SIP), and the double inverted pendulum (DIP), are compared when controlled by a common state space controller. The four dynamic performance considerations of stability, driver dynamic stress, maneuverability and technical requirements were used to compare these designs while performing the following five tests: 1) transition from four-wheel to two-wheel, balancing mode; 2) stationary, self-balancing stability when subjected to an impact disturbance; 3) movement initiation, and stopping while balancing; 4) response to impact disturbances while moving; and 5) stability on low traction surfaces. In addition, the movement initiation and stopping test was repeated with increased chair mass and inertia to investigate the sensitivity of model performance to changes in model parameters. After comparing the three models it was determined that the HPC mechanism is the best choice for further development based on the criteria of stability, driver dynamic stress, maneuverability, and technical requirements. The HPC ranked equal or better compared to the SIP and DIP on 15 of 29 stability and performance factors. It was also the only design that was stable for all normally expected driving conditions.

  3. Direct interaction of human serum proteins with AAV virions to enhance AAV transduction: immediate impact on clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Sun, J; Crosby, A; Woodard, K; Hirsch, M L; Samulski, R J; Li, C

    2017-01-01

    Recent hemophilia B clinical trials using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery have demonstrated much lower coagulation factor IX (FIX) production in patients compared with the high levels observed in animal models and AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response elicited at high doses of AAV vectors. These results emphasize the necessity to explore effective approaches for enhancement of AAV transduction. Initially, we found that incubation of all AAV vectors with human serum enhanced AAV transduction. Complementary analytical experiments demonstrated that human serum albumin (HSA) directly interacted with the AAV capsid and augmented AAV transduction. The enhanced transduction was observed with clinical grade HSA. Mechanistic studies suggest that HSA increases AAV binding to target cells, and that the interaction of HSA with AAV does not interfere with the AAV infection pathway. Importantly, HSA incubation during vector dialysis also increased transduction. Finally, HSA enhancement of AAV transduction in a model of hemophilia B displayed greater than a fivefold increase in vector-derived circulating FIX, which improved the bleeding phenotype correction. In conclusion, incubation of HSA with AAV vectors supports a universal augmentation of AAV transduction and, more importantly, this approach can be immediately transitioned to the clinic for the treatment of hemophilia and other diseases.

  4. Comparing large lecture mechanics curricula using the Force Concept Inventory: A five thousand student study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Greco, Edwin F.; Murray, Eric R.; Bujak, Keith R.; Jackson Marr, M.; Catrambone, Richard; Kohlmyer, Matthew A.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2012-07-01

    The performance of over 5000 students in introductory calculus-based mechanics courses at the Georgia Institute of Technology was assessed using the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). Results from two different curricula were compared: a traditional mechanics curriculum and the Matter & Interactions (M&I) curriculum. Both were taught with similar interactive pedagogy. Post-instruction FCI averages were significantly higher for the traditional curriculum than for the M&I curriculum; the differences between curricula persist after accounting for factors such as pre-instruction FCI scores, grade point averages, and SAT scores. FCI performance on categories of items organized by concepts was also compared; traditional averages were significantly higher in each concept. We examined differences in student preparation between the curricula and found that the relative fraction of homework and lecture topics devoted to FCI force and motion concepts correlated with the observed performance differences. Concept inventories, as instruments for evaluating curricular reforms, are generally limited to the particular choice of content and goals of the instrument. Moreover, concept inventories fail to measure what are perhaps the most interesting aspects of reform: the non-overlapping content and goals that are not present in courses without reform.

  5. Comparative studies of transcriptional regulation mechanisms in a group of eight gamma-proteobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Vladimir; González, Abel D; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Huerta, Araceli M; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2005-11-18

    Experimental data on the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulation has enabled the construction of statistical models to predict new regulatory elements within its genome. Far less is known about the transcriptional regulatory elements in other gamma-proteobacteria with sequenced genomes, so it is of great interest to conduct comparative genomic studies oriented to extracting biologically relevant information about transcriptional regulation in these less studied organisms using the knowledge from E. coli. In this work, we use the information stored in the TRACTOR_DB database to conduct a comparative study on the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in eight gamma-proteobacteria and 38 regulons. We assess the conservation of transcription factors binding specificity across all the eight genomes and show a correlation between the conservation of a regulatory site and the structure of the transcription unit it regulates. We also find a marked conservation of site-promoter distances across the eight organisms and a correspondence of the statistical significance of co-occurrence of pairs of transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory regions, which is probably related to a conserved architecture of higher-order regulatory complexes in the organisms studied. The results obtained in this study using the information on transcriptional regulation in E. coli enable us to conclude that not only transcription factor-binding sites are conserved across related species but also several of the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms previously identified in E. coli.

  6. Tracing retinal vessel trees by transductive inference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structural study of retinal blood vessels provides an early indication of diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and hypertensive retinopathy. These studies require accurate tracing of retinal vessel tree structure from fundus images in an automated manner. However, the existing work encounters great difficulties when dealing with the crossover issue commonly-seen in vessel networks. Results In this paper, we consider a novel graph-based approach to address this tracing with crossover problem: After initial steps of segmentation and skeleton extraction, its graph representation can be established, where each segment in the skeleton map becomes a node, and a direct contact between two adjacent segments is translated to an undirected edge of the two corresponding nodes. The segments in the skeleton map touching the optical disk area are considered as root nodes. This determines the number of trees to-be-found in the vessel network, which is always equal to the number of root nodes. Based on this undirected graph representation, the tracing problem is further connected to the well-studied transductive inference in machine learning, where the goal becomes that of properly propagating the tree labels from those known root nodes to the rest of the graph, such that the graph is partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the trees is traced and separated from the rest of the vessel network. This connection enables us to address the tracing problem by exploiting established development in transductive inference. Empirical experiments on public available fundus image datasets demonstrate the applicability of our approach. Conclusions We provide a novel and systematic approach to trace retinal vessel trees with the present of crossovers by solving a transductive learning problem on induced undirected graphs. PMID:24438151

  7. The mechanical properties of various chemical vapor deposition diamond structures compared to the ideal single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the diamond lattice, leading to its outstanding mechanical properties, are discussed. These include the highest elastic moduli and fracture strength of any known material. Its extreme hardness is strongly connected with the extreme shear modulus, which even exceeds the large bulk modulus, revealing that diamond is more resistant to shear deformation than to volume changes. These unique features protect the ideal diamond lattice also against mechanical failure and fracture. Besides fast heat conduction, the fast vibrational movement of carbon atoms results in an extreme speed of sound and propagation of crack tips with comparable velocity. The ideal mechanical properties are compared with those of real diamond films, plates, and crystals, such as ultrananocrystalline (UNC), nanocrystalline, microcrystalline, and homo- and heteroepitaxial single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, produced by metastable synthesis using CVD. Ultrasonic methods have played and continue to play a dominant role in the determination of the linear elastic properties, such as elastic moduli of crystals or the Young's modulus of thin films with substantially varying impurity levels and morphologies. A surprising result of these extensive measurements is that even UNC diamond may approach the extreme Young's modulus of single-crystal diamond under optimized deposition conditions. The physical reasons for why the stiffness often deviates by no more than a factor of two from the ideal value are discussed, keeping in mind the large variety of diamond materials grown by various deposition conditions. Diamond is also known for its extreme hardness and fracture strength, despite its brittle nature. However, even for the best natural and synthetic diamond crystals, the measured critical fracture stress is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the ideal value obtained by ab initio calculations for the ideal cubic lattice. Currently

  8. Pseudotyped adeno-associated viral vector tropism and transduction efficiencies in murine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Balaji, Swathi; Le, Louis; Leung, Alice; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N; Wilson, James M; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Cell specific gene transfer and sustained transgene expression are goals of cutaneous gene therapy for tissue repair and regeneration. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2/2) mediated gene transfer to the skin results in stable transgene expression in the muscle fascicles of the panniculus carnosus in mice, with minimal gene transfer to the dermal or epidermal elements. We hypothesized that pseudotyped AAV vectors may have a unique and characteristic tropism and transduction efficiency profile for specific cells in the cutaneous wounds. We compared transduction efficiencies of cells in the epidermis, cells in the dermis, and the fascicles of the panniculus carnosus by AAV2/2 and three pseudotyped AAV vectors, AAV2/5, AAV2/7, and AAV2/8 in a murine excisional wound model. AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 result in significantly enhanced transduction of cells both in the epidermis and the dermis compared to AAV2/2. AAV2/5 transduces both the basilar and supra-basilar keratinocytes. In contrast, AAV2/8 transduces mainly supra-basilar keratinocytes. Both AAV2/7 and AAV2/8 result in more efficient gene transfer to the muscular panniculus carnosus compared to AAV2/2. The capsid of the different pseudotyped AAV vectors produces distinct tropism and efficiency profiles in the murine wound healing model. Both AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 administration result in significantly enhanced gene transfer. To further characterize cell specific transduction and tropism profiles of the AAV pseudotyped vectors, we performed in vitro experiments using human and mouse primary dermal fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that pseudotyping strategy confers a differential transduction of dermal fibroblasts, with higher transduction of both human and murine cells by AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 at early and later time points. At later time points, AAV2/2 demonstrates increased transduction. Interestingly, AAV2/8 appears to be more efficacious in transducing human cells as compared to AAV2/5. The pseudotype-specific pattern of

  9. Verhulst and stochastic models for comparing mechanisms of MAb productivity in six CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shirsat, Nishikant; Avesh, Mohd; English, Niall J; Glennon, Brian; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The present study validates previously published methodologies-stochastic and Verhulst-for modelling the growth and MAb productivity of six CHO cell lines grown in batch cultures. Cytometric and biochemical data were used to model growth and productivity. The stochastic explanatory models were developed to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of growth and productivity, whereas the Verhulst mechanistic models were developed for their predictability. The parameters of the two sets of models were compared for their biological significance. The stochastic models, based on the cytometric data, indicated that the productivity mechanism is cell specific. However, as shown before, the modelling results indicated that G2 + ER indicate high productivity, while G1 + ER indicate low productivity, where G1 and G2 are the cell cycle phases and ER is Endoplasmic Reticulum. In all cell lines, growth proved to be inversely proportional to the cumulative G1 time (CG1T) for the G1 phase, whereas productivity was directly proportional to ER. Verhulst's rule, "the lower the intrinsic growth factor (r), the higher the growth (K)," did not hold for growth across all cell lines but held good for the cell lines with the same growth mechanism-i.e., r is cell specific. However, the Verhulst productivity rule, that productivity is inversely proportional to the intrinsic productivity factor (r x ), held well across all cell lines in spite of differences in their mechanisms for productivity-that is, r x is not cell specific. The productivity profile, as described by Verhulst's logistic model, is very similar to the Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic equation, suggesting that productivity is more likely enzymatic in nature. Comparison of the stochastic and Verhulst models indicated that CG1T in the cytometric data has the same significance as r, the intrinsic growth factor in the Verhulst models. The stochastic explanatory and the Verhulst logistic models can explain the

  10. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments.

  11. Excitation and Adaptation in Bacteria–a Model Signal Transduction System that Controls Taxis and Spatial Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Othmer, Hans G.; Xin, Xiangrong; Xue, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    The machinery for transduction of chemotactic stimuli in the bacterium E. coli is one of the most completely characterized signal transduction systems, and because of its relative simplicity, quantitative analysis of this system is possible. Here we discuss models which reproduce many of the important behaviors of the system. The important characteristics of the signal transduction system are excitation and adaptation, and the latter implies that the transduction system can function as a “derivative sensor” with respect to the ligand concentration in that the DC component of a signal is ultimately ignored if it is not too large. This temporal sensing mechanism provides the bacterium with a memory of its passage through spatially- or temporally-varying signal fields, and adaptation is essential for successful chemotaxis. We also discuss some of the spatial patterns observed in populations and indicate how cell-level behavior can be embedded in population-level descriptions. PMID:23624608

  12. Expression of the synaptic exocytosis-regulating molecule complexin 2 in taste buds and its participation in peripheral taste transduction.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yoshimoto, Joto; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi

    2015-06-01

    Taste information from type III taste cells to gustatory neurons is thought to be transmitted via synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying taste transduction through this pathway have not been fully elucidated. In this study, to identify molecules that participate in synaptic taste transduction, we investigated whether complexins (Cplxs), which play roles in regulating membrane fusion in synaptic vesicle exocytosis, were expressed in taste bud cells. Among four Cplx isoforms, strong expression of Cplx2 mRNA was detected in type III taste cells. To investigate the function of CPLX2 in taste transduction, we observed taste responses in CPLX2-knockout mice. When assessed with electrophysiological and behavioral assays, taste responses to some sour stimuli in CPLX2-knockout mice were significantly lower than those in wild-type mice. These results suggested that CPLX2 participated in synaptic taste transduction from type III taste cells to gustatory neurons. A part of taste information is thought to be transmitted via synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. To identify molecules that participate in synaptic taste transduction, we investigated complexins (Cplxs) expression in taste bud cells. Strong expression of Cplx2 mRNA was detected in taste bud cells. Furthermore, taste responses to some sour stimuli in CPLX2- knockout mice were significantly lower than those in wild-type mice. These suggested that CPLX2 participated in synaptic taste transduction.

  13. Protein transduction: cell penetrating peptides and their therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2006-01-01

    Cell penetrating proteins or peptides (CPPs) have the ability to cross the plasma membranes of mammalian cells in an apparently energy- and receptor-independent fashion. Although there is much debate over the mechanism by which this "protein transduction" occurs, the ability of CPPs to translocate rapidly into cells is being exploited to deliver a broad range of therapeutics including proteins, DNA, antibodies, oligonucleotides, imaging agents and liposomes in a variety of situations and biological systems. The current review looks at the delivery of many such molecules by various CPPs, and their potential therapeutic application in a wide range of areas. CPP ability to deliver different cargoes in a relatively efficient and non-invasive manner has implications as far reaching as drug delivery, gene transfer, DNA vaccination and beyond. Although many questions remain to be answered and limitations on the use of CPPs exist, it is clear that this emerging technology has much to offer in a clinical setting.

  14. Signal Transduction by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sina; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are master regulators of vascular development and of blood and lymphatic vessel function during health and disease in the adult. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of this family of five mammalian ligands, which act through three receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In addition, coreceptors like neuropilins (NRPs) and integrins associate with the ligand/receptor signaling complex and modulate the output. Therapeutics to block several of the VEGF signaling components have been developed with the aim to halt blood vessel formation, angiogenesis, in diseases that involve tissue growth and inflammation, such as cancer. In this review, we outline the current information on VEGF signal transduction in relation to blood and lymphatic vessel biology. PMID:22762016

  15. Molecular biology of thermosensory transduction in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ichiro; Mori, Ikue

    2015-10-01

    As the environmental temperature prominently influences diverse biological aspects of the animals, thermosensation and the subsequent information processing in the nervous system has attracted much attention in biology. Thermotaxis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal behavioral paradigm by which to address the molecular mechanism underlying thermosensory transduction. Molecular genetic analysis in combination with other physiological and behavioral studies revealed that sensation of ambient temperature is mediated mainly by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling in thermosensory neurons. The information of the previously perceived temperature is also stored within the thermosensory neurons, and the consequence of the comparison between the past and the present temperature is conveyed to the downstream interneurons to further regulate the motor-circuits that encode the locomotion.

  16. Effects of electromagnetic field stimulation on cellular signal transduction mechanisms: Analyses of the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields on calcium spiking in ROS 17/2.8 cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sisken, B.F.; Sisken, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    The general goals of this work were to determine whether resting levels of cellular second messengers, especially calcium, are affected by low-level electromagnetic fields and the mechanisms that could lead to such changes. The work performed was directed at (1) verifying the report of McLeod et al (1990) that low frequency sinusoidal EMF can alter basal calcium fluctuations in cultured ROS 17/2.8 osteoblast-like cells and (2) reproducing the findings of Luben et al (1982) that pulsed electromagnetic fields can affect PTH-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in osteoblasts. Initially a system was constructed so that cells could be exposed to sinusoidal electric fields using platinum electrodes. In this system, the electrodes were separated from the cells and culture medium by agar barriers. A series of experiments indicated that this system was subject to a significant, though little-known artifact in which a not well understood interaction between the electrodes and sodium ions in the medium or in plain salt solutions led to frequency and amplitude dependent emission of photons that are recorded by the detection system. They therefore designed and constructed an air gap reactor system that utilizes a ferromagnetic core to direct the magnetic flux generated by a sinusoidal coil. Studies on the effects of a 15 Hz pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on cyclic AMP metabolism were performed on ROS 17/2.8 and MC3T3 cells.

  17. A quantum mechanical study on phosphotyrosyl peptide binding to the SH2 domain of p56lck tyrosine kinase with insights into the biochemistry of intracellular signal transduction events.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2004-05-01

    A study on the interaction between a phosphotyrosyl peptide with the SH2 domain of Lck kinase has been undertaken with the aid of semiempirical linear-scaling quantum mechanical methods. The structure of this complex has been solved at atomic resolution and, hence, it represents the ideal candidate for studying the charge deformation effects induced by the phosphopeptide on the binding site. Substantial changes in the charge of amino acid residues located in the binding pocket of the protein are observed upon ligand binding. More specifically, our quantum chemical calculations indicate that H-bonds involving charged side-chains are subject to consistent charge deformation effects whereas those forming salt bridges are unaffected by ligand binding. Furthermore, ligand binding has the effect of changing both the magnitude and direction of the protein's macrodipole, which rotates approximately 150 degrees with respect that of the unliganded protein. This suggests that a change in the polarization state of the protein might acts as a switch during the transmission of intracellular signals. The binding energy calculated with the aid of the COSMO solvation model corresponds to about -200 kcal/mol, most of which is attributed to the interaction of the phosphotyrosine head with the amino acid chains located in the binding site of the SH2 domain.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  19. [Molecular mechanisms of transitions induced by cytosine analogue: comparative quantum-chemical study].

    PubMed

    Brovarets', O O; Govorun, D M

    2010-01-01

    Using the simplest molecular models at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of the theory it has been shown for the first time that in addition to traditional incorporational errors caused by facilitated (compared with the canonical DNA bases cytosine (Cyt)) tautomerization of 6-(2-deoxy-beta-D-ribofuranosyl)-3,4-dihydro-6H,8H-pyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (DCyt), this mutagen causes the replication errors, increasing one million times the population of mispair Gua.DCyt* (asterisk marked mutagenic tautomer) as compared with mispair Gua.Cyt*. It is also proved that DCyt in addition to traditional incorporational errors also induces similar errors by an additional mechanism - due to a facilitated tautomerization of the wobble base pair Ade.DCyt (compared to the same pair Ade.Cyt) to a mispair Ade.DCyt* which is quasirisomorphic Watson-Crick base pair. Moreover, the obtained results allowed interpreting non-inconsistently the existing experimental NMR data.

  20. Nanomechanical motion transduction with a scalable localized gap plasmon architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic structures couple oscillating electromagnetic fields to conduction electrons in noble metals and thereby can confine optical-frequency excitations at nanometre scales. This confinement both facilitates miniaturization of nanophotonic devices and makes their response highly sensitive to mechanical motion. Mechanically coupled plasmonic devices thus hold great promise as building blocks for next-generation reconfigurable optics and metasurfaces. However, a flexible approach for accurately batch-fabricating high-performance plasmomechanical devices is currently lacking. Here we introduce an architecture integrating individual plasmonic structures with precise, nanometre features into tunable mechanical resonators. The localized gap plasmon resonators strongly couple light and mechanical motion within a three-dimensional, sub-diffraction volume, yielding large quality factors and record optomechanical coupling strength of 2 THz.nm-1. Utilizing these features, we demonstrate sensitive and spatially localized optical transduction of mechanical motion with a noise floor of 6 fm.Hz-1/2, representing a 1.5 orders of magnitude improvement over existing localized plasmomechanical systems.

  1. Nanomechanical motion transduction with a scalable localized gap plasmon architecture

    PubMed Central

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic structures couple oscillating electromagnetic fields to conduction electrons in noble metals and thereby can confine optical-frequency excitations at nanometre scales. This confinement both facilitates miniaturization of nanophotonic devices and makes their response highly sensitive to mechanical motion. Mechanically coupled plasmonic devices thus hold great promise as building blocks for next-generation reconfigurable optics and metasurfaces. However, a flexible approach for accurately batch-fabricating high-performance plasmomechanical devices is currently lacking. Here we introduce an architecture integrating individual plasmonic structures with precise, nanometre features into tunable mechanical resonators. The localized gap plasmon resonators strongly couple light and mechanical motion within a three-dimensional, sub-diffraction volume, yielding large quality factors and record optomechanical coupling strength of 2 THz·nm−1. Utilizing these features, we demonstrate sensitive and spatially localized optical transduction of mechanical motion with a noise floor of 6 fm·Hz−1/2, representing a 1.5 orders of magnitude improvement over existing localized plasmomechanical systems. PMID:27922019

  2. In search of cellular control: signal transduction in context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1998-01-01

    The field of molecular cell biology has experienced enormous advances over the last century by reducing the complexity of living cells into simpler molecular components and binding interactions that are amenable to rigorous biochemical analysis. However, as our tools become more powerful, there is a tendency to define mechanisms by what we can measure. The field is currently dominated by efforts to identify the key molecules and sequences that mediate the function of critical receptors, signal transducers, and molecular switches. Unfortunately, these conventional experimental approaches ignore the importance of supramolecular control mechanisms that play a critical role in cellular regulation. Thus, the significance of individual molecular constituents cannot be fully understood when studied in isolation because their function may vary depending on their context within the structural complexity of the living cell. These higher-order regulatory mechanisms are based on the cell's use of a form of solid-state biochemistry in which molecular components that mediate biochemical processing and signal transduction are immobilized on insoluble cytoskeletal scaffolds in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Key to the understanding of this form of cellular regulation is the realization that chemistry is structure and hence, recognition of the the importance of architecture and mechanics for signal integration and biochemical control. Recent work that has unified chemical and mechanical signaling pathways provides a glimpse of how this form of higher-order cellular control may function and where paths may lie in the future.

  3. In Vitro Comparative Assessment of Mechanical Blood Damage Induced by Different Hemodialysis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Carlo Alberto; Sconziano, Sara Antonia; Beck, Werner; Bosch, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gradual deterioration of red blood cells (RBCs) due to mechanical stress (chronic hemolysis) is unavoidable during treatments that involve extracorporeal blood circulation, such as hemodialysis (HD). This effect is generally undetectable and does not generate any acute symptoms, but it leads to an increase in plasma free hemoglobin (fHb). There are no absolute safety levels for fHb increase, indicating the need for an empirical evaluation using comparative testing. The increase in fHb levels was investigated in vitro by applying double‐needle double‐pump HD (HD‐DNDP), a new modality in which arterial and venous pumps both run continuously. fHb was measured during typical and worst‐case simulated dialysis treatments (double‐needle single‐pump HD [HD‐DNSP], hemodiafiltration [HDF‐DN], single‐needle double‐pump HD [HD‐SNDP], and HD‐DNDP) performed in vitro using bovine blood for 4 h. Hemolysis‐related indices (fHb%; index of hemolysis, IH; and normalized IH) were calculated and used for comparison. The increase in fHb during either HDF‐DN or HD‐SNDP with Artis and AK200 dialysis machines was similar, while the fHb at the maximum real blood flow rate (Qbreal) at the completion of the HD‐DNDP treatment on Artis was higher than that for HD‐DNSP using a Phoenix dialysis machine (fHb % = 1.24 ± 0.13 and 0.92 ± 0.12 for the Artis machine with HD‐DNDP at Qbreal = 450 mL/min and Phoenix with HD‐DNSP at Qbreal = 500 mL/min, respectively). However, the fHb levels increased linearly, and no steep changes were observed. The increases observed during HD‐DNDP were the same order of magnitude as those for widely used bloodlines and treatment modes for delivering dialysis treatments. The observed results matched literature findings, and thus the measured fHb trends are not predicted to have clinical side effects. HD‐DNDP treatment with Artis does not merit any additional concern regarding mechanical stress

  4. Driving DNA transposition by lentiviral protein transduction

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujia; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-01-01

    Gene vectors derived from DNA transposable elements have become powerful molecular tools in biomedical research and are slowly moving into the clinic as carriers of therapeutic genes. Conventional uses of DNA transposon-based gene vehicles rely on the intracellular production of the transposase protein from transfected nucleic acids. The transposase mediates mobilization of the DNA transposon, which is typically provided in the context of plasmid DNA. In recent work, we established lentiviral protein transduction from Gag precursors as a new strategy for direct delivery of the transposase protein. Inspired by the natural properties of infecting viruses to carry their own enzymes, we loaded lentivirus-derived particles not only with vector genomes carrying the DNA transposon vector but also with hundreds of transposase subunits. Such particles were found to drive efficient transposition of the piggyBac transposable element in a range of different cell types, including primary cells, and offer a new transposase delivery approach that guarantees short-term activity and limits potential cytotoxicity. DNA transposon vectors, originally developed and launched as a non-viral alternative to viral integrating vectors, have truly become viral. Here, we briefly review our findings and speculate on the perspectives and potential advantages of transposase delivery by lentiviral protein transduction. PMID:25057443

  5. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  6. Increased transduction efficiency of primary hematopoietic cells by physical colocalization of retrovirus and target cells.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, M; Moriwaki, K; Dilloo, D; Hoffmann, T; Kimbrough, S; Johnsen, H E; Brenner, M K; Heslop, H E

    1998-06-01

    Efficient gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells offers a number of potential therapeutic applications. However, the relatively low titer of retroviral supernatants and the requirement for cell division to ensure integration have meant that transduction efficiency has been low. We have modified a flowthrough approach to cell transduction and have been able consistently to increase gene transfer efficiency into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. We transduced CD34 cells with retroviral vectors encoding a truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) or neo. Retroviral supernatant was pulled through 0.2-micron polycarbonated membranes, followed by placement of cells on the filter. In the absence of cytokines, the transduction efficiency of CD34 cells with a NGFR vector was increased 3-11-fold over that obtained at an identical MOI in liquid culture to produce 11%-44% transduction. Furthermore, both Thy1+ and Thy1- subsets in a total CD34 population were transduced with similar efficiency, and transduction with a neo vector, as measured by G418 resistance in clonogenic assays, increased 1.5-5-fold. The mechanism by which gene transfer is improved may reflect colocalization of cells and retrovirus. Costaining of cells transduced on the filter with an NGFR retrovirus with both an NGFR antibody and a gp70 antibody that recognizes viral coat protein revealed high-level coexpression. The levels of in vitro gene transfer we obtain are equivalent to those observed when CD34 cells are cocultured in liquid culture with cytokines. However, culture with cytokines may commit CD34 cells to differentiation and has produced disappointingly low levels of subsequent in vivo gene transfer. Gene marking studies using distinguishable retroviral vectors will provide a means of learning whether the effects of flowthrough transduction genuinely enhance the efficiency of gene transfer to human marrow-repopulating cells.

  7. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. OBJECTIVE To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. EXPOSURES Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. RESULTS Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95%CI, 0%–5%]; African wild dog, 8%[95%CI, 0%–16%]; lion, 2%[95%CI, 0% –7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95%CI, 3.14%–6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25%cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain

  8. Potential mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and comparative cellular response to DNA damage in humans

    DOE PAGES

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; ...

    2015-10-08

    Here, evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Design, Setting, and Participants A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n=644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro inmore » the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n=8), patients with LFS (n=10), and age-matched human controls (n=11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Exposures Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes

  9. Potential mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and comparative cellular response to DNA damage in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J.; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2015-10-08

    Here, evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Design, Setting, and Participants A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n=644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n=8), patients with LFS (n=10), and age-matched human controls (n=11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Exposures Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes

  10. Comparative investigation of diagnosis media for induction machine mechanical unbalance fault.

    PubMed

    Salah, Mohamed; Bacha, Khmais; Chaari, Abdelkader

    2013-11-01

    For an induction machine, we suggest a theoretical development of the mechanical unbalance effect on the analytical expressions of radial vibration and stator current. Related spectra are described and characteristic defect frequencies are determined. Moreover, the stray flux expressions are developed for both axial and radial sensor coil positions and a substitute diagnosis technique is proposed. In addition, the load torque effect on the detection efficiency of these diagnosis media is discussed and a comparative investigation is performed. The decisive factor of comparison is the fault sensitivity. Experimental results show that spectral analysis of the axial stray flux can be an alternative solution to cover effectiveness limitation of the traditional stator current technique and to substitute the classical vibration practice.

  11. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals phenol tolerance mechanism of evolved Chlorella strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Cheng, Dujia; Wang, Liang; Gao, Juan; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-03-01

    The growth of microalgae is inhibited by high concentration phenol due to reactive oxygen species. An evolved strain tolerated to 500mg/L phenol, Chlorella sp. L5, was obtained in previous study. In this study, comparative transcriptomic analysis was performed for Chlorella sp. L5 and its original strain (Chlorella sp. L3). The tolerance mechanism of Chlorella sp. L5 for high concentration phenol was explored on genome scale. It was identified that the up-regulations of the related genes according to antioxidant enzymes (SOD, APX, CAT and GR) and carotenoids (astaxanthin, lutein and lycopene) biosynthesis had critical roles to tolerate high concentration phenol. In addition, most of genes of PS I, PS II, photosynthetic electron transport chain and starch biosynthesis were also up-regulated. It was consistent to the experimental results of total carbohydrate contents of Chlorella sp. L3 and Chlorella sp. L5 under 0mg/L and 500mg/L phenol.

