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Sample records for comparative ultrasound biomicroscopic

  1. Ultrasound biomicroscopic analysis of iris cysts.

    PubMed

    Pedro-Aguilar, L; Fuentes-Cataño, C; Pedroza-Seres, M

    2016-02-01

    To describe the ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) features and complications associated with iris cysts. A retrospective case series. Thirteen patients with iris cysts were identified in a 10 year period study at a ophthalmologic reference Center in Mexico City. The variables included demographic data, ocular and medical history, clinical course, and complications. All patients were examined by UBM, and type, number, location, and acoustic characteristics of cysts were evaluated. Descriptive statistics were performed. Thirteen patients were included (8 men and 5 women). The mean age was 44.5 ± 15.5 years (range 6-70 years). The origin most prevalent was neuroepithelial (92.3%), and 7.7% had stromal cysts. Regarding to location 76.9% were found in the periphery, and 69.2% between meridians II and VI. All cysts showed a moderate to high reflectivity in the wall. Complications were present in 38.5% of cases (15.4% partial angle closure, 15.4% secondary angle closure glaucoma and 7.7% dyscoria). Most cysts are derived from iris pigmented epithelium, with a benign course and a minor rate of complications. The UBM is an indispensable tool that allows us to plan more specific and conservative treatments, with less damage to ocular structures and, therefore, better visual prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopic imaging in a mouse model of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alves, Kelly Z; Soletti, Rossana C; de Britto, Marcelo A P; de Matos, Dyanna G; Soldan, Mônica; Borges, Helena L; Machado, João C

    2013-01-01

    The gold-standard tool for colorectal cancer detection is colonoscopy, but it provides only mucosal surface visualization. Ultrasound biomicroscopy allows a clear delineation of the epithelium and adjacent colonic layers. The aim of this study was to design a system to generate endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopic images of the mouse colon, in vivo, in an animal model of inflammation-associated colon cancer. Thirteen mice (Mus musculus) were used. A 40-MHz miniprobe catheter was inserted into the accessory channel of a pediatric flexible bronchofiberscope. Control mice (n = 3) and mice treated with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium (n = 10) were subjected to simultaneous endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopy and white-light colonoscopy. The diagnosis obtained with endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopy and colonoscopy was compared and confirmed by postmortem histopathology. Endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopic images showed all layers of the normal colon and revealed lesions such as lymphoid hyperplasias and colon tumors. Additionally, endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopy was able to detect two cases of mucosa layer thickening, confirmed by histology. Compared to histologic results, the sensitivities of endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopy and colonoscopy were 0.95 and 0.83, respectively, and both methods achieved specificities of 1.0. Endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopy can be used, in addition to colonoscopy, as a diagnostic method for colonic lesions. Moreover, experimental endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse models is feasible and might be used to further develop research on the differentiation between benign and malignant colonic diseases. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A New Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Sign seen after Deep Sclerectomy (Dolphin Head Sign).

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed M; Cheweikh, Hala M El; El-Fayoumi, Dina Ms; Allam, Riham Shm

    2016-01-01

    To describe a new ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) sign seen in patients who underwent deep sclerectomy (DS) as a surgical procedure for the management of uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The presence of this sign in ultrasound biomicroscopy is suggested to be an indicator of successful surgery. We would like to name this sign as the "dolphin head sign." Prospective interventional study. Twenty-eight eyes of 17 patients with POAG underwent DS with intraoperative mitomycin C (MMC) 0.3% applied for 2 minutes under the superficial scleral flap. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was done at the third postoperative month to evaluate the surgical area in both successful and failed cases. The study included 28 eyes of 17 patients. The mean age of the study group was 42.90 ± 14.37 years (20-64 years). The study included 10 females and 7 males. The mean preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) was 24.57 ± 6.37 mm Hg (20-38 mm Hg). The mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.57 ± 0.3 (0.05-1.00). Complete success has been achieved in 21 eyes (75%) during the follow-up period, with a mean IOP of 12.00 ± 3.86 mm Hg (6-20 mm Hg). The dolphin head sign was demonstrated only in successful cases, whereas the unsuccessful cases failed to show the typical sign. The presence of a "dolphin head" configuration in UBM images could be taken as an indicator of successful DS. How to cite this article: Abdelrahman AM, El Cheweikh HM, El-Fayoumi DMS, Allam RSHM. A New Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Sign seen after Deep Sclerectomy (Dolphin Head Sign). J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2016;10(2):56-59.

  4. A New Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Sign seen after Deep Sclerectomy (Dolphin Head Sign)

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed M; Cheweikh, Hala M El; Allam, Riham SHM

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe a new ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) sign seen in patients who underwent deep sclerectomy (DS) as a surgical procedure for the management of uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The presence of this sign in ultrasound biomicroscopy is suggested to be an indicator of successful surgery. We would like to name this sign as the “dolphin head sign.” Design: Prospective interventional study. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight eyes of 17 patients with POAG underwent DS with intraoperative mitomycin C (MMC) 0.3% applied for 2 minutes under the superficial scleral flap. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was done at the third postoperative month to evaluate the surgical area in both successful and failed cases. Results: The study included 28 eyes of 17 patients. The mean age of the study group was 42.90 ± 14.37 years (20–64 years). The study included 10 females and 7 males. The mean preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) was 24.57 ± 6.37 mm Hg (20-38 mm Hg). The mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.57 ± 0.3 (0.05–1.00). Complete success has been achieved in 21 eyes (75%) during the follow-up period, with a mean IOP of 12.00 ± 3.86 mm Hg (6–20 mm Hg). The dolphin head sign was demonstrated only in successful cases, whereas the unsuccessful cases failed to show the typical sign. Conclusion: The presence of a “dolphin head” configuration in UBM images could be taken as an indicator of successful DS. How to cite this article: Abdelrahman AM, El Cheweikh HM, El-Fayoumi DMS, Allam RSHM. A New Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Sign seen after Deep Sclerectomy (Dolphin Head Sign). J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2016;10(2):56-59. PMID:27536048

  5. Comparison of anterior segment structures in two rat glaucoma models: an ultrasound biomicroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Nissirios, Nikolaos; Chanis, Raul; Johnson, Elaine; Morrison, John; Cepurna, William O; Jia, Lijun; Mittag, Thomas; Danias, John

    2008-06-01

    Optic nerve disease in chronic IOP elevation rat glaucoma models develops at different rates. This study was undertaken to investigate whether anterior chamber (AC) changes develop in two popular models in vivo and whether the changes are related to IOP. Ten female Wistar rats and 12 male Brown-Norway rats were subjected to episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) and hypertonic saline episcleral vein sclerosis (HSEVS), respectively. Contralateral untreated eyes served as controls. IOP was recorded for a period of 5 to 6 weeks, and with the rats under anesthesia, the eyes were imaged with an ultrasound biomicroscope. Measurements of the AC depth (ACD), trabecular-iris angle (TIA), iris thickness at the thickest point near the pupillary margin (IT), angle opening distance (AOD; at 200 microm from the scleral spur), and ciliary body area (CBA) were compared between control eyes of the two strains and between experimental and control eyes within each strain. The differences were correlated with IOP history. Eyes subjected to EVC demonstrated greater increases in IOP than eyes subjected to HSEVS. Between rat strains, control eyes differed significantly in all the parameters studied, except for ACD. No difference was detected between experimental and control eyes in the EVC group. In contrast, experimental eyes in the HSEVS group had approximately 71% larger ACDs and approximately 32% smaller CBAs than did the contralateral control eyes (P < 0.001). ACD and CBA correlated well (R2 = 0.80 and 0.51, respectively) with IOP in the HSEVS group. Two of the experimental eyes in this group showed the presence of ultrasound-scattering material in the AC. Despite apparently higher IOP exposure, eyes in the EVC rat model of glaucoma do not undergo changes in the AC. In contrast, eyes subjected to HSEVS display deepening of the AC and reduction in size of the ciliary body within 5 to 6 weeks. These changes correlate to IOP exposure and may be the result of specific changes induced by

  6. The suitability of the ultrasound biomicroscope for establishing texture in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Roters, S.; Szurman, P.; Engels, B.; Brunner, R.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To establish whether ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) is a helpful tool in locating the arterial segment responsible in patients with segmental attacks in giant cell arteritis
METHODS—The superficial temporal arteries of 19 patients with suspected giant cell arteritis were examined with the UBM before biopsy.
RESULTS—20 specimens provided the histological proof of giant cell arteritis in five patients. Side differences, a dark perivascular halo, and high reflexivity of the intra-arterial space were found.
CONCLUSION—it is assumed that there are two types of arteritic inflammation: (1) the occlusion of intra-arterial space due to intimal fibrosis (UBM: high reflexive "filling"), and (2) inflammation of the perivascular zone with oedematous thickening and infiltration of the media (UBM: dark halo) and its combination. UBM is helpful in obtaining an indication of the side and segment for biopsy.

 PMID:11466252

  7. Ultrasound biomicroscopic evaluation of anterior segment cysts as a risk factor for ocular hypertension and closure angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Dusak, Abdurrahim; Baykara, Mehmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ozcetin, Hikmet; Tuncel, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between the ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) features of anterior-segment cysts (ASCs) and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) as a risk factor for closed-angle glaucoma (CAG). METHODS Totally 24 eyes with recently diagnosed ASCs were divided into two groups. First group with ASC and ocular normotension (n=13), second group with ASC and ocular hypertension (n=11). An ophthalmologic examination, including tonometry, slit-lamp biomicroscopy (SLBM), gonioscopy, fundoscopy, pentacam, and UBM, was performed. The features of the ASCs were compared with the IOP. RESULTS ASCs were accurately diagnosed and delineated in 24 eyes using UBM. IOP was elevated in those ASCs with a secondary aetiology (P=0.027), iridociliary location (P=0.006), deformed shape (P=0.013), increased size (P=0.001) and elongated pupillary aperture (P=0.009). However, the count (P=0.343) of ASCs, anterior chamber depth (ACD; P=0.22) and axial lenght (AL; P=0.31) were not associated with ocular hypertension. Correlations were found between the IOP and ASC size (r=-0.712; P=0.003), anterior chamber angle (ACA; r=-0.985; P<0.001), angle opening area (AOA; r=0.885; P<0.001), angulation of iris (r=-0.776, P<0.001), and affected iris quadrant (r =-0.655, P=0.002). CONCLUSION Ocular hypertension in some eyes with ASC might be associated with various mechanisms, including secondary aetiology, iridociliary location, deformed shape, increased size and elongated pupill, which can be determined by UBM. PMID:23991389

  8. Ultrasound biomicroscopic findings of the iridocorneal angle in live healthy and glaucomatous dogs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takashi; Kawata, Manabu; Ota, Mitsuharu

    2016-01-01

    By using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), the cross-sectional structures of the entire iridocorneal angle (ICA) which are unable to assess with gonioscopic examination were evaluated objectively and quantitatively in live healthy and glaucomatous dogs. The ICAs of normotensive eyes in healthy dogs with normal open angle (NOR), a predisposition to primary closed angle glaucoma (PCAG) (PREDIS) and suffering from unilateral PCAG (UNI), as well as the ICAs of hypertensive eyes with acute and chronic PCAG (ACG and CRG), were assessed. The opening of the ciliary cleft in PREDIS was smaller than that in NOR. In UNI, the opening and area of the ciliary cleft were significantly decreased compared with those of NOR and PREDIS. ACG had widespread structural abnormalities including marked decrease in the ciliary cleft and scleral venous plexus, and a thinner sclera than those in normotensive eyes, whereas the ICA collapsed in CRG with the thinnest sclera. Medical therapy-responsive glaucomatous cases had wider ciliary cleft and scleral venous plexus than unresponsive ones. These findings suggest that the ciliary cleft and scleral venous plexus of the ICA are key structures contributing to not only the pathophysiology of canine glaucoma but also the responsiveness to medical therapy in glaucomatous eyes, and cross-sectional entire structures of the ICA should be evaluated quantitatively with UBM when diagnosing and managing canine glaucoma.

  9. Reliability of measurements of rat lateral gastrocnemius architectural parameters obtained from ultrasound biomicroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Carolina Carneiro; Martins, Natália Santos da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Machado, João Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This study used ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify the pennation angle (PA) and muscle thickness (MT) of rat skeletal muscle and evaluated the reliability and reproducibility of the method by statistical analysis, determining the coefficient of variation (CV), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and typical error of measurement. A UBM system with a center frequency of 40 MHz was used to acquire images of the right lateral gastrocnemius of ten male Wistar rats on two different days and with two ankle positions (90° or 150°). Two independent measurements of the PA and MT were randomly performed in each of three picture frames. The analysis resulted in CVs of 10.47% and 4.81% for the PA and the MT, respectively, for the ankle at 90° and 9.24% and 5.98% for the ankle at 150°. Additionally, the ICC values ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for the PA and 0.57 to 0.99 for the MT. Statistically significant differences between the ankle positions were observed for the PA (p = 0.00013). The reliability of the PA and MT measurements for the rat right lateral gastrocnemius, determined from the ultrasound biomicroscopy images, was high (>0.90) for the methodology proposed. This finding indicates the potential of ultrasound biomicroscopy for quantitative muscle characterization and the longitudinal examination of tissue adaptation to different conditions of use, disease and rehabilitation.

  10. Reliability of Measurements of Rat Lateral Gastrocnemius Architectural Parameters Obtained from Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Peixinho, Carolina Carneiro; Martins, Natália Santos da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Machado, João Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This study used ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify the pennation angle (PA) and muscle thickness (MT) of rat skeletal muscle and evaluated the reliability and reproducibility of the method by statistical analysis, determining the coefficient of variation (CV), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and typical error of measurement. A UBM system with a center frequency of 40 MHz was used to acquire images of the right lateral gastrocnemius of ten male Wistar rats on two different days and with two ankle positions (90° or 150°). Two independent measurements of the PA and MT were randomly performed in each of three picture frames. The analysis resulted in CVs of 10.47% and 4.81% for the PA and the MT, respectively, for the ankle at 90° and 9.24% and 5.98% for the ankle at 150°. Additionally, the ICC values ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for the PA and 0.57 to 0.99 for the MT. Statistically significant differences between the ankle positions were observed for the PA (p = 0.00013). The reliability of the PA and MT measurements for the rat right lateral gastrocnemius, determined from the ultrasound biomicroscopy images, was high (>0.90) for the methodology proposed. This finding indicates the potential of ultrasound biomicroscopy for quantitative muscle characterization and the longitudinal examination of tissue adaptation to different conditions of use, disease and rehabilitation. PMID:24505306

  11. Ultrasound biomicroscopic analysis of iris-fixed acrylic intraocular lens in the absence of capsule support.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Teresio; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Castiglione, Francesco; Gagliano, Caterina; Reibaldi, Michele; Pulvirenti, Manuela; Reibaldi, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate postoperative complications and to determine with ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) the position of a foldable acrylic intraocular lens (IOL) implanted with a surgical technique of iris suturing in eyes without capsule support. Six eyes with iris-sutured IOLs were examined postoperatively with UBM. The examination included the position of haptics and their relationship to the surrounding structures. Other parameters studied were central anterior chamber depth, IOL iris contact and pigment dispersion. The position of all 12 haptics was determined. All haptics were in touch with the iris. Pigment dispersion was seen in two cases. The anterior chamber depth of the sutured eyes was normal. There was neither cystoid macular edema nor chronic uveitis postoperatively. In conclusion, in most cases surgical placement of iris-fixed lenses is a blind procedure and UBM could be an appropriate method to determine the position of IOL haptics postoperatively and to demonstrate that this surgical technique is reproducible, safe, and effective with the limitation of the difficulty of iris suturing IOL.

  12. An ultrasound biomicroscopic and water jet ultrasound indentation method for detecting the degenerative changes of articular cartilage in a rabbit model of progressive osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Aijun; Wan, Wenbo; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-06-01

    It is important to assess the early degeneration of articular cartilage associated with osteoarthritis (OA) for early intervention and treatment planning. Previously, we have developed a high frequency ultrasound and water jet indentation method for the morphologic, acoustic and mechanical assessment of articular cartilage, using the enzymatic digestion as a model of osteoarthritic degeneration. No naturally degenerated articular cartilage has been tested with the developed method. In this study, we aimed to determine the usefulness of the developed method for detecting the natural degeneration of articular cartilage in a standard surgical model of OA in rabbits. Forty adult New Zealand white female rabbits were used in this study, which included 30 experimental rabbits undergoing the right anterior cruciate ligament transection surgery and 10 control rabbits. At the 3rd, 6th, and 9th week post-surgery, 10 experimental rabbits were sacrificed, respectively, for assessment of the knee cartilage quality. The cartilage at the medial and lateral femoral condyles and tibial plateaus (four points) was measured by the high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy, the water jet ultrasound indentation and a contact mechanical indentation test before a histopathologic analysis for grading of degeneration severity. Measured parameters were compared among different groups classified either by post-surgery time or by histopathologic grade. The results showed a general trend of increase for ultrasound roughness index and a general trend of decrease for integrated reflection coefficient, stiffness coefficient from water-jet indentation and Young's modulus (E) from the mechanical indentation with the increase of post-surgery time. Comparisons among groups with different histopathologic grades showed similar trend with the increase of degeneration severity. The water jet ultrasound indentation method was demonstrated to be an effective method to measure the mechanical properties of the

  13. A Novel Method for Measuring Anterior Segment Area of the Eye on Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Images Using Photoshop

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziqiang; Lin, Jialiu; Huang, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel method for quantitative measurement of area parameters in ocular anterior segment ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) images using Photoshop software and to assess its intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility. Methods Twenty healthy volunteers with wide angles and twenty patients with narrow or closed angles were consecutively recruited. UBM images were obtained and analyzed using Photoshop software by two physicians with different-level training on two occasions. Borders of anterior segment structures including cornea, iris, lens, and zonules in the UBM image were semi-automatically defined by the Magnetic Lasso Tool in the Photoshop software according to the pixel contrast and modified by the observers. Anterior chamber area (ACA), posterior chamber area (PCA), iris cross-section area (ICA) and angle recess area (ARA) were drawn and measured. The intraobserver and interobserver reproducibilities of the anterior segment area parameters and scleral spur location were assessed by limits of agreement, coefficient of variation (CV), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results All of the parameters were successfully measured by Photoshop. The intraobserver and interobserver reproducibilities of ACA, PCA, and ICA were good, with no more than 5% CV and more than 0.95 ICC, while the CVs of ARA were within 20%. The intraobserver and interobserver reproducibilities for defining the spur location were more than 0.97 ICCs. Although the operating times for both observers were less than 3 minutes per image, there was significant difference in the measuring time between two observers with different levels of training (p<0.001). Conclusion Measurements of ocular anterior segment areas on UBM images by Photoshop showed good intraobserver and interobserver reproducibilties. The methodology was easy to adopt and effective in measuring. PMID:25803857

  14. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist-Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-08-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra(+/-)/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)(-/-) and IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(+/+) mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE(-/-) mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression.

  15. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist–Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-01-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra+/−/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)−/− and IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra+/+/apoE+/+ mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra+/−/apoE−/− mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra+/−/apoE−/− mice than in the IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra+/−/apoE−/− mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE−/− mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE−/− mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression. PMID:26413013

  16. 21 CFR 886.1850 - AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. 886.1850... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1850 AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. (a) Identification. An AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope is an AC-powered device that is...

  17. 21 CFR 886.1850 - AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. 886.1850... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1850 AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. (a) Identification. An AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope is an AC-powered device that is...

  18. Sonomammography: An atlas of comparative breast ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Guyer, B.P.; Dewsbury, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas of breast ultrasound is extensively illustrated and provides a short analytical text before each group of pathologies. Although based on B-scan techniques, there are numerous comparisons with sector scans and linear array scans. X-ray mammography and breast ultrasound is analyzed, based upon 2000 sonomammograms, showing how a more accurate pre-operation assessment can be made, and how unnecessary surgery can be reduced. Major features of this atlas include a detailed analysis of the appearances of breast lesions, extensive illustrations of the various pathologies (generally confirmed histologically), a close comparison of ultrasound with x-ray mammography, and illustrations of lesions by different ultrasound techniques.

  19. Comparative evaluation of ultrasound scanner accuracy in distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, F. P.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop and compare two different automatic methods for accuracy evaluation in ultrasound phantom measurements on B-mode images: both of them give as a result the relative error e between measured distances, performed by 14 brand new ultrasound medical scanners, and nominal distances, among nylon wires embedded in a reference test object. The first method is based on a least squares estimation, while the second one applies the mean value of the same distance evaluated at different locations in ultrasound image (same distance method). Results for both of them are proposed and explained.

  20. Comparing Ultrasound and Mechanical Steering in a Biodiesel Production Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.; Ferreira, Jerusa R. L.

    The analysis of the kinetics of the transesterification reaction is crucial to compare different routes or routes with different catalysts or reaction accelerators. The use of ultrasound is considereda method for accelerating the biodiesel production. However, little effort has been done and is reported in the literature about how and under what conditions the use of ultrasound really speeds up the process, or the conditions under which its use is unnecessary or even harmful, burdening the process. Two dissimilar energy injections into a typical route were tested: ultrasound (@ 1 MHz and no heating) and mechanical steering (with heating), both applied in an 8:1 ratio of soybean oil and methanol, adding 1% of KOH as catalyzer. As results, during the first 10 minutes of reaction ultrasound showed unbearable effect on the transesterification, whilst mechanical steering and heating achieved almost 70% of conversion ratio. However, during the following 10 minutes, the mechanical steering and heating got nothing more than 80% of conversion, a considerable less efficient process than ultrasound assisted one, which achieved more than 90%. The straightforward explanation is that ultrasound continually inserts energy in a slower rate, what can result in a more stable conversion scenario. On the other hand, mechanical steering and heating provides more energy at a glance, but cannot push the final conversion rate beyond a limit, as the transesterification is a double-way chemical process. The instability mechanical steering and heating settles in the reaction medium pulls the components back to their original states more than pushes than to the converted equilibrium state of the matter.

  1. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  2. Localising rectus muscle insertions using high frequency wide-field ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Smith, David R; Kraft, Stephen P

    2012-05-01

    The ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) can accurately locate an extraocular muscle (EOM) insertion. The authors compared the accuracy of the Sonomed UBM (SUBM), a new 'wide-field ultrasound biomicroscope', with the older model Humphrey UBM (HUBM) in localising EOM insertions and compared their ranges of detection of muscle insertions. Prospective, double-masked, observational study of 27 patients undergoing primary (n=40 muscles) or repeat (n=10 muscles) horizontal or vertical rectus muscle surgery. EOM insertional distances were measured with SUBM, and then intraoperatively with callipers. A Bland-Altman analysis and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to compare the SUBM and surgical data. For all muscles, the differences between SUBM and surgery measurements were less than 1.0 mm. The mean of the SUBM insertion distances was 6.67 mm (SD 1.65 mm) versus 6.7 mm (SD 1.6 mm) at surgery. The intraclass correlation coefficient showed 'excellent' correlation between the two sets of data and was higher than that reported with HUBM. The image quality with the SUBM was superior to the HUBM, and its range of field was much larger (14×18 mm vs 5×6 mm). The SUBM with its smaller, more manoeuvrable probe handpiece and a wider scanning field was more accurate in detecting muscle insertions compared with HUBM.

  3. Three-dimensional ultrasound does not improve diagnosis of retained placental tissue compared to two-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Belachew, Johanna; Axelsson, Ove; Eurenius, Karin; Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to improve ultrasonic diagnosis of retained placental tissue by measuring the volume of the uterine body and cavity using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. Twenty-five women who were to undergo surgical curettage due to suspected retained placental tissue were included. The volume of the uterine body and cavity was measured using the VOCAL imaging program. Twenty-one women had retained placental tissue histologically verified. Three of these had uterine volumes exceeding the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. Seventeen of the 21 women had a uterine cavity volume exceeding the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. In all 14 cases examined 28 days or more after delivery the cavity volume exceeded the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. A large cavity volume estimated with 3D ultrasound is indicative of retained placental tissue. However, 3D ultrasound adds little or no diagnostic power compared to 2D ultrasound.

  4. Comparative efficacy of pregabalin and therapeutic ultrasound versus therapeutic ultrasound alone on patients with post stroke shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M S; Uddin, M T

    2014-07-01

    The study was designed to compare the efficacy of pregabalin, an anticonvulsant on pain behavior of stroke patients with shoulder pain in a comparative study with ultrasound therapy and ultimately to recommend a better treatment option to improve pain and function in post stroke shoulder pain. This study was carried out in a private neurology Hospital in Dhaka during January to December 2010. Data were collected from 70 post stroke patients with shoulder pain and were divided into two groups. The patients in Group A were treated with pregabalin 100mg twice daily along with therapeutic ultrasound 10 minutes daily and group B were treated with therapeutic ultrasound alone for the same dose and duration. Pain free range of motion exercise was given to both groups as the therapeutic exercise. Pain parameters in the form of VAS were measured at one and two weeks and were compared. Seventy one percent of the patients were male with 80% were above 60 years old. Pain scoring in VAS of 100 was 21.32±6.01 in group A and 41±4.58 in groups B at the end of two weeks assuming the pretreatment VAS of all patients as 100. Marked improvement in shoulder pain were observed in both groups and Group A had better improvement in pain than group B. Therapeutic ultrasound when given with pregabalin found to have added benefit over therapeutic ultrasound alone in post stroke shoulder pain. Differences were statistically significant.

  5. Breast imaging with ultrasound tomography: a comparative study with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan; Littrup, Peter; Duric, Neb; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven; Lupinacci, Jessica; Myc, Lukasz; Szczepanski, Amy; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype relative to magnetic resonance (MR) for imaging overall breast anatomy and accentuating tumors relative to background tissue. The study was HIPAA compliant, approved by the Institutional Review Board, and performed after obtaining the requisite informed consent. Twenty-three patients were imaged with MR and the UST prototype. T1 weighted images with fat saturation, with and without gadolinium enhancement, were used to examine anatomical structures and tumors, while T2 weighted images were used to identify cysts. The UST scans generated sound speed, attenuation, and reflection images. A qualitative visual comparison of the MRI and UST images was then used to identify anatomical similarities. A more focused approach that involved a comparison of reported masses, lesion volumes, and breast density was used to quantify the findings from the visual assessment. Our acoustic tomography prototype imaged distributions of fibrous stroma, parenchyma, fatty tissues, and lesions in patterns similar to those seen in the MR images. The range of thresholds required to establish tumor volume equivalency between MRI and UST suggested that a universal threshold for isolating masses relative to background tissue is feasible with UST. UST has demonstrated the ability to visualize and characterize breast tissues in a manner comparable to MRI. Thresholding techniques accentuate masses relative to background anatomy, which may prove clinically useful for early cancer detection.

  6. The effect of biomicroscope illumination system on grading anterior chamber inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ira G; Nugent, Alex K; Vargas-Martín, Fernando

    2009-10-01

    To determine how a biomicroscope illumination system affects the grading of anterior chamber (AC) inflammation. Laboratory investigation. An artificial AC was designed to replicate optically a human AC and was filled with 5-mum polystyrene beads suspended in ethanol. A high-definition video eyepiece camera recorded the moving beads. Using image processing software, the main outcomes measures determined were the average number of beads in a 1 x 1-mm field at varying widths of the slit-beam. The volume of light and number of beads observed increased significantly as the slit-beam widened. Additionally, 3 separate biomicroscopes of identical make and model were found to produce different levels of luminance at the same aperture dial settings, influencing the number of beads observed, with the brighter biomicroscope yielding higher bead counts. Ability to count beads and perhaps the ability to count inflammatory cells in an inflamed eye depend on a number of factors, including the level of illumination and width of the slit-beam. This study demonstrated that the brighter the illumination and the wider the beam, the more beads were observed. This illustrates the importance of standardizing biomicroscopy, particularly where consecutive observations are used to make clinical decisions and in cases of multicenter clinical trials where clinical data are evaluated across different facilities.

  7. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  8. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  9. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pregnant woman and assess her fetus Diagnose gallbladder disease Evaluate flow in blood vessels Guide a ... For some ultrasound exams, such as of the gallbladder, your doctor may ask that you not eat ...

  10. A comparative study in ultrasound breast imaging classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Edirisinghe, Eran A.; Bez, Helmut E.

    2009-02-01

    American College of Radiology introduces a standard in classification, the breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS), standardize the reporting of ultrasound findings, clarify its interpretation, and facilitate communication between clinicians. The effective use of new technologies to support healthcare initiatives is important and current research is moving towards implementing computer tools in the diagnostics process. Initially a detailed study was carried out to evaluate the performance of two commonly used appearance based classification algorithms, based on the use of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and two dimensional linear discriminant analysis (2D-LDA). The study showed that these two appearance based classification approaches are not capable of handling the classification of ultrasound breast image lesions. Therefore further investigations in the use of a popular feature based classifier - Support Vector Machine (SVM) was conducted. A pre-processing step before feature based classification is feature extraction, which involve shape, texture and edge descriptors for the Region of Interest (ROI). The input dataset to SVM classification is from a fully automated ROI detection. We achieve the success rate of 0.550 in PCA, 0.500 in LDA, and 0.931 in SVM. The best combination of features in SVM classification is to combine the shape, texture and edge descriptors, with sensitivity 0.840 and specificity 0.968. This paper briefly reviews the background to the project and then details the ongoing research. In conclusion, we discuss the contributions, limitations, and future plans of our work.

  11. Ultrasound and cadaveric prosections as methods for teaching cardiac anatomy: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Griksaitis, Michael J; Sawdon, Marina A; Finn, Gabrielle M

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two cardiac anatomy teaching modalities, ultrasound imaging and cadaveric prosections, for learning cardiac gross anatomy. One hundred and eight first-year medical students participated. Two weeks prior to the teaching intervention, students completed a pretest to assess their prior knowledge and to ensure that groups were equally randomized. Students, divided into pre-existing teaching groups, were assigned to one of two conditions; "cadaver" or "ultrasound." Those in the cadaver group received teaching on the heart using prosections, whereas the ultrasound group received teaching using live ultrasound images of the heart. Immediately after teaching, students sat a post-test. Both teaching modalities increased students' test scores by similar amounts but no significant difference was found between the two conditions, suggesting that both prosections and ultrasound are equally effective methods for teaching gross anatomy of the heart. Our data support the inclusion of either cadaveric teaching or living anatomy using ultrasound within the undergraduate anatomy curriculum, and further work is needed to compare the additive effect of the two modalities. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Ultrasound detection of pneumothorax compared with chest X-ray and computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Nagarsheth, Khanjan; Kurek, Stanley

    2011-04-01

    Pneumothorax after trauma can be a life threatening injury and its care requires expeditious and accurate diagnosis and possible intervention. We performed a prospective, single blinded study with convenience sampling at a Level I trauma center comparing thoracic ultrasound with chest X-ray and CT scan in the detection of traumatic pneumothorax. Trauma patients that received a thoracic ultrasound, chest X-ray, and chest CT scan were included in the study. The chest X-rays were read by a radiologist who was blinded to the thoracic ultrasound results. Then both were compared with CT scan results. One hundred and twenty-five patients had a thoracic ultrasound performed in the 24-month period. Forty-six patients were excluded from the study due to lack of either a chest X-ray or chest CT scan. Of the remaining 79 patients there were 22 positive pneumothorax found by CT and of those 18 (82%) were found on ultrasound and 7 (32%) were found on chest X-ray. The sensitivity of thoracic ultrasound was found to be 81.8 per cent and the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The sensitivity of chest X-ray was found to be 31.8 per cent and again the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasound for pneumothorax was 0.934 and the negative predictive value for chest X-ray for pneumothorax was found to be 0.792. We advocate the use of chest ultrasound for detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

  13. Estimating the keratoconus index from ultrasound images of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, F; Castiglione, F

    2000-12-01

    The keratoconus index (KI) is a new biometric parameter to make diagnosis and to follow the development of the keratoconus in human eyes. Using images from an ultrasound biomicroscope, we show a semi-automatic method to speed up the computation of the KI.

  14. An adaptive optics biomicroscope for mouse retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David P.; Webb, Robert H.; Zhou, Yaopeng; Bifano, Thomas G.; Zamiri, Parisa; Lin, Charles P.

    2007-02-01

    In studying retinal disease on a microscopic level, in vivo imaging has allowed researchers to track disease progression in a single animal over time without sacrificing large numbers of animals for statistical studies. Historically, a drawback of in vivo retinal imaging, when compared to ex vivo imaging, is decreased image resolution due to aberrations present in the mouse eye. Adaptive optics has successfully corrected phase aberrations introduced the eye in ophthalmic imaging in humans. We are using adaptive optics to correct for aberrations introduced by the mouse eye in hopes of achieving cellular resolution retinal images of mice in vivo. In addition to using a wavefront sensor to drive the adaptive optic element, we explore the using image data to correct for wavefront aberrations introduced by the mouse eye. Image data, in the form of the confocal detection pinhole intensity are used as the feedback mechanism to control the MEMS deformable mirror in the adaptive optics system. Correction for wavefront sensing and sensor-less adaptive optics systems are presented.

  15. A randomised experiment comparing low-cost ultrasound gel alternative with commercial gel.

    PubMed

    Riguzzi, Christine; Binkowski, Allison; Butterfield, Mike; Sani, Farhad; Teismann, Nathan; Fahimi, Jahan

    2017-04-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is a portable, relatively low-cost imaging modality with great potential utility in low-resource settings. However, commercially produced ultrasound gel is often cost-prohibitive and unavailable. We investigated whether images obtained using an alternative cornstarch-based gel would be of comparable quality with those using commercial gel. This was a blinded, randomised, cross-over study comparing commercially produced ultrasound gel with home-made cornstarch-based gel. Ultrasound-trained faculty obtained three video clips with each gel type from patients at one urban ED. The clips were evaluated by a radiologist and an ultrasound-trained emergency physician. Images were assessed in terms of overall adequacy (dichotomous) and quality, resolution and detail using a rating scale (0-10). All sonographers and physicians reviewing the images were blinded to the type of gel used. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the study, producing 204 separate images (102 with each gel). The cornstarch gel clips were deemed accurate in 70.6% (95% CI 63.9% to 76.5%) of the scans, as compared with 65.2% (95% CI 58.4% to 71.4%) of those using commercial gel. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to image detail, resolution or quality. Images produced using the cornstarch-based alternative ultrasound gel were of similar quality to those using commercial gel. The low cost and easy preparation of the cornstarch-based gel make it an attractive coupling medium for use in low-resource settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. A pilot study comparing the DuoFertility® monitor with ultrasound in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Rollason, Jennie CB; Outtrim, Joanne G; Mathur, Raj S

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of ovulation detection by the DuoFertility® monitor compared with transvaginal ultrasound in infertile women with regular menstrual cycles. Methods Eight infertile patients, aged 27–40 years, with a body mass index of 19–29, regular menses, normal ovaries on pelvic ultrasound scan, and normal early follicular luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin were recruited from infertility clinics in primary and secondary care for this pilot, prospective, observational study. The patients were asked to use the DuoFertility monitor for the whole cycle, with investigators and patients blind to DuoFertility data. Daily urine LH monitoring commenced on cycle day 8, with daily transvaginal ultrasound following the first positive LH until ovulation was observed. Ovulation was further confirmed by serum progesterone. The main outcome measure was detection of ovulation by the DuoFertility monitor, and correlation between day of ovulation assessed by DuoFertility and ultrasound. Results DuoFertility identified ovulation as having occurred within one day of that determined via ultrasound in all cycles. The sensitivity of ovulation detection was 100% (95% confidence interval 82–100). The specificity could not be concluded from the data. Conclusion In infertile women with regular cycles, the DuoFertility monitor appears to accurately identify ovulatory cycles and the day of ovulation. PMID:25075200

  17. Compare ultrasound-mediated heating and cavitation between flowing polymer- and lipid-shelled microbubbles during focused ultrasound exposures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi; Yu, Xiaojun; Fu, Quanyou; Ding, Ting; Zhou, Fanyu; Wang, Supin

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares the efficiency of flowing polymer- and lipid-shelled microbubbles (MBs) in the heating and cavitation during focused ultrasound exposures. Temperature and cavitation activity were simultaneously measured as the two types of shelled MBs and saline flowing through a 3 mm diameter vessel in the phantom with varying flow velocities (0-20 cm/s) at different acoustic power levels (0.6-20 W) with each exposure for 5 s. Temperature and cavitation for the lipid-shelled MBs were higher than those for the polymer-shelled MBs. Temperature rise decreased with increasing flow velocities for the two types of shelled MBs and saline at acoustic power 1.5 W. At acoustic power 11.1 W, temperature rise increased with increasing flow velocities for the lipid-shelled MBs. For the polymer-shelled MBs, the temperature rise increased with increasing flow velocities from 3-15 cm/s and decreased at 20 cm/s. Cavitation increased with increasing flow velocity for the two shelled MBs and there were no significant changes of cavitation with increasing flow velocities for saline. These results suggested that lipid-shelled MBs may have a greater efficiency than polymer-shelled MBs in heating and cavitation during focused ultrasound exposures.

  18. Nonlinear Ultrasound Propagation in Solid ^4{He} Compared with Shear Modulus Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Izumi; Kojima, Harry

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound attenuation (α ) and velocity (V) at 9.6 MHz are measured in polycrystalline hcp ^4{He} . The ultrasound signal above 200 mK is linear and understood in terms of resonant vibration of dislocation segments pinned between network nodes with an average pinning length of 3.7 μ m, much shorter than 59 μ m estimated from a shear modulus measurement. Dramatic changes in α and V are observed below 200 mK. The changes are strongly dependent on temperature and are nonlinear and hysteretic. These effects result from pinning of dislocations by ^3{He} impurities (nominal concentration of 0.3 ppm). The dislocation damping constant due to thermal phonons, the binding energy between dislocation and ^3{He} , and the average network pinning length obtained from the ultrasound data are compared with those from the shear modulus experiments.

  19. Ultrasound and Cadaveric Prosections as Methods for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griksaitis, Michael J.; Sawdon, Marina A.; Finn, Gabrielle M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two cardiac anatomy teaching modalities, ultrasound imaging and cadaveric prosections, for learning cardiac gross anatomy. One hundred and eight first-year medical students participated. Two weeks prior to the teaching intervention, students completed a pretest to assess their prior knowledge and to ensure that…

  20. Ultrasound and Cadaveric Prosections as Methods for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griksaitis, Michael J.; Sawdon, Marina A.; Finn, Gabrielle M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two cardiac anatomy teaching modalities, ultrasound imaging and cadaveric prosections, for learning cardiac gross anatomy. One hundred and eight first-year medical students participated. Two weeks prior to the teaching intervention, students completed a pretest to assess their prior knowledge and to ensure that…

  1. Analysis of lymph flow in microvessels by biomicroscopic and coherent optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekateryna I.; Brill, Gregory E.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Solov'eva, Anastasiya V.; Sedykh, Alexey V.

    2000-04-01

    The lymph flow velocity in microvessels of rat mesentery was investigated by using biomicroscopic manual frame-by-frame technique with image processing system and speckle- interferometrical method. Lymph flow was observed in the majority of lymphatics. Lymph flow was registered in microvessels with phasic contractions and functioning valves. The lymphocytes motion in flow was measured. It was established that mean lymph flow velocity increased in vessels with phasic contractions and moderate concentration of lymphocytes in flow. The application of speckle- interferometry allowed us to estimate lymph flow on the whole with all stops, the increases and decreases of flow velocity. The parameters both of changes of a mean velocity and of spatial-temporal velocity distribution in lymph flow were calculated. Temporal changes of the parameter V showed a shuttle-type character of lymph flow velocity.

  2. A Clinical Comparative Study of Ultrasound-Normal Versus Ultrasound-Abnormal Congenital Muscular Torticollis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Taek; Park, Jong-Wan; Lim, Mikyung; Yoon, Kyung Jae; Kim, Yong Bum; Chung, Pil-Wook; Park, Hee-Jin; Lee, So-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the clinical features and outcome of outpatient-based physiotherapy (manual stretch) of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) with passive neck motion limitation (≥ 10°) according to whether the finding on ultrasonography (US) is normal or abnormal. Case-control study. Institutional practice. A total of 149 patients with CMT who met eligibility criteria were included: age at presentation ≤ 6 months, limitation of passive neck rotation (ΔROT) or lateral flexion (ΔLAT) ≥ 10°, and completion of our outpatient-based physiotherapy program. Patients were allocated to the US-normal or US-abnormal group. Patients underwent physiotherapy and were followed-up monthly until ΔROT and ΔLAT were ≤ 5° or did not respond to treatment. Baseline characteristics, initial ΔROT and ΔLAT, age at presentation, treatment durations, and success rates of physiotherapy were compared between 2 groups. Treatment duration was adjusted for initial ΔROT, ΔLAT, and age at presentation using analysis of covariance. Mean initial ΔROT and ΔLAT in US-abnormal (28.5°; 17.0°) were greater than in US-normal (7.9°, P < .001; 12.3°, P = .001, respectively). Mean age at presentation was older in US-normal (3.8 months) than in US-abnormal (1.8 months, P < .001). Treatment duration was shorter in the US-normal (5.1 weeks) than US-abnormal (14.9 weeks, P < .001). Adjusted treatment duration was also shorter in US-normal (9.7 weeks) than US-abnormal (13.8 weeks, P < .05). The success rates of physiotherapy were 95% in US-abnormal and 100% in US-normal. Two of 6 treatment failures in the US-abnormal group underwent surgery. In CMT with passive neck motion limitation (≥ 10°), patients in the US-normal group demonstrated lesser passive neck motion limitation and older age at presentation than US-abnormal. It seems that US-normal showed shorter treatment duration irrespective of severity of neck motion limitation and age at presentation. Additionally, manual stretching

  3. Comparative kinetic analysis of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Rokhina, Ekaterina V; Repo, Eveliina; Virkutyte, Jurate

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic study of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol in water was performed to qualitatively assess the effect of ultrasound on the process kinetics. Various kinetic parameters such as the apparent kinetic rate constants, the surface utilization coefficient and activation energy of phenol oxidation over RuI(3) catalyst were investigated. Comparative analysis revealed that the use of ultrasound irradiation reduced the energy barrier of the reaction but had no impact on the reaction pathway. The activation energy for the oxidation of phenol over RuI(3) catalyst in the presence of ultrasound was found to be 13kJmol(-1), which was four times smaller in comparison to the silent oxidation process (57kJmol(-1)). Finally, 'figures-of-merit' was utilized to assess different experimental strategies such as sonolysis alone, H(2)O(2)-enhanced sonolysis and sono-catalytic oxidation of phenol in order to estimate the electric energy consumption based on the kinetic rate constants of the oxidation process.

  4. Validity of gestational age estimates by last menstrual period and neonatal examination compared to ultrasound in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Deputy, Nicholas P; Nguyen, Phuong H; Pham, Hoa; Nguyen, Son; Neufeld, Lynnette; Martorell, Reynaldo; Ramakrishnan, Usha

    2017-01-11

    Accurate estimation of gestational age is important for both clinical and public health purposes. Estimates of gestational age using fetal ultrasound measurements are considered most accurate but are frequently unavailable in low- and middle-income countries. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of last menstrual period and Farr neonatal examination estimates of gestational age, compared to ultrasound estimates, in a large cohort of women in Vietnam. Data for this analysis come from a randomized, placebo-controlled micronutrient supplementation trial in Vietnam. We analyzed 912 women with ultrasound and prospectively-collected last menstrual period estimates of gestational age and 685 women with ultrasound and Farr estimates of gestational age. We used the Wilcoxon signed rank sum test to assess differences in gestational age estimated by last menstrual period or Farr examination compared to ultrasound and computed the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) to quantify agreement between methods. We computed the Kappa coefficient (κ) to quantify agreement in preterm, term and post-term classification. The median gestational age estimated by ultrasound was 273.9 days. Gestational age was slightly overestimated by last menstrual period (median 276.0 days, P < 0.001) and more greatly overestimated by Farr examination (median 286.7 days, P < 0.001). Gestational age estimates by last menstrual period and ultrasound were moderately correlated (ICC = 0.78) and concordant (CCC = 0.63), whereas gestational age estimates by Farr examination and ultrasound were weakly correlated (ICC = 0.26) and concordant (CCC = 0.05). Last menstrual period and ultrasound estimates of gestational age were within ± 14 days for 88.4% of women; Farr and ultrasound estimates were within ± 14 days for 55.8% of women. Last menstrual period and ultrasound estimates of gestational age had higher

  5. A multi-centre randomised trial comparing ultrasound vs mammography for screening breast cancer in high-risk Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Shen, S; Zhou, Y; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Duan, X; Huang, R; Li, B; Shi, Y; Shao, Z; Liao, H; Jiang, J; Shen, N; Zhang, J; Yu, C; Jiang, H; Li, S; Han, S; Ma, J; Sun, Q

    2015-03-17

    Chinese women tend to have small and dense breasts and ultrasound is a common method for breast cancer screening in China. However, its efficacy and cost comparing with mammography has not been evaluated in randomised trials. At 14 breast centres across China during 2008-2010, 13 339 high-risk women aged 30-65 years were randomised to be screened by mammography alone, ultrasound alone, or by both methods at enrollment and 1-year follow-up. A total of 12 519 and 8692 women underwent the initial and second screenings, respectively. Among the 30 cancers (of which 15 were stage 0/I) detected, 5 (0.72/1000) were in the mammography group, 11 (1.51/1000) in the ultrasound group, and 14 (2.02/1000) in the combined group (P=0.12). In the combined group, ultrasound detected all the 14 cancers, whereas mammography detected 8, making ultrasound more sensitive (100 vs 57.1%, P=0.04) with a better diagnostic accuracy (0.999 vs 0.766, P=0.01). There was no difference between mammography and ultrasound in specificity (100 vs 99.9%, P=0.51) and positive predictive value (72.7 vs 70.0%; P=0.87). To detect one cancer, the costs of ultrasound, mammography, and combined modality were $7876, $45 253, and $21 599, respectively. Ultrasound is superior to mammography for breast cancer screening in high-risk Chinese women.

  6. Comparative effectiveness of ultrasound and paraffin therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Hsieh, Shih-Fu; Horng, Yu-Shiow; Chen, Hui-Ling; Lee, Kun-Chang; Horng, Yi-Shiung

    2014-11-26

    Conclusive evidence indicating an effective treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a common entrapment neuropathy, is lacking. Ultrasound therapy (US therapy) has long been used as one of the combination treatments for CTS. In addition, paraffin bath therapy has been applied widely as a physical modality in treating patients with hand conditions. The purpose of this randomized trial was to compare the efficacy of combining a wrist orthosis with either US therapy or paraffin bath therapy in treating CTS patients. Patients with CTS were randomized into two groups. All patients received a wrist orthosis. Twice per week, one group underwent paraffin therapy, and the other group underwent ultrasound therapy. Each patient received a questionnaire, physical examination and nerve conduction study of the upper extremities before and after treatment for eight weeks. Sixty patients were recruited, and 47 completed the study. Statistical analysis revealed significant improvements in symptom severity scores in both groups. After adjusting for age, gender and baseline data, the analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference in the functional status score between two groups. The combination of ultrasound therapy with a wrist orthosis may be more effective than paraffin therapy with a wrist orthosis. Clinicaltrial.gov: NCT02278289 Oct 28, 2014.

  7. Two Crosslinking Technologies for Superficial Reticular Dermis Injection: A Comparative Ultrasound and Histologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few hyaluronic acid fillers have been developed for superficial injection. Objective: To compare the diffusion and integration properties of cohesive polydensified matrix and Vycross® technology hyaluronic acid fillers with lidocaine following injection into the superficial reticular dermis. Methods and materials: Two subjects received two injections each of cohesive polydensified matrix and Vycross® hyaluronic acid (0.2mL/site) in the superficial reticular dermis of the buttock under ultrasound control. Biopsies were obtained at Days 0, 15, and/or 90. Ultrasound and histologic analyses were performed, plus a series of simple rheological tests. Results: Day 0 ultrasound images showed cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid homogeneous with the surrounding dermis. Vycross® hyaluronic acid showed more heterogeneity and some leakage into the hypodermis. Day 15 and Day 90 images were similar to Day 0. Histologic examination of biopsy tissue showed cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid homogeneously distributed among collagen fibrils with no visible particles. Vycross® hyaluronic acid appeared as variable-sized pools with a particulate appearance. Neither gel was associated with an inflammatory reaction. Laboratory tests showed cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid to have greater cohesivity and resistance to traction forces than Vycross®. Conclusion: cohesive polydensified matrix gel with lidocaine is homogeneously distributed following injection in the superficial reticular dermis and may be particularly suited for aesthetic indications requiring superficial injection. PMID:28210379

  8. Laboratory and histopathologic comparative study of internal ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty and tumescent lipoplasty.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Camarena, Lázaro; Andino-Ulloa, Rider; Mora, Rene Crisanto; Fajardo-Barajas, Daniel

    2002-09-15

    Despite the advantages of using internal ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty instead of the classic tumescent lipoplasty, such as reduced bleeding and tissue damage, the authors found no objective or comparative study of these techniques in humans. For this reason, they conducted a clinical study to determine the amount of bleeding and tissue damage caused by each of the techniques. A simple clinical assay was accomplished at the Jalisco Plastic Surgery Institute on seven female patients scheduled for abdominal lipectomy. Two similar sections of the surgical area were marked for lipoplasty techniques: classic tumescent lipoplasty on one side and internal ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty on the other. Both areas were treated simultaneously by surgeons experienced in each technique. Laboratory tests and histologic studies were performed on the aspirated material and the manipulated tissue, respectively. The fluids sent to the laboratory were analyzed to determine the amount of bleeding and tissue damage. In the laboratory, the degree of lesion and tissue damage was evaluated in the dermis, nerves, blood vessels, and adipose cells. With internal ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty, indicators of tissue damage such as glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, pyruvic oxalacetic transaminase, cholinesterase, and myoglobin showed higher values than with tumescent lipoplasty. The same was found for hemoglobin levels and in the histologic data indicative of tissue damage; both values were statistically significant at < 0.001. Internal ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty was not demonstrated to be more innocuous or to have a selective effect in adipose cells, and it generally resulted in more tissue damage and bleeding than the classic tumescent technique.