  12. Comparing Student Learning in Mechanics Using Simulations and Hands-on Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Adrian; Chini, Jacquelyn J.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Puntambekar, Sadhana

    2010-10-01

    Often computer simulation environments present students with an idealized version of the real world which can affect students' conceptual understanding. In this study we investigate the effects of completing an experiment in mechanics using this ideal world as compared to an identical experiment in the real world. Students in three of five conceptual physics laboratory sections completed the physical experiment while the other two sections performed the virtual experiment. The experiments were part of a unit on simple machines from the CoMPASS curriculum [1] which integrates hypertext-based concept maps in a design-based context. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre and post data of the students in the two groups. Students who performed the virtual experiment were able to answer questions dealing with work and potential energy more correctly, though neither group was able to offer sound reasoning to support their answers.

  13. A comparative study on industrial waste fillers affecting mechanical properties of polymer-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkliğ, Ahmet; Alsaadi, Mohamad; Bulut, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical properties of the various inorganic filler-filled polymer composites. Sewage sludge ash (SSA), fly ash (FA) and silicon carbide (SiC) micro-particles were used as filler in the polyester resin. Composite samples were prepared with various filler content of 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt%. The results indicated that the tensile and flexural strength increased at the particle content of 5 wt% and then followed a decreasing trend with further particle inclusion. The tensile and flexural modulus values of the particulate polyester composites were significantly enhanced compared with the unfilled polyester composite. SEM micrograph results showed good indication for dispersion of FA, SSA and SiC particles within the polymer matrix.

  14. The composition and role of cross links in mechanoelectrical transduction in vertebrate sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Carole M; Furness, David N

    2013-04-15

    The key components of acousticolateralis systems (lateral line, hearing and balance) are sensory hair cells. At their apex, these cells have a bundle of specialized cellular protrusions, which are modified actin-containing microvilli, connected together by extracellular filaments called cross links. Stereociliary deflections open nonselective cation channels allowing ions from the extracellular environment into the cell, a process called mechanoelectrical transduction. This produces a receptor potential that causes the release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate onto the terminals of the sensory nerve fibres, which connect to the cell base, causing nerve signals to be sent to the brain. Identification of the cellular mechanisms underlying mechanoelectrical transduction and of some of the proteins involved has been assisted by research into the genetics of deafness, molecular biology and mechanical measurements of function. It is thought that one type of cross link, the tip link, is composed of cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15, and gates the transduction channel when the bundle is deflected. Another type of link, called lateral (or horizontal) links, maintains optimal bundle cohesion and stiffness for transduction. This Commentary summarizes the information currently available about the structure, function and composition of the links and how they might be relevant to human hearing impairment.

  15. Investigation of signal transduction routes within the sensor/transducer protein BlaR1 of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Staude, Michael W; Frederick, Thomas E; Natarajan, Sivanandam V; Wilson, Brian D; Tanner, Carol E; Ruggiero, Steven T; Mobashery, Shahriar; Peng, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-03

    The transmembrane antibiotic sensor/signal transducer protein BlaR1 is part of a cohort of proteins that confer β-lactam antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) [Fisher, J. F., Meroueh, S. O., and Mobashery, S. (2005) Chem. Rev. 105, 395-424; Llarrull, L. I., Fisher, J. F., and Mobashery, S. (2009) Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 53, 4051-4063; Llarrull, L. I., Toth, M., Champion, M. M., and Mobashery, S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 38148-38158]. Specifically, BlaR1 regulates the inducible expression of β-lactamases that hydrolytically destroy β-lactam antibiotics. The resistance phenotype starts with β-lactam antibiotic acylation of the BlaR1 extracellular domain (BlaRS). The acylation activates the cytoplasmic protease domain through an obscure signal transduction mechanism. Here, we compare protein dynamics of apo versus antibiotic-acylated BlaRS using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our analyses reveal inter-residue interactions that relay acylation-induced perturbations within the antibiotic-binding site to the transmembrane helix regions near the membrane surface. These are the first insights into the process of signal transduction by BlaR1.

  16. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  17. Locomotor loading mechanics in the hindlimbs of tegu lizards (Tupinambis merianae): comparative and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, K Megan; Butcher, Michael T; Shugart, S Katherine; Gander, Jennifer C; Blob, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    Skeletal elements are usually able to withstand several times their usual load before they yield, and this ratio is known as the bone's safety factor. Limited studies on amphibians and non-avian reptiles have shown that they have much higher limb bone safety factors than birds and mammals. It has been hypothesized that this difference is related to the difference in posture between upright birds and mammals and sprawling ectotherms; however, limb bone loading data from a wider range of sprawling species are needed in order to determine whether the higher safety factors seen in amphibians and non-avian reptiles are ancestral or derived conditions. Tegus (family Teiidae) are an ideal lineage with which to expand sampling of limb bone loading mechanics for sprawling taxa, particularly for lizards, because they are from a different clade than previously sampled iguanas and exhibit different foraging and locomotor habits (actively foraging carnivore versus burst-activity herbivore). We evaluated the mechanics of locomotor loading for the femur of the Argentine black and white tegu (Tupinambus merianae) using three-dimensional measurements of the ground reaction force and hindlimb kinematics, in vivo bone strains and femoral mechanical properties. Peak bending stresses experienced by the femur were low (tensile: 10.4 ± 1.1 MPa; compressive: -17.4 ± 0.9 MPa) and comparable to those in other reptiles, with moderate shear stresses and strains also present. Analyses of peak femoral stresses and strains led to estimated safety factor ranges of 8.8-18.6 in bending and 7.8-17.5 in torsion, both substantially higher than typical for birds and mammals but similar to other sprawling tetrapods. These results broaden the range of reptilian and amphibian taxa in which high femoral safety factors have been evaluated and further indicate a trend for the independent evolution of lower limb bone safety factors in endothermic taxa.

  18. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  19. Galectin-3-induced cell spreading and motility relies on distinct signaling mechanisms compared to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    More, Shyam K; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2016-05-01

    Secreted galectin-3 often gets incorporated into extracellular matrix and is utilized by cancer cells for spreading, movement, and metastatic dissemination. Here we investigate molecular mechanisms by which galectin-3 brings about these effects and compare it with fibronectin. Imaging of cells spread on fibronectin showed stress fibers throughout cell body, however, galectin-3-induced formation of parallel actin bundles in the lamellipodial region resulting in unique morphological features. FRAP analysis showed that the actin turnover in the lamellipodial region was much higher in cells spread on galectin-3 as compared to that on fibronectin. Rac1 activation is correlated with lamellipodial organization on both the substrates. Activation of Akt and Rac1, the regulators of actin dynamics, show inverse correlation with each other on both galectin-3 and fibronectin. Activation of Erk however, remained similar. Further, inhibition of activation of Akt and Erk inhibited spreading and motility of cells on galectin-3 but not on fibronectin. The results very comprehensively demonstrate distinct signaling pathways that regulate microfilament organization, lamellipodial structures, spreading, and movement of cells plated on galectin-3 as opposed to fibronectin.

  20. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  1. Inverse zonation of hepatocyte transduction with AAV vectors between mice and non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Peter; Wang, Lili; Gao, Guangping; Haskins, Mark E.; Tarantal, Alice F.; McCarter, Robert J.; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) are highly efficient in liver transduction and can be easily administered by intravenous injection. In mice, AAV8 transduces predominantly hepatocytes near central veins and yields lower transduction levels in hepatocytes in periportal regions. This transduction bias has important implications for gene therapy that aims to correct metabolic liver enzymes because metabolic zonation along the porto-central axis requires the expression of therapeutic proteins within the zone where they are normally localized. In the present study we compared the expression pattern of AAV8 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in liver between mice, dogs, and non-human primates. We confirmed the pericentral dominance in transgene expression in mice with AAV8 when the liver-specific thyroid hormone-binding globulin (TBG) promoter was used but also observed the same expression pattern with the ubiquitous chicken β-actin (CB) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoters, suggesting that transduction zonation is not caused by promoter specificity. Predominantly pericentral expression was also found in dogs injected with AAV8. In contrast, in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques the expression pattern from AAV vectors was reversed, i.e. transgene expression was most intense around portal areas and less intense or absent around central veins. Infant rhesus macaques as well as newborn mice injected with AAV8 however showed a random distribution of transgene expression with neither portal nor central transduction bias. Based on the data in monkeys, adult humans treated with AAV vectors are predicted to also express transgenes predominantly in periportal regions whereas infants are likely to show a uniform transduction pattern in liver. PMID:21778099

  2. AAV-mediated photoreceptor transduction of the pig cone-enriched retina

    PubMed Central

    Mussolino, C; della Corte, M; Rossi, S; Viola, F; Di Vicino, U; Marrocco, E; Neglia, S; Doria, M; Testa, F; Giovannoni, R; Crasta, M; Giunti, M; Villani, E; Lavitrano, M; Bacci, M L; Ratiglia, R; Simonelli, F; Auricchio, A; Surace, E M

    2011-01-01

    Recent success in clinical trials supports the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene therapy of retinal diseases caused by defects in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In contrast, evidence of the efficacy of AAV-mediated gene transfer to retinal photoreceptors, the major site of inherited retinal diseases, is less robust. In addition, although AAV-mediated RPE transduction appears efficient, independently of the serotype used and species treated, AAV-mediated photoreceptor gene transfer has not been systematically investigated thus so far in large animal models, which also may allow identifying relevant species-specific differences in AAV-mediated retinal transduction. In the present study, we used the porcine retina, which has a high cone/rod ratio. This feature allows to properly evaluate both cone and rod photoreceptors transduction and compare the transduction characteristics of AAV2/5 and 2/8, the two most efficient AAV vector serotypes for photoreceptor targeting. Here we show that AAV2/5 and 2/8 transduces both RPE and photoreceptors. AAV2/8 infects and transduces photoreceptor more efficiently than AAV2/5, similarly to what we have observed in the murine retina. The use of the photoreceptor-specific rhodopsin promoter restricts transgene expression to porcine rods and cones, and results in photoreceptor transduction levels similar to those obtained with the ubiquitous promoters tested. Finally, immunological, toxicological and biodistribution studies support the safety of AAV subretinal administration to the large porcine retina. The data presented here on AAV-mediated transduction of the cone-enriched porcine retina may affect the development of gene-based therapies for rare and common severe photoreceptor diseases. PMID:21412286

  3. Influence of Unweighting on Insulin Signal Transduction in Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    2002-01-01

    Unweighting of the juvenile soleus muscle is characterized by an increased binding capacity for insulin relative to muscle mass due to sparing of the receptors during atrophy. Although carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation in the unweighted muscle develop increased sensitivity to insulin in vivo, protein synthesis in vivo and system A amino acid transport in vitro do not appear to develop such an enhanced response. The long-term goal is to identify the precise nature of this apparent resistance in the insulin signal transduction pathway and to consider how reduced weight-bearing may elicit this effect, by evaluating specific components of the insulin signalling pathway. Because the insulin-signalling pathway has components in common with the signal transduction pathway for insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and potentially other growth factors, the study could have important implications in the role of weight-bearing function on muscle growth and development. Since the insulin signalling pathway diverges following activation of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, the immediate specific aims will be to study the receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) and those branches, which lead to phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and of Shc protein. To achieve these broader objectives, we will test in situ, by intramuscular injection, the responses of glucose transport, system A amino acid transport and protein synthesis to insulin analogues for which the receptor has either a weaker or much stronger binding affinity compared to insulin. Studies will include: (1) estimation of the ED(sub 50) for each analogue for these three processes; (2) the effect of duration (one to four days) of unweighting on the response of each process to all analogues tested; (3) the effect of unweighting and the analogues on IRTK activity; and (4) the comparative effects of unweighting and analogue binding on the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRTK, IRS-1, and Shc protein.

  4. Green Light to Illuminate Signal Transduction Events

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    When cells are exposed to hormones that act on cell surface receptors, information is processed through the plasma membrane into the cell interior via second messengers generated in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Individual biochemical steps along this cascade, starting with ligand binding to receptors to activation of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and their downstream effectors such as adenylate cyclase or phospholipase C, have been biochemically characterized. However, the complexity of temporal and spatial integration of these molecular events requires that they be studied in intact cells. The great expansion of fluorescent techniques and improved imaging technologies such as confocal- and TIRF microscopy combined with genetically engineered protein modules has provided a completely new approach to signal transduction research. Spatial definition of biochemical events followed with real-time temporal resolution has become a standard goal and we are breaking the resolution barrier of light microscopes with several new techniques. PMID:19818623

  5. [ALPHA-ACTININS AND SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS].

    PubMed

    Panyushev, N V; Tentler, D G

    2015-01-01

    Involvement of actin cytoskeleton proteins in signal transduction from cell surface to the nucleus, including regulation of transcription factors activity, has now been supported by a lot of experimental data. Here-with, cytoskeletal proteins may have different functions than ones they execute in the cytoplasm. Particularly, alpha-actinin 4 stabilizing actin microfilaments in the cytoplasm can translocate to the nucleus and change the activity of several transcription factors. Despite the lack of nuclear import signal and DNA binding domain, alpha-actinin 4 can bind to promoter sequences, and co-activate NF-κB-dependent transcription. Selective regulation of NF-κB gene targets may indicate involvement of alpha-actinin 4 in determining the specificity of cell response to NF-κB activation in cells of different types.

  6. Modeling the infection dynamics of bacteriophages in enteric Escherichia coli: estimating the contribution of transduction to antimicrobial gene spread.

    PubMed

    Volkova, Victoriya V; Lu, Zhao; Besser, Thomas; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2014-07-01

    Animal-associated bacterial communities are infected by bacteriophages, although the dynamics of these infections are poorly understood. Transduction by bacteriophages may contribute to transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes, but the relative importance of transduction among other gene transfer mechanisms is unknown. We therefore developed a candidate deterministic mathematical model of the infection dynamics of enteric coliphages in commensal Escherichia coli in the large intestine of cattle. We assumed the phages were associated with the intestine and were predominantly temperate. Model simulations demonstrated how, given the bacterial ecology and infection dynamics, most (>90%) commensal enteric E. coli bacteria may become lysogens of enteric coliphages during intestinal transit. Using the model and the most liberal assumptions about transduction efficiency and resistance gene frequency, we approximated the upper numerical limits ("worst-case scenario") of gene transfer through specialized and generalized transduction in E. coli by enteric coliphages when the transduced genetic segment is picked at random. The estimates were consistent with a relatively small contribution of transduction to lateral gene spread; for example, generalized transduction delivered the chromosomal resistance gene to up to 8 E. coli bacteria/hour within the population of 1.47 × 10(8) E. coli bacteria/liter luminal contents. In comparison, the plasmidic blaCMY-2 gene carried by ~2% of enteric E. coli was transferred by conjugation at a rate at least 1.4 × 10(3) times greater than our generalized transduction estimate. The estimated numbers of transductants varied nonlinearly depending on the ecology of bacteria available for phages to infect, that is, on the assumed rates of turnover and replication of enteric E. coli.

  7. Intrinsic disorder mediates cooperative signal transduction in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yukio; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Ikegami, Takahisa; Dagliyan, Onur; Jin, Lin; Hall, Damien; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Namba, Keiichi; Akira, Shizuo; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Standley, Daron M

    2014-05-15

    Intrinsically disordered domains have been reported to play important roles in signal transduction networks by introducing cooperativity into protein-protein interactions. Unlike intrinsically disordered domains that become ordered upon binding, the EF-SAM domain in the stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 is distinct in that it is ordered in the monomeric state and partially unfolded in its oligomeric state, with the population of the two states depending on the local Ca(2+) concentration. The oligomerization of STIM1, which triggers extracellular Ca(2+) influx, exhibits cooperativity with respect to the local endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) concentration. Although the physiological importance of the oligomerization reaction is well established, the mechanism of the observed cooperativity is not known. Here, we examine the response of the STIM1 EF-SAM domain to changes in Ca(2+) concentration using mathematical modeling based on in vitro experiments. We find that the EF-SAM domain partially unfolds and dimerizes cooperatively with respect to Ca(2+) concentration, with Hill coefficients and half-maximal activation concentrations very close to the values observed in vivo for STIM1 redistribution and extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Our mathematical model of the dimerization reaction agrees quantitatively with our analytical ultracentrifugation-based measurements and previously published free energies of unfolding. A simple interpretation of these results is that Ca(2+) loss effectively acts as a denaturant, enabling cooperative dimerization and robust signal transduction. We present a structural model of the Ca(2+)-unbound EF-SAM domain that is consistent with a wide range of evidence, including resistance to proteolytic cleavage of the putative dimerization portion.

  8. Comparing the effects of manual and ultrasonic instrumentation on root surface mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study is to analyze the surface profiles of healthy and periodontal-treated roots. In addition, manual and ultrasonic instrumentation methods have been compared in terms of surface mechanical properties of root surfaces including surface roughness, hardness, and elastic modulus. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using extracted teeth that were randomly divided into two study groups (1 and 2). Root planing was performed using either Gracey curettes (Group 1) or ultrasonic scaler (Group 2). The noncontact profilometer was used to analyze surface roughness before and after root planing. A nanoindenter was used to analyze the surface mechanical properties. Results: The root planing treatment reduced the peak and valley heights hence decreasing the surface roughness. The average maximum height of peaks (Sp) and average maximum height of valleys (Sv) for control groups remain 83.08 ± 18.47 μm and 117.58 ± 18.02 μm. The Sp was reduced to 32.86 ± 7.99 μm and 62.11 ± 16.07 μm for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The Sv was reduced to 49.32 ± 29.51 μm for Group 1 and 80.87 ± 17.99 μm Group 2. The nanohardness and modulus of elasticity for cementum of the control group remain 0.28 ± 0.13 GPa and 5.09 ± 2.67 GPa, respectively. Conclusions: Gracey curettes and ultrasonic scalers are capable of significantly reducing the roughness following root planing. Although Gracey curettes produced smoother surfaces than ultrasonic scalers, there was no significant difference. PMID:28042268

  9. Mechanical Signal Transduction in Countermeasures to Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, James G.; Chu, Amy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that modifications in muscle use result in changes in the expression and activity of calpains and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Although muscle unloading for 10 days produced no change in the concentrations of calpain 1 or 2 and no change in calpain activation, muscle reloading produced a 90% increase in calpain 2 concentration. We developed an in vitro model to test our hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. Talin was selected because it is a well-characterized calpain substrate and it is codistributed with calpain in muscle cells. We found that intermittant loading during hindlimb suspension that is sufficient to prevent muscle mass loss that occurs during muscle unloading is also sufficient to prevent the decrease in NOS expression that normally occurs during hindlimb unloading. These findings indicate that therapeutics directed toward regulating the calpain/calpastatin system may be beneficial in preventing muscle mass loss in muscle injury, unloading and disease.

  10. Chemical Modulation of Endocytic Sorting Augments Adeno-associated Viral Transduction*

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Garrett E.; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking of viruses can be influenced by a variety of inter-connected cellular sorting and degradation pathways involving endo-lysosomal vesicles, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy-based or endoplasmic reticulum-associated machinery. In the case of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAV), proteasome inhibitors are known to prevent degradation of ubiquitinated AAV capsids, thereby leading to increased nuclear accumulation and transduction. However, the impact of other cellular degradation pathways on AAV trafficking is not well understood. In the current study, we screened a panel of small molecules focused on modulating different cellular degradation pathways and identified eeyarestatin I (EerI) as a novel reagent that enhances AAV transduction. EerI improved AAV transduction by an order of magnitude regardless of vector dose, genome architecture, cell type, or serotype. This effect was preceded by sequestration of AAV within enlarged vesicles that were dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Specifically, EerI treatment redirected AAV particles toward large vesicles positive for late endosomal (Rab7) and lysosomal (LAMP1) markers. Notably, MG132 and EerI (proteasomal and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation inhibitors, respectively) appear to enhance AAV transduction by increasing the intracellular accumulation of viral particles in a mutually exclusive fashion. Taken together, our results expand on potential strategies to redirect recombinant AAV vectors toward more productive trafficking pathways by deregulating cellular degradation mechanisms. PMID:26527686

  11. Comparative study of chemo-electro-mechanical transport models for an electrically stimulated hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaer, S. E.; Moussa, W. A.

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to introduce a new expression for the hydrogel’s hydration for use within the Poisson Nernst-Planck chemo electro mechanical (PNP CEM) transport models. This new contribution to the models support large deformation by considering the higher order terms in the Green-Lagrangian strain tensor. A detailed discussion of the CEM transport models using Poisson Nernst-Planck (PNP) and Poisson logarithmic Nernst-Planck (PLNP) equations for chemically and electrically stimulated hydrogels will be presented. The assumptions made to simplify both CEM transport models for electric field application in the order of 0.833 kV m-1 and a highly diluted electrolyte solution (97% is water) will be explained. This PNP CEM model has been verified accurately against experimental and numerical results. In addition, different definitions for normalizing the parameters are used to derive the dimensionless forms of both the PNP and PLNP CEM. Four models, PNP CEM, PLNP CEM, dimensionless PNP CEM and dimensionless PNLP CEM transport models were employed on an axially symmetric cylindrical hydrogel problem with an aspect ratio (diameter to thickness) of 175:3. The displacement and osmotic pressure obtained for the four models are compared against the variation of the number of elements for finite element analysis, simulation duration and solution rate when using the direct numerical solver.

  12. Comparing the mechanical influence of vinculin, focal adhesion kinase and p53 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, Anna H.; Diez, Gerold; Alonso, Jose-Luis

    2009-02-13

    Cytoskeletal reorganization is an ongoing process when cells adhere, move or invade extracellular substrates. The cellular force generation and transmission are determined by the intactness of the actomyosin-(focal adhesion complex)-integrin connection. We investigated the intracellular course of action in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the nuclear matrix protein p53 using magnetic tweezer and nanoparticle tracking techniques. Results show that the lack of these proteins decrease cellular stiffness and affect cell rheological behavior. The decrease in cellular binding strength was higher in FAK- to vinculin-deficient cells, whilst p53-deficient cells showed no effect compared to wildtype cells. The intracellular cytoskeletal activity was lowest in wildtype cells, but increased in the following order when cells lacked FAK+p53 > p53 > vinculin. In summary, cell mechanical processes are differently affected by the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and FAK than by the nuclear matrix protein, p53.

  13. Nonradiative Relaxation Mechanisms of UV Excited Phenylalanine Residues: A Comparative Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Mališ, Momir; Došlić, Nađa

    2017-03-21

    The present work is directed toward understanding the mechanisms of excited state deactivation in three neutral model peptides containing the phenylalanine residue. The excited state dynamics of theγL(g+)folded form of N-acetylphenylalaninylamide (NAPA B) and its amide-N-methylated derivative (NAPMA B) is reviewed and compared to the dynamics of the monohydrated structure of NAPA (NAPAH). The goal is to unravel how the environment, and in particular solvation, impacts the photodynamics of peptides. The systems are investigated using reaction path calculations and surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics based on the coupled cluster doubles (CC2) method and time-dependent density functional theory. The work emphasizes the role that excitation transfer from the phenylππ*to amidenπ*state plays in the deactivation of the three systems and shows how the ease of out-of-plane distortions of the amide group determines the rate of population transfer between the two electronic states. The subsequent dynamics on thenπ*state is barrierless along several pathways and leads to fast deactivation to the ground electronic state.

  14. Comparative study of the mechanical properties of nanostructured thin films on stretchable substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaziri, S.; Renault, P.-O.; Le Bourhis, E.; Goudeau, Ph.; Faurie, D.; Geandier, G.; Mocuta, C.; Thiaudière, D.

    2014-09-01

    Comparative studies of the mechanical behavior between copper, tungsten, and W/Cu nanocomposite based on copper dispersoïd thin films were performed under in-situ controlled tensile equi-biaxial loadings using both synchrotron X-ray diffraction and digital image correlation techniques. The films first deform elastically with the lattice strain equal to the true strain given by digital image correlation measurements. The Cu single thin film intrinsic elastic limit of 0.27% is determined below the apparent elastic limit of W and W/Cu nanocomposite thin films, 0.30% and 0.49%, respectively. This difference is found to be driven by the existence of as-deposited residual stresses. Above the elastic limit on the lattice strain-true strain curves, we discriminate two different behaviors presumably footprints of plasticity and fracture. The Cu thin film shows a large transition domain (0.60% true strain range) to a plateau with a smooth evolution of the curve which is associated to peak broadening. In contrast, W and W/Cu nanocomposite thin films show a less smooth and reduced transition domain (0.30% true strain range) to a plateau with no peak broadening. These observations indicate that copper thin film shows some ductility while tungsten/copper nanocomposites thin films are brittle. Fracture resistance of W/Cu nanocomposite thin film is improved thanks to the high compressive residual stress and the elimination of the metastable β-W phase.

  15. Erosion of tooth enamel surfaces among battery chargers and automobile mechanics in Ibadan: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Arowojolu, M O

    2001-01-01

    A cross sectional comparative survey was conducted among battery chargers and automobile mechanics in Ibadan to determine the effect of exposure of acid in form of solution or fumes on tooth enamel wear one hundred and five subjects were recruited and examined for erosion. This number comprised 67 automechanics and apprentices and 38 battery chargers and their apprentices. Other groups of automobile workers sharing the workshops were excluded from the study. All respondents aged between 11 and 68 years of age. Verbal informed consent was taken from all the subjects. One thousand and one hundred teeth were examined using the upper and lower central sextants. One hundred and sixty teeth were found to be missing. The teeth examined comprised 712 teeth of automechanics (88.55%) and 388 teeth of battery chargers (85.08%). Out of the 712 teeth of automechanics, only 23 teeth (3.2%) showed evidence of tooth wear whereas in the battery chargers group, 159 teeth out of 388 teeth (41%) had tooth wear. (P < 0.05). The battery charger group also showed a higher percentage of missing teeth, (14.9%) as against 11.44% of the automechanic group (P > 0.05). This study has shown that battery chargers are subjected to occupational hazard of exposure to highly erosive acids and fumes. Prevention through oral health education targeted at this group of subjects and early diagnosis are very important.

  16. Comparative study of the mechanical properties of nanostructured thin films on stretchable substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Djaziri, S.; Renault, P.-O.; Le Bourhis, E.; Goudeau, Ph.; Faurie, D.; Geandier, G.; Mocuta, C.; Thiaudière, D.

    2014-09-07

    Comparative studies of the mechanical behavior between copper, tungsten, and W/Cu nanocomposite based on copper dispersoïd thin films were performed under in-situ controlled tensile equi-biaxial loadings using both synchrotron X-ray diffraction and digital image correlation techniques. The films first deform elastically with the lattice strain equal to the true strain given by digital image correlation measurements. The Cu single thin film intrinsic elastic limit of 0.27% is determined below the apparent elastic limit of W and W/Cu nanocomposite thin films, 0.30% and 0.49%, respectively. This difference is found to be driven by the existence of as-deposited residual stresses. Above the elastic limit on the lattice strain-true strain curves, we discriminate two different behaviors presumably footprints of plasticity and fracture. The Cu thin film shows a large transition domain (0.60% true strain range) to a plateau with a smooth evolution of the curve which is associated to peak broadening. In contrast, W and W/Cu nanocomposite thin films show a less smooth and reduced transition domain (0.30% true strain range) to a plateau with no peak broadening. These observations indicate that copper thin film shows some ductility while tungsten/copper nanocomposites thin films are brittle. Fracture resistance of W/Cu nanocomposite thin film is improved thanks to the high compressive residual stress and the elimination of the metastable β-W phase.

  17. Comparative study of predictive FE methods for mechanical properties of nuclear composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Joshim; Farooqi, Johar K.; Buckthorpe, Derek; Cheyne, Allister; Mummery, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon (C/C) composites are candidate materials for plasma facing components in experimental fusion reactors such as: the ITER; the JT-60 - a Tokamak fusion test facility (JAEA); and for control rods in the next generation fission reactors. Therefore, determining their thermo-mechanical properties under irradiation is essential for safe design-cum-operation of future reactors. Development of reliable models which can predict such materials' behavior is of massive advantage against the conventional experimental verification which is hugely expensive and time-consuming. Three-dimensional finite element (FE) methods are used here for predicting Young's modulus of two woven C/C composites where tensile tests are performed for validation. Stress distribution results indicate that a novel image-based route for FE meshes compared to a unit cell approach gives stronger agreement with experimental data. The image-based approach captures true porosity as fine microstructural details are converted from X-ray tomographic data. In comparison, the unit cell model represents idealizations of composite architecture that ignores porosities.

  18. A Comparative Study of Apical Microleakage Using the Conventional Lateral Condensation and Mechanical Lateral Condensation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Jalalzadeh, Seyed Mohsen; Moradkhany, Reza; Abedi, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study compared apical dye penetration using lateral condensation technique (LC) and LC technique with a reciprocal handpiece (mechanical lateral condensation or MLC) as a new method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-eight human extracted straight canine teeth were used. After crown amputation, the teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 10 teeth each and two negative and positive control groups of 4 teeth each. The groups were as follows: IA, 10 obturations completed by operator A using the LC technique; Group IB, 10 obturations completed by operator B using the LC technique; Group IIA, 10 obturations completed by operator A using the MLC technique; and Group IIB, 10 obturations completed by operator B using the MLC technique. All roots were placed in 2% methylene blue dye and centrifuged at 3000 rpm for 3 minutes. Following centrifugation, the roots were cut along their long axis and evaluated under a stereomicroscope to measure the depth of dye penetration. RESULTS: A t-test showed that the teeth which were filled by the MLC technique had less dye penetration in comparison with LC technique (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: This in vitro study illustrates that canals obturated with the MLC technique had superior apical seal than canals filled with the LC technique. PMID:24146675

  19. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy.

  20. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cimpan, Ciprian Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat

  1. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  2. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  3. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  4. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: A stochastic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  5. Primary Cilia Modulate IHH Signal Transduction in Response to Hydrostatic Loading of Growth Plate Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Y, Yvonne Y.; Wang, Lai; Welter, J, Jean F.; Ballock, R. Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) is a key component of the regulatory apparatus governing chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in the growth plate. Recent studies have demonstrated that the primary cilium is the site of Ihh signaling within the cell, and that primary cilia are essential for bone and cartilage formation. Primary cilia are also postulated to act as mechanosensory organelles that transduce mechanical forces acting on the cell into biological signals. In this study, we used a hydrostatic compression system to examine Ihh signal transduction under the influence of mechanical load. Our results demonstrate that hydrostatic compression increased both Ihh gene expression and Ihh-responsive Gli-luciferase activity. These increases were aborted by disrupting the primary cilia structure with chloral hydrate. These results suggest that growth plate chondrocytes respond to hydrostatic loading by increasing Ihh signaling, and that the primary cilium is required for this mechano-biological signal transduction to occur. PMID:21930256

  6. Signal transduction induced by activated protein C: no role in protection against sepsis?

    PubMed

    Slofstra, Sjoukje H; ten Cate, Hugo; Spek, C Arnold

    2006-08-01

    The anticoagulant activated protein C (APC) is historically known as a risk factor for venous thrombosis. However, after the positive results of the protein C worldwide evaluation in severe sepsis (PROWESS) trial, which showed that APC was the first drug that considerably reduced sepsis-related mortality, APC is considered a pleiotropic protein with both anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, in vitro studies have suggested that APC-induced intracellular signal transduction is a potential mechanism by which APC might be protective against sepsis. Recently, however, the efficacy of APC in sepsis has been argued, and also the extent to which the signal transduction capacity of APC contributes to its pro-survival effects is debated. Here, we review the role of APC in the body natural defense against sepsis and discuss the mechanism by which APC might act at a cellular level.

  7. Differences in muscle mechanical properties between elite power and endurance athletes: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Gil, Saulo; Laurino, Cristiano Frota de Souza; Roschel, Hamilton; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar C; Nakamura, Fabio Y

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare muscle mechanical properties (using tensiomyography-TMG) and jumping performance of endurance and power athletes and to quantify the associations between TMG parameters and jumping performance indices. Forty-one high-level track and field athletes from power (n = 22; mean ± SD age, height, and weight were 27.2 ± 3.6 years; 180.2 ± 5.4 cm; and 79.4 ± 8.6 kg, respectively) and endurance (endurance runners and triathletes; n = 19; mean ± SD age, height, and weight were 27.1 ± 6.9 years; 169.6 ± 9.8 cm; 62.2 ± 13.1 kg, respectively) specialties had the mechanical properties of their rectus femoris (RF) and biceps femoris (BF) assessed by TMG. Muscle displacement (Dm), contraction time (Tc), and delay time (Td) were retained for analyses. Furthermore, they performed squat jumps (SJs), countermovement jumps (CMJs), and drop jumps to assess reactive strength index (RSI), using a contact platform. Comparisons between groups were performed using differences based on magnitudes, and associations were quantified by the Spearman's ρ correlation. Power athletes showed almost certain higher performance in all jumping performance indices when compared with endurance athletes (SJ = 44.9 ± 4.1 vs. 30.7 ± 6.8 cm; CMJ = 48.9 ± 4.5 vs. 33.6 ± 7.2 cm; RSI = 2.19 ± 0.58 vs. 0.84 ± 0.39, for power and endurance athletes, mean ± SD, respectively; 00/00/100, almost certain, p ≤ 0.05), along with better contractile indices reflected by lower Dm, Tc, and Td (Tc BF = 14.3 ± 2.3 vs. 19.4 ± 3.3 milliseconds; Dm BF = 1.67 ± 1.05 vs. 4.23 ± 1.75 mm; Td BF = 16.8 ± 1.6 vs. 19.6 ± 1.3 milliseconds; Tc RF = 18.3 ± 2.8 vs. 22.9 ± 4.0 milliseconds; Dm RF = 4.98 ± 3.71 vs. 8.88 ± 3.45 mm; Td RF = 17.5 ± 1.0 vs. 20.9 ± 1.6 milliseconds, for power and endurance athletes, mean ± SD, respectively; 00/00/100, almost certain, p ≤ 0.05). Moderate correlations (Spearman's ρ between -0.61 and -0.72) were found between TMG and jumping

  8. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Luke E; Zhulin, Igor B

    2010-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. These are identified by searching protein sequences for specific domain profiles that implicate a protein in signal transduction. Compared to the previous version of the database, MiST2 contains a host of new features and improvements including the following: draft genomes; extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor protein identification; enhanced classification of signaling proteins; novel, high-quality domain models for identifying histidine kinases and response regulators; neighboring two-component genes; gene cart; better search capabilities; enhanced taxonomy browser; advanced genome browser; and a modern, biologist-friendly web interface. MiST2 currently contains 966 complete and 157 draft bacterial and archaeal genomes, which collectively contain more than 245 000 signal transduction proteins. The majority (66%) of these are one-component systems, followed by two-component proteins (26%), chemotaxis (6%), and finally ECF factors (2%).

  9. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2010-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. These are identified by searching protein sequences for specific domain profiles that implicate a protein in signal transduction. Compared to the previous version of the database, MiST2 contains a host of new features and improvements including the following: draft genomes; extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor protein identification; enhanced classification of signaling proteins; novel, high-quality domain models for identifying histidine kinases and response regulators; neighboring two-component genes; gene cart; better search capabilities; enhanced taxonomy browser; advanced genome browser; and a modern, biologist-friendly web interface. MiST2 currently contains 966 complete and 157 draft bacterial and archaeal genomes, which collectively contain more than 245 000 signal transduction proteins. The majority (66%) of these are one-component systems, followed by two-component proteins (26%), chemotaxis (6%), and finally ECF factors (2%). PMID:19900966

  10. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Maury, Wendy; McCray, Paul B; Sinn, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN) responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction. PMID:23360952

  11. Recombinant TAT-Gelonin Fusion Toxin: Synthesis and Characterization of Heparin/Protamine-Regulated Cell Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Huang, Yongzhuo; He, Huining; Wang, Mei; Min, Kyoung Ah; Yang, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins, such as gelonin, are highly desirable anti-cancer drug candidates due to their unparalleled potency and repetitive reaction mechanism in inhibiting protein translation. However, for its potential application in cancer therapy, there remains the cell membrane barrier that allows permeation of only small molecules, which must be overcome. To address this challenge, we conjugated gelonin with a protein transduction domain (PTD), the TAT peptide, via genetic recombination. The chimeric TAT-gelonin fusion protein (TAT-Gel) retained equipotent N-glycosidase activity yet displayed greater cell uptake than unmodified recombinant gelonin (rGel), thereby yielding a significantly augmented cytotoxic activity. Remarkably, TATGel displayed up to 177-fold lower IC50 (avg. 54.3 nM) than rGel (avg. IC50: 3640 nM) in tested cell lines. This enhanced cytotoxicity, however, also raised potential toxicity concerns due to the non-selectivity of PTD in its mediated cell transduction. To solve this problem, we investigated the plausibility of regulating the cell transduction of TAT-Gel via a reversible masking using heparin and protamine. Here, we demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, that the cell transduction of TAT-Gel can be completely curbed with heparin and yet this heparin block can be efficiently reversed by the addition of protamine. This reversible tight regulation of the cell transduction of TAT-Gel by heparin and protamine sheds light of possible application of TATGel in achieving a highly effective yet safe drug therapy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:24733757

  12. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  13. Targeting signal transduction pathways of cancer stem cells for therapeutic opportunities of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Waqas; Alkarim, Saleh; AlHejin, Ahmed; Mukhtar, Hasan; Saini, Kulvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Tumor comprises of heterogeneous population of cells where not all the disseminated cancer cells have the prerogative and “in-build genetic cues” to form secondary tumors. Cells with stem like properties complemented by key signaling molecules clearly have shown to exhibit selective growth advantage to form tumors at distant metastatic sites. Thus, defining the role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumorigenesis and metastasis is emerging as a major thrust area for therapeutic intervention. Precise relationship and regulatory mechanisms operating in various signal transduction pathways during cancer dissemination, extravasation and angiogenesis still remain largely enigmatic. How the crosstalk amongst circulating tumor cells (CTC), epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and CSC is coordinated for initiating the metastasis at secondary tissues, and during cancer relapse could be of great therapeutic interest. The signal transduction mechanisms facilitating the dissemination, infiltration of CSC into blood stream, extravasations, progression of metastasis phenotype and angiogenesis, at distant organs, are the key pathologically important vulnerabilities being elucidated. Therefore, current new drug discovery focus has shifted towards finding “key driver genes” operating in parallel signaling pathways, during quiescence, survival and maintenance of stemness in CSC. Understanding these mechanisms could open new horizons for tackling the issue of cancer recurrence and metastasis-the cause of ~90% cancer associated mortality. To design futuristic & targeted therapies, we propose a multi-pronged strategy involving small molecules, RNA interference, vaccines, antibodies and other biotechnological modalities against CSC and the metastatic signal transduction cascade. PMID:27486983

  14. Plasma Gelsolin Induced Glomerular Fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads Signal Transduction Pathway in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Han, Changsong; Ye, Fei; He, Yan; Jin, Yinji; Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Yiqi; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Fengmin; Jin, Xiaoming

    2017-02-12

    Glomerular fibrosis has been shown to be closely related to the progression and prognosis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, mechanism underlying IgAN glomerular fibrosis remains unclear. Recently, our study showed that plasma gelsolin (pGSN) was decreased in the serum of an IgAN mouse model and that pGSN deposition was found in the glomeruli. Another cytokine, TGF-β1, which is closely related to glomerular fibrosis, was also found to be highly expressed in the glomeruli. In the present study, we report that pGSN induces glomerular fibrosis through the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This is supported by the following findings: human mesangial cells (HMCs) show remarkable morphological changes and proliferation in response to co-stimulation with pGSN and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) from IgAN patients compared to other controls. Moreover, ELISA assays showed that more TGF-β1 secretion was found in HMCs supernatants in the co-stimulation group. Further experiments showed increased TGF-β1, Smad3, p-Smad2/3, Smad4, and collagen 1 and decreased Smad7 expression in the co-stimulation group. Our present study implied that the synergistic effect of pGSN and pIgA induced glomerular fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This might be a potential mechanism for the glomerular fibrosis observed in IgAN patients.

  15. Plasma Gelsolin Induced Glomerular Fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads Signal Transduction Pathway in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Han, Changsong; Ye, Fei; He, Yan; Jin, Yinji; Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Yiqi; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Fengmin; Jin, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Glomerular fibrosis has been shown to be closely related to the progression and prognosis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, mechanism underlying IgAN glomerular fibrosis remains unclear. Recently, our study showed that plasma gelsolin (pGSN) was decreased in the serum of an IgAN mouse model and that pGSN deposition was found in the glomeruli. Another cytokine, TGF-β1, which is closely related to glomerular fibrosis, was also found to be highly expressed in the glomeruli. In the present study, we report that pGSN induces glomerular fibrosis through the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This is supported by the following findings: human mesangial cells (HMCs) show remarkable morphological changes and proliferation in response to co-stimulation with pGSN and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) from IgAN patients compared to other controls. Moreover, ELISA assays showed that more TGF-β1 secretion was found in HMCs supernatants in the co-stimulation group. Further experiments showed increased TGF-β1, Smad3, p-Smad2/3, Smad4, and collagen 1 and decreased Smad7 expression in the co-stimulation group. Our present study implied that the synergistic effect of pGSN and pIgA induced glomerular fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This might be a potential mechanism for the glomerular fibrosis observed in IgAN patients. PMID:28208683

  16. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo . E-mail: ysbae04@skku.edu

    2006-05-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused {beta}-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-{beta}-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material.

  17. Comparative left-right mechanical testing of cancellous bone from normal femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Banse, X; Delloye, C; Cornu, O; Bourgois, R

    1996-10-01

    In order to assess the potential influence of various physical or chemical treatments on bone grafts, and in particular, on femoral heads to be used as bone grafts, the mechanical symmetry of the femoral head was investigated. Pairs of proximal human femora were harvested and transversally sliced using a coordinate system to orient correctly the head. After being embedded and polished, bone slices were loaded to failure between two steel columns (6 mm of diameter) in a sequential and symmetrical manner for both heads. From ten pairs, 592 mechanical assays on the cancellous bone of femoral heads were performed. There was a high variation in the mechanical properties of the specimens from the different donors. However, no statistical difference could be observed within each pair when side-to-side symmetry was tested for the different mechanical characteristics. Ultimate stress at failure and stiffness were also highly correlated for each mirror location of each pair. Provided that an accurate and reproducible method of slicing femoral head can be achieved, an excellent mechanical symmetry is observed using a static compressive test. Such a method could be used to determine the mechanical influence of any treatment applied to bone.

  18. Electromechanical transduction in multilayer ionic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar; Leo, Donald J.

    2004-10-01

    A transducer consisting of multiple layers of ionic polymer material is developed for applications in sensing, actuation and control. A multilayer transducer is fabricated by layering individual transducers on top of one another. Each multilayer transducer consists of two to four individual layers each approximately 200 µm thick. The electrical characteristics of the transducers can be varied by connecting the layers in either a parallel arrangement or a series arrangement. The tradeoff in deflection and force is obtained by controlling the mechanical constraint at the interface. Packaging the transducer in an outer coating produces a hard constraint between layers and reduces the deflection with a force that increases linearly with the number of layers. This configuration also increases the bandwidth of the transducer. Removing the outer packaging produces an actuator that maintains the deflection of a single layer with an increased force output. This is obtained by allowing the layers to slide relative to one another during bending. Experiments on transducers with one to three layers are performed and the results are compared to an equivalent circuit model which was modified to accommodate multilayer transducers. The modification is performed on four different boundary conditions: two electrical, the series and the parallel connection, and two mechanical, the zero interfacial friction and the zero slip on the interface. Expressions for blocked force, free deflection, and electrical impedance of the transducer are developed in terms of fundamental material parameters, transducer geometry, and the number of individual layers. The trends in the transducer response are validated using experiments on transducers with multiple polymer layers.

  19. [COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MECHANICAL STRESS EFFECT ON HUMAN AND ANIMAL ERYTHROCYTES].

    PubMed

    Shpakova, N M; Orlova, N V; Nipot, E E; Aleksandrova, D I

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of human and animal (bovine, rat, rabbit, equine) erythrocytes to the effect of mechanical stress has been studied. Mechanical stress effect was demonstrated to result in a time-dependent (5-60 min) release of potassium cations out of mammalian erythrocytes and a partial hemolytic cell damage. Herewith the release levels of potassium ions and hemolysis did not coincide for erythrocytes of all the mammals except rabbit ones. The most sensitive to mechanical stress (60 min) by the parameters of hemolytic damage and potassium ion release were rat (32%) and bovine (66%) erythrocytes respectively, the lowest sensitive by both parameters were rabbit ones (about 20%). Implemented correlation analysis has demonstrated a statistically significant negative relation between the values of mechanical hemolysis of mammalian erythrocytes and surface-volumetric ratio of cells (rs = -0.900, P = 0.037). A feasible relationship between the content of phosphatidylethanolamine in mammalian erythrocyte membranes and the level of potassium cation loss under mechanical stress effect is under discussion.

  20. Signal Transduction in the Footsteps of Goethe and Schiller

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Karlheinz; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Entschladen, Frank; Serfling, Edgar; Thiel, Gerald; Kieser, Arnd; Giehl, Klaudia; Ehrhardt, Christina; Feller, Stephan M; Ullrich, Oliver; Schaper, Fred; Janssen, Ottmar; Hass, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS) has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction – Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field. The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction. PMID:19193215

  1. Electrical Stimulation of Cellular Response: Responses and Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    frequencies using this new method. This should provide invaluable information regarding the kinetics of the electrochemical transductive coupling at...provide invaluable information regarding the kinetics of the electrochemical transductive coupling at the plasma membrane. Thus far, the installation of...dependence with the kinetics of known cellular processes may provide insight to the putative mechanisms of energy transduction. II.b Methods Connective

  2. Signal transduction across alamethicin ion channels in the presence of noise.

    PubMed Central

    Bezrukov, S M; Vodyanoy, I

    1997-01-01

    We have studied voltage-dependent ion channels of alamethicin reconstituted into an artificial planar lipid bilayer membrane from the point of view of electric signal transduction. Signal transduction properties of these channels are highly sensitive to the external electric noise. Specifically, addition of bandwidth-restricted "white" noise of 10-20 mV (r.m.s.) to a small sine wave input signal increases the output signal by approximately 20-40 dB conserving, and even slightly increasing, the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output. We have developed a small-signal adiabatic theory of stochastic resonance for a threshold-free system of voltage-dependent ion channels. This theory describes our main experimental findings giving good qualitative understanding of the underlying mechanism. It predicts the right value of the output signal-to-noise ratio and provides a reliable estimate for the noise intensity corresponding to its maximum. Our results suggest that the alamethicin channel in a lipid bilayer is a good model system for studies of mechanisms of primary electrical signal processing in biology showing an important feature of signal transduction improvement by a fluctuating environment. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9370439

  3. Transduction channels’ gating can control friction on vibrating hair-cell bundles in the ear

    PubMed Central

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. Friction is generally thought to result mainly from viscous drag by the surrounding fluid. We demonstrate here that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle. We characterized friction by analyzing hysteresis in the force–displacement relation of single hair-cell bundles in response to periodic triangular stimuli. For bundle velocities high enough to outrun adaptation, we found that frictional forces were maximal within the narrow region of deflections that elicited significant channel gating, plummeted upon application of a channel blocker, and displayed a sublinear growth for increasing bundle velocity. At low velocity, the slope of the relation between the frictional force and velocity was nearly fivefold larger than the hydrodynamic friction coefficient that was measured when the transduction machinery was decoupled from bundle motion by severing tip links. A theoretical analysis reveals that channel friction arises from coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. Varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. We propose that this intrinsic source of friction may contribute to the process that sets the hair cell’s characteristic frequency of responsiveness. PMID:24799674

  4. AKAP-Lbc: a molecular scaffold for the integration of cyclic AMP and Rho transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Baisamy, Laurent; Appert-Collin, Aline

    2006-07-01

    A Kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a family of functionally related proteins involved in the targeting of the PKA holoenzyme towards specific physiological substrates. We have recently identified a novel anchoring protein expressed in cardiomyocytes, called AKAP-Lbc, that functions as a PKA-targeting protein as well as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the GTPase RhoA. Here, we discuss the most recent findings elucidating the molecular mechanisms and the transduction pathways involved in the regulation of the AKAP-Lbc signaling complex inside cells. We could show that AKAP-Lbc is regulated in a bi-directional manner by signals that activate or deactivate its Rho-GEF activity. Activation of AKAP-Lbc occurs in response to agonists that stimulate G proteins coupled receptors linked to the heterotrimeric G protein G12, whereas inactivation occurs through mechanisms that require phosphorylation of AKAP-Lbc by anchored PKA and subsequent recruitment of the regulatory protein 14-3-3. Interestingly, we could demonstrate that AKAP-Lbc can form homo-oligomers inside cells and that 14-3-3 can inhibit the Rho-GEF activity of AKAP-Lbc only when the anchoring protein adopts an oligomeric conformation. These findings reveal the molecular architecture of the AKAP-Lbc transduction complex and provide a mechanistic explanation of how upstream signaling pathways can be integrated within the AKAP-Lbc transduction complex to precisely modulate the activation of Rho.

  5. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Li; Yao, Xinglei; Faiola, Francesco; Liu, Bojun; Zhang, Tianyuan; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Gao, Jian-Qing; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with multilineage potential, which makes them attractive tools for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential not only for basic research in developmental biology but also for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors, but not into MSCs, which are deficient in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors expression. To overcome this problem, we developed an Adv coated with a spermine-pullulan (SP) cationic polymer and investigated its physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms. We demonstrated that the SP coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. PMID:28008251

  6. GAP-43 augments G protein-coupled receptor transduction in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, S M; Cannon, S C; Ross, E M; Higashijima, T; Fishman, M C

    1993-01-01

    The neuronal protein GAP-43 is thought to play a role in determining growth-cone motility, perhaps as an intracellular regulator of signal transduction, but its molecular mechanism of action has remained unclear. We find that GAP-43, when microinjected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, increases the oocyte response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists by 10- to 100-fold. Higher levels of GAP-43 cause a transient current flow, even without receptor stimulation. The GAP-43-induced current, like receptor-stimulated currents, is mediated by a calcium-activated chloride channel and can be desensitized by injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. This suggests that neuronal GAP-43 may serve as an intracellular signal to greatly enhance the sensitivity of G protein-coupled receptor transduction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7685122

  7. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianfei; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process. PMID:26393507

  8. Inquiry into Chemotherapy-Induced P53 Activation in Cancer Cells as a Model for Teaching Signal Transduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srougi, Melissa C.; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular communication is conducted through an intricate and interwoven network of signal transduction pathways. The mechanisms for how cells speak with one another are of significant biological importance to both basic and industrial scientists from a number of different disciplines. We have therefore developed and…

  9. Bacterial mechanosensitive channels as a paradigm for mechanosensory transduction.

    PubMed

    Martinac, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Research on bacterial mechanosensitive (MS) channels has since their discovery been at the forefront of the MS channel field due to extensive studies of the structure and function of MscL and MscS, two of the several different types of MS channels found in bacteria. Just a few years after these two MS channels were cloned their 3D structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. Today, the repertoire of multidisciplinary approaches used in experimental and theoretical studies following the cloning and crystallographic determination of the MscL and MscS structure has expanded by including electronparamagnetic resonance (EPR) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy aided by computational modelling employing molecular dynamics as well as Brownian dynamics simulations, which significantly advanced the understanding of structural determinants of the gating and conduction properties of these two MS channels. These extensive multidisciplinary studies of MscL and MscS have greatly contributed to elucidation of the basic physical principles of MS channel gating by mechanical force. This review summarizes briefly the major experimental and conceptual advancements, which helped in establishing MscL and MscS as a major paradigm of mechanosensory transduction in living cells.

  10. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Oliver; Huber, Kathrin; Lang, Kerstin

    2008-10-28

    Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  11. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  12. Comparative mechanisms of cancer cell migration through 3D matrix and physiological microtracks.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Rahman, Aniqua; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Romero, Bethsabe; Somasegar, Sahana; Torre, Olivia M; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-03-15

    Tumor cell invasion through the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key feature of cancer metastasis, and understanding the cellular mechanisms of invasive migration is critical to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Since cancer cell migration is highly adaptable to physiochemical properties of the ECM, it is critical to define these migration mechanisms in a context-specific manner. Although extensive work has characterized cancer cell migration in two- and three-dimensional (3D) matrix environments, the migration program employed by cells to move through native and cell-derived microtracks within the stromal ECM remains unclear. We previously reported the development of an in vitro model of patterned type I collagen microtracks that enable matrix metalloproteinase-independent microtrack migration. Here we show that collagen microtracks closely resemble channel-like gaps in native mammary stroma ECM and examine the extracellular and intracellular mechanisms underlying microtrack migration. Cell-matrix mechanocoupling, while critical for migration through 3D matrix, is not necessary for microtrack migration. Instead, cytoskeletal dynamics, including actin polymerization, cortical tension, and microtubule turnover, enable persistent, polarized migration through physiological microtracks. These results indicate that tumor cells employ context-specific mechanisms to migrate and suggest that selective targeting of cytoskeletal dynamics, but not adhesion, proteolysis, or cell traction forces, may effectively inhibit cancer cell migration through preformed matrix microtracks within the tumor stroma.

  13. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. PMID:19455134

  14. Expansion of Signal Transduction Pathways in Fungi by Extensive Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Corrochano, Luis M; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P; Benoit, Isabelle; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Lang, B Franz; Lavín, José L; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M; Marcos, Ana T; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A; Ohm, Robin A; Olmedo, María; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thon, Michael R; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P; Wiebenga, Ad; Yadav, Jagjit S; Braun, Edward L; Baker, Scott E; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2016-06-20

    Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic human pathogen that changes its mode of growth upon receipt of signals from the environment to facilitate pathogenesis [2]. Understanding how these organisms respond to environmental cues should provide insights into the mechanisms of sensory perception and signal transduction by a single eukaryotic cell, and their role in pathogenesis. We sequenced the genomes of P. blakesleeanus and M. circinelloides and show that they have been shaped by an extensive genome duplication or, most likely, a whole-genome duplication (WGD), which is rarely observed in fungi [3-6]. We show that the genome duplication has expanded gene families, including those involved in signal transduction, and that duplicated genes have specialized, as evidenced by differences in their regulation by light. The transcriptional response to light varies with the developmental stage and is still observed in a photoreceptor mutant of P. blakesleeanus. A phototropic mutant of P. blakesleeanus with a heterozygous mutation in the photoreceptor gene madA demonstrates that photosensor dosage is important for the magnitude of signal transduction. We conclude that the genome duplication provided the means to improve signal transduction for enhanced perception of environmental signals. Our results will help to understand the role of genome dynamics in the evolution of sensory perception in eukaryotes.

  15. Gravitactic signal transduction elements in astasia longa investigated during parabolic flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Lebert, Michael; Häder, Donat-P.

    2003-12-01

    Euglena gracilis and its close relative Astasia longa show a pronounced negative gravitactic behavior. Many experiments revealed that gravitaxis is most likely mediated by an active physiological mechanism. The goal of the present study was to examine elements in the sensory transduction by means of inhibitors of gravitaxis and the intracellular calcium concentration during short microgravity periods. During the course of six parabolic flights (ESA 31 th parabolic flight campaign and DLR 6 th parabolic flight campaign) the effects of trifluoperazine (calmodulin inhibitor), caffeine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) and gadolinium (blocks mechano-sensitive ion channels) was investigated. Due to the extreme parabolic flight maneuvers of the aircraft alternating phases of 1.8×gn (about 20 s) and microgravity (about 22 s) were achieved (gn: acceleration of Earth's gravity field). The duration of the microgravity periods was sufficient to detect a loss of cell orientation in the samples. In the presence of gadolinium impaired gravitaxis was found during acceleration, while caffeine-treated cells showed, compared to the controls, a very precise gravitaxis and faster reorientation in the 1.8×gn period following microgravity. A transient increase of the intracellular calcium upon increased acceleration was detected also in inhibitor-treated samples. Additionally, it was found that the cells showed a higher calcium signal when they deviated from the vertical swimming direction. In the presence of trifluoperazine a slightly higher general calcium signal was detected compared to untreated controls, while gadolinium was found to decrease the intracellular calcium concentration. In the presence of caffeine no clear changes of intracellular calcium were detected compared to the control.

  16. Cellular Mechanisms and Behavioral Outcomes in Blast-Induced Neurotrauma: Comparing Experimental Setups.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Hubbard, W Brad; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) has increased in incidence over the past decades and can result in cognitive issues that have debilitating consequences. The exact primary and secondary mechanisms of injury have not been elucidated and appearance of cellular injury can vary based on many factors, such as blast overpressure magnitude and duration. Many methodologies to study blast neurotrauma have been employed, ranging from open-field explosives to experimental shock tubes for producing free-field blast waves. While there are benefits to the various methods, certain specifications need to be accounted for in order to properly examine BINT. Primary cell injury mechanisms, occurring as a direct result of the blast wave, have been identified in several studies and include cerebral vascular damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, axonal injury, and cytoskeletal damage. Secondary cell injury mechanisms, triggered subsequent to the initial insult, result in the activation of several molecular cascades and can include, but are not limited to, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. The collective result of these secondary injuries can lead to functional deficits. Behavioral measures examining motor function, anxiety traits, and cognition/memory problems have been utilized to determine the level of injury severity. While cellular injury mechanisms have been identified following blast exposure, the various experimental models present both concurrent and conflicting results. Furthermore, the temporal response and progression of pathology after blast exposure have yet to be detailed and remain unclear due to limited resemblance of methodologies. This chapter summarizes the current state of blast neuropathology and emphasizes the need for a standardized preclinical model of blast neurotrauma.

  17. Leaf mechanical resistance in plant trait databases: comparing the results of two common measurement methods

    PubMed Central

    Enrico, Lucas; Díaz, Sandra; Westoby, Mark; Rice, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims The influence of leaf mechanical properties on local ecosystem processes, such as trophic transfer, decomposition and nutrient cycling, has resulted in a growing interest in including leaf mechanical resistance in large-scale databases of plant functional traits. ‘Specific work to shear’ and ‘force to tear’ are two properties commonly used to describe mechanical resistance (toughness or strength) of leaves. Two methodologies have been widely used to measure them across large datasets. This study aimed to assess correlations and standardization between the two methods, as measured by two widely used apparatuses, in order to inter-convert existing data in those global datasets. Methods Specific work to shear (WSS) and force to tear (FT) were measured in leaves of 72 species from south-eastern Australia. The measurements were made including and excluding midribs. Relationships between the variables were tested by Spearman correlations and ordinary least square regressions. Key Results A positive and significant correlation was found between the methods, but coefficients varied according to the inclusion or exclusion of the midrib in the measurements. Equations for prediction varied according to leaf venation pattern. A positive and significant (r = 0·90, P < 0·0001) correlation was also found between WSS values for fresh and rehydrated leaves, which is considered to be of practical relevance. Conclusions In the context of broad-scale ecological hypotheses and used within the constraints recommended here, leaf mechanical resistance data obtained with both methodologies could be pooled together into a single coarser variable, using the equations provided in this paper. However, more detailed datasets of FT cannot be safely filled in with estimations based on WSS, or vice versa. In addition, WSS values of green leaves can be predicted with good accuracy from WSS of rehydrated leaves of the same species. PMID:26530215

  18. Bioactive nanoparticle-gelatin composite scaffold with mechanical performance comparable to cancellous bones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Shen, Hong; Tian, Ye; Xie, Yue; Li, Ailing; Ji, Lijun; Niu, Zhongwei; Wu, Decheng; Qiu, Dong

    2014-08-13

    Mechanical properties are among the most concerned issues for artificial bone grafting materials. The scaffolds used for bone grafts are either too brittle (glass) or too weak (polymer), and therefore composite scaffolds are naturally expected as the solution. However, despite the intensive studies on composite bone grafting materials, there still lacks a material that could be matched to the natural cancellous bones. In this study, nanosized bioactive particles (BP) with controllable size and good colloidal stability were used to composite with gelatin, forming macroporous scaffolds. It was found that the mechanical properties of obtained composite scaffolds, in terms of elastic modulus, compressive strength, and strain at failure, could match to that of natural cancellous bones. This is ascribed to the good distribution of particle in matrix and strong interaction between particle and gelatin. Furthermore, the incorporation of BPs endues the composite scaffolds with bioactivity, forming HA upon reacting with simulated body fluid (SBF) within days, thus stimulating preosteoblasts attachment, growth, and proliferation in these scaffolds. Together with their good mechanical properties, these composite scaffolds are promising artificial bone grating materials.