  9. /sup 201/Tl perfusion study of ''ischemic'' ulcers of the leg: prognostic ability compared with Doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.E.; Stewart, C.A.; Kwong, P.; Sakimura, I.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium 201 perfusion analysis was compared with Doppler ultrasound as a means of determining the healing potential of an ischemic ulcer of the leg in 27 patients. The degree of hyperemia was determined by comparative point counting of the /sup 201/Tl distribution in and about the ulcer. Using established Doppler criteria and a hyperemia ratio greater than 1.5:1, ultrasound alone correctly predicted healing in 15 out of 23 cases and /sup 201/Tl in 20 out of 23. Ultrasound correctly predicted non-healing in 3 out of 6 cases, compared with 5 out of 6 for /sup 201/Tl. The positive predictive value of the /sup 201/Tl study was 63%, versus 27% for ultrasound, and the negative predictive value was 95% for /sup 201/Tl and 83% for ultrasound. The accuracy of /sup 201/Tl and ultrasound was 86% and 62%, respectively. This limited study suggests that /sup 201/Tl perfusion scanning is a useful noninvasive test of ulcer healing potential and may be more sensitive than Doppler ultrasound.

  10. Comparative ultrasound measurement of normal thyroid gland dimensions in school aged children in our local environment.

    PubMed

    Marchie, T T; Oyobere, O; Eze, K C

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the measurement of normal range of ultrasound (US) thyroid gland dimensions in school-aged children (6-16 years) in our environment and compared with what is obtained elsewhere. A prospective ultrasound measurement study done in University of Benin Teaching Hospital Benin, Nigeria. A prospective ultrasound (US) study of thyroid dimensions of 500 school-aged children in our environment consisting of 227 boys and 273 girls was done from 1 December 2006 to July 2007. The subjects were examined by the authors and subjects with palpable abnormal thyroid gland were excluded from the study. The thyroid dimensions (length, height, and diameter) were taken for each lobe by means of ultrasound (US). In addition volume of each thyroid lobe was calculated and the summation of volume of the lobes was taken as thyroid gland volume of each subject. Also height and weight of patients were documented from which the subject's body surface was calculated. Incidental thyroid gland lesion in US was excluded from the study. Using the Statistical program of social science (SPSS) and INSTAT (Graph Pad Inc. USA) the data were analyzed. Informed consent was obtained from all the subjects and the study was done in line with the ethical guidelines of the centers. The US thyroid gland volume in school-aged children in Benin City from this study ranges between 1.17 cm 3 and 7.19 cm 3 , mean volume range of 1.76-4.95 cm 3 , median volume range of 1.73-4.73 cm 3 , and range of standard deviation from 0.39 cm 3 to 1.49 cm 3 . The average mean thyroid volume is 2.32 cm 3 with the following average dimensions; anteroposterior right lobe =1.06 cm, mediolateral right lobe = 1.01 cm and craniocaudal right lobe = 2.34 cm, and anteroposterior left lobe = 1.01 cm, mediolateral left lobe = 1.04 cm and craniocaudal left lobe = 2.41 cm for both boys and girls respectively. These data are significantly lower than data obtained by European based World Health

  11. Prospective Study Comparing Two Second-Look Ultrasound Techniques: Handheld Ultrasound and an Automated Breast Volume Scanner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonsoo; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Eun Jae

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of handheld ultrasound (US) and an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) as second-look US techniques subsequent to preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We prospectively enrolled patients with breast cancer who underwent handheld US and ABVS examinations as second-look US modalities for additional suspicious lesions found via preoperative breast MRI. We reviewed each second-look US modality independently and evaluated the detection rate of each modality. We then analyzed the correlation between the detection rate and the MRI factors (size, distance, and enhancement type). From March to September 2014, both types of second-look US examinations were performed on 40 patients with breast cancer who had 76 additional suspicious lesions detected via preoperative breast MRI. The detection rate of the ABVS was higher than that of handheld US for the second-look examination (94.7% versus 86.8%; P< .05). Among the 76 total lesions, 7 were only identified by the ABVS, 1 was only found by handheld US, and 3 were not detected by either the ABVS or handheld US. When we analyzed the correlation between the detection rate and MRI factors, the only meaningful factor was the enhancement type. The ability to detect a nonmass lesion was lower than the ability to detect a mass-type lesion (P < 0.05) for both the ABVS and handheld US. For a second-look US examination subsequent to preoperative breast MRI in patients with breast cancer, the ABVS is a more efficient modality than handheld US for preoperative evaluations. However, both techniques have limitations in detecting nonmass lesions.

  12. Ultrasound aspects in therapy-naive CIDP compared to long-term treated CIDP.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Vittore, Debora; Schubert, Victoria; Rasenack, Maria; Décard, Bernhard F; Heiling, Bianka; Hammer, Nadin; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the use of nerve ultrasound (NUS) along with the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines and clinical scores in untreated, recently diagnosed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) vs. long-lasting treated CIDP. NUS and nerve conduction studies (NCS) of predefined nerves/cervical roots were performed in CIDP on diagnostic onset and "chronic-CIDP" (diagnosis and therapy >6 months), compared to controls. Nerve morphology was quantified using the modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS, which is the sum of 3 ultrasound scores derived at 12 predefined measurement points and the homogeneity score (HS) in ulnar, median, and tibial nerve. 21 onset-CIDP, 21 "chronic-CIDP", and 21 age-matched controls were included. No differences in clinical scores or in the number of electrophysiologically affected nerves existed between the groups. Significantly enlarged cross-sectional areas of the nerves and diameters of the roots ensued already in onset-CIDP; however, with proximal predominance, whilst in chronic-CIDP, nerve enlargement was more prominent and ubiquitous. Increased UPS scores were shown in both patient groups compared to the controls. Significant differences between the patient groups were found particularly in the peripheral nerve score UPSA. Evaluation by means of HS revealed that the nerves in onset-CIDP were mostly regionally enlarged (often sparing distal segments) whereas in chronic-CIDP, nerves were more generalized enlarged. Onset- and chronic-CIDP show enlarged nerves and therefore increased mUPSS, however, nerve enlargement shows a more generalized pattern in chronic-CIDP compared to disease onset and correlates with disease duration and delayed therapy start, but not with disability.

  13. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Infertility - transvaginal ultrasound; Ovarian - transvaginal ultrasound; Abscess - transvaginal ultrasound

  14. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  15. Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Compared to Blind Steroid Injections in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Evers, Stefanie; Bryan, Andrew J; Sanders, Thomas L; Selles, Ruud W; Gelfman, Russell; Amadio, Peter C

    2017-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections to blind injections in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large community-based cohort. This study evaluated residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, treated with a corticosteroid injection for CTS between 2001 and 2010. The proportion of patients receiving retreatment and the duration of retreatment-free survival between blind and ultrasound-guided injections were compared. Propensity score matching was used to control for confounding by indication. In the matched data set consisting of 234 (of 600) hands treated with a blind injection and 87 (of 89) ultrasound-guided injection cases, ultrasound guidance was associated with a reduced hazard of retreatment (hazard ratio 0.59 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.37-0.93]). In addition, ultrasound guidance was associated with 55% reduced odds of retreatment within 1 year compared to blind injections (adjusted odds ratio 0.45 [95% CI 0.24-0.83]). This study indicates that ultrasound-guided injections are more effective in comparison to blind injections in the treatment of CTS. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Comparing tongue shapes from ultrasound imaging using smoothing spline analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lisa

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the tongue is increasingly common in speech production research. However, there has been little standardization regarding the quantification and statistical analysis of ultrasound data. In linguistic studies, researchers may want to determine whether the tongue shape for an articulation under two different conditions (e.g., consonants in word-final versus word-medial position) is the same or different. This paper demonstrates how the smoothing spline ANOVA (SS ANOVA) can be applied to the comparison of tongue curves [Gu, Smoothing Spline ANOVA Models (Springer, New York, 2002)]. The SS ANOVA is a technique for determining whether or not there are significant differences between the smoothing splines that are the best fits for two data sets being compared. If the interaction term of the SS ANOVA model is statistically significant, then the groups have different shapes. Since the interaction may be significant even if only a small section of the curves are different (i.e., the tongue root is the same, but the tip of one group is raised), Bayesian confidence intervals are used to determine which sections of the curves are statistically different. SS ANOVAs are illustrated with some data comparing obstruents produced in word-final and word-medial coda position.

  17. Investigation of mass transfer intensification under power ultrasound irradiation using 3D computational simulation: A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Asgharzadehahmadi, Seyedali; Asaithambi, Perumal; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Parthasarathy, Rajarathinam

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of acoustic streaming induced by low-frequency (24kHz) ultrasound irradiation on mass transfer in a two-phase system. The main objective is to discuss the possible mass transfer improvements under ultrasound irradiation. Three analyses were conducted: i) experimental analysis of mass transfer under ultrasound irradiation; ii) comparative analysis between the results of the ultrasound assisted mass transfer with that obtained from mechanically stirring; and iii) computational analysis of the systems using 3D CFD simulation. In the experimental part, the interactive effects of liquid rheological properties, ultrasound power and superficial gas velocity on mass transfer were investigated in two different sonicators. The results were then compared with that of mechanical stirring. In the computational part, the results were illustrated as a function of acoustic streaming behaviour, fluid flow pattern, gas/liquid volume fraction and turbulence in the two-phase system and finally the mass transfer coefficient was specified. It was found that additional turbulence created by ultrasound played the most important role on intensifying the mass transfer phenomena compared to that in stirred vessel. Furthermore, long residence time which depends on geometrical parameters is another key for mass transfer. The results obtained in the present study would help researchers understand the role of ultrasound as an energy source and acoustic streaming as one of the most important of ultrasound waves on intensifying gas-liquid mass transfer in a two-phase system and can be a breakthrough in the design procedure as no similar studies were found in the existing literature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Advanced noise reduction in placental ultrasound imaging using CPU and GPU: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zombori, G.; Ryan, J.; McAuliffe, F.; Rainford, L.; Moran, M.; Brennan, P.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of different implementations of 3D anisotropic diffusion speckle noise reduction technique on ultrasound images. In this project we are developing a novel volumetric calcification assessment metric for the placenta, and providing a software tool for this purpose. The tool can also automatically segment and visualize (in 3D) ultrasound data. One of the first steps when developing such a tool is to find a fast and efficient way to eliminate speckle noise. Previous works on this topic by Duan, Q. [1] and Sun, Q. [2] have proven that the 3D noise reducing anisotropic diffusion (3D SRAD) method shows exceptional performance in enhancing ultrasound images for object segmentation. Therefore we have implemented this method in our software application and performed a comparative study on the different variants in terms of performance and computation time. To increase processing speed it was necessary to utilize the full potential of current state of the art Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Our 3D datasets are represented in a spherical volume format. With the aim of 2D slice visualization and segmentation, a "scan conversion" or "slice-reconstruction" step is needed, which includes coordinate transformation from spherical to Cartesian, re-sampling of the volume and interpolation. Combining the noise filtering and slice reconstruction in one process on the GPU, we can achieve close to real-time operation on high quality data sets without the need for down-sampling or reducing image quality. For the GPU programming OpenCL language was used. Therefore the presented solution is fully portable.

  19. [Interscalene block for total shoulder arthroplasty: comparative study (ultrasound vs. neurostimulation)].

    PubMed

    Mejía-Terrazas, Gabriel Enrique; Ruiz-Suárez, Michell; Gaspar-Carrillo, Sandra Patricia; Valero-González, Fernando; Unzueta-Navarro, David; Encalada-Díaz, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Modern anesthesiology has integrated the use of ultrasonography as a tool that has displaced neurostimulation as a technique for locating peripheral nerves. The aim of this study was to determine which procedure is more effective for guiding interscalene block for total shoulder arthroplasty. We carried out a comparative, prospective non-randomized study comprised of the group guided by neurostimulation interscalene block and the group guided by ultrasound. All patients in both groups were scheduled for total shoulder arthroplasty. Latency, degree of sensory and motor block, success rate, postoperative pain intensity at 6, 12, and 24 h, patient satisfaction and complications were measured. We included 110 patients, 55 per group. Patients were placed in beach chair position and the deltopectoral approach was used. There were no differences in demographic characteristics. Results for neurostimulation vs. ultrasound group: latency 19.11 ± 2.27 vs. 17.24 ± 1.42 min, p= 0.23. Block sensitivity in both groups was grade 0 motor block grade 0 in 76.4% and grade 1 in 23.6% vs. grade 0 to 100%. There was 100% success rate for both groups. Postoperative pain at 6 h was 0.13 ± 0.54 vs. 0.11 ± 0.13 p= 0.90, at 12 h 1.67 ± 1.15 vs. 1.65 ± 0.59 p= 0.89 and at 24 h 3.15 ± 1.66 vs. 2.99 ± 1.15 p= 0.78. Satisfaction 54.5% very satisfied and 45.5% satisfied 96.36% vs 3.6% very satisfied and satisfied. Complications 18.18% vs. 3.6% p= 0.023. Ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve block is the technique of choice in elective total shoulder arthroplasty.

  20. Preoperative imaging for DIEA perforator flaps: a comparative study of computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Warren M; Phillips, Timothy J; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Gibson, Robert N; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal donor-site flaps, including the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps, are standard in autologous breast reconstruction. With significant variation in the vascular anatomy of the abdominal wall, preoperative imaging is essential for preoperative planning and reducing intraoperative error. Doppler and color duplex sonography have been used with varying results, and the quest continues for optimal preoperative assessment. Computed tomographic angiography has recently been proposed as a noninvasive modality for this purpose. This is the first study to formally compare preoperative Doppler ultrasound with computed tomographic angiography for imaging the DIEA. Eight consecutive patients undergoing DIEA perforator flap surgery for breast reconstruction underwent both computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound preoperatively. All investigations and procedures were performed at the same institution with the same primary and assisting surgeons and the same radiology team. Computed tomographic angiography was superior to Doppler ultrasound at identifying the course of the DIEA and its branching pattern, and in visualizing its perforators. Preoperative computed tomographic angiography was highly specific (100 percent) and more sensitive in mapping and visualizing perforators (p = 0.0078). It was also proficient at identifying the superficial epigastric arterial system and for effectively displaying the results intraoperatively. It was substantially quicker and removed the interobserver error associated with Doppler ultrasonography. The study was ceased after eight patients because of the overwhelming benefit of computed tomographic angiography over Doppler ultrasonography. Computed tomographic angiography is a valuable imaging modality for the preoperative assessment of the donor-site vascular supply for TRAM and DIEA perforator flaps.

  1. Preoperative imaging for DIEA perforator flaps: a comparative study of computed tomographic angiography and doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Warren M; Phillips, Timothy J; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Gibson, Robert N; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal donor-site flaps, including the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps, are standard in autologous breast reconstruction. With significant variation in the vascular anatomy of the abdominal wall, preoperative imaging is essential for preoperative planning and reducing intraoperative error. Doppler and color duplex sonography have been used with varying results, and the quest continues for optimal preoperative assessment. Computed tomographic angiography has recently been proposed as a noninvasive modality for this purpose. This is the first study to formally compare preoperative Doppler ultrasound with computed tomographic angiography for imaging the DIEA. Eight consecutive patients undergoing DIEA perforator flap surgery for breast reconstruction underwent both computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound preoperatively. All investigations and procedures were performed at the same institution with the same primary and assisting surgeons and the same radiology team. Computed tomographic angiography was superior to Doppler ultrasound at identifying the course of the DIEA and its branching pattern, and in visualizing its perforators. Preoperative computed tomographic angiography was highly specific (100 percent) and more sensitive in mapping and visualizing perforators (p = 0.0078). It was also proficient at identifying the superficial epigastric arterial system and for effectively displaying the results intraoperatively. It was substantially quicker and removed the interobserver error associated with Doppler ultrasonography. The study was ceased after eight patients because of the overwhelming benefit of computed tomographic angiography over Doppler ultrasonography. Computed tomographic angiography is a valuable imaging modality for the preoperative assessment of the donor-site vascular supply for TRAM and DIEA perforator flaps.

  2. Three-dimensional volume off-line analysis as compared to real-time ultrasound for assessing adnexal masses.

    PubMed

    Alcázar, Juan Luis; Iturra, Alberto; Sedda, Federica; Aubá, María; Ajossa, Silvia; Guerriero, Stefano; Jurado, Matías

    2012-03-01

    To assess the agreement between three-dimensional volume off-line analysis as compared to real-time ultrasound for assessing adnexal masses. Ninety-nine non-consecutive women diagnosed as having an adnexal mass were assessed by transvaginal power Doppler ultrasound. One single examiner performed all ultrasound examinations. Based on the examiner's subjective evaluation using gray scale and Doppler ultrasound findings a presumptive diagnosis (benign or malignant) was provided after real-time ultrasound was performed. Once real-time was done a 3D volume of the adnexal mass was acquired and stored by this examiner. Two examiners, unaware of the real-time ultrasound results, evaluated the 3D volumes using multiplanar display and virtual navigation and also had to provide a presumptive diagnosis (benign or malignant). These two examiners, like the first one, had information about patient's age, menopausal status and complaints. All women underwent surgery or were followed-up until cyst resolution. Histologic diagnosis was used as gold standard. Cysts that resolved spontaneously were considered as benign for analytical purposes. The Kappa index was used to assess the agreement between real time ultrasound and 3D volume analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of both methods were calculated and compared using McNemar test. Forty-one masses were malignant and 58 were benign. Agreement between real-time ultrasound and 3D volume analysis was good for both off-line examiners (Kappa index: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70-0.93 and 0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.90). Sensitivities for real-time ultrasound and 3D volume analyses were 100%, 93% and 90%, respectively (p>0.05). Specificities for real-time ultrasound and 3D volume analyses were 91%, 84% and 86%, respectively (p>0.05). Off-line 3D volume analysis may be a useful method for assessing adnexal masses, showing a good agreement with real-time ultrasound and having a similar diagnostic performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  3. Osteoporosis--comparative study between quantitative ultrasound of calcaneus and DXA.

    PubMed

    Muftic, Mirsad; Selimovic, Elma Kucukalic; Miladinovic, Ksenija

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is bone disease characterized by reduced bone mass and reduction of bone tissue. Main complications of osteoporosis and major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly population are fractures. Early diagnosis and detection of osteoporosis can prevent complications of osteoporosis in terms of fractures. Diagnostic assessment of osteoporosis is mostly being done threw two commonly used methods: ultrasound of calcaneus and osteodensitometry (DXA). The results were compared through a prospective study involving two groups of patients with osteoporosis. The study included 100 female patients with average age 54. In I phase every patient had some protocol. That protocol included: age, body, mass index (BMI), employment, marrital status, risk factors (smoking, coffee, physical activity), endocrine causes of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. ln II phase for every patient we were using two methods in diagnostics of osteoporosis: ultrasound of calcaneus and DXA. In both methods, we analyzed T score and Z score. 21% patients had 21,12 BMI (low BMI), 58% patients were in menopauses, triad of risk factors (smoking, consumption of coffee, low physical activity) had 32%, 28% of patients had osteoporotic fractures. Quality of life patients with osteoporosis was weak. T score is main score for diagnostics. Results of T score with UZ and DXA had statisticly significant differents. T score (UZ) and maximum T score (DXA) (lumbal spine and hip) has statisticly similar value with potential possibility to predict osteoporosis fractures.

  4. Comparative histomorphometric study of bone tissue synthesized after electric and ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Coman, Mălina; Hîncu, Mihaela; Surlin, Petra; Mateescu, Garofiţa; Nechita, A; Banu, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The clinical use of the alternative therapies in traumatology is conditioned by the knowledge and understanding of their actions on the bone tissue. The hereby study aims at the comparative assessment of the effectiveness of the direct current and ultrasounds in treating the fractures. Thus, we have proceeded to a comparative histological study of the bone tissue in the fractured area and the biomechanical description and the three-dimensional model of the stimulated bone's behavior by using micro-CT X-rays and the finite element analysis. The findings clearly show that the bone, which has been stimulated during a period of two weeks, has regained its functions, that is 85% of the compression one and 95% of the shearing one. These values prove that 90% of the bone structure has healed.

  5. Ultrasound biomicroscopy findings in fireworks-related blunt eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Zandian, Mehdi; Fakhraie, Ghasem; Majdi, Mercede; Tabatabai, Seyed-Ali; Rahnama, Azadeh; Lashay, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    To present ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) findings and their clinical correlations in people with optically hazy media after injury at the Persian Wednesday Eve fireworks festival. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed on a series of 32 eyes with severe closed-globe injuries by P40 ultrasound biomicroscope. The median age of the participants was 19 years, and 81.3% were male. All but one had gross hyphema. Seventy-five percent had an extension of the injury (at least) to Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology zone II. Ultrasound biomicroscopy detected 3 more iridodialyses and 10 more cyclodialyses in addition to the respective 5 and 3 that were diagnosed clinically. Ten cases of angle recession were observed, and 5 were suggestive of subluxation of the crystalline lens. Two cases were suspected for anterior segment intraocular foreign body on clinical examination, but UBM and computed tomography scanning together ruled out such a diagnosis. Our study showed the value of UBM in the assessment of severely contused eyes and hyphema. It made possible evaluation for dialyses and recessions at presentation. Ultrasound biomicroscopy illustrated diverse subclinical disruptions in clinically invisible anterior segment structures.

  6. Ultrasound and analysis of the deformation patterns of the masseter muscle: comparing surgical anatomy, ultrasound and functional anatomy

    PubMed Central

    BUSATO, A.; BALCONI, G.; VISMARA, V.; BERTELÈ, L.; GARO, G.; DE GREGORIO, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose We have tried to demonstrate whether the analysis of the muscle strain allows us to identify the three distinct functional areas of the architecture of the masseter, as one would see them by performing or viewing an anatomical dissection of said muscle, and whether these sections have behave differently in terms of origin and coping of the strain they face (quantitative analysis). Materials and methods This work has been elaborated by the use of an ultrasound machine (MicrUs ext-1H Telemed Medical Systems Milano) and a linear probe (L12-5l40S-3 5–12 MHz 40 mm) which allowed us to record a 45 frame per second video (DCM). Videos has been elaborated by use of an ultrasound machine (MicrUs ext-1H Telemed Medical Systems Milano) and a linear probe (L12-5l40S-3 5–12 MHz 40 mm) which allowed us to record a 45 frame per second video (DCM). We applied to the resulting video a software (Mudy 1.7.7.2 AMID Sulmona Italy) for the analysis of muscle deformation patters (contraction, dilatation, cross-plane, vertical strain, horizontal strain, vertical shear, horizontal shear, horizontal displacement, vertical displacement). The number of videos of masseter muscles in contraction at maximum exertion due to dental clenching made during this research is around 12,000. Out of these we chose 1,200 videos which examine 200 patients (100 females, 100 males). Results The deformation pattern analysis of the skeletal muscle on ultrasound basis seems to be an adequate instrument to use during the investigation of the functional structure of the masseter muscle given its ability to highlight the distinct activity of each separate part of the muscle. Conclusions Moreover the strain does not apply to the muscle uniformly; instead it varies according to the observed area. PMID:28280530

  7. A multi-centre randomised trial comparing ultrasound vs mammography for screening breast cancer in high-risk Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Shen, S; Zhou, Y; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Duan, X; Huang, R; Li, B; Shi, Y; Shao, Z; Liao, H; Jiang, J; Shen, N; Zhang, J; Yu, C; Jiang, H; Li, S; Han, S; Ma, J; Sun, Q

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chinese women tend to have small and dense breasts and ultrasound is a common method for breast cancer screening in China. However, its efficacy and cost comparing with mammography has not been evaluated in randomised trials. Methods: At 14 breast centres across China during 2008–2010, 13 339 high-risk women aged 30–65 years were randomised to be screened by mammography alone, ultrasound alone, or by both methods at enrolment and 1-year follow-up. Results: A total of 12 519 and 8692 women underwent the initial and second screenings, respectively. Among the 30 cancers (of which 15 were stage 0/I) detected, 5 (0.72/1000) were in the mammography group, 11 (1.51/1000) in the ultrasound group, and 14 (2.02/1000) in the combined group (P=0.12). In the combined group, ultrasound detected all the 14 cancers, whereas mammography detected 8, making ultrasound more sensitive (100 vs 57.1%, P=0.04) with a better diagnostic accuracy (0.999 vs 0.766, P=0.01). There was no difference between mammography and ultrasound in specificity (100 vs 99.9%, P=0.51) and positive predictive value (72.7 vs 70.0% P=0.87). To detect one cancer, the costs of ultrasound, mammography, and combined modality were $7876, $45 253, and $21 599, respectively. Conclusions: Ultrasound is superior to mammography for breast cancer screening in high-risk Chinese women. PMID:25668012

  8. Comparing efficiency of micro-RNA and mRNA biomarker liberation with microbubble-enhanced ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Forbrich, Alex; Paproski, Robert; Hitt, Mary; Zemp, Roger

    2014-09-01

    Blood biomarkers are potentially powerful diagnostic tools that are limited clinically by low concentrations, the inability to determine biomarker origin and unknown patient baseline. Recently, ultrasound has been shown to liberate proteins and large mRNA biomarkers, overcoming many of these limitations. We have since demonstrated that adding lipid-stabilized microbubbles elevates mRNA concentration an order of magnitude compared with ultrasound without microbubbles, in vitro. Unfortunately the large size of some mRNA molecules may limit efficiency of release and hinder efficacy as an ultrasound-liberated biomarker. We hypothesize that smaller molecules will be released more efficiently with ultrasound than larger molecules. Although investigation of large libraries of biomarkers should be performed to fully validate this hypothesis, we focus on a small subset of mRNA and micro-RNAs. Specifically, we focus on miR-21 (22 base pairs [bp]), which is upregulated in certain forms of cancer, compared with previously investigated mammaglobin mRNA (502 bp). We also report release of micro-RNA miR-155 (22 bp) and housekeeping rRNA S18 (1869 bp). More than 10 million additional miR-21 copies per 100,000 cells are released with ultrasound-microbubble exposure. The low- molecular-weight miR-21 proved to be liberated 50 times more efficiently than high-molecular-weight mammaglobin mRNA, releasing orders of magnitude more miR-21 than mammaglobin mRNA under comparable conditions.

  9. Comparative study of ultrasound and computed tomography for incidentally detecting diffuse thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Soo Jin; Ha, Tae Kwun; Park, Ha Kyoung; Kang, Taewoo

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic values of thyroid ultrasound (US) and neck computed tomography (CT) in incidentally detecting diffuse thyroid disease (DTD). A single radiologist made US and CT diagnoses of incidentally detected DTD in 130 consecutive patients before thyroidectomy for various malignancies. Histopathologic examinations confirmed normal thyroid (n = 80), Hashimoto thyroiditis (n = 20), non-Hashimoto lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 28) and diffuse hyperplasia (n = 2). Receiver operating characteristic curves revealed that the best diagnostic indices of both imaging methods were achieved on the basis of two or more abnormal imaging findings. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US and CT in incidentally detecting DTD by this classification were 72% and 72%, 87.5% and 91.3% and 81.5% and 83.8%, respectively. Thyroid US and neck CT have similar diagnostic values for differentiating incidental DTD from normal thyroid.

  10. Sensory and Quality Evaluation of Traditional Compared with Power Ultrasound Processed Corn (Zea Mays) Tortilla Chips.

    PubMed

    Janve, Bhaskar; Yang, Wade; Sims, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Power ultrasound reduces the traditional corn steeping time from 18 to 1.5 h during tortilla chips dough (masa) processing. This study sought to examine consumer (n = 99) acceptability and quality of tortilla chips made from the masa by traditional compared with ultrasonic methods. Overall appearance, flavor, and texture acceptability scores were evaluated using a 9-point hedonic scale. The baked chips (process intermediate) before and after frying (finished product) were analyzed using a texture analyzer and machine vision. The texture values were determined using the 3-point bend test using breaking force gradient (BFG), peak breaking force (PBF), and breaking distance (BD). The fracturing properties determined by the crisp fracture support rig using fracture force gradient (FFG), peak fracture force (PFF), and fracture distance (FD). The machine vision evaluated the total surface area, lightness (L), color difference (ΔE), Hue (°h), and Chroma (C*). The results were evaluated by analysis of variance and means were separated using Tukey's test. Machine vision values of L, °h, were higher (P < 0.05) and ΔE was lower (P < 0.05) for fried and L, °h were significantly (P < 0.05) higher for baked chips produced from ultra-sonication as compare to traditional. Baked chips texture for ultra-sonication was significantly higher (P < 0.05) on BFG, BPD, PFF, and FD. Fried tortilla chips texture were higher significantly (P < 0.05) in BFG and PFF for ultra-sonication than traditional processing. However, the instrumental differences were not detected in sensory analysis, concluding possibility of power ultrasound as potential tortilla chips processing aid. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. A Comparative Study of Fibroid Ablation Rates Using Radio Frequency or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Xin; He Guangbin; Zhang Jun; Han Zenghui; Yu Ming; Zhang Miaomiao; Tang Yu; Fang Ling; Zhou Xiaodong

    2010-08-15

    This study compared the technical success of fibroid devascularization using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and radio frequency (RF) to provide an experimental basis for the clinical selection of a suitable, minimally invasive method for treating uterine fibroids. Patients were randomly divided into two groups and treated with HIFU or RF accordingly. The two groups of patients were divided again into subgroups A, B, and C based on fibroid diameter and subgroups A', B', and C' based on fibroid blood supply grades. The fibroid diameters in subgroups A, B, and C were 2.0 cm {<=} D < 4.0 cm, 4.0 cm {<=} D<6.0 cm and 6.0 cm {<=} D<8.0 cm, respectively, and fibroid blood supplies were classified into three grades corresponding to subgroups A', B', and C', respectively. The complete ablation rates of the two treatments were compared by contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Both treatments were effective, but the general complete ablation rate of RF was higher than that of HIFU (p < 0.05). The comparison between the two treatments in subgroup A and subgroup A' showed that the complete ablation rate of HIFU was as good as that of RF (p > 0.05). In other subgroups, the complete ablation rates of RF were better than those of HIFU (p < 0.05). No severe complications were observed after these two treatments. RF can be applied for the majority of fibroids. As a noninvasive therapy, HIFU could be the preferred method for the treatment of small, hypovascular fibroids.

  12. Prevalence of biomicroscopic findings in the anterior segment and ocular adnexa among schoolchildren in Natal/Brazil.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carlos Alexandre de Amorim; Pinheiro, Francisco Irochima; Montenegro, Daniel Alves; Gomes, Alexandre Henrique Bezerra; Oréfice, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of ocular findings of the external structures and anterior segment of the eye, detected by biomicroscopic examination in schoolchildren in Natal (RN)-Brazil. After previous random selection, 1,024 pupils from elementary and secondary public and private schools in the city of Natal were evaluated from March to June 2001. All were submitted to preestablished standard research norms, consisting of identification, demographic information, ophthalmologic biomicroscopic examination, with slit lamp, performed by ophthalmologists from the "Onofre Lopes" University Hospital. Alterations of the conjunctival and palpebral conditions were the most prevalent (10.4% and 6.2% respectively). Follicles (4.2%) and papillae (3.0%) were the frequent conjunctival lesions, while blepharitis (3.5%) and meibomitis (1.1%) were the most detected abnormalities in the eyelids. Upon examining the cornea, iris, lens and anterior vitreous, the most encountered findings were nubecula (0.5%), papillary membrane reliquiae (0.5%), posterior capsula opacity (0.8%) and hyaloid arteria reliquiae (2.0%). The most prevalent findings affecting the external structures of the eye such as eyelids and conjunctiva, consisted of blepharitis followed by follicular reaction of the conjunctiva. The most prevalent abnormalities in the cornea, iris, lens and anterior vitreous were nubecula, papillary membrane reliquiae, posterior capsular opacity and hyaloid arteria reliquiae, in that order.

  13. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study*

    PubMed Central

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emílio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fábio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. PMID:27777476

  14. Reproducibility and accuracy of optic nerve sheath diameter assessment using ultrasound compared to magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantification of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) by transbulbar sonography is a promising non-invasive technique for the detection of altered intracranial pressure. In order to establish this method as follow-up tool in diseases with intracranial hyper- or hypotension scan-rescan reproducibility and accuracy need to be systematically investigated. Methods The right ONSD of 15 healthy volunteers (mean age 24.5 ± 0.8 years) were measured by both transbulbar sonography (9 – 3 MHz) and 3 Tesla MRI (half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo sequences, HASTE) 3 and 5 mm behind papilla. All volunteers underwent repeated ultrasound and MRI examinations in order to assess scan-rescan reproducibility and accuracy. Moreover, inter- and intra-observer variabilities were calculated for both techniques. Results Scan-rescan reproducibility was robust for ONSD quantification by sonography and MRI at both depths (r > 0.75, p ≤ 0.001, mean differences < 2%). Comparing ultrasound- and MRI-derived ONSD values, we found acceptable agreement between both methods for measurements at a depth of 3 mm (r = 0.72, p = 0.002, mean difference < 5%). Further analyses revealed good inter- and intra-observer reliability for sonographic measurements 3 mm behind the papilla and for MRI at 3 and 5 mm (r > 0.82, p < 0.001, mean differences < 5%). Conclusions Sonographic ONSD quantification 3 mm behind the papilla can be performed with good reproducibility, measurement accuracy and observer agreement. Thus, our findings emphasize the feasibility of this technique as a non-invasive bedside tool for longitudinal ONSD measurements. PMID:24289136

  15. In vitro comparative study of vibro-acoustography versus pulse-echo ultrasound in imaging permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mitri, F.G.; Davis, B.J.; Greenleaf, J.F.; Fatemi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) is a common treatment for early stage prostate cancer. While the modern approach using trans-rectal ultrasound guidance has demonstrated excellent outcome, the efficacy of PPB depends on achieving complete radiation dose coverage of the prostate by obtaining a proper radiation source (seed) distribution. Currently, brachytherapy seed placement is guided by trans-rectal ultrasound imaging and fluoroscopy. A significant percentage of seeds are not detected by trans-rectal ultrasound because certain seed orientations are invisible making accurate intra-operative feedback of radiation dosimetry very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, intra-operative correction of suboptimal seed distributions cannot easily be done with current methods. Vibro-acoustography (VA) is an imaging modality that is capable of imaging solids at any orientation, and the resulting images are speckle free. Objective and methods The purpose of this study is to compare the capabilities of VA and pulse-echo ultrasound in imaging PPB seeds at various angles and show the sensitivity of detection to seed orientation. In the VA experiment, two intersecting ultrasound beams driven at f1 = 3.00 MHz and f2 = 3.020 MHz respectively were focused on the seeds attached to a latex membrane while the amplitude of the acoustic emission produced at the difference frequency 20 kHz was detected by a low frequency hydrophone. Results Finite element simulations and results of experiments conducted under well-controlled conditions in a water tank on a series of seeds indicate that the seeds can be detected at any orientation with VA, whereas pulse-echo ultrasound is very sensitive to the seed orientation. Conclusion It is concluded that vibro-acoustography is superior to pulse-echo ultrasound for detection of PPB seeds. PMID:18538365

  16. Osteotomy in direct sinus lift. A comparative study of the rotary technique and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Sanchez-Recio, Cristina; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Romero-Millán, Javier

    2012-05-01

    The present study investigates sinus membrane rupture in direct maxillary sinus lift with the rotary technique and with ultrasound, examining the survival of implants placed after sinus augmentation, and analyzing the bone gain obtained after the operation and 12 months after placement of the prosthetic restoration. A retrospective study was made of 45 patients requiring maxillary sinus lift or augmentation for implant-prosthetic rehabilitation. Use was made of the handpiece and ostectomy drills for the rotary technique, and of specific tips for ultrasound. The implant success criteria were based on those developed by Buser. The bone gain obtained as a result of sinus lift was calculated from the postoperative panoramic X-rays. A total of 57 direct elevations of the maxillary sinus were carried out: 32 with the rotary technique and 25 with ultrasound. Perforations of Schneider's membrane with the rotary technique and ultrasound occurred in 7% and 1.7% of the cases, respectively, with membrane integrity being preserved in 91.2%. Of the 100 implants placed, 5 failed after one year of follow-up in the rotary technique group, while one implant failed in the ultrasound group. The rotary technique in turn afforded a bone gain of 5.9 mm, versus 6.7 mm with ultrasound. Perforations of the membrane sinusal in direct lift were more frequent with the rotary technique (7%) than with ultrasound (1.7%). Implant survival and bone gain were both greater when ultrasound was used.

  17. Biomechanical evaluation of novel ultrasound-activated bioresorbable pins for the treatment of osteochondral fractures compared to established methods.

    PubMed

    Kienast, Benjamin; Mohsen, Hellal; Wendlandt, Robert; Reimers, Nils; Schulz, Arndt P; Heuer, Hinrich; Gille, Justus; Neumann, Hanjo

    2017-08-28

    Osteochondral injuries often lead to osteoarthritis of the affected joint. All established systems for refixation of osteochondral defects show certain disadvantages. To address the problem of reduced stability in resorbable implants, ultrasound-activated pins were developed. By ultrasound-activated melting of the tip of these implants, a more secure anchoring is assumed. The aim of the study was to investigate if ultrasound-activated pins can provide secure fixation of osteochondral fragments compared to screws and conventional resorbable pins. In a biomechanical laboratory setting, osteochondral fragments of the medial femoral condyle of sheep were refixated with ultrasound-activated pins [US fused poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (PLDLLA) pins], polydioxanone (PDA) pins and conventional titanium screws. Anchoring forces of the different fixation methods were examined, registered and compared concerning shear force and tensile force. Concerning the pull out test, the US fused PLDLLA pins and titanium screws (~122 N and ~203 N) showed comparable good results, while the PDA pins showed significantly lower anchoring forces (~18 N). Examination of shear forces showed a significantly higher anchoring of the screws (~248 N) than the US fused PLDLLA pins (~218 N). Nevertheless, the US fused PLDLLA pins could significantly outperform the PDA pins (~68 N) concerning shear forces. The US fused PLDLLA pins demonstrated a comparable anchorage to the fixation with screws, but were free from the disadvantages of metal implants, i.e. the need for implant removal. The PDA pin application showed inferior biomechanical properties.

  18. Accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound compared with conventional ultrasound in acute pancreatitis: Diagnosis and complication monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cai, Diming; Parajuly, Shyam Sundar; Wang, Huiyao; Wang, Xiaoling; Ling, Wenwu; Song, Bin; Li, Yongzhong; Luo, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been used for diagnosing acute pancreatitis (AP), particularly severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). However, the diagnostic difference between CEUS and conventional ultrasonography (CUS) for AP and SAP has not been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of CUS and CEUS for AP. A total of 196 patients clinically diagnosed with AP were selected. All patients underwent CUS, CEUS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) within 72 h. CECT was considered the gold standard. Pancreatic size, peripancreatic fluid collection (PPFC) and splenic vessel complications were the variables observed by CUS and CEUS. The differences in the variables among the three methods were analyzed using the χ(2) test and statistical analysis software. Significant differences in pancreatic size, PPFC and splenic vessel complications in AP were observed between CEUS and CUS (P<0.05). χ(2) test results indicated that CEUS significantly differed from CUS in terms of having a higher diagnostic accuracy for AP and SAP (P<0.05). The results indicate that CEUS is a reliable method for the diagnosis and monitoring of AP and SAP, and may be substituted for CECT.

  19. A randomized controlled trial comparing surgical termination of pregnancy with and without continuous ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Ganesh; Morgan, Heulwen; Paramanantham, Leslie; Fernando, Regina

    2004-05-10

    Approximately 50 million abortions are performed worldwide each year, and the majority of them are surgical terminations of pregnancy (STOP). Therefore, the safety of this procedure is a global public health concern. It is not known whether routine use of intraoperative ultrasound guidance improves the outcome of first trimester STOP. To investigate whether surgical termination of pregnancy in the first trimester with continuous ultrasound guidance is safer than the conventional procedure without ultrasound guidance. A randomized controlled trial. A teaching hospital in London, UK. Women undergoing STOP in the first trimester. PARTICIPANTS were randomized to have the procedure with or without continuous ultrasound guidance. The primary outcome measures were intraoperative and short-term complications (anaesthetic complication, haemorrhage, ongoing pregnancy, cervical trauma, uterine perforation, need for laparoscopy and/or laparotomy, repeat evacuation, and infection). The secondary outcomes were the blood loss, procedure time, and convalescence time. A total of 230 women (115 in each arm of the trial) participated in the study. Follow-up data were available for analysis in all but 15 (8 in control group and 7 in intervention group) cases. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. The overall complication rate was 9.8 percent. STOP under ultrasound guidance had a complication rate of 3.7% (4/108) in comparison to 15.9% (17/107) without ultrasound (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.08-0.67). Intraoperative ultrasound guidance also had a statistically significant beneficial effect in reducing the blood loss, procedure time, and convalescence time. STOP in the first trimester under continuous ultrasound guidance was associated with a lower rate of complications than the conventional procedure without ultrasound.

  20. Myocardial tissue Doppler velocity imaging in children: comparative study between two ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Laurens P; Slorach, Cameron; Manlhiot, Cedric; McCrindle, Brian W; Friedberg, Mark K; Mertens, Luc; Jaeggi, Edgar T

    2010-09-01

    The investigators compared pulsed-wave tissue Doppler (PWTD) and color tissue Doppler (CTD) ventricular tissue velocities obtained using Vivid 7 (GE) and iE33 (Philips) ultrasound systems within a 30-minute time frame and examined interobserver and intraobserver variability. Longitudinal PWTD and CTD images were prospectively acquired in 49 children from the base of the right and left ventricular free wall and septum and stored for offline analysis. Intraobserver and interobserver coefficients of variation for PWTD velocities ranged from 4% to 6% and 5% to 10% for GE and from 1% to 10% and 2% to 14% for Philips, respectively. Intraobserver and interobserver coefficients of variation for CTD velocities ranged from 4% to 15% and 6% to 24% for GE and from 6% to 19% and 7% to 25% for Philips, respectively. Mean biases between the two systems for PWTD velocities, expressed as percentage differences, were around 0%, with the narrowest limits of agreement for systolic velocities at the septal annulus and the widest limits of agreement for early diastolic velocities at the lateral tricuspid valve annulus, respectively. Peak CTD-derived velocities were significantly and consistently lower for Philips compared with GE. Agreement between GE-derived and Philips-derived PWTD velocities was reasonable, whereas CTD-derived velocities differed substantially. 2010 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Osteotomy in direct sinus lift. A comparative study of the rotary technique and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Sanchez-Recio, Cristina; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Romero-Millán, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates sinus membrane rupture in direct maxillary sinus lift with the rotary technique and with ultrasound, examining the survival of implants placed after sinus augmentation, and analyzing the bone gain obtained after the operation and 12 months after placement of the prosthetic restoration. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was made of 45 patients requiring maxillary sinus lift or augmentation for implant-prosthetic rehabilitation. Use was made of the hand piece and ostectomy drills for the rotary technique, and of specific tips for ultrasound. The implant success criteria were based on those developed by Buser. The bone gain obtained as a result of sinus lift was calculated from the postoperative panoramic X-rays. Results: A total of 57 direct elevations of the maxillary sinus were carried out: 32 with the rotary technique and 25 with ultrasound. Perforations of Schneider’s membrane with the rotary technique and ultrasound occurred in 7% and 1.7% of the cases, respectively, with membrane integrity being preserved in 91.2%. Of the 100 implants placed, 5 failed after one year of follow-up in the rotary technique group, while one implant failed in the ultrasound group. The rotary technique in turn afforded a bone gain of 5.9 mm, versus 6.7 mm with ultrasound. Conclusions: Perforations of the membrane sinusal in direct lift were more frequent with the rotary technique (7%) than with ultrasound (1.7%). Implant survival and bone gain were both greater when ultrasound was used. Key words:Bone sectioning, maxillary sinus augmentation, piezosurgery. PMID:22143735

  2. Comparative assessment of the acute ankle injury by ultrasound and magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Margetić, Petra; Pavić, Roman

    2012-06-01

    We compared ultrasound (US) with magnetic resonance (MR) findings of muscle tendon and ligaments (mt&l) of 17 men and 13 women, 16-66 years old, who suffered from acute ankle injury without bone fracture visible on conventional radiographs. Joint effusion (JE), and injury of the Tibials anterior muscle tendon (TAmt), Calcaneofibular ligament (CFl), Long flexor of the great toe muscle tendon (LFGTmt), Short peroneus muscle tendon (SPmt), Long peroneus muscle tendon (LPmt), and Anterior talofibular ligament (ATFl) were assessed by the US, at seven days, and MR, at seventeenth day. Grading of ligament and muscle tendon injury as stretching (Grade 1), partially ruptured (Grade 2), and complete rupture (Grade 3); no lesion was considered to be Grade 0. Joint effusion and ATFl were the most common lesions whereas the TAmt lesion was the least frequent: JE approximately ATFl > SPmt approximately LPmt > LFGTmt approximately CFl approximately TAmt. Both US and MR were equally sensitive in detecting the presence (or absence) of the mt&l ankle injury, whereas US was less specific than MR in detecting G3 injury.

  3. A comparative evaluation of three hydrophones and a numerical model in high intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Haller, Julian; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Durando, Gianni; Shaw, Adam

    2012-02-01

    The pressure fields of two different high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers operated in burst mode were measured at acoustical power levels of 25 and 50 W (continuous wave equivalent) with three different hydrophones: A fiber-optic displacement sensor, a commercial HIFU needle hydrophone, and a prototype of a membrane hydrophone with a protective coating against cavitation effects. Additionally, the fields were modeled using a freely available simulations software package. The measured waveforms, the peak pressure profiles, as well as the spatial-peak temporal-average intensities from the different devices and from the modeling are compared and possible reasons for differences are discussed. The results clearly show that reliable pressure measurements in HIFU fields remain a difficult task concerning both the reliability of the measured values and the robustness of the sensors used: Only the fiber-optic hydrophone survived all four exposure regimes and the measured spatial-peak temporal-average intensities varied by a factor of up to 1.5 between the measurements and the modeling and between the measurements among themselves.

  4. Comparing the performance of different ultrasonic images enhancement for speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images using techniques: a preference study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Md. Shohel; Sarker, Kaushik; Bhuiyan, Touhid; Hassan, Md. Maruf

    2017-06-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound (US) is an important tool in today's sophisticated medical diagnostics. Nearly every medical discipline benefits itself from this relatively inexpensive method that provides a view of the inner organs of the human body without exposing the patient to any harmful radiations. Medical diagnostic images are usually corrupted by noise during their acquisition and most of the noise is speckle noise. To solve this problem, instead of using adaptive filters which are widely used, No-Local Means based filters have been used to de-noise the images. Ultrasound images of four organs such as Abdomen, Ortho, Liver, Kidney, Brest and Prostrate of a Human body have been used and applied comparative analysis study to find out the output. These images were taken from Siemens SONOLINE G60 S System and the output was compared by matrices like SNR, RMSE, PSNR IMGQ and SSIM. The significance and compared results were shown in a tabular format.

  5. In Vivo Calcium Detection by Comparing Optical Coherence Tomography, Intravascular Ultrasound, and Angiography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Mintz, Gary S; Lee, Tetsumin; Zhang, Wenbin; Cao, Yang; Fujino, Akiko; Lin, Yongqing; Usui, Eisuke; Kanaji, Yoshihisa; Murai, Tadashi; Yonetsu, Taishi; Kakuta, Tsunekazu; Maehara, Akiko

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) versus coronary angiography in the assessment of target lesion calcification and its effect on stent expansion. IVUS is more sensitive than angiography in the detection of coronary artery calcium, but the relationship among IVUS, OCT, and angiography has not been studied. Overall, 440 lesions (440 patients with stable angina) underwent OCT- and IVUS-guided stent implantation. Coronary calcification was evaluated using: 1) angiography; 2) IVUS (maximum calcium angle and the surface pattern); and 3) OCT (mean and maximum calcium angle, calcium length, and maximum calcium thickness). Median patient age was 66 years, and 82.5% were men. Among 440 lesions, calcium was detected by angiography in 40.2%, IVUS in 82.7%, and OCT in 76.8%. The maximum calcium angle, maximum calcium thickness, and calcium length by OCT or IVUS increased in relation to the increasing severity of angiographically visible calcium. In 13.2% of lesions with IVUS-detected calcium, calcium was either not visible or was underestimated (>90° smaller maximum arc) by OCT mostly due to superficial OCT plaque attenuation. In 21.6% of lesions with IVUS calcium angle >180°, angiography did not detect any calcium; these lesions had thinner and shorter calcium deposits as assessed using OCT, and final minimum stent area was larger compared to those with angiographically visible calcium. In lesions with thinner calcium deposits by OCT, IVUS detected a smooth surface with reverberations whereas thick calcium deposits were associated with an irregular surface without reverberations. Angiographic detection of target lesion coronary calcium (compared to intravascular imaging) has not changed in the past 2 decades, and angiographically invisible calcium (only detectable by IVUS or OCT) did not appear to inhibit stent expansion. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  6. Critical assessment of intramodality 3D ultrasound imaging for prostate IGRT compared to fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Hermans, Jolanda; Voncken, Robert; Heuvelmans, Denys; Gubbels, Carol; Fontanarosa, Davide; Visser, Peter; Lutgens, Ludy; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A quantitative 3D intramodality ultrasound (US) imaging system was verified for daily in-room prostate localization, and compared to prostate localization based on implanted fiducial markers (FMs).Methods: Thirteen prostate patients underwent multiple US scans during treatment. A total of 376 US-scans and 817 matches were used to determine the intra- and interoperator variability. Additionally, eight other patients underwent daily prostate localization using both US and electronic portal imaging (EPI) with FMs resulting in 244 combined US-EPI scans. Scanning was performed with minimal probe pressure and a correction for the speed of sound aberration was performed. Uncertainties of both US and FM methods were assessed. User variability of the US method was assessed.Results: The overall US user variability is 2.6 mm. The mean differences between US and FM are: 2.5 {+-} 4.0 mm (LR), 0.6 {+-} 4.9 mm (SI), and -2.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (AP). The intramodality character of this US system mitigates potential errors due to transducer pressure and speed of sound aberrations.Conclusions: The overall accuracy of US (3.0 mm) is comparable to our FM workflow (2.2 mm). Since neither US nor FM can be considered a gold standard no conclusions can be drawn on the superiority of either method. Because US imaging captures the prostate itself instead of surrogates no invasive procedure is required. It requires more effort to standardize US imaging than FM detection. Since US imaging does not involve a radiation burden, US prostate imaging offers an alternative for FM EPI positioning.