  19. A comparative study of the effects of constructional elements on the mechanical behaviour of dragonfly wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, H.; Rezasefat, M.; Darvizeh, A.; Dirks, J.-H.; Eshghi, Sh.; Shafiei, A.; Mostofi, T. Mirzababaie; Gorb, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Although wings of insects show a large variation in morphology, they are all made from a network of irregular veins interconnected through membranous areas. Depending on their shape, size, and position, wing veins are usually divided into three different groups: longitudinal veins, cross-veins and ambient veins. The veins together with the membrane and some other elements such as spines, nodus and pterostigma can be considered as the wing's "constructional elements". In spite of rather extensive literature on dragonfly wing structure, the role of each of these elements in determining the wing's function remains mostly unknown. As this question is difficult to answer in vivo using biomechanical experiments on actual wings, this study was undertaken to reveal the effects of the constructional elements on the mechanical behaviour of dragonfly wings by applying numerical simulations. An image processing technique was used to develop 12 finite element models of the insect wings with different constructional elements. The mechanical behaviour of these models was then simulated under normal and shear stresses due to tension, bending and torsion. A free vibration analysis was also performed to determine the resonant frequencies and the mode shapes of the models. For the first time, a quantitative comparison was carried out between the mechanical effects selectively caused by different elements. Our results suggest that the complex interactions of veins, membranes and corrugations may considerably affect the dynamic deformation of the insect wings during flight.

  20. Microstructure and compressive mechanical properties of cortical bone in children with osteogenesis imperfecta treated with bisphosphonates compared with healthy children.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Laurianne; Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Pernelle, Kélig; Hoc, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by a change in bone tissue quality, but little data are available to describe the factors involved at the macroscopic scale. To better understand the effect of microstructure alterations on the mechanical properties at the sample scale, we studied the structural and mechanical properties of six cortical bone samples from children with OI treated with bisphosphonates and compared them to the properties of three controls. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution computed tomography and compression testing were used to assess these properties. More resorption cavities and a higher osteocyte lacunar density were observed in OI bone compared with controls. Moreover, a higher porosity was measured for OI bones along with lower macroscopic Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate stress. The microstructure was impaired in OI bones; the higher porosity and osteocyte lacunar density negatively impacted the mechanical properties and made the bone more prone to fracture.

  1. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  2. Transduction of E13 murine neural precursor cells by non-immunogenic recombinant adeno-associated viruses induces major changes in neuronal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Nash, K R; Cardenas-Aguayo, Mdel C; Berg, M J; Marks, N

    2012-05-17

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) provide a cellular model to compare transduction efficiency and toxicity for a series of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs). Results led to the choice of rAAV9 as a preferred candidate to transduce NPCs for in vivo transplantation. Importantly, transduction promoted a neuronal phenotype characterized by neurofilament M (NFM) with a concomitant decrease in the embryonic marker, nestin, without significant change in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). In marked contrast to recent studies for induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), exposure to rAAVs is non-immunogenic and these do not result in genetic abnormalities, thus bolstering the earlier use of NPCs such as those isolated from E13 murine cells for clinical applications. Mechanisms of cellular interactions were explored by treatment with genistein, a pan-specific inhibitor of protein receptor tyrosine kinases (PRTKs) that blocked the transduction and differentiation, thus implying a central role for this pathway for inducing infectivity along with observed phenotypic changes and as a method for drug design. Implantation of transduced NPCs into adult mouse hippocampus survived up to 28 days producing a time line for targeting or migration to dentate gyrus and CA3-1 compatible with future clinical applications. Furthermore, a majority showed commitment to highly differentiated neuronal phenotypes. Lack of toxicity and immune response of rAAVs plus ability for expansion of NPCs in vitro auger well for their isolation and suggest potential therapeutic applications in repair or replacement of diseased neurons in neurodegeneration.

  3. Impairment of skin barrier function via cholinergic signal transduction in a dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Dry skin has been clinically associated with visceral diseases, including liver disease, as well as for our previously reported small intestinal injury mouse model, which have abnormalities in skin barrier function. To clarify this disease-induced skin disruption, we used a dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Following treatment with DSS, damage to the colon and skin was monitored using histological and protein analysis methods as well as the detection of inflammatory mediators in the plasma. Notably, transepidermal water loss was higher, and skin hydration was lower in DSS-treated mice compared to controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 and NO2-/NO3- levels were also upregulated in the plasma, and a decrease in body weight and colon length was observed in DSS-treated mice. However, when administered TNF-α antibody or an iNOS inhibitor, no change in skin condition was observed, indicating that another signalling mechanism is utilized. Interestingly, the number of tryptase-expressing mast cells, known for their role in immune function via cholinergic signal transduction, was elevated. To evaluate the function of cholinergic signalling in this context, atropine (a muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist) or hexamethonium (a nicotinic cholinergic ganglion-blocking agent) was administered to DSS-treated mice. Our data indicate that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are the primary receptors functioning in colon-to-skin signal transduction, as DSS-induced skin disruption was suppressed by atropine. Thus, skin disruption is likely associated with DSS-induced colitis, and the activation of mast cells via mAChRs is critical to this association.

  4. Comparative study using MS and XRD of Fe80Al20 alloy produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadef, F.; Otmani, A.; Grenèche, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    An X-ray diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer effect study of mechanically alloyed Fe80Al20 is presented. X-ray measurements indicate that the disordered bcc α-Fe(Al) solid solution was formed after 2 h of milling, while the analysis of Mössbauer spectra suggested that total dissolution of aluminium is achieved after 10 h of milling. These differences can be attributed to: (i) rapid nanocrystallization of aluminium and/or (ii) small particles with small amounts of aluminium cannot be detected by the X-ray diffraction technique.

  5. Postsynaptic Signal Transduction Models for Long-Term Potentiation and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Manninen, Tiina; Hituri, Katri; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren; Blackwell, Kim T.; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2010-01-01

    More than a hundred biochemical species, activated by neurotransmitters binding to transmembrane receptors, are important in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). To investigate which species and interactions are critical for synaptic plasticity, many computational postsynaptic signal transduction models have been developed. The models range from simple models with a single reversible reaction to detailed models with several hundred kinetic reactions. In this study, more than a hundred models are reviewed, and their features are compared and contrasted so that similarities and differences are more readily apparent. The models are classified according to the type of synaptic plasticity that is modeled (LTP or LTD) and whether they include diffusion or electrophysiological phenomena. Other characteristics that discriminate the models include the phase of synaptic plasticity modeled (induction, expression, or maintenance) and the simulation method used (deterministic or stochastic). We find that models are becoming increasingly sophisticated, by including stochastic properties, integrating with electrophysiological properties of entire neurons, or incorporating diffusion of signaling molecules. Simpler models continue to be developed because they are computationally efficient and allow theoretical analysis. The more complex models permit investigation of mechanisms underlying specific properties and experimental verification of model predictions. Nonetheless, it is difficult to fully comprehend the evolution of these models because (1) several models are not described in detail in the publications, (2) only a few models are provided in existing model databases, and (3) comparison to previous models is lacking. We conclude that the value of these models for understanding molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity is increasing and will be enhanced further with more complete descriptions and sharing of the published models. PMID:21188161

  6. Prefrontal Dopaminergic Mechanisms of Extinction in Adolescence Compared to Adulthood in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zbukvic, Isabel C.; Park, Chun Hui J.; Ganella, Despina E.; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents with anxiety disorders attain poorer outcomes following extinction-based treatment compared to adults. Extinction deficit during adolescence has been identified to involve immaturity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Findings from adult rodents suggest extinction involves dopamine signaling in the mPFC. This system changes dramatically during adolescence, but its role in adolescent extinction is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the role of prefrontal dopamine in extinction using Pavlovian fear conditioning in adolescent and adult rats. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses, we measured changes in dopamine receptor gene expression in the mPFC before and after extinction. We then enhanced dopamine 1 receptor (D1R) or dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) signaling in the infralimbic cortex (IL) of the mPFC using agonists at the time of extinction. Adolescent rats displayed a deficit in extinction retention compared to adults. Extinction induced a reduction in D1R compared to D2R gene expression in adolescent rats, whereas an increase of D1R compared to D2R gene expression was observed in adult rats. Acutely enhancing IL D1R signaling using SKF-81297 had no effect on extinction at either age. In contrast, acutely enhancing IL D2R signaling with quinpirole significantly enhanced long-term extinction in adolescents, and impaired within-session extinction in adults. Our results suggest a dissociated role for prefrontal dopamine in fear extinction during adolescence compared to adulthood. Findings highlight the dopamine system as a potential pharmacological target to improve extinction-based treatments for adolescents. PMID:28275342

  7. A comparative study of mechanical alloying and mechanical milling of Nd{sub 8}Fe{sub 88}B{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Q.; Xiao, Y.F.; Liu, X.B.; Dong, S.Z.; Deng, Y.S.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Wang, R.

    1999-06-01

    A comparative study was made of structure and magnetic properties of Nd{sub 8}Fe{sub 88}B{sub 4} prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) using elemental powders as starting materials and by mechanical milling (MM) of the alloy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) combined with transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies revealed that both milling procedures resulted in a mixture of {alpha}-Fe and an amorphous phase. The thermal stability of the as-milled powders produced by MA was comparable to that of the as-milled powders produced by MM. Heat treatment of the milled powders above the crystallization temperature resulted in the formation of a nanocrystalline mixture of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and {alpha}-Fe, but annealed MA powders demonstrated a somewhat coarser structure in comparison with annealed MM powders. Therefore, higher remanences and coercivities were obtained by MM.

  8. Comparative genetic screens in human cells reveal new regulatory mechanisms in WNT signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lebensohn, Andres M; Dubey, Ramin; Neitzel, Leif R; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Yang, Eungi; Marceau, Caleb D; Davis, Eric M; Patel, Bhaven B; Bahrami-Nejad, Zahra; Travaglini, Kyle J; Ahmed, Yashi; Lee, Ethan; Carette, Jan E; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive understanding of cellular signaling pathways remains a challenge due to multiple layers of regulation that may become evident only when the pathway is probed at different levels or critical nodes are eliminated. To discover regulatory mechanisms in canonical WNT signaling, we conducted a systematic forward genetic analysis through reporter-based screens in haploid human cells. Comparison of screens for negative, attenuating and positive regulators of WNT signaling, mediators of R-spondin-dependent signaling and suppressors of constitutive signaling induced by loss of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli or casein kinase 1α uncovered new regulatory features at most levels of the pathway. These include a requirement for the transcription factor AP-4, a role for the DAX domain of AXIN2 in controlling β-catenin transcriptional activity, a contribution of glycophosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and glypicans to R-spondin-potentiated WNT signaling, and two different mechanisms that regulate signaling when distinct components of the β-catenin destruction complex are lost. The conceptual and methodological framework we describe should enable the comprehensive understanding of other signaling systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21459.001 PMID:27996937

  9. Genome-wide Comparative Analysis of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis Gives Insight into Opposing Genetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D.; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A.E.; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Morris, Derek W.; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M.; Novak, Natalija; O’Regan, Grainne M.; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E.; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C.; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T.; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J.; Brown, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21–22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features. PMID:25574825

  10. Comparative analysis of disease pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms of New World and Old World arenavirus infections.

    PubMed

    McLay, Lisa; Liang, Yuying; Ly, Hinh

    2014-01-01

    Arenaviruses can cause fatal human haemorrhagic fever (HF) diseases for which vaccines and therapies are extremely limited. Both the New World (NW) and Old World (OW) groups of arenaviruses contain HF-causing pathogens. Although these two groups share many similarities, important differences with regard to pathogenicity and molecular mechanisms of virus infection exist. These closely related pathogens share many characteristics, including genome structure, viral assembly, natural host selection and the ability to interfere with innate immune signalling. However, members of the NW and OW viruses appear to use different receptors for cellular entry, as well as different mechanisms of virus internalization. General differences in disease signs and symptoms and pathological lesions in patients infected with either NW or OW arenaviruses are also noted and discussed herein. Whilst both the OW Lassa virus (LASV) and the NW Junin virus (JUNV) can cause disruption of the vascular endothelium, which is an important pathological feature of HF, the immune responses to these related pathogens seem to be quite distinct. Whereas LASV infection results in an overall generalized immune suppression, patients infected with JUNV seem to develop a cytokine storm. Additionally, the type of immune response required for recovery and clearance of the virus is different between NW and OW infections. These differences may be important to allow the viruses to evade host immune detection. Understanding these differences will aid the development of new vaccines and treatment strategies against deadly HF viral infections.

  11. Genome-wide comparative analysis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis gives insight into opposing genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A E; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W H Irwin; Morris, Derek W; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M; Novak, Natalija; O'Regan, Grainne M; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J; Brown, Sara J

    2015-01-08

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21-22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features.

  12. A comparative study of bio-inspired protective scales using 3D printing and mechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Martini, Roberto; Balit, Yanis; Barthelat, Francois

    2017-03-16

    Flexible natural armors from fish, alligators or armadillo are attracting an increasing amount of attention for their unique combinations of hardness, flexibility and light weight. The extreme contrast of stiffness between hard scales and surrounding soft tissues gives rise to unusual and attractive mechanisms, which now serve as models for the design of bio-inspired armors. Despite this growing interest, there is little guideline for the choice of materials, optimum thickness, size, shape and arrangement for the protective scales. In this work, we explore how the geometry and arrangement of hard scales can be tailored to promote scale-scale interactions. We use 3D printing to fabricate arrays of scales with increasingly complex geometries and arrangements, from simple squares with no overlap to complex ganoid-scales with overlaps and interlocking features. We performed puncture tests and flexural tests on each of the 3D printed materials, and we report the puncture resistance - compliance characteristics of each design on an Ashby chart. The interactions between the scales can significantly increase the resistance to puncture, and these interactions can be maximized by tuning the geometry and arrangement of the scales. Interestingly, the designs that offer the best combinations of puncture resistance and flexural compliance are similar to the geometry and arrangement of natural teleost and ganoid scales, which suggests that natural evolution has shaped these systems to maximize flexible protection. This study yields new insights into the mechanisms of natural dermal armor, and also suggests new designs for personal protective systems.

  13. Comparative analysis of disease pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms of New World and Old World arenavirus infections

    PubMed Central

    McLay, Lisa; Liang, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Arenaviruses can cause fatal human haemorrhagic fever (HF) diseases for which vaccines and therapies are extremely limited. Both the New World (NW) and Old World (OW) groups of arenaviruses contain HF-causing pathogens. Although these two groups share many similarities, important differences with regard to pathogenicity and molecular mechanisms of virus infection exist. These closely related pathogens share many characteristics, including genome structure, viral assembly, natural host selection and the ability to interfere with innate immune signalling. However, members of the NW and OW viruses appear to use different receptors for cellular entry, as well as different mechanisms of virus internalization. General differences in disease signs and symptoms and pathological lesions in patients infected with either NW or OW arenaviruses are also noted and discussed herein. Whilst both the OW Lassa virus (LASV) and the NW Junin virus (JUNV) can cause disruption of the vascular endothelium, which is an important pathological feature of HF, the immune responses to these related pathogens seem to be quite distinct. Whereas LASV infection results in an overall generalized immune suppression, patients infected with JUNV seem to develop a cytokine storm. Additionally, the type of immune response required for recovery and clearance of the virus is different between NW and OW infections. These differences may be important to allow the viruses to evade host immune detection. Understanding these differences will aid the development of new vaccines and treatment strategies against deadly HF viral infections. PMID:24068704

  14. Comparative proteomics exploring the molecular mechanism of eutrophic water purification using water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiong; Xi, Houcheng; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yunqiang; Yang, Shihai; Zhou, Yanli; Zhou, Xinmao; Yang, Yongping

    2015-06-01

    Eutrophication is a serious threat to ecosystem stability and use of water resources worldwide. Accordingly, physical, chemical, and biological technologies have been developed to treat eutrophic water. Phytoremediation has attracted a great deal of attention, and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is regarded as one of the best plants for purification of eutrophic water. Previous studies have shown that water hyacinths remove nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) via diverse processes and that they can inhibit the growth of algae. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these processes, especially the role of proteins, are unknown. In this study, we applied a proteomics approach to investigate the protein dynamics of water hyacinth under three eutrophication levels. The results suggested that proteins with various functions, including response to stress, N and P metabolic pathways, synthesis and secretion, photosynthesis, biosynthesis, and energy metabolism, were involved in regulating water hyacinth to endure the excess-nutrient environment, remove N and P, and inhibit algal growth. The results help us understand the mechanism of purification of eutrophic water by water hyacinth and supply a theoretical basis for improving techniques for phytoremediation of polluted water.

  15. Elucidation of Cross-Talk and Specificity of Early Response Mechanisms to Salt and PEG-Simulated Drought Stresses in Brassica napus Using Comparative Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junling; Tang, Shaohua; Peng, Xiaojue; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Xinhua; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cross-talk and specificity of the early responses of plants to salt and drought, we performed physiological and proteome analyses of Brassica napus seedlings pretreated with 245 mM NaCl or 25% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 under identical osmotic pressure (-1.0 MPa). Significant decreases in water content and photosynthetic rate and excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes and oxidative damage were observed in response to both stresses. Unexpectedly, the drought response was more severe than the salt response. We further identified 45 common differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), 143 salt-specific DEPs and 160 drought-specific DEPs by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. The proteome quantitative data were then confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The differences in the proteomic profiles between drought-treated and salt-treated seedlings exceeded the similarities in the early stress responses. Signal perception and transduction, transport and membrane trafficking, and photosynthesis-related proteins were enriched as part of the molecular cross-talk and specificity mechanism in the early responses to the two abiotic stresses. The Ca2+ signaling, G protein-related signaling, 14-3-3 signaling pathway and phosphorylation cascades were the common signal transduction pathways shared by both salt and drought stress responses; however, the proteins with executive functions varied. These results indicate functional specialization of family proteins in response to different stresses, i.e., CDPK21, TPR, and CTR1 specific to phosphorylation cascades under early salt stress, whereas STN7 and BSL were specific to phosphorylation cascades under early drought stress. Only the calcium-binding EF-hand family protein and ZKT were clearly identified as signaling proteins that acted as cross-talk nodes for salt and drought signaling pathways. Our study provides new clues and insights for developing strategies to

  16. Elucidation of Cross-Talk and Specificity of Early Response Mechanisms to Salt and PEG-Simulated Drought Stresses in Brassica napus Using Comparative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Junling; Tang, Shaohua; Peng, Xiaojue; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Xinhua; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cross-talk and specificity of the early responses of plants to salt and drought, we performed physiological and proteome analyses of Brassica napus seedlings pretreated with 245 mM NaCl or 25% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 under identical osmotic pressure (-1.0 MPa). Significant decreases in water content and photosynthetic rate and excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes and oxidative damage were observed in response to both stresses. Unexpectedly, the drought response was more severe than the salt response. We further identified 45 common differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), 143 salt-specific DEPs and 160 drought-specific DEPs by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. The proteome quantitative data were then confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The differences in the proteomic profiles between drought-treated and salt-treated seedlings exceeded the similarities in the early stress responses. Signal perception and transduction, transport and membrane trafficking, and photosynthesis-related proteins were enriched as part of the molecular cross-talk and specificity mechanism in the early responses to the two abiotic stresses. The Ca2+ signaling, G protein-related signaling, 14-3-3 signaling pathway and phosphorylation cascades were the common signal transduction pathways shared by both salt and drought stress responses; however, the proteins with executive functions varied. These results indicate functional specialization of family proteins in response to different stresses, i.e., CDPK21, TPR, and CTR1 specific to phosphorylation cascades under early salt stress, whereas STN7 and BSL were specific to phosphorylation cascades under early drought stress. Only the calcium-binding EF-hand family protein and ZKT were clearly identified as signaling proteins that acted as cross-talk nodes for salt and drought signaling pathways. Our study provides new clues and insights for developing strategies to

  17. Selective transduction of astrocytic and neuronal CNS subpopulations by lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Chikungunya virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Dieringer, Michael; Poh, Xuan Ying; Sanchez-Garrido, Julia; Gao, Yunan; Sgourou, Argyro; Simmons, Laura E; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2017-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors are gene delivery vehicles that integrate into the host genome of dividing and non-dividing mammalian cells facilitating long-term transgene expression. Lentiviral vector versatility is greatly increased by incorporating heterologous viral envelope proteins onto the vector particles instead of the native envelope, conferring on these pseudotyped vectors a modified tropism and host range specificity. We investigated the pseudotyping efficiency of HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors with alphaviral envelope proteins from the Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV-G) and Sindbis Virus (SINV-G). Following vector production optimisation, titres for the CHIKV-G pseudotype were comparable to the VSV-G pseudotype but those for the SINV-G pseudotype were significantly lower. High titre CHIKV-G pseudotyped vector efficiently transduced various human and mouse neural cell lines and normal human astrocytes (NHA) in vitro. Although transduction was broad, tropism for NHAs was observed. In vivo stereotaxic delivery in striatum, thalamus and hippocampus respectively in the adult rat brain revealed localised transduction restricted to striatal astrocytes and hippocampal dentate granule neurons. Transduction of different subtypes of granule neurons from precursor to post-mitotic stages of differentiation was evident in the sub-granular zone and dentate granule cell layer. No significant inflammatory response was observed, but comparable to that of VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors. Robust long-term expression followed for three months post-transduction along with absence of neuroinflammation, coupled to the selective and unique neuron/glial tropism indicates that these vectors could be useful for modelling and gene therapy studies in the CNS.

  18. Sensory cilia and integration of signal transduction in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Lotte B; Schneider, Linda; Satir, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The primary cilium is a hallmark of mammalian tissue cells. Recent research has shown that these organelles display unique sets of selected signal transduction modules including receptors, ion channels, effector proteins and transcription factors that relay chemical and physical stimuli from the extracellular environment in order to control basic cellular processes during embryonic and postnatal development, as well as in tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Consequently, defects in building of the cilium or in transport or function of ciliary signal proteins are associated with a series of pathologies, including developmental disorders and cancer. In this review, we highlight recent examples of the mechanisms by which signal components are selectively targeted and transported to the ciliary membrane and we present an overview of the signal transduction pathways associated with primary and motile cilia in vertebrate cells, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRalpha), hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways. Finally, we discuss the functions of these cilia-associated signal transduction pathways and their role in human health and development.

  19. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2010-04-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a negative gravitactic behavior. This is based on physiological mechanisms which in the past have been indirectly assessed. Meanwhile, it was possible to isolate genes involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. The DNA sequences of five calmodulins were found in Euglena, one of which was only known in its protein structure (CaM.1); the other four are new. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of CaM.1-CaM.5 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to determine their involvement in the gravitactic signal transduction chain. RNAi of CaM.1 inhibits free swimming of the cells and pronounced cell-form aberrations. The division of cells was also hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Blockage of CaM.3 to CaM. 5 did not impair gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of CaM.2 has only a transient and not pronounced influence on motility and cell form, but leads to a total loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days. This indicates that CaM.2 is an element in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in E. gracilis. The results are discussed with regard to the current working model of gravitaxis in E. gracilis.

  20. Comparing dynamic connective tissue in echinoderms and sponges: morphological and mechanical aspects and environmental sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sugni, Michela; Fassini, Dario; Barbaglio, Alice; Biressi, Anna; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Tricarico, Serena; Bonasoro, Francesco; Wilkie, Iain C; Candia Carnevali, Maria Daniela

    2014-02-01

    Echinoderms and sponges share a unique feature that helps them face predators and other environmental pressures. They both possess collagenous tissues with adaptable viscoelastic properties. In terms of morphology these structures are typical connective tissues containing collagen fibrils, fibroblast- and fibroclast-like cells, as well as unusual components such as, in echinoderms, neurosecretory-like cells that receive motor innervation. The mechanisms underpinning the adaptability of these tissues are not completely understood. Biomechanical changes can lead to an abrupt increase in stiffness (increasing protection against predation) or to the detachment of body parts (in response to a predator or to adverse environmental conditions) that are regenerated. Apart from these advantages, the responsiveness of echinoderm and sponge collagenous tissues to ionic composition and temperature makes them potentially vulnerable to global environmental changes.

  1. Comparative Role of Disc Degeneration and Ligament Failure on Functional Mechanics of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Shaw, Miranda N.; Giambini, Hugo; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spinal kinematics is essential for distinguishing between pathological conditions of spine disorders, which ultimately lead to low back pain. It’s of high importance to understand how changes in mechanical properties affect the response of the lumbar spine, specifically in an effort to differentiate those associated with disc degeneration from ligamentous changes, allowing for more precise treatment strategies. To do this the goals of this study were twofold: 1) develop and validate a finite element (FE) model of the lumbar spine and 2) systematically alter the properties of the intervertebral disc and ligaments to define respective roles in functional mechanics. A three-dimensional non-linear FE model of the lumbar spine (L3-Sacrum) was developed and validated for pure moment bending. Disc degeneration and sequential ligament failure was modeled. Intersegmental range of motion (ROM) and bending stiffness was measured. The prediction of the FE model to moment loading in all three planes of bending showed very good agreement, where global and intersegmental ROM and bending stiffness of the model fell within one standard deviation of the in vitro results. Degeneration decreased ROM for all directions. Stiffness increased for all directions except axial rotation, where it initially increased then decreased for moderate and severe degeneration, respectively. Incremental ligament failure produced increased ROM and decreased stiffness. This effect was much more pronounced for all directions except lateral bending, which is minimally impacted by ligaments. These results indicate that lateral bending may be more apt to detect the subtle changes associated with degeneration, without being masked by associated changes of surrounding stabilizing structures. PMID:26404463

  2. Elementary signaling modes predict the essentiality of signal transduction network components

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding how signals propagate through signaling pathways and networks is a central goal in systems biology. Quantitative dynamic models help to achieve this understanding, but are difficult to construct and validate because of the scarcity of known mechanistic details and kinetic parameters. Structural and qualitative analysis is emerging as a feasible and useful alternative for interpreting signal transduction. Results In this work, we present an integrative computational method for evaluating the essentiality of components in signaling networks. This approach expands an existing signaling network to a richer representation that incorporates the positive or negative nature of interactions and the synergistic behaviors among multiple components. Our method simulates both knockout and constitutive activation of components as node disruptions, and takes into account the possible cascading effects of a node's disruption. We introduce the concept of elementary signaling mode (ESM), as the minimal set of nodes that can perform signal transduction independently. Our method ranks the importance of signaling components by the effects of their perturbation on the ESMs of the network. Validation on several signaling networks describing the immune response of mammals to bacteria, guard cell abscisic acid signaling in plants, and T cell receptor signaling shows that this method can effectively uncover the essentiality of components mediating a signal transduction process and results in strong agreement with the results of Boolean (logical) dynamic models and experimental observations. Conclusions This integrative method is an efficient procedure for exploratory analysis of large signaling and regulatory networks where dynamic modeling or experimental tests are impractical. Its results serve as testable predictions, provide insights into signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms and can guide targeted computational or experimental follow-up studies. The

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analyses Reveal a Special Glucosinolate Metabolism Mechanism in Brassica alboglabra Sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rongfang; Huang, Zhongkai; Deng, Yanping; Chen, Xiaodong; XuHan, Xu; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2016-01-01

    Brassica sprouts contain abundant phytochemicals, especially glucosinolates (GSs). Various methods have been used to enhance GS content in sprouts. However, the molecular basis of GS metabolism in sprouts remains an open question. Here we employed RNA-seq analysis to compare the transcriptomes of high-GS (JL-08) and low-GS (JL-09) Brassica alboglabra sprouts. Paired-end Illumina RNA-seq reads were generated and mapped to the Brassica oleracea reference genome. The differentially expressed genes were analyzed between JL-08 and JL-09. Among these, 1477 genes were up-regulated and 1239 down-regulated in JL-09 compared with JL-08. Enrichment analysis of these differentially expressed genes showed that the GS biosynthesis had the smallest enrichment factor and the highest Q-value of all metabolic pathways in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, indicating the main metabolic difference between JL-08 and JL-09 is the GS biosynthetic pathway. Thirty-seven genes of the sequenced data were annotated as putatively involved in GS biosynthesis, degradation, and regulation, of which 11 were differentially expressed in JL-08 and JL-09. The expression level of GS degradation enzyme myrosinase in high-GS JL-08 was lower compared with low-GS JL-09. Surprisingly, in high-GS JL-08, the expression levels of GS biosynthesis genes were also lower than those in low-GS JL-09. As the GS contents in sprouts are determined by dynamic equilibrium of seed stored GS mobilization, de novo synthesis, degradation, and extra transport, the result of this study leads us to suggest that efforts to increase GS content should focus on either raising GS content in seeds or decreasing myrosinase activity, rather than improving the expression level of GS biosynthesis genes in sprouts. PMID:27757119

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Reception and Perireception in Crustacean Chemoreception: A Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Kozma, Mihika T; Senatore, Adriano; Schmidt, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    This review summarizes our present knowledge of chemoreceptor proteins in crustaceans, using a comparative perspective to review these molecules in crustaceans relative to other metazoan models of chemoreception including mammals, insects, nematodes, and molluscs. Evolution has resulted in unique expansions of specific gene families and repurposing of them for chemosensation in various clades, including crustaceans. A major class of chemoreceptor proteins across crustaceans is the Ionotropic Receptors, which diversified from ionotropic glutamate receptors in ancient protostomes but which are not present in deuterostomes. Representatives of another major class of chemoreceptor proteins-the Grl/GR/OR family of ionotropic 7-transmembrane receptors-are diversified in insects but to date have been reported in only one crustacean species, Daphnia pulex So far, canonic 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors, the principal chemoreceptors in vertebrates and reported in a few protostome clades, have not been identified in crustaceans. More types of chemoreceptors are known throughout the metazoans and might well be expected to be discovered in crustaceans. Our review also provides a comparative coverage of perireceptor events in crustacean chemoreception, including molecules involved in stimulus acquisition, stimulus delivery, and stimulus removal, though much less is known about these events in crustaceans, particularly at the molecular level.

  5. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E.; Yin, Hang; Crowley, Michael F.; Bomble, Yannick J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions. PMID:26741367

  6. Comparing residue clusters from thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes reveals adaptive mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E.; Yin, Hang; Crowley, Michael F.; Bomble, Yannick J.

    2016-01-07

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. As a result, the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  7. Comparing residue clusters from thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes reveals adaptive mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E.; ...

    2016-01-07

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research.more » Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. As a result, the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.« less

  8. Comparative transcriptional profiling and preliminary study on heterosis mechanism of super-hybrid rice.

    PubMed

    Song, Gui-Sheng; Zhai, Hong-Li; Peng, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Gang; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Xiao, Yu-Guo; Wang, Lili; Chen, Yue-Jun; Wu, Bin; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Hua; Feng, Xiu-Jing; Gong, Wan-Kui; Liu, Yao; Yin, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Feng; Liu, Guo-Zhen; Xu, Hong-Lin; Wei, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Hankemeier, Thomas; Reijmers, Theo; van der Heijden, Rob; Lu, Cong-Ming; Wang, Mei; van der Greef, Jan; Zhu, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Heterosis is a biological phenomenon whereby the offspring from two parents show improved and superior performance than either inbred parental lines. Hybrid rice is one of the most successful apotheoses in crops utilizing heterosis. Transcriptional profiling of F(1) super-hybrid rice Liangyou-2186 and its parents by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) revealed 1183 differentially expressed genes (DGs), among which DGs were found significantly enriched in pathways such as photosynthesis and carbon-fixation, and most of the key genes involved in the carbon-fixation pathway exhibited up-regulated expression in F(1) hybrid rice. Moreover, increased catabolic activity of corresponding enzymes and photosynthetic efficiency were also detected, which combined to indicate that carbon fixation is enhanced in F(1) hybrid, and might probably be associated with the yield vigor and heterosis in super-hybrid rice. By correlating DGs with yield-related quantitative trait loci (QTL), a potential relationship between differential gene expression and phenotypic changes was also found. In addition, a regulatory network involving circadian-rhythms and light signaling pathways was also found, as previously reported in Arabidopsis, which suggest that such a network might also be related with heterosis in hybrid rice. Altogether, the present study provides another view for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying heterosis in rice.

  9. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling and Preliminary Study on Heterosis Mechanism of Super-Hybrid Rice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui-Sheng; Zhai, Hong-Li; Peng, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Gang; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Xiao, Yu-Guo; Wang, Lili; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Xiu-Jing; Gong, Wan-Kui; Liu, Yao; Yin, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Feng; Liu, Guo-Zhen; Xu, Hong-Lin; Wei, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Reijmers, Theo; van der Heijden, Rob; Wang, Mei; van der Greef, Jan; Zhu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Heterosis is a biological phenomenon whereby the offspring from two parents show improved and superior performance than either inbred parental lines. Hybrid rice is one of the most successful apotheoses in crops utilizing heterosis. Transcriptional profiling of F1 super-hybrid rice Liangyou-2186 and its parents by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) revealed 1183 differentially expressed genes (DGs), among which DGs were found significantly enriched in pathways such as photosynthesis and carbon-fixation, and most of the key genes involved in the carbon-fixation pathway exhibited up-regulated expression in F1 hybrid rice. Moreover, increased catabolic activity of corresponding enzymes and photosynthetic efficiency were also detected, which combined to indicate that carbon fixation is enhanced in F1 hybrid, and might probably be associated with the yield vigor and heterosis in super-hybrid rice. By correlating DGs with yield-related quantitative trait loci (QTL), a potential relationship between differential gene expression and phenotypic changes was also found. In addition, a regulatory network involving circadian-rhythms and light signaling pathways was also found, as previously reported in Arabidopsis, which suggest that such a network might also be related with heterosis in hybrid rice. Altogether, the present study provides another view for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying heterosis in rice. PMID:20729474

  10. Comparative population genetics of two invading ticks: Evidence of the ecological mechanisms underlying tick range expansions.

    PubMed

    Nadolny, Robyn; Gaff, Holly; Carlsson, Jens; Gauthier, David

    2015-10-01

    Two species of ixodid tick, Ixodes affinis Neumann and Amblyomma maculatum Koch, are simultaneously expanding their ranges throughout the mid-Atlantic region of the US. Although we have some understanding of the ecology and life history of these species, the ecological mechanisms governing where and how new populations establish and persist are unclear. To assess population connectivity and ancestry, we sequenced a fragment of the 16S mitochondrial rRNA gene from a representative sample of individuals of both species from populations throughout the eastern US. We found that despite overlapping host preferences throughout ontogeny, each species exhibited very different genetic and geographic patterns of population establishment and connectivity. I. affinis was of two distinct mitochondrial clades, with a clear geographic break separating northern and southern populations. Both I. affinis populations showed evidence of recent expansion, although the southern population was more genetically diverse, indicating a longer history of establishment. A. maculatum exhibited diverse haplotypes that showed no significant relationship with geographic patterns and little apparent connectivity between sites. Heteroplasmy was also observed in the 16S mitochondrial rRNA gene in 3.5% of A. maculatum individuals. Genetic evidence suggests that these species rely on different key life stages to successfully disperse into novel environments, and that host vagility, habitat stability and habitat connectivity all play critical roles in the establishment of new tick populations.

  11. Comparative study of the molecular mechanisms of oocyte maturation in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, N; Mita, K; Yamashita, M

    2000-06-01

    Maturation-promoting factor (MPF), a complex of Cdc2 and cyclin B, is the final inducer of oocyte maturation. Its activity is controlled by inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2 on Tyr15/Thr14 and activating phosphorylation on Thr161. Full-grown immature oocytes of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis contain inactive MPF (pre-MPF) that comprises cyclin B-bound Cdc2 phosphorylated on Tyr15/Thr14 and Thr161. The synthesis of Mos, but not cyclin B, after stimulation by the maturation-inducing steroid progesterone, is believed to be necessary for initiating Xenopus oocyte maturation through Tyr15/Thr14 dephosphorylation of pre-MPF. In contrast, amphibians other than Xenopus (and also fishes) employ a different mechanism. Full-grown immature oocytes of these species contain monomeric Cdc2 but not cyclin B. MPF is formed after hormonal stimulation by binding of the newly produced cyclin B to the pre-existing Cdc2 and is immediately activated through Thr161 phosphorylation. Mos/MAP kinase is neither necessary nor sufficient for initiating maturation in fishes and amphibians except for Xenopus. We propose a new model of MPF formation and activation during oocyte maturation that is applicable to all amphibians (as well as fishes), based on a novel concept that pre-MPF is an artificial molecule that is not essential for inducing oocyte maturation.

  12. Complex molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice revealed by comparative transcriptome and metabolomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Sheng; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Min; Huang, Li-Yu; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Yan-Ru; Fu, Bin-Ying; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2016-01-01

    To understand the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.), the phenotypic, metabolic, and transcriptome responses of two related rice genotypes, IR64 and PL177, with contrasting salt tolerance were characterized under salt stress and salt+abscisic acid (ABA) conditions. PL177 showed significantly less salt damage, lower Na+/K+ ratios in shoots, and Na+ translocation from roots to shoots, attributed largely to better salt exclusion from its roots and salt compartmentation of its shoots. Exogenous ABA was able to enhance the salt tolerance of IR64 by selectively decreasing accumulation of Na+ in its roots and increasing K+ in its shoots. Salt stress induced general and organ-specific increases of many primary metabolites in both rice genotypes, with strong accumulation of several sugars plus proline in shoots and allantoin in roots. This was due primarily to ABA-mediated repression of genes for degradation of these metabolites under salt. In PL177, salt specifically up-regulated genes involved in several pathways underlying salt tolerance, including ABA-mediated cellular lipid and fatty acid metabolic processes and cytoplasmic transport, sequestration by vacuoles, detoxification and cell-wall remodeling in shoots, and oxidation–reduction reactions in roots. Combined genetic and transcriptomic evidence shortlisted relatively few candidate genes for improved salt tolerance in PL177. PMID:26512058

  13. The structural stabilities, mechanical properties and hardness of chromium tetraboride: Compared with low-B borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ming-Min; Huang, Cheng; Tian, Chun-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, we provide a systemic understanding of the structural features and phase stability, mechanical and electronic properties, as well as the roles of boron (B) atom arrangement in the hardness for chromium borides. The structural and relative energy searches together with formation enthalpy confirm the most stable Cr2B with an orthorhombic Fddd symmetry, CrB with an orthorhombic Cmcm symmetry, CrB2 with a hexagonal P63/mmc symmetry and chromium tetraboride (CrB4) with an orthorhombic Pnnm symmetry. The shear modulus, Young’s modulus and C44 increase with the boron content, while the Poisson’s ratio and B/G ratio have an opposite tendency. Moreover, due to higher B content, strong three-dimensional (3D) covalent B networks and lower metallic contribution, CrB4 with Pnnm symmetry has the largest hardness value (46.8 GPa), exceeding the superhard limit, indicating its superhard nature.

  14. Comparative Analysis of the Tour Jete and Aerial with Detailed Analysis of Aerial Takeoff Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Mimi; Coplin, Kim

    2006-10-01

    Whether internally as muscle tension or from external sources, forces are necessary for all motion. This research focused on athletic rotations where conditions of flight are established during takeoff. By studying reaction forces that produce torques, moments of inertia, and linear and angular differences between distinct rotations around different principle axes of the body (tour jete in ballet - longitudinal axis; aerial in gymnastics - anteroposterior axis), and by looking at the values of angular momentum in the specific mechanics of aerial takeoff, we can gain insight into possible causes of injury, flaws in technique and limitations of athletes. Results showed significant differences in the horizontal and vertical components of takeoff between the tour jete and the aerial, and a realization that torque was produced in different biomechanical planes. Both rotations showed braking forces before takeoff to counteract forward momentum and increase vertical lift, but the angle of applied force varied, and the horizontal components of velocity and force and vertical velocity as well as moment of inertia throughout flight were consistently greater for the aerial. Breakdown of aerial takeoff highlighted the relative importance of the takeoff phases, showing that completion depends fundamentally upon the rotation of the rear foot and torso twisting during takeoff rather than the last foot in contact with the ground.

  15. Complex molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice revealed by comparative transcriptome and metabolomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Sheng; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Min; Huang, Li-Yu; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Yan-Ru; Fu, Bin-Ying; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2016-01-01

    To understand the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.), the phenotypic, metabolic, and transcriptome responses of two related rice genotypes, IR64 and PL177, with contrasting salt tolerance were characterized under salt stress and salt+abscisic acid (ABA) conditions. PL177 showed significantly less salt damage, lower Na(+)/K(+) ratios in shoots, and Na(+) translocation from roots to shoots, attributed largely to better salt exclusion from its roots and salt compartmentation of its shoots. Exogenous ABA was able to enhance the salt tolerance of IR64 by selectively decreasing accumulation of Na(+) in its roots and increasing K(+) in its shoots. Salt stress induced general and organ-specific increases of many primary metabolites in both rice genotypes, with strong accumulation of several sugars plus proline in shoots and allantoin in roots. This was due primarily to ABA-mediated repression of genes for degradation of these metabolites under salt. In PL177, salt specifically up-regulated genes involved in several pathways underlying salt tolerance, including ABA-mediated cellular lipid and fatty acid metabolic processes and cytoplasmic transport, sequestration by vacuoles, detoxification and cell-wall remodeling in shoots, and oxidation-reduction reactions in roots. Combined genetic and transcriptomic evidence shortlisted relatively few candidate genes for improved salt tolerance in PL177.

  16. Comparable mechanisms of working memory interference by auditory and visual motion in youth and aging.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Jyoti; Zanto, Theodore; Nilakantan, Aneesha; Gazzaley, Adam

    2013-08-01

    Intrasensory interference during visual working memory (WM) maintenance by object stimuli (such as faces and scenes), has been shown to negatively impact WM performance, with greater detrimental impacts of interference observed in aging. Here we assessed age-related impacts by intrasensory WM interference from lower-level stimulus features such as visual and auditory motion stimuli. We consistently found that interference in the form of ignored distractions and secondary task interruptions presented during a WM maintenance period, degraded memory accuracy in both the visual and auditory domain. However, in contrast to prior studies assessing WM for visual object stimuli, feature-based interference effects were not observed to be significantly greater in older adults. Analyses of neural oscillations in the alpha frequency band further revealed preserved mechanisms of interference processing in terms of post-stimulus alpha suppression, which was observed maximally for secondary task interruptions in visual and auditory modalities in both younger and older adults. These results suggest that age-related sensitivity of WM to interference may be limited to complex object stimuli, at least at low WM loads.

  17. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R L; Ashley, C S

    1980-01-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about 1.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodecyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks. PMID:6250474

  18. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.L.; Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about l.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodcyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks.

  19. Mechanical properties and microstructures of China low activation martensitic steel compared with JLF-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Huang, Q.; Wu, Y.; Nagasaka, T.; Muroga, T.

    2007-08-01

    The tensile and impact properties of CLAM steel are compared to those of JLF-1 steel. Tensile testing revealed that the ultimate and yield strengths of the CLAM steel are 670 MPa and 512 MPa at room temperature, and 373 MPa and 327 MPa at 873 K, respectively. These values are higher than those measured for JLF-1. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of CLAM was found to be 171 K using one-third size Charpy V-notch specimens, which is 16 K lower than that of JLF-1. Microstructural analysis by SEM and TEM indicated that the prior austenite grain size and lath width for CLAM are smaller than those for JLF-1. The finer grain and lath structure is considered to be one of the main reasons for the higher strength and lower DBTT of the CLAM steel.

  20. A Comparative Study of the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Hydrogen Using Data Mining Research Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settouti, Nadera; Aourag, Hafid

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen was the first element to exist in the universe. It is the lightest and simplest element, but chemists do not agree about its placement in the periodic table; its position has given rise to much confusion. Metallization of hydrogen under high pressure influences its properties and its placement in the periodic table. The properties of groups I, IV, and VII are investigated, and are then compared to those of hydrogen. In this study, we present a data mining approach to determine models and discover the similarities included in the datasets. Principal component analysis and partial least squares regression were applied as data analysis techniques in order to explore multivariate data. Our results indicate that hydrogen shares some properties with certain elements and groups in the periodic table, such as carbon group elements, but not entirely, because hydrogen is still considered as an element that is special and apart.

  1. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  2. The octopus: a model for a comparative analysis of the evolution of learning and memory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hochner, Binyamin; Shomrat, Tal; Fiorito, Graziano

    2006-06-01

    Comparative analysis of brain function in invertebrates with sophisticated behaviors, such as the octopus, may advance our understanding of the evolution of the neural processes that mediate complex behaviors. Until the last few years, this approach was infeasible due to the lack of neurophysiological tools for testing the neural circuits mediating learning and memory in the brains of octopus and other cephalopods. Now, for the first time, the adaptation of modern neurophysiological methods to the study of the central nervous system of the octopus allows this avenue of research. The emerging results suggest that a convergent evolutionary process has led to the selection of vertebrate-like neural organization and activity-dependent long-term synaptic plasticity. As octopuses and vertebrates are very remote phylogenetically, this convergence suggests the importance of the shared properties for the mediation of learning and memory.

  3. Antitumor Activity of Tenacissoside H on Esophageal Cancer through Arresting Cell Cycle and Regulating PI3K/Akt-NF-κB Transduction Cascade.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yong-Sen; Hu, Xue-Qin; Gabriella, Hegyi; Qin, Li-Juan; Meggyeshazi, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of tenacissoside H (TDH) inhibiting esophageal carcinoma infiltration and proliferation. Methods. In vitro, EC9706 cells were treated with TDH. Cells proliferation and cell cycle were assayed. PI3K and NF-κB mRNAs expression were determined by real time PCR. In vivo, model of nude mice with tumor was established. Mice were treated with TDH. Inhibition ratio of tumor volume was calculated. PCNA expression was examined. Protein expression in PI3K/Akt-NF-κB signaling pathway was determined. Results. In vitro, TDH significantly inhibited cells proliferation in a time-and-dose-dependent manner. TDH arrested the cell cycle in S phase and significantly inhibited PI3K and NF-κB mRNA expression, compared with blank controlled group (P < 0.05). In vivo, TDH strongly inhibits tumor growth and volume. PCNA expression was significantly decreased after treatment of TDH. TDH downregulated proteins expression in PI3K/Akt-NF-κB transduction cascade (P < 0.05). Conclusion. TDH inhibited esophageal carcinoma infiltration and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The anticancer activity has relation to arresting the cell cycle at the S phase, inhibited the PCNA expression of transplanted tumors in nude mice, and regulated the protein expression in the PI3K/Akt-NF-κB transduction cascade.

  4. Evolutionary mechanisms of rib loss in anurans: a comparative developmental approach.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M J; Sanchiz, B

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT The presence of free ribs is presumed to be a primitive morphological character observed only in a few families of Recent anurans, whereas the absence of ribs has been considered to be a derived condition that is widespread within this order. A comparative study of rib development based on representatives of several anuran lineages (Alytes, Bombina, Bufo, Discoglossus, Hyla, Pelobates, Pelodytes, Rana, and Xenopus) reveals a previously undetected diversity of developmental features in the formation and interaction between neural arches and ribs. The absence of free ribs at premetamorphic or later stages is verified in some groups, but we present for the first time evidence of the existence of larval rib rudiments in others, both in the anterior (Rana, Hyla) and posterior (Bufo, Discoglossus, Pelobates) presacral regions. Heterochrony seems to have played a major role in the processes underlying rib reduction. The intracolumnar differences between anterior (V(2)-V(4)) and posterior (V(5)-V(8)) regions are based on perturbations in the timing of early differentiation. Furthermore, a clear shift in the relative timing of ossification among evolutionary lineages was detected. In this respect Xenopus has a highly derived condition. The use of the morphological character of "rib loss" in phylogenetic analyses must be reconsidered due to the different convergent developmental paths described here. The phylogenetic analysis of a "sequence units" matrix of rib development is compared with current anuran phylogenies. Some evolutionary information appears to be clearly present in the ontogenetic data of this "missing morphology," but its value for evolutionary inferences is rather limited.

  5. Comparative study of electron transport mechanisms in epitaxial and polycrystalline zinc nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiang; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Naoomi

    2016-01-01

    Zn3N2 has been reported to have high electron mobility even in polycrystalline films. The high mobility in polycrystalline films is a striking feature as compared with group-III nitrides. However, the origins of the high mobility have not been elucidated to date. In this paper, we discuss the reason for high mobility in Zn3N2. We grew epitaxial and polycrystalline films of Zn3N2. Electron effective mass (m*) was determined optically and found to decrease with a decrease in electron density. Using a nonparabolic conduction band model, the m* at the bottom of the conduction band was derived to be (0.08 ± 0.03)m0 (m0 denotes the free electron mass), which is comparable to that in InN. Optically determined intra-grain mobility (μopt) in the polycrystalline films was higher than 110 cm2 V-1 s-1, resulting from the small m*. The Hall mobility (μH) in the polycrystalline films was significantly smaller than μopt, indicating that electron transport is impeded by scattering at the grain boundaries. Nevertheless, μH higher than 70 cm2 V-1 s-1 was achievable owing to the beneficial effect of the high μopt. As for the epitaxial films, we revealed that electron transport is hardly affected by grain boundary scattering and is governed solely by ionized impurity scattering. The findings in this study suggest that Zn3N2 is a high-mobility semiconductor with small effective mass.

  6. Comparative study of electron transport mechanisms in epitaxial and polycrystalline zinc nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiang; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Naoomi

    2016-01-14

    Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2} has been reported to have high electron mobility even in polycrystalline films. The high mobility in polycrystalline films is a striking feature as compared with group-III nitrides. However, the origins of the high mobility have not been elucidated to date. In this paper, we discuss the reason for high mobility in Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}. We grew epitaxial and polycrystalline films of Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}. Electron effective mass (m*) was determined optically and found to decrease with a decrease in electron density. Using a nonparabolic conduction band model, the m* at the bottom of the conduction band was derived to be (0.08 ± 0.03)m{sub 0} (m{sub 0} denotes the free electron mass), which is comparable to that in InN. Optically determined intra-grain mobility (μ{sub opt}) in the polycrystalline films was higher than 110 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, resulting from the small m*. The Hall mobility (μ{sub H}) in the polycrystalline films was significantly smaller than μ{sub opt}, indicating that electron transport is impeded by scattering at the grain boundaries. Nevertheless, μ{sub H} higher than 70 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} was achievable owing to the beneficial effect of the high μ{sub opt}. As for the epitaxial films, we revealed that electron transport is hardly affected by grain boundary scattering and is governed solely by ionized impurity scattering. The findings in this study suggest that Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2} is a high-mobility semiconductor with small effective mass.

  7. Comparative chloroplast genomes of pinaceae: insights into the mechanism of diversified genomic organizations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Lin, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Chi-Yao; Wang, Rui-Jiang; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2011-01-01

    Pinaceae, the largest family of conifers, has diversified organizations of chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) with the two typical inverted repeats (IRs) highly reduced. To unravel the mechanism of this genomic diversification, we examined the cpDNA organizations from 53 species of the ten Pinaceous genera, including those of Larix decidua (122,474 bp), Picea morrisonicola (124,168 bp), and Pseudotsuga wilsoniana (122,513 bp), which were firstly elucidated. The results uncovered four distinct cpDNA forms (A-C and P) that are due to rearrangements of two ∼20 and ∼21 kb specific fragments. The C form was documented for the first time and the A form might be the most ancestral one. In addition, only the individuals of Ps. macrocarpa and Ps. wilsoniana were detected to have isomeric cpDNA forms. Three types (types 1-3) of Pinaceae-specific repeats situated nearby the rearranged fragments were found to be syntenic. We hypothesize that type 1 (949 ± 343 bp) and type 3 (608 ± 73 bp) repeats are substrates for homologous recombination (HR), whereas type 2 repeats are likely inactive for HR because of their relatively short sizes (151 ± 30 bp). Conversions among the four distinct forms may be achieved by HR and mediated by type 1 or 3 repeats, thus resulting in increased diversity of cpDNA organizations. We propose that in the Pinaceae cpDNAs, the reduced IRs have lost HR activity, then decreasing the diversity of cpDNA organizations, but the specific repeats that the evolution endowed Pinaceae complement the reduced IRs and increase the diversity of cpDNA organizations.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Latex Transcriptome Reveals Putative Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Super Productivity of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heping; Fan, Yujie; Yang, Jianghua; Qi, Jiyan; Li, Huibo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demand for natural rubber prompts studies into the mechanisms governing the productivity of rubber tree (Heveabrasiliensis). It is very interesting to notice that a rubber tree of clone PR107 in Yunnan, China is reported to yield more than 20 times higher than the average rubber tree. This super-high-yielding (SHY) rubber tree (designated as SY107), produced 4.12 kg of latex (cytoplasm of rubber producing laticifers, containing about 30% of rubber) per tapping, more than 7-fold higher than that of the control. This rubber tree is therefore a good material to study how the rubber production is regulated at a molecular aspect. A comprehensive cDNA-AFLP transcript profiling was performed on the latex of SY107 and its average counterparts by using the 384 selective primer pairs for two restriction enzyme combinations (ApoI/MseI and TaqI/MseI). A total of 746 differentially expressed (DE) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were identified, of which the expression patterns of 453 TDFs were further confirmed by RT-PCR. These RT-PCR confirmed TDFs represented 352 non-redundant genes, of which 215 had known or partially known functions and were grouped into 10 functional categories. The top three largest categories were transcription and protein synthesis (representing 24.7% of the total genes), defense and stress (15.3%), and primary and secondary metabolism (14.0%). Detailed analysis of the DE-genes suggests notable characteristics of SHY phenotype in improved sucrose loading capability, rubber biosynthesis-preferred sugar utilization, enhanced general metabolism and timely stress alleviation. However, the SHY phenotype has little correlation with rubber-biosynthesis pathway genes. PMID:24066172

  9. Comparative analysis of latex transcriptome reveals putative molecular mechanisms underlying super productivity of Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chaorong; Xiao, Xiaohu; Li, Heping; Fan, Yujie; Yang, Jianghua; Qi, Jiyan; Li, Huibo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demand for natural rubber prompts studies into the mechanisms governing the productivity of rubber tree (Heveabrasiliensis). It is very interesting to notice that a rubber tree of clone PR107 in Yunnan, China is reported to yield more than 20 times higher than the average rubber tree. This super-high-yielding (SHY) rubber tree (designated as SY107), produced 4.12 kg of latex (cytoplasm of rubber producing laticifers, containing about 30% of rubber) per tapping, more than 7-fold higher than that of the control. This rubber tree is therefore a good material to study how the rubber production is regulated at a molecular aspect. A comprehensive cDNA-AFLP transcript profiling was performed on the latex of SY107 and its average counterparts by using the 384 selective primer pairs for two restriction enzyme combinations (ApoI/MseI and TaqI/MseI). A total of 746 differentially expressed (DE) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were identified, of which the expression patterns of 453 TDFs were further confirmed by RT-PCR. These RT-PCR confirmed TDFs represented 352 non-redundant genes, of which 215 had known or partially known functions and were grouped into 10 functional categories. The top three largest categories were transcription and protein synthesis (representing 24.7% of the total genes), defense and stress (15.3%), and primary and secondary metabolism (14.0%). Detailed analysis of the DE-genes suggests notable characteristics of SHY phenotype in improved sucrose loading capability, rubber biosynthesis-preferred sugar utilization, enhanced general metabolism and timely stress alleviation. However, the SHY phenotype has little correlation with rubber-biosynthesis pathway genes.

  10. Comparing the symptoms and mechanisms of "dissociation" in dissociative identity disorder and borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Laddis, Andreas; Dell, Paul F; Korzekwa, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    A total of 75 patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised as having dissociative identity disorder (DID), and 100 patients were diagnosed with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality as having borderline personality disorder (BPD). Both groups were administered the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). DID patients had significantly higher MID scores than BPD patients, different distributions of MID scores, and different MID subscale profiles in 3 ranges of MID scores (0-15, 15-30, 30-45). The core MID symptoms-exhibited at all ranges of MID scores-for DID patients (the presence of alters, identity confusion, and memory problems) and BPD patients (flashbacks, identity confusion, and memory problems) were ostensibly similar but were considered to be mostly produced by different underlying processes. Multiple regression analyses showed that the core MID symptoms of DID patients had different predictors than did the core MID symptoms of BPD patients. Alter identities seemed to generate most-but not all-dissociative phenomena in DID patients, whereas only the 24% highest scoring BPD patients (MID ≥45) seemed to manifest alter-driven dissociative experiences. Most BPD dissociative experiences appeared to be due to 5 other mechanisms: (a) BPD-specific, stress-driven, rapid shifts of self-state; (b and c) nondefensive disruptions of the framework of perceptual organization with or without an accompanying BPD-specific, dissociation-like disintegration of affective/neurocognitive functioning; (d) a defensive distancing or detachment from distress (i.e., simple depersonalization); and (e) Allen, Console, and Lewis's (1999) severe absorptive detachment.

  11. Transduction of human primitive repopulating hematopoietic cells with lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34(+) peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34(+) cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34(+) cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45(+) cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37-45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the gamma-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the gamma-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector.

  12. New insights into transduction pathways that regulate boar sperm function.

    PubMed

    Hurtado de Llera, A; Martin-Hidalgo, D; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J; Bragado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Detailed molecular mechanisms mediating signal transduction cascades that regulate boar sperm function involving Ser/Thr and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins have been reviewed previously. Therefore, this review will focus in those kinase pathways identified recently (<10 years) in boar spermatozoa that regulate different functional spermatozoa processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cell energy sensor kinase that was first identified in mammalian spermatozoa in 2012, and since then it has emerged as an essential regulator of boar sperm function. Signaling pathways leading to AMPK activation in boar sperm are highlighted in this review (PKA, CaMKKα/β, and PKC as well as Ca(2+) and cAMP messengers as upstream regulators). Interestingly, stimuli considered as cell stress (hyperosmotic stress, inhibition of mitochondrial activity, absence of intracellular Ca(2+)) markedly activate AMPK in boar spermatozoa. Moreover, AMPK plays a remarkable and necessary regulatory role in mammalian sperm function, controlling essential boar sperm functional processes such as motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, organization and fluidity of plasma membrane, and outer acrosome membrane integrity. These mentioned processes are all required under fluctuating environment of spermatozoa when transiting through the female reproductive tract to achieve fertilization. An applied role of AMPK in artificial insemination techniques is also suggested as during boar seminal doses preservation at 17 °C, physiological levels of AMPK activity markedly increase (maximum on Day 7) and result essential to maintain the aforementioned fundamental sperm processes. Moreover, regulation of sperm function exerted by the glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Src family kinase pathways is summarized.