  7. Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Jugular Venous Pressure Assessment: Live and Online Learning Compared.

    PubMed

    Socransky, Steve; Lang, Eddy; Bryce, Rhonda; Betz, Martin

    2017-06-08

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a novel technique for the assessment of jugular venous pressure. Distance education may allow for efficient dissemination of this technique. We compared online learning to a live course for teaching ultrasonography jugular venous pressure (u-JVP) to determine if these teaching methods yielded different levels of comfort with and use of u-JVP. This was an interventional trial of Canadian emergency physicians who had taken a basic POCUS course. The participants were in one of three Groups: online learning (Group OL), live teaching (Group LT), control (Group C). Group LT participants also took an advanced course prior to the study that included instruction in u-JVP. The participants who took the basic course were randomized to Group OL or Group C. Group OL was subject to the intervention, online learning. Group C only received an article citation regarding u-JVP. Questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. The primary outcome was physician self-reported use and comfort with the technique of u-JVP after online learning compared to live teaching. Of the 287 advanced course participants, 42 completed the questionnaires (Group LT). Of the 3303 basic course participants, 47 who were assigned to Group OL completed the questionnaires and 47 from Group C completed the questionnaires. Use of u-JVP increased significantly in Group OL (from 15% to 55%) and Group C (from 21% to 47%) with the intervention. The comfort with use did not differ between Group LT and Group OL (p=0.14). The frequency of use remained higher in Group LT than Group OL (p=0.07). Online learning increases the use and comfort with performing u-JVP for emergency physicians with prior POCUS experience. Although the comfort with use of u-JVP was similar in Groups LT and OL, online learning appears to yield levels of use that are less than those of a live course.

  8. Different information by MRI compare to ultrasound in fetal intracranial space occupying lesions.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Kasprian, Gregor; Hu, Daoyu; Xiao, Peng; Yang, Wenzhong; Chen, Xinlin

    2017-07-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in characterizing fetal intracranial space occupying lesions in comparison to prenatal ultrasound. This retrospective study included 50 fetuses (mean age 26 years, mean gestational weeks 31 + 1 GW) with intracranial space occupying lesions, suspected by prenatal screening ultrasound. T2-weighted, T1-weighted, SSFP, and diffusion-weighted sequences of the fetal brain were obtained on a 1.5 T unit. Pathology (n = 5), postmortem MRI (n = 3), or postnatal US (n = 42) was available as standard of reference. The fetal MRI provided correct diagnosis in 49 cases (98%), while 35 (70%) by ultrasound, and MRI failed in 1 case (2%), while ultrasound failed in 15 cases (30%). Fetal MR and ultrasound were concordant in 35 of 50 cases (70%), completely discordant in 4 (8%), and partially discordant in 11 (22%) cases. MRI could provide detailed information about the minor lesions, such as focal hemorrhage and periventricular nodules. Meanwhile, it could provide whole view of the lesion in order to delineate the surrounding anatomical structure. But there are still some limitations of its soft-tissue resolution in a case with teratoma; more effort is needed to improve the sequences.

  9. Brain Tissue Pulsatility is Increased in Midlife Depression: a Comparative Study Using Ultrasound Tissue Pulsatility Imaging.

    PubMed

    Desmidt, Thomas; Brizard, Bruno; Dujardin, Paul-Armand; Ternifi, Redouane; Réméniéras, Jean-Pierre; Patat, Frédéric; Andersson, Frédéric; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Vierron, Emilie; Gissot, Valérie; Kim, Kang; Aizenstein, Howard; El-Hage, Wissam; Camus, Vincent

    2017-06-06

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is consistently associated with late-life depression but poorly documented in midlife depression. It can be hypothesized that the relatively low sensitivity of conventional neuroimaging techniques does not allow the detection of subtle CVD in midlife depression. We used tissue pulsatility imaging (TPI), a novel ultrasound (US) neuroimaging technique that has demonstrated good sensitivity to detect changes in the pulsatility of small brain volumes, to identify early and subtle changes in brain vascular function in midlife depression. We compared the maximum and mean brain tissue pulsatility (MaxBTP and MeanBTP), as identified by TPI, between three groups of middle-aged females matched for age: patients with depression (n=25), patients with remitted depression (n=24) and community controls (n=25). MRI arterial spin labeling, white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and transcranial doppler (TCD) were used as control conventional markers for CVD. We found no difference in the MRI and TCD measures among the three groups. In contrast, depressive patients showed an increased BTP related to the mean global brain pulsatility (MeanBTP) and no change related to large vessels (MaxBTP) in comparison with the remitted and control groups. US neuroimaging is a highly accurate method to detect brain pulsatility changes related to cerebrovascular functioning, and TPI identified an increased BTP in midlife depressed patients, suggesting early and subtle vascular impairments in this population at risk for CVD such as stroke or WMHs. Because high pulsatility could represent prodromal cerebrovascular changes that damage the brain over time, this paper provides a potential target for blocking the progression of CVD.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 26 July 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.113.

  10. Disinfection of transvaginal ultrasound probes in a clinical setting: comparative performance of automated and manual reprocessing methods.

    PubMed

    Buescher, D L; Möllers, M; Falkenberg, M K; Amler, S; Kipp, F; Burdach, J; Klockenbusch, W; Schmitz, R

    2016-05-01

    Transvaginal and intracavitary ultrasound probes are a possible source of cross-contamination with microorganisms and thus a risk to patients' health. Therefore appropriate methods for reprocessing are needed. This study was designed to compare the standard disinfection method for transvaginal ultrasound probes in Germany with an automated disinfection method in a clinical setting. This was a prospective randomized controlled clinical study of two groups. In each group, 120 microbial samples were collected from ultrasound transducers before and after disinfection with either an automated method (Trophon EPR®) or a manual method (Mikrozid Sensitive® wipes). Samples were then analyzed for microbial growth and isolates were identified to species level. Automated disinfection had a statistically significantly higher success rate of 91.4% (106/116) compared with 78.8% (89/113) for manual disinfection (P = 0.009). The risk of contamination was increased by 2.9-fold when disinfection was performed manually (odds ratio, 2.9 (95% CI, 1.3-6.3)). Before disinfection, bacterial contamination was observed on 98.8% of probes. Microbial analysis revealed 36 different species of bacteria, including skin and environmental bacteria as well as pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp. Considering the high number of contaminated probes and bacterial species found, disinfection of the ultrasound probe's body and handle should be performed after each use to decrease the risk of cross-contamination. This study favored automated disinfection owing to its significantly higher efficacy compared with a manual method. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Comparable Outcomes of Ultrasound versus Computed Tomography in the Guidance of Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Hung; Hwang, Jen-I; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Wu, Chun-Ying; Lee, Shou-Wu; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Chang, Chi-Sen; Lee, Teng-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) in the guidance of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed consecutive treatment-naïve patients who received curative RFA for HCC from January 2008 to July 2013. Patients were divided into the US group or the CT group according to their RFA guidance instruments. Patients who were only suitable for US- or CT-guided RFA were excluded. Cumulative incidences of and hazard ratios for HCC recurrence were analyzed after adjusting for competing mortality risk. Results We recruited a total of 101 patients in the US group and 51 patients in the CT group. The baseline demographic characteristics were not significantly different in both groups. Initial response rates were similar between the two groups (US vs. CT: 89.1% vs. 92.2%, p = 0.54), and complete tumor ablation was finally achieved for all patients. However, more ablations per session were performed in US group (median 2.0 [1.0–3.0] vs. 1.0 [1.0–2.0]; p<0.01). The 1-, 2- and 3-year local tumor recurrence rates (US vs. CT: 13.0%, 20.9%, and 29.2% vs. 11.2%, 29.8% and 29.8%, respectively) and overall mortality rates (US vs. CT: 5.2%, 9.6% and 16.5% vs. 0%, 3.1% and 23.8%, respectively) were not significantly different. In multivariate analysis, tumor characteristics and underlying liver function, but not US or CT guidance, were independent prognostic factors. The complication rates were similar between the two groups (US vs. CT: 10.9% vs. 9.8%; p = 0.71), and there was no procedure-related mortality. Conclusions With comparable major outcomes, either US or CT can be used in the guidance of RFA in experience hands. PMID:28068369

  12. Utility of ultrasound for body fat assessment: validity and reliability compared to a multicompartment criterion.

    PubMed

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Blue, Malia N M; Trexler, Eric T; Hirsch, Katie R

    2016-12-16

    Measurement of body composition to assess health risk and prevention is expanding. Accurate portable techniques are needed to facilitate use in clinical settings. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of a portable ultrasound (US) in comparison with a four-compartment criterion for per cent body fat (%Fat) in overweight/obese adults. Fifty-one participants (mean ± SD; age: 37·2 ± 11·3 years; BMI: 31·6 ± 5·2 kg m(-2) ) were measured for %Fat using US (GE Logiq-e) and skinfolds. A subset of 36 participants completed a second day of the same measurements, to determine reliability. US and skinfold %Fat were calculated using the seven-site Jackson-Pollock equation. The Wang 4C model was used as the criterion method for %Fat. Compared to a gold standard criterion, US %Fat (36·4 ± 11·8%; P = 0·001; standard error of estimate [SEE] = 3·5%) was significantly higher than the criterion (33·0 ± 8·0%), but not different than skinfolds (35·3 ± 5·9%; P = 0·836; SEE = 4·5%). US resulted in good reliability, with no significant differences from Day 1 (39·95 ± 15·37%) to Day 2 (40·01 ± 15·42%). Relative consistency was 0·96, and standard error of measure was 0·94%. Although US overpredicted %Fat compared to the criterion, a moderate SEE for US is suggestive of a practical assessment tool in overweight individuals. %Fat differences reported from these field-based techniques are less than reported by other single-measurement laboratory methods and therefore may have utility in a clinical setting. This technique may also accurately track changes. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Comparative efficacy of microwave, visible light and ultrasound irradiation for green synthesis of dihydropyrimidinones in fruit juice medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Tanay; Padan, Simarjit Kaur; Gupta, Richa; Bedi, Pooja; Singh, Gurinderpal

    2017-07-01

    Dihydropyrimidinones (DHPM) were synthesized via multi component condensation reaction employing urea, ethyl acetoacetate and aromatic aldehydes as reactants. Apple, pomegranate, grape juice were used individually as biodegradable, eco friendly, and green reaction medium whereas microwave, visible light and ultrasound irradiation were applied individually as green source of energy for carrying out the aforesaid reactions. It was observed that the reactions under microwave irradiation were taking minimum time to go for completion whereas the reactions under ultrasound and visible light irradiation were taking approximately same time duration to form products. This is the first of its kind study where the three different reaction methodologies based on three different sources of green energies were compared with each other for their effectiveness and efficiency towards multi component condensation reactions.

  14. Is ultrasound of bone relevant for corticosteroid-treated patients? A comparative study with bone densitometry measured by DEXA.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Beatriz; Di Gregorio, Silvana; Parisi, Muriel Solange; Solís, Fabiana; Mautalen, Carlos

    2003-02-01

    Corticosteroid treatment diminishes bone mass and alters bone quality. The objective was to evaluate bone in corticosteroid-treated patients and controls and in fractured and non-fractured patients treated with corticosteroids using both X-ray densitometry (DEXA) and ultrasound. We evaluated 34 women aged 58 +/- 14 years (X +/- SD), who had been on long-term low dose prednisone therapy for at least 6 months, and who had never received specific treatment for osteoporosis. Bone mineral density of total skeleton (TS), lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN), and vertebral morphometry (MXA) were measured by DEXA. Speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and stiffness were measured using an Achilles Plus system. Forty-two healthy women served as controls. Both densitometric and ultrasound parameters in the patients were significantly diminished compared with controls: TS: P < 0.002, LS: P < 0.025, FS: P < 0.005, Stiffness: P < 0.001, BUA: P < 0.002 and SOS: P < 0.002. The percentage of patients with a Z score below -2 was higher in Stiffness and BUA: 38% and 47%, respectively, compared with a range of 16-24% in the other parameters (P < 0.05 BUA vs. DEXA measurements). Eleven patients with previous bone fracture had values lower than the non-fractured patients, both according to DEXA and ultrasound measurements, but the difference was only significant for BUA (P < 0.02). BUA of the calcaneus was more effective in detecting the specific skeletal alterations and fracture risk of the group of patients receiving chronic corticosteroid treatment.

  15. High-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer: comparative definitions of biochemical failure.

    PubMed

    Blana, Andreas; Brown, Stephen C W; Chaussy, Christian; Conti, Giario N; Eastham, James A; Ganzer, Roman; Murat, Francois J; Pasticier, Gilles; Rebillard, Xavier; Rewcastle, John C; Robertson, Cary N; Thuroff, Stefan; Ward, John F

    2009-10-01

    To compare the specificity and sensitivity of different definitions of biochemical failure in patients treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate cancer, to identify the most accurate predictor of clinical failure after HIFU. Consecutively treated patients who underwent HIFU between October 1997 and July 2006 at two centres (Lyon, France; and Regensburg, Germany) were prospectively maintained within a central database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Clinical failure was defined as a positive prostate biopsy after treatment, radiographic evidence of lymphatic or bony metastatic disease, or salvage treatment for prostate cancer (surgery, radiation, hormonal therapy or second HIFU). The serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values after HIFU were assessed as a biochemical surrogate of a therapeutic success or failure. PSA threshold values, 'PSA nadir plus', PSA velocity, PSA doubling time and the American Society or Therapeutic Radiotherapy and Oncology and Phoenix definition of biochemical failure were all considered. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each biochemical definition for predicting clinical failure were determined. The data from 285 patients (stage

  16. Automatic Cataract Classification based on Ultrasound Technique Using Machine Learning: A comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caxinha, Miguel; Velte, Elena; Santos, Mário; Perdigão, Fernando; Amaro, João; Gomes, Marco; Santos, Jaime

    This paper addresses the use of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the cataract classification based on ultrasound technique. Ultrasound A-scan signals were acquired in 220 porcine lenses. B-mode and Nakagami images were constructed. Ninety-seven parameters were extracted from acoustical, spectral and image textural analyses and were subjected to feature selection by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Bayes, K Nearest-Neighbors (KNN), Fisher Linear Discriminant (FLD) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were tested. The classification of healthy and cataractous lenses shows a good performance for the four classifiers (F-measure ≥92.68%) with SVM showing the highest performance (90.62%) for initial versus severe cataract classification.

  17. A Comparative Evaluation of Elasticity in Pentaerythritol tetranitrate using Brillouin Scattering and Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, L.; Hooks, D; Migliori, A

    2010-01-01

    Elastic tensors for organic molecular crystals vary significantly among different measurements. To understand better the origin of these differences, Brillouin scattering and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy measurements were made on the same specimen for single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate. The results differ significantly despite mitigation of sample-dependent contributions to errors. The frequency dependence and vibrational modes probed for both measurements are discussed in relation to the observed tensor variance.

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Ultrasound Velocity in Binary Liquid Systems of PPG by Mathematical and Experimental Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayathri, A.; Venugopal, T.; Venkatramanan, K.

    The estimation of the speed of ultrasound is the fundamental requirement for investigating the transport properties of liquid and solid systems. Ultrasonic velocities of liquid mixtures containing polar and non-polar groups are of considerable importance in understanding inter-molecular interaction between component molecules and they find applications in several industrial and technological processes. There are many standard mathematical methods available to measure the ultrasonic velocity. In the present study, interferometric technique is planned for experimental measurement of ultrasound velocity. In this paper, the speed of ultrasound waves in Polypropylene Glycol (PPG 400, PPG 4000) in toluene has been estimated for different concentrations (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% & 10%) at 303K and these experimental values compared with theoretical values obtained by using various mathematical methods like Nomotto's Relation, Vandeal Vangeal Relation, Impedance Relation, and Rao's specific sound velocity. The most reliable method that matches with experimental method is identified using Average Percentage Error (APE) and analysed in the light of molecular interactions occurring in the binary liquid systems. Comparison of evaluated theoretical velocities with experimental values will reveal the nature of interaction between component molecules in the mixtures. Such theoretical study is useful in defining a comprehensive theoretical model for a specific liquid mixture. Also, various molecular interaction parameters like free volume, internal pressure, viscous relaxation time, inter atomic free length, etc are calculated and discussed in terms of polymer-solvent interactions.

  19. Compare study CaCO3 crystals on the cellulose substrate by microwave-assisted method and ultrasound agitation method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lian-Hua; Dong, Yan-Yan; Ma, Ming-Guo; Li, Shu-Ming; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-05-01

    The purposes of this article were to investigate the influences of synthesis strategy on the CaCO(3) crystals on the cellulose substrate. In this study, CaCO(3) crystals were synthesized using cellulose as matrix by the microwave-assisted method and ultrasound agitation method, respectively. The CaCO(3) crystals on the cellulose substrate were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental results demonstrated that the synthesis strategy had a dramatically influences on the phase, microstructure, morphology, thermal stability, and biological activity of the CaCO(3) crystals. The pure phase of vaterite spheres with the diameter of about 320-600nm were obtained by ultrasound agitation method, meanwhile, the mixed phases of calcite and vaterite with the diameter of about 0.82-1.24μm were observed by microwave-assisted method. In view of experimental results, one can conclude that the ultrasound agitation method do more favors to the synthesis of CaCO(3) crystals with uniform morphology and size, compared with microwave-assisted method. Furthermore, cytotoxicity experiments indicated that the CaCO(3) crystals on the cellulose substrate had good biocompatibility and could be a candidate for the biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of foreign objects in soft-tissue using a PE-CMOS ultrasound system: a preliminary comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lasser, Marvin E.; Lasser, Bob; Kula, John; Wang, Yue Joseph; Hsieh, Tsung-I.; Sarcone, Anita

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we have tested the ability of four imaging modalities to investigate foreign objects in soft tissue. We inserted wood, plastic, glass, and aluminum objects into a pork sample to simulate traumatized soft tissue. Each object was inserted into the skin, then passed through the fat tissue layer and penetrated into the muscle layer. We then took images of the pork sample using four different modalities: (1) a C-Scan imaging prototype which consists of an unfocused transducer, a compound acoustic lens, and a 2D ultrasound sensor array based on the piezoelectric sensing complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (PE-CMOS) technology; (2) a portable B-Scan ultrasound system; (3) a conventional X-ray system; (4) and a computed radiography (CR) X-ray system. We found that the aluminum and glass objects were clearly visible in both conventional X-ray and CR X-ray images with good contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); however, the wood and plastic objects could not be clearly seen using these modalities. However, we found that the wood, plastic, and glass objects, as well as the thicker aluminum object, were clearly visible in the C-Scan ultrasound images. Furthermore, the fold fibro structures of the fat and muscle tissues in the pork were observable using this modality. The C-Scan prototype images produce neither speckle nor geometry distortion. Both of these issues are commonly seen in B-Scan ultrasound. The results of this study also indicate that the C-Scan images have better CNRs for most foreign objects when compared to other imaging modalities.

  1. Note: Comparative experimental studies on the performance of 2-2 piezocomposite for medical ultrasound transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinozzi, F.; Bini, F.; Biagioni, A.; Grandoni, A.; Spicci, L.

    2013-09-01

    The paper reports the experimental investigation of the behavior of 2-2 Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)-polymer composite transducers array for clinical ultrasound equipments. Several 2-2 plate composites having the same dicing pitch of 0.11 mm and different volume fractions were manufactured and investigated. Measurements were performed through different techniques such as electrical impedance, pulse-echo, and Laser Doppler Vibrometer. With the last one, maps of the surface displacement were presented relative to thickness mode and first lateral mode resonance frequencies. The transducers with volume fractions of the 40% resulted markedly inefficient, whereas the largest bandwidth and best band shape were achieved by the 50%.

  2. A review of randomised controlled trials comparing ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy with endothermal ablation for the treatment of great saphenous varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Davies, Huw Ob; Popplewell, Matthew; Darvall, Katy; Bate, Gareth; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the introduction into everyday clinical practice of a wide range of novel non-surgical treatments for varicose veins. In July 2013, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommended the following treatment hierarchy for varicose veins: endothermal ablation, ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, surgery and compression hosiery. The aim of this paper is to review the randomised controlled trials that have compared endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy to determine if the level 1 evidence base still supports an "endothermal ablation first" strategy for the treatment of varicose veins. A PubMed and OVID literature search (until 31 January 2015) was performed and randomised controlled trials comparing endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy were obtained. Although anatomical success appeared higher with endothermal ablation than ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, clinical success and patient-reported outcomes measures were similar. Morbidity and complication rates were very low and not significantly different between endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy. Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy was consistently less expensive that endothermal ablation. All endovenous modalities appear to be successful and have a role in modern day practice. Although further work is required to optimise ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy technique to maximise anatomical success and minimise retreatment, the present level 1 evidence base shows there is no significant difference in clinical important outcomes between ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy and endothermal ablation. As ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy is less expensive, it is likely to be a more cost-effective option in most patients in most healthcare settings. Strict adherence to the treatment hierarchy recommended by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence seems unjustified. © The Author

  3. [Comparative study of the efficacy of ultrasound and sonophoresis in the treatment of painful shouder syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vlak, T

    1999-01-01

    This research tries to determine the difference between two forms of physical therapy, as regards their efficiency, in treating painful shoulder syndrome. They are ultrasound and sonophoresis. The research comprised 64 patients, divided in two groups. One group was treated by 10 ultrasound procedures (16 women and 17 men, average age 49.3 years), the other by 10 sonophoresis (14 women and 17 men, average age 45.1 years), both having in addition individual physical training (corrective medical exercises) for each patient. The difference in efficiency regarding both procedures were observed on the basis of objective measurable parameters (abduction, anteflexion, retroflexion, outer and inner rotation, the distance between vertebrae prominens and styloid radius) as well as in view of anamnestic terms (pain both at rest and in motion) recorded before the treatment started and after the application of 10 therapeutic procedures. The statistics results of data processing showed significant difference in efficiency, regarding the objective parameters--sonophoresis is more efficient (retroflexion--p < 0.05). Nevertheless, sonophoresis (diclofenac gel) proved much more efficient in reducing pain at rest (p < 0.01) and in motion (p < 0.05).

  4. Ultrasound-enhanced mass transfer in Halal compared with non-Halal chicken.

    PubMed

    Leal-Ramos, Martha Y; Alarcon-Rojo, Alma D; Mason, Timothy J; Paniwnyk, Larysa; Alarjah, Mohammed

    2011-01-15

    Halal foods are often perceived as wholesome products that are specially selected and processed to achieve the highest standards of quality. In this study, dye penetration from an aqueous solution of methylene blue (1 mol L(-1)) was used as a model for the marination process of Halal and non-Halal chicken breast. The effect of dye penetration was evaluated by three techniques: (1) the mass of methylene blue solution in the samples was quantified by mass gain, (2) the amount of dye absorbed was determined by spectroscopy and (3) the penetration distance of dye inside the samples was measured. For non-Halal meat, ultrasound increased the amount of dye inside the samples by 6 and 13% after 15 and 30 min respectively. The effect on Halal meat was much more pronounced, with an increase in dye uptake of over 60% being observed for both time periods. Dye penetration is an indication of meat permeability and so can be used as an estimate of marinading of meat. Thus the use of high-power ultrasound has potential in poultry-processing methods, in particular that of Halal chicken marination. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. A randomized, double-blind clinical trial comparing the effects of continuous and pulsed ultrasound in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Fathali, Mojtaba; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasson, Scott; Jalaie, Shohreh; Rastak, Mohammad Saeed

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of continuous ultrasound (CUS) with pulsed ultrasound (PUS) in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study, 40 patients (10 losses) with CRS participated. Patients received either continuous or pulsed (1:9) 1 MHz ultrasound (US) using a US head of 1 cm2 at 1 W/cm2 and 0.5 W/cm2 for the maxillary and frontal sinuses, respectively. Treatment was performed in 10 sessions, 3 days per week, with US given every other day. The primary outcome measure was percent improvement in the Sinusitis Symptom Score. Measurements were taken before and after 10 treatment sessions. The patients were followed up monthly for 2 months. After treatment, both groups improved significantly on the Sinusitis Symptoms Score. Patients who received PUS had significantly decreased total symptom scores compared with patients receiving CUS (mean change 9.8 vs. 5.6, p = 0.049). The percent improvement in the Sinusitis Symptom Score between the PUS group (65.2 SD 23.1) and the CUS group (43.9 SD 40.7) was not statistically significant (p = 0.09). The effect size for each treatment was large; PUS: d = 3.92 and CUS: d = 1.93. Symptom improvement in both groups was similar at the 2-month follow-up. These results support the use of therapeutic US for CRS. This pilot study gives only marginal evidence to favor PUS over CUS.

  6. Ultrasound detection of visceral adhesion after intraperitoneal ventral hernia treatment: a comparative study of protected versus unprotected meshes.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, J P; Hennekinne-Mucci, S; Pessaux, P; Tuech, J J; Aube, C

    2003-06-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) ventral hernia repair has been proposed with the advantages of reducing dissection, operative time, and postoperative pain. The IP position of the mesh is suspected of increasing the risk of visceral adhesion and inducing complications. To overcome these drawbacks, a mesh protected on one side by a hydrophilic resorbable film (Parietex Composite) has been validated. Using a previously described ultrasound procedure, the purpose of this study was to compare the rate of visceral adhesion after intraperitoneal placement of a polyester mesh versus this protected mesh. Fifty-one patients who received a Parietex Composite mesh were prospectively compared to a retrospective series of 22 consecutive asymptomatic patients who received a Mersilene mesh. To objectively assess visceral adhesion toward the abdominal wall, an ultrasound (US) specific examination was firstly validated and secondly used to evaluate the adhesion incidence in both groups. Both groups were equivalent in terms of inclusion criteria and body mass index (BMI). Pre-operative US versus perioperative macroscopical findings determined the following parameters: sensitivity 83%, accuracy 78%, negative predictive value 81%. Using this procedure, 77% of the patients exhibited visceral adhesion to the mesh in the Mersilene group, against 18% in the Parietex Composite group (P<0.001, chi-square). US examination represents a suitable tool to evaluate postoperative adhesions to the abdominal wall. Using this procedure, a significant reduction of visceral adhesion in the Parietex Composite group was shown.

  7. Comparative study of the effect of ultrasound on the removal of intracanal posts.

    PubMed

    Braga, Neilor Mateus Antunes; Resende, Leandro Marques; Vasconcellos, Walisom Arthuso; Paulino, Silvana Maria; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate how ultrasound affected the removal of stainless steel and titanium posts that had been attached with two different resin cements. The crowns of 32 maxillary canines were removed, the roots were embedded in acrylic resin blocks, and the canals were treated endodontically. The specimens were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 16) according to the brand of cement and subdivided (n = 8) according to the type of post. The specimens were submitted to ultrasonic vibration applied perpendicularly to the long axis of the tooth for 60 seconds. Data were submitted to ANOVA and showed no significant statistical difference among the groups (p > 0.05). It may be concluded that the effects of ultrasonic vibration used to remove intraradicular posts were not significantly different when applied to stainless steel or titanium posts cemented with chemically or dual-activated resin cements.

  8. Prostate volume estimations using magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound compared to radical prostatectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Nicholas R.; Lavallée, Luke T.; Nguyen, Laura N.; Witiuk, Kelsey; Ross, James; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Shabana, Wael; MacDonald, Blair; Scheida, Nicola; Fergusson, Dean; Momoli, Franco; Cnossen, Sonya; Morash, Christopher; Cagiannos, Ilias; Breau, Rodney H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prostate volume estimates in patients who received both a preoperative transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to the referent pathological specimen post-radical prostatectomy. Methods: Patients receiving both TRUS and MRI prior to radical prostatectomy at one academic institution were retrospectively analyzed. TRUS and MRI volumes were estimated using the prolate ellipsoid formula. TRUS volumes were collected from sonography reports. MRI volumes were estimated by two blinded raters and the mean of the two was used for analyses. Pathological volume was calculated using a standard fluid displacement method. Results: Three hundred and eighteen (318) patients were included in the analysis. MRI was slightly more accurate than TRUS based on interclass correlation (0.83 vs. 0.74) and absolute risk bias (higher proportion of estimates within 5, 10, and 20 cc of pathological volume). For TRUS, 87 of 298 (29.2%) prostates without median lobes differed by >10 cc of specimen volume and 22 of 298 (7.4%) differed by >20 cc. For MRI, 68 of 298 (22.8%) prostates without median lobes differed by >10 cc of specimen volume, while only 4 of 298 (1.3%) differed by >20 cc. Conclusions: MRI and TRUS prostate volume estimates are consistent with pathological volumes along the prostate size spectrum. MRI demonstrated better correlation with prostatectomy specimen volume in most patients and may be better suited in cases where TRUS and MRI estimates are disparate. Validation of these findings with prospective, standardized ultrasound techniques would be helpful. PMID:27878049

  9. A randomised controlled trial comparing meat-based with human cadaveric models for teaching ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chuan, A; Lim, Y C; Aneja, H; Duce, N A; Appleyard, R; Forrest, K; Royse, C F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study was to compare novices' acquisition of the technical skills of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia using either a meat phantom model or fresh-frozen human cadavers. The primary outcome was the time taken to successfully perform an ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block on a cadaver; secondary outcomes were the cumulative score of errors, and best image quality of the sciatic nerve achieved. After training, the median (IQR [range]) time taken to perform the block was 311(164-390 [68-600]) s in the meat model trained group and 210 (174-354 [85-600]) s in the fresh-frozen cadaver trained group (p = 0.24). Participants made a median (IQR [range]) of 18 (14-33 [8-55]) and 15 (12-22 [8-44]) errors in the two groups respectively (p = 0.39). The image quality score was also not different, with a median (IQR [range]) of 62.5 (59.4-65.6 [25.0-100.0])% vs 62.5 (62.5-75.0 [25.0-87.5])% respectively (p = 0.58). The training and deliberate feedback improved all participants' block performance, the median (IQR [range]) times being 310 (206-532 [110-600]) s before and 240 (174-354 [85-600]) s after training (p = 0.02). We conclude that novices taught ultrasound scanning and needle guidance skills using an inexpensive and easily constructed meat model perform similarly to those trained on a cadaveric model. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Shear Wave Elastography May Add a New Dimension to Ultrasound Evaluation of Thyroid Nodules: Case Series with Comparative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Slapa, Rafal Z.; Piwowonski, Antoni; Jakubowski, Wieslaw S.; Bierca, Jacek; Szopinski, Kazimierz T.; Slowinska-Srzednicka, Jadwiga; Migda, Bartosz; Mlosek, R. Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Although elastography can enhance the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, its diagnostic performance is not ideal at present. Further improvements in the technique and creation of robust diagnostic criteria are necessary. The purpose of this study was to compare the usefulness of strain elastography and a new generation of elasticity imaging called supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) in differential evaluation of thyroid nodules. Six thyroid nodules in 4 patients were studied. SSWE yielded 1 true-positive and 5 true-negative results. Strain elastography yielded 5 false-positive results and 1 false-negative result. A novel finding appreciated with SSWE, were punctate foci of increased stiffness corresponding to microcalcifications in 4 nodules, some not visible on B-mode ultrasound, as opposed to soft, colloid-inspissated areas visible on B-mode ultrasound in 2 nodules. This preliminary paper indicates that SSWE may outperform strain elastography in differentiation of thyroid nodules with regard to their stiffness. SSWE showed the possibility of differentiation of high echogenic foci into microcalcifications and inspissated colloid, adding a new dimension to thyroid elastography. Further multicenter large-scale studies of thyroid nodules evaluating different elastographic methods are warranted. PMID:22685685

  11. A Comparative Study on the Influence of Probe Placement on Quality Assurance Measurements in B-mode Ultrasound by Means of Ultrasound Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, A; Conforto, S; D'Anna, C; Sciuto, S.A

    2015-01-01

    To check or to prevent failures in ultrasound medical systems, some tests should be scheduled for both clinical suitability and technical functionality evaluation: among them, image quality assurance tests performed by technicians through ultrasound phantoms are widespread today and their results depend on issues related to scanner settings as well as phantom features and operator experience. In the present study variations on some features of the B-mode image were measured when the ultrasound probe is handled by the technician in a routine image quality test: ultrasound phantom images from two array transducers are processed to evaluate measurement dispersion in distance accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution and penetration depth when probe is handled by the operator. All measurements are done by means of an in-house image analysis software that minimizes errors due to operator’s visual acuity and subjective judgment while influences of ultrasound transducer position on quality assurance test results are estimated as expanded uncertainties on parameters above (measurement reproducibility at 95 percent confidence level): depending on the probe model, they ranged from ±0.1 to ±1.9 mm in high contrast spatial resolution, from ±0.1 to ±5.5 percent in distance measurements error and from ±1 to ±10 mm in maximum depth of signal visualization. Although numerical results are limited to the two examined probes, they confirm some predictions based on general working principles of diagnostic ultrasound systems: (a) measurements strongly depend on settings as well on phantoms features, probes and parameters investigated; (b) relative uncertainty due to probe manipulation on spatial resolution can be very high, i.e. from 10 to more than 30 percent; (c) Field of View settings must be taken into account for measurement reproducibility as well as Dynamic Range compression and phantom attenuation. PMID:26312078

  12. A Comparative Study of Three Speckle Reducing Methods for Intima-Media Thickness Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Mehravar; Arabfard, Masoud; Rafati Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad; Voshtani, Hasan; Moladoust, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ultrasonic evaluation of intima-media thickness (IMT) is an early marker of assessing the development of atherosclerosis and determining cardiovascular risk. To attain the best possible diagnosis, it is essential that medical images be clear, sharp and without noise and artifacts. Objectives: Comparison of speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD), discrete (DTD) and continuum topological derivative (CTD) on B-mode ultrasound images of common carotid and brachial arteries throughout the cardiac cycle. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, an examination was performed on forty-two human subjects with a mean age of 44 ± 6 years from April 2013 to June 2013. This study was approved by the ethics committees of Kashan University of Medical Sciences and Beheshti Hospital. An ultrasonic examination of common carotid and brachial arteries of forty-two human subjects was performed. The program was designed in MATLAB software to extract consecutive B-mode images and apply region of interest (ROI) on the IMT of the common carotid and brachial arteries. Then, three different noise reduction filters with the Canny edge detection were used in ROI separately. Finally, the program measured the image quality metrics. Results: According to values of eleven different image quality metrics (mentioned in the main text), there was a significant difference between CTD, DTD and SRAD filters with the Canny edge detection status in the common carotid and brachial arteries throughout the cardiac cycle (all P values < 0.001). For example, peak signal to noise ratios (PSNR) using CTD, DTD and SRAD filters were 95.43 ± 0.64, 88.86 ± 0.82 and 73.02 ± 0.20 in common carotid and 96.39 ± 1.25, 92.58 ± 0.11 and 88.27 ± 0.63 in brachial arteries, respectively (both P values < 0.001). Conclusions: By measuring image quality metrics, this study showed that DTD and CTD filters with the Canny edge detection respectively, are better than SRAD filter with the Canny

  13. Differences in liver stiffness values obtained with new ultrasound elastography machines and Fibroscan: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Piscaglia, Fabio; Salvatore, Veronica; Mulazzani, Lorenzo; Cantisani, Vito; Colecchia, Antonio; Di Donato, Roberto; Felicani, Cristina; Ferrarini, Alessia; Gamal, Nesrine; Grasso, Valentina; Marasco, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Elena; Ravaioli, Federico; Ruggieri, Giacomo; Serio, Ilaria; Sitouok Nkamgho, Joules Fabrice; Serra, Carla; Festi, Davide; Schiavone, Cosima; Bolondi, Luigi

    2017-07-01

    Whether Fibroscan thresholds can be immediately adopted for none, some or all other shear wave elastography techniques has not been tested. The aim of the present study was to test the concordance of the findings obtained from 7 of the most recent ultrasound elastography machines with respect to Fibroscan. Sixteen hepatitis C virus-related patients with fibrosis ≥2 and having reliable results at Fibroscan were investigated in two intercostal spaces using 7 different elastography machines. Coefficients of both precision (an index of data dispersion) and accuracy (an index of bias correction factors expressing different magnitudes of changes in comparison to the reference) were calculated. Median stiffness values differed among the different machines as did coefficients of both precision (range 0.54-0.72) and accuracy (range 0.28-0.87). When the average of the measurements of two intercostal spaces was considered, coefficients of precision significantly increased with all machines (range 0.72-0.90) whereas of accuracy improved more scatteredly and by a smaller degree (range 0.40-0.99). The present results showed only moderate concordance of the majority of elastography machines with the Fibroscan results, preventing the possibility of the immediate universal adoption of Fibroscan thresholds for defining liver fibrosis staging for all new machines. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Volumetric breast density evaluation by ultrasound tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myc, Lukasz; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Ranger, Bryan; Lupinacci, Jessica; Schmidt, Steven; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    Since a 1976 study by Wolfe, high breast density has gained recognition as a factor strongly correlating with an increased incidence of breast cancer. These observations have led to mammographic density being designated a "risk factor" for breast cancer. Clinically, the exclusive reliance on mammography for breast density measurement has forestalled the inclusion of breast density into statistical risk models. This exclusion has in large part been due to the ionizing radiation associated with the method. Additionally, the use of mammography as valid tool for measuring a three dimensional characteristic (breast density) has been criticized for its prima facie incongruity. These shortfalls have prompted MRI studies of breast density as an alternative three-dimensional method of assessing breast density. Although, MRI is safe and can be used to measure volumetric density, its cost has prohibited its use in screening. Here, we report that sound speed measurements using a prototype ultrasound tomography device have potential for use as surrogates for breast density measurement. Accordingly, we report a strong positive linear correlation between volume-averaged sound speed of the breast and percent glandular tissue volume as assessed by MR.

  15. [Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging: a comparative study on the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosis in morbidly obese patients].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela Villaça; Pereira, Sílvia Elaine; Saboya, Carlos José; Cortes, Caroline; Ramalho, Rejane

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the concordance between abdominal ultrasound and an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in the diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and concordance of these two methods with the histopathological exam. The population studied was comprised of 145 patients with morbid obesity (BMI > or = 40 Kg/m(2)), of both genders. NAFLD diagnosis was performed by MRI and Ultrasound. Liver biopsy was performed in a sub-sample (n=40). To evaluate the concordance of these two methods, the kappa coefficient was used. Concordance between both methods (MRI and Ultrasound) was poor and not significant (Kappa adjusted= 0.27; CI 95%= 0.07-0.39.) Nevertheless a slight concordance was found between diagnosis of NAFLD by ultrasound and the hepatic biopsy, with 83.,3% of concordant results and Kappa adjusted= 0.67.Results of an MRI and the histopathological exam were compared and results showed 53.6% of concordant results and kappa adjusted= 0.07. The concordance found in the diagnosis performed using the ultrasound method and the hepatic biopsy, shows a need to implement and perform more research on the use of ultrasound to validate and reconsider these methods. This would minimize the need to perform biopsies to detect and diagnose such disease.

  16. Validation study of ultrasound-based high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy planning compared with CT-based planning.

    PubMed

    Batchelar, Deidre; Gaztañaga, Miren; Schmid, Matt; Araujo, Cynthia; Bachand, François; Crook, Juanita

    2014-01-01

    The use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to both guide and plan high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) for prostate is increasing. Studies using prostate phantoms have demonstrated the accuracy of ultrasound (US) needle tip reconstruction compared with CT imaging standard. We have assessed the in vivo accuracy of needle tip localization by TRUS using cone-beam CT (CBCT) as our reference standard. Needle positions from 37 implants have been analyzed. A median of 16 needles (range, 16-18) per implant were inserted, advanced to the prostate base, and their tips identified using live TRUS images and real-time planning BT software. Needle protrusion length from the template was recorded to allow for reverification before capturing images for planning. The needles remained locked in the template, which was fixed to the stepper, while a set of three-dimensional TRUS images was acquired for needle path reconstruction and HDR-BT treatment planning. Following treatment, CBCT images were acquired for subsequent needle reconstruction using a BT Treatment Planning System. The coordinates of each needle tip were recorded from the Treatment Planning System for CT and US and compared. A total of 574 needle tip positions have been compared between TRUS and CBCT. Of these, 59% agreed within 1 mm, 27% within 1-2 mm, and 11% agreed within 2-3 mm. The discrepancy between tip positions in the two modalities was greater than 3 mm for only 20 needles (3%). The US needle tip identification in vivo is at least as accurate as CT identification, while providing all the advantages of a one-step procedure. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Are Ultrasound-Guided Ophthalmic Blocks Injurious to the Eye? A Comparative Rabbit Model Study of Two Ultrasound Devices Evaluating Intraorbital Thermal and Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Palte, Howard D.; Gayer, Steven; Arrieta, Esdras; Shaw, Eric Scot; Nose, Izuru; Lee, Elizabete; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Dubovy, Sander; Birnbach, David J.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background Since Atkinson’s original description of retrobulbar block in 1936, needle-based anesthetic techniques have become integral to ophthalmic anesthesia. These techniques are unfortunately associated with rare, grave complications such as globe perforation. Ultrasound has gained widespread acceptance for peripheral nerve blockade but its translation to ocular anesthesia has been hampered because sonic energy, in the guise of thermal or biomechanical insult, is potentially injurious to vulnerable eye tissue. The United States Food and Drug Administration have defined guidelines for safe use of ultrasound for ophthalmic examination but most ultrasound devices used by anesthesiologists are not Food and Drug Administration-approved for ocular application because they generate excessive energy. Regulating agencies state that ultrasound examination can be safely undertaken as long as tissue temperatures do not increase >1.5°C above physiological levels. Methods Using a rabbit model, we investigated the thermal and mechanical ocular effects after prolonged ultrasonic exposure to single orbital and non-orbital-rated devices. In a dual-phase study, aimed at detecting ocular injury, the eyes of 8 rabbits were exposed to continuous 10-minute ultrasound examinations from two devices: 1) the Sonosite Micromaxx (non-orbital-rated) and 2) the Sonomed VuMax (orbital-rated) machines. In Phase I temperatures were continuously monitored via thermocouples implanted within specific eye structures (n=4). In Phase II the eyes were subjected to ultrasonic exposure without surgical intervention (n=4). All eyes underwent light microscopy examinations followed, at different intervals, by histology evaluations conducted by an ophthalmic pathologist. Results Temperature changes were monitored in the eyes of four rabbits. The non-orbital-rated transducer produced increases in ocular tissue temperature that surpassed the safe limit (increases> 1.50C ) in the lens of three rabbits (at 5

  18. Are ultrasound-guided ophthalmic blocks injurious to the eye? A comparative rabbit model study of two ultrasound devices evaluating intraorbital thermal and structural changes.

    PubMed

    Palte, Howard D; Gayer, Steven; Arrieta, Esdras; Scot Shaw, Eric; Nose, Izuru; Lee, Elizabete; Arheart, Kristopher L; Dubovy, Sander; Birnbach, David J; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-07-01

    Since Atkinson's original description of retrobulbar block in 1936, needle-based anesthetic techniques have become integral to ophthalmic anesthesia. These techniques are unfortunately associated with rare, grave complications such as globe perforation. Ultrasound has gained widespread acceptance for peripheral nerve blockade, but its translation to ocular anesthesia has been hampered because sonic energy, in the guise of thermal or biomechanical insult, is potentially injurious to vulnerable eye tissue. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has defined guidelines for safe use of ultrasound for ophthalmic examination, but most ultrasound devices used by anesthesiologists are not FDA-approved for ocular application because they generate excessive energy. Regulating agencies state that ultrasound examinations can be safely undertaken as long as tissue temperatures do not increase >1.5°C above physiological levels. Using a rabbit model, we investigated the thermal and mechanical ocular effects after prolonged ultrasonic exposure to single orbital- and nonorbital-rated devices. In a dual-phase study, aimed at detecting ocular injury, the eyes of 8 rabbits were exposed to continuous 10-minute ultrasound examinations from 2 devices: (1) the Sonosite Micromaxx (nonorbital rated) and (2) the Sonomed VuMax (orbital rated) machines. In phase I, temperatures were continuously monitored via thermocouples implanted within specific eye structures (n = 4). In phase II the eyes were subjected to ultrasonic exposure without surgical intervention (n = 4). All eyes underwent light microscopy examinations, followed at different intervals by histology evaluations conducted by an ophthalmic pathologist. Temperature changes were monitored in the eyes of 4 rabbits. The nonorbital-rated transducer produced increases in ocular tissue temperature that surpassed the safe limit (increases >1.5°C) in the lens of 3 rabbits (at 5.0, 5.5, and 1.5 minutes) and cornea of 2 rabbits (both at 1

  19. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  20. The Role of Ultrasound Compared to Biopsy of Temporal Arteries in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Giant Cell Arteritis (TABUL): a diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Luqmani, Raashid; Lee, Ellen; Singh, Surjeet; Gillett, Mike; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Bradburn, Mike; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Forrester-Barker, Wulf; Hamilton, William; Masters, Shauna; McDonald, Brendan; McNally, Eugene; Pease, Colin; Piper, Jennifer; Salmon, John; Wailoo, Allan; Wolfe, Konrad; Hutchings, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a relatively common form of primary systemic vasculitis, which, if left untreated, can lead to permanent sight loss. We compared ultrasound as an alternative diagnostic test with temporal artery biopsy, which may be negative in 9-61% of true cases. To compare the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ultrasound with biopsy in diagnosing patients with suspected GCA. Prospective multicentre cohort study. Secondary care. A total of 381 patients referred with newly suspected GCA. Sensitivity, specificity and cost-effectiveness of ultrasound compared with biopsy or ultrasound combined with biopsy for diagnosing GCA and interobserver reliability in interpreting scan or biopsy findings. We developed and implemented an ultrasound training programme for diagnosing suspected GCA. We recruited 430 patients with suspected GCA. We analysed 381 patients who underwent both ultrasound and biopsy within 10 days of starting treatment for suspected GCA and who attended a follow-up assessment (median age 71.1 years; 72% female). The sensitivity of biopsy was 39% [95% confidence interval (CI) 33% to 46%], which was significantly lower than previously reported and inferior to ultrasound (54%, 95% CI 48% to 60%); the specificity of biopsy (100%, 95% CI 97% to 100%) was superior to ultrasound (81%, 95% CI 73% to 88%). If we scanned all suspected patients and performed biopsies only on negative cases, sensitivity increased to 65% and specificity was maintained at 81%, reducing the need for biopsies by 43%. Strategies combining clinical judgement (clinician's assessment at 2 weeks) with the tests showed sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 81%, respectively, for biopsy and 93% and 77%, respectively, for ultrasound; cost-effectiveness (incremental net monetary benefit) was £485 per patient in favour of ultrasound with both cost savings and a small health gain. Inter-rater analysis revealed moderate agreement among sonographers (intraclass

  1. [Comparative evaluation of bone mineral density in Mexican women using x-ray bone densitometry and ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Llaca Rodríguez, V; Aguilera Pérez, R; Ahued Ahued, R; Rio de la Loza, F; Mendoza Torres, L J; Coria Soto, I; Zambrana Castañeda, M M

    2000-03-01

    With lifestyle changes in women, smoking and use of beverages with caffeine, and sedentarism increasing, so the risk factors for decalcification, increase; which is a public health problem by the higher incidence of osteoporotic fractures, as the age advances, specially in the postmenopause woman, which means a greater secondary morbidity-mortality; an important cause of physical disability, which directly affects psychoemotional wellbeing in women. In this study two methods of bone densitometry, were used; one of x ray, and other with ultrasound in 138 women during postmenopause with an average index of corporal mass of 29. Both results were compared of bone density, T measurement with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Double densitometry, was done in the 138 patients of lumbar spine with DEXA equipment, and of calcaneum with DTU-one equipment, by the same technician, finding the difference of T punctuation in this double study.

  2. Comparative cost analysis of endobronchial ultrasound-guided and blind TBNA in the evaluation of hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Grove, Daniel A; Bechara, Rabih I; Josephs, Josh S; Berkowitz, David M

    2012-07-01

    The superior accuracy of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) averts many diagnostic surgical procedures. This likely leads to significant cost savings despite an increased per procedure cost. We sought to compare the true costs of endobronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) compared with "blind" fiberoptic bronchoscopy-transbronchial needle aspiration (FB-TBNA) factoring in the impact of diagnostic surgical procedures in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. In this retrospective case study, we selected 294 patients with thoracic lymphadenopathy as diagnosed by computed tomography at a university hospital. Information was extracted from the electronic record. Costs were determined from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services resource-based relative value scale. We defined a positive diagnosis as one where benign or malignant disease was found. A negative biopsy was one where lymph node sampling was confirmed, but no pathology (benign or malignant) was seen. A nondiagnostic biopsy was one where no pathology was seen and lymph node sampling could not be confirmed. The total cost of endoscopic and surgical diagnostic procedures was tallied for each patient to obtain mean costs per patient. Thirty-seven patients underwent FB-TBNA and 257 underwent EBUS-TBNA. A diagnosis was found in 90% of patients in the EBUS group and 62.2% of patients in the FB-TBNA group (P<0.001). More patients in the FB-TBNA group underwent a diagnostic surgical procedure (HR= -0.1573, 95% confidence interval, -0.30 to -0.15; P<0.001). After accounting for all diagnostic procedures, the mean savings with EBUS was $1071.09 (P=0.09) per patient. EBUS-TBNA is less expensive than blind FB-TBNA in the evaluation of thoracic lymphadenopathy when accounting for diagnostic surgical procedures.