  13. Biomechanical Origins of Muscle Stem Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James B; Cheng, Richard Y; Davoudi, Sadegh; Gilbert, Penney M

    2016-04-10

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant and widespread tissue in the human body, contracts upon receiving electrochemical signals from the nervous system to support essential functions such as thermoregulation, limb movement, blinking, swallowing and breathing. Reconstruction of adult muscle tissue relies on a pool of mononucleate, resident muscle stem cells, known as "satellite cells", expressing the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 necessary for their specification during embryonic development and long-term maintenance during adult life. Satellite cells are located around the myofibres in a niche at the interface of the basal lamina and the host fibre plasma membrane (i.e., sarcolemma), at a very low frequency. Upon damage to the myofibres, quiescent satellite cells are activated and give rise to a population of transient amplifying myogenic progenitor cells, which eventually exit the cell cycle permanently and fuse to form new myofibres and regenerate the tissue. A subpopulation of satellite cells self-renew and repopulate the niche, poised to respond to future demands. Harnessing the potential of satellite cells relies on a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms guiding their regulation in vivo. Over the past several decades, studies revealed many signal transduction pathways responsible for satellite cell fate decisions, but the niche cues driving the activation and silencing of these pathways are less clear. Here we explore the scintillating possibility that considering the dynamic changes in the biophysical properties of the skeletal muscle, namely stiffness, and the stretch and shear forces to which a myofibre can be subjected to may provide missing information necessary to gain a full understanding of satellite cell niche regulation.

  14. Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Eloy; Hendricks, Eric; Menze, Michael A; Torres, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between O2 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of ATP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit.

  15. Serotype-dependent transduction efficiencies of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors in monkey neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Annelies; Vancraeyenest, Pascaline; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Michiels, Annelies; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Moons, Lieve; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle; Arckens, Lutgarde; Vanduffel, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Viral vector-mediated expression of genes (e.g., coding for opsins and designer receptors) has grown increasingly popular. Cell-type specific expression is achieved by altering viral vector tropism through crosspackaging or by cell-specific promoters driving gene expression. Detailed information about transduction properties of most recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) serotypes in macaque cortex is gradually becoming available. Here, we compare transduction efficiencies and expression patterns of reporter genes in two macaque neocortical areas employing different rAAV serotypes and promoters. A short version of the calmodulin-kinase-II (CaMKIIα0.4) promoter resulted in reporter gene expression in cortical neurons for all tested rAAVs, albeit with different efficiencies for spread: rAAV2/5>>rAAV2/7>rAAV2/8>rAAV2/9>>rAAV2/1 and proportion of transduced cells: rAAV2/1>rAAV2/5>rAAV2/7=rAAV2/9>rAAV2/8. In contrast to rodent studies, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter appeared least efficient in macaque cortex. The human synapsin-1 promoter preceded by the CMV enhancer (enhSyn1) produced homogeneous reporter gene expression across all layers, while two variants of the CaMKIIα promoter resulted in different laminar transduction patterns and cell specificities. Finally, differences in expression patterns were observed when the same viral vector was injected in two neocortical areas. Our results corroborate previous findings that reporter-gene expression patterns and efficiency of rAAV transduction depend on serotype, promoter, cortical layer, and area. PMID:26839901

  16. A Learning-Based CT Prostate Segmentation Method via Joint Transductive Feature Selection and Regression

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yinghuan; Gao, Yaozong; Liao, Shu; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2015-01-01

    In1 recent years, there has been a great interest in prostate segmentation, which is a important and challenging task for CT image guided radiotherapy. In this paper, a learning-based segmentation method via joint transductive feature selection and transductive regression is presented, which incorporates the physician’s simple manual specification (only taking a few seconds), to aid accurate segmentation, especially for the case with large irregular prostate motion. More specifically, for the current treatment image, experienced physician is first allowed to manually assign the labels for a small subset of prostate and non-prostate voxels, especially in the first and last slices of the prostate regions. Then, the proposed method follows the two step: in prostate-likelihood estimation step, two novel algorithms: tLasso and wLapRLS, will be sequentially employed for transductive feature selection and transductive regression, respectively, aiming to generate the prostate-likelihood map. In multi-atlases based label fusion step, the final segmentation result will be obtained according to the corresponding prostate-likelihood map and the previous images of the same patient. The proposed method has been substantially evaluated on a real prostate CT dataset including 24 patients with 330 CT images, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-arts in terms of higher Dice ratio, higher true positive fraction, and lower centroid distances. Also, the results demonstrate that simple manual specification can help improve the segmentation performance, which is clinically feasible in real practice. PMID:26752809

  17. Comparative effectiveness and molecular pharmacological mechanisms of antiallergic agents on experimental conjunctivitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, S; Merayo-Lloves, J; Zhao, T; Foster, C S

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of antiallergic agents in the treatment of experimental murine ragweed conjunctivitis. SWR/J mice were divided into eight groups: 1; normal controls (unmanipulated); 2, untreated; 3, lodoxamide; 4, cromolyn; 5, livocarbastine; 6, nedocromil; 7, buffer solution (BS); and 8, tetrandine (TDR). Groups 2-8 were exposed to ragweed pollen through topical application to conjunctival and nasal mucosa, followed by conjunctival challenge with the allergen. Allergic conjunctivitis was evaluated by scoring of the clinical signs and histopathology. mRNA gene expression of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in conjunctiva was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques. Exposed mice developed allergic conjunctivitis clinically and histologically that was modulated by topical lodoxamide, cromolyn, livocarbastine, or nedocromil eye drops or TDR intraperitoneally injected. Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that the drugs and TDR significantly reduced conjunctival eosinophil infiltration and the number of intact and degranulating mast cells. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA gene expression in conjunctiva of treated mice was inhibited compared with untreated and BS-treated controls. No IL-6 mRNA expression was observed even on the conjunctiva of the untreated mice. The antiallergic drugs and TDR exerted a similar action on the murine model of allergic conjunctivitis and demonstrated pharmacologic effectiveness on the conjunctival mRNA expression of cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha.

  18. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture

    PubMed Central

    Saisadan, D.; Manimaran, P.; Meenapriya, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. Acrylics: These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, and versatility. Composites: Composite provisional materials use bis-acryl resin, a hydrophobic material that is similar to bis-GMA. Composites are available as auto-polymerized, dualpolymerized and visible light polymerized. Preformed Crowns: Preformed provisional crowns or matrices usually consist of tooth-shaped shells of plastic, cellulose acetate or metal. They are commercially available in various tooth sizes and are usually selected for a particular tooth anatomy. They are commonly relined with acrylic resin to provide a more custom fit before cementation, but the plastic and metal crown shells can also be cemented directly onto prepared teeth. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to choose a material to serve as a better interim prosthesis and to compare three different properties – flexural strength, compressive strength, and color stability. Materials and Methods: The samples were made with three different provisional materials (Revotek LC, Protemp 4, TemSpan). Result: It was inferred from the study that no one material was superior in all three tested parameters. PMID:27829758

  19. Detoxification mechanisms in shrimp: comparative approach between hydrothermal vent fields and estuarine environments.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Serafim, Angela; Company, Rui; Gomes, Tânia; Bebianno, Maria João

    2008-07-01

    Hydrothermal vents are extreme deep-sea habitats that, due to their singular features, still intrigue scientific communities. Swift growth rates and profuse biomass of biological communities can be observed, despite of their inherently unstable physical-chemical and toxic conditions, indicating that organisms inhabiting this environment must be well adapted to these inhospitable conditions. The caridean shrimp, Chorocaris chacei, Mirocaris fortunata and Rimicaris exoculata, together with bathymodiolid mussels, dominate the vent fauna along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Crustacean species are widely used as biological indicators of environmental alterations, since they play a key ecological role as planktivorous grazers, epibenthic scavengers or as prey species. The biological consequences of the hydrothermal metal-rich environment in shrimp species are still largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was the determination of the metal levels (Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn), metallothioneins (MT) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in shrimp species collected in Rainbow, Lucky Strike and Menez-Gwen vent sites, in order to evaluate their different adaptation strategies toward metals when compared with two common coastal shrimp species (Palaemon elegans and Palaemonetes varians) from a fairly unpolluted estuarine system in south Portugal (Ria Formosa). Results show significant differences in metal concentrations, MT levels and lipid peroxidation between vent and coastal shrimp and also between shrimp species from the same site. This indicates that biochemical responses in both vent and coastal shrimp are affected not only by the environmental characteristics but also by inter-specific differences. Nevertheless, these responses apparently grant a successful adaptation for the survival in a metal-extreme environment.

  20. Comparative binding mechanism of lupeol compounds with plasma proteins and its pharmacological importance.

    PubMed

    Kallubai, Monika; Rachamallu, Aparna; Yeggoni, Daniel Pushparaju; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2015-04-01

    Lupeol, a triterpene, possesses beneficial effects like anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Binding of lupeol and its derivative (phytochemicals) to plasma proteins such as human serum albumin (HSA) and α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) is a major determinant in the disposition of drugs. Cytotoxic studies with mouse macrophages (RAW 246.7) and HeLa cell lines revealed anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties for both lupeol and lupeol derivative. Both molecules reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in LPS induced macrophages. Further, apoptosis was observed in HeLa cell lines when they were incubated with these molecules for 24 h. The fluorescence quenching of HSA was observed upon titration with different concentrations of lupeol and lupeol derivative; their binding constants were found to be 3 ± 0.01 × 10(4) M(-1) and 6.2 ± 0.02 × 10(4) M(-1), with binding free energies of -6.59 kcal M(-1) and -7.2 kcal M(-1). With AGP, however, the lupeol and lupeol derivative showed binding constants of 0.9 ± 0.02 × 10(3) M(-1) and 2.7 ± 0.01 × 10(3) M(-1), with free energies of -4.6 kcal M(-1) and -5.1 kcal M(-1) respectively. Molecular displacement studies based on competition with site I-binding phenylbutazone (which binds site I of HSA) and ibuprofen (which binds site II) suggest that lupeol binds site II and the lupeol derivative site I. Molecular docking studies also confirmed that lupeol binds to the IIIA and the lupeol derivative to the IIA domain of HSA. Secondary structure changes were observed upon formation of HSA-lupeol/lupeol derivative complexes by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations support greater stability of HSA-lupeol and HSA-lupeol derivative complexes compared to that of HSA alone.

  1. Gene amplification in thyroid cancer: A new mechanism defined by comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.N.; Lai, E.; Fagin, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    More than 12,000 new cases of thyroid cancer develop each year in the USA for which scant information is available on cytogenetic abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) now permits the detection and mapping of amplified regions in DNAs without the need for metaphase tumor preparations. Using CGH, we have analyzed the DNA copy number changes in 10 human thyroid tumors. Further, the procedure of CGH was modified by using a chromomycin and sitamycin reverse-banding technique to provide a high resolution assignment of amplified regions. The results revealed a series of copy number changes including amplifications of chromosome bands 1p36, 1q42, 2p13, 2p21, 19q13.1 and losses of chromosome bands 16q12-13 and 16q22-23. The most striking regions of amplifications, band 2p21 and 2p13 were further analyzed by constructing a 90-member chromosome 2 BAC map and using 9 members of this to analyze WRO, a thyroid follicular carcinoma cell line containing double minutes (dm). Eight BACs revealed three copies of chromosome 2; one BAC mapping at the 2p21-22 border revealed significant and variable amplification in all of the metaphase dm`s suggesting a local amplification. Interphase analyses revealed about 40-70 signals per nucleus. The variable signals seen in the WRO cell population suggest the existence of a minor population with higher copy number and smaller amplicon size. In summary, high resolution CGH has been combined with BAC contig construction for the analysis of thyroid tumor to reveal a very specific region amplification on chromosome 2p21 likely to contain a new gene involved in thyroid cancer tumorigenesis.

  2. Comparing the similarity of responses received from studies in Amazon's Mechanical Turk to studies conducted online and with direct recruitment.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Christoph; Duenser, Andreas; Moltchanova, Elena; Zawieska, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Computer and internet based questionnaires have become a standard tool in Human-Computer Interaction research and other related fields, such as psychology and sociology. Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) service is a new method of recruiting participants and conducting certain types of experiments. This study compares whether participants recruited through AMT give different responses than participants recruited through an online forum or recruited directly on a university campus. Moreover, we compare whether a study conducted within AMT results in different responses compared to a study for which participants are recruited through AMT but which is conducted using an external online questionnaire service. The results of this study show that there is a statistical difference between results obtained from participants recruited through AMT compared to the results from the participant recruited on campus or through online forums. We do, however, argue that this difference is so small that it has no practical consequence. There was no significant difference between running the study within AMT compared to running it with an online questionnaire service. There was no significant difference between results obtained directly from within AMT compared to results obtained in the campus and online forum condition. This may suggest that AMT is a viable and economical option for recruiting participants and for conducting studies as setting up and running a study with AMT generally requires less effort and time compared to other frequently used methods. We discuss our findings as well as limitations of using AMT for empirical studies.

  3. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  4. Comparative Ability of Oropsylla montana and Xenopsylla cheopis Fleas to Transmit Yersinia pestis by Two Different Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bland, David M.; Bosio, Christopher F.; Jarrett, Clayton O.

    2017-01-01

    Background Transmission of Yersinia pestis by flea bite can occur by two mechanisms. After taking a blood meal from a bacteremic mammal, fleas have the potential to transmit the very next time they feed. This early-phase transmission resembles mechanical transmission in some respects, but the mechanism is unknown. Thereafter, transmission occurs after Yersinia pestis forms a biofilm in the proventricular valve in the flea foregut. The biofilm can impede and sometimes completely block the ingestion of blood, resulting in regurgitative transmission of bacteria into the bite site. In this study, we compared the relative efficiency of the two modes of transmission for Xenopsylla cheopis, a flea known to become completely blocked at a high rate, and Oropsylla montana, a flea that has been considered to rarely develop proventricular blockage. Methodology/Principal findings Fleas that took an infectious blood meal containing Y. pestis were maintained and monitored for four weeks for infection and proventricular blockage. The number of Y. pestis transmitted by groups of fleas by the two modes of transmission was also determined. O. montana readily developed complete proventricular blockage, and large numbers of Y. pestis were transmitted by that mechanism both by it and by X. cheopis, a flea known to block at a high rate. In contrast, few bacteria were transmitted in the early phase by either species. Conclusions A model system incorporating standardized experimental conditions and viability controls was developed to more reliably compare the infection, proventricular blockage and transmission dynamics of different flea vectors, and was used to resolve a long-standing uncertainty concerning the vector competence of O. montana. Both X. cheopis and O. montana are fully capable of transmitting Y. pestis by the proventricular biofilm-dependent mechanism. PMID:28081130

  5. Regulation of Early Steps of GPVI Signal Transduction by Phosphatases: A Systems Biology Approach.

    PubMed

    Dunster, Joanne L; Mazet, Francoise; Fry, Michael J; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Tindall, Marcus J

    2015-11-01

    We present a data-driven mathematical model of a key initiating step in platelet activation, a central process in the prevention of bleeding following Injury. In vascular disease, this process is activated inappropriately and causes thrombosis, heart attacks and stroke. The collagen receptor GPVI is the primary trigger for platelet activation at sites of injury. Understanding the complex molecular mechanisms initiated by this receptor is important for development of more effective antithrombotic medicines. In this work we developed a series of nonlinear ordinary differential equation models that are direct representations of biological hypotheses surrounding the initial steps in GPVI-stimulated signal transduction. At each stage model simulations were compared to our own quantitative, high-temporal experimental data that guides further experimental design, data collection and model refinement. Much is known about the linear forward reactions within platelet signalling pathways but knowledge of the roles of putative reverse reactions are poorly understood. An initial model, that includes a simple constitutively active phosphatase, was unable to explain experimental data. Model revisions, incorporating a complex pathway of interactions (and specifically the phosphatase TULA-2), provided a good description of the experimental data both based on observations of phosphorylation in samples from one donor and in those of a wider population. Our model was used to investigate the levels of proteins involved in regulating the pathway and the effect of low GPVI levels that have been associated with disease. Results indicate a clear separation in healthy and GPVI deficient states in respect of the signalling cascade dynamics associated with Syk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Our approach reveals the central importance of this negative feedback pathway that results in the temporal regulation of a specific class of protein tyrosine phosphatases in controlling the rate

  6. Modelling and simulation of signal transductions in an apoptosis pathway by using timed Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ge, Qi-Wei; Nakata, Mitsuru; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Miyano, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    This paper first presents basic Petri net components representing molecular interactions and mechanisms of signalling pathways, and introduces a method to construct a Petri net model of a signalling pathway with these components. Then a simulation method of determining the delay time of transitions, by using timed Petri nets - i.e. the time taken in fi ring of each transition - is proposed based on some simple principles that the number of tokens flowed into a place is equivalent to the number of tokens fl owed out. Finally, the availability of proposed method is confirmed by observing signalling transductions in biological pathways through simulation experiments of the apoptosis signalling pathways as an example.

  7. Structure-function relationships in the IL-17 receptor: Implications for signal transduction and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fang; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2008-01-01

    IL-17 is the defining cytokine of a newly-described “Th17” population that plays critical roles in mediating inflammation and autoimmunity. The IL-17/IL-17 receptor superfamily is the most recent class of cytokines and receptors to be described, and until recently very little was known about its function or molecular biology. However, in the last year important new insights into the composition and dynamics of the receptor complex and mechanisms of downstream signal transduction have been made, which will be reviewed here. PMID:18178098

  8. A comparative study of the mechanical performance of Glass and Glass/Carbon hybrid polymer composites at different temperature environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, M. J.; Kumar, D. S.; Mahato, K. K.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2015-02-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) composites have been widely accepted as high strength, low weight structural material as compared to their metallic counterparts. Some specific advanced high performance applications such as aerospace components still require superior specific strength and specific modulus. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites exhibit superior specific strength and modulus but have a lower failure strain and high cost. Hence, the combination of both glass and carbon fiber in polymer composite may yield optimized mechanical properties. Further the in-service environment has a significant role on the mechanical performance of this class of materials. Present study aims to investigate the mechanical property of GFRP and Glass/Carbon (G/C hybrid) composites at room temperature, in-situ and ex-situ temperature conditions. In-situ testing at +70°C and +100°C results in significant loss in inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) for both the composites as compared to room temperature. The ILSS was nearly equal for both the composite systems tested in-situ at +100°C and effect of fiber hybridisation was completely diminished there. At low temperature ex-situ conditioning significant reduction in ILSS was observed for both the systems. Further at -60°C G/C hybrid exhibited 32.4 % higher ILSS than GFRP. Hence this makes G/C hybrid a better choice of material in low temperature environmental applications.

  9. A comparative study on the mechanical properties of the healthy and varicose human saphenous vein under uniaxial loading.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Kudo, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Saphenous Vein (SV) due to fatness, age, inactiveness, etc. can be afflicted with varicose. The main reason of the varicose vein is believed to be related to the leg muscle pump which is unable to return the blood to the heart in contradiction of the effect of gravity. As a result of the varicose vein, both the structure and mechanical properties of the vein wall would alter. However, so far there is a lack of knowledge on the mechanical properties of the varicose vein. In this study, a comparative study was carried out to measure the elastic and hyperelastic mechanical properties of the healthy and varicose SVs. Healthy and varicose SVs were removed at autopsy and surgery from seven individuals and then axial tensile load was applied to them up to the failure point. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the vein, this study was benefitted from three different stress definitions, such as 2nd Piola-Kichhoff, engineering and true stresses and four different strain definitions, i.e. Almansi-Hamel, Green-St. Venant, engineering and true strains, to determine the linear mechanical properties of the SVs. A Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique was used to measure the true strain of the vein walls during load bearing. The non-linear mechanical behaviour of the SVs was also computationally evaluated via the Mooney-Rivlin material model. The true/Cauchy stress-strain diagram exhibited the elastic modulus of the varicose SVs as 45.11% lower than that of the healthy ones. Furthermore, by variation of the stress a significant alteration on the maximum stress of the healthy SVs was observed, but then not for the varicose veins. Additionally, the highest stresses of 4.99 and 0.65 MPa were observed for the healthy and varicose SVs, respectively. These results indicate a weakness in the mechanical strength of the SV when it becomes varicose, owing to the degradation of the elastin and collagen content of the SV. The Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic and the Finite

  10. Lambda bacteriophage-mediated transduction of ColE1 deoxyribonucleic acid having a lambda bacteriophage-cohesive end site: selection of packageable-length deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Umene, K; Shimada, K; Tsuzuki, T; Mori, R; Takagi, Y

    1979-01-01

    An in vitro recombinant ColE1-cos lambda deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, pKY96, has 70% of the length of lambda phage DNA. The process of lambda phage-mediated transduction of pKY96 generated a small amount of transducing phage particles containing ColE1-cos lambda DNA molecules of 80 or 101% of the length of lambda phage DNA, in addition to those containing original pKY96 DNA molecules. The newly isolated larger plasmid DNAs were transduced 100 times more efficiently than pKY96 DNA. Their structures were compared with that of a prototype pKY96 DNA, and the mechanism of the formation of these molecules is discussed. Images PMID:158007

  11. A Comparative Numerical Study on the Performances and Vortical Patterns of Two Bioinspired Oscillatory Mechanisms: Undulating and Pure Heaving

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Abbaspour, Madjid

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamics and energetics of bioinspired oscillating mechanisms have received significant attentions by engineers and biologists to develop the underwater and air vehicles. Undulating and pure heaving (or plunging) motions are two significant mechanisms which are utilized in nature to provide propulsive, maneuvering, and stabilization forces. This study aims to elucidate and compare the propulsive vortical signature and performance of these two important natural mechanisms through a systematic numerical study. Navier-Stokes equations are solved, by a pressure-based finite volume method solver, in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework domain containing a 2D NACA0012 foil moving with prescribed kinematics. Some of the important findings are (1) the thrust production of the heaving foil begins at lower St and has a greater growing slope with respect to the St; (2) the undulating mechanism has some limitations to produce high thrust forces; (3) the undulating foil shows a lower power consumption and higher efficiency; (4) changing the Reynolds number (Re) in a constant St affects the performance of the oscillations; and (5) there is a distinguishable appearance of leading edge vortices in the wake of the heaving foil without observable ones in the wake of the undulating foil, especially at higher St. PMID:27057133

  12. Comparative acoustic performance and mechanical properties of silk membranes for the repair of chronic tympanic membrane perforations.

    PubMed

    Allardyce, Benjamin J; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Dilley, Rodney J; Xie, Zhigang; Campbell, Luke; Keating, Adrian; Atlas, Marcus D; von Unge, Magnus; Wang, Xungai

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic and mechanical properties of silk membranes of different thicknesses were tested to determine their suitability as a repair material for tympanic membrane perforations. Membranes of different thickness (10-100μm) were tested to determine their frequency response and their resistance to pressure loads in a simulated ear canal model. Their mechanical rigidity to pressure loads was confirmed by tensile testing. These membranes were tested alongside animal cartilage, currently the strongest available myringoplasty graft as well as paper, which is commonly used for simpler procedures. Silk membranes showed resonant frequencies within the human hearing range and a higher vibrational amplitude than cartilage, suggesting that silk may offer good acoustic energy transfer characteristics. Silk membranes were also highly resistant to simulated pressure changes in the middle ear, suggesting they can resist retraction, a common cause of graft failure resulting from chronic negative pressures in the middle ear. Part of this strength can be explained by the substantially higher modulus of silk films compared with cartilage. This allows for the production of films that are much thinner than cartilage, with superior acoustic properties, but that still provide the same level of mechanical support as thicker cartilage. Together, these in vitro results suggest that silk membranes may provide good hearing outcomes while offering similar levels of mechanical support to the reconstructed middle ear.

  13. Comparative analysis of mutant plants impaired in the main regulatory mechanisms of photosynthetic light reactions - From biophysical measurements to molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Rantala, Sanna; Grieco, Michele; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2017-03-01

    Chlorophyll (chl) fluorescence emission by photosystem II (PSII) and light absorption by P700 reaction center chl a of photosystem I (PSI) provide easy means to probe the function of the photosynthetic machinery. The exact relationship between the measured optical variables and the molecular processes have, however, remained elusive. Today, the availability of mutants with distinct molecular characterization of photosynthesis regulatory processes should make it possible to gain further insights into this relationship, yet a systematic comparative analysis of such regulatory mutants has been missing. Here we have systematically compared the behavior of Dual-PAM fluorescence and P700 variables from well-characterized photosynthesis regulation mutants. The analysis revealed a very convincing relationship between the given molecular deficiency in the photosynthetic apparatus and the original fluorescence and P700 signals obtained by using varying intensities of actinic light and by applying a saturating pulse. Importantly, the specific information on the underlying molecular mechanism, present in these authentic signals of a given photosynthesis mutant, was largely nullified when using the commonly accepted parameters that are based on further treatment of the original signals. Understanding the unique relationship between the investigated molecular process of photosynthesis and the measured variable is an absolute prerequisite for comprehensive interpretation of fluorescence and P700 measurements. The data presented here elucidates the relationships between the main regulatory mechanisms controlling the photosynthetic light reactions and the variables obtained by fluorescence and P700 measurements. It is discussed how the full potential of optical photosynthesis measurements can be utilized in investigation of a given molecular mechanism.

  14. Thermodynamic and choreographic constraints for energy transduction by cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xavier, António V

    2004-07-23

    Cooperative effects are fundamental for electroprotonic energy transduction processes, crucial to sustain much of life chemistry. However, the primary cooperative mechanism by which transmembrane proteins couple the downhill transfer of electrons to the uphill activation (acidification) of protic groups is still a matter of great controversy. To understand cooperative processes fully, it is necessary to obtain the microscopic thermodynamic parameters of the functional centres and relate them to the relevant structural features, a task difficult to achieve for large proteins. The approach discussed here explores how this may be done by extrapolation from mechanisms used by simpler proteins operative in similar processes. The detailed study of small, soluble cytochromes performing electroprotonic activation has shown how they use anti-electrostatic effects to control the synchronous movement of charges. These include negative e(-)/H(+) (redox-Bohr effect) cooperativities. This capacity is the basis to discuss an unorthodox mechanism consistent with the available experimental data on the process of electroprotonic energy transduction performed by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO).

  15. Sodium-coupled energy transduction in the newly isolated thermoalkaliphilic strain LBS3.

    PubMed Central

    Prowe, S G; van de Vossenberg, J L; Driessen, A J; Antranikian, G; Konings, W N

    1996-01-01

    Strain LBS3 is a novel anaerobic thermoalkaliphilic bacterium that grows optimally at pH 9.5 and 50 degrees C. Since a high concentration of Na+ ions is required for growth, we have analyzed the primary bioenergetic mechanism of energy transduction in this organism. For this purpose, a method was devised for the isolation of right-side-out membrane vesicles that are functional for the energy-dependent uptake of solutes. A strict requirement for Na+ was observed for the uptake of several amino acids, and in the case of L-leucine, it was concluded that amino acid uptake occurs in symport with Na+ ions. Further characterization of the leucine transport system revealed that its pH and temperature optima closely match the conditions that support the growth of strain LBS3. The ATPase activity associated with inside-out membrane vesicles was found to be stimulated by both Na+ and Li+ ions. These data suggest that the primary mechanism of energy transduction in the anaerobic thermoalkaliphilic strain LBS3 is dependent on sodium cycling. The implications of this finding for the mechanism of intracellular pH regulation are discussed. PMID:8763937

  16. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, Kelly J.; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs. PMID:26594176

  17. Phosphodiesterase 4D acts downstream of Neuropilin to control Hedgehog signal transduction and the growth of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xuecai; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Suyama, Kaye; Hartl, Tom; Purzner, Teresa; Winans, Amy; Meyer, Tobias; Scott, Matthew P

    2015-09-15

    Alterations in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling lead to birth defects and cancers including medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor. Although inhibitors targeting the membrane protein Smoothened suppress Hh signaling, acquired drug resistance and tumor relapse call for additional therapeutic targets. Here we show that phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) acts downstream of Neuropilins to control Hh transduction and medulloblastoma growth. PDE4D interacts directly with Neuropilins, positive regulators of Hh pathway. The Neuropilin ligand Semaphorin3 enhances this interaction, promoting PDE4D translocation to the plasma membrane and cAMP degradation. The consequent inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) enhances Hh transduction. In the developing cerebellum, genetic removal of Neuropilins reduces Hh signaling activity and suppresses proliferation of granule neuron precursors. In mouse medulloblastoma allografts, PDE4D inhibitors suppress Hh transduction and inhibit tumor growth. Our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of Hh transduction, and highlight PDE4D as a promising target to treat Hh-related tumors.