  3. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures within ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  4. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  5. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Breast Ultrasound imaging of the breast uses sound waves to produce pictures of the internal structures ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  6. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  7. Ultrasound-based follow-up does not increase survival in early-stage melanoma patients: A comparative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ribero, S; Podlipnik, S; Osella-Abate, S; Sportoletti-Baduel, E; Manubens, E; Barreiro, A; Caliendo, V; Chavez-Bourgeois, M; Carrera, C; Cassoni, P; Malvehy, J; Fierro, M T; Puig, S

    2017-09-07

    Different protocols have been used to follow up melanoma patients in stage I-II. However, there is no consensus on the complementary tests that should be requested or the appropriate intervals between visits. Our aim is to compare an ultrasound-based follow-up with a clinical follow-up. Analysis of two prospectively collected cohorts of melanoma patients in stage IB-IIA from two tertiary referral centres in Barcelona (clinical-based follow-up [C-FU]) and Turin (ultrasound-based follow-up [US-FU]). Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), disease-free interval (DFI), nodal metastases-free survival (NMFS) and melanoma-specific survival (MSS). A total of 1149 patients in the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage IB and IIA were included in this study, of which 554 subjects (48%) were enrolled for a C-FU, and 595 patients (52%) received a protocolised US-FU. The median age was 53.8 years (interquartile range [IQR] 41.5-65.2) with a median follow-up time of 4.14 years (IQR 1.2-7.6). During follow-up, 69 patients (12.5%) in C-FU and 72 patients (12.1%) in US-FU developed disease progression. Median time to relapse for the first metastatic site was 2.11 years (IQR 1.14-4.04) for skin metastases, 1.32 (IQR 0.57-3.29) for lymph node metastases and 2.84 (IQR 1.32-4.60) for distant metastases. The pattern of progression and the total proportion of metastases were not significantly different (P = .44) in the two centres. No difference in DFI, DMFS, NMFS and MSS was found between the two cohorts. Ultrasound-based follow-up does not increase the survival of melanoma patients in stage IB-IIA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Strain elastography of abnormal axillary nodes in breast cancer patients does not improve diagnostic accuracy compared with conventional ultrasound alone.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Mi; Fornage, Bruno D; Benveniste, Ana Paula; Fox, Patricia S; Bassett, Roland L; Yang, Wei Tse

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of strain elastography (SE) alone and in combination with gray-scale ultrasound in the diagnosis of benign versus metastatic disease for abnormal axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer patients. Patients with breast cancer and axillary lymph nodes suspicious for metastatic disease on conventional ultrasound who underwent SE of the suspicious node before ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) were included in this study. On conventional ultrasound, the long- and short-axis diameters, long-axis-to-short-axis ratio, cortical echogenicity, thickness, and evenness were documented. The nodal vascularity was assessed on power Doppler imaging. Elastograms were evaluated for the percentage of black (hard) areas in the lymph node, and the SE-ultrasound size ratio was calculated. Two readers assessed the images independently and then in consensus in cases of disagreement. ROC AUCs were calculated for conventional ultrasound, SE, and both methods combined. Interreader reliability was assessed using kappa statistics. A total of 101 patients with 104 nodes were examined; 35 nodes were benign, and 69 had metastases. SE alone showed a significantly lower AUC (62%) than did conventional ultrasound (92%) (p<0.001). There was no difference between the AUC of conventional ultrasound and the AUC of the combination of conventional ultrasound and SE (93%) (p=0.16). Interreader reliability was moderate for all variables (κ≥0.60) except the SE-ultrasound size ratio (κ=0.35). Added SE does not improve the diagnostic ability of conventional ultrasound when evaluating abnormal axillary lymph nodes.

  9. Adjunct Screening With Tomosynthesis or Ultrasound in Women With Mammography-Negative Dense Breasts: Interim Report of a Prospective Comparative Trial.

    PubMed

    Tagliafico, Alberto S; Calabrese, Massimo; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela; Tosto, Simona; Monetti, Francesco; Airaldi, Sonia; Bignotti, Bianca; Nori, Jacopo; Bagni, Antonella; Signori, Alessio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Houssami, Nehmat

    2016-03-09

    Debate on adjunct screening in women with dense breasts has followed legislation requiring that women be informed about their mammographic density and related adjunct imaging. Ultrasound or tomosynthesis can detect breast cancer (BC) in mammography-negative dense breasts, but these modalities have not been directly compared in prospective trials. We conducted a trial of adjunct screening to compare, within the same participants, incremental BC detection by tomosynthesis and ultrasound in mammography-negative dense breasts. Adjunct Screening With Tomosynthesis or Ultrasound in Women With Mammography-Negative Dense Breasts is a prospective multicenter study recruiting asymptomatic women with mammography-negative screens and dense breasts. Eligible women had tomosynthesis and physician-performed ultrasound with independent interpretation of adjunct imaging. Outcome measures included cancer detection rate (CDR), number of false-positive (FP) recalls, and incremental CDR for each modality; these were compared using McNemar's test for paired binary data in a preplanned interim analysis. Among 3,231 mammography-negative screening participants (median age, 51 years; interquartile range, 44 to 78 years) with dense breasts, 24 additional BCs were detected (23 invasive): 13 tomosynthesis-detected BCs (incremental CDR, 4.0 per 1,000 screens; 95% CI, 1.8 to 6.2) versus 23 ultrasound-detected BCs (incremental CDR, 7.1 per 1,000 screens; 95% CI, 4.2 to 10.0), P = .006. Incremental FP recall occurred in 107 participants (3.33%; 95% CI, 2.72% to 3.96%). FP recall (any testing) did not differ between tomosynthesis (FP = 53) and ultrasound (FP = 65), P = .26; FP recall (biopsy) also did not differ between tomosynthesis (FP = 22) and ultrasound (FP = 24), P = .86. The Adjunct Screening With Tomosynthesis or Ultrasound in Women With Mammography-Negative Dense Breasts' interim analysis shows that ultrasound has better incremental BC detection than tomosynthesis in mammography

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction using ultrasound images with DWT, GLCM and HOS methods: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Vidya, K Sudarshan; Ng, E Y K; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chou, Siaw Meng; Tan, Ru San; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial Infarction (MI) or acute MI (AMI) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Precise and timely identification of MI and extent of muscle damage helps in early treatment and reduction in the time taken for further tests. MI diagnosis using 2D echocardiography is prone to inter-/intra-observer variability in the assessment. Therefore, a computerised scheme based on image processing and artificial intelligent techniques can reduce the workload of clinicians and improve the diagnosis accuracy. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) of infarcted and normal ultrasound images will be useful for clinicians. In this study, the performance of CAD approach using Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), second order statistics calculated from Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and Higher-Order Spectra (HOS) texture descriptors are compared. The proposed system is validated using 400 MI and 400 normal ultrasound images, obtained from 80 patients with MI and 80 normal subjects. The extracted features are ranked based on t-value and fed to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to obtain the best performance using minimum number of features. The features extracted from DWT coefficients obtained an accuracy of 99.5%, sensitivity of 99.75% and specificity of 99.25%; GLCM have achieved an accuracy of 85.75%, sensitivity of 90.25% and specificity of 81.25%; and HOS obtained an accuracy of 93.0%, sensitivity of 94.75% and specificity of 91.25%. Among the three techniques presented DWT yielded the highest classification accuracy. Thus, the proposed CAD approach may be used as a complementary tool to assist cardiologists in making a more accurate diagnosis for the presence of MI.

  11. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this case was the SUS.

  12. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. Methods A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. Results When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Conclusion Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this

  13. Routine use of standard breast MRI compared to axillary ultrasound for differentiating between no, limited and advanced axillary nodal disease in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van Nijnatten, T J A; Ploumen, E H; Schipper, R J; Goorts, B; Andriessen, E H; Vanwetswinkel, S; Schavemaker, M; Nelemans, P; de Vries, B; Beets-Tan, R G H; Smidt, M L; Lobbes, M B I

    2016-12-01

    To compare standard breast MRI to dedicated axillary ultrasound (with or without tissue sampling) for differentiating between no, limited and advanced axillary nodal disease in breast cancer patients. All patients who underwent breast MRI and dedicated axillary ultrasound between 2009 and 2014 were eligible. Exclusion criteria were recurrent disease, neoadjuvant systemic therapy and not receiving completion axillary lymph node dissection after positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). Two radiologists independently reassessed all MRI exams. Axillary ultrasound findings were retrospectively collected. Probability of advanced axillary nodal disease (pN2-3) given clinically node negative (cN0) or limited (cN1) findings was calculated, with corresponding negative predictive value (NPV) to exclude pN2-3 and positive predictive value (PPV) to identify axillary nodal disease. Histopathology served as gold standard. A total of 377 cases resulted in 81.4% no, 14.4% limited and 4.2% advanced axillary nodal disease at final histopathology. Probability of pN2-3 given cN0 for breast MRI and axillary ultrasound was 0.7-0.9% versus 1.5% and probability of pN2-3 given cN1 was 11.6-15.4% versus 29.0%. When cN1 on breast MRI was observed, PPV to identify positive axillary nodal disease was 50.7% and 59.0%. Evaluation of axillary nodal status on standard breast MRI is comparable to dedicated axillary ultrasound in breast cancer patients. In patients who underwent preoperative standard breast MRI, axillary ultrasound is only required in case of suspicious nodal findings on MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Body composition in sport: a comparison of a novel ultrasound imaging technique to measure subcutaneous fat tissue compared with skinfold measurement.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolfram; Horn, Martin; Fürhapter-Rieger, Alfred; Kainz, Philipp; Kröpfl, Julia M; Maughan, Ronald J; Ahammer, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Extremely low weight and rapid changes in weight and body composition have become major concerns in many sports, but sufficiently accurate field methods for body composition assessment in athletes are missing. This study aimed to explore the use of ultrasound methods for assessment of body fat content in athletes. 19 female athletes (stature: 1.67(± 0.06) m, weight: 59.6(± 7.6) kg; age: 19.5(± 3.3) years) were investigated by three observers using a novel ultrasound method for thickness measurement of uncompressed subcutaneous adipose tissue and of embedded structures. Two observers also measured skinfold thickness at eight International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthrometry (ISAK) sites; mean skinfold values were compared to mean subcutaneous adipose tissue thicknesses measured by ultrasound. Interobserver reliability of imaging and evaluation obtained by this ultrasound technique: intraclass correlation coefficient ICC=0.968 (95% CI 0.957 to 0.977); evaluation of given images: ICC=0.997 (0.993 to 0.999). Skinfold compared to ultrasound thickness showed that compressibility of subcutaneous adipose tissue depends largely on the site and the person: regression slopes ranged from 0.61 (biceps) to 1.59 (thigh) and CIs were large. Limits of agreement ranged from 2.6 to 8.6 mm. Regression lines did not intercept the skinfold axis at zero because of the skin thickness being included in the skinfold. The four ISAK trunk sites caused ultrasound imaging problems in 13 of 152 sites (8 ISAK sites, 19 athletes). The ultrasound method allows measurement of uncompressed subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness with an accuracy of 0.1-0.5 mm, depending on the probe frequency. Compressibility of the skinfold depends on the anatomical site, and skin thickness varies by a factor of two. This inevitably limits the skinfold methods for body fat estimation. Ultrasound accuracy for subcutaneous adipose tissue measurement is limited by the plasticity of fat and furrowed tissue

  15. Comparative assessments of the effects of alcohol exposure on fetal brain development using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-02-01

    The developing fetal brain is vulnerable to a variety of environmental agents including maternal ethanol consumption. Preclinical studies on the development and amelioration of fetal teratology would be significantly facilitated by the application of high resolution imaging technologies like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (US). This study investigates the ability of these imaging technologies to measure the effects of maternal ethanol exposure on brain development, ex vivo, in fetal mice. Pregnant mice at gestational day 12.5 were administered ethanol (3 g/Kg b.wt.) or water by intragastric gavage, twice daily for three consecutive days. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and imaged. Three-dimensional images of the mice fetus brains were obtained by OCT and high-resolution US, and the volumes of the left and right ventricles of the brain were measured. Ethanol-exposed fetuses exhibited a statistically significant, 2-fold increase in average left and right ventricular volumes compared with the ventricular volume of control fetuses, with OCT-derived measures of 0.38 and 0.18 mm3, respectively, whereas the boundaries of the fetal mouse lateral ventricles were not clearly definable with US imaging. Our results indicate that OCT is a useful technology for assessing ventriculomegaly accompanying alcohol-induced developmental delay. This study clearly demonstrated advantages of using OCT for quantitative assessment of embryonic development compared with US imaging.

  16. Comparing a volume based template approach and ultrasound guided freehand approach in multicatheter interstitial accelerated partial breast irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Vicky Y.; Buhari, Shaik A.; Tan, Poh Wee; Tan, Yun Inn; Leong, Yuh Fun; Earnest, Arul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Currently, there are two described methods of catheter insertion for women undergoing multicatheter interstitial accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). These are a volume based template approach (template) and a non-template ultrasound guidance freehand approach (non-template). We aim to compare dosimetric endpoints between the template and non-template approach. Material and methods Twenty patients, who received adjuvant multicatheter interstitial APBI between August 2008 to March 2010 formed the study cohort. Dosimetric planning was based on the RTOG 04-13 protocol. For standardization, the planning target volume evaluation (PTV-Eval) and organs at risk were contoured with the assistance of the attending surgeon. Dosimetric endpoints include D90 of the PTV-Eval, Dose Homogeneity Index (DHI), V200, maximum skin dose (MSD), and maximum chest wall dose (MCD). A median of 18 catheters was used per patient. The dose prescribed was 34 Gy in 10 fractions BID over 5 days. Results The average breast volume was 846 cm3 (526-1384) for the entire cohort and there was no difference between the two groups (p = 0.6). Insertion time was significantly longer for the non-template approach (mean 150 minutes) compared to the template approach (mean: 90 minutes) (p = 0.02). The planning time was also significantly longer for the non-template approach (mean: 240 minutes) compared to the template approach (mean: 150 minutes) (p < 0.01). The template approach yielded a higher D90 (mean: 95%) compared to the non-template approach (mean: 92%) (p < 0.01). There were no differences in DHI (p = 0.14), V200 (p = 0.21), MSD (p = 0.7), and MCD (p = 0.8). Conclusions Compared to the non-template approach, the template approach offered significant shorter insertion and planning times with significantly improved dosimetric PTV-Eval coverage without significantly compromising organs at risk dosimetrically. PMID:25097558

  17. Management of myofascial pain by therapeutic ultrasound and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shalu; Ranjan, Vikash; Misra, Deepankar; Panjwani, Sapna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present comparative study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of Th US and TENS in the management of myofascial pain in TMD patients. Materials and Methods: The present randomized comparative study was on 90 patients who were further assigned in three different groups each having 30 patients; Group I was healthy control patients, Group II was receiving Th US therapy, and Group III was receiving TENS therapy. All the 90 patients were further evaluated for maximum inter incisor subjective evaluation regarding muscle pain, impediment to daily life, massage impression on visual analog scale (VAS) scale, and intensity and duration used in Th US massage. Results: The masseter muscle thickness in control group was 12.00 (standard deviation [SD] ±1.1) mm when compared with TMD patient of 13.00 (SD ± 1.1) mm before treatment. Statistical significant findings on VAS score of muscle pain, impediment to daily life, and massage impression were observed in Th US. After treatment, the anechoic areas disappeared or were reduced in Th US group by 95.6% and in TENS by 74.4%. Conclusion: Th US appeared to be subjectively better which was related to VAS score of massage impression, muscle pain, and impediment to daily life after treatment as well as sonographically related to existence of anechoic areas. PMID:27011739

  18. Management of myofascial pain by therapeutic ultrasound and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Shalu; Ranjan, Vikash; Misra, Deepankar; Panjwani, Sapna

    2016-01-01

    The present comparative study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of Th US and TENS in the management of myofascial pain in TMD patients. The present randomized comparative study was on 90 patients who were further assigned in three different groups each having 30 patients; Group I was healthy control patients, Group II was receiving Th US therapy, and Group III was receiving TENS therapy. All the 90 patients were further evaluated for maximum inter incisor subjective evaluation regarding muscle pain, impediment to daily life, massage impression on visual analog scale (VAS) scale, and intensity and duration used in Th US massage. The masseter muscle thickness in control group was 12.00 (standard deviation [SD] ±1.1) mm when compared with TMD patient of 13.00 (SD ± 1.1) mm before treatment. Statistical significant findings on VAS score of muscle pain, impediment to daily life, and massage impression were observed in Th US. After treatment, the anechoic areas disappeared or were reduced in Th US group by 95.6% and in TENS by 74.4%. Th US appeared to be subjectively better which was related to VAS score of massage impression, muscle pain, and impediment to daily life after treatment as well as sonographically related to existence of anechoic areas.

  19. Lab-on-fiber platforms for ultrasound detection: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaquinto, M.; Ricciardi, A.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    Sub-wavelength metallo-dielectric gratings integrated on optical fibers tip and supporting plasmonic resonances were numerically investigated in their behavior as acousto-optical transducers. Different configurations have been analyzed and compared among them in terms of sensitivity, defined as reflectivity intensity variation (at fixed wavelength) with respect to dielectric layer thickness changes. Our results demonstrate that the maximum sensitivity is obtained when an interaction between different plasmonic modes occurs. Sensitivity enhancement up to a factor of 3 with respect to Fabry- Perot cavity like transducer with same materials and sizes can be achieved.

  20. Value of stress ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic ankle instability compared to manual anterior drawer test, stress radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Ho; Lee, Doo Hyung; Song, Hyung Keun; Bang, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Tai; Park, Young Uk

    2016-04-01

    Clinicians frequently diagnose chronic ankle instability using the manual anterior drawer test and stress radiography. However, both examinations can yield incorrect results and do not reveal the extent of ankle instability. Stress ultrasound has been reported to be a new diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of chronic ankle instability. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of stress ultrasound for chronic ankle instability compared to the manual anterior drawer test, stress radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and arthroscopy. Twenty-eight consecutive patients who underwent ankle arthroscopy and subsequent modified Broström repair for treatment of chronic ankle instability were included. The arthroscopic findings were used as the reference standard. A standardized physical examination (manual anterior drawer test), stress radiography, MRI, and stress ultrasound were performed to assess the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) prior to operation. Ultrasound images were taken in the resting position and the maximal anterior drawer position. Grade 3 lateral instability was verified arthroscopically in all 28 cases with a clinical diagnosis (100%). Twenty-two cases showed grade III instability on the manual anterior drawer test (78.6%). Twenty-four cases displayed anterior translation exceeding 5 mm on stress radiography (86%), and talar tilt angle exceeded 15° in three cases (11 %). Nineteen cases displayed a partial chronic tear (change in thickness or signal intensity), and nine cases displayed complete tear on MRI (100%). Lax and wavy ATFL was evident on stress ultrasound in all cases (100 %). The mean value of the ATFL length was 2.8 ± 0.3 cm for the stressed condition and 2.1 ± 0.2 cm for the resting condition (p < 0.001). Stress ultrasound may be useful for the diagnosis of chronic ankle instability in addition to the manual anterior drawer test and stress radiography. III.

  1. [Comparative study of 2 dosage forms of liquid dimethicone for ultrasound premedication].

    PubMed

    Gladisch, R; Elfner, R; Ulrich, H; Heene, D L

    1990-04-01

    A double-blind study was carried out to compare the effects of a premedication with 4 x 500 mg dimethylpolysiloxane (DPS)/24 hours and with 2 x 500 mg/12 hours before abdominal ultrasonography. The investigations covered 13 abdominal regions in specified planes. The incidence of the unobscured presentation of the selected organs and organ sections per patient served as a basis for a sonography index. This index was 67%, without significant difference between the two groups. We believe that the optimal conditions for sonography are given when the patient is fasting and two 500 mg doses of DPS are administered, one in the evening before and one in the morning at the day of investigation.

  2. Randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing two anesthetic techniques for ultrasound-guided transvaginal follicular puncture

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gilvandro Lins; Serralheiro, Fernando Cesar; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Ribeiro, Onésimo Duarte; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Bianco, Bianca; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the anesthetic techniques using propofol and fentanyl versus midazolam and remifentanil associated with a paracervical block with lidocaine in performing ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte aspiration. Methods: A randomized double-blind clinical trial (#RBR-8kqqxh) performed in 61 women submitted to assisted reproductive treatment. The patients were divided into two groups: anesthetic induction with 1mcg/kg of fentanyl associated with 1.5mg/kg of propofol (FP Group, n=32), in comparison with anesthetic induction using 0.075mg/kg of midazolam associated with 0.25mcg/kg/min of remifentanil, and paracervical block with 3mL of 2% lidocaine (MRPB Group, n=29). Main outcome measures: human reproduction outcomes, modified Aldrete-Kroulik index, hemodynamic parameters, and salivary cortisol. Results: The results revealed a higher number of embryos formed in the FP Group (p50=2 versus 1; p=0.025), gestation rate two times higher in the FP Group (44.4% versus 22.2%; p=0.127), less time to reach AK=10 in the MRPB Group (p50=10 versus 2; p<0.001), and lower mean of hemodynamic parameters in the MRPB Group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Anesthesia with fentanyl and propofol as well as with midazolam, remifentanil, and paracervical block offered satisfactory anesthetic conditions when performing assisted reproduction procedures, providing comfort for the patient and physician. PMID:27759816

  3. Comparative study of contrast-enhanced ultrasound qualitative and quantitative analysis for identifying benign and malignant breast tumor lumps.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Gao, Yun-Hua; Li, Ding-Dong; Gao, Yan-Chun; Hou, Ling-Mi; Xie, Ting

    2014-01-01

    To compare the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) qualitative and quantitative analysis in the identification of breast tumor lumps. Qualitative and quantitative indicators of CEUS for 73 cases of breast tumor lumps were retrospectively analyzed by univariate and multivariate approaches. Logistic regression was applied and ROC curves were drawn for evaluation and comparison. The CEUS qualitative indicator-generated regression equation contained three indicators, namely enhanced homogeneity, diameter line expansion and peak intensity grading, which demonstrated prediction accuracy for benign and malignant breast tumor lumps of 91.8%; the quantitative indicator-generated regression equation only contained one indicator, namely the relative peak intensity, and its prediction accuracy was 61.5%. The corresponding areas under the ROC curve for qualitative and quantitative analyses were 91.3% and 75.7%, respectively, which exhibited a statistically significant difference by the Z test (P<0.05). The ability of CEUS qualitative analysis to identify breast tumor lumps is better than with quantitative analysis.

  4. Comparative analysis of ultrasound changes in the vastus lateralis muscle following myofascial release and thermotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi; Usa, Hideyuki; Mitomo, Shoh; Ogawa, Daisuke

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of myofascial release (MFR) and hot pack therapy (HPT) on fascial gliding and flexibility of the vastus lateralis muscle. Three treatments were applied to the left vastus lateralis muscles of each participant (12 healthy males): MFR for 4 min, superficial HPT for 10 min, and superficial HPT for 20 min. Deep fascial motion was measured by B-mode ultrasound, whereas muscle stiffness was measured by real-time elastography (RTE) and a durometer before and after the interventions. Only MFR resulted in changes in both deep fascial motion and muscle stiffness measured by RTE. Durometer-measured muscle stiffness revealed changes following both MFR and 20-min HPT but not 10-min HPT. HPT may produce only superficial effects. Because MFR improved all measured parameters, continuous stretching and pressure are probably important for improving fascial gliding and flexibility of the vastus lateralis muscle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurements of ultrasound velocity and attenuation in numerical anisotropic porous media compared to Biot's and multiple scattering models.

    PubMed

    Mézière, Fabien; Muller, Marie; Bossy, Emmanuel; Derode, Arnaud

    2014-07-01

    This article quantitatively investigates ultrasound propagation in numerical anisotropic porous media with finite-difference simulations in 3D. The propagation media consist of clusters of ellipsoidal scatterers randomly distributed in water, mimicking the anisotropic structure of cancellous bone. Velocities and attenuation coefficients of the ensemble-averaged transmitted wave (also known as the coherent wave) are measured in various configurations. As in real cancellous bone, one or two longitudinal modes emerge, depending on the micro-structure. The results are confronted with two standard theoretical approaches: Biot's theory, usually invoked in porous media, and the Independent Scattering Approximation (ISA), a classical first-order approach of multiple scattering theory. On the one hand, when only one longitudinal wave is observed, it is found that at porosities higher than 90% the ISA successfully predicts the attenuation coefficient (unlike Biot's theory), as well as the existence of negative dispersion. On the other hand, the ISA is not well suited to study two-wave propagation, unlike Biot's model, at least as far as wave speeds are concerned. No free fitting parameters were used for the application of Biot's theory. Finally we investigate the phase-shift between waves in the fluid and the solid structure, and compare them to Biot's predictions of in-phase and out-of-phase motions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative analysis of laparoscopic and ultrasound-guided biopsy methods for gene expression analysis in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Melo, C H; Sousa, F C; Batista, R I P T; Sanchez, D J D; Souza-Fabjan, J M G; Freitas, V J F; Melo, L M; Teixeira, D I A

    2015-07-31

    The present study aimed to compare laparoscopic (LP) and ultrasound-guided (US) biopsy methods to obtain either liver or splenic tissue samples for ectopic gene expression analysis in transgenic goats. Tissue samples were collected from human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF)-transgenic bucks and submitted to real-time PCR for the endogenous genes (Sp1, Baff, and Gapdh) and the transgene (hG-CSF). Both LP and US biopsy methods were successful in obtaining liver and splenic samples that could be analyzed by PCR (i.e., sufficient sample sizes and RNA yield were obtained). Although the number of attempts made to obtain the tissue samples was similar (P > 0.05), LP procedures took considerably longer than the US method (P = 0.03). Finally, transgene transcripts were not detected in spleen or liver samples. Thus, for the phenotypic characterization of a transgenic goat line, investigation of ectopic gene expression can be made successfully by LP or US biopsy, avoiding the traditional approach of euthanasia.

  7. Dynamic telecytology compares favorably to rapid onsite evaluation of endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspirates

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, James L.; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A.; Lane, Christianne J.; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Linder, Ami; Crowe, Amanda E.; Jhala, Darshana; Jhala, Nirag C.; Crowe, David R.; Eltoum, Isam A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Rapid onsite evaluation (ROSE) has been demonstrated to correlate with final cytologic interpretations and improves the diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA, however, its availability is variable across centers. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate whether remote telecytology can substitute for ROSE. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent EUS-FNA for diverse indications at a high volume referral center were enrolled All samples were prospectively evaluated by three methods. ROSE was performed by a cytopathologist in the procedure room; simultaneously dynamic telecytology was done by a different cytopathologist in a remote location at our institution. The third method, final cytologic interpretation in the laboratory, was the gold standard. Telecytology was performed using an Olympus microscope system (BX) which broadcasts live images over the internet. Accuracy of telecytology and agreement with other methods were the principle outcome measurements. Results Twenty-five consecutive samples were obtained from participants 40–87 years (median age =63, 48% male). There was 88% agreement between telecytology and final cytology (p < 0.001) and 92% agreement between ROSE and final cytology (p <0.001). There was consistency between telecytology and ROSE (p-value for McNemar’s χ2 = 1.0). Cohen’s kappa for agreement for telecytology and ROSE was 0.80 (SE = 0.11), confirming favorable correlation. Conclusion Dynamic telecytology compares favorably to ROSE in the assessment of EUS acquired fine needle aspirates. If confirmed by larger trials, this system might obviate the need for onsite interpretation of EUS-FNA specimens. PMID:22729624

  8. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  11. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  12. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  13. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. Agreement in Measurement of Optic Cup-to-Disc Ratio with Stereo Biomicroscope Funduscopy and Digital Image Analysis: Results from the Nigeria National Blindness and Visual Impairment Survey.

    PubMed

    Kyari, Fatima; Gilbert, Clare

    2017-02-01

    To determine agreement in estimations of vertical cup-to-disc ratio (VCDR) between clinical stereo-biomicroscopic funduscopy and digital fundus image analysis. Systematic sampling of 1-in-7 from a sample of 13,591 participants aged ≥40 years gave a subsample who were examined in detail. VCDR was estimated clinically by 60 diopter aspheric lens biomicroscopic funduscopy (c-VCDR) and by digital fundus images (i-VCDR) graded at the Moorfields Eye Hospital Reading Centre. Spearman's correlation coefficient, paired t-test and the Bland-Altman method to assess limits of agreement (LOA) between the two methods were applied. Of 1759 participants in the subsample, 848 participants (48%) with normal frequency doubling technology (FDT) visual fields and data for i-VCDR and c-VCDR in both eyes (n = 1696 eyes) were included in the analysis. By absolute difference of VCDR values for each eye between the two methods, 1585 eyes (94%) differed by ≤0.2. Mean i-VCDR was 0.381 (standard deviation, SD 0.156), and mean c-VCDR 0.321 (SD 0.145). i-VCDRs were significantly larger by a mean difference of 0.061 (SD 0.121; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.055-0.066; p < 0.001). The 95% LOA assessed by the Bland-Altman method were lower limit -0.182 (95% CI -0.192 to -0.172) and upper limit 0.303 (95% CI 0.293-0.313). The 95% LOA intervals narrowed with higher VCDR. Digital image analysis and clinical assessment are two distinct methods to measure VCDR; with larger i-VCDRs in this survey. Applying i-VCDR cut-off values to c-VCDR measurements in the Nigeria Blindness Survey might have underestimated glaucoma prevalence. It is recommended that all participants in glaucoma surveys have VCDR by digital image measurement.

  18. Fluoroscopy-assisted vs fluoroless endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Consiglieri, Claudia F; Gornals, Joan B; Busquets, Juli; Peláez, Nuria; Secanella, Lluis; De-La-Hera, Meritxell; Sanzol, Resurrección; Fabregat, Joan; Castellote, José

    2017-09-04

    The need for fluoroscopy guidance in patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage (EUS-TMD) of peripancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare general outcomes of EUS-TMD of PFCs under fluoroscopy (F) vs fluoroless (FL). This is a comparative study with a retrospective analysis of a prospective and consecutive inclusion database at a tertiary centre, from 2009 to 2015. All patients were symptomatic pseudocyst (PSC) and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WON). Two groups were assigned depending on availability of fluoroscopy. The groups were heterogeneous in terms of their demographic characteristics, PFCs and procedure. The main outcome measures included technical and clinical success, incidences, adverse events (AEs), and follow-up. Fifty EUS-TMD of PFCs from 86 EUS-guided drainages were included during the study period. Group F included 26 procedures, PSC 69.2%, WON 30.8%, metal stents 61.5% (46.1% lumen-apposing stent) and plastic stents 38.5%. Group FL included 24 procedures, PSC 37.5%, WON 62.5%, and metal stents 95.8% (lumen-apposing stents). Technical success was 100% in both groups, and clinical success was similar (F 88.5%, FL 87.5%). Technical incidences and intra-procedure AEs were only described in group F (7.6% and 11.5%, respectively) and none in group FL. Procedure time was less in group FL (8min, p=0.0341). Fluoroless in the EUS-TMD of PFCs does not involve more technical incidences or intra-procedure AEs. Technical and clinical success was similar in the two groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Contrast Enhanced Maximum Intensity Projection Ultrasound Imaging for Assessing Angiogenesis in Murine Glioma and Breast Tumor Models: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Flemming; Ro, Raymond J.; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Chiou, See-Ying; Potoczek, Magdalena; Goldberg, Barry B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare noninvasive, quantitative measures of vascularity obtained from 4 contrast enhanced ultrasound (US) techniques to 4 invasive immunohistochemical markers of tumor angiogenesis in a large group of murine xenografts. Glioma (C6) or breast cancer (NMU) cells were implanted in 144 rats. The contrast agent Optison (GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 0.4ml/kg). Power Doppler imaging (PDI), pulse-subtraction harmonic imaging (PSHI), flash-echo imaging (FEI), and Microflow imaging (MFI; a technique creating maximum intensity projection images over time) was performed with an Aplio scanner (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA) and a 7.5 MHz linear array. Fractional tumor neovascularity was calculated from digital clips of contrast US, while the relative area stained was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using a factorial, repeated measures ANOVA, linear regression and z-tests. The tortuous morphology of tumor neovessels was visualized better with MFI than with the other US modes. Cell line, implantation method and contrast US imaging technique were significant parameters in the ANOVA model (p<0.05). The strongest correlation determined by linear regression in the C6 model was between PSHI and percent area stained with CD31 (r=0.37, p<0.0001). In the NMU model the strongest correlation was between FEI and COX-2 (r=0.46, p<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between correlations obtained with the various US methods (p>0.05). In conclusion, the largest study of contrast US of murine xenografts to date has been conducted and quantitative contrast enhanced US measures of tumor neovascularity in glioma and breast cancer xenograft models appear to provide a noninvasive marker for angiogenesis; although the best method for monitoring angiogenesis was not conclusively established. PMID:21144542

  20. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  1. Coronary bifurcation lesions treated with double kissing crush technique compared to classical crush technique: serial intravascular ultrasound analysis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shou-Jie; Ye, Fei; Liu, Zhi-Zhong; Tian, Nai-Liang; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Chen, Shao-Liang

    2013-04-01

    The double kissing (DK) crush technique is a modified version of the crush technique. It is specifically designed to increase the success rate of the final kissing balloon post-dilatation, but its efficacy and safety remain unclear. Data were obtained from the DKCRUSH-I trial, a prospective, randomized, multi-center study to evaluate safety and efficacy. Post-procedural and eight-month follow-up intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis was available in 61 cases. Volumetric analysis using Simpson's method within the Taxus stent, and cross-sectional analysis at the five sites of the main vessel (MV) and three sites of the side branch (SB) were performed. Impact of the bifurcation angle on stent expansion at the carina was also evaluated. Stent expansion in the SB ostium was significantly less in the classical crush group ((53.81 ± 13.51)%) than in the DK crush group ((72.27 ± 11.46)%) (P = 0.04). For the MV, the incidence of incomplete crush was 41.9% in the DK group and 70.0% in the classical group (P = 0.03). The percentage of neointimal area at the ostium had a tendency to be smaller in the DK group compared with the classical group ((16.4 ± 19.2)% vs. (22.8 ± 27.1)%, P = 0.06). The optimal threshold of post-procedural minimum stent area (MSA) to predict follow-up minimum lumen area (MLA) < 4.0 mm(2) at the SB ostium was 4.55 mm(2), yielding an area under the curve of 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.61 to 0.92). Our data suggest that the DK crush technique is associated with improved quality of the final kissing balloon inflation (FKBI) and had smaller optimal cutoff value of post-procedural MSA at the SB ostium.

  2. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    PubMed

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p < 0.001). Among patients with surgical conditions, the difference between ultrasonography (US) and CT diagnoses was significant in groups 2 (p = 0.046) and 3 (p =  .001). The impact of the change in diagnosis in surgical patients imaged with two modalities was significant in the group as a whole and in each age group separately. Non-diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  3. Disaster Response Team FAST Skills Training with a Portable Ultrasound Simulator Compared to Traditional Training: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Michael T.; Bailitz, John; Horowitz, Russ; Khishfe, Basem; Cosby, Karen; Sergel, Michelle J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-hospital focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) has been effectively used to improve patient care in multiple mass casualty events throughout the world. Although requisite FAST knowledge may now be learned remotely by disaster response team members, traditional live instructor and model hands-on FAST skills training remains logistically challenging. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of a novel portable ultrasound (US) simulator with traditional FAST skills training for a deployed mixed provider disaster response team. Methods We randomized participants into one of three training groups stratified by provider role: Group A. Traditional Skills Training, Group B. US Simulator Skills Training, and Group C. Traditional Skills Training Plus US Simulator Skills Training. After skills training, we measured participants’ FAST image acquisition and interpretation skills using a standardized direct observation tool (SDOT) with healthy models and review of FAST patient images. Pre- and post-course US and FAST knowledge were also assessed using a previously validated multiple-choice evaluation. We used the ANOVA procedure to determine the statistical significance of differences between the means of each group’s skills scores. Paired sample t-tests were used to determine the statistical significance of pre- and post-course mean knowledge scores within groups. Results We enrolled 36 participants, 12 randomized to each training group. Randomization resulted in similar distribution of participants between training groups with respect to provider role, age, sex, and prior US training. For the FAST SDOT image acquisition and interpretation mean skills scores, there was no statistically significant difference between training groups. For US and FAST mean knowledge scores, there was a statistically significant improvement between pre- and post-course scores within each group, but again there was not a statistically

  4. Disaster response team FAST skills training with a portable ultrasound simulator compared to traditional training: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Michael T; Bailitz, John; Horowitz, Russ; Khishfe, Basem; Cosby, Karen; Sergel, Michelle J

    2015-03-01

    Pre-hospital focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) has been effectively used to improve patient care in multiple mass casualty events throughout the world. Although requisite FAST knowledge may now be learned remotely by disaster response team members, traditional live instructor and model hands-on FAST skills training remains logistically challenging. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of a novel portable ultrasound (US) simulator with traditional FAST skills training for a deployed mixed provider disaster response team. We randomized participants into one of three training groups stratified by provider role: Group A. Traditional Skills Training, Group B. US Simulator Skills Training, and Group C. Traditional Skills Training Plus US Simulator Skills Training. After skills training, we measured participants' FAST image acquisition and interpretation skills using a standardized direct observation tool (SDOT) with healthy models and review of FAST patient images. Pre- and post-course US and FAST knowledge were also assessed using a previously validated multiple-choice evaluation. We used the ANOVA procedure to determine the statistical significance of differences between the means of each group's skills scores. Paired sample t-tests were used to determine the statistical significance of pre- and post-course mean knowledge scores within groups. We enrolled 36 participants, 12 randomized to each training group. Randomization resulted in similar distribution of participants between training groups with respect to provider role, age, sex, and prior US training. For the FAST SDOT image acquisition and interpretation mean skills scores, there was no statistically significant difference between training groups. For US and FAST mean knowledge scores, there was a statistically significant improvement between pre- and post-course scores within each group, but again there was not a statistically significant difference between

  5. Comparing microbubble cavitation at 500 kHz and 70 kHz related to micellar drug delivery using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Diaz de la Rosa, Mario A; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G

    2013-02-01

    We have previously reported that ultrasonic drug release at 70kHz was found to correlate with the presence of subharmonic emissions. No evidence of drug release or of the subharmonic emissions were detected in experiments at 500kHz. In an attempt to understand the difference in drug release behavior between low- and mid-frequency ultrasound, a mathematical model of a bubble oscillator was developed to explore the difference in the behavior of a single 10-μm bubble under 500- and 70-kHz ultrasound. The dynamics were found to be fundamentally different; the 500-kHz bubble follows a period-doubling route to chaos while a 70-kHz bubble follows an intermittent route to chaos. We propose that this type of "intermittent subharmonic" oscillation behavior is associated with the drug release observed experimentally.

  6. Estimation of tumor size in breast cancer comparing clinical examination, mammography, ultrasound and MRI-correlation with the pathological analysis of the surgical specimen.

    PubMed

    Cortadellas, Tomas; Argacha, Paula; Acosta, Juan; Rabasa, Jordi; Peiró, Ricardo; Gomez, Margarita; Rodellar, Laura; Gomez, Sandra; Navarro-Golobart, Alejandra; Sanchez-Mendez, Sonia; Martinez-Medina, Milagros; Botey, Mireia; Muñoz-Ramos, Carlos; Xiberta, Manel

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the best method in our center to measure preoperative tumor size in breast tumors, using as reference the tumor size in the postoperative surgical specimen. We compared physical examination vs. mammography vs. resonance vs. ultrasound. There are different studies in the literature with disparate results. This is a retrospective study. All the included patients have been studied by clinical examination performed by gynecologist or surgeon specialists in senology, and radiological tests (mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging). The correlation of mammary examination, ultrasound, mammography and resonance with pathological anatomy was studied using the Pearson index. Subsequently, the results of such imaging tests were compared with the tumor size of the infiltrating component measured by anatomopathological study using a student's t test for related variables. The level of significance was set at 95%. Statistical package R. was used. A total of 73 cases were collected from October 2015 to July 2016 with diagnosis of infiltrating breast carcinoma. Twelve cases of carcinoma in situ and seven cases of neoadjuvant carcinoma are excluded. Finally, a total of 56 cases were included in the analysis. The mean age of the patients is 57 years. The histology is of infiltrating ductal carcinoma in 46 patients (80.7%), lobular in 8 (14%) and other carcinomas in 3 cases (5.2%). We verified the relationship between preoperative tumor size by physical examination, mammography, ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the final size of the surgical specimen by applying a Pearson correlation test. A strong correlation was found between the physical examination results 0.62 (0.43-0.76 at 95% CI), ultrasound 0.68 (0.51-0.8 at 95% CI), mammography 0.57 (0.36-0.72 at 95% CI) and RM 0.51 (0.29-0.68 at 95% CI) with respect to pathological anatomy. The mean tumor size of the surgical specimen was 16.1 mm. Mean of tumor size by physical examination

  7. Tongue reading: comparing the interpretation of visual information from inside the mouth, from electropalatographic and ultrasound displays of speech sounds.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Joanne; McCron, Caitlin; Scobbie, James M

    2013-04-01

    Speakers possess a natural capacity for lip reading; analogous to this, there may be an intuitive ability to "tongue-read." Although the ability of untrained participants to perceive aspects of the speech signal has been explored for some visual representations of the vocal tract (e.g. talking heads), it is not yet known to what extent there is a natural ability to interpret speech information presented through two clinical phonetic tools: EPG and ultrasound. This study aimed to determine whether there is any intuitive ability to interpret the images produced by these systems, and to determine whether one tool is more conducive to this than the other. Twenty adults viewed real-time and slow motion EPG and ultrasound silent movies of 10 different linguo-palatal consonants and 4 vowels. Participants selected which segment they perceived from four forced-choice options. Overall, participants scored above chance in the EPG and ultrasound conditions, suggesting that these images can be interpreted intuitively to some degree. This was the case for consonants in both the conditions and for vowels in the EPG condition.

  8. [Comparative study of core needle biopsy and fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of neck lymph node diseases with contrast-enhanced ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Z; Yang, G Y; Xu, J P; Zhang, L; Li, J; Zhao, D

    2016-08-07

    To compare the efficacies of core needle biopsy and fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of neck lymph node diseases with contrast-enhanced ultrasound. A total of 105 patients with enlargement cervical lymph nodes were randomly divided into two groups, 49 in group A and 56 in group B. All patients were firstly examined with contrast-enhanced ultrasound to determine the targeted lymph node and the puncture point. Core needle biopsy was performed in Group A and tissues were fixed by with 10% formaldehyde; Fine needle aspiration cytology was performed in Group B and extracts were smeared and fixed with 95% alcohol. The success rates of sampling were 100.0% in group A and 96.4% in group B. The positive rates of pathological examinations were 97.9% in group A; and 82.1% in group B, with a significant difference between two groups (χ(2) = 6.97, P<0.05). The pathologically positive rates of core needle biopsy is higher than that of fine needle aspiration cytology for the diagnosis of neck lymph node diseases with contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL LASER AND LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSILICATE® ON THE PROCESS OF BONE REPAIR IN THE RAT TIBIA

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Poliani de; Fernandes, Kelly Rosseti; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Pastor, Fabio Alexandre Casarin; Nonaka, Keico Okino; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Verify the effects of the association between Biosilicate® and ultrasound and, Biosilicate® and laser in bone consolidation process of rats, through the biomechanical and histological analysis. Methods: Forthy male rats were used. The animals were randomized into four groups (n=10): control group fracture no treated (CGF); group treated with Biosilicate® (BG); group treated with Biosilicate® and laser (BLG); group treated with Biosilicate® and ultrasound (BUG). Results: The biomechanical analysis showed no significant difference among any groups after 14 days post-surgery. In the morphometric analysis, the control group showed moderate presence of new formed bone tissue inside the defects areas and the Biosilicate® group showed similar results. Despite those facts, the biomaterial osteogenic potential was demonstrated by the great amount of cells and bone tissue around the particles. Curiously, the Biosilicate® plus laser or ultrasound groups showed lower amounts of bone tissue deposition when compared with control fracture and Biosilicate® groups. Conclusion: The data from this study can conclude that Biosilicate® was able to accelerate and optimized the bone consolidation, through the modulation of the inflammatory process and the stimulation of new bone formation. However, when resources were associated, there are no positive results. PMID:27027088

  10. Palpation Versus Ultrasound-Guided Acromioclavicular Joint Intra-articular Corticosteroid Injections: A Retrospective Comparative Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Deok; Kim, Tai Kon; Lee, Jihae; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Jae Ki; Park, Yongbum

    2015-01-01

    Primary osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of pain arising from the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. The true incidence is unknown because of differences in the criteria used to define arthritis in various studies. The proper diagnosis of AC joint OA requires a thorough physical examination, radiographic findings, and a diagnostic local anesthetic injection. The goal of this study was to assess the effects and safety of ultrasound (US) versus palpation-guided acromioclavicular (AC) joint intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid injection for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the AC joint. Retrospective, compared clinical study. University hospital outpatient pain clinic. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with AC joint degenerative OA who had undergone US or palpation-guided AC joint IA corticosteroid injection between January 2012 and December 2013 at our outpatient clinic. One hundred consecutive patients identified from chart review met inclusion criteria. Patients (N = 50) in US guide AC joint IA steroid injection group were administered a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine (1 mL) with triamcinolone (20 mg/mL; 0.5 mL) and radiographic contrast material (0.5 mL) and patients (N = 50) in palpation-guided AC joint IA steroid injection group were administered a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine (1 mL) with triamcinolone (20 mg/mL; 0.5 mL) and 0.5 mL of radiographic contrast material. Results were measured using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), Verbal Numeric pain Scale (VNS) at rest (VNSar), under local pressure (VNSlp) ,and the arm adduction test (VNSaat) at the joint space area before injections and at one, 3, and 6 months after the injections. Successful treatment occurred when patients obtained significant pain relief (as measured by > 50% improvement in the VNS score and 20 point improvement in the SPADI) at one, 3, and 6 months after the injections. Univariable analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between possible outcome

  11. Randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing two anesthetic techniques for ultrasound-guided transvaginal follicular puncture.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gilvandro Lins de; Serralheiro, Fernando Cesar; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Ribeiro, Onésimo Duarte; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Bianco, Bianca; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2016-01-01

    To compare the anesthetic techniques using propofol and fentanyl versus midazolam and remifentanil associated with a paracervical block with lidocaine in performing ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte aspiration. A randomized double-blind clinical trial (#RBR-8kqqxh) performed in 61 women submitted to assisted reproductive treatment. The patients were divided into two groups: anesthetic induction with 1mcg/kg of fentanyl associated with 1.5mg/kg of propofol (FP Group, n=32), in comparison with anesthetic induction using 0.075mg/kg of midazolam associated with 0.25mcg/kg/min of remifentanil, and paracervical block with 3mL of 2% lidocaine (MRPB Group, n=29). Main outcome measures: human reproduction outcomes, modified Aldrete-Kroulik index, hemodynamic parameters, and salivary cortisol. The results revealed a higher number of embryos formed in the FP Group (p50=2 versus 1; p=0.025), gestation rate two times higher in the FP Group (44.4% versus 22.2%; p=0.127), less time to reach AK=10 in the MRPB Group (p50=10 versus 2; p<0.001), and lower mean of hemodynamic parameters in the MRPB Group (p<0.05). Anesthesia with fentanyl and propofol as well as with midazolam, remifentanil, and paracervical block offered satisfactory anesthetic conditions when performing assisted reproduction procedures, providing comfort for the patient and physician. Comparar as técnicas anestésicas utilizando propofol e fentanil contra midazolam e remifentanil associados a um bloqueio paracervical com lidocaína na aspiração de oócitos transvaginal guiada por ultrassom. Ensaio clínico randomizado duplocego (#RBR-8kqqxh) realizado em 61 mulheres submetidas ao tratamento de reprodução assistida. As pacientes foram divididas em dois grupos: um grupo foi submetido à indução da anestesia com 1mcg/kg de fentanil associada com 1,5mg/kg de propofol (Grupo FP, n=32), em comparação com ao grupo submetido à indução da anestesia utilizando 0,075mg/kg de midazolam associada com 0,25mcg

  12. A Prospective Comparative Study of High Resolution Ultrasound and MRI in the Diagnosis of Rotator Cuff Tears in a Tertiary Hospital of North India

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Narvir Singh; Ahluwalia, Ajay; Sharma, Yash Paul; Thakur, Lokesh

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the accuracy of high resolution ultrasound (USG) and MRI in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears (RCT) and to determine if high resolution USG compares favorably in sensitivity and specificity to MRI in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Material/Methods In this prospective comparative study, 40 patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent both ultrasound and MRI of the shoulder. Out of these 40 patients, 31 patients who had positive findings for rotator cuff tears on ultrasound and/or MRI were finally included in the study while the remaining 9 patients with negative or unrelated findings were excluded. The USG and MRI were interpreted by two radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal radiology and blinded to findings of each other. Comparison was done using MRI as a standard reference. Results The agreement between USG and MRI for diagnosis of RCTs was statistically excellent; USG showed a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 100% for full-thickness tears, and a sensitivity of 89.7% and a specificity of 98.8% for partial-thickness tears; observed accuracy for full thickness tears was 98.4% and 95.9% for partial thickness tears. The Kappa coefficient of association was 0.91 for full thickness tears and 0.90 for partial thickness tears. Conclusions Considering the comparable diagnostic accuracy of USG and MRI, the former modality can be used as a first-line investigation for diagnosis of RCT. MRI should be used secondarily as a problem-solving tool either following an equivocal shoulder USG or for delineation of anatomy in cases where surgical correction is needed. PMID:27800039

  13. Ultrasound guided intra-articular ketorolac versus corticosteroid injection in osteoarthritis of the hip: a retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Deok; Kim, Tai Kon; Bae, Byung Woo; Ahn, JaeKi; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yongbum

    2015-09-01

    Intra-articular steroid injection has been widely used in the management of symptomatic osteoarthritis; however, its frequent use is avoided since there is an increase in the incidence of articular infection and several mechanical side effects such as cartilage breakdown and loss of elasticity of the articular cartilage. For these reasons, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs instead of corticosteroids can be considered for intra-articular injection. On this basis, we investigated the effects and safety of ultrasound-guided intra-articular ketorolac versus corticosteroid injection for patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. This retrospective study included 98 patients with diagnoses of hip osteoarthritis who underwent ultrasound-guided intra-articular ketorolac or corticosteroid injection. Fifty patients who received ultrasound-guided intra-articular corticosteroid injection were administered a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine and triamcinolone. Forty-eight patients who received ultrasound-guided intra-articular ketorolac injection were administered 0.5% lidocaine and ketorolac. Outcome measurement was assessed using the Harris hip score and verbal numeric pain scale, which were evaluated before the injections and at 1, 3 and 6 months following the injection. Univariate analysis (using the x (2) test) and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the relationship between the possible outcome predictors (injected medications, patients' age, gender, pain duration and Kellgren-Lawrence classification) and the therapeutic effects. The Harris hip score and verbal numeric pain scale were improved at 1, 3 and 6 months after the injection in both groups. No statistical differences in the Harris hip score and verbal numeric pain scale were observed between the groups. The success rate was also not significantly different among the time periods of 1, 3 and 6 months. Multiple logistic regression and univariate analysis showed that injected medications

  14. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound uses sound waves to evaluate the body’s circulatory system and help identify blockages in the arteries and ... is a useful way of evaluating the body's circulatory system. Vascular ultrasound is performed to: help monitor the ...

  15. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound uses sound waves to evaluate the body’s circulatory system and help identify blockages and detect blood clots. ... is a useful way of evaluating the body's circulatory system. Vascular ultrasound is performed to: help monitor the ...

  18. Correlation Between the Findings of Optical Coherent Retinal Tomography (OCT), Stereo Biomicroscopic Images from Fundus of an Eye and Values from Visual Acuity of Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Nisic, Faruk; Turkovic, Samir; Mavija, Milka; Jovanovic, Nina; Alimanovic, Emina Halilovic-

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetic maculopathy is the major cause of reduced visual acuity in patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and occurs on average in 29% of patients who have diabetes for 20 or more years. Aim: The aim of this study is to re examine the correlation between the findings of optical coherence retinal tomography, stereo bio-microscopic images from fundus of an eye and values from visual acuity of diabetic macular edema. In addition, the aim is to show the importance of various ophthalmic tests for establishing diagnosis in time. Material and methods: The research sample consisted of 90 subjects-patients from Cabinet for photographic documentation, fluorescein angiography and laser photocoagulation in Department of Ophthalmology at the University Clinical Centre in Sarajevo. The study was a one-year long, prospective, clinical study. Results: Research has shown a positive correlation between the various tests that are applied for the diagnosis of diabetic macular edema. Accurate and early diagnosis is of great importance for the treatment in time of this disease by applying laser photocoagulation, intravitreal injections of Anti-VEGF drugs or surgical treatment by Pars Plana Vitrectomy. PMID:25395723

  19. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  20. Prospective randomized trial comparing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided in-bore biopsy to MRI-ultrasound fusion and transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in patients with prior negative biopsies.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Christian; Rabenalt, Robert; Blondin, Dirk; Quentin, Michael; Hiester, Andreas; Godehardt, Erhard; Gabbert, Helmut E; Becker, Nikolaus; Antoch, Gerald; Albers, Peter; Schimmöller, Lars

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of prostate cancers (PCas) are missed by conventional transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUS-GB). It remains unclear whether the combined approach using targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy (FUS-GB) and systematic TRUS-GB is superior to targeted MRI-guided in-bore biopsy (IB-GB) for PCa detection. To compare PCa detection between IB-GB alone and FUS-GB + TRUS-GB in patients with at least one negative TRUS-GB and prostate-specific antigen ≥4 ng/ml. Patients were prospectively randomized after multiparametric prostate MRI to IB-GB (arm A) or FUS-GB + TRUS-GB (arm B) from November 2011 to July 2014. The study was powered at 80% to demonstrate an overall PCa detection rate of ≥60% in arm B compared to 40% in arm A. Secondary endpoints were the distribution of highest Gleason scores, the rate of detection of significant PCa (Gleason ≥7), the number of biopsy cores to detect one (significant) PCa, the positivity rate for biopsy cores, and tumor involvement per biopsy core. The study was halted after interim analysis because the primary endpoint was not met. The trial enrolled 267 patients, of whom 210 were analyzed (106 randomized to arm A and 104 to arm B). PCa detection was 37% in arm A and 39% in arm B (95% confidence interval for difference, -16% to 11%; p=0.7). Detection rates for significant PCa (29% vs 32%; p=0.7) and the highest percentage tumor involvement per biopsy core (48% vs 42%; p=0.4) were similar between the arms. The mean number of cores was 5.6 versus 17 (p<0.001). A limitation is the limited number of patients because of early cessation of accrual. This trial failed to identify an important improvement in detection rate for the combined biopsy approach over MRI-targeted biopsy alone. A prospective comparison between MRI-targeted biopsy alone and systematic TRUS-GB is justified. Our randomized study showed similar prostate cancer detection rates between targeted prostate biopsy

  1. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  2. Ultrasound measurement of median nerve cross-sectional area at the inlet and outlet of carpal tunnel after carpal tunnel release compared to electrodiagnostic findings.

    PubMed

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Nishimoto, Hanako; Mifune, Yutaka; Kokubu, Takeshi; Sakata, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound measurement of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve can give information about regeneration of the nerve after carpal tunnel release (CTR), but the changes at selected follow-up points up to 1 year compared to electrodiagnostic findings are not known. We postoperatively measured the CSA of the median nerve with ultrasound and compared the measurements with electrophysiological findings over 12 months after open CTR. In 21 hands that underwent open CTR, the CSA of the median nerve was measured at the inlet (proximal CSA) and outlet (distal CSA) of the carpal tunnel at 3- 6- and 12-month follow-up. The respective ratios [(CSA postoperatively/CSA preoperatively) × 100] were calculated and correlated with distal motor latency (DML) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). The proximal CSA ratio was 88.9, 84.5, and 78.4 % at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Each value was significantly lower than that before surgery. The distal CSA ratio was 104.3, 99.1, and 91.8 % at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. The values were not significantly different compared to preoperative values. The proximal CSA of the median nerve decreased continuously over the time after CTR while the distal CSA increased up to 3 months before it decreased continuously, too.

  3. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI.

    PubMed

    Meissnitzer, T; Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-07-01

    To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740-1110 MBq of Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive-predictive value for malignancy and accuracy were the highest for BSGI in our

  4. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Methods: Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740–1110 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Results: Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Conclusion: Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Advances in knowledge: Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive

  5. Randomized, prospective, observational simulation study comparing residents' needle-guided vs free-hand ultrasound techniques for central venous catheter access.

    PubMed

    Ball, R D; Scouras, N E; Orebaugh, S; Wilde, J; Sakai, T

    2012-01-01

    Short-axis ultrasound-guided placement of central venous catheters (CVCs) is widely accepted as safe practice. However, utilizing the long-axis approach could further improve safety, as it allows for better visualization of the needle as it is advanced to the target vessel. However, the long-axis approach has not widely been used due to the technical difficulty. Recently, a new needle guidance device has become available to aid in the long-axis approach. We hypothesized that the use of a needle guide paired with the long-axis approach would facilitate puncture of the target vessel in a simulation model more effectively than similar free-hand techniques. A prospective observational study of anaesthesia residents using a CVC partial-task training device was conducted. Each resident performed needle puncture of the target vessel with three different techniques, assigned in random order: short-axis free hand (S-FH), long-axis free hand (L-FH), and long-axis needle guide (NG). To prove the effectiveness of the needle guide, the fraction of time the needle tip remained in view of the ultrasound was recorded and compared. Time required for completing the task and the number of needle sticks and needle re-directions were compared. Thirty-three residents participated in the study. The fraction of time the needle tip remained in view of the ultrasound was significantly higher for the residents using NG [0.90 (0.10)] compared with residents using the other techniques [L-FH: 0.36 (0.20), S-FH: 0.18 (0.10)] (P<0.001). For each resident, the use of the needle guide in the long-axis approach increased visualization by 352 (276)% compared with that of L-FH and by 1028 (1804) % compared with that of S-FH. There was no significant difference in time required to puncture the target between NG [23.7 (14.6) s] and L-FH [30.3 (36.5) s] (P=0.21); however, both were significantly longer than S-FH [17.0 (13.3) s] (P=0.012). The numbers of needle sticks and of needle re-directions did not

  6. Intravascular ultrasound chirp imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, D.; Jansen, K.; Renaud, G.; van Soest, G.; Li, X.; Zhou, Q.; de Jong, N.; Shung, K. K.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) chirp imaging as well as chirp reversal ultrasound contrast imaging at intravascular ultrasound frequency. Chirp excitations were emitted with a 34 MHz single crystal intravascular transducer and compared to conventional Gaussian-shaped pulses of equal acoustic pressure. The signal to noise ratio of the chirp images was increased by up to 9 dB relative to the conventional images. Imaging of contrast microbubbles was implemented by chirp reversal, achieving a contrast to tissue ratio of 12 dB. The method shows potential for intravascular imaging of structures in and beyond coronary atherosclerotic plaques including vasa vasorum.

  7. Lung cancer diagnosis and staging with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration compared with conventional approaches: an open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Navani, Neal; Nankivell, Matthew; Lawrence, David R; Lock, Sara; Makker, Himender; Baldwin, David R; Stephens, Richard J; Parmar, Mahesh K; Spiro, Stephen G; Morris, Stephen; Janes, Sam M

    2015-01-01

    and was admitted to hospital. Interpretation Transbronchial needle aspiration guided by endobronchial ultrasound should be considered as the initial investigation for patients with suspected lung cancer, because it reduces the time to treatment decision compared with conventional diagnosis and staging techniques. Funding UK Medical Research Council. PMID:25660225

  8. Novel Ultrasound Joint Selection Methods Using a Reduced Joint Number Demonstrate Inflammatory Improvement when Compared to Existing Methods and Disease Activity Score at 28 Joints.

    PubMed

    Tan, York Kiat; Allen, John C; Lye, Weng Kit; Conaghan, Philip G; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Chew, Li-Ching; Thumboo, Julian

    2016-01-01

    A pilot study testing novel ultrasound (US) joint-selection methods in rheumatoid arthritis. Responsiveness of novel [individualized US (IUS) and individualized composite US (ICUS)] methods were compared with existing US methods and the Disease Activity Score at 28 joints (DAS28) for 12 patients followed for 3 months. IUS selected up to 7 and 12 most ultrasonographically inflamed joints, while ICUS additionally incorporated clinically symptomatic joints. The existing, IUS, and ICUS methods' standardized response means were -0.39, -1.08, and -1.11, respectively, for 7 joints; -0.49, -1.00, and -1.16, respectively, for 12 joints; and -0.94 for DAS28. Novel methods effectively demonstrate inflammatory improvement when compared with existing methods and DAS28.

  9. Quantitative comparison of Zeiss-Humphrey model 840 and Rion UX-02 systems of ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Kobayashi, K

    1999-05-01

    Our objective was to estimate the agreement between two different ultrasound biomicroscopes (UBMs) and to evaluate the clinical implications of the measurements obtained. We measured the anterior chamber depth, trabecular-iris angle, angle opening distance at 250 and 500 microm from the scleral spur, iris thickness and scleral-iris angle using the Humphrey UBM model 840 and Rion UBM UX-02 in 25 eyes of 25 normal volunteers. No significant difference was found in the mean values of any parameters measured by the Humphrey and Rion systems. Correlation coefficients of greater than 90% were observed for the parameters studied. Each system showed high reproducibility for all measured parameters. There were significant differences between the two systems in coefficients of variation for all parameters measured except the anterior chamber depth. The parameters measured with the Humphrey and Rion systems showed correlation coefficients of greater than 90%. The Humphrey system showed better reproducibility than the Rion system.

  10. Interventional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  11. Comparison of the biometric values obtained by two different A-mode ultrasound devices (Eye Cubed vs. PalmScan): A Transversal, descriptive, and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess the reliability of the measurements obtained with the PalmScan™, when compared with another standardized A-mode ultrasound device, and assess the consistency and correlation between the two methods. Methods Transversal, descriptive, and comparative study. We recorded the axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and lens thickness (LT) obtained with two A-mode ultrasounds (PalmScan™ A2000 and Eye Cubed™) using an immersion technique. We compared the measurements with a two-sample t-test. Agreement between the two devices was assessed with Bland-Altman plots and 95% limits of agreement. Results 70 eyes of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The measurements with the Eye Cubed™ of AL and ACD were shorter than the measurements taken by the PalmScan™. The differences were not statistically significant regarding AL (p < 0.4) but significant regarding ACD (p < 0.001). The highest agreement between the two devices was obtained during LT measurement. The PalmScan™ measurements were shorter, but not statistically significantly (p < 0.2). Conclusions The values of AL and LT, obtained with both devices are not identical, but within the limits of agreement. The agreement is not affected by the magnitude of the ocular dimensions (but only between range of 20 mm to 27 mm of AL and 3.5 mm to 5.7 mm of LT). A correction of about 0.5 D could be considered if an intraocular lens is being calculated. However due to the large variability of the results, the authors recommend discretion in using this conversion factor, and to adjust the power of the intraocular lenses based upon the personal experience of the surgeon. PMID:20334670

  12. Ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography using energy-scaled amplitude ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Shin, Junseob; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound attenuation of breast tumors is related to their types and pathological states, and can be used to detect and characterize breast cancer. Particularly, ultrasound scattering attenuation can infer the margin properties of breast tumors. Ultrasound attenuation tomography quantitatively reconstructs the attenuation properties of the breast. Our synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays records both ultrasound reflection and transmission signals. We develop an ultrasound attenuation tomography method using ultrasound energy-scaled amplitude decays of ultrasound transmission signals and conduct ultrasound attenuation tomography using a known sound-speed model. We apply our ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography method to a breast phantom dataset, and compare the ultrasound attenuation tomography results with conventional beamforming ultrasound images obtained using reflection signals. We show that ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography complements beamforming images in identifying breast lesions.

  13. The ability of synovitis to predict structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis: a comparative study between clinical examination and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dougados, Maxime; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Ferlet, Jean François; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Backhaus, Marina; Bentin, Jacques; Chalès, Gérard; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Conaghan, Philip; Wakefield, Richard J; Etchepare, Fabien; Etcheparre, Frédéric; Gaudin, Philippe; Grassi, Walter; Heijde, Désirée van der; Mariette, Xavier; Naredo, Esperanza; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate synovitis (clinical vs ultrasound (US)) to predict structural progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with RA. Prospective, 2-year follow-up. Synovitis (32 joints (2 wrists, 10 metacarpophalangeal, 10 proximal interphalangeal, 10 metatarsophalangeal)) at baseline and after 4 months of therapy by clinical, US grey scale (GS-US) and power doppler (PD-US); x-rays at baseline and at year 2. Measures of association (OR) were tested between structural deterioration and the presence of baseline synovitis, or its persistence, after 4 months of therapy using generalised estimating equation analysis. Structural deterioration was observed in 9% of the 1888 evaluated joints in 59 patients. Baseline synovitis increased the risk of structural progression: OR=2.01 (1.36-2.98) p<0.001 versus 1.61 (1.06-2.45) p=0.026 versus 1.75 (1.18-2.58) p=0.005 for the clinical versus US-GS versus US-PD evaluation, respectively. In the joints with normal baseline examination (clinical or US), an increased probability for structural progression in the presence of synovitis for the other modality was also observed (OR=2.16 (1.16-4.02) p=0.015 and 3.50 (1.77-6.95) p<0.001 for US-GS and US-PD and 2.79 (1.35-5.76) p=0.002) for clinical examination. Persistent (vs disappearance) synovitis after 4 months of therapy was also predictive of subsequent structural progression. This study confirms the validity of synovitis for predicting subsequent structural deterioration irrespective of the modality of examination of joints, but also suggests that both clinical and ultrasonographic examinations may be relevant to optimally evaluate the risk of subsequent structural deterioration.

  14. Infrared thermography and ultrasound C-scan for non-destructive evaluation of 3D carbon fiber materials: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, Francois; Maldague, Xavier; West, Lucas; Joncas, Simon; Leduc, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    3D Carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (3D CF PMCs) are increasingly used for aircraft construction due to their exceptional stiffness and strength-to-mass ratios. However, defects are common in the 3D combining areas and are challenging to inspect. In this paper, Stitching is used to decrease these defects, but causes some new types of defects. Infrared NDT (non-destructive testing) and ultrasound NDT are used. In particular, a micro-laser line thermography technique (micro-LLT) and a micro-laser spot thermography (micro-LST) with locked-in technique are used to detect the micro-defects. In addition, a comparative study is conducted by using pulsed thermography (PT), vibrothermography (VT). In order to confirm the types of the defects, microscopic inspection is carried out before NDT work, after sectioning and polishing a small part of the sample..

  15. Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    While the use of contrast agents in other imaging modalities (X ray, MRI, PET, …) has been routinely accepted for many years, the development and commercialization of contrast agents designed specifically for ultrasound imaging has occurred only very recently. As in the other imaging modalities, the injection of contrast agents during an ultrasound examination is intended to facilitate the detection and diagnosis of specific pathologies. Contrast agents efficiency is based on the backscattering of ultrasound by microbubbles. These microparticules are intravenously injected in the blood flow. After an introduction and generalities on ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) the microbubble physics in an acoustic field will be developed. Second, physics characteristics of contrast agents will be compared (bubbles with or without shell, gas nature, size distribution). Influence of acoustic pressure on the behaviour of the microparticules (linear, non linear and destruction) will be discussed. Finally, a review of specific imaging adapted to contrast agent properties as harmonic imaging, pulse inversion imaging will be presented.

  16. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea: targeted ultrasound initiative survey.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taeyoung; Wakefield, Richard J; Emery, Paul

    2016-04-01

    In collaboration with the Targeted Ultrasound Initiative (TUI), to conduct the first study in Korea to investigate current practices in ultrasound use among Korean rheumatologists. We translated the TUI Global Survey into Korean and added questions to better understand the specific challenges facing rheumatologists in Korea. To target as many rheumatologists in Korea as possible, we created an on-line version of this survey, which was conducted from March to April 2013. Rheumatologists are in charge of ultrasound in many Korean hospitals. Rheumatologists in hospitals and private clinics use ultrasound to examine between one and five patients daily; they use ultrasound for diagnosis more than monitoring and receive compensation of about US$30-50 per patient. There are marked differences in the rates of ultrasound usage between rheumatologists who work in private practice compared with tertiary hospitals. Korean rheumatologists not currently using ultrasound in their practice appear eager to do so. This survey provides important insights into the current status of ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea and highlights several priorities; specifically, greater provision of formal training, standardization of reporting and accrual of greater experience among ultrasound users. If these needs are addressed, all rheumatology departments in Korea are likely to use ultrasound or have access to it in the future. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, C. L.

    An ultrasound spectrometer was designed, constructed and used to measure the frequency dependence of forward scattered ultrasound from biological specimens. A piezoelectric transducer was continuously tuned through the frequency range of 150 to 400 MHz, producing ultrasound of the same frequency. Pulse modulation of the input signal permitted a frequency resolution of 2 MHz. The received pulse was detected at various temporal positions of its amplitude, thereby allowing measurement of the interference of the scattered and unscattered ultrasound radiation. Because of system nonlinearities all received signals were calibrated with respect to the attenuation of ultrasound in water over the system frequency range. The attenuation of water over the frequency range of 150 to 400 MHz was measured. Forward scattering experiments were performed with both physical objects and biological specimens. Sapphire spheres and plastic cylinders exhibited the expected Mie scattering resonant structure.

  18. Sterile working in ultrasonography: the use of dedicated ultrasound covers and sterile ultrasound gel.

    PubMed

    Marhofer, Peter; Fritsch, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently an important tool for diagnostic and interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging provides significant advantages as compared to other imaging methods. The widespread use of ultrasound also carries the risk of drawbacks such as cross-infections. A large body of literature reports this possibly life-threatening side effect and specific patient populations are particularly at risk (e.g., neonates). Various methods of ultrasound probe disinfection are described; however, none of the mechanical or chemical probe disinfection procedures is optimal and, in particular, disinfection with high concentration of alcohol might be associated with ultrasound probe damage. The preparation of ultrasound probes with dedicated probe covers is a useful alternative for sterile working conditions. One ultrasound probe cover discussed in this paper is directly glued on to the ultrasound probe without the use of ultrasound coupling gel. By the use of sterile ultrasound coupling gel at the outer surface, additional effects on aseptic working conditions can be obtained.

  19. Results of a comparative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-targeted versus three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsies: Size does matter.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Alexandre; Aoun, Fouad; Albisinni, Simone; Marcelis, Quentin; Ledinh, Dam; Paesmans, Marianne; Lemort, Marc; van Velthoven, Roland

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the detection rate of clinically significant disease in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted biopsies versus three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (3D TRUS)-guided biopsies according to prostate size. The study compared 120 consecutive biopsy-naïve men who underwent 3D TRUS-guided systematic biopsy to 120 consecutive men who underwent MRI-targeted biopsy. Stratifications based on tertiles were used for assessing interactions between prostate volume and rates of detection of significant cancer. Older age, higher prostate-specific antigen level, lower prostate volume, increased number of cores and MRI-targeted biopsy were independent predictors of prostate cancer detection in the entire cohort on logistic regression. Clinically significant cancer detection rates were significantly higher in the MRI-targeted group than in the 3D TRUS-guided biopsy group (48.7% vs 29.4%, p = 0.002). When stratified according to prostate volume, these rates were significantly higher only in the third tertile group (volume > 50 cm(3)) for MRI-targeted biopsy compared to 3D TRUS-guided biopsy (56% vs 22%, p = 0.003). MRI-targeted biopsies increased the detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer only in patients with enlarged prostates compared to the 3D TRUS.

  20. Effect of continuous high intensity focused ultrasound in a squamous cell carcinoma tumor model compared to muscle tissue evaluated by MRI, histology, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Walter; Yuh, Esther L; Steinbach, Silke; Bednarski, Mark D

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the continuous mode of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in a mouse head and neck cancer model (SCCVII) compared to muscle tissue. HIFU was applied to SCCVII tumors and to muscle tissue in C3H/Km mice using a dual ultrasound system (imaging 6 MHz/therapeutic 1 MHz). A continuous HIFU mode (total time 20 sec, intensity 6730.6 W/cm(2)) was applied. Three hours after HIFU treatment pre- and post-contrast T1-wt, T2-wt images, and a diffusion-wt STEAM sequence were obtained. After MR imaging, the animals were euthenized and the treated tumor and muscle tissue was taken out for histology and functional genomic analysis. T2 images showed increased signal intensity, post-contrast T1 showed a decreased contrast uptake in the central parts in the tumor tissue as well as in the muscle tissue. In addition a significant higher diffusion coefficient was found in both tissue types. Histological evaluation (H&E, Immunohistochemistry) of the tumors and the muscle tissue revealed areas of significant necrosis. In the tumor tissue 23 genes were up-regulated (> 2 fold change) and 4 genes were down-regulated (< -2 fold change). In the muscle tissue 29 genes were up-regulated and 17 genes down-regulated. Thirteen genes were up-regulated in both tissue types, 8 genes only in the SCCVII tissue, and 11 genes only in the muscle tissue. The use of HIFU treatment on tumor and muscle tissue results in dramatic changes in gene expression. The expression of some genes are tissue specific, the expression of other genes are independent of the tissue type.

  1. Discriminative ability of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound compared with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in men with hip or distal forearm fractures.

    PubMed

    Cesme, Fatih; Esmaeilzadeh, Sina; Oral, Aydan

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to compare the discriminatory ability of bone mineral density (BMD) measurements and calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters for fractures and to determine fracture thresholds for each variable in men with hip or distal forearm fractures. A total of 20 men with hip and 18 men with distal forearm fractures and 38 age-matched controls were included in this study. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) BMD (spine and hip) and calcaneal QUS measurements were made. Area under the curves (AUCs) were calculated to assess fracture discriminatory power of DXA and QUS variables. Quantitative Ultrasound Index (QUI) T-score and Speed of Sound (SOS) were found to be the best parameters for the identification of hip and distal forearm fractures, respectively, with AUCs greater than those of DXA BMD and other QUS parameters. While a QUI T-score of ≤-1.18 could identify and rule out hip fracture cases with approximately 80% sensitivity and specificity, a SOS value of ≤1529.75 reached to almost 90% for ruling in and out distal forearm fractures. The discriminatory performance of calcaneal QUS variables between fractured and non-fractured men was as good as those of the DXA BMD and even better. Since men appear to sustain fractures at closer QUS variable levels than those of the DXA BMD regardless of the fracture type, it may be speculated that calcaneal QUS may be more helpful in predicting the risk of fractures when BMD alone does not demonstrate impaired bones. Level III, Study of Diagnostic Test. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of intravascular ultrasound-derived minimal lumen area compared with fractional flow reserve--meta-analysis: pooled accuracy of IVUS luminal area versus FFR.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Bruno R; de Sousa, Marcos R; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Samady, Habib; Bezerra, Hiram G; Ribeiro, Antônio L P; Costa, Marco A

    2014-09-01

    Although intravascular ultrasound minimal luminal area (IVUS-MLA) is one of many anatomic determinants of lesion severity, it has been proposed as an alternative to fractional flow reserve (FFR) to assess severity of coronary artery disease. Pool the diagnostic performance of IVUS-MLA and determine its overall accuracy to predict the functional significance of coronary disease using FFR (0.75 or 0.80) as the gold standard. Studies comparing IVUS and FFR to establish the best MLA cutoff value that correlates with significant coronary stenosis were reviewed from a Medline search using the terms "fractional flow reserve" and "ultrasound." DerSimonian Laird method was applied to obtain pooled accuracy. Eleven clinical trials, including two left main (LM) trials (total N = 1,759 patients, 1,953 lesions) were included. The weighted overall mean MLA cutoff was 2.61 mm(2) in non-LM trials and 5.35 mm(2) in LM trials. For non-LM lesions, the pooled sensitivity of MLA was 0.79 (95% CI = 0.76-0.83) and specificity was 0.65 (95% CI = 0.62-0.67). Positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 2.26 (95% CI = 1.98-2.57) and LR- was 0.32 (95% CI = 0.24-0.44). Area under the summary receiver operator curve for all trials was 0.848. Pooled LM trials had better accuracy: sensitivity = 0.90, specificity = 0.90, LR+ = 8.79, and LR- = 0.120. Given its limited pooled accuracy, IVUS-MLA's impact on clinical decision in this scenario is low and may lead to misclassification in up to 20% of the lesions. Pooled analysis points toward lower MLA cutoffs than the ones used in current practice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease. It is also used to measure conditions affecting blood flow to and within the brain, such as: Stenosis : ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures ... represent the flow of blood through the blood vessels. top of ...

  4. Randomized Trial Comparing the Flexible 19G and 25G Needles for Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Solid Pancreatic Mass Lesions.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Bang, Ji Young; Hebert-Magee, Shantel; Trevino, Jessica; Eltoum, Isam; Frost, Andra; Hasan, Muhammad K; Logue, Amy; Hawes, Robert; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Although a large gauge needle can procure more tissue at endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), its advantage over smaller needles is unclear. This study compared flexible 19G and 25G needles for EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic masses. This was a randomized trial of patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Main outcome measure was to compare median number of passes for on-site diagnosis. Secondary measures were to compare specimen bloodiness, complications, technical failures, and histological core tissue procurement. One hundred patients were randomized to EUS-FNA using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Median of 1 pass was required to achieve on-site diagnosis of 96% and 92% (P = 0.68) in 19G and 25G cohorts. There was no significant difference in technical failure (0% vs 2%, P = 0.99) or adverse events (2% vs 0%, P = 0.99) between 19G and 25G cohorts. Although histological core tissue procurement was significantly better with flexible 19G needle (88% vs 44%, P < 0.001), specimens were bloodier (severe bloodiness, 36% vs 4%; P < 0.001). As there is no significant difference in the performance of flexible 19G and 25G needles, needle choice for sampling pancreatic masses should be based on endoscopist preference and need for histology.

  5. Randomized Trial Comparing the Flexible 19G and 25G Needles for Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Solid Pancreatic Mass Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Bang, Ji Young; Hebert-Magee, Shantel; Trevino, Jessica; Eltoum, Isam; Frost, Andra; Hasan, Muhammad K.; Logue, Amy; Hawes, Robert; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although a large gauge needle can procure more tissue at endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), its advantage over smaller needles is unclear. This study compared flexible 19G and 25G needles for EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic masses. Methods This was a randomized trial of patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Main outcome measure was to compare median number of passes for on-site diagnosis. Secondary measures were to compare specimen bloodiness, complications, technical failures, and histological core tissue procurement. Results One hundred patients were randomized to EUS-FNA using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Median of 1 pass was required to achieve on-site diagnosis of 96% and 92% (P = 0.68) in 19G and 25G cohorts. There was no significant difference in technical failure (0% vs 2%, P = 0.99) or adverse events (2% vs 0%, P = 0.99) between 19G and 25G cohorts. Although histological core tissue procurement was significantly better with flexible 19G needle (88% vs 44%, P < 0.001), specimens were bloodier (severe bloodiness, 36% vs 4%; P < 0.001). Conclusions As there is no significant difference in the performance of flexible 19G and 25G needles, needle choice for sampling pancreatic masses should be based on endoscopist preference and need for histology. PMID:25232713

  6. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Trainee anaesthetist diagnosis of intraneural injection-a study comparing B-mode ultrasound with the fusion of B-mode and elastography in the soft embalmed Thiel cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Munirama, S; Zealley, K; Schwab, A; Columb, M; Corner, G A; Eisma, R; McLeod, G A

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of intraneural injection during trainee anaesthetist ultrasound guided nerve block varies between 16% in experts and up to 35% in trainees. We hypothesized that elastography, an ultrasound-based technology that presents colour images of tissue strain, had the potential to improve trainee diagnosis of intraneural injection during UGRA, when integrated with B-Mode ultrasound onto a single image. We recorded 40 median nerve blocks randomly allocated to 0.25 ml, 0.5 ml, 1 ml volumes to five sites, on both arms of two soft embalmed cadavers, using a dedicated B-Mode ultrasound and elastography transducer. We wrote software to fuse elastogram and B-Mode videos, then asked 20 trainee anaesthetists whether injection was intraneural or extraneural when seeing B-Mode videos, adjacent B-Mode and elastogram videos, fusion elastography videos or repeated B-Mode ultrasound videos. Fusion elastography improved the diagnosis of intraneural injection compared with B-Mode ultrasound, Diagnostic Odds Ratio (DOR) (95%CI) 21.7 (14.5 - 33.3) vs DOR 7.4 (5.2 - 10.6), P < 0.001. Compared with extraneural injection, intraneural injection was identified on fusion elastography as a distinct, brighter translucent image, geometric ratio 0.33 (95%CI: 0.16 - 0.49) P < 0.001. Fusion elastography was associated with greater trainee diagnostic confidence, OR (95%CI) 1.89 (1.69 - 2.11), P < 0.001, and an improvement in reliability, Kappa 0.60 (0.55 - 0.66). Fusion elastography improved the accuracy, reliability and confidence of trainee anaesthetist diagnosis of intraneural injection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis References Lee LS. Endoscopic ultrasound. In: McNalley PR, ed. GI/Liver Secrets Plus . 5th ed. Philadelphia, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  9. Ultrasound, computed tomography, or the combination for the detection of supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with esophageal or gastric cardia cancer: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Evelyn P M; van der Lugt, Aad; Kuipers, Ernst J; Tilanus, Hugo W; van der Gaast, Ate; Hermans, John J; Siersema, Peter D

    2007-09-01

    Both ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) can be used to detect supraclavicular lymph node metastases. Aim was to compare US, US plus fine-needle aspiration (US-FNA), CT, US + CT, and US-FNA + CT for the detection of these metastases in esophageal or gastric cardia cancer patients. Between 1994 and 2004, 567 patients underwent US and CT for esophageal or gastric cardia cancer staging. Gold standard was postoperative detection of lymph nodes in the resected specimen, FNA, or a radiological result with follow-up. Sensitivities of US (75%), US-FNA (72%), US + CT (80%), and US-FNA + CT (79%) were higher than sensitivity of CT alone (25%) (P < 0.001). Specificities were high for US-FNA (100%), CT (99%), and US-FNA + CT (99%), whereas those of US alone (91%) and US + CT (91%) were lower (P < 0.001). In 4/65 (6%) patients with true-positive malignant lymph nodes, CT was positive with US and/or US-FNA being negative. However, in 36/65 (55%) patients, US and/or US-FNA were positive with CT being negative. US-FNA seems the preferred diagnostic modality for the detection of supraclavicular lymph node metastases in patients with esophageal or gastric cardia cancer. Sensitivity of metastases detection only slightly improves if US-FNA is combined with CT. A prospective, comparative study is however needed. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Non-contact low-frequency ultrasound therapy compared with UK standard of care for venous leg ulcers: a single-centre, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    White, Judith; Ivins, Nicola; Wilkes, Antony; Carolan-Rees, Grace; Harding, Keith G

    2016-10-01

    'Hard-to-heal' wounds are those which fail to heal with standard therapy in an orderly and timely manner and may warrant the use of advanced treatments such as non-contact low-frequency ultrasound (NLFU) therapy. This evaluator-blinded, single-site, randomised controlled trial, compared NLFU in addition to UK standard of care [SOC: (NLFU + SOC)] three times a week, with SOC alone at least once a week. Patients with chronic venous leg ulcers were eligible to participate. All 36 randomised patients completed treatment (17 NLFU + SOC, 19 SOC), and baseline demographics were comparable between groups. NLFU + SOC patients showed a -47% (SD: 38%) change in wound area; SOC, -39% (38%) change; and difference, -7·4% [95% confidence intervals (CIs) -33·4-18·6; P = 0·565]. The median number of infections per patient was two in both arms of the study and change in quality of life (QoL) scores was not significant (P = 0·490). NLFU + SOC patients reported a substantial mean (SD) reduction in pain score of -14·4 (14·9) points, SOC patients' pain scores reduced by -5·3 (14·8); the difference was -9·1 (P = 0·078). Results demonstrated the importance of high-quality wound care. Outcome measures favoured NLFU + SOC over SOC, but the differences were not statistically significant. A larger sample size and longer follow-up may reveal NLFU-related improvements not identified in this study.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Versus Fluoroscopy-Guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Unilateral Lower Lumbar Radicular Pain: Case-Controlled, Retrospective, Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Deok; Kim, Tai Kon; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, JaeKi; Koh, Sung Hoon; Park, Yongbum

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the article is to investigate the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection (CESI) compared with fluoroscopy (FL)-guided CESI in patients with unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain. This case-controlled, retrospective, comparative study was done at the university hospital. A total of 110 patients treated with US- or FL-guided CESI were administered a mixture of 20 cc (0.5% lidocaine 18.0  mL + dexamethason 10  mg 2  mL). Outcome measurement was assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), verbal numeric pain scale (VNS) before injections and at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injections. Successful outcome was defined as measured by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI. ODI and VNS showed improvement at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injection in both groups. No statistical differences in ODI, VNS were observed between groups (P < 0.05). No significant differences in the proportion of patients with successful treatment were observed between the groups from the 3-month to 6-month to 12-month outcomes. US-guided CESI is deserving of consideration in conservative management of unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain.

  12. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery. PMID:27601741

  13. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  14. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  15. Hepatic transit time analysis using contrast-enhanced ultrasound with BR1: A prospective study comparing patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer with healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Joachim; Müller, Christine; Oldenburg, Anja; Skrok, Jan; Frericks, Bernd B; Wolf, Karl-Jürgen; Albrecht, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    We prospectively compared hepatic transit time (HTT) measurements in subjects with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (group a) and healthy volunteers (group b) using contrast-enhanced ultrasound with BR1. The purpose of this study was to verify our hypothesis that the hemodynamic changes of the liver, which occur during metastasis seeding, would shorten the HTT, and we expect that such changes could be used for the detection of occult liver metastases from colorectal cancer in the future. The study had institutional review board approval and all subjects gave informed written consent. Group a and group b consisted of 22 subjects each. Baseline and post contrast images were acquired starting 10 s before and ending 40 s after administration of BR1, using nonlinear imaging at a frame rate of 5/s. The baseline images were used to determine the signal intensity without contrast enhancement as the reference signal. Arrival times (AT) of the contrast agent for the hepatic artery, the portal vein and one hepatic vein were determined using (i) quantitative analysis and (ii) subjective analysis by two blinded readers. HTT was calculated based on arrival time measurements. Quantitative and subjective analysis showed significantly shorter arterial to venous and portal to venous HTT in group a compared with group b (p < 0.001). Arterial to venous HTT (quantitative analysis) was < or = 9 s in 19 of 22 subjects of group a and >9 s in 18 of 22 subjects of group b (sensitivity 86%, specificity 82%, positive predictive value 83%, negative predictive value 86%, area under the curve [AUC] 0.87). Portal to venous HTT (quantitative analysis) was < 7 s in 21 of 22 subjects of group a and > 7s in 15 of 22 subjects of group b (sensitivity 95%, specificity 68%, PPV 75%, NPV 94%, AUC 0.85). There was an inverse relation with number of liver segments involved for arterial to venous and portal to venous HTT in group a (p < 0.05), but no correlation between HTT and overall volume of

  16. The diagnostic accuracy of physical examination compared to lung ultrasound for determining lung congestion in hemodialysis patients who have reached their dry weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahardjo, K. D.; Dharmaeizar; Nainggolan, G.; Harimurti, K.

    2017-08-01

    Research has shown that hemodialysis patients with lung congestion have high morbidity and mortality. Patients were assumed to be free of lung congestion if they had reached their post-dialysis dry weight. Most often, to determine if the patient was free of lung congestion, physical examination was used. However, the accuracy of physical examination in detecting lung congestion has not been established. To compare the capabilities of physical examination and lung ultrasound in detection of lung congestion, cross-sectional data collection was conducted on hemodialysis patients. Analysis was done to obtain proportion, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive likelihood ratio. Sixty patients participated in this study. The inter observer variation of 20 patients revealed a kappa value of 0.828. When all 60 patients were taken into account, we found that 36 patients (57.1%) had lung congestion. Mild lung congestion was found in 24 (38.1%), and 12 (19%) had a moderate degree of congestion. In the analysis comparing jugular venous pressure to lung ultrasound, we found that sensitivity was 0.47 (0.31-0.63), specificity was 0.73 (0.54-0.86), positive predictive value (PPV) was 0.51 (0.36-0.67), negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.70 (0.49-0.84), positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was 1.75 (0.88-3.47), and the negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was 0.72 (0.47-1.12). In terms of lung auscultation, we found that sensitivity was 0.56 (0.39-0.71), specificity was 0.54 (0.35-0.71), PPV was 0.61 (0.44-0.76), NPV was 0.48 (0.31-0.66), PLR was 1.21 (0.73-2.0), and NLR was 0.82 (0.49-1.38). The results of our study showed that jugular venous distention and lung auscultation examination are not reliable means of detecting lung congestion.

  17. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  18. Comparative Effectiveness of Two Ultrasound-Guided Regional Block Techniques for Surgical Anesthesia in Open Unilateral Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Steffel, Lauren; Kim, T Edward; Howard, Steven K; Ly, Daphne P; Kou, Alex; King, Robert; Mariano, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) and ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric (II/IH) nerve blocks have been described as analgesic adjuncts for inguinal hernia repair, but the efficacy of these techniques in providing intraoperative anesthesia, either individually or together, is not known. We designed this retrospective cohort study to test the hypothesis that combining TAP and II/IH nerve blocks ("double TAP" technique) results in greater accordance between the preoperative anesthetic plan and actual anesthetic technique provided when compared to TAP alone. Based on this study, double TAP may be preferred for patients undergoing open inguinal hernia repair who wish to avoid general anesthesia.

  19. [The evaluation of the usefulness of ultrasound independent of estradiol as a prognostic criterion for ovular capture and maturity. A comparative double-blind study].

    PubMed

    Kably Ambe, A; Carranza Lira, S; Serviere Zaragoza, C; Espinoza de los Monteros, A; Coria Soto, I; Alvarado Durán, A

    1994-09-01

    One hundred and twenty women were studied which had primary or secondary sterility, and underwent into the GIFT or IVF-ET program at the INPer. They were divided in two groups. Group I had 96 women in which only was taken in account the follicular development measured by vaginal ultrasound to decide continuation or cancellation, in this group estradiol serum levels determination was done, but it was not used for decision making; group II had 24 women in which estradiol was taken in account in addition with ultrasound. There were no differences in the number of follicles seen by ultrasound neither in the estradiol serum levels between the groups. Correlation coefficients between follicles seen by ultrasound and retrieved oocytes and mature oocytes, thus partial correlation coefficients for follicles seen by ultrasound plus estradiol serum levels and retrieved oocytes and captured oocytes were higher in group I in all days with the exception of day 10 in which they were similar. By the aforementioned in can be concluded that in this group of patients the ultrasound was the most reliable variable to give a quantitative and qualitative prognostic of oocyte retrieval.

  20. Randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of the ultrasound-guided galvanic electrolysis technique (USGET) versus conventional electro-physiotherapeutic treatment on patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Abat, F; Sánchez-Sánchez, J L; Martín-Nogueras, A M; Calvo-Arenillas, J I; Yajeya, J; Méndez-Sánchez, R; Monllau, J C; Gelber, P E

    2016-12-01

    Patellar tendinopathy has a high prevalence rate among athletes. Different therapeutic options can be found in the current literature, but none of them has been clearly established as the gold standard. The purpose of this study is to compare, in a randomized controlled trial, the clinical efficacy of eccentric exercise combined with either an ultrasound-guided galvanic electrolysis technique (USGET) or conventional electrophysiotherapy to treat patellar tendinopathy. Sixty patients diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy were randomized into two groups. Group 1 (n = 30) received electrophysiotherapy treatment consisting of ultrasound, laser and interferential current techniques. Group 2 (n = 30) received USGET. Both groups did the same standardized eccentric exercise program. Periodic assessments of the subjects were carried out with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) score. An analysis of means and a survival study were performed. There were statistically significant differences in the VISA-P between the baseline and final follow-up in each treatment group. Group 1 (conventional electrophysiotherapy) went from 52.5 ± 18.8 to 61.9 ± 13.7 (in VISA-P < 90 subgroup) and from 69.1 ± 9.1 to 95.2 ± 2.5 (in VISA-P > 90 subgroup). Group 2 (USGET) went from 51.4 ± 17.9 to 63.3 ± 14.3 (in VISA-P < 90 subgroup) and from 66.3 ± 13.1 to 97.1 ± 1.7 (in VISA-P > 90 subgroup). There were statistically significant correlations between the baseline and final score in the VISA-P > 90 subjects upon completing the study but no statistically significant correlations between subjects with VISA-P < 90. The mean number of sessions applied was 22.6 ± 2.5 in Group 1 and 3.2 ± 0.9 in Group 2. The success probability in Group 1 was 36.1% versus 72.4% in Group 2. The difference was statistically significant. The results obtained with the combination of USGET and eccentric exercise reported

  1. Comparative clinical study of ultrasound-guided A1 pulley release vs open surgical intervention in the treatment of trigger finger

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Malahias, Michael-Alexander; Kaseta, Maria-Kyriaki; Sourlas, Ioannis; Babis, George C

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided release of the first annular pulley and compare results with the conventional open operative technique. METHODS In this prospective randomized, single-center, clinical study, 32 patients with trigger finger or trigger thumb, grade II-IV according to Green classification system, were recruited. Two groups were formed; Group A (16 patients) was treated with an ultrasound-guided percutaneous release of the affected A1 pulley under local anesthesia. Group B (16 patients) underwent an open surgical release of the A1 pulley, through a 10-15 mm incision. Patients were assessed pre- and postoperatively (follow-up: 2, 4 and 12 wk) by physicians blinded to the procedures. Treatment of triggering (primary variable of interest) was expressed as the “success rate” per digit. The time for taking postoperative pain killers, range of motion recovery, QuickDASH test scores (Greek version), return to normal activities (including work), complications and cosmetic results were assessed. RESULTS The success rate in group A was 93.75% (15/16) and in group B 100% (16/16). Mean times in group A patients were 3.5 d for taking pain killers, 4.1 d for returning to normal activities, and 7.2 and 3.9 d for complete extension and flexion recovery, respectively. Mean QuickDASH scores in group A were 45.5 preoperatively and, 7.5, 0.5 and 0 after 2, 4, and 12 wk postoperatively. Mean times in group B patients were 2.9 d for taking pain killers, 17.8 d for returning to normal activities, and 5.6 and 3 d for complete extension and flexion recovery. Mean QuickDASH scores in group B were 43.2 preoperatively and, 8.2, 1.3 and 0 after 2, 4, and 12 wk postoperatively. The cosmetic results found excellent or good in 87.5% (14/16) of group A patients, while in 56.25% (9/16) of group B patients were evaluated as fair or poor. CONCLUSION Treatment of the trigger finger using ultrasonography resulted in fewer absence of work days, and better

  2. Treatment of abdominal abscesses: comparative evaluation of operative drainage versus percutaneous catheter drainage guided by computed tomography or ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W C; Gerzof, S G; Robbins, A H; Nabseth, D C

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomography and, to a lesser extent, ultrasonography provide detailed anatomic localization of intra-abdominal abscesses that permit precise percutaneous placement of catheters large enough to effect drainage. Using routes similar to surgical approaches, the authors have used this technique as definitive therapy for intra-abdominal abscesses. To assess its efficacy, the results in the 27 patients treated percutaneously over the last five years have been compared with the results in the 43 patients treated by operative intervention over the past ten years. In the percutaneous group, complications (4%), inadequate drainage (11%), and duration of drainage (17 days) were less than in the operative group (16%, 21% and 29 days respectively). These results indicate that percutaneous drainage is at least as efficacious as operative drainage and avoids the risks of a major operative procedure. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:7283510

  3. Comparative study of multi-enzyme production from typical agro-industrial residues and ultrasound-assisted extraction of crude enzyme in fermentation with Aspergillus japonicus PJ01.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-jun; Xia, Jin-lan; Shan, Yang; Nie, Zhen-yuan

    2015-10-01

    Submerged fermentation (SmF) and solid-state fermentation (SSF) of Aspergillus japonicus PJ01 for multi-enzyme complexes (MEC) production were comparatively studied. The results showed that orange peel and wheat bran were the best substrates for MEC production in SmF and SSF, respectively. After 72 h of cultivation under SmF, the maximal pectinase, CMCase, and xylanase activities reached 2610, 85, and 335 U/gds (units/gram dry substrate), respectively; while after 72 h of cultivation under SSF, these three enzymes' activities reached 966, 58, and 1004 U/gds, respectively. Effects of ultrasound on extraction of crude enzymes from SSF medium were determined, the maximal activities of pectinase, CMCase, and xylanase increased to 1.20, 1.48, and 1.30-fold, respectively. Apparent different mycelia growths of SSF and SmF were observed by scanning electron microscopy; and different isoforms of the crude enzyme extracts from SSF and SmF were presented by zymogram analysis.

  4. Comparative study of the topical application of Aloe vera gel, therapeutic ultrasound and phonophoresis on the tissue repair in collagenase-induced rat tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Maia Filho, Antonio Luiz Martins; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Munin, Egberto; Aimbire, Flávio; Albertini, Regiane

    2010-10-01

    The aim of our study was to compare topical use of Aloe vera gel, pulsed mode ultrasound (US) and Aloe vera phonophoresis on rat paw with collagenase-induced tendinitis. Edema size, tensile tendon strength, tendon elasticity, number of inflammatory cells and tissue histology were studied at 7 and 14 days after tendinitis induction. Pulse mode US parameters were: 1 MHz frequency, 100 Hz repetition rate, 10% duty cycle, and 0.5 W/cm(2) intensity, applied for 2 min each session. A 0.5 mL of Aloe vera gel at 2% concentration was applied for 2 min per session, topically and by phonophoresis. Topical application of Aloe vera gel did not show any statistically significant improvement in the inflammatory process, whereas phonophoresis enhanced the gel action reducing edema and number of inflammatory cells, promoting the rearrangement of collagen fibers and promoting also the recovery of the tensile strength and elasticity of the inflamed tendon to recover their normal pre-injury status. Results seem to indicate that Aloe vera phonophoresis is a promising technique for tendinitis treatment, without the adverse effect provoked by systemic anti-inflammatory drugs.

  5. A comparative study on the effect of conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwave and ultrasound treatments on the antioxidant activity of five fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Sangeeta; Mahnot, Nikhil Kumar; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2016-06-01

    A comparative study on the effect of conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwave and ultrasound treatments on the phytochemical and antioxidant activities of juices from carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.), black jamun (Syzygium cumuni L.Skeels.), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var lanatus), pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr) and litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) was carried out. Depending on the type of fruit sample and treatment, increase or decrease in phytochemical values was observed. Overall, sonication had a positive effect on the total flavonoid content in all the juice samples followed by microwave treatment with exceptions in some cases. High-performance liquid chromatography study showed the presence of different phenolic acids depending on the sample type. The phenolic acids in some processed carambola juice samples showed decrease or complete destruction, while in some cases, an increase or appearance of newer phenolic acid originally not detected in the fresh juice was observed as seen in conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwaved at 600 W and sonicated juices. Both microwaved and sonicated samples were found to have positive effect on the phenolic content and antioxidant activity with exceptions in some cases. Therefore, microwave and sonication treatment could be used in place of thermal pasteurisation depending on the sample requirements. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Osteogenic effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound, extracorporeal shockwaves and their combination - an in vitro comparative study on human periosteal cells.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kam-Fai; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Lee, Kwong-Man; Qin, Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2008-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that on human periosteal cells, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has an immediate stimulatory effect whereas extracorporeal shockwaves (ESW) have an delayed stimulatory effect. Therefore, we hypothesized that a combined ESW and LIPUS treatment might provide additive or synergistic effects on periosteal cells, by using ESW to trigger a biological activity while using LIPUS to maintain the stimulated activity. Human periosteal cells were subjected to a single session of ESW treatment on day 0 and/or daily LIPUS treatments or no treatment (control). The cell viability, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity on day 6 and day 18 as well as matrix mineralization on day 35 were measured. Results revealed that LIPUS alone had early positive effects on the activities on day 6 only. In contrast, ESW alone had an early destructive effect but exerted delayed stimulatory effects on the cellular activities on day 18. The combined treatment of ESW plus LIPUS produced effects that were comparable to the ESW treatment alone. Although these findings suggest that ESW and LIPUS stimulate the periosteal cells in two different ways and at different times, their additive or synergistic effects could not be proven.

  7. Bedside lung ultrasound, mobile radiography and physical examination: a comparative analysis of diagnostic tools in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Andrew J; Nalos, Marek; Sue, Kwan-Hing; Hruby, Jan; Campbell, Daniel M; Braham, Rachel M; Orde, Sam R

    2016-06-01

    To compare lung ultrasonography (LUS), chest xray (CXR) and physical examination (Ex) for the detection of pathological abnormalities in the lungs of critically ill patients. A prospective cohort study of 145 patients in the intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital who were undergoing echocardiography for a clinical indication. Each patient was independently assessed by Ex, CXR and LUS on the same day. Examiners were asked to comment on the presence or absence and severity of pleural effusion, lung consolidation and alveolar interstitial syndrome (AIS). Independent expert examiners performed the LUS and an independent radiologist reported on the CXR. Ex, CXR and LUS were in fair agreement with each other in detecting a pulmonary abnormality (CXR v LUS, κ = 0.31; CXR v Ex, κ = 0.29; LUS v Ex, κ = 0.22). LUS detected more abnormalities than did CXR (16.2%; χ(2) = 64.1; P < 0.001) or Ex (23.5%; χ(2) = 121.9; P < 0.001). CXR detected more pleural effusions than LUS (9.3%; χ(2) = 7.6; κ = 0.39), but LUS detected more pleural effusions than Ex (22.8%; χ(2) = 36.4; κ = 0.18). There was no significant difference in the performance of LUS and CXR in quantifying the size of a pleural effusion (Z = -1.2; P = 0.23). Ex underestimated size compared with CXR or LUS. LUS detected more consolidation than CXR (17%; χ(2) = 115.9; P < 0.001) and Ex (16.2%; χ(2) = 90.3; P < 0.001). We saw no difference in performance between CXR and Ex in detecting lung consolidation (0.9%; χ(2) = 0.51; P < 0.48). LUS detected more cases of AIS than CXR (5.5%; χ(2) = 7.9; P = 0.005) and Ex (13%; χ(2) = 25.8; P < 0.001). There was only fair-to-moderate agreement between LUS, CXR and Ex in detecting pulmonary abnormalities, including pleural effusion, lung consolidation and AIS. The higher rate of detection from LUS, combined with its ease of use and increasing accessibility, makes for a powerful diagnostic tool in the ICU.

  8. Five-dimensional long bones biometry for estimation of femur length and fetal weight at term compared to two-dimensional ultrasound: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Laban, Mohamed; Alanwar, Ahmed A; Etman, Mohamed K; Elsokkary, Mohammed S; Elkotb, Ahmed M; Hasanien, Ahmad S; KhalafAllah, Ali E; Noah, Nancy M

    2017-07-27

    This study aimed to evaluate accuracy of five-dimensional long bones (5D LB) compared to two-dimensional ultrasound (2DUS) biometry to predict fetal weight among normal term women. Fifty six normal term women were recruited at Ain Shams Maternity Hospital, Egypt from 14 May to 30 November 2015. Fetal weight was estimated by Hadlock's IV formula using 2DUS and 5D LB. Estimated fetal weights (EFW) by 2DUS and 5D LB were compared with actual birth weights (ABW). Mean femur length (FL) was 7.07 ± 0.73 cm and 6.74 ± 0.67 cm by 2DUS and 5D LB (p = .02). EFW was 3309.86 ± 463.06 g by 2DUS and 3205.46 ± 447.85 g by 5D LB (p = .25). No statistical difference was observed between ABW and EFW by 2DUS (p = .7) or 5D LB (p = .45). Positive correlation was found between EFW by 2DUS, 5D LB, and ABW (r = 0.67 and 0.7; p < .001). There was strong agreement between FL measured by 2DUS and 5D LB (ICC = 0.78), and perfect agreement between EFW by 2DUS and EFW by 5D LB (ICC = 0.918). 2DUS and 5D LB showed mean absolute percentage error for EFW of 10 ± 7% and 8 ± 7% compared to ABW (p = .15). 2DUS and 5D LB had same accuracy for fetal weight estimation at normal term pregnancy.

  9. A comparative study of contrast enhanced ultrasound and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Zhu, Zheng; Huang, Beijian; Ding, Hong; Mao, Feng; Li, Chaolun; Zeng, Mengsu; Zhou, Jianjun; Wang, Ling; Wang, Wenping; Chen, Yue

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to compare contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CEMRI) for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas. Included in this retrospective study were 83 histopathologically confirmed lesions of hemangioma in 66 hospitalized patients who underwent both CEUS and CEMRI and received surgery. The enhancement patterns on CEUS and CEMRI in each lesion were compared and analyzed. In addition, data obtained by the two modalities were then compared with the pathological findings to determine their value in differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. CEUS diagnosed 78 lesions of hemangioma against 80 by CEMRI. There were no statistical significant differences in the diagnostic value between CEUS and CEMRI in terms of sensitivity (88.0% vs. 92.8%), specificity (99.0% vs. 99.4%), accuracy (97.3% vs. 98.4%), positive predictive value (93.6% vs. 96.3%), and negative predictive value (98.0% vs. 98.8%) (p > 0.05, all). In the arterial phase, the main enhancement pattern on both CEUS and CEMRI was peripheral nodular enhancement (73 vs. 76), but lesions with diffuse enhancement on CEUS outnumbered those on CEMRI (3 vs. 1) and lesions with circular enhancement on CEMRI outnumbered those on CEUS (3 vs. 2). In the portal venous phase and delayed phase, the main enhancement pattern was hyperechoic change on CEUS and hyperintense on CEMRI (66 vs. 65), some lesions presented isoechoic change (12 vs. 15). These results suggested CEUS, an equivalent to CEMRI, may have an added diagnostic value in hemangiomas.

  10. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    PubMed

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  11. Potentially accommodating intraocular lenses--an in vitro and in vivo study using three-dimensional high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Stachs, Oliver; Schneider, Hanka; Stave, Joachim; Guthoff, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the accommodative performance of new intraocular lenses (IOL) using the advantages of three-dimensional ultrasound biomicroscopy. An in vitro simulation device was designed to study IOL performance using an artificial capsular bag and a stretching device. The haptic region of the Akkommodative 1CU (HumanOptics AG) and CrystaLens AT-45 (Eyeonics Inc) was visualized in vitro in three dimensions, using an in-house developed three-dimensional ultrasound biomicroscope. The in vitro results were used to describe the in vivo situation in four patients with accommodative implants. The haptic position and angulation in consideration of the accommodation state was distinguished and analyzed. In the simulation model, a maximal angulation change of 4.5 degrees and 4.3 degrees and a maximal forward shift of 0.33 mm and 0.28 mm was observed for the AT-45 and 1CU, respectively. In vivo, a change in haptic angulation <100 and a maximal forward shift of 0.50 mm was observed for the 1CU. These changes correspond to a theoretical approximate value of 0.50 diopters. The in vitro simulation device examined with three-dimensional ultrasound biomicroscopy provided information on the accommodative performance of these potentially accommodative IOL designs. Using three-dimensional ultrasound biomicroscopy, corresponding changes in haptic angulation during pharmacological-induced accommodation were observed.

  12. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of intraoperative imaging in high-grade glioma resection; a comparative review of intraoperative ALA, fluorescein, ultrasound and MRI.

    PubMed

    Eljamel, M Sam; Mahboob, Syed Osama

    2016-12-01

    Surgical resection of high-grade gliomas (HGG) is standard therapy because it imparts significant progression free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). However, HGG-tumor margins are indistinguishable from normal brain during surgery. Hence intraoperative technology such as fluorescence (ALA, fluorescein) and intraoperative ultrasound (IoUS) and MRI (IoMRI) has been deployed. This study compares the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these technologies. Critical literature review and meta-analyses, using MEDLINE/PubMed service. The list of references in each article was double-checked for any missing references. We included all studies that reported the use of ALA, fluorescein (FLCN), IoUS or IoMRI to guide HGG-surgery. The meta-analyses were conducted according to statistical heterogeneity between studies. If there was no heterogeneity, fixed effects model was used; otherwise, a random effects model was used. Statistical heterogeneity was explored by χ(2) and inconsistency (I(2)) statistics. To assess cost-effectiveness, we calculated the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). Gross total resection (GTR) after ALA, FLCN, IoUS and IoMRI was 69.1%, 84.4%, 73.4% and 70% respectively. The differences were not statistically significant. All four techniques led to significant prolongation of PFS and tended to prolong OS. However none of these technologies led to significant prolongation of OS compared to controls. The cost/QALY was $16,218, $3181, $6049 and $32,954 for ALA, FLCN, IoUS and IoMRI respectively. ALA, FLCN, IoUS and IoMRI significantly improve GTR and PFS of HGG. Their incremental cost was below the threshold for cost-effectiveness of HGG-therapy, denoting that each intraoperative technology was cost-effective on its own. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Central Corneal Thickness After Cross-linking Using High-Definition Optical Coherence Tomography, Ultrasound, and Dual Scheimpflug Tomography: A Comparative Study Over One Year.

    PubMed

    Antonios, Rafic; Fattah, Maamoun Abdul; Maalouf, Fadi; Abiad, Bachir; Awwad, Shady T

    2016-07-01

    To assess central corneal thickness (CCT) and corneal haze in keratoconus eyes following corneal cross-linking (CXL). Prospective noncomparative case series. Forty patients (44 eyes) with keratoconus that had serial evaluation for CCT, following CXL, using high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT), ultrasound pachymetry (USP), and dual Scheimpflug tomography. CCT was measured at baseline, then at 2 weeks and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The mean baseline CCT measurements were 470.02 μm, 469.79 μm, and 466.66 μm using the HD-OCT, the USP, and dual Scheimpflug tomography, respectively (P = .91). Following CXL, the mean CCT measurements by dual Scheimpflug, at all follow-up periods, were lower compared to mean baseline reading (P < .003). The mean CCT measurements by the HD-OCT and USP were similar to baseline readings except for the thicker readings at the 2-week follow-up visit. Overall, the mean CCT obtained by the USP was similar to that obtained by the HD-OCT throughout the 12-month period. However, the mean CCT measurements obtained by dual Scheimpflug tomography were statistically and clinically significantly lower than those obtained by both HD-OCT and USP at all follow-up visits. USP and HD-OCT showed better agreement in CCT readings at all visits, and may better estimate the true CCT following CXL as compared to dual Scheimpflug tomography. The lower mean CCT post-CXL as measured by the latter seems to be correlated with the amount of haze that develops after cross-linking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of osteoporosis using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Dantas, Ricardo G.

    2000-04-01

    We have developed an equipment using ultrasound transducers to help in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The equipment consists of an X-Y axes displacement system controlled by a microcomputer and uses two ultrasound transducers in opposite sides to inspect the calcaneus region of the patient. We have used two pairs of transducers with 500 kHz and 1 MHz central frequencies. Each pair of transducers was fixed in the X-Y displacement system submerged in a small water tank with a support for the foot of the patient. The transmitter was excited with pulses of 400 - 600 kHz or 800 - 1200 kHz and the ultrasound waves propagating through the bone in the calcaneus region are received by the opposite transducer, amplified and acquired in a digital oscilloscope. The data are transferred to the microcomputer and the ultrasound attenuation and the ultrasound transmission velocity are determined. The system was tested in patients, selected from a group that had already been diagnosed using a DEXA equipment. The results showed that there is a decrease in the ultrasound transmission velocity and the ultrasound attenuation in osteoporotic patients when compared to healthy patients of the same sex and age group. The conclusion is that ultrasound attenuation and the transmission velocity in the calcaneus region may be used as parameters in the evaluation of osteoporosis using our new system.

  15. Can botulinum toxin type A injection technique influence the clinical outcome of patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity? A randomized controlled trial comparing manual needle placement and ultrasound-guided injection techniques.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Panza, Francesco; Fortunato, Francesca; Baricich, Alessio; Cisari, Carlo; Pilotto, Alberto; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2014-12-15

    Botulinum toxin type A is a first-line treatment for post-stroke focal spasticity, and the accuracy in delivering the toxin to the target muscles may influence the treatment outcome. Our aim was to compare the reduction of spasticity and the related finger position at rest improvement in post-stroke patients treated with botulinum toxin type A in upper limb muscles using ultrasound guidance and manual needle placement. In a randomized clinical trial, two groups of 15 stroke patients were treated with botulinum toxin type A injections in the wrist and finger flexor muscles of the affected upper limb using ultrasound guidance or manual needle placement. The Modified Ashworth Scale and the finger position at rest were measured at baseline and one month after toxin injections. After one month of follow-up from toxin injections, the Modified Ashworth Scale and finger position at rest significantly improved in both treatment groups, although these clinical outcomes were significantly better in patients treated under ultrasound guidance than in patients injected using manual needle placement. Ultrasound guidance for botulinum toxin type A injections could improve clinical outcome measures better than manual needle placement in post-stroke patients with spasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A geometrically accurate vascular phantom for comparative studies of x-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance vascular imaging: construction and geometrical verification.

    PubMed

    Frayne, R; Gowman, L M; Rickey, D W; Holdsworth, D W; Picot, P A; Drangova, M; Chu, K C; Caldwell, C B; Fenster, A; Rutt, B K

    1993-01-01

    A technique for producing accurate models of vascular segments for use in experiments that assess vessel geometry and flow has been developed and evaluated. The models are compatible with x-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems. In this paper, a model of the human carotid artery bifurcation, is evaluated that has been built using this technique. The phantom consists of a thin-walled polyester-resin replica of the bifurcation through which a blood-mimicking fluid may be circulated. The phantom is surrounded by an agar tissue-mimicking material and a series of fiducial markers. The blood- and tissue-mimicking materials have x-ray, ultrasound, and MR properties similar to blood and tissue; fiducial markers provide a means of aligning images acquired by different modalities. The root-mean-square difference between the inner wall geometry of the constructed model and the desired dimensions was 0.33 mm. Static images were successfully acquired using x-ray, ultrasound, and MR imaging systems, and are free of significant artifacts. Flow images acquired with ultrasound and MR agree qualitatively with each other, and with previously published flow patterns. Volume-flow measurements obtained with ultrasound and MR were within 4.4% of the actual values.

  17. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially when the mass is solid). Blood flow images of the testicles are not always reliable in determining the presence or absence of blood supply to a testicle that has twisted. When searching for an absent testicle, ultrasound may not be ...

  18. Accuracy of computer-aided ultrasound as compared with magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese and eutrophic adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, José Hermes Ribas; Soder, Ricardo Bernardi; Epifanio, Matias; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of computer-aided ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by means of hepatorenal gradient analysis in the evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adolescents. Materials and Methods This prospective, cross-sectional study evaluated 50 adolescents (aged 11–17 years), including 24 obese and 26 eutrophic individuals. All adolescents underwent computer-aided US, MRI, laboratory tests, and anthropometric evaluation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were evaluated for both imaging methods, with subsequent generation of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and calculation of the area under the ROC curve to determine the most appropriate cutoff point for the hepatorenal gradient in order to predict the degree of steatosis, utilizing MRI results as the gold-standard. Results The obese group included 29.2% girls and 70.8% boys, and the eutrophic group, 69.2% girls and 30.8% boys. The prevalence of NAFLD corresponded to 19.2% for the eutrophic group and 83% for the obese group. The ROC curve generated for the hepatorenal gradient with a cutoff point of 13 presented 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. As the same cutoff point was considered for the eutrophic group, false-positive results were observed in 9.5% of cases (90.5% specificity) and false-negative results in 0% (100% sensitivity). Conclusion Computer-aided US with hepatorenal gradient calculation is a simple and noninvasive technique for semiquantitative evaluation of hepatic echogenicity and could be useful in the follow-up of adolescents with NAFLD, population screening for this disease as well as for clinical studies. PMID:26379321

  19. Corneal ablation depth readout of the MEL 80 excimer laser compared to Artemis three-dimensional very high-frequency digital ultrasound stromal measurements.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the ablation depth readout for the MEL 80 excimer laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec). Artemis 1 very high-frequency digital ultrasound measurements were obtained before and at least 3 months after LASIK in 121 eyes (65 patients). The Artemis-measured ablation depth was calculated as the maximum difference in stromal thickness before and after treatment. Laser in situ keratomileusis was performed using the MEL 80 excimer laser and the Hansatome microkeratome (Bausch & Lomb). The Aberration Smart Ablation profile was used in 56 eyes and the Tissue Saving Ablation profile was used in 65 eyes. All ablations were centered on the corneal vertex. Comparative statistics and linear regression analysis were performed between the laser readout ablation depth and Artemis-measured ablation depth. The mean maximum myopic meridian was -6.66±2.40 diopters (D) (range: -1.50 to -10.00 D) for Aberration Smart Ablation-treated eyes and -6.50±2.56 D (range: -1.34 to -11.50 D) for Tissue Saving Ablation-treated eyes. The MEL 80 readout was found to overestimate the Artemis-measured ablation depth by 20±12 μm for Aberration Smart Ablation and by 21±12 μm for Tissue Saving Ablation profiles. The accuracy of ablation depth measurement was improved by using the Artemis stromal thickness profile measurements before and after surgery to exclude epithelial changes. The MEL 80 readout was found to overestimate the achieved ablation depth. The linear regression equations could be used by MEL 80 users to adjust the ablation depth for predicted residual stromal thickness calculations without increasing the risk of ectasia due to excessive keratectomy depth as long as a suitable flap thickness bias is included. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Evaluation of Plaque Morphology by 64-Slice Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography Compared to Intravascular Ultrasound in Nonocclusive Segments of Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Kesarwani, Manoj; Nakanishi, Rine; Choi, Tae-Young; Shavelle, David M; Budoff, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    Although intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is the current gold standard for plaque characterization, noninvasive coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) requires further evaluation. The ability to detect plaque morphology by CCTA remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for plaque detection and morphology. Thirty-one patients underwent cardiac catheterization with IVUS and CCTA. The presence of plaque was evaluated by both modalities in nonocclusive segments (<50% stenosis) of the left anterior descending artery, left circumflex artery, and right coronary artery. Plaque morphology was classified as (1) normal, (2) soft or fibrous, (3) fibrocalcific, or (4) calcific. Results by IVUS and CCTA were compared blindly on a segment-to-segment basis with subgroup analysis based on CCTA tube voltage. Among the 31 patients (mean age 56.2 ± 8.6 years, 27% female), 152 segments were analyzed. Of these segments, 42% were in the left anterior descending artery, 32% were in the left circumflex artery, and 26% were in the right coronary artery. Plaque morphology by IVUS identified 103 segments as fibrous (68%), 31 as fibrocalcific (20%), and 6 as calcific (4.0%); 12 segments were normal (8.0%). To evaluate for the presence of plaque, CCTA had an overall sensitivity and specificity of 99% and 75%, respectively. In patients who underwent CCTA with a tube voltage of 100 kV, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of CCTA to identify plaque as calcified (fibrocalcific or calcific) vs noncalcified (soft or fibrous) were 87% and 96%, respectively. Overall, the accuracy of CCTA to detect the presence of plaque was 97%; the accuracy to detect plaque calcification was 94%. CCTA offers excellent sensitivity and accuracy for plaque detection and morphology characterization in nonocclusive coronary segments. In addition, diagnostic accuracy is preserved with a reduced tube voltage protocol

  1. Comparatively studying the ultrasound present in a mild two-stage approach on the content of functional groups in modified MWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Run; Liang, Shaolei; Li, Guangfen; Zhang, Yanxia; Shi, Le

    2016-04-01

    A two-stage approach assisted with ultrasound for oxidation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with ultra-high content of functional groups was utilized. The effect of ultrasound on the content of functional groups of the modified MWCNTs from different stages was analyzed by FE-SEM, HR-TEM, FTIR, Raman, TGA, XPS and triple double-backward titration method. The results confirm that more oxygen-containing functional groups were grafted on MWCNT with little damage to the structure integrity of nanotubes. The particle size distribution and the dispersion photography of MWCNTs in water and in ethanol further show a better dispersion of modified MWCNTs in polar solvent.

  2. Short-term efficacy to conventional blind injection versus ultrasound-guided injection of local corticosteroids in tenosynovitis in patients with inflammatory chronic arthritis: A randomized comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Marwin; Di Matteo, Andrea; Rosemffet, Marcos; Cazenave, Tomas; Rodriguez-Gil, Gustavo; Diaz, Cristina Hernandez; Rios, Lucio Ventura; Zamora, Natalia; Guzman, Maria del Carmen Gonzalez; Carrillo, Ignacio; Okano, Tadashi; Salaffi, Fausto; Pineda, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    To compare the short-term efficacy of conventional blind injection (CBI) versus ultrasound-guided injection (USGI) of corticosteroids (CS) injection in tenosynovitis in patients with chronic arthritis and to investigate if the USGI is a less painful procedure and if there are differences in the changes of US findings during the post injection follow-up. Patients presenting tenosynovitis requiring CS injection were involved. After clinical and US evaluation, patients were randomized to receive CBI or USGI. Efficacy of procedure was assessed by the improvement in both Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS), including procedure-VAS global-VAS and local-VAS, after 1 and 4 weeks post-procedure. Power Doppler (PD) and greyscale (GS) US findings were also object of the follow-up. CBI or USGI under an aseptic technique were performed according the local guidelines using 20mg of methylprednisolone acetate. A total of 114 patients were randomized to receive CBI (54 patients) or USGI (60 patients) procedure. No significant difference was observed in terms of gender, age and pain duration among CBI and USGI groups at baseline. USGI proved to be significantly less painful than CBI (P=0.0001). AUC analysis showed that during the follow up visits, the USGI procedure had significantly better response in HAQ, local-VAS and global-VAS (P=0.0001, P=0.012 and P=0.0001 respectively) compared to CBI. During the follow up period, a significant greater reduction in the PD scores was found in the USGI group compared to the CBI group (P=0.0002), whereas no statistical differences were found in the GS findings between the groups (P=0.5627). Our study demonstrates superiority of USGI over CBI for CS injections in painful tenosynovitis, having better short-term outcomes measured by functional, clinical and US scores. These data support the use of USGI for tenosynovits in typical inpatient and/or outpatient in rheumatological practices. Copyright © 2015 Soci

  3. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  4. Doppler ultrasound surveillance in deep tunneling compressed-air work with Trimix breathing: bounce dive technique compared to saturation-excursion technique.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, T P van Rees; Sterk, W; de Boer, A G E M; van der Beek, A J; Verhoeven, A C; van Dijk, F J H

    2008-01-01

    The Western Scheldt Tunneling Project in The Netherlands provided a unique opportunity to evaluate two deep-diving techniques with Doppler ultrasound surveillance. Divers used the bounce diving techniques for repair and maintenance of the TBM. The tunnel boring machine jammed at its deepest depth. As a result the work time was not sufficient. The saturation diving technique was developed and permitted longer work time at great depth. Thirty-one divers were involved in this project. Twenty-three divers were examined using Doppler ultrasound. Data analysis addressed 52 exposures to Trimix at 4.6-4.8 bar gauge using the bounce technique and 354 exposures to Trimix at 4.0-6.9 bar gauge on saturation excursions. No decompression incidents occurred with either technique during the described phase of the project. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the bubble loads assessed in both techniques were generally low. We find out, that despite longer working hours, shorter decompression times and larger physical workloads, the saturation-excursion technique was associated with significant lower bubble grades than in the bounce technique using Doppler Ultrasound. We conclude that the saturation-excursion technique with Trimix is a good option for deep and long exposures in caisson work. The Doppler technique proved valuable, and it should be incorporated in future compressed-air work.

  5. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  6. Comparative study of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and low-level laser therapy on injured muscle repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Toma, Renata Luri; Feitosa, Suellen Maurin; Fernandes, Kelly; de Oliveira, Poliani; Parizotto, N.; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2011-03-01

    Muscle tissue is one of the most frequently affected by injury, whether during sports activities, or work activities. In this context, biochemical and biophysical resources have been studied to minimize the time of muscle regeneration. Among these, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) may be highlighted. Despite a series of evidences about the positive effects of these resources in the process of tissue regeneration, the cellular and morphological changes triggered by LLLT and U.S. are still largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of US and LLLT on muscle repair after cryolesion by means of histopathological analysis and immunohistochemistry for COX-2. A total of thirty five male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 4 groups: intact control group; injured control group: muscle injured animals without any treatment; laser treated group: muscle injured animals treated with 830 nm laser and ultra-sound treated group: muscle injured animals treated with US. The treatments started 24 hours post-surgery and were performed during 6 sessions. The animals exposed to lasertherapy pointed out minor degenerative changes of muscle tissue. In the same way, exposure to ultrasound was able to reduce tissue injuries induced by cryolesion, but less intense than laser therapy. Strong COX-2 positive cells were found in rats submitted to cryolesion only, whereas COX-2 immunoexpression was lower in laser treated or ultrasound treated groups. In summary, this study reveals that both lasertherapy and ultrasound have positive effects on muscle repair in rats.

  7. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  8. Lenticule thickness readout for small incision lenticule extraction compared to artemis three-dimensional very high-frequency digital ultrasound stromal measurements.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the lenticule thickness readout for small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) with the VisuMax femtosecond laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Jena, Germany). Artemis very high-frequency digital ultrasound (ArcScan, Inc., Morrison, CO) measurements were obtained before and 3 months after SMILE in 70 eyes of 37 patients. The Artemis measured lenticule thickness was calculated as the maximum difference in stromal thickness before and after treatment. Comparative statistics and linear regression analysis were performed between the VisuMax readout lenticule thickness and Artemis measured maximum stromal change. Central epithelial thickness was measured and a similar analysis was performed using corneal thickness. Variability of the data were compared to ablation depths for a matched group of eyes from a previously published LASIK population treated with the MEL80 excimer laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec). The mean maximum myopic meridian treated was -7.81 ± 2.33 diopters (range: -2.25 to -12.50 diopters). On average, the VisuMax readout lenticule depth was 8.2 ± 8.0 μm thicker (range: -8 to +29 μm) than the Artemis measured stromal change (P < .001). On average, central epithelial thickness was 15.0 ± 5.2 μm thicker (range: 5 to 30 μm) after the procedure. The VisuMax readout lenticule thickness was 23.2 ± 10.9 μm thicker (range: +5 to +49 μm) than the Artemis measured corneal thickness change. The R(2) of 0.868 for the SMILE group was higher than 0.738 for the LASIK group (P = .015). The accuracy of SMILE lenticule thickness was found to be higher than actual measured stromal thickness change; however, predictability for SMILE lenticule thickness appeared higher than predictability for excimer laser ablation depth. The VisuMax readout lenticule depth was found to be 8 μm thicker than the achieved stromal change. This can be partly explained by alignment errors between preoperative and postoperative scans. However, this appears to show some

  9. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  10. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  12. Efficacy of transvaginal ultrasound-guided twin reduction in the mare by embryonic or fetal stabbing compared with yolk sac or allantoic fluid aspiration.

    PubMed

    Journée, S L; de Ruijter-Villani, M; Hendriks, W K; Stout, T A E

    2013-09-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound-guided pregnancy reduction (TUGR) is a procedure described for the management of twins post-fixation in the horse. Success rates are often disappointing but are reported to be more favorable for bilaterally situated twins and when intervention takes place before day 35 of gestation. This study aimed to determine whether stabbing the embryo/fetus rather than aspirating conceptus fluids improved the likelihood of success, measured as the birth of a normal live singleton foal. Data from 103 TUGR interventions were analyzed by logistic regression analysis; method of treatment, relative conceptus location (i.e., uni- vs. bilateral), and stage of gestation were included as interdependent factors that potentially influence the outcome. Overall, 34/103 (33%) TUGR interventions resulted in a single live foal. There was no significant difference (P = 0.14) in the outcome between TUGR based on fetal stabbing (12/28: 42.9%) versus fluid aspiration (22/75: 29.3%). There was also no significant influence (P = 0.11) of the conceptuses being located unilaterally (19/65: 29.2%) versus bilaterally (15/38: 39.5%). However, TUGR was numerically more successful (P = 0.05) when performed ≤ Day 35 of gestation (21/53: 39.6%), as opposed to > Day 35 (13/50: 26%). Day 45 may represent an even more critical time point because only 2 out of 15 TUGRs (13.3%) performed beyond this day resulted in the birth of a live foal, compared with 11/35 (31.4%) performed between Days 36 and 45. Although the numbers are low, this suggests that TUGR is not the method of choice for reducing > Day 45 twins. Four pregnancy losses were recorded 1 to 7 months post-TUGR (4/38: 10.5%), and although it is tempting to attribute the losses to TUGR, this rate of late gestation pregnancy loss is normal. We conclude that TUGR by fetal stabbing does not offer significant advantages over fluid aspiration. However, TUGR should be performed before Day 35 of gestation and is considered primarily a

  13. Breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ueno, E

    1996-03-01

    In ultrasound, ultrasonic images are formed by means of echoes among tissues with different acoustic impedance. Acoustic impedance is the product of sound speed and bulk modulus. The bulk modulus expresses the elasticity of an object, and in the human body, the value is increased by conditions such as fibrosis and calcification. The sound speed is usually high in elastic tissues and low in water. In the body, it is lowest in the fatty tissue. Ultrasound echoes are strong on the surface of bones which are hard and have a high sound speed. In organs filled with air such as the lungs, the bulk modulus is low and the sound speed is extremely low at 340 m/s, which produce strong echoes (the sound speed in solid tissues is 1,530 m/s). Human tissue is constructed of units smaller than the ultrasonic beam, and it is necessary to understand back-scattering in order to understand the ultrasonic images of these tissues. When ultrasound passes through tissue, it is absorbed as thermal energy and attenuated. Fiber is a tissue with a high absorption and attenuation rate. When the rate increases, the posterior echoes are attenuated. However, in masses with a high water content such as cysts, the posterior echoes are accentuated. This phenomenon is an important, basic finding for determining the properties of tumors. Breast cancer can be classified into two types: stellate carcinoma and circumscribed carcinoma. Since stellate carcinoma is rich in fiber, the posterior echoes are attenuated or lacking. However, circumscribed carcinoma has a high cellularity and the posterior echoes are accentuated. The same tendency is also seen in benign tumors. In immature fibroadenomas, posterior echoes are accentuated, while in fibroadenomas with hyalinosis, the posterior echoes are attenuated. Therefore, if the fundamentals of this tissue characterization and the histological features are understood, reading of ultrasound becomes easy. Color Doppler has also been developed and has contributed

  14. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  15. Imaging characteristics of intraocular foreign bodies: a comparative study of plain film X-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Modjtahedi, Bobeck S; Rong, Andrew; Bobinski, Mathew; McGahan, John; Morse, Lawrence S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the imaging features of common intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs) and the ability to differentiate types of IOFBs. Four-mm IOFBs were inserted via through pars plana approach into cadaveric lamb eyes. Six metallic (aluminum, brass, copper, silver, steel, and lead) and seven nonmetallic (plastic [CF6 spectacle plastic and polyvinyl chloride pipe], glass [bottle glass and windshield glass], wood [dry and wet poplar], and stone [slate]) IOFBs were imaged using plain film x-ray, computed tomography scan, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (T1, T2, and gradient echo sequences). Plain film x-ray had limited ability to differentiate most IOFBs. Computed tomography findings can be divided into low attenuation objects (wood), moderate attenuation (CF6 spectacle plastic), high attenuation without surrounding artifact (polyvinyl chloride, slate, bottle glass, windshield glass, and aluminum), high attenuation with shadow artifact and minimal edge streak artifact (steel, brass, copper), and high attenuation with significant shadow artifact and prominent streak artifact (silver and lead). Density (in Hounsfield units) aided in differentiating the types of IOFBs. Gradient echo sequences on magnetic resonance imaging also held utility. Ultrasound images had considerable overlap in appearances. Imaging techniques can significantly aid in determining the IOFBs type, with computed tomography serving as the best initial modality. X-ray holds limited utility while ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are best reserved as adjunctive tests.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL LASER AND LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSILICATE(®) ON THE PROCESS OF BONE REPAIR IN THE RAT TIBIA.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Poliani de; Fernandes, Kelly Rosseti; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Pastor, Fabio Alexandre Casarin; Nonaka, Keico Okino; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2012-01-01

    Verify the effects of the association between Biosilicate® and ultrasound and, Biosilicate® and laser in bone consolidation process of rats, through the biomechanical and histological analysis. Forthy male rats were used. The animals were randomized into four groups (n=10): control group fracture no treated (CGF); group treated with Biosilicate® (BG); group treated with Biosilicate® and laser (BLG); group treated with Biosilicate® and ultrasound (BUG). The biomechanical analysis showed no significant difference among any groups after 14 days post-surgery. In the morphometric analysis, the control group showed moderate presence of new formed bone tissue inside the defects areas and the Biosilicate® group showed similar results. Despite those facts, the biomaterial osteogenic potential was demonstrated by the great amount of cells and bone tissue around the particles. Curiously, the Biosilicate® plus laser or ultrasound groups showed lower amounts of bone tissue deposition when compared with control fracture and Biosilicate® groups. The data from this study can conclude that Biosilicate® was able to accelerate and optimized the bone consolidation, through the modulation of the inflammatory process and the stimulation of new bone formation. However, when resources were associated, there are no positive results.

  17. Ultrasound Fracture Diagnosis in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Amponsah, David; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; vanHolsbeeck, Marnix

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This ground-based investigation accumulated high-level clinical evidence on the sensitivity and specificity of point of care ultrasound performed by expert and novice users for the rapid diagnosis of musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries. We developed preliminary educational methodologies to provide just-in-time training of novice users by creating multi-media training tools and imaging procedures for non expert operators and evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of non-expert performed musculoskeletal ultrasound to diagnose acute injuries in a Level 1 Trauma Center. Methods: Patients with potential MSK injuries were identified in the emergency room. A focused MSK ultrasound was performed by expert operators and compared to standard radiographs. A repeat examination was performed by non-expert operators who received a short, just-in-time multimedia education aid. The sensitivity and specificity of the expert and novice ultrasound examinations were compared to gold standard radiography. Results: Over 800 patients were enrolled in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of expert performed ultrasound exceeded 98% for MSK injuries. Novice operators achieved 97% sensitivity and 99% specificity for targeted examinations with the greatest error in fractures involving the hand and foot. Conclusion: Point of care ultrasound is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for MSK injury when performed by experts and just-in-time trained novice operators.

  18. Ultrasound-guided subacromial injections of sodium hyaluronate for the management of rotator cuff tendinopathy: a prospective comparative study with rehabilitation therapy.

    PubMed

    Merolla, G; Bianchi, P; Porcellini, G

    2013-06-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy is a common cause of pain and shoulder dysfunction. The literature evidence suggests that a combination of overuse and extrinsic compression may induce chronic RC tendinopathy. Aim of the current study was to compare the results of subacromial sodium hyaluronate injections with rehabilitation therapy. We enrolled 48 patients (M/F: 26/22; mean age: 50 years; shoulder right/left: 29/19) with persistent shoulder pain for at least 4 months. Exclusion criteria were as follows: RC tear, calcifying tendinitis, glenohumeral instability, osteoarthritis, rheumatic diseases, physical therapy and/or injection in the previous 4 months, shoulder surgery, anesthetic nerve block, trauma, and severe medical diseases. The included subjects received either two ultrasound-guided subacromial hyaluronic acid (HA) injections (25 patients, HA group) at baseline and 14 days, or underwent rehabilitation therapy (23 patients, Physio group) including active shoulder mobilization, soft tissue stretching and humeral head positioner and propeller muscles strengthening for 30 days (3 sessions every week). Clinical assessment of shoulder function was performed with visual analog scale score for pain (0-100), Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), and Constant-Murley Score (CS). Overall, patients were examined at baseline, week 2, week 4, week 12, and week 24. Statistical significance was set at 5 % (p < 0.05). Reduction in overall pain in the HA group was statistically significant at week 2 (p < 0.05) week 4 (p < 0.05), week 12 comparing to baseline. Similarly, pain subscores (at night and with activity) were significantly lower at week 2 (p < 0.05), week 4 (p < 0.05), and week 12 (p < 0.05), respectively. In the Physio group, pain decreased significantly at week 2 (p < 0.05) but not maintained at week 4 (p > 0.05), week 12 (p > 0.05), and week 24 (p > 0.05). CS and OSS in the HA group increased significantly at week 2 (p < 0.05), week 4 (p < 0

  19. Towards Dynamic Contrast Specific Ultrasound Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    We report on the first study demonstrating the ability of a recently-developed, contrast-enhanced, ultrasound imaging method, referred to as cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI), to image and quantify ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) kinetics. Unlike standard ultrasound tomography, which exploits changes in speed of sound and attenuation, CPDI is based on a marker specific to UCAs, thus enabling dynamic contrast-specific ultrasound tomography (DCS-UST). For breast imaging, DCS-UST will lead to a more practical, faster, and less operator-dependent imaging procedure compared to standard echo-contrast, while preserving accurate imaging of contrast kinetics. Moreover, a linear relation between CPD values and ultrasound second-harmonic intensity was measured (coefficient of determination = 0.87). DCS-UST can find clinical applications as a diagnostic method for breast cancer localization, adding important features to multi-parametric ultrasound tomography of the breast.

  20. Towards Dynamic Contrast Specific Ultrasound Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demi, Libertario; Van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first study demonstrating the ability of a recently-developed, contrast-enhanced, ultrasound imaging method, referred to as cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI), to image and quantify ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) kinetics. Unlike standard ultrasound tomography, which exploits changes in speed of sound and attenuation, CPDI is based on a marker specific to UCAs, thus enabling dynamic contrast-specific ultrasound tomography (DCS-UST). For breast imaging, DCS-UST will lead to a more practical, faster, and less operator-dependent imaging procedure compared to standard echo-contrast, while preserving accurate imaging of contrast kinetics. Moreover, a linear relation between CPD values and ultrasound second-harmonic intensity was measured (coefficient of determination = 0.87). DCS-UST can find clinical applications as a diagnostic method for breast cancer localization, adding important features to multi-parametric ultrasound tomography of the breast. PMID:27703251

  1. Validation of an ultrasound-guided technique to establish a liver-to-coelom ratio and a comparative analysis of the ratios among acclimated and recently wild-caught southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana.

    PubMed

    Grant, Krystan R; Campbell, Terry W; Silver, Tawni I; Olea-Popelka, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, are a well-represented elasmobranch species in public aquaria and other facilities throughout the world. This study was conducted at a facility that experienced some mortality and replenished the collection with wild-caught stingrays. A common necropsy finding among the stingrays was a small, dark liver. The objectives of this study were to assess the reliability of an ultrasound-guided technique for establishing a liver-to-coelom ratio by calculating the approximate length of the liver with respect to the coelomic cavity length and then to compare ratios between acclimated captive and wild-caught stingrays. The ultrasound validation phase of the study measured the distance from the caudal margin of the liver to the pelvic cartilaginous girdle and compared it to the actual distance measured during the necropsy or surgery. There was no significant difference found between the ultrasound and actual distance measurements (P = 0.945). This technique was then used to establish liver-to-coelom ratios and compare two groups of stingrays, presumably under different metabolic states at different periods. Liver-to-coelom ratios were established during initial examinations as well as 8 months after cohabitation in a touch pool exhibit. There were significant differences in liver-to-coelom ratios between the two stingray groups at introduction (median difference = 30.9%, P = 0.007) and after 8 months (median difference = 20.5%, P = 0.008). There were also significant differences in the liver-to-coelom ratios within each group at introduction and at 8 months (acclimated group median difference = 20.4%, P = 0.018; wild-caught group median difference 31%, P = 0.008).

  2. A comparative analysis of analgesic efficacy of ultrasound and shock wave therapy in the treatment of patients with inflammation of the attachment of the plantar fascia in the course of calcaneal spurs.

    PubMed

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Wrona, Jacek; Sienkiewicz, Monika; Czernicki, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Troublesome heel spur is a nuisance condition that affects people of all ages. Treatment of patients with heel spur is a difficult and lengthy process requiring patience from both the patient and the therapist. Sometimes, the only and ultimate method of treatment is surgery, although spurs tend to recur. The aim of the study is a comparative analysis of the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound and shock wave therapy in patients with heel spur. The cause of pain in the course of calcaneal spur is inflammation of the attachment of the plantar fascia, which plays an important role in the process of walking and is seriously strained during different types of movement. Treatment of patients is a difficult and lengthy process. The study was conducted on a group of 47 patients of both sexes, aged 38-60 years (mean 51.3) with a plantar calcaneal spur confirmed by X-ray images. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups using a simple randomization: Group 1-ultrasound therapy group (a series of ten treatments) and Group 2-the radial shock wave group (series of four treatments). In all patients, pain intensity was assessed three times: before therapy, after the first and second weeks of treatment. A version of Laitinen's pain assessment questionnaire and the Huskisson visual analogue scale (VAS) were used. Of the group of studied respondents, 47 patients of both sexes and aged 38-60 years (mean age 51.3) with a heel spur (confirmed on X-rays), who had pain for at least a month, were randomly included in the study. The patients were classified into: Group 1-US therapeutic group (a series of ten treatments) and Group 2-with RSWT (a series of five treatments). Pain intensity was assessed three times: before the treatment, after the first and second week of the treatment with the application of the VAS and the Leitinen Pain Questionnaire. However, a decrease in pain sensation was reported in all test intervals, and its largest decrease occurred in both groups within 1

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ...

  4. [Ultrasound in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, F; Deltour, S; Petrovic, T

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed.

  5. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  6. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  7. Ultrasound in twin pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lucie; Lim, Kenneth

    2011-06-01

    technologies) should have first trimester ultrasound performed. (II-2A) 2. Every attempt should be made to determine and report amnionicity and chorionicity when a twin pregnancy is identified. (II-2A) 3. Although the accuracy in confirmation of gestational age at the first and second trimester is comparable, dating should be done with first trimester ultrasound. (II-2A) 4. Beyond the first trimester, it is suggested that a combination of parameters rather than a single parameter should be used to confirm gestational age. (II-2C) 5. When twin pregnancy is the result of in vitro fertilization, accurate determination of gestational age should be made from the date of embryo transfer. (II-1A) 6. There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation of which fetus (when discordant for size) to use to date a twin pregnancy. However, to avoid missing a situation of early intrauterine growth restriction in one twin, most experts agree that the clinician may consider dating pregnancy using the larger fetus. (III-C) 7. In twin pregnancies, aneuploidy screening using nuchal transluscency measurements should be offered. (II-2B) 8. Detailed ultrasound examination to screen for fetal anomalies should be offered, preferably between 18 and 22 weeks' gestation, in all twin pregnancies. (II-2B) 9. When ultrasound is used to screen for preterm birth in a twin gestation, endovaginal ultrasound measurement of the cervical length should be performed. (II-2A) 10. Increased fetal surveillance should be considered when there is either growth restriction diagnosed in one twin or significant growth discordance. (II-2A) 11. Umbilical artery Doppler should not be routinely offered in uncomplicated twin pregnancies. (I-E) 12. For defining oligohydramnios and polyhydramnios, the ultrasonographer should use the deepest vertical pocket in either sac: oligohydramnios when < 2 cm and polyhydramnios when > 8 cm. (II-2B).

  8. Ultrasound Imaging for Analyzing Lateral Tongue Movements during Mastication in Adults with Cerebral Palsy Compared with Adults without Oral Motor Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Lianne; Weijers, Gert; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Groen, Brenda E; de Korte, Chris L

    2015-06-01

    Described here is an ultrasound technique used to study tongue movements, particularly lateral tongue movements, during mastication. A method to analyze spatial and temporal tongue movements was developed, and the feasibility of using this method was evaluated. Biplane ultrasound images of tongue movements of four adults without oral motor disability and two adults with oral motor disability as a result of cerebral palsy, were acquired. Tongue movements were analyzed in the coronal and sagittal planes using B-mode and M-mode ultrasonography. Inter-rater and intra-rater agreement for manual tracing of tongue contours was good (ICC = 0.81 and 0.84, respectively). There were significant differences between the two adult groups in movement frequency in the horizontal direction in both coronal and sagittal planes. In the coronal plane, differences in movement frequency and range of vertical movement were detected. Data obtained from sagittal images, with the exception of vertical frequency, indicated no differences between the groups. The protocol developed in this study (using B-mode and M-mode) proved to be valid and reliable. By using this protocol with individuals with and without oral motor disability, we were able to illustrate the clinical application of our protocol to evaluation of differences in tongue movements during mastication.

  9. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  10. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated.

  11. Case Study Using Ultrasound to Treat /[turned r]/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modha, Geetanjalee; Bernhardt, B. May; Church, Robyn; Bacsfalvi, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound has shown promise as visual feedback in remediation of /[turned r]/.Aims: To compare treatment for [turned r] with and without ultrasound.Methods & Procedures: A Canadian English-speaking adolescent participated in a case study with a no treatment baseline, alternating treatment blocks with and without ultrasound and a…

  12. Case Study Using Ultrasound to Treat /[turned r]/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modha, Geetanjalee; Bernhardt, B. May; Church, Robyn; Bacsfalvi, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound has shown promise as visual feedback in remediation of /[turned r]/.Aims: To compare treatment for [turned r] with and without ultrasound.Methods & Procedures: A Canadian English-speaking adolescent participated in a case study with a no treatment baseline, alternating treatment blocks with and without ultrasound and a…

  13. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nirupama; Needles, Andrew; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionizing irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of preclinical and clinical ultrasound systems , the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. PMID:20541656

  14. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, N; Needles, A; Willmann, J K

    2010-07-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. Copyright 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  16. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound Annual, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

  18. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M.; Rogers, B; Walsh, N.

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  19. Breast Ultrasound: Indications and Findings.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Kathleen R

    2016-06-01

    Breast ultrasound is a widely used adjuvant to mammography for the detection of breast cancer. This chapter will review some of the basic ultrasound technical factors and techniques, describe findings on ultrasound with an emphasis on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System terminology, and present the indications for breast ultrasound. New innovations in breast ultrasound, such as elastography, ultrasound contrast, 3-dimensional, and automated whole-breast ultrasound, will be reviewed. Ultrasound-guided breast procedures are also presented.

  20. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    PubMed

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Open-label pilot study comparing quantitative ultrasound and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to assess corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grabe, Darren W; Chan, Marcia; Eisele, George

    2006-02-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) might be at high risk for bone disease. Decreased functional kidney mass contributes to renal osteodystrophy, which might be exacerbated by certain drug therapies. Long-term (> or = 6 months) corticosteroid treatment is commonly prescribed in patients with glomerular disease, possibly causing bone loss both indirectly and directly, putting the patient at increased risk for fracture. The dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the current "gold standard" for measuring osteoporosis-related fractures and works by passing ultrasound waves through bone to determine the structural anisotropy in the heel. This pilot study was designed to determine whether there is a correlation between DXA and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) in detecting corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. This open-label pilot study was conducted at the Medical Center Nephrology Clinic, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York. Female patients aged > or = 18 years with a diagnosis of CKD and/or a history of kidney transplantation and who were receiving long-term corticosteroid treatment were enrolled. Each patient served as her own control and underwent DXA of the hip and spine (DXA-hip and DXA-spine, respectively) and QUS of the dominant and nondominant heels (QUS-dominant and QUS-nondominant, respectively), within 1 week so that conditions were similar in each patient. Eight patients were included in the study (mean [SD] age, 50.2 [11.2] years). A positive correlation was found between DXA-hip and QUS-nondominant (r2=0.76; P=0.009); however, no correlation was found with DXA-spine. Similarly, a positive correlation was found between DXA-hip and QUS-dominant (r2=0.75; P=0.009), but no correlation with DXA-spine was found (r2=0.22). In this small, selected population, QUS showed a fair correlation with DXA-hip but no correlation with DXA-spine. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness in other populations.