  18. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  19. Highly efficient transduction of primary adult CNS and PNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Evgeny; Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Delivery and expression of recombinant genes, a key methodology for many applications in biological research, remains a challenge especially for mature neurons. Here, we report easy, highly efficient and well tolerated transduction of adult peripheral and central neuronal populations of diverse species in culture using VSV-G pseudo-typed, recombinant baculovirus (BacMam). Transduction rates of up to 80% were reliably achieved at high multiplicity of infection without apparent neuro-cytopathic effects. Neurons could be transduced either shortly after plating or after several days in culture. Co-incubation with two different baculoviruses attained near complete co-localization of fluorescent protein expression, indicating multigene delivery. Finally, evidence for functional protein expression is provided by means of cre-mediated genetic recombination and neurite outgrowth assays. Recombinant protein was already detected within hours after transduction, thereby enabling functional readouts even in relatively short-lived neuronal cultures. Altogether, these results substantiate the usefulness of baculovirus-mediated transduction of mature neurons for future research in neuroscience. PMID:27958330

  20. Empirical Properties of Multilingual Phone-To-Word Transduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    EMPIRICAL PROPERTIES OF MULTILINGUAL PHONE-TO-WORD TRANSDUCTION Geoffrey Zweig Microsoft Research gzweig@microsoft.com Jon Nedel U.S. Department of...69–88, 2002. [2] G. Saon, G. Zweig , and D. Povey, “Anatomy of an extremely fast LVCSR decoder,” in Interspeech, 2005. [3] S. Ortmanns, H. Ney, and A

  1. Mechanism of Arachidonic Acid Accumulation during Aging in Mortierella alpina: A Large-Scale Label-Free Comparative Proteomics Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yadong; Li, Tao; Wu, Na; Ren, Lujing; Jiang, Ling; Ji, Xiaojun; Huang, He

    2016-11-30

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) is an important polyunsaturated fatty acid having various beneficial physiological effects on the human body. The aging of Mortierella alpina has long been known to significantly improve ARA yield, but the exact mechanism is still elusive. Herein, multiple approaches including large-scale label-free comparative proteomics were employed to systematically investigate the mechanism mentioned above. Upon ultrastructural observation, abnormal mitochondria were found to aggregate around shrunken lipid droplets. Proteomics analysis revealed a total of 171 proteins with significant alterations of expression during aging. Pathway analysis suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were accumulated and stimulated the activation of the malate/pyruvate cycle and isocitrate dehydrogenase, which might provide additional NADPH for ARA synthesis. EC 4.2.1.17-hydratase might be a key player in ARA accumulation during aging. These findings provide a valuable resource for efforts to further improve the ARA content in the oil produced by aging M. alpina.

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of insecticides and plant growth regulators: comparative studies toward understanding the molecular mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamura, H; Nishimura, K; Fujita, T

    1985-01-01

    Emphasis was put on the comparative quantitative structure-activity approaches to the exploration of action mechanisms of structurally different classes of compounds showing the same type of activity as well as those of the same type of compounds having different actions. Examples were selected from studies performed on insecticides and plant growth regulators, i.e., neurotoxic carbamates, phosphates, pyrethroids and DDT analogs, insect juvenile hormone mimics, and cytokinin agonistic and antagonistic compounds. Similarities and dissimilarities in structures required to elicit activity between compounds classes were revealed in terms of physicochemical parameters, provoking further exploration and evoking insights into the molecular mechanisms of action which may lead to the development of new structures having better qualities. PMID:3905379

  3. Noise-Immune Multisensor Transduction of Speech.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    for each of the six attributes: voicing, nasality, sustention , sibilation, graveness, and compactness [5]. Each of the rhyming pairs associated with the...Nasality involves discrimination between nasal and non-nasal sounds (e.g., meat vs. beat); sustention involves discrimination between stop sounds and non...the addition of the accelerometer to M12 improved voicing by 13.2 points, sustention by 19.5 points, and graveness by 14.1 points. Comparing (ACC, M12

  4. The discovery of signal transduction by G proteins. A personal account and an overview of the initial findings and contributions that led to our present understanding

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    The realization that there existed a G-protein coupled signal transduction mechanism developed gradually and was initially the result of an ill fated quest for uncovering the mechanism of action of insulin, followed by a refocused research in many laboratories, including mine, on how GTP acted to increase hormonal stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Independent research into how light-activated rhodopsin triggers a response in photoreceptor cells of the retina and the attendant biochemical studies joined midway and, without the left hand knowing well what the right hand was doing, preceded classical G protein research in identifying the molecular players responsible for signal transduction by G proteins. PMID:17141178

  5. Alterations in Energy Metabolism, Neuroprotection and Visual Signal Transduction in the Retina of Parkinsonian, MPTP-Treated Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bru-Martínez, Roque; Herrero, María Trinidad; Fernández-Villalba, Emiliano; Cuenca, Nicolás; Martín-Nieto, José

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease is mainly characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, including the retina. Different interrelated molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease-associated neuronal death have been put forward in the brain, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Systemic injection of the proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to monkeys elicits the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome, including morphological and functional impairments in the retina. However, the intracellular events leading to derangement of dopaminergic and other retinal neurons in MPTP-treated animal models have not been so far investigated. Here we have used a comparative proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in the retina of MPTP-treated monkeys. Proteins were solubilized from the neural retinas of control and MPTP-treated animals, labelled separately with two different cyanine fluorophores and run pairwise on 2D DIGE gels. Out of >700 protein spots resolved and quantified, 36 were found to exhibit statistically significant differences in their expression levels, of at least ±1.4-fold, in the parkinsonian monkey retina compared with controls. Most of these spots were excised from preparative 2D gels, trypsinized and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. Data obtained were used for protein sequence database interrogation, and 15 different proteins were successfully identified, of which 13 were underexpressed and 2 overexpressed. These proteins were involved in key cellular functional pathways such as glycolysis and mitochondrial electron transport, neuronal protection against stress and survival, and phototransduction processes. These functional categories underscore that alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotective mechanisms and signal transduction are involved in MPTP-induced neuronal degeneration in the retina, in similarity to mechanisms thought to

  6. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis and Deduction of Putative Cognate Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-01-20

    ABSTRACT-Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) composed of sensory histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), constitute a key element of the mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to changes in environments. A large number of TCSTSs including 59 putative HKs and 55 RRs were identified from the Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome, indicating their important roles in regulation of cellular metabolism. In this study, the structural and phylogenetic analysis of all putative TCSTSs in D. vulgaris was performed. The results showed D. vulgaris contained an unexpectedly large number of hybrid-type HKs, implying that multiple-step phosphorelay may be a common signal transduction mechanism in D. vulgaris. Most TCSTS components of D. vulgaris were found clustered into several subfamilies previously recognized in other bacteria and extensive co-evolution between D. vulgaris HKs and RRs was observed, suggesting that the concordance of HKs and RRs in cognate phylogenetic groups could be indicative of cognate TCSTSs...

  7. Smartphone Operated Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) Amplifier for Nanopore Sensors: Design and Analytical Application.

    PubMed

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Kahnemouyi, Sina; Fan, Hsinwen; Mak, Wai Han; Lohith, Akshar; Seger, Adam; Teodorescu, Mircea; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-03-25

    In this report, we demonstrated a handheld wireless voltage-clamp amplifier for current measurement of nanopore sensors. This amplifier interfaces a sensing probe and connects wirelessly with a computer or smartphone for the required stimulus input, data processing and storage. To test the proposed Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) wireless amplifier, in the current study the system was tested with a nano-pH sensor to measure pH of standard buffer solutions and the performance was compared against the commercial voltage-clamp amplifier. To our best knowledge, STING amplifier is the first miniaturized wireless voltage-clamp platform operated with a customized smart-phone application (app).

  8. Cell sheet detachment affects the extracellular matrix: a surface science study comparing thermal liftoff, enzymatic, and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Heather E; Cheng, Xuanhong; Graham, Daniel J; Ratner, Buddy D; Castner, David G

    2005-10-01

    This work compares the removal of bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) monolayers via 1) low-temperature liftoff from a "smart polymer," plasma polymerized poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (ppNIPAM), 2) enzymatic digestion, and 3) mechanical dissociation from ppNIPAM surfaces. We examine the surfaces after cell removal by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), immunostaining, and cell adhesion assay. Immunoassay results indicate that low-temperature liftoff nondestructively harvests the cell sheet and most of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas enzymatic digestion and mechanical dissociation are damaging to both the cells and ECM. XPS results indicate that amide and alcohol groups attributed to proteins in the ECM are present on postliftoff surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) of ToF-SIMS data indicates that molecular ion fragments of amino acids are present on postliftoff surfaces. Finally, a cell adhesion assay seeding new cells on surfaces from which an initial layer of cells was removed via each of the three methods indicates that liftoff and mechanical dissociation leave behind surfaces that better promote cell adhesion. We conclude that the removal of BAEC cells via low-temperature liftoff from ppNIPAM-treated surfaces is less damaging to the ECM proteins remaining at the surface than the other methods.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Mechanical Properties of PWV, NO and Ascending Aorta between WHY Rats and SHR Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bo; Xu, De-Jun; Sun, Huan; Yang, Kun; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the tensile mechanical properties of the ascending aorta (AA) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), for the purpose of providing a biomechanical basis for hypertension prevention. Methods Pulse wave velocities (PWV) and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were determined in 6-month-old WKY rats and SHRs (n = 21, n = 21, respectively). Then, 20 AAs from each group were obtained for longitudinal tensile testing. Results The maximum stress, maximum strain, and strain at a tensile stress of 16 Kpa were greater in WKY rats than in SHRs (p < 0.05). The aortic elastic modulus and PWV value were greater in SHRs than in WKY rats (p < 0.05 for both), while NO concentrations were lower in the SHR group than in the WKY group (p < 0.05). Conclusions The AA tensile mechanical properties differed between the WKY rats and SHRs, and the tensile mechanical properties of the SHR model had changed. PMID:27122902

  10. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  11. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-22

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  12. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains. PMID:26691589

  13. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis.

  14. Signal transduction of stress via ceramide.

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, S; Peña, L A; Kolesnick, R N

    1998-01-01

    The sphingomyelin (SM) pathway is a ubiquitous, evolutionarily conserved signalling system analogous to conventional systems such as the cAMP and phosphoinositide pathways. Ceramide, which serves as second messenger in this pathway, is generated from SM by the action of a neutral or acidic SMase, or by de novo synthesis co-ordinated through the enzyme ceramide synthase. A number of direct targets for ceramide action have now been identified, including ceramide-activated protein kinase, ceramide-activated protein phosphatase and protein kinase Czeta, which couple the SM pathway to well defined intracellular signalling cascades. The SM pathway induces differentiation, proliferation or growth arrest, depending on the cell type. Very often, however, the outcome of signalling through this pathway is apoptosis. Mammalian systems respond to diverse stresses with ceramide generation, and recent studies show that yeast manifest a form of this response. Thus ceramide signalling is an older stress response system than the caspase/apoptotic death pathway, and hence these two pathways must have become linked later in evolution. Signalling of the stress response through ceramide appears to play a role in the development of human diseases, including ischaemia/reperfusion injury, insulin resistance and diabetes, atherogenesis, septic shock and ovarian failure. Further, ceramide signalling mediates the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and radiation in some cells. An understanding of the mechanisms by which ceramide regulates physiological and pathological events in specific cells may provide new targets for pharmacological intervention. PMID:9794783

  15. Mechanical properties of completely autologous human tissue engineered blood vessels compared to human saphenous vein and mammary artery

    PubMed Central

    Konig, Gerhardt; McAllister, Todd N; Dusserre, Nathalie; Garrido, Sergio A; Iyican, Corey; Marini, Alicia; Fiorillo, Alex; Avila, Hernan; Wystrychowski, Wojciech; Zagalski, Krzysztof; Maruszewski, Marcin; Jones, Alyce Linthurst; Cierpka, Lech; de la Fuente, Luis M; L’Heureux, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported initial clinical feasibility with our small diameter tissue engineered blood vessel (TEBV). Here we present in vitro results of the mechanical properties of the TEBVs of the first 25 patients enrolled in an arterio-venous (A-V) shunt safety trial, and compare these properties with those of risk-matched human vein and artery. TEBV average burst pressures (3,490 +/− 892 mmHg, n=230) were higher than native saphenous vein (SV) (1,599 +/− 877 mmHg, n=7), and not significantly different than native internal mammary artery (IMA) (3,196 +/− 1,264 mmHg, n=16). Suture retention strength for the TEBVs (152 +/− 50 gmf) was also not significantly different than IMA (138 +/− 50 gmf). Compliance for the TEBVs prior to implantation (3.4 +/− 1.6 %/100 mmHg) was lower than IMA (11.5 +/− 3.9 %/100 mmHg). By 6 months post-implant, the TEBV compliance (8.8 +/− 4.2 %/100 mmHg, n=5) had increased to values comparable to IMA, and showed no evidence of dilation or aneurysm formation. With clinical time points beyond 21 months as an A-V shunt without intervention, the mechanical tests and subsequent lot release criteria reported here would seem appropriate minimum standards for clinical use of tissue engineered vessels. PMID:19111338

  16. A Comparative Study on the Mechanical, Thermal and Morphological Characterization of Poly(lactic acid)/Epoxidized Palm Oil Blend

    PubMed Central

    Giita Silverajah, V. S.; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Hassan, Hazimah Abu; Woei, Chieng Buong

    2012-01-01

    In this work, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) a fully biodegradable thermoplastic polymer matrix was melt blended with three different epoxidized palm oil (EPO). The aim of this research was to enhance the flexibility, mechanical and thermal properties of PLA. The blends were prepared at various EPO contents of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wt% and characterized. The SEM analysis evidenced successful modification on the neat PLA brittle morphology. Tensile tests indicate that the addition of 1 wt% EPO is sufficient to improve the strength and flexibility compared to neat PLA. Additionally, the flexural and impact properties were also enhanced. Further, DSC analysis showed that the addition of EPO results in a decrease in Tg, which implies an increase in the PLA chain mobility. In the presence of 1 wt% EPO, TGA results revealed significant increase in the thermal stability by 27%. Among the three EPOs used, EPO(3) showed the best mechanical and thermal properties compared to the other EPO’s, with an optimum loading of 1 wt%. Conclusively, EPO showed a promising outcome to overcome the brittleness and improve the overall properties of neat PLA, thus can be considered as a potential plasticizer. PMID:22754338

  17. Comparative genomics analysis of the companion mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis Bc601 and Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 in bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Nan; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus endophyticus both act as the companion bacteria, which cooperate with Ketogulonigenium vulgare in vitamin C two-step fermentation. Two Bacillus species have different morphologies, swarming motility and 2-keto-L-gulonic acid productivities when they co-culture with K. vulgare. Here, we report the complete genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis Bc601 and eight plasmids of B. endophyticus Hbe603, and carry out the comparative genomics analysis. Consequently, B. thuringiensis Bc601, with greater ability of response to the external environment, has been found more two-component system, sporulation coat and peptidoglycan biosynthesis related proteins than B. endophyticus Hbe603, and B. endophyticus Hbe603, with greater ability of nutrients biosynthesis, has been found more alpha-galactosidase, propanoate, glutathione and inositol phosphate metabolism, and amino acid degradation related proteins than B. thuringiensis Bc601. Different ability of swarming motility, response to the external environment and nutrients biosynthesis may reflect different companion mechanisms of two Bacillus species. Comparative genomic analysis of B. endophyticus and B. thuringiensis enables us to further understand the cooperative mechanism with K. vulgare, and facilitate the optimization of bacterial consortium. PMID:27353048

  18. A comparative study of sliding wear of nonmetallic dental restorative materials with emphasis on micromechanical wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Nataliya Deyneka; von Koeckritz, Ann-Kristin; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Characterization and expression of genes involved in the ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction during ripening of mulberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Aichun; Zhu, Panpan; Li, Jun; Han, Leng; Wang, Xiling; Fan, Wei; Lü, Ruihua; Wang, Chuanhong; Li, Zhengang; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L.) fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC) during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF), while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene) upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH) and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and ripening.

  20. Characterization and Expression of Genes Involved in the Ethylene Biosynthesis and Signal Transduction during Ripening of Mulberry Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Aichun; Zhu, Panpan; Li, Jun; Han, Leng; Wang, Xiling; Fan, Wei; Lü, Ruihua; Wang, Chuanhong; Li, Zhengang; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L.) fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC) during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF), while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1–methylcyclopropene) upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH) and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and ripening. PMID

  1. Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species

    SciTech Connect

    Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

  2. Visual transduction in human rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Kraft, T W; Schneeweis, D M; Schnapf, J L

    1993-05-01

    1. Photocurrents were recorded with suction electrodes from rod photoreceptors of seven humans. 2. Brief flashes of light evoked transient outward currents of up to 20 pA. With increasing light intensity the peak response amplitude increased along an exponential saturation function. A half-saturating peak response was evoked by approximately sixty-five photoisomerizations. 3. Responses to brief dim flashes rose to a peak in about 200 ms. The waveform was roughly like the impulse response of a series of four to five low-pass filters. 4. The rising phases of the responses to flashes of increasing strength were found to fit with a biochemical model of phototransduction with an 'effective delay time' and 'characteristic time' of about 2 and 800 ms, respectively. 5. Spectral sensitivities were obtained over a wavelength range from 380 to 760 nm. The action spectrum, which peaked at 495 nm, followed the template described for photoreceptors in the macaque retina. Variation between rods in the position of the spectrum on the wavelength axis was small. 6. The scotopic luminosity function derived from human psychophysical experiments was found to agree well with the measured rod action spectrum after adjustments were made for lens absorption and photopigment self-screening in the intact eye. 7. Responses to steps of light rose monotonically to a maintained level, showing little or no relaxation. Nevertheless, the relationship between light intensity and steady-state response amplitude was shallower than that expected from simple response saturation. This is consistent with an adaptation mechanism acting on a rapid time scale. 8. Flash sensitivity fell with increasing intensities of background light according to Weber's law. Sensitivity was reduced twofold by lights evoking about 120 photoisomerizations per second. Background lights decreased the time to peak and the integration time of the flash response by up to 20%.

  3. Quantitative modeling of the transduction of electromagnetic acoustic transducers operating on ferromagnetic media.

    PubMed

    Ribichini, Remo; Cegla, Frederic; Nagy, Peter B; Cawley, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The noncontact nature of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) offers a series of advantages over traditional piezoelectric transducers, but these features are counter-balanced by their relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and their strong dependence on material properties such as electric conductivity, magnetic permeability, and magnetostriction. The implication is that full exploitation of EMATs needs detailed modeling of their operation. A finite element model, accounting for the main transduction mechanisms, has been developed to allow the optimization of the transducers. Magnetostriction is included and described through an analogy with piezoelectricity. The model is used to predict the performance of a simple EMAT: a single current-carrying wire, parallel to a bias magnetic field generating shear horizontal waves in a nickel plate close to it. The results are validated against experiments. The model is able to successfully predict the wave amplitude dependence on significant parameters: the static bias field, the driving current amplitude, and the excitation frequency. The comparison does not employ any arbitrary adjustable parameter; for the first time an absolute validation of a magnetostrictive EMAT model has been achieved. The results are satisfactory: the discrepancy between the numerical predictions and the measured values of wave amplitude per unit current is less than 20% over a 200 kHz frequency range. The study has also shown that magnetostrictive EMAT sensitivity is not only a function of the magnetostrictive properties, because the magnetic permeability also plays a significant role in the transduction mechanism, partly counterbalancing the magnetostrictive effects.

  4. Genome-Wide RNAi Screening to Dissect the TGF-β Signal Transduction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochu; Xu, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family of cytokines figures prominently in regulation of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis from Drosophila to mammals. Genetic defects affecting TGF-β signaling underlie developmental disorders and diseases such as cancer in human. Therefore, delineating the molecular mechanism by which TGF-β regulates cell biology is critical for understanding normal biology and disease mechanisms. Forward genetic screens in model organisms and biochemical approaches in mammalian tissue culture were instrumental in initial characterization of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway. With complete sequence information of the genomes and the advent of RNA interference (RNAi) technology, genome-wide RNAi screening emerged as a powerful functional genomics approach to systematically delineate molecular components of signal transduction pathways. Here, we describe a protocol for image-based whole-genome RNAi screening aimed at identifying molecules required for TGF-β signaling into the nucleus. Using this protocol we examined >90 % of annotated Drosophila open reading frames (ORF) individually and successfully uncovered several novel factors serving critical roles in the TGF-β pathway. Thus cell-based high-throughput functional genomics can uncover new mechanistic insights on signaling pathways beyond what the classical genetics had revealed.

  5. The shear stress of it all: the cell membrane and mechanochemical transduction.

    PubMed

    White, Charles R; Frangos, John A

    2007-08-29

    As the inner lining of the vessel wall, vascular endothelial cells are poised to act as a signal transduction interface between haemodynamic forces and the underlying vascular smooth-muscle cells. Detailed analyses of fluid mechanics in atherosclerosis-susceptible regions of the vasculature reveal a strong correlation between endothelial cell dysfunction and areas of low mean shear stress and oscillatory flow with flow recirculation. Conversely, steady shear stress stimulates cellular responses that are essential for endothelial cell function and are atheroprotective. The molecular basis of shear-induced mechanochemical signal transduction and the endothelium's ability to discriminate between flow profiles remains largely unclear. Given that fluid shear stress does not involve a traditional receptor/ligand interaction, identification of the molecule(s) responsible for sensing fluid flow and mechanical force discrimination has been difficult. This review will provide an overview of the haemodynamic forces experienced by the vascular endothelium and its role in localizing atherosclerotic lesions within specific regions of the vasculature. Also reviewed are several recent lines of evidence suggesting that both changes in membrane microviscosity linked to heterotrimeric G proteins, and the transmission of tension across the cell membrane to the cell-cell junction where known shear-sensitive proteins are localized, may serve as the primary force-sensing elements of the cell.

  6. In situ patch-clamp recordings from Merkel cells in rat whisker hair follicles, an experimental protocol for studying tactile transduction in tactile-end organs.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryo; Ling, Jennifer; Cha, Myeounghoon; Gu, Jianguo G

    2015-04-25

    Mammals use tactile end-organs to perform sensory tasks such as environmental exploration, social interaction, and tactile discrimination. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tactile transduction in tactile end-organs remain poorly understood. The patch-clamp recording technique may be the most valuable approach for detecting and studying tactile transduction in tactile end-organs, but it is technically challenging because tactile transduction elements in an end-organ are normally inaccessible by patch-clamp recording electrodes. Here we describe an in situ patch-clamp recording protocol for the study of tactile transduction in Merkel cells of rat whisker hair follicles, one of the most sensitive tactile end-organs in mammals. This technique offers an opportunity to explore the identities and properties of ion channels that are involved in tactile transduction in whisker hair follicles, and it may also lend a useful tool for researchers to study other tactile end-organs. The experimental protocol describes procedures for 1) tissue dissection and whisker hair follicle preparation, 2) device setup and steps for performing patch-clamp recordings from Merkel cells in a whisker hair follicle, 3) methods of delivering mechanical stimuli, and 4) intra-follicle microinjection for receptor knockdown in whisker hair follicles. The main procedures in this protocol, from tissue preparation to whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, can be completed in a few hours.

  7. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Latex Reveals Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Increased Rubber Yield in Hevea brasiliensis Self-Rooting Juvenile Clones

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Liang; Guo, Dong; Zhu, Jia-Hong; Wang, Ying; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) self-rooting juvenile clones (JCs) are promising planting materials for rubber production. In a comparative trial between self-rooting JCs and donor clones (DCs), self-rooting JCs exhibited better performance in rubber yield. To study the molecular mechanism associated with higher rubber yield in self-rooting JCs, we sequenced and comparatively analyzed the latex of rubber tree self-rooting JCs and DCs at the transcriptome level. Total raw reads of 34,632,012 and 35,913,020 bp were obtained from the library of self-rooting JCs and DCs, respectively, by using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing technology. De novo assemblies yielded 54689 unigenes from the library of self-rooting JCs and DCs. Among 54689 genes, 1716 genes were identified as differentially expressed between self-rooting JCs and DCs via comparative transcript profiling. Functional analysis showed that the genes related to the mass of categories were differentially enriched between the two clones. Several genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, hormone metabolism and reactive oxygen species scavenging were up-regulated in self-rooting JCs, suggesting that the self-rooting JCs provide sufficient molecular basis for the increased rubber yielding, especially in the aspects of improved latex metabolisms and latex flow. Some genes encoding epigenetic modification enzymes were also differentially expressed between self-rooting JCs and DCs. Epigenetic modifications may lead to gene differential expression between self-rooting JCs and DCs. These data will provide new cues to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the improved rubber yield of H. brasiliensis self-rooting clones. PMID:27555864

  8. Developing Itô stochastic differential equation models for neuronal signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Tiina; Linne, Marja-Leena; Ruohonen, Keijo

    2006-08-01

    Mathematical modeling and simulation of dynamic biochemical systems are receiving considerable attention due to the increasing availability of experimental knowledge of complex intracellular functions. In addition to deterministic approaches, several stochastic approaches have been developed for simulating the time-series behavior of biochemical systems. The problem with stochastic approaches, however, is the larger computational time compared to deterministic approaches. It is therefore necessary to study alternative ways to incorporate stochasticity and to seek approaches that reduce the computational time needed for simulations, yet preserve the characteristic behavior of the system in question. In this work, we develop a computational framework based on the Itô stochastic differential equations for neuronal signal transduction networks. There are several different ways to incorporate stochasticity into deterministic differential equation models and to obtain Itô stochastic differential equations. Two of the developed models are found most suitable for stochastic modeling of neuronal signal transduction. The best models give stable responses which means that the variances of the responses with time are not increasing and negative concentrations are avoided. We also make a comparative analysis of different kinds of stochastic approaches, that is the Itô stochastic differential equations, the chemical Langevin equation, and the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Different kinds of stochastic approaches can be used to produce similar responses for the neuronal protein kinase C signal transduction pathway. The fine details of the responses vary slightly, depending on the approach and the parameter values. However, when simulating great numbers of chemical species, the Gillespie algorithm is computationally several orders of magnitude slower than the Itô stochastic differential equations and the chemical Langevin equation. Furthermore, the chemical

  9. Effect of saw palmetto extract on PI3K cell signaling transduction in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hui, Lv; Yuqin, Che; Jie, Li; Shuai, Hou; Tiezhu, Zhou; Wei, Wang

    2014-08-01

    Saw palmetto extract can induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of saw palmetto extract on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling transduction pathway in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Suspensions of U87 and U251 cells in a logarithmic growth phase were seeded into six-well plates at a density of 10(4) cells/well. In the experimental group, 1 μl/ml saw palmetto extract was added, while the control group was cultured without a drug for 24 h. The expression levels of PI3K, B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and p53 were evaluated through western blot analysis. In the experimental group, the U87 and U251 cells exhibited a lower expression level of PI3K protein as compared with the control group (t=6.849; P<0.001). In addition, the two cell lines had a higher expression level of p53 protein in the experimental group as compared with the control group (t=40.810; P<0.001). Protein expression levels of Bcl-xL decreased significantly in the experimental group as compared with the control group (t=19.640; P=0.000). Therefore, saw palmetto extract induces glioma cell growth arrest and apoptosis via decreasing PI3K/Akt signal transduction.

  10. Effect of saw palmetto extract on PI3K cell signaling transduction in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YANG; HUI, LV; YUQIN, CHE; JIE, LI; SHUAI, HOU; TIEZHU, ZHOU; WEI, WANG

    2014-01-01

    Saw palmetto extract can induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of saw palmetto extract on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling transduction pathway in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Suspensions of U87 and U251 cells in a logarithmic growth phase were seeded into six-well plates at a density of 104 cells/well. In the experimental group, 1 μl/ml saw palmetto extract was added, while the control group was cultured without a drug for 24 h. The expression levels of PI3K, B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and p53 were evaluated through western blot analysis. In the experimental group, the U87 and U251 cells exhibited a lower expression level of PI3K protein as compared with the control group (t=6.849; P<0.001). In addition, the two cell lines had a higher expression level of p53 protein in the experimental group as compared with the control group (t=40.810; P<0.001). Protein expression levels of Bcl-xL decreased significantly in the experimental group as compared with the control group (t=19.640; P=0.000). Therefore, saw palmetto extract induces glioma cell growth arrest and apoptosis via decreasing PI3K/Akt signal transduction. PMID:25009620

  11. The two-component signal transduction system YvcPQ regulates the bacterial resistance to bacitracin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumeng; Li, Xinfeng; Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; He, Jin

    2016-10-01

    YvcPQ is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that respond to specific stimuli and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvcQ and a response regulator YvcP. In this study, through searching the consensus sequence recognized by YvcP, we found four YvcP-binding motifs in the promoter regions of genes yvcR (BMB171_C4100), BMB171_C4385, kapD (BMB171_C4525) and BMB171_C4835 in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 which is a representative of Bacillus cereus group, and confirmed that these genes are regulated by YvcP. We compared the sequence of yvcPQ and its downstream genes in genus Bacillus, and found two different kinds of yvc locus, one was the yvcPQ-RS in B. subtilis species and the other was the yvcPQ-R-S1S2 in B. cereus group. Furthermore, we found that YvcP activates the transcription of yvcS1S2 (downstream of yvcR) to promote bacterial resistance to bacitracin and deletion of either yvcPQ operon or yvcS1S2 operon renders the bacterial cells more sensitive to bacitracin. This study enriched our understanding of both the YvcPQ's function and the mechanism of bacterial resistance to bacitracin.