  2. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  3. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  4. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  5. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  6. Clinical ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Hefny, Ashraf F; Corr, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the basic physics of ultrasound is essential for acute care physicians. Medical ultrasound machines generate and receive ultrasound waves. Brightness mode (B mode) is the basic mode that is usually used. Ultrasound waves are emitted from piezoelectric crystals of the ultrasound transducer. Depending on the acoustic impedance of different materials, which depends on their density, different grades of white and black images are produced. There are different methods that can control the quality of ultrasound waves including timing of ultrasound wave emission, frequency of waves, and size and curvature of the surface of the transducer. The received ultrasound signal can be amplified by increasing the gain. The operator should know sonographic artifacts which may distort the studied structures or even show unreal ones. The most common artifacts include shadow and enhancement artifacts, edge artifact, mirror artifact and reverberation artifact.

  7. Endobronchial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco; Fois, Flavio; Grosso, Daniele

    2003-01-01

    Complex technical problems interfered with the application of thoracic ultrasound (US) for studies and clinical research. Moreover, in contrast to radiologists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, internists, obstetricians, gynecologists and others, pulmonologists were not trained in the basics of US images. However, endoscopic US methods were developed in the last 20 years and these methods also provided important results for pulmonologists. As soon as the technical problems interfering with US application in air-containing spaces were solved, endobronchial US (EBUS) became a valuable technique as well. With EBUS, the delicate multilayer structure of the tracheobronchial wall can be analyzed. This knowledge became decisive for the management of early cancer in the central airways. These lesions can undergo local treatment instead of surgical intervention if the bronchial cartilage is intact and if the adjacent lymph nodes are not involved. EBUS proved valuable as well for the staging of more advanced lung cancer, especially with regard to endoluminal, intramural and extraluminal tumor spread. Endobronchial endosonographers are able to diagnose mediastinal lymph nodes similar to the experience of gastrointestinal endosonographers. EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improved the results of N-staging of lung cancer, especially in difficult lymph node levels without any clear endoscopic landmarks. The possibility of identifying N2 and N3 stages by means of a nonsurgical procedure can modify the management of lung cancer and decrease the number of unnecessary surgical interventions. EBUS can reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as thoracoscopy or mediastinoscopy. It is also useful for biopsying peripheral lesions or solitary pulmonary nodules instead of fluoroscopic guidance and also plays an important role in the strategy of interventional endoscopy.

  8. Comparative study between ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of axillary lymph nodes and sentinel lymph node histopathology in early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Coelho, Lívio Portela; Borges, Rafael Soares; Alencar, Airlane Pereira; Cardoso-Campos-Verdes, Larysse Maira; da Silva-Sampaio, João Paulo; Borges, Umbelina Soares; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique; da Silva, Benedito Borges

    2017-05-01

    The replacement of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-guided FNA) cytology of axillary lymph nodes is controversial, despite the simplicity and reduced cost of the latter. In the present study, US-guided FNA was performed in 27 patients with early-stage breast cancer for comparison with SNB. Data were analyzed by calculation of sample proportions. Tumor subtypes included invasive ductal carcinoma (85%), invasive lobular carcinoma (7%), and tubular and metaplastic carcinoma (4%). FNA had a sensitivity of 45%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 73%. Axillary lymph node cytology obtained by US guided-FNA in patients with breast cancer had a specificity similar to that of sentinel lymph node histopathology in the presence of axillary node metastases. However, when lymph node cytology is negative, it does not exclude the existence of metastatic implants, due to its low sensitivity in comparison to sentinel lymph node histopathology.

  9. Comparative study between ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of axillary lymph nodes and sentinel lymph node histopathology in early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Coelho, Lívio Portela; Borges, Rafael Soares; Alencar, Airlane Pereira; Cardoso-Campos-Verdes, Larysse Maira; da Silva-Sampaio, João Paulo; Borges, Umbelina Soares; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique; da Silva, Benedito Borges

    2017-01-01

    The replacement of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-guided FNA) cytology of axillary lymph nodes is controversial, despite the simplicity and reduced cost of the latter. In the present study, US-guided FNA was performed in 27 patients with early-stage breast cancer for comparison with SNB. Data were analyzed by calculation of sample proportions. Tumor subtypes included invasive ductal carcinoma (85%), invasive lobular carcinoma (7%), and tubular and metaplastic carcinoma (4%). FNA had a sensitivity of 45%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 73%. Axillary lymph node cytology obtained by US guided-FNA in patients with breast cancer had a specificity similar to that of sentinel lymph node histopathology in the presence of axillary node metastases. However, when lymph node cytology is negative, it does not exclude the existence of metastatic implants, due to its low sensitivity in comparison to sentinel lymph node histopathology. PMID:28521436

  10. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Efficacy Evaluation after Hepatocellular Carcinoma Radiofrequency Ablation: A Comparative Study with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohong; Luo, Liangping; Chen, Jiexin; Wang, Jiexin; Zhou, Honglian; Li, Mingyi; Jin, Zhanqiang; Chen, Nianping; Miao, Huilai; Lin, Manzhou; Dai, Wei; Ahuja, Anil T.; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To explore acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in assessing residual tumors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and Methods. There were 83 HCC lesions among 72 patients. All patients were examined with ARFI, contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), and CT or MRI. Tumor brightness on virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and shear wave velocity (SWV) were assessed before and approximately one month after RFA. Results. There were 14 residual tumors after RFA. VTI showed that all the tumors were darker after RFA. VTI was not able to distinguish the ablated lesions and the residual tumors. 13 residual tumor lesions were detected by CEUS. All completely ablated nodules had SWV demonstration of x.xx., while with those residual nodules, 6 tumors had x.xx measurement and 8 tumors had measurable SWV. nine lesions with residual tumors occurred in cirrhosis subjects and 5 lesions with residual tumors occurred in fibrosis subjects; there was no residual tumor in the normal liver subjects. Conclusion. VTI technique cannot demonstrate residual tumor post RFA. While SWV measurement of less than x.xx is likely associated with residual tumors, measurement of less than x.xx cannot exclude residual tumors. Liver cirrhosis is associated with decreased chance of a complete ablation. PMID:24895624

  11. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  12. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  13. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Ultrasound: Abdomen KidsHealth > For Parents > Ultrasound: Abdomen Print A A A What's in this article? ... Child If You Have Questions en español Ultrasonido: abdomen What It Is An abdominal ultrasound is a ...

  14. Reliablity of measurements from ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Sarah M.; Frisch, Stefan A.

    2005-09-01

    As ultrasound imaging gains popularity in phonetic and speech science research, examining the reliability of measures taken from ultrasound images becomes important. This study assesses the reliability of hand measures of ultrasound data collected by graduate student researchers at the University of South Florida ultrasound imaging lab. Speech production data from two different experiments, ``Ultrasound analysis of velar fronting'' (Wodzinski, 2004) and ``Ultrasound study of errors in speech production'' [Frisch, (2003)] were analyzed by two different researchers to obtain inter-rater reliability measures. In addition, one data set was measured twice by the same researcher, once when inexperienced with ultrasound analysis and 7 months later after considerable experience had been gained. The study compared researcher's choice of image to analyze, the measures of the location of articulatory landmarks, and the measures used to quantify articulatory postures. Overall, hand measures of ultrasound images were found to be reliable. There were some differences in the absolute measures obtained, however, different researcher's measures of the same data led to the same conclusions about articulation. In addition, it was found that the measurements of different researchers became more similar to one another with experience.

  15. Synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S. H.; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Jayaranthe, Uditha L.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration allows for ultrasound images to be incorporated into a variety of interventional applica­ tions. Traditional Z- bar calibration procedures rely on wired phantoms with an a priori known geometry. The line fiducials produce small, localized echoes which are then segmented from an array of ultrasound images from different tracked probe positions. In conventional B-mode ultrasound, the wires at greater depths appear blurred and are difficult to segment accurately, limiting the accuracy of ultrasound calibration. This paper presents a novel ultrasound calibration procedure that takes advantage of synthetic aperture imaging to reconstruct high resolution ultrasound images at arbitrary depths. In these images, line fiducials are much more readily and accu­ rately segmented, leading to decreased calibration error. The proposed calibration technique is compared to one based on B-mode ultrasound. The fiducial localization error was improved from 0.21mm in conventional B-mode images to 0.15mm in synthetic aperture images corresponding to an improvement of 29%. This resulted in an overall reduction of calibration error from a target registration error of 2.00mm to 1.78mm, an improvement of 11%. Synthetic aperture images display greatly improved segmentation capabilities due to their improved resolution and interpretability resulting in improved calibration.

  16. Toward image analysis and decision support for ultrasound technology.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Gillian; Padman, Rema; Maharaja, Nisha

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is a low cost and efficient method of detecting diseases and abnormalities in the body. Yet there is a lack of precision and reliability associated with the technology, partly due to the operator dependent nature of ultrasound scanning. When scanning is performed to an agreed protocol, ultrasound has been shown to be highly reliable. This research aims to minimize these limitations that arise during ultrasound training, scanning and reporting by developing and evaluating an image analysis and decision support system that can aid the decision making process. We hypothesize that this intervention will likely increase the role of ultrasound in diagnosis when compared with other imaging technologies, particularly in low resource settings.

  17. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  18. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  19. A randomised controlled trial comparing use of lignocaine periprostatic nerve block alone and combined with diclofenac suppository for patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Wei Ling; Hawks, Cynthia; Tan, Andrew H H; Hayne, Dickon

    2014-11-01

    To examine whether or not the combination of diclofenac suppository with peri-prostatic nerve block (PPNB) was effective in reducing the degree of pain experienced during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy in a randomised single-blind placebo-controlled trial. In all, 96 patients having a planned TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were randomised into one of the following arms on a 1:1 basis: 10 mL 1% lignocaine PPNB and placebo suppository (control) or 10 mL 1% lignocaine PPNB and 100 mg diclofenac suppository (treatment). Pain scores were recorded using the Numerical Rating Scale for pain (0-10) at the following time-points: (i) introduction of probe, (ii) during biopsy, (iii) 1 h after biopsy, (iv) later that evening (≈6 h after biopsy) and (v) 1 day after biopsy. Patients were asked about their preferred method for pain control if a repeat TRUS-guided prostate biopsy was required: local anaesthetic (LA) again or intravenous sedation. There were no significant differences in age (P = 0.653) or PSA level (P = 0.584) between either study arm. The differences in pain scores between the control and treatment groups were not significant at Time 1 (probe insertion; P = 0.299), Time 2 (biopsy; P = 0.983), Time 4 (evening after; P = 0.231) and Time 5 (1 day after biopsy; P = 0.384). At Time 3 (1 h after biopsy), the control pain scale scores were statistically significantly higher than the treatment pain scale scores (P = 0.044). There was no difference between treatment (87%) and control (80%) groups as to whether they would prefer to repeat the biopsy under LA (P = 0.373). The use of a diclofenac suppository with PPNB did not show any clinically meaningful effect in decreasing pain or improving tolerability of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and is not recommended. PPNB TRUS-guided biopsy is extremely well tolerated, with >80% of patients electing for subsequent LA biopsy if required. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU

  20. Impact of ultrasound video transfer on the practice of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Grant, Edward G.; Valentino, Daniel J.; Rahbar, Darius; Kiszonas, Mike; Franco, Ricky; Melany, Michelle; Narin, Sherelle L.; Ragavendra, Nagesh

    1996-05-01

    Sonography can be highly dependent on real-time imaging and as such is highly physician intensive. Such situations arise mostly during complicated ultrasound radiology studies or echocardiology examinations. Under those circumstances it would be of benefit to transmit real-time images beyond the immediate area of the ultrasound laboratory when a physician is not on location. We undertook this study to determine if both static and dynamic image transfer to remote locations might be accomplished using an ultrafast ATM network and PACS. Image management of the local image files was performed by a commercial PACS from AGFA corporation. The local network was Ethernet based, and the global network was based on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM, rates up to 100 Mbits/sec). Real-time image transfer involved two teaching hospitals, one of which had 2 separate ultrasound facilities. Radiologists consulted with technologists via telephone while the examinations were being performed. The applications of ATM network providing real time video for ultrasound imaging in a clinical environment and its potential impact on health delivery and clinical teaching. This technology increased technologist and physician productivity due to the elimination of commute time for physicians and waiting time for technologists and patients. Physician confidence in diagnosis increased compared to reviewing static images alone. This system provided instant access for radiologists to real-time scans from remote sites. Image quality and frame rate were equivalent to the original. The system increased productivity by allowing physicians to monitor studies at multiple sites simultaneously.

  1. Characterisation of gene delivery using liposomal bubbles and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshima, Risa; Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Hirata, Keiichi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Negishi, Yoichi; Utoguchi, Naoki; Kudo, Nobuki; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    The combination of nano/microbubbles and ultrasound is a novel technique for a non-viral gene deliver. We have previously developed novel ultrasound sensitive liposomes (Bubble liposomes) which contain the ultrasound imaging gas perfluoropropane. In this study, Bubble liposomes were compared with cationic lipid (CL)-DNA complexes as potential gene delivery carriers into tumors in vivo. The delivery of genes by bubble liposomes depended on the intensity of the applied ultrasound. The transfection efficiency plateaued at 0.7 W/cm2 ultrasound intensity. Bubble liposomes efficiently transferred genes into cultured cells even when the cells were exposed to ultrasound for only 1 s. In addition, bubble liposomes were able to introduce the luciferase gene more effectively than CL-DNA complexes into mouse ascites tumor cells. We conclude that the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound is a good method for gene transfer in vivo.

  2. Ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction method for simultaneous determination of anethole, estragole, and para-anisaldehyde in different plant extracts and human urine: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Haji-Esfandiari, Sudabeh; Barfi, Behruz; Ghanbari, Hanieh

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the performances of four ionic-liquid-based microextraction methods, ionic-liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME), ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (IL-USA-ME), temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (TC-IL-DLME), and ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (USA-TC-IL-DLME), were investigated for extraction of three bioactive compounds (anethole, estragole, and anisaldehyde) from different plant extracts and human urine. Anethole and estragole were chosen because they can alter cellular processes positively or negatively, and an efficient method is needed for their extraction and sensitive determination in the samples mentioned. Because there is no previous report on the separation of anethole and estragole (structural isomers), first, simultaneous gradient elution and flow programming were used. The microextraction methods were then applied and compared for analysis of these compounds in plant extracts and human urine by use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effect of conditions on extraction efficiency was studied and under the optimum conditions, the best enrichment factors (58-64), limits of detection (14-18 ng mL(-1)), limits of quantification (47-60 ng mL(-1)), and recovery (94.4-101.7 %) were obtained by use of USA-TC-IL-DLME. The optimized conditions were used to determine anethole, estragole, and para-anisaldehyde in fennel, anise, and tarragon extracts and in human urine.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial To Assess and Compare the Outcomes of Two-core Prostate Biopsy Guided by Fused Magnetic Resonance and Transrectal Ultrasound Images and Traditional 12-core Systematic Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Baco, Eduard; Rud, Erik; Eri, Lars Magne; Moen, Gunnar; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Svindland, Aud; Eggesbø, Heidi B; Ukimura, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Prostate biopsy guided by computer-assisted fusion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images (MRI group) has not yet been compared with 12-core random biopsy (RB; control group) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). To compare the rate of detection of clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) between the two groups. This RCT included 175 biopsy-naïve patients with suspicion for prostate cancer, randomized to an MRI group (n=86) and a control group (n=89) between September 2011 and June 2013. In the MRI group, two-core targeted biopsy (TB) guided by computer-assisted fusion of MRI/TRUS images of MRI-suspicious lesions was followed by 12-core RB. In the control group, both two-core TB for abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) and/or TRUS-suspicious lesions and 12-core RB were performed. In patients with normal MRI or DRE/TRUS, only 12-core RB was performed. The detection rates for any cancer and csPCa were compared between the two groups and between TB and RB. Detection rates for any cancer (MRI group 51/86, 59%; control group 48/89, 54%; p=0.4) and csPCa (38/86, 44% vs 44/89, 49%; p=0.5) did not significantly differ between the groups. Detection of csPCa was comparable between two-core MRI/TRUS-TB (33/86, 38%) and 12-core RB in the control group (44/89, 49%; p=0.2). In a subset analysis of patients with normal DRE, csPCa detection was similar between two-core MRI/TRUS-TB (14/66, 21%) and 12-core RB in the control group (15/60, 25%; p=0.7). Among biopsy-proven csPCas in MRI group, 87% (33/38) were detected by MRI/TRUS-TB. The definition of csPCa was only based on biopsy outcomes. Overall csPCa detection was similar between the MRI and control groups. Two-core MRI/TRUS-TB was comparable to 12-core RB for csPCa detection. Our randomized controlled trial revealed a similar rate of prostate cancer detection between targeted biopsy guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and 12-core random

  4. Endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopy as a reliable tool for in vivo assessment of colonic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    de Britto, Marcelo Alexandre Pinto; Soletti, Rossana Colla; Schanaider, Alberto; Madi, Kalil; de Souza, Heitor Siffert Pereira; Machado, João Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) imaging of the colon is an important diagnostic tool for early neoplasia, although usually restricted to the rectum in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study aimed to evaluate the ability of an endoluminal ultrasound biomicroscopic (eUBM) system to detect and characterize lesions simulating Crohn's disease in the colon of rats in vivo. Colitis was induced with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid instillated in the distal colon. Eighteen Wistar rats were submitted to eUBM in three time points: week 1 group (18 animals examined on day 3 after colitis induction), week 2 group (12 animals on days 3 and 10), and week 3 group (7 animals on days 3, 10, and 17). This design yielded distinct inflammation intensities. Three untreated rats were used for acquisition of control images. Scores were used for comparison with histology. Scores for eUBM and histology in the different moments of examination achieved a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.87 (p < 0.001). Findings of wall thickening presented positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of 94 and of 100 %, respectively. Superficial and deep ulcers presented a PPV of 89 and 80 %, respectively, and negative predictive values of 100 and 85 %, respectively. Accurate detection and analysis of the lesions was achieved. The model is essential for the clinical development of the technique and a reproducible method for the evaluation of experimental colitis. eUBM might be applicable in different segments of the gut, developing into a novel adjunct method for IBD evaluation.

  5. Breast ultrasound image segmentation: a survey.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinghua; Luo, Yaozhong; Zhang, Qiangzhi

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women worldwide. Ultrasound imaging is one of the most frequently used diagnostic tools to detect and classify abnormalities of the breast. Recently, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems using ultrasound images have been developed to help radiologists to increase diagnosis accuracy. However, accurate ultrasound image segmentation remains a challenging problem due to various ultrasound artifacts. In this paper, we investigate approaches developed for breast ultrasound (BUS) image segmentation. In this paper, we reviewed the literature on the segmentation of BUS images according to the techniques adopted, especially over the past 10 years. By dividing into seven classes (i.e., thresholding-based, clustering-based, watershed-based, graph-based, active contour model, Markov random field and neural network), we have introduced corresponding techniques and representative papers accordingly. We have summarized and compared many techniques on BUS image segmentation and found that all these techniques have their own pros and cons. However, BUS image segmentation is still an open and challenging problem due to various ultrasound artifacts introduced in the process of imaging, including high speckle noise, low contrast, blurry boundaries, low signal-to-noise ratio and intensity inhomogeneity CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of the approaches developed for segmentation of BUS images. With most techniques involved, this paper will be useful and helpful for researchers working on segmentation of ultrasound images, and for BUS CAD system developers.

  6. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Intravascular ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaye, D.M.; White, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This book will give vascular surgeons, cardiologists, radiologists, and technologists a complete working knowledge of intravascular ultrasound imaging and the crucial role of this new technology in endovascular diagnosis and therapy. The book reviews the essential principles of vascular pathology and ultrasound imaging and then provides state-of-the-art information on intraluminal ultrasound imaging devices and techniques, including practical guidelines for using catheters, optimizing image quality, and avoiding artifacts. Image interpretation and computerized image reconstruction are also discussed in detail. The first section explains the diagnostic, therapeutic, and experimental applications of intravascular ultrasound, particularly as a adjunct to angioplasty and other current interventional procedures.

  9. [Lung ultrasound for diagnosis of neonatal atelectasis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Ying; Wang, Hua-wei; Li, Jing-ya; Han, Tao; Liang, Jing; Yang, Chang-shuan; Xing, Meng; Feng, Zhi-chun

    2013-09-01

    The diagnosis of neonatal atelectasis (NA) is usually based on clinical manifestations and chest X-rays, lung ultrasounds are not included in the diagnostic work-up of NA.Recently, ultrasounds have been used extensively and successfully in the diagnosis of many kinds of lung diseases, but few studies have addressed NA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound imaging features of NA-and to evaluate the value of lung ultrasound in diagnosing NA. From May, 2012 to June, 2013, 40 newborn infants with NA and another 40 neonates without lung disease were enrolled into this study.Lung ultrasound was performed at the bedside by a single expert physician.In a quiet state, the infants were positioned in supine, side or prone postures. The lung field was divided into three areas by the anterior auxilary and posterior auxilary line. The regions of the bilateral lungs were scanned by the probe which was vertical or parallel with the ribs, then compared the results with conventional chest X-ray findings. (1) The main ultrasound imaging features of neonatal NA include lung consolidation with air bronchograms, pleural line abnormalities and A-line disappearance. Besides, lung pulse and lung sliding disappearance could be seen by real-time ultrasound. (2) The sensitivity of lung ultrasound for diagnosis of NA was 100%, while it was only 70% for conventional chest X-rays. Use of ultrasound to diagnose NA is accurate and reliable, the sensitivity was superior to that of conventional chest X-ray examination, which also has many other advantages including easy-operating, non-ionizing, can be performed at the bedside, therefore, ultrasonic can provide important value for clinicians.

  10. Accelerated heavy ions and the lens. IV. Biomicroscopic and cytopathological analyses of the lenses of mice irradiated with 600 MeV/amu sup 56 Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E. )

    1989-11-01

    The lenses of mice exposed to 600 MeV/amu iron ions were evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and cytopathological analyses. The doses ranged from 0.05 to 1.6 Gy, and the lenses were assessed at several intervals postirradiation. Cataract, the development of which is dependent on both time and dose, is significantly more advanced in all of the exposed mice when compared to the unirradiated controls. The great difference between the severity of the cataracts caused by 0.05 Gy (the lowest dose used) and those that developed spontaneously in the control animals is an indication that 0.05 Gy may far exceed the threshold dose for the production of cataracts by accelerated iron ions. Cytopathologically, a similar dose dependence was observed for a number of end points including micronucleation, interphase death, and meridional row disorganization. In addition the exposure to the 56Fe ions produced a long-term effect on the mitotic population and a pronounced focal loss of epithelial cytoarchitecture. The microscopic changes support the view that the mechanism of heavy-ion-induced cataractogenesis is the same as that for cataracts caused by low-LET radiation.

  11. An ultrasound speckle tracking (two-dimensional strain) analysis of myocardial deformation in professional soccer players compared with healthy subjects and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Richand, Viviane; Lafitte, Stéphane; Reant, Patricia; Serri, Karim; Lafitte, Marianne; Brette, Stephanie; Kerouani, Akem; Chalabi, Hakim; Dos Santos, Pierre; Douard, Herve; Roudaut, Raymond

    2007-07-01

    Deformation analysis using 2-dimensional strain echocardiography can detect early systolic function abnormalities in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. This study was designed to characterize global and regional myocardial deformation using 2-dimensional strain in professional soccer players (PSPs) compared with control subjects and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Twenty nine PSPs, 26 patients with HC, and 17 controls were investigated at rest using transthoracic echocardiography with 2-dimensional strain analysis. Radial and transverse strains were significantly higher in PSPs compared with controls, whereas longitudinal strain was lower. Compared with patients with HC, athletes had higher values for transverse, radial, and circumferential strains. In pathologic hypertrophic segments, longitudinal strain was lower in patients with HC than in PSPs. In conclusion, 2-dimensional strain can identify specific patterns of myocardial deformation in PSPs, controls, and patients with HC. It has the potential to become a routinely used method for the differentiation of athlete's heart and HC.

  12. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Quantitative ultrasound of denervated hand muscles.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Ralph, Jeffrey W; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Poncelet, Ann N; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kliot, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Presentations to the neuromuscular clinic commonly involve hand muscle denervation, but few studies have evaluated hand muscle ultrasound. Ultrasound studies of abductor pollicis brevis, first dorsal interosseous, and abductor digit minimi were prospectively performed in a cohort of 34 patients (77 muscles) with electromyography (EMG)-confirmed denervation, compared with 58 healthy control subjects. In control subjects, muscle thickness was highly reproducible [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.88-0.98], and echogenicity was moderately reproducible (ICC = 0.542-0.686). Age, gender, and body mass index influenced muscle thickness and echogenicity. Ultrasound changes in denervated muscles correlated with the severity of EMG abnormalities. A z-score cutoff of 0 identified denervated muscles with a sensitivity of 100% and 89% for echogenicity and muscle thickness, respectively. Hand muscle ultrasound provides a noninvasive method to quantify muscle denervation and may be useful as a screening tool before EMG studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ultrasound elastography: principles, techniques, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dewall, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an emerging set of imaging modalities used to image tissue elasticity and are often referred to as virtual palpation. These techniques have proven effective in detecting and assessing many different pathologies, because tissue mechanical changes often correlate with tissue pathological changes. This article reviews the principles of ultrasound elastography, many of the ultrasound-based techniques, and popular clinical applications. Originally, elastography was a technique that imaged tissue strain by comparing pre- and postcompression ultrasound images. However, new techniques have been developed that use different excitation methods such as external vibration or acoustic radiation force. Some techniques track transient phenomena such as shear waves to quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Clinical use of elastography is increasing, with applications including lesion detection and classification, fibrosis staging, treatment monitoring, vascular imaging, and musculoskeletal applications.

  15. Pocket-sized versus standard ultrasound machines in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tse, K H; Luk, W H; Lam, M C

    2014-06-01

    The pocket-sized ultrasound machine has emerged as an invaluable tool for quick assessment in emergency and general practice settings. It is suitable for instant and quick assessment in cardiac imaging. However, its applicability in the imaging of other body parts has yet to be established. In this pictorial review, we compared the performance of the pocketsized ultrasound machine against the standard ultrasound machine for its image quality in common abdominal pathology.

  16. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Oz, Nilgün Ayman Yarimtepe, Canan Can

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  17. Seven-site versus three-site method of body composition using BodyMetrix ultrasound compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Baranauskas, Marissa N; Johnson, Kelly E; Juvancic-Heltzel, Judith A; Kappler, Rachele M; Richardson, Laura; Jamieson, Scott; Otterstetter, Ronald

    2015-10-22

    Obesity is a steadily growing epidemic affecting all segments of the population including college-aged students. The weight gain that is evidenced amid the transitional stage of college years increases the risks associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The BodyMetrix® BX-2000 (ULTRA) using a seven-site method has been evaluated against dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for estimation of body composition, which has yielded conflicting results. To date, no studies have compared the three-site method Jackson and Pollock three-site method to DXA.

  18. Assisted ultrasound applications for the production of safe foods.

    PubMed

    Sango, D M; Abela, D; McElhatton, A; Valdramidis, V P

    2014-05-01

    Ultrasound requires high power and longer treatment times to inactivate micro-organisms when compared to ultrasound combined with other technologies. Previous reports have shown that the effectiveness of ultrasound as a decontamination technology can be increased by combining it with another treatment such as pressure, heat and antimicrobial solutions. Assisted ultrasound, the combination of ultrasound with another technology, is more energy efficient, and it has less impact on the food properties. In this review paper, the power ultrasound antimicrobial mechanisms of action, the antimicrobial effects of ultrasound in combination with other physical processes and antimicrobial solutions are comprehensively discussed. Furthermore, the present interest on using these technologies as alternative processing and decontamination methods is presented. Research outputs on the application of ultrasound combined with physical processes are showcased including applications of thermosonication, manosonication, manothermosonication and osmosonication. Antimicrobial efficacy, energy requirements and optimal operation conditions of the different assisted ultrasound technologies are critically discussed, and their impact on the food industry for future applications is presented. Overall, this review paper highlights the importance and recent developments of assisted ultrasound for enhancing food safety. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Ultrasound processed nanoemulsion: A comparative approach between resveratrol and resveratrol cyclodextrin inclusion complex to study its binding interactions, antioxidant activity and UV light stability.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Kaur, Khushwinder; Uppal, Shivani; Mehta, S K

    2017-07-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring therapeutic molecule used for treatment of diseases caused by oxidative stress. This investigation elucidates the advantages of fabrication of size controlled resveratrol inclusion complex. This has been done by encapsulating resveratrol-cyclodextrin inclusion complex in a phospholipid stabilized nanoemulsion formulated by ultrasonication emulsification method. The prepared nanoemulsion has been compared with resveratrol encapsulated nanoemulsion system. The morphology of the resveratrol nanoemulsion and inclusion complex nanoemulsion have been observed using transmission electron microscopy with average size 20.41±3.41 and 24.48±5.70nm respectively. The nanoemulsion showed good loading and release efficiency. The radical diminishing potential of resveratrol and its inclusion complex has been compared in nanoemulsion. The effect of UV irradiation (365nm) on resveratrol in different solvent systems (ethanol, water and nanoemulsion) indicated that nanoemulsion prevents degradation of resveratrol. Efforts have also been made to explore the interactions between bovine serum albumin and resveratrol in nanoemulsion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Melissa; Bricker, Leanne; Neilson, James P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic ultrasound is a sophisticated electronic technology, which utilises pulses of high frequency sound to produce an image. Diagnostic ultrasound examination may be employed in a variety of specific circumstances during pregnancy such as after clinical complications, or where there are concerns about fetal growth. Because adverse outcomes may also occur in pregnancies without clear risk factors, assumptions have been made that routine ultrasound in all pregnancies will prove beneficial by enabling earlier detection and improved management of pregnancy complications. Routine screening may be planned for early pregnancy, late gestation, or both. The focus of this review is routine early pregnancy ultrasound. Objectives To assess whether routine early pregnancy ultrasound for fetal assessment (i.e. its use as a screening technique) influences the diagnosis of fetal malformations, multiple pregnancies, the rate of clinical interventions, and the incidence of adverse fetal outcome when compared with the selective use of early pregnancy ultrasound (for specific indications). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009). Selection criteria Published, unpublished, and ongoing randomised controlled trials that compared outcomes in women who experienced routine versus selective early pregnancy ultrasound (i.e. less than 24 weeks’ gestation). We have included quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data for each included study. We used the Review Manager software to enter and analyse data. Main results Routine/revealed ultrasound versus selective ultrasound/concealed: 11 trials including 37505 women. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy reduces the failure to detect multiple pregnancy by 24 weeks’ gestation (risk ratio (RR) 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.17). Routine scan is associated with a reduction in

  1. Nonlinear acoustics in diagnostic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis A

    2002-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic waves is nonlinear. Phenomena associated with the propagation of diagnostic ultrasound pulses cannot be predicted using linear assumptions alone. These include a progressive distortion in waveform, the generation of frequency harmonics and acoustic shocks, excess deposition of energy and acoustic saturation. These effects occur most strongly when ultrasound propagates within liquids with comparatively low acoustic attenuation, such as water, amniotic fluid or urine. Within soft tissues, similar effects occur, although they are limited by absorption and scattering. Nonlinear effects are of considerable importance during acoustic measurements, especially when these are used to predict in situ exposure. Harmonic generation may be used to create images. These offer improvements over conventional B-mode images in spatial resolution and, more significantly, in the suppression of acoustic clutter and side-lobe artifacts. B/A has promise as a parameter for tissue characterisation, but methods for imaging B/A have shown limited success.

  2. A novel de-noising method for B ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Da-Yong; Mo, Jia-qing; Yu, Yin-Feng; Lv, Xiao-Yi; Yu, Xiao; Jia, Zhen-Hong

    2015-12-01

    B ultrasound as a kind of ultrasonic imaging, which has become the indispensable diagnosis method in clinical medicine. However, the presence of speckle noise in ultrasound image greatly reduces the image quality and interferes with the accuracy of the diagnosis. Therefore, how to construct a method which can eliminate the speckle noise effectively, and at the same time keep the image details effectively is the research target of the current ultrasonic image de-noising. This paper is intended to remove the inherent speckle noise of B ultrasound image. The novel algorithm proposed is based on both wavelet transformation of B ultrasound images and data fusion of B ultrasound images, with a smaller mean squared error (MSE) and greater signal to noise ratio (SNR) compared with other algorithms. The results of this study can effectively remove speckle noise from B ultrasound images, and can well preserved the details and edge information which will produce better visual effects.

  3. ULTRASOUND INCREASES THE RATE OF BACTERIAL CELL GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.; Ross, S. Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound was employed to increase the growth rate of bacterial cells attached to surfaces. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli cells adhered to and grew on a polyethylene surface in the presence of ultrasound. It was found that low frequency ultrasound (70 kHz) of low acoustic intensity (<2 W/cm2) increased the growth rate of the cells compared to growth without ultrasound. However, at high intensity levels, cells were partially removed from the surface. Ultrasound also enhanced planktonic growth of S. epidermidis and other planktonic bacteria. It is hypothesized that ultrasound increases the rate of transport of oxygen and nutrients to the cells and increases the rate of transport of waste products away from the cells, thus enhancing their growth. PMID:12790676

  4. Xylanase and ultrasound assisted pulping of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Dedhia, Bhavin S; Csoka, Levente; Rathod, Virendra K

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, a novel approach to pretreat wheat straw pulping was investigated with ultrasound and xylanase to achieve maximum reduction in lignin content. Sequential xylanase pretreatment and alkaline pulping was found to reduce kappa number by 0.31 to 4.84 % compared with only alkaline pulping alone at different pulping conditions. Although Klason lignin of ultrasound-treated straw was found to be 7.37 % less compared with untreated straw, sequential ultrasound pretreatment and alkaline pulping could not show any significant reduction in kappa number compared with alkaline pulping alone. Also, sequential xylanase and ultrasound pretreatment could not show any significant reduction in kappa number. Total yield of the pulp was found to be less in ultrasound-assisted processing compared with both alkaline pulping alone and sequential xylanase pretreatment and alkaline pulping.

  5. Simplified stereo-optical ultrasound plane calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoßbach, Martin; Noll, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Image guided therapy is a natural concept and commonly used in medicine. In anesthesia, a common task is the injection of an anesthetic close to a nerve under freehand ultrasound guidance. Several guidance systems exist using electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound probe as well as the needle, providing the physician with a precise projection of the needle into the ultrasound image. This, however, requires additional expensive devices. We suggest using optical tracking with miniature cameras attached to a 2D ultrasound probe to achieve a higher acceptance among physicians. The purpose of this paper is to present an intuitive method to calibrate freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems employing a rigid stereo camera system. State of the art methods are based on a complex series of error prone coordinate system transformations which makes them susceptible to error accumulation. By reducing the amount of calibration steps to a single calibration procedure we provide a calibration method that is equivalent, yet not prone to error accumulation. It requires a linear calibration object and is validated on three datasets utilizing di erent calibration objects: a 6mm metal bar and a 1:25mm biopsy needle were used for experiments. Compared to existing calibration methods for freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems, we are able to achieve higher accuracy results while additionally reducing the overall calibration complexity. Ke

  6. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Schoellhammer, Carl M; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M; Brugge, William R; Anderson, Daniel G; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-21

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M.; Brugge, William R.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26491078

  8. Anterior capsule cleaning with an ultrasound irrigating scratcher.

    PubMed

    Meucci, G; Esente, S; Esente, I

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasound anterior capsule cleaning was performed in 22 intercapsular cataract extraction cases. These eyes were compared with 24 others which had the intercapsular procedure performed by the same surgeon without ultrasound capsule cleaning. Eyes were randomly assigned to one procedure from a group of 62 cataract patients. Histologic specimens of the anterior capsule flap removed from the optical zone at the end of the procedure were examined. The anterior capsules cleaned by ultrasound appeared more transparent, without residual lens fibers with fewer epithelial cells. Ultrasound cleaning seems effective in preventing anterior capsular fibrosis and opacification.

  9. Ultrasound in regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J; Nicholls, B

    2010-04-01

    Ultrasound guidance is rapidly becoming the gold standard for regional anaesthesia. There is an ever growing weight of evidence, matched with improving technology, to show that the use of ultrasound has significant benefits over conventional techniques, such as nerve stimulation and loss of resistance. The improved safety and efficacy that ultrasound brings to regional anaesthesia will help promote its use and realise the benefits that regional anaesthesia has over general anaesthesia, such as decreased morbidity and mortality, superior postoperative analgesia, cost-effectiveness, decreased postoperative complications and an improved postoperative course. In this review we consider the evidence behind the improved safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia, before discussing its use in pain medicine, paediatrics and in the facilitation of neuraxial blockade. The Achilles' heel of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia is that anaesthetists are far more familiar with providing general anaesthesia, which in most cases requires skills that are achieved faster and more reliably. To this ends we go on to provide practical advice on ultrasound-guided techniques and the introduction of ultrasound into a department.

  10. Frequency and number of B-lines using a regionally based lung ultrasound examination in cats with radiographically normal lungs compared to cats with left-sided congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lisciandro, Gregory R; Fulton, Robert M; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Mann, Kelly A

    2017-09-01

    To establish a baseline lung ultrasound (LUS) artifact profile using a regionally based protocol in cats without clinical signs of respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lungs compared to a cohort of cats with left-sided congestive heart failure (CHF). Prospective case series. Forty-nine cats without clinical signs of respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lungs and 7 cats with radiographic evidence of left-sided CHF. Application of a previously published LUS protocol. Frequency of B-lines was compared based on signalment, body condition score, investigator, and reasons for radiography and between 49 cats with radiographically normal lungs to 7 cats with radiographic evidence of left-sided CHF. Overall frequency of B-lines was 12% (95% confidence interval, 5-24%) in cats without respiratory disease versus 100% (95% confidence interval, 65-100%) in those with left-sided CHF. Six cats (6/49) had B-lines with 5/6 having B-lines at a single site; and 4/5 having a single B-line at 1 site, 1/5 having 2 B-lines at 1 site; and the sixth cat having 2 positive sites with a single B-line at each. In the cohort of cats with left-sided CHF, all cats (7/7) had >3 B-lines detected at every site. The lack of B-lines in cats without respiratory disease (with radiographically normal lungs) and the predominance of B-lines in cats with left-sided CHF suggest that a regionally based LUS protocol may be clinically useful for the identification and evaluation of feline respiratory conditions. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  11. Value of ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT in the detection of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatectomy or radiofrequency ablation: a comparative study with contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Yan; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Xiang Song; Chen, Zhi Feng; Hu, An Bin

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the role of positron emission tomography/computer tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG-PET/CT) in detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence after hepatectomy and/or radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and to compare its efficacy with contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). A total of 36 HCC patients were included in this study. All patients underwent both (18) F-FDG-PET/CT and CEUS at least once for the diagnosis of HCC recurrence. The time interval between PET/CT and CEUS was 14 ± 3 days. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months. In all, 32 patients were confirmed to have HCC recurrence by pathology and clinical follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of (18) F-FDG-PET/CT for intrahepatic HCC recurrence were 96.7%, 83.3%, 96.7%, 83.3% and 94.4%, respectively. The corresponding values of CEUS were 56.7%, 100%, 100%, 31.6% and 63.9%, respectively. The sensitivity and accuracy of (18) F-FDG-PET/CT for the diagnosis of HCC recurrence were significantly higher than those of CEUS (P < 0.01, respectively). Compared with CEUS, (18) F-FDG-PET/CT has higher sensitivity and accuracy in detecting the local recurrence of HCC after hepatectomy and/or RFA. It can be used to detect recurrent extrahepatic lesions of HCC effectively. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  12. Retrospective and comparative analysis of (99m)Tc-Sestamibi breast specific gamma imaging versus mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuyan; Hu, Guoming; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiu, Fuming; Shao, Xuan; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhan, Hongwei; Chen, Yiding; Deng, Yongchuan; Huang, Jian

    2016-07-11

    Diagnosing breast cancer during the early stage may be helpful for decreasing cancer-related mortality. In Western developed countries, mammographies have been the gold standard for breast cancer detection. However, Chinese women usually have denser and smaller-sized breasts compared to Caucasian women, which decreases the diagnostic accuracy of mammography. However, breast specific gamma imaging, a type of molecular functional breast imaging, has been used for the accurate diagnosis of breast cancer and is not influenced by breast density. Our objective was to analyze the breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI) diagnostic value for Chinese women. During a 2-year period, 357 women were diagnosed and treated at our oncology department and received BSGI in addition to mammography (MMG), ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnostic assessment. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of each method of detection and compared the biological profiles of the four imaging methods. A total of 357 women received a final surgical pathology diagnosis, with 168 malignant diseases (58.5 %) and 119 benign diseases (41.5 %). Of these, 166 underwent the four imaging tests preoperatively. The sensitivity of BSGI was 80.35 and 82.14 % by US, 75.6 % by MMG, and 94.06 % by MRI. Furthermore, the breast cancer diagnosis specificity of BSGI was high (83.19 % vs. 77.31 % vs. 66.39 % vs. 67.69 %, respectively). The BSGI diagnostic sensitivity for mammographic breast density in women was superior to mammography and more sensitive for non-luminal A subtypes (luminal A vs. non-luminal A, 68.63 % vs. 88.30 %). BSGI may help improve the ability to diagnose early stage breast cancer for Chinese women, particularly for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), mammographic breast density and non-luminal A breast cancer.

  13. How well can pelvic floor muscles with major defects contract? A cross-sectional comparative study 6 weeks after delivery using transperineal 3D/4D ultrasound and manometer.

    PubMed

    Hilde, G; Staer-Jensen, J; Siafarikas, F; Gjestland, K; Ellström Engh, M; Bø, K

    2013-10-01

    To investigate ability to contract, vaginal resting pressure (VRP), pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and PFM endurance 6 weeks after vaginal delivery in primiparous women, with and without major defects of the levator ani (LA) muscle. Cross-sectional comparative study. Akershus University Hospital, Norway. A cohort of 175 singleton primiparous women delivering vaginally after more than 32 weeks of gestation. Major LA defects were assessed by 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound at maximal PFM contraction, using tomographic imaging. VRP, PFM strength and PFM endurance were measured vaginally by manometer. Data were analysed by independent-samples Student's t test, chi-square test, and standard multiple and simple linear regression. VRP, PFM strength and PFM endurance. Of the women included in the study, 4% were not able to contract their PFM 6 weeks after delivery. Women with major LA defects (n = 55) had 47% lower PFM strength and 47% lower endurance when compared with women without major LA defects (n = 120). Mean differences were 7.5 cmH2O (95% CI 5.1-9.9, P < 0.001) and 51.2 cmH2O seconds (95% CI 32.8-69.6, P < 0.001), respectively. These estimates were unchanged by adjustment in multivariable linear regression for potentially confounding demographic and obstetric factors. No difference was found regarding VRP (P = 0.670). Women with major LA defects after vaginal delivery had pronounced lower PFM strength and endurance than women without such defects; however, most women with major LA defects were able to contract the PFM. This indicates a potential capacity by non-injured muscle fibres to compensate for loss in muscle strength, even at an early stage after delivery. © 2013 RCOG.

  14. Simulating cardiac ultrasound image based on MR diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Lu, Guolan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac ultrasound simulation can have important applications in the design of ultrasound systems, understanding the interaction effect between ultrasound and tissue and setting the ground truth for validating quantification methods. Current ultrasound simulation methods fail to simulate the myocardial intensity anisotropies. New simulation methods are needed in order to simulate realistic ultrasound images of the heart. Methods: The proposed cardiac ultrasound image simulation method is based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data of the heart. The method utilizes both the cardiac geometry and the fiber orientation information to simulate the anisotropic intensities in B-mode ultrasound images. Before the simulation procedure, the geometry and fiber orientations of the heart are obtained from high-resolution structural MRI and DTI data, respectively. The simulation includes two important steps. First, the backscatter coefficients of the point scatterers inside the myocardium are processed according to the fiber orientations using an anisotropic model. Second, the cardiac ultrasound images are simulated with anisotropic myocardial intensities. The proposed method was also compared with two other nonanisotropic intensity methods using 50 B-mode ultrasound image volumes of five different rat hearts. The simulated images were also compared with the ultrasound images of a diseased rat heart in vivo. A new segmental evaluation method is proposed to validate the simulation results. The average relative errors (AREs) of five parameters, i.e., mean intensity, Rayleigh distribution parameter σ, and first, second, and third quartiles, were utilized as the evaluation metrics. The simulated images were quantitatively compared with real ultrasound images in both ex vivo and in vivo experiments. Results: The proposed ultrasound image simulation method can realistically simulate cardiac ultrasound images of the heart using high-resolution MR-DTI data. The AREs of their

  15. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  17. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  18. Thyroid and parathyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ghervan, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid ultrasound is easy to perform due to the superficial location of the thyroid gland, but appropriate equipment is mandatory with a linear high frequency transducer (7.5 - 12) MHz. Some pathological aspects of the thyroid gland are easily diagnosed by ultrasound, like the enlargement of the thyroid volume (goiter) or the presence of nodules and cysts; while other aspects are more difficult and need more experience (diffuse changes in the structure, echogenicity and vascularization of the parenchyma, differential diagnosis of malignant nodules). Ultrasound has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules; most structural abnormalities of the thyroid need evaluation and monitoring but not intervention. A good knowledge of the normal appearance of the thyroid gland is compulsory for an accurate ultrasound diagnosis.

  19. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation ... leg. This condition is often referred to as deep vein thrombosis or DVT. These clots may break ...

  20. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  1. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pelvic area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  2. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  3. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  4. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  5. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  6. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  7. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... A radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray and ultrasound images) will ...

  8. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... A radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray, ultrasound, and other imaging ...

  9. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  10. Pelvic ultrasound - abdominal

    MedlinePlus

    ... you Bladder growths or other problems Kidney stones Pelvic inflammatory disease , an infection of a woman's uterus, ovaries, or tubes Abnormal vaginal bleeding Menstrual problems Problems ... the uterus Pelvic pain Pelvic ultrasound is also used during a ...

  11. Varying ultrasound power level to distinguish surgical instruments and tissue.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Anuraj, Banani; Dupont, Pierre E

    2017-08-15

    We investigate a new framework of surgical instrument detection based on power-varying ultrasound images with simple and efficient pixel-wise intensity processing. Without using complicated feature extraction methods, we identified the instrument with an estimated optimal power level and by comparing pixel values of varying transducer power level images. The proposed framework exploits the physics of ultrasound imaging system by varying the transducer power level to effectively distinguish metallic surgical instruments from tissue. This power-varying image-guidance is motivated from our observations that ultrasound imaging at different power levels exhibit different contrast enhancement capabilities between tissue and instruments in ultrasound-guided robotic beating-heart surgery. Using lower transducer power levels (ranging from 40 to 75% of the rated lowest ultrasound power levels of the two tested ultrasound scanners) can effectively suppress the strong imaging artifacts from metallic instruments and thus, can be utilized together with the images from normal transducer power levels to enhance the separability between instrument and tissue, improving intraoperative instrument tracking accuracy from the acquired noisy ultrasound volumetric images. We performed experiments in phantoms and ex vivo hearts in water tank environments. The proposed multi-level power-varying ultrasound imaging approach can identify robotic instruments of high acoustic impedance from low-signal-to-noise-ratio ultrasound images by power adjustments.

  12. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. Controversial ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Meredith; Eddleman, Keith

    2004-03-01

    This article has reviewed a few of the more controversial findings in the field of obstetric ultrasound. For each one evidence-based strategies for the management of affected pregnancies have been suggested, derived from what the authors believe is the best information available. In some cases, this information is very limited, which can make counseling these patients extremely difficult. Some physicians find using specific likelihood ratios helpful in these complex discussions. An example of the relative likelihood ratios for several markers of trisomy 21 is illustrated in Table 10. Although the management of each of the findings discussed in this article is different, a few generalizations can be made. To begin with, the detection of any abnormal finding on ultrasound should prompt an immediate detailed ultrasound evaluation of the fetus by someone experienced in the diagnosis of fetal anomalies. If there is more than one abnormal finding on ultrasound, if the patient is over the age of 35, or if the multiple marker screen is abnormal, an amniocentesis to rule out aneuploidy should be recommended. Of the six ultrasound findings reviewed here, the authors believe that only echogenic bowel as an isolated finding confers a high enough risk of aneuploidy to recommend an amniocentesis in a low-risk patient. The other findings in isolation in a low-risk patient seem to confer only a modest increased risk of aneuploidy, if any, and this risk is certainly less than the risk of unintended loss from amniocentesis. Wherever possible, modifiers of this risk, such as maternal age, history, and first and second multiple marker screening, should be used to define more clearly the true risk of aneuploidy. As obstetric ultrasound moves forward, particularly into the uncharted waters of clinical use of three- and four-dimensional ultrasound, one can expect a whole new crop of ultrasound findings with uncertain clinical significance. Clinicians are well advised to await well

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound hemostasis techniques.

    PubMed

    Artifon, Everson L A; Aparicio, Dayse P S; Otoch, Jose P; Carvalho, Paulo B; Marson, Fernando P; Fernandes, Kaie; Tchekmedyian, Asadur J

    2014-04-01

    Since its development, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from a simple diagnostic technique to an important therapeutic tool for interventional endoscopy. EUS analysis provides real-time imaging of most major thoracic and abdominal vessels, and the possibility to use needle puncture with a curved linear array echoendoscope as a vascular intervention. In this review, we describe the endoscopic ultrasound approach to vascular therapy outside of the gastrointestinal wall.

  15. Outcome of patients with early stage oral cancer managed by an observation strategy towards the N0 neck using ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology: No survival difference as compared to elective neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Flach, Géke B; Tenhagen, Mark; de Bree, Remco; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; van der Waal, Isaac; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Kuik, Dirk J; Castelijns, Jonas A; Leemans, C René

    2013-02-01

    Management of the clinically N0 neck in oral cancer patients remains controversial. We describe the outcome of patients with T1-T2 oral cancer and N0 neck based on ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology (USgFNAC) who were treated by transoral excision and followed by a 'wait and scan' policy (W&S). This retrospective analysis included 285 consecutive patients of whom 234 were followed by W&S and 51 underwent elective neck dissection (END). Survival rates were compared between groups and correction for confounding factors was performed. Of W&S patients, the 5-year disease-specific (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were 94.2% and 81.6% respectively. During follow-up 72.2% remained free of lymph node metastases and 27.8% developed delayed metastases. W&S patients with delayed metastases had a 5-year DSS and OS of 80.0% and 62.8%, respectively. In patients with positive END these rates were 81.3% and 64.2%, respectively. Between the groups, survival rates were not significantly different. Of the W&S patients with delayed metastases, 90.6% needed adjuvant radiotherapy versus 55.0% of patients with positive END. With regard to survival, in patients with early stage oral cancer and cN0 neck a 'wait and scan' policy using strict USgFNAC surveillance is justified as survival is not negatively influenced. Using a 'wait and scan' follow-up strategy instead of elective neck treatment, unnecessary neck dissection and its accompanying morbidity can be avoided in 72.2% of patients. However, for the small proportion of patients with delayed metastases, more extensive treatment with adjuvant radiotherapy is needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Discriminant validity study of Achilles enthesis ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Expósito Molinero, María Rosa; de Miguel Mendieta, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    We want to know if the ultrasound examination of the Achilles tendon in spondyloarthritis is different compared to other rheumatic diseases. We studied 97 patients divided into five groups: rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, gout, chondrocalcinosis and osteoarthritis, exploring six elementary lesions in 194 Achilles entheses examined. In our study the total index ultrasonographic Achilles is higher in spondyloarthritis with significant differences. The worst elementary spondyloarthritis lesions for discriminations against other pathologies were calcification. This study aims to demonstrate the discriminant validity of Achilles enthesitis observed by ultrasound in spondyloarthritis compared with other rheumatic diseases that may also have ultrasound abnormalities such enthesis level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities.

  18. [Ultrasound findings in rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Galván-Talamantes, Yazmin; Meza-Ayala, Cynthia Margarita; Cruz-Santana, Julio Alberto; Bonilla-Reséndiz, Luis Ignacio

    Rhabdomyolysis is defined as skeletal muscle necrosis. Ultrasound assessment has recently become a useful tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of muscle diseases, including rhabdomyolysis. A case is presented on the ultrasound findings in a patient with rhabdomyolysis. To highlight the importance of ultrasound as an essential part in the diagnosis in rhabdomyolysis, to describe the ultrasound findings, and review the literature. A 30 year-old with post-traumatic rhabdomyolysis of both thighs. Ultrasound was performed using a Philips Sparq model with a high-frequency linear transducer (5-10MHz), in low-dimensional scanning mode (2D), in longitudinal and transverse sections at the level of both thighs. The images obtained showed disorganisation of the orientation of the muscle fibres, ground glass image, thickening of the muscular fascia, and the presence of anechoic areas. Ultrasound is a useful tool in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. PMID:27757007

  20. Ultrasound in trauma.

    PubMed

    Rippey, James C R; Royse, Alistair G

    2009-09-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is well suited for use in the emergency setting for assessment of the trauma patient. Currently, portable ultrasound machines with high-resolution imaging capability allow trauma patients to be imaged in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments and operating theatres. In major trauma, ultrasound is used to diagnose life-threatening conditions and to prioritise and guide appropriate interventions. Assessment of the basic haemodynamic state is a very important part of ultrasound use in trauma, but is discussed in more detail elsewhere. Focussed assessment with sonography for Trauma (FAST) rapidly assesses for haemoperitoneum and haemopericardium, and the Extended FAST examination (EFAST) explores for haemothorax, pneumothorax and intravascular filling status. In regional trauma, ultrasound can be used to detect fractures, many vascular injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, testicular injuries and can assess foetal viability in pregnant trauma patients. Ultrasound can also be used at the bedside to guide procedures in trauma, including nerve blocks and vascular access. Importantly, these examinations are being performed by the treating physician in real time, allowing for immediate changes to management of the patient. Controversy remains in determining the best training to ensure competence in this user-dependent imaging modality.

  1. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A.; TenCate, James A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  2. Breast ultrasound tomography with total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb

    2009-01-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A new ultrasound breast imaging device (CURE) with a ring array of transducers has been designed and built at Karmanos Cancer Institute, which acquires both reflection and transmission ultrasound signals. To extract the sound-speed information from the breast data acquired by CURE, we have developed an iterative sound-speed image reconstruction algorithm for breast ultrasound transmission tomography based on total-variation (TV) minimization. We investigate applicability of the TV tomography algorithm using in vivo ultrasound breast data from 61 patients, and compare the results with those obtained using the Tikhonov regularization method. We demonstrate that, compared to the Tikhonov regularization scheme, the TV regularization method significantly improves image quality, resulting in sound-speed tomography images with sharp (preserved) edges of abnormalities and few artifacts.

  3. Ultrasound dynamic micro-elastography applied to the viscoelastic characterization of soft tissues and arterial walls.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Cédric; Hadj Henni, Anis; Cloutier, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative noninvasive methods that provide in vivo assessment of mechanical characterization of living tissues, organs and artery walls are of interest because information on their viscoelastic properties in the presence of disease can affect diagnosis and treatment options. This article proposes the dynamic micro-elastography (DME) method to characterize viscoelasticity of small homogeneous soft tissues, as well as the adaptation of the method for vascular applications [vascular dynamic micro-elastography (VDME)]. The technique is based on the generation of relatively high-frequency (240-1100 Hz) monochromatic or transient plane shear waves within the medium and the tracking of these waves from radio-frequency (RF) echoes acquired at 25 MHz with an ultrasound biomicroscope (Vevo 770, Visualsonics). By employing a dedicated shear wave gated strategy during signal acquisition, postprocessed RF sequences could achieve a very high frame rate (16,000 images per s). The proposed technique successfully reconstructed shear wave displacement maps at very high axial (60 mum) and lateral (250 mum) spatial resolutions for motions as low as a few mum. An inverse problem formulated as a least-square minimization, involving analytical simulations (for homogenous and vascular geometries) and experimental measurements were performed to retrieve storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli as a function of the shearing frequency. Viscoelasticity measurements of agar-gelatin materials and of a small rat liver were proven feasible. Results on a very thin wall (3 mm thickness) mimicking artery enabled to validate the feasibility and the reliability of the vascular inverse problem formulation. Subsequently, the G' and G'' of a porcine aorta showed that both parameters are strongly dependent on frequency, suggesting that the vascular wall is mechanically governed by complex viscoelastic laws.

  4. In vivo analysis of glued intraocular lens position with ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dhivya Ashok; Agarwal, Amar; Packialakshmi, Sathiya; Agarwal, Athiya

    2013-07-01

    To report ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) findings of glued transscleral-fixated posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs) in eyes with inadequate capsules. Dr. Agarwal's Eye Hospital and Eye Research Centre, Chennai, India. Case series. Eyes with glued IOLs for inadequate capsule support were examined with UBM. Optic tilt was measured in relation to the iris plane. Haptic location, iris-IOL contact, vitreous incarceration, and central anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured and correlated clinically with vision and refractive error. The mean follow-up was 24.6 months ± 14.3 (SD). Of the 46 eyes, 8 (17.4%) showed optic tilt and 38 (82.6%) showed no optic tilt. Of 92 haptics examined, 85 (92.4%) were in the ciliary sulcus and 7 (7.6%) in the pars plicata. There was no significant association between the presence of optic tilt and haptic location (P=.585, chi-square test). The mean ocular residual astigmatism (ORA) was 0.5 ± 0.2 diopter (D). There was no significant difference in ORA between eyes with tilt and eyes without tilt (P=.079). There was no significant correlation between ORA and IOL position. There was no correlation of optic tilt and postoperative vision or cylinder. Other features included iris-IOL contact (6.5%), vitreous incarceration (5.4%), and ACD difference (P=.002). No significant IOL optic tilt affecting the postoperative vision was detected with glued transscleral-fixated IOLs. The technique reliability was good, with the haptics located in the intended position in more than 90% of eyes. Dr. Amar Agarwal is a paid consultant to Staar Surgical Co. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2013 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High-resolution imaging with a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Simonetti, Francesco; Williamson, Michael; Rosenberg, Robert; Heintz, Philip; Sandoval, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult for ultrasound to image small targets such as breast microcalcifications. Synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging has recently developed as a promising tool to improve the capabilities of medical ultrasound. We use two different tissueequivalent phantoms to study the imaging capabilities of a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system for imaging small targets. The InnerVision ultrasound system DAS009 is an investigational system for real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. We use the system to image the two phantoms, and compare the images with those obtained from clinical scanners Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. Our results show that synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging produces images with higher resolution and less image artifacts than Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. In addition, we study the effects of sound speed on synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and demonstrate that an accurate sound speed is very important for imaging small targets.

  6. Ultrasound of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular disjonction: Comparison of radiographic, ultrasound and MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Lapègue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Hélène; Bayol, Marie Aurélie; Bonnevialle, Nicolas; Sans, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are typically diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to describe how the ultrasound findings of acromioclavicular joint injury compare with radiography and MRI findings. Forty-seven patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint injury after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography, ultrasound and 3T MRI. A modified Rockwood classification was used to evaluate the coracoclavicular ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint injuries diagnosed with radiography, ultrasound and MRI were compared. MRI was used as the gold standard. The agreement between the ultrasound and MRI findings was very good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (95 % CI: 0.72-0.90; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound detected coracoclavicular ligament injuries with a sensitivity of 88.9 %, specificity of 90.0 %, positive predictive value of 92.3 % and negative predictive value of 85.7 %. The agreement between the ultrasound and radiography findings was poor, with a correlation coefficient of 0.69 (95 % CI: 0.51-0.82; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound is an effective examination for the diagnostic work-up of lesions of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular injury. • Ultrasound is appropriate for acute acromioclavicular trauma due to its accessibility. • Ultrasound contributes to the diagnostic work-up of acute lesions of the coracoclavicular ligaments. • Ultrasound is appropriate in patients likely to benefit from surgical treatment. • Ultrasound could be a supplement to standard radiography in acute acromioclavicular trauma.

  7. The ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction of rice bran oil.

    PubMed

    Khoei, Maryam; Chekin, Fereshteh

    2016-03-01

    In this work, aqueous extraction of rice bran oil was done without and with ultrasound pretreatment. Key factors controlling the extraction and optimal operating conditions were identified. The highest extraction efficiency was found at pH=12, temperature of 45°C, agitation speed of 800rpm and agitation time of 15min, ultrasound treatment time of 70min and ultrasound treatment temperature of 25°C. Moreover, extraction yields were compared to ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction and Soxhlet extraction. The results showed that the yield of rice bran oil at ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction was close to the yield of oil extracted by hexane Soxhlet extraction. This result implied that the yield of rice bran oil was significantly influenced by ultrasound. With regard to quality, the oil extracted by ultrasound-assisted aqueous process had a lower content of free fatty acid and lower color imparting components than the hexane-extracted oil. Also, effect of parboiling of paddy on hexane and ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction was studied. Both extraction methods gives higher percentage of oil from par boiled rice bran compared with raw rice bran. This may be due to the fact that parboiling releases the oil.

  8. Comparing cost-effectiveness between endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosis of common bile duct stone in patients with predefined risks: A study from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Netinatsunton, Nisa; Attasaranya, Siriboon; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Witeerungrot, Teepawit; Jongboonyanuparp, Theeratus; Piratvisuth, Teerha; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) achieves results comparable to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of common bile duct (CBD) stone, but studies from the western have shown EUS to be less expensive in patients with intermediate risk for CBD stones. The aim of this study was to compare the costs of EUS and ERCP in the diagnosis of CBD stones in a developing country. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done with 141 patients with suspected CBD stones, categorized as having high or intermediate risk for CBD stone. All underwent EUS, and the high-risk patients had ERCP after the EUS. For intermediate-risk patients, an ERCP was done at the discretion of the attending physician. The CBD stone was confirmed by ERCP in patients who underwent both EUS and ERCP. Patients who received EUS only were followed up every 3 months for 1 year. The false negative rate in patients with EUS and ERCP was estimated in the clinical follow-up. Result: One hundred and forty-one patients (141: 83 females, 58 males) with a mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of 55.71 ±18.68 years were recruited. Ninety-four (94) patients underwent both EUS and ERCP. ERCP confirmed the diagnosis in 83 of 85 patients (97.6%) with CBD stone detected by EUS. Forty-seven (47) patients with a negative EUS and no ERCP done were symptom-free during the follow-up. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EUS were 97.6%, 80%, 97.6%, and 80% respectively. An EUS-based strategy for high-risk patients was 15% more expensive than an ERCP-based strategy, but the EUS-based strategy reduced the cost to 37.78% less than the ERCP-based strategy in intermediate-risk patients. The EUS-based strategy was cost-saving when the CBD stone prevalence was less than 52.5%. Conclusion: EUS is safer and less costly than ERCP for CBD stone diagnosis in patients with intermediate risk. PMID:27386473

  9. Randomised trial comparing the transversus abdominis plane block posterior approach or quadratus lumborum block type I with femoral block for postoperative analgesia in femoral neck fracture, both ultrasound-guided.

    PubMed

    Parras, T; Blanco, R

    2016-03-01

    A double-blind randomised controlled trial was conducted to compare the analgesic effect of the transversus abdominis plane block posterior approach or the quadratus lumborum block I versus femoral block, both ultrasound-guided. Prospective study with parallel groups with 104 patients with neck of femur fracture undergoing hemiarthroplasty (although 7 participants did not finish the study). The inclusion criteria were patients older than 65 years old, ASA I-III status, who required and gave their consent for hemiarthroplasty. The exclusion criteria were patients with known allergy to local anaesthetics, mental disability, peripheral neuropathy, a coagulopathy disorder, and those patients who received morphine, or a block was performed previous to the surgery. Each patient received one block followed by a spinal anaesthetic technique, performed by the anaesthetist. Pain was measured using a visual analogue score, sensory blockade using cold spray, and motor blockade, evaluating the leg movement. These were compared on arrival in recovery and at 6, 12, 18, and 24h later. Total opioid amount administered in 24 hours, duration of stay in post-anaesthesia care unit, patient satisfaction, and adverse effects were also recorded. A lower visual analogue score was observed in the quadratus lumborum block group at 6, 12, 18 and 24h (3.7, 1.4, 0.8, 0.7 versus 5.2, 4.6, 3.4, 2.6 in the femoral group, P<.01). Opioid use in 24h was lower in this group (9.7 versus 16.9mg in the femoral group, P<.01). The sensory and motor blockade, satisfaction, and adverse effects, were similar in both groups. Quadratus lumborum block is an effective analgesic option to be used in patients with neck of femur fracture. More clinical trials are required to validate this. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Musculoskeletal ultrasound for preoperative imaging of the plantar plate: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Erin E; Weil, Lowell; Weil, Lowell Scott; Knight, Jessica

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare preoperative findings on musculoskeletal ultrasound evaluation to observed intraoperative findings for patients undergoing surgical correction of plantar plate tears. Fifty consecutive patients with forefoot pain and a suspected unilateral plantar plate tear at the second metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint were identified. The same examiner performed a 2-plane (longitudinal and transverse) musculoskeletal ultrasound on the painful second MTP joint. The contralateral second MTP joint was used for comparison. Longitudinal ultrasound images were graded as "torn" or "intact." Transverse ultrasound images were used to localize the suspected pathology. Results of the ultrasound were compared with observed intraoperative pathology. Forty-five plantar plate tears were identified intraoperatively. Longitudinal ultrasound images correctly identified 40 plantar plate tears. The longitudinal ultrasound had a sensitivity of 91.1%, a specificity of 25%, a positive predictive value of 91.1%, and a negative predictive value of 25%. Transverse ultrasound images identified 36 plantar plate tears correctly localizing only 19 tears. Musculoskeletal ultrasound has been widely used to identify and localize pathology in many soft tissue structures. Whereas the longitudinal ultrasound images were useful in identifying plantar plate tears, the same cannot be said about the ability to localize the tear on the transverse ultrasound images. Therefore, ultrasound may not be as good an imaging modality as magnetic resonance imaging for identification and localization of plantar plate pathology.

  11. Endoanal ultrasound in perianal fistulae and abscesses.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Arjan Paul; Felt-Bersma, Richelle J F

    2015-06-01

    Endoanal ultrasound is a technique that provides imaging of the anal sphincters and its surrounding structures as well as the pelvic floor. However, endoanal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferred by most physicians, although costs are higher and demand easily outgrows availability. Endoanal ultrasound is an accurate imaging modality delineating anatomy of both cryptoglandular as well as Crohn perianal fistula and abscess. Endoanal ultrasound is comparable with examination under anesthesia and equally sensitive as endoanal MRI in fistula detection. When fistula tracts or abscesses are located above the puborectal muscle, an additional endoanal MRI should be performed. Preoperative imaging is advocated in recurrent cryptoglandular fistula because a more complex pattern can be expected. Endoanal ultrasound can help avoid missing tracts during surgery, lowering the chance for the fistula to persist or recur. It can easily be performed in an outpatient setting and endosonographic skills are quickly incremented. Costs are low and endoanal ultrasound has the potential to improve outcome of patients with both cryptoglandular and fistulizing Crohn disease; therefore, it values more attention.

  12. OEIS complex: prenatal ultrasound and autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Ben-Neriah, Z; Withers, S; Thomas, M; Toi, A; Chong, K; Pai, A; Velscher, L; Vero, S; Keating, S; Taylor, G; Chitayat, D

    2007-02-01

    To describe prenatal ultrasound and autopsy findings in fetuses with OEIS (omphalocele, bladder exstrophy, imperforate anus, spina bifida) complex. This was a retrospective study of the nine cases with OEIS complex diagnosed at our center using detailed fetal ultrasound during the last 10 years. We summarized the fetal ultrasound findings that led to the diagnosis and compared them with the autopsy results. All affected fetuses were diagnosed using detailed fetal ultrasound after 16 weeks' gestation. The main prenatal findings were omphalocele, skin-covered lumbosacral neural tube defect, non-visualized bladder and limb defects. Prenatal sonography failed to detect the abnormal genitalia, bladder exstrophy and anal atresia. All cases had abnormalities in a 'diaper distribution', which helped in making the prenatal diagnosis. Eight of the nine couples chose to terminate the pregnancies following multidisciplinary counseling. The pregnancy that was continued was a case with dizygotic twins discordant for OEIS, and the affected fetus died in utero. The combination of the following ultrasound findings: ventral wall defect, spinal defect and a non-visualized bladder with or without limb defects, are characteristic of OEIS complex. Diagnosis can be made with confidence as early as 16 weeks' gestation, although earlier diagnosis may be possible. Copyright 2007 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Quantitative Ultrasound Characterization of Tumor Cell Death: Ultrasound-Stimulated Microbubbles for Radiation Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjung Christina; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Karshafian, Raffi; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy) to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy). In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL) staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:25051356

  14. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of tumor cell death: ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles for radiation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjung Christina; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Karshafian, Raffi; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy) to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy). In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL) staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes.

  15. Quo vadis medical ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lewin, Peter A

    2004-04-01

    The last three decades of development in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and technology are briefly reviewed and the impact of the crucial link between the two apparently independent research efforts, which eventually facilitated implementation of harmonic imaging modality is explored. These two efforts included the experiments with piezoelectric PVDF polymer material and studies of the interaction between ultrasound energy and biological tissue. Harmonic imaging and its subsequent improvements revolutionized the diagnostic power of clinical ultrasound and brought along images of unparalleled resolution, close to that of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality. The nonlinear propagation effects and their implications for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound are also briefly addressed. In diagnostic applications, the impact of these effects on image resolution and tissue characterization is reviewed; in therapeutic applications, the influence of nonlinear propagation effects on highly localized tissue ablation and cauterization is examined. Next, the most likely developments and future trends in clinical ultrasound technology, including 3D and 4D imaging, distant palpation, image enhancement using contrast agents, monitoring, and merger of diagnostic and therapeutic applications by e.g. introducing ultrasonically controlled targeted drug delivery are reviewed. Finally, a possible competition from other imaging modalities is discussed.

  16. Medical ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-08-06

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue.

  17. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Stride, E; Saffari, N

    2003-01-01

    The superior scattering properties of gas bubbles compared with blood cells have made microbubble ultrasound contrast agents important tools in ultrasound diagnosis. Over the past 2 years they have become the focus of a wide and rapidly expanding field of research, with their benefits being repeatedly demonstrated, both in ultrasound image enhancement, and more recently in drug and gene delivery applications. However, despite considerable investigation, their behaviour is by no means fully understood and, while no definite evidence of harmful effects has been obtained, there remain some concerns as to their safety. In this review the existing theoretical and experimental evidence is examined in order to clarify the extent to which contrast agents are currently understood and to identify areas for future research. In particular the disparity between the conditions considered in theoretical models and those encountered both in vitro, and more importantly in vivo is discussed, together with the controversy regarding the risk of harmful bio-effects.

  18. [Crohn disease: diagnosis by graded compression ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Z; Makó, E; Dévai, T; Tulassay, Z

    1995-08-27

    Fifty-four patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel underwent ultrasound examination with graded compression. The pathologic sonographic findings were compared with the clinical, endoscopic and in 32 cases with the parallel performed CT and selective enterographic examinations. Of the 29 proven cases of Crohn's disease 26 (89.7%) had bowel wall thickening detectable with US. The change in the bowel wall structure correlated to the stage of the disease. The luminal narrowing, the mesenteric involvement, the enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the abscesses and fistulas were judged easily, but the length and the location of the bowel segment were estimated only approximately. The characteristic but nonspecific signs observed by ultrasound were found to be a useful adjunct to the endoscopic and roentgen examinations. The ultrasound with graded compression in our view is a well usable alternative method for both diagnosis and follow-up, informing about the transmural spread of the pathology.

  19. Experimental and simulation studies on focused ultrasound triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Choi, Yongjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2017-01-01

    To improve drug delivery efficiency in cancer therapy, many researchers have recently concentrated on drug delivery systems that use anticancer drug loaded micro- or nanoparticles. In addition, induction methods, such as ultrasound, magnetic field, and infrared light, have been considered as active induction methods for drug delivery. Among these, focused ultrasound has been regarded as a promising candidate for the active induction method of drug delivery system because it can penetrate a deep site in soft tissue, and its energy can be focused on the targeted lesion. In this research, we employed focused ultrasound as an active induction method. For an anticancer drug loaded microparticles, we fabricated poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid docetaxel (PLGA-DTX) nanoparticle encapsulated alginate microbeads using the single-emulsion technique and the aeration method. To select the appropriate operating parameter for the focused ultrasound, we measured the pressure and temperature induced by the focused ultrasound at the focal area using a needle-type hydrophone and a digital thermal detector, respectively. Additionally, we conducted a simulation of focused ultrasound using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3a. The experimental measurement results were compared with the simulation results. In addition, the drug release rates of the PLGA-DTX-encapsulated alginate microbeads induced by the focused ultrasound were tested. Through these experiments, we determined that the appropriate focused ultrasound parameter was peak pressure of 1 MPa, 10 cycle/burst, and burst period of 20 μSec. Finally, we performed the cell cytotoxicity and drug uptake test with focused ultrasound induction and found that the antitumor effect and drug uptake efficiency were significantly enhanced by the focused ultrasound induction. Thus, we confirmed that focused ultrasound can be an effective induction method for an anticancer drug delivery system.

  20. How often does ultrasound marking change the liver biopsy site?

    PubMed

    Riley, T R

    1999-11-01

    The aim of this study was to answer the question: How often does ultrasound change the liver biopsy position, when a percussion technique is applied, because of intervening structures? A secondary objective is to compare the performance of the hepatologist to a radiology technician to demonstrate safety of a self-training technique. One hundred sixty-five consecutive outpatient liver biopsies were studied. Using a standard percussion technique, a biopsy site was chosen and marked. Ultrasound was applied to the marked site. An adequate site was determined to be one without intervening structure within 6 cm of liver depth. If an intervening structure was found, an alternative site was chosen by ultrasound. Data recorded included reason for change of position, distance of moved site from original site, and complications. The first third of liver biopsies were done with assistance of a certified radiology technician performing ultrasound, the last two-thirds were done by the hepatologist after observing the first 64 biopsies. Ultrasound changed the position in 21 of 165 patients. The ultrasound caused an abortion of the procedure in 4 of 165 patients. Ultrasound changed management in 15.1% of patients. Reasons for change were lung (10 patients), gallbladder (6), large central vessel (4), >4-cm rim of ascites (2), colonic loop (1), slim liver edge (1), and focal liver lesions (1 patient). There was a 1.8% multiple pass rate. No serious complications occurred. Ultrasound changed management 15.1% of patients. A hepatologist could perform ultrasound marking after a period of observation, without compromising results. A low multiple pass rate was observed when applying ultrasound and percussion. Avoided structures could explain decrease in pain when ultrasound is applied.

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Background: In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. Objectives: To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Results: Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Conclusions: Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid. PMID:25763079

  2. Assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis using contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    van den Oord, Stijn C H; ten Kate, Gerrit L; Akkus, Zeynettin; Renaud, Guillaume; Sijbrands, Eric J G; ten Cate, Folkert J; van der Lugt, Aad; Bosch, Johan G; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Schinkel, Arend F L

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of standard carotid ultrasound and colour Doppler for the detection of subclinical atherosclerotic plaques is suboptimal. The aim of this study is to assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) added to standard carotid ultrasound improves the detection of subclinical atherosclerosis. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) measurement, standard carotid ultrasound including colour Doppler imaging, and CEUS were performed in 100 asymptomatic patients with one or more risk factors for atherosclerosis. CEUS was performed using intravenous administration of SonoVue™ contrast agent (Bracco S.p.A., Milan, Italy). CIMT, standard ultrasound, colour Doppler, and CEUS were reviewed by two independent observers. Standard ultrasound, colour Doppler, and CEUS were scored for the presence of atherosclerotic plaques. Subclinical atherosclerosis was diagnosed if patients had a CIMT above their age-corrected threshold value or if atherosclerotic plaques were present on standard carotid ultrasound clips or CEUS clips. McNemar's test was performed to compare between groups. Twenty-one patients (21%) had a thickened CIMT value and were considered to have subclinical atherosclerosis. Standard carotid ultrasound including colour Doppler demonstrated atherosclerotic plaques in 77 patients (77%). The addition of CEUS to the standard ultrasound protocol demonstrated atherosclerotic plaques in 88 patients (88%). The incorporation of CEUS into the standard carotid ultrasound protocol resulted in a significantly improved detection of patients with subclinical atherosclerosis (P < 0.01). CEUS has an incremental value for the detection of subclinical atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries. Atherosclerotic plaques which were only detected with CEUS and not with standard carotid ultrasound and colour Doppler imaging were predominantly hypoechoic.

  3. Ultrasound physics in a nutshell.

    PubMed

    Coltrera, Marc D

    2010-12-01

    This content presents to the neophyte ultrasonographer the essential nutshell of information needed to properly interpret ultrasound images. Basic concepts of physics related to ultrasound are supported with formulas and related to clinical use.

  4. Plane reconstruction ultrasound tomography device

    SciTech Connect

    Hassler, D.

    1984-10-23

    An ultrasound tomography device for scanning an object under examination from a plurality of directions. Coronal slice images of the plane areas near or at the female breast wall are obtained. Ultrasound lobes from ultrasound transducers are electronically directed or mechanically positioned to obliquely strike the coronal slice located at or near the breast wall. A full image of the coronal slice plane is reconstructed through section by section combination of the images obtained from the several ultrasound lobes.

  5. In-flight ultrasound identification of pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Uhlich, Rindi M; Ahmad, Salman; Barnes, Stephen L; Coughenour, Jeffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound is a standard adjunct to the initial evaluation of injured patients in the emergency department. We sought to evaluate the ability of prehospital, in-flight thoracic ultrasound to identify pneumothorax. Non-physician aeromedical providers were trained to perform and interpret thoracic ultrasound. All adult trauma patients and adult medical patients requiring endotracheal intubation underwent both in-flight and emergency department ultrasound evaluations. Findings were documented independently and reviewed to ensure quality and accuracy. Results were compared to chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT). One hundred forty-nine patients (136 trauma/13 medical) met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 44.4 (18-94) years; 69 % were male. Mean injury severity score was 17.68 (1-75), and mean chest injury score was 2.93 (0-6) in the injured group. Twenty pneumothoraces and one mainstem intubation were identified. Sixteen pneumothoraces were correctly identified in the field. A mainstem intubation was misinterpreted. When compared to chest CT (n = 116), prehospital ultrasound had a sensitivity of 68 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 46-85 %), a specificity of 96 % (95 % CI 90-98 %), and an overall accuracy of 91 % (95 % CI 85-95 %). In comparison, emergency department (ED) ultrasound had a sensitivity of 84 % (95 % CI 62-94 %), specificity of 98 % (95 % CI 93-99 %), and an accuracy of 96 % (95 % CI 90-98 %). The unique characteristics of the aeromedical environment render the auditory element of a reliable physical exam impractical. Thoracic ultrasonography should be utilized to augment the diagnostic capabilities of prehospital aeromedical providers.

  6. Diagnostic Emergency Ultrasound: Assessment Techniques In The Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Joshua; Nelson, Bret P

    2016-01-01

    Emergency ultrasound is performed at the point of care to answer focused clinical questions in a rapid manner. Over the last 20 years, the use of this technique has grown rapidly, and it has become a core requirement in many emergency medicine residencies and in some pediatric emergency medicine fellowships. The use of emergency ultrasound in the pediatric setting is increasing due to the lack of ionizing radiation with these studies, as compared to computed tomography. Utilizing diagnostic ultrasound in the emergency department can allow clinicians to arrive at a diagnosis at the bedside rather than sending the patient out of the department for another study. This issue focuses on common indications for diagnostic ultrasound, as found in the pediatric literature or extrapolated from adult literature where pediatric evidence is scarce. Limitations, current trends, controversies, and future directions of diagnostic ultrasound in the emergency department are also discussed.

  7. Structural adaptations of rat lateral gastrocnemius muscle-tendon complex to a chronic stretching program and their quantification based on ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Carolina Carneiro; Martins, Natália Santos Fonseca; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Machado, João Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A chronic regimen of flexibility training can increase range of motion, with the increase mechanisms believed to be a change in the muscle material properties or in the neural components associated with this type of training. This study followed chronic structural adaptations of lateral gastrocnemius muscle of rats submitted to stretching training (3 times a week during 8weeks), based on muscle architecture measurements including pennation angle, muscle thickness and tendon length obtained from ultrasound biomicroscopic images, in vivo. Fiber length and sarcomere number per 100μm were determined in 3 fibers of each muscle (ex vivo and in vitro, respectively), using conventional optical microscopy. Stretching training resulted in a significant pennation angle reduction of the stretched leg after 12 sessions (25%, P=0.002 to 0.024). Muscle thickness and tendon length presented no significant changes. Fiber length presented a significant increase for the stretched leg (8.5%, P=0.00006), with the simultaneous increase in sarcomere length (5%, P=0.041) since the stretched muscles presented less sarcomeres per 100μm. A stretching protocol with characteristics similar to those applied in humans was sufficient to modify muscle architecture of rats with absence of a sarcomerogenesis process. The results indicate that structural adaptations take place in skeletal muscle tissue submitted to moderate-intensity stretching training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanics of ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography enables in vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of living soft tissues in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner and has attracted considerable interest for clinical use in recent years. Continuum mechanics plays an essential role in understanding and improving ultrasound-based elastography methods and is the main focus of this review. In particular, the mechanics theories involved in both static and dynamic elastography methods are surveyed. They may help understand the challenges in and opportunities for the practical applications of various ultrasound elastography methods to characterize the linear elastic, viscoelastic, anisotropic elastic and hyperelastic properties of both bulk and thin-walled soft materials, especially the in vivo characterization of biological soft tissues. PMID:28413350

  9. Ultrasound in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Priego Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound is a type of energy which can help analytical chemists in almost all their laboratory tasks, from cleaning to detection. A generic view of the different steps which can be assisted by ultrasound is given here. These steps include preliminary operations usually not considered in most analytical methods (e.g. cleaning, degassing, and atomization), sample preparation being the main area of application. In sample preparation ultrasound is used to assist solid-sample treatment (e.g. digestion, leaching, slurry formation) and liquid-sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction, emulsification, homogenization) or to promote heterogeneous sample treatment (e.g. filtration, aggregation, dissolution of solids, crystallization, precipitation, defoaming, degassing). Detection techniques based on use of ultrasonic radiation, the principles on which they are based, responses, and the quantities measured are also discussed.

  10. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  11. Ultrasound in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David S.; South, Donna A.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Arbeille, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Physiology of the human body in space has been a major concern for space-faring nations since the beginning of the space era. Ultrasound (US) is one of the most cost effective and versatile forms of medical imaging. As such, its use in characterizing microgravity-induced changes in physiology is being realized. In addition to the use of US in related ground-based studies, equipment has also been modified to fly in space. This involves alteration to handle the stresses of launch and different power and cooling requirements. Study protocols also have been altered to accommodate the microgravity environment. Ultrasound studies to date have shown a pattern of adaptation to microgravity that includes changes in cardiac chamber sizes and vertebral spacing. Ultrasound has been and will continue to be an important component in the investigation of physiological and, possibly, pathologic changes occurring in space or as a result of spaceflight.

  12. Endometrial receptivity: evaluation with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Musoles, Fernando; Raga, Francisco; Osborne, Newton G; Castillo, Juan Carlos; Bonilla, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    An adequate endometrial receptivity is a crucial factor for embryo implantation. We describe endometrial morphology (endometrial appearance or pattern, endometrial thickness, volume, and delimitation), based on the concepts and possibilities of the new ultrasound modalities (3-dimensional/4-dimensional ultrasound, automatic volume calculation, virtual organ computer-aided analysis, tomographic ultrasound image, inverse mode, and 3-dimensional Doppler angiography) as markers of endometrial receptivity.

  13. [Ultrasound and regional anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Delaunay, L; Plantet, F; Jochum, D

    2009-02-01

    The use of ultrasound is the latest major evolution in regional anaesthesia. Review of available literature shows significant changes in clinical practice. Ultrasound guidance allows the visualization of anatomical variations or unsuspected intraneural injections, reduces the volume of local anaesthetic injections and confirms correct local anaesthetic distribution or catheter placement. No study has found a statistical difference in success rates and safety because all studies were underpowered. However, the ability to visualize an invasive procedure that has been performed blindly in the past is an undeniable progress in terms of safety. The necessity to be familiar with the machine and the learning curve can be repulsive. The aim of this article is to demystify ultrasound guidance by explaining the fundamentals of the clinical use of ultrasound. With the help of different chapters, the authors explain the different adjustments and possible artefacts and give easy solutions for the use of bedside ultrasound. Training is essential and can be performed on manikins or training phantom. For each region the main anatomical landmarks are explained. One must be familiar with several imaging techniques: short axis (transverse) or long axis (longitudinal) nerve imaging, in-plane or out-of-plane imaging and hydrolocalization. Viewing the needle's tip position during its progression remains the main safety endpoint. Therefore, electrical nerve stimulation and ultrasound guidance should be combined, especially for beginners, to confirm proximity to neural structures and to help in case of difficulty. Optimizing safety and clinical results must remain a key priority in regional anaesthesia. Finally, specific regulations concerning the transducers are described. Paediatric specificities are also mentioned.

  14. Benchmarking the value of ultrasound for acute appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Thomas P; Gent, Roger; Frauenfelder, Claire; Lukic, Laura; Linke, Rebecca J; Goh, Day Way

    2016-12-01

    This study appraises the diagnostic quality of ultrasound for acute appendicitis in children and consequently challenges the perception of inferior accuracy and suitability compared to computed tomography (CT). Radiologist reports for consecutive "query appendicitis" ultrasound studies were retrieved from a hospital database for the study period 2009-2014. Children who subsequently underwent appendicectomy were identified. Corresponding operative and histopathology findings were evaluated. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound was determined by analyzing overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, predictivity, and likelihood ratios. A total of 3799 ultrasound examinations were evaluated. Mean age was 11.5±3.8years. The proportion of patients investigated with preoperative ultrasound was 59.9% (1103/1840). Appendix visualization rate was 91.7%. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 95.5%. Sensitivity and specificity values were 97.1% (95.9-98.1; 95% CI) and 94.8% (93.9-95.6; 95% CI), respectively. Separate analysis of only ultrasound positive and negative examinations (i.e., excluding nondiagnostic examinations) confirmed sensitivity and specificity values of 98.8% and 98.3%. In this largest reported single institution series of ultrasound examinations for appendicitis, we report benchmark standard quality of diagnostic accuracy and visualization rates. Given the radiation and cost implications of CT, there is a strong argument to recommend ultrasound as the primary imaging modality. Diagnostic Study-Level II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Xampling in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Noam; Eldar, Yonina C.; Feuer, Arie; Danin, Gilad; Friedman, Zvi

    2011-03-01

    Recent developments of new medical treatment techniques put challenging demands on ultrasound imaging systems in terms of both image quality and raw data size. Traditional sampling methods result in very large amounts of data, thus, increasing demands on processing hardware and limiting the flexibility in the postprocessing stages. In this paper, we apply Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques to analog ultrasound signals, following the recently developed Xampling framework. The result is a system with significantly reduced sampling rates which, in turn, means significantly reduced data size while maintaining the quality of the resulting images.

  16. Ultrasound waveform tomography with the second-order total-generalized-variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Youzuo; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound waveform tomography with the total-variation regularization could improve reconstructions of tumor margins, but the reconstructions usually contain unwanted blocky artifacts. We develop a new ultrasound waveform tomography method with a second-order total-generalized-variation regularization scheme to improve tomographic reconstructions of breast tumors and remove blocky artifacts in reconstruction results. We validate our new method using numerical phantom data and real phantom data acquired using our synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays. Compared to reconstructions of ultrasound waveform tomography with modified total-variation regularization, our new ultrasound waveform tomography yields accurate sound-speed reconstruction results with significantly reduced artifacts.

  17. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  18. [WHEN ULTRASOUND MEETS THE INTERNIST].

    PubMed

    Katz, David; Dadon, Ziv; Zalut, Todd; Avraham Alpert, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is an important modality with many advantages. At the Shaare Zedek Medical Centre, we developed a case-based course to teach POCUS to internal medicine residents and attendings. The topics include: "Introduction to Point-of-Care Ultrasound", "Focused Assessment with Sonography of Trauma", "Basic Cardiac, Pulmonary and Vascular Ultrasound", "Rapid Ultrasound in Shock" and "Ultrasound Guided Central Lines". The use of POCUS should aid in rapid diagnosis, decrease complications associated with bed-side procedures, and ultimately improve patient care.

  19. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation and has no known harmful effects. If the veins in your abdomen are to be examined, you may be asked not to eat or drink anything but water for six to eight hours beforehand. Otherwise, little ...

  20. ICV Echo Ultrasound Scan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-31

    View of Integrated Cardiovascular (ICV) Echo Ultrasound Scan,in the Columbus module. ICV aims to quantify the extent,time course and clinical significance of cardiac atrophy (decrease in the size of the heart muscle) in space. Photo was taken during Expedition 34.

  1. Ultrasound and the IRB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist researchers in writing their research protocols and subject consent forms so that both the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and subjects are assured of the minimal risk associated with diagnostic B-scan ultrasound as it is used in speech research. There have been numerous epidemiological studies on fetal…

  2. Intravascular ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, A F; de Korte, C L; Céspedes, E I

    1998-10-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound Blastography. The response of a tissue to mechanical excitation is a function of its mechanical properties. Excitation can be dynamic or quasistatic in nature. The response (e.g. displacement, velocity, compression) can be measured via ultrasound. This is the main principle underlying ultrasound elasticity imaging, sonoelasticity imaging, or ultrasound elastography. It is of great interest to know the local hardness of vessel wall and plaques. Intravascular elastography yields information unavailable or inconclusive if obtained from IVUS alone and thus contributes to more correct diagnosis. Potentially it can be used for therapy guidance. During the last decade several working groups used elastography in intravascular applications with varying success. In this paper we discuss the various approaches by different working groups. Focus will be on the approach of the Rotterdam group. Using a 30 MHz IVUS catheter, RF data are acquired from vessels in vitro at different intraluminal pressures. Local tissue displacement estimation by cross-correlation is followed by computation of the local strain. The resulting image supplies local information on the elastic properties of the vessel and plaque with high spatial resolution. Feasibility and usefulness are shown by means of phantom measurements. Furthermore, initial in vitro results of femoral arteries and correlation with histology are discussed. Phantom data show that the elastograms reveal information not presented by the echogram. In vitro artery data prove that in principle elastography is capable of identifying plaque composition where echography fails.

  3. History of intraoperative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Makuuchi, M; Torzilli, G; Machi, J

    1998-11-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) using A-mode or non-real-time B-mode imaging started in the 1960s; however, it was not widely accepted mainly because of difficulty in image interpretation. In the late 1970s, IOUS became one of the topics in the surgical communities upon the introduction of high-frequency real-time B-mode ultrasound. Special probes for operative use were developed. In the 1980s, all over the world the use of IOUS spread to a variety of surgical fields, such as hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery, neurosurgery, and cardiovascular surgery. IOUS changed hepatic surgery dramatically because IOUS was the only modality that was capable of delineating and examining the interior of the liver during surgery. After 1990, color Doppler imaging and laparoscopic ultrasound were incorporated into IOUS. Currently, IOUS is considered an indispensable operative procedure for intraoperative decision-making and guidance of surgical procedures. For better surgical practice, education of surgeons in the use of ultrasound is the most important issue.

  4. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  5. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Lu, Huihong; Mathewson, Kory; Walsh, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J

    2009-11-23

    We report on the development of an imaging system capable of combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging based on a fast-scanning single-element 25-MHz ultrasound transducer and a unique light-delivery system. The system is capable of 20 ultrasound frames per second and slower photoacoustic frame rates limited by laser pulse-repetition rates. Laser and ultrasound pulses are interlaced for co-registration of photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In vivo imaging of a human finger permits ultrasonic visualization of vessel structures and speckle changes indicative of blood flow, while overlaid photoacoustic images highlight some small vessels that are not clear from the ultrasound scan. Photoacoustic images provide optical absorption contrast co-registered in the structural and blood-flow context of ultrasound with high-spatial resolution and may prove important for clinical diagnostics and basic science of the microvasculature.

  6. An autotuning respiration compensation system based on ultrasound image tracking.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chia-Chun; Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Teng, Kuan-Ting; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Chih-Jen; Jeng, Shiu-Chen; Chiou, Jeng-Fong

    2016-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to develop an ultrasound image tracking algorithm (UITA) for extracting the exact displacement of internal organs caused by respiratory motion. The program can track organ displacements in real time, and analyze the displacement signals associated with organ displacements via a respiration compensating system (RCS). The ultrasound imaging system is noninvasive and has a high spatial resolution and a high frame rate (around 32 frames/s), which reduces the radiation doses that patients receive during computed tomography and X-ray observations. This allows for the continuous noninvasive observation and compensation of organ displacements simultaneously during a radiation therapy session.This study designed a UITA for tracking the motion of a specific target, such as the human diaphragm. Simulated diaphragm motion driven by a respiration simulation system was observed with an ultrasound imaging system, and then the induced diaphragm displacements were calculated by our proposed UITA. These signals were used to adjust the gain of the RCS so that the amplitudes of the compensation signals were close to the target movements. The inclination angle of the ultrasound probe with respect to the surface of the abdomen affects the results of ultrasound image displacement tracking. Therefore, the displacement of the phantom was verified by a LINAC with different inclination-angle settings of the ultrasound probe. The experimental results indicate that the best inclination angle of the ultrasound probe is 40 degrees, since this results in the target displacement of the ultrasound images being close to the actual target motion. The displacement signals of the tracking phantom and the opposing displacement signals created by the RCS were compared to assess the positioning accuracy of our proposed ultrasound image tracking technique combined with the RCS.When the ultrasound probe was inclined by 40 degrees in simulated respiration experiments using sine

  7. Transperineal ultrasound for measurement of prostate volume: validation against transrectal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Kaye A; Ly, Lam P; Jin, Bo; Chan, Lewis; Handelsman, David J

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the transperineal ultrasound method to measure total and central prostate volume compared with the standard transrectal ultrasound. Healthy men without prostate disease underwent transperineal and transrectal ultrasound at a single session to calculate total and central prostate volume by the ellipsoidal formula from maximal measured dimensions. Reproducibility within and between methods was evaluated by ICC, CV and Bland-Altman plots. In 13 men measured on 3 occasions within 2 weeks transperineal and transrectal ultrasound had high within method (ICC 0.92 and 0.97, and CV 7.2% and 5.1%, respectively) and between method (ICC 0.98 and CV 5.4%) agreement. Agreement for central prostate volume was good but it was lower within method (ICC 0.74 and 0.73, and CV 20.5% and 20.3%, respectively) and between method (ICC 0.85 and CV 19.7%). Transperineal ultrasound bias was -2.7% for total and -8.9% for central prostate volume. Of 287 healthy men the methods highly correlated for total prostate volume in 245 (ICC 0.92, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.94) and for central prostate volume in 217 (ICC 0.87, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.90). Transperineal ultrasound had minimal bias for total prostate volume (-3.7%, mean -1.0 ml, 95% CI -1.7 to -0.2 ml) and no bias for central prostate volume (-3.0%, mean bias 0.10 ml, 95% CI -0.3 to 0.5 ml). Transperineal ultrasound was more acceptable but it had a higher technical failure rate for total and central prostate volume (13.6% vs 1.4% and 23.7% vs 3.5%, respectively). Transperineal ultrasound provides an accurate, less invasive and more acceptable alternative but with a higher technical failure rate than transrectal ultrasound, especially for central prostate volume. By trading off acceptability for the failure rate transperineal ultrasound may enhance the feasibility of valid studies requiring repeat prostate volume measurement in asymptomatic men.

  8. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography using Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared (IR) thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and IR imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with IR-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (− 0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (− 0.69 ± 0.18 °C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the IR measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45 – 50 °C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies where thermocouples or water-bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results show that high resolution IR thermography provides a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  9. Ultrasound stylet for non-image-guided ventricular catheterization.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Nathaniel K; Chiarelli, Peter A; Su, David K; Chang, Jason J; MacConaghy, Brian; Murthy, Revathi; Toms, Peter; Robb, Terrence L; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Browd, Samuel R; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Urgent ventriculostomy placement can be a lifesaving procedure in the setting of hydrocephalus or elevated intracranial pressure. While external ventricular drain (EVD) insertion is common, there remains a high rate of suboptimal drain placement. Here, the authors seek to demonstrate the feasibility of an ultrasound-based guidance system that can be inserted into an existing EVD catheter to provide a linear ultrasound trace that guides the user toward the ventricle. METHODS The ultrasound stylet was constructed as a thin metal tube, with dimensions equivalent to standard catheter stylets, bearing a single-element, ceramic ultrasound transducer at the tip. Ultrasound backscatter signals from the porcine ventricle were processed by custom electronics to offer real-time information about ventricular location relative to the catheter. Data collected from the prototype device were compared with reference measurements obtained using standard clinical ultrasound imaging. RESULTS A study of porcine ventricular catheterization using the experimental device yielded a high rate of successful catheter placement after a single pass (10 of 12 trials), despite the small size of pig ventricles and the lack of prior instruction on porcine ventricular architecture. A characteristic double-peak signal was identified, which originated from ultrasound reflections off of the near and far ventricular walls. Ventricular dimensions, as obtained from the width between peaks, were in agreement with standard ultrasound reference measurements (p < 0.05). Furthermore, linear ultrasound backscatter data permitted in situ measurement of the stylet distance to the ventricular wall (p < 0.05), which assisted in catheter guidance. CONCLUSIONS The authors have demonstrated the ability of the prototype ultrasound stylet to guide ventricular access in the porcine brain. The alternative design of the device makes it potentially easy to integrate into the standard workflow for bedside EVD

  10. Role of pelvic ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sushila; Mulla, Zuber D; Kupesic Plavsic, Sanja

    2017-10-10

    Pelvic ultrasound is a critical diagnostic imaging tool in obstetrics and gynaecology. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand among learners because of the increased complexity of modern ultrasound technology and duty-hour restrictions. Ultrasound simulation training has the potential to overcome this gap. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to determine the usefulness, applicability and attitudes toward pelvic ultrasound simulation training among residents, sonographers and practising doctors. Pelvic ultrasound simulation activity using high-fidelity virtual reality ultrasound simulators lasted 4 hours and consisted of three modules: abnormal uterine bleeding, adnexal masses and bleeding in pregnancy. All learners completed a pre- and post-encounter quiz, and an anonymous post-simulation survey on the relevance of ultrasound simulation to clinical learning, and its usefulness to improve scanning performance and interpretation skills. Thirty-one participants attended the workshop, and 28 (90.3%) of them responded to the survey. Five respondents agreed and 23 strongly agreed that pelvic ultrasound simulation applies to their clinical ultrasound practice, and seven of them agreed and 21 strongly agreed that their performance of ultrasound and interpretation skills will be improved following their simulation training. The average post-activity knowledge score for all three topics significantly increased (paired Student's t-test, p < 0.0001). All 28 respondents believe that ultrasound simulation is a useful complement to learning with real patients, with the potential to improve their pelvic ultrasound performance, interpretation skills and clinical reasoning. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted biopsy may enhance the diagnostic accuracy of significant prostate cancer detection compared to standard transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schoots, Ivo G; Roobol, Monique J; Nieboer, Daan; Bangma, Chris H; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2015-09-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate may improve the diagnostic accuracy of prostate cancer detection in MRI-targeted biopsy (MRI-TBx) in comparison to transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUS-Bx