  12. Identification and Validation of Small Molecules That Enhance Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus Transduction following High-Throughput Screens

    PubMed Central

    Nicolson, Sarah C.; Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matthew L.; Setola, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    foundation based on the rAAV small-molecule screen methodology, which is ideally used for more-diverse libraries of compounds that can be tested for potentiating rAAV transduction. IMPORTANCE This study seeks to enhance the capability of adeno-associated viral vectors for therapeutic gene delivery applicable to the treatment of diverse diseases. To do this, a comprehensive panel of FDA-approved drugs were tested in human cells and in animal models to determine if they increased adeno-associated virus gene delivery. The results demonstrate that particular groups of drugs enhance adeno-associated virus gene delivery by unknown mechanisms. In particular, the enhancement of gene delivery was approximately 50 to 100 times better with than without teniposide, a compound that is also used as chemotherapy for cancer. Collectively, these results highlight the potential for FDA-approved drug enhancement of adeno-associated virus gene therapy, which could result in safe and effective treatments for diverse acquired or genetic diseases. PMID:27147738

  13. Pathway logic modeling of protein functional domains in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Talcott, C; Eker, S; Knapp, M; Lincoln, P; Laderoute, K

    2004-01-01

    Protein functional domains (PFDs) are consensus sequences within signaling molecules that recognize and assemble other signaling components into complexes. Here we describe the application of an approach called Pathway Logic to the symbolic modeling signal transduction networks at the level of PFDs. These models are developed using Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic. Models can be queried (analyzed) using the execution, search and model-checking tools of Maude. We show how signal transduction processes can be modeled using Maude at very different levels of abstraction involving either an overall state of a protein or its PFDs and their interactions. The key insight for the latter is our algebraic representation of binding interactions as a graph.

  14. Widespread Losses of Vomeronasal Signal Transduction in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabin; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Shuyi; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate vomeronasal system (VNS) detects intraspecific pheromones and environmental odorants. We sequenced segments of the gene encoding Trpc2, an ion channel crucial for vomeronasal signal transduction, in 11 species that represent all main basal lineages of Yinpterochiroptera, one of the two suborders of the order Chiroptera (bats). Our sequences show that Trpc2 is a pseudogene in each of the 11 bats, suggesting that all yinpterochiropterans lack vomeronasal sensitivity. The Trpc2 sequences from four species of Yangochiroptera, the other suborder of bats, suggest vomeronasal insensitivity in some but not all yangochiropterans. These results, together with the available morphological data from the bat VNS, strongly suggest multiple and widespread losses of vomeronasal signal transduction and sensitivity in bats. Future scrutiny of the specific functions of the VNS in the few bats that still retain the VNS may help explain why it is dispensable in most bats. PMID:20693241

  15. A PKD Channel-based Biosensor for Taste Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a micro electrode array (MEA)-based biosensor for taste transduction using heterologous expressed taste polycystic kidney disease-like (PKD) channels as molecular sensors. Taste PKD1L3/2L1 channels were expressed on the plasma membrane of human embryo kidney (HEK)-293 cells [1]. Then the cells were cultured on the surface of MEA chip [2] to record the responses of PKD channels to sour stimulations by monitoring membrane potential. The results indicate this MEA-based biosensor can record the special off-responses of PKD channels to sour stimulation in a non-invasive manner for a long term. It may provide an alternative tool for the research of taste transduction, especially for the characterization of taste ion channels.

  16. Maxwell's demon in biochemical signal transduction with feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Sosuke; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    Signal transduction in living cells is vital to maintain life itself, where information transfer in noisy environment plays a significant role. In a rather different context, the recent intensive research on `Maxwell's demon'--a feedback controller that utilizes information of individual molecules--have led to a unified theory of information and thermodynamics. Here we combine these two streams of research, and show that the second law of thermodynamics with information reveals the fundamental limit of the robustness of signal transduction against environmental fluctuations. Especially, we find that the degree of robustness is quantitatively characterized by an informational quantity called transfer entropy. Our information-thermodynamic approach is applicable to biological communication inside cells, in which there is no explicit channel coding in contrast to artificial communication. Our result could open up a novel biophysical approach to understand information processing in living systems on the basis of the fundamental information-thermodynamics link.

  17. Colored Petri net modeling and simulation of signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Zimmer, Ralf; Lee, Sang Yup; Park, Sunwon

    2006-03-01

    Presented herein is a methodology for quantitatively analyzing the complex signaling network by resorting to colored Petri nets (CPN). The mathematical as well as Petri net models for two basic reaction types were established, followed by the extension to a large signal transduction system stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in an application study. The CPN models based on the Petri net representation and the conservation and kinetic equations were used to examine the dynamic behavior of the EGF signaling pathway. The usefulness of Petri nets is demonstrated for the quantitative analysis of the signal transduction pathway. Moreover, the trade-offs between modeling capability and simulation efficiency of this pathway are explored, suggesting that the Petri net model can be invaluable in the initial stage of building a dynamic model.

  18. Comparative Study by MS and XRD of Fe50Al50 Alloys Produced by Mechanical Alloying, Using Different Ball Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Martínez, Y.; Pérez Alcázar, G. A.; Bustos Rodríguez, H.; Oyola Lozano, D.

    2005-02-01

    In this work we report a comparative study of the magnetic and structural properties of Fe50Al50 alloys produced by mechanical alloying using two different planetary ball mills with the same ball mass to powder mass relation. The Fe50Al50 sample milled during 48 h using the Fritsch planetary ball mill pulverisette 5 and balls of 20 mm, presents only a bcc alloy phase with a majority of paramagnetic sites, whereas that sample milled during the same time using the Fritsch planetary ball mill pulverisette 7 with balls of 15 mm, presents a bcc alloy phase with paramagnetic site (doublet) and a majority of ferromagnetic sites which include pure Fe. However for 72 h of milling this sample presents a bcc paramagnetic phase, very similar to that prepared with the first system during 48 h. These results show that the conditions used in the first ball mill equipment make more efficient the milling process.

  19. Comparative analysis of the mechanisms of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by dsr operon to maintain environmental sulfur balance.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Semanti; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur metabolism is one of the oldest known redox geochemical cycles in our atmosphere. These redox processes utilize different sulfur anions and the reactions are performed by the gene products of dsr operon from phylogenetically diverse sets of microorganisms. The operon is involved in the maintenance of environmental sulfur balance. Interestingly, the dsr operon is found to be present in both sulfur anion oxidizing and reducing microorganisms and in both types of organisms DsrAB protein complex plays a vital role. Though there are various reports regarding the genetics of dsr operon there are practically no reports dealing with the structural aspects of sulfur metabolism by dsr operon. In our present study, we tried to compare the mechanisms of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by Allochromatium vinosum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris respectively through DsrAB protein complex. We analyzed the modes of bindings of sulfur anions to the DsrAB protein complex and observed that for sulfur anion oxidizers, sulfide and thiosulfate are the best substrates whereas for reducers sulfate and sulfite have the best binding abilities. We analyzed the binding interaction pattern of the DsrA and DsrB proteins while forming the DsrAB protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Allochromatium vinosum. To our knowledge this is the first report that analyzes the differences in binding patterns of sulfur substrates with DsrAB protein from these two microorganisms. This study would therefore be essential to predict the biochemical mechanism of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by these two microorganisms i.e., Desulfovibrio vulgaris (sulfur anion reducer) and Allochromatium vinosum (sulfur anion oxidizer). Our observations also highlight the mechanism of sulfur geochemical cycle which has important implications in future study of sulfur metabolism as it has a huge application in waste remediation and production of industrial bio-products viz. vitamins, bio-polyesters and bio-hydrogen.

  20. Understanding abiotic stress tolerance mechanisms in soybean: a comparative evaluation of soybean response to drought and flooding stress.

    PubMed

    Mutava, Raymond N; Prince, Silvas Jebakumar K; Syed, Naeem Hasan; Song, Li; Valliyodan, Babu; Chen, Wei; Nguyen, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Many sources of drought and flooding tolerance have been identified in soybean, however underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, it is important to illuminate different plant responses to these abiotic stresses and understand the mechanisms that confer tolerance. Towards this goal we used four contrasting soybean (Glycine max) genotypes (PI 567690--drought tolerant, Pana--drought susceptible, PI 408105A--flooding tolerant, S99-2281--flooding susceptible) grown under greenhouse conditions and compared genotypic responses to drought and flooding at the physiological, biochemical, and cellular level. We also quantified these variations and tried to infer their role in drought and flooding tolerance in soybean. Our results revealed that different mechanisms contribute to reduction in net photosynthesis under drought and flooding stress. Under drought stress, ABA and stomatal conductance are responsible for reduced photosynthetic rate; while under flooding stress, accumulation of starch granules played a major role. Drought tolerant genotypes PI 567690 and PI 408105A had higher plastoglobule numbers than the susceptible Pana and S99-2281. Drought stress increased the number and size of plastoglobules in most of the genotypes pointing to a possible role in stress tolerance. Interestingly, there were seven fibrillin proteins localized within the plastoglobules that were up-regulated in the drought and flooding tolerant genotypes PI 567690 and PI 408105A, respectively, but down-regulated in the drought susceptible genotype Pana. These results suggest a potential role of Fibrillin proteins, FBN1a, 1b and 7a in soybean response to drought and flooding stress.

  1. Bioinformatics investigation of therapeutic mechanisms of Xuesaitong capsule treating ischemic cerebrovascular rat model with comparative transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiangquan; Wei, Benjun; Chen, Hengwen; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Xuesaitong soft capsule (XST) which consists of panax notoginseng saponin (PNS) has been used to treat ischemic cerebrovascular diseases in China. The therapeutic mechanism of XST has not been elucidated yet from prospective of genomics and bioinformatics. Methods: A transcriptome analysis was performed to review series concerning middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model and XST intervention after MCAO from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were compared between blank group and model group, model group and XST group. Functional enrichment and pathway analysis were performed. Protein-Protein interaction network was constructed. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were screened out and profound analysis was performed. Results: Two series including 22 samples were obtained. 870 DEGs were identified between blank group and model group, and 1189 DEGs were identified between model group and XST group. GO terms and KEGG pathways of MCAO and XST intervention were significantly enriched. PPI networks were constructed to demonstrate the gene-gene interactions. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were highlighted. ANTXR2, FHL3, PRCP, TYROBP, TAF9B, FGFR2, BCL11B, RB1CC1 and MBNL2 were the pivotal genes and possible action sites of XST therapeutic mechanisms. Conclusion: MCAO is a pathological process with multiple. PMID:27347353

  2. Comparative physiological and transcriptomic analyses provide integrated insight into osmotic, cold, and salt stress tolerance mechanisms in banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Juhua; Wang, Jiashui; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The growth, development, and production of banana plants are constrained by multiple abiotic stressors. However, it remains elusive for the tolerance mechanisms of banana responding to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, we found that Fen Jiao (FJ) was more tolerant to osmotic, cold, and salt stresses than BaXi Jiao (BX) by phenotypic and physiological analyses. Comparative transcriptomic analyses highlighted stress tolerance genes that either specifically regulated in FJ or changed more than twofold in FJ relative to BX after treatments. In total, 933, 1644, and 133 stress tolerance genes were identified after osmotic, cold, and salt treatments, respectively. Further integrated analyses found that 30 tolerance genes, including transcription factor, heat shock protein, and E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, could be commonly regulated by osmotic, cold, and salt stresses. Finally, ABA and ROS signaling networks were found to be more active in FJ than in BX under osmotic, cold, and salt treatments, which may contribute to the strong stress tolerances of FJ. Together, this study provides new insights into the tolerance mechanism of banana responding to multiple stresses, thus leading to potential applications in the genetic improvement of multiple abiotic stress tolerances in banana. PMID:28223714

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part II—Mechanical and Thermal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Porter, Wallace D.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-03-01

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systems (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.

  4. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  5. Antibody mediated transduction of therapeutic proteins into living cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Weisbart, Richard H; Nishimura, Robert N

    2005-09-16

    Protein therapy refers to the direct delivery of therapeutic proteins to cells and tissues with the goal of ameliorating or modifying a disease process. Current techniques for delivering proteins across cell membranes include taking advantage of receptor-mediated endocytosis or using protein transduction domains that penetrate directly into cells. The most commonly used protein transduction domains are small cell-penetrating peptides derived from such proteins as the HIV-1 Tat protein. A novel protein transduction domain developed as the single chain fragment (Fv) of a murine anti-DNA autoantibody, mAb 3E10, has recently been developed and used to deliver biologically active proteins to living cells in vitro. This review will provide a brief overview of the development of the Fv fragment and provide a summary of recent studies using Fv to deliver therapeutic peptides and proteins (such as a C-terminal p53 peptide, C-terminal p53 antibody fragment, full-length p53, and micro-dystrophin) to cells.

  6. Signal Transduction Pathways of TNAP: Molecular Network Analyses.

    PubMed

    Négyessy, László; Györffy, Balázs; Hanics, János; Bányai, Mihály; Fonta, Caroline; Bazsó, Fülöp

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence pointing on the involvement of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in brain function and diseases like epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, our understanding about the role of TNAP in the regulation of neurotransmission is severely limited. The aim of our study was to integrate the fragmented knowledge into a comprehensive view regarding neuronal functions of TNAP using objective tools. As a model we used the signal transduction molecular network of a pyramidal neuron after complementing with TNAP related data and performed the analysis using graph theoretic tools. The analyses show that TNAP is in the crossroad of numerous pathways and therefore is one of the key players of the neuronal signal transduction network. Through many of its connections, most notably with molecules of the purinergic system, TNAP serves as a controller by funnelling signal flow towards a subset of molecules. TNAP also appears as the source of signal to be spread via interactions with molecules involved among others in neurodegeneration. Cluster analyses identified TNAP as part of the second messenger signalling cascade. However, TNAP also forms connections with other functional groups involved in neuronal signal transduction. The results indicate the distinct ways of involvement of TNAP in multiple neuronal functions and diseases.

  7. Modeling of mitochondria bioenergetics using a composable chemiosmotic energy transduction rate law: theory and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ivan; Heiske, Margit; Letellier, Thierry; Wallace, Douglas; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetic processes are central to the production of cellular energy, and a decrease in the expression or activity of enzyme complexes responsible for these processes can result in energetic deficit that correlates with many metabolic diseases and aging. Unfortunately, existing computational models of mitochondrial bioenergetics either lack relevant kinetic descriptions of the enzyme complexes, or incorporate mechanisms too specific to a particular mitochondrial system and are thus incapable of capturing the heterogeneity associated with these complexes across different systems and system states. Here we introduce a new composable rate equation, the chemiosmotic rate law, that expresses the flux of a prototypical energy transduction complex as a function of: the saturation kinetics of the electron donor and acceptor substrates; the redox transfer potential between the complex and the substrates; and the steady-state thermodynamic force-to-flux relationship of the overall electro-chemical reaction. Modeling of bioenergetics with this rate law has several advantages: (1) it minimizes the use of arbitrary free parameters while featuring biochemically relevant parameters that can be obtained through progress curves of common enzyme kinetics protocols; (2) it is modular and can adapt to various enzyme complex arrangements for both in vivo and in vitro systems via transformation of its rate and equilibrium constants; (3) it provides a clear association between the sensitivity of the parameters of the individual complexes and the sensitivity of the system's steady-state. To validate our approach, we conduct in vitro measurements of ETC complex I, III, and IV activities using rat heart homogenates, and construct an estimation procedure for the parameter values directly from these measurements. In addition, we show the theoretical connections of our approach to the existing models, and compare the predictive accuracy of the rate law with our experimentally

  8. ATP-gamma-S shifts the operating point of outer hair cell transduction towards scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Bobbin, Richard P; Salt, Alec N

    2005-07-01

    ATP receptor agonists and antagonists alter cochlear mechanics as measured by changes in distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Some of the effects on DPOAEs are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP affects mechano-electrical transduction and the operating point of the outer hair cells (OHCs). This hypothesis was tested by monitoring the effect of ATP-gamma-S on the operating point of the OHCs. Guinea pigs anesthetized with urethane and with sectioned middle ear muscles were used. The cochlear microphonic (CM) was recorded differentially (scala vestibuli referenced to scala tympani) across the basal turn before and after perfusion (20 min) of the perilymph compartment with artificial perilymph (AP) and ATP-gamma-S dissolved in AP. The operating point was derived from the cochlear microphonics (CM) recorded in response low frequency (200 Hz) tones at high level (106, 112 and 118 dB SPL). The analysis procedure used a Boltzmann function to simulate the CM waveform and the Boltzmann parameters were adjusted to best-fit the calculated waveform to the CM. Compared to the initial perfusion with AP, ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) enhanced peak clipping of the positive peak of the CM (that occurs during organ of Corti displacements towards scala tympani), which was in keeping with ATP-induced displacement of the transducer towards scala tympani. CM waveform analysis quantified the degree of displacement and showed that the changes were consistent with the stimulus being centered on a different region of the transducer curve. The change of operating point meant that the stimulus was applied to a region of the transducer curve where there was greater saturation of the output on excursions towards scala tympani and less saturation towards scala vestibuli. A significant degree of recovery of the operating point was observed after washing with AP. Dose response curves generated by perfusing ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) in a cumulative manner yielded an EC(50) of 19.8 micro

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  10. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Anna W.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Moreno Morales, Neydis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacterium Ramlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, the R. tataouinensis bacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. IMPORTANCE BphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these

  11. Efficient and Targeted Transduction of Nonhuman Primate Liver With Systemically Delivered Optimized AAV3B Vectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyong; Ling, Chen; Zhong, Li; Li, Mengxin; Su, Qin; He, Ran; Tang, Qiushi; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A; Flotte, Terence R; Mueller, Christian; Srivastava, Arun; Gao, Guangping

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (rAAV3B) can transduce cultured human liver cancer cells and primary human hepatocytes efficiently. Serine (S)- and threonine (T)-directed capsid modifications further augment its transduction efficiency. Systemically delivered capsid-optimized rAAV3B vectors can specifically target cancer cells in a human liver cancer xenograft model, suggesting their potential use for human liver-directed gene therapy. Here, we compared transduction efficiencies of AAV3B and AAV8 vectors in cultured primary human hepatocytes and cancer cells as well as in human and mouse hepatocytes in a human liver xenograft NSG-PiZ mouse model. We also examined the safety and transduction efficacy of wild-type (WT) and capsid-optimized rAAV3B in the livers of nonhuman primates (NHPs). Intravenously delivered S663V+T492V (ST)-modified self-complementary (sc) AAV3B-EGFP vectors led to liver-targeted robust enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression in NHPs without apparent hepatotoxicity. Intravenous injections of both WT and ST-modified rAAV3B.ST-rhCG vectors also generated stable super-physiological levels of rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (rhCG) in NHPs. The vector genome predominantly targeted the liver. Clinical chemistry and histopathology examinations showed no apparent vector-related toxicity. Our studies should be important and informative for clinical development of optimized AAV3B vectors for human liver-directed gene therapy.

  12. A comparative study on poly(xylitol sebacate) and poly(glycerol sebacate): mechanical properties, biodegradation and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Wenchao; Cook, Wayne D; Chen, Qizhi

    2013-06-01

    In order to develop degradable elastomers with a satisfactory combination of flexibility and enzyme-mediated degradation rate, the mechanical properties, enzymatic degradation kinetics and biocompatibility of poly(xylitol sebcate) (PXS) has been systematically investigated in comparison with poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS). Under the same level of crosslinked density, the PXS elastomer networks have approximately twice the stretchability (elongation at break) of their PGS counterparts. This observation is attributable to the relatively longer and more orientable xylitol monomers, compared with glycerol molecules. Although xylitol monomers have two more hydroxyl groups, we, surprisingly, found that the hydrophilic side chains did not accelerate the water attack on the ester bonds of the PXS network, compared with their PGS counterpart. This observation was attributed to a steric hindrance effect, i.e. the large-sized hydroxyl groups can shield ester bonds from the attack of water molecules. In conclusion, the use of polyols of more than three -OH groups is an effective approach enhancing flexibility, whilst maintaining the degradation rate of polyester elastomers. Further development could be seen in the copolymerization of PPS with appropriate thermoplastic polyesters, such as poly(lactic acid) and polyhydroxyalkanoate.

  13. A Study of the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Lutetium Compared with Those of Transition Metals: A Data Mining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settouti, Nadera; Aourag, Hafid

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we study the physical and mechanical properties of lutetium, which will be compared with the elements of the third-row transition metals (Cs, Ba, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Tl, Pb, and Bi). Data mining is an ideal approach for analyzing the information and exploring the hidden knowledge among the data. The purpose of the data mining scheme is to identify and classify the effects of the relationships existing between properties. The results of the investigation are presented by means of multivariate modeling methods, such as the principal component analysis and the partial least squares regression to discover the implicit, yet meaningful, relationship between the elements of the data set, and to locate correlations between the properties of the materials. In this study, we present a data mining approach to discover such unusual correlations between properties of the elements. When comparing the properties of the transition metals with those of lutetium, our results show that lutetium shares many properties and similarities with the transition metals of the sixth row in the periodic table and can be well described as a transition metal.

  14. Effects of low-energy electromagnetic fields (pulsed and DC) on membrane signal transduction processes in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Luben, R A

    1991-07-01

    The vertebrate organism possesses a number of internal processes for signaling and communication between cell types. Hormones and neurotransmitters move from one cell type to another and carry chemical "messages" that modulate the metabolic responses of tissues to the environment. Interaction with these signaling systems is a potential mechanism by which very low-energy electromagnetic fields might produce metabolic responses in the body. Hormone and neurotransmitter receptors are specialized protein molecules that use a variety of biochemical activities to pass chemical signals from the outside of a cell across the plasma membrane to the interior of the cell. Since many low-energy electromagnetic fields have too little energy to directly traverse the membrane, it is possible that they may modify the existing signal transduction processes in cell membranes, thus producing both transduction and biochemical amplification of the effects of the field itself. As an example of the kinds of processes that may be involved in these interactions, one metabolic process in which the physiological effects of low-energy electromagnetic fields is well established is the healing of bone fractures. The process of regulation of bone turnover and healing is reviewed in the context of clinical applications of electromagnetic energy to the healing process, especially for persistent nonunion fractures. A hypothetical molecular mechanism is presented that might account for the observed effects of electromagnetic fields on bone cell metabolism in terms of the fields' interference with signal transduction events involved in the hormonal regulation of osteoblast function and differentiation.

  15. Amyloid beta-peptide disrupts carbachol-induced muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction in cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J F; Furukawa, K; Barger, S W; Rengen, M R; Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Roth, G S; Mattson, M P

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic pathways serve important functions in learning and memory processes, and deficits in cholinergic transmission occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). A subset of muscarinic cholinergic receptors are linked to G-proteins that activate phospholipase C, resulting in the liberation of inositol trisphosphate and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We now report that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which forms plaques in the brain in AD, impairs muscarinic receptor activation of G proteins in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of rodent fetal cortical neurons to Abeta25-35 and Abeta1-40 resulted in a concentration and time-dependent attenuation of carbachol-induced GTPase activity without affecting muscarinic receptor ligand binding parameters. Downstream events in the signal transduction cascade were similarly attenuated by Abeta. Carbachol-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, IP3, and IP4) was decreased and calcium imaging studies revealed that carbachol-induced release of calcium was severely impaired in neurons pretreated with Abeta. Muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction was disrupted with subtoxic levels of exposure to AP. The effects of Abeta on carbachol-induced GTPase activity and calcium release were attenuated by antioxidants, implicating free radicals in the mechanism whereby Abeta induced uncoupling of muscarinic receptors. These data demonstrate that Abeta disrupts muscarinic receptor coupling to G proteins that mediate induction of phosphoinositide accumulation and calcium release, findings that implicate Abeta in the impairment of cholinergic transmission that occurs in AD. PMID:8692890

  16. Uncovering signal transduction networks from high-throughput data by integer linear programming.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing-Ming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-05-01

    Signal transduction is an important process that transmits signals from the outside of a cell to the inside to mediate sophisticated biological responses. Effective computational models to unravel such a process by taking advantage of high-throughput genomic and proteomic data are needed to understand the essential mechanisms underlying the signaling pathways. In this article, we propose a novel method for uncovering signal transduction networks (STNs) by integrating protein interaction with gene expression data. Specifically, we formulate STN identification problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) model, which can be actually solved by a relaxed linear programming algorithm and is flexible for handling various prior information without any restriction on the network structures. The numerical results on yeast MAPK signaling pathways demonstrate that the proposed ILP model is able to uncover STNs or pathways in an efficient and accurate manner. In particular, the prediction results are found to be in high agreement with current biological knowledge and available information in literature. In addition, the proposed model is simple to be interpreted and easy to be implemented even for a large-scale system.

  17. Optical biosensors based on direct coupling of recognition, signal transduction, and amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    1999-02-01

    Highly sensitive, specific and reagent-free optical signal transduction methods for detection of polyvalent proteins have been developed by directly coupling distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and/or resonant energy transfer to the protein receptor binding events. The ganglioside GM1 as recognition unit for cholera toxin (CT) was covalently labeled with fluorophores, and then incorporated into a biomimetic membrane surface. In the case using fluorescence self-quenching as a signal transduction mechanism, the fluorescence intensity drops significantly due to aggregation of the fluorophore-labeled GM1 on a biomimetic surface. By labeling GM1 with a fluorescence energy transfer pair, aggregation of the labeled-GM1 results in a decrease in donor and an increase in acceptor fluorescence, providing a unique signature for specific protein-receptor binding. The detection systems can reliably detect less than 0.05 nM CT with fast response (less than five minutes). This approach can easily be adapted to any biosensor scheme that relies on multiple receptors or coreceptors. The methods can also be applied to investigate the kinetics and thermodynamics of the multivalent interactions.

  18. Transduction of aminergic and peptidergic signals in enteric neurones of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J M; Wood, J D; Zafirov, D H

    1987-01-01

    1. The biogenic amines 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine, and the peptides bombesin, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), cholecystokinin (CCK), substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) each mimicked slow synaptic excitation (slow e.p.s.p.) when applied to myenteric neurones of the guinea-pig small intestine. 2. Stimulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and intraneuronal elevation of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) also mimicked the slow e.p.s.p. and the actions of the aminergic and peptidergic messengers. 3. Adenosine prevented stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and abolished the slow e.p.s.p.-like actions of forskolin. 4. Exposure of the neurones to adenosine prior to or during application of bombesin, GRP, VIP, CCK or histamine blocked the actions of these substances. 5. Pre-treatment with adenosine did not suppress the slow e.p.s.p.-like actions of substance P, CGRP or 5-HT. 6. The results suggest that signal transduction for bombesin, GRP, VIP, CCK and histamine involves stimulation of adenylate cyclase and second messenger function of cyclic AMP. Transduction mechanisms for 5-HT, substance P and CGRP appear not to involve second messenger function of cyclic AMP. PMID:3656177

  19. Improved lentiviral transduction of ALS motoneurons in vivo via dual targeting.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Valerie B; Ovsepian, Saak V; Bodeker, Macdara; Dolly, J Oliver

    2013-11-04

    Treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is hampered by its complex etiology and lack of efficient means for targeted transfer of therapeutics into motoneurons. The objective of this research was engineering of a versatile motoneuron targeting adapter--a full-length atoxic tetanus toxin fused to core-streptavidin (CS-TeTIM)--for retro-axonal transduction of viral vectors; validation of the targeting efficiency of CS-TeTIM in vivo, by expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter in motoneurons of presymptomatic and symptomatic ALS-like SOD1(G93A) mice, and comparison with age-matched controls; and appraisal of lentiviral transduction with CS-TeTIM relative to (1) a HC binding fragment of tetanus toxin CS-TeTx(HC), (2) rabies glycoprotein (RG), and (3) a CS-TeTIM-RG dual targeting approach. CS-TeTIM and CS-TeTx(HC) were engineered using recombinant technology and site-directed mutagenesis. Biotinylated vectors, pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) or RG, were linked to these adaptors and injected intraperitoneally (ip) into presymptomatic (12 weeks old), symptomatic SOD1(G93A) (22 weeks old) or wild type control mice, followed by monitoring of GFP expression in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures with quantitative PCR and immuno-histochemistry. Transcripts were detected in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures of all mice 2 weeks after receiving a single ip injection, although in symptomatic SOD1(G93A) animals reporter RNA levels were lower compared to presymptomatic and wild-type controls irrespective of the targeting approach. GFP transduction with CS-TeTIM proved more efficient than CS-TeTx(HC) across all groups while CS-TeTIM-RG dual-targeted vectors yielded the highest transcript numbers. Importantly, in both wild-type and presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice strong colabeling of choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) and GFP was visualized in neurons of the

  20. The gravity persistent signal (gps) Mutants of Arabidopsis: Insights into Gravitropic Signal Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, S.

    The gravitropic response of Arabidopsis stems is rapid with a visible within 30 min and vertical reorientation within 2 h. However, horizontal gravistimulation for 3 h at 4°C does not cause curvature. When the stems are subsequently placed in the vertical position at RT, they bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation. These results indicate that the gravity perception step can occur at 4°C, but that part of the response is sensitive to cold. At 4°C, starch-containing amyloplasts in the endodermis of the inflorescence stems sedimented normally but auxin transport was abolished indicating that the cold treatment affected early events of the signal transduction pathway that occur after amyloplast sedimentation but prior to auxin transport. The gps mutants of Arabidopsis are a unique group of mutants that respond abnormally after gravistimulation at 4°C. gps1 shows no response to the cold gravistimulation, gps2 bends the wrong way as compared to wild type and gps3 over responds, bending past the anticipated curvature. The mutants were selected from a T-DNA tagged population. Cloning strategies based on the tag have been employed to identify the genes disrupted. GPS1 was cloned using TAIL PCR and is At3g20130, a cytochrome P450, CYP705A22, of unknown function. GPS1p::GFP fusions are being used to determine temporal and spatial expression of GPS1. The mutation in gps3 appears to disrupt a non-coding region downstream of At1g43950 No function has yet been determined for this region, but it appears that the mutation disrupts transcription of a transcription factor homologous to the DNA binding domain of an auxin response factor (ARF) 9-like protein. The identity of GPS2 is as yet unknown. The gps mutants represent potentially three independent aspects of signal transduction in the gravitropic response: perception or retention of the gravity signal (gps1), determination of the polarity of the response (gps2), and the tissue specificity of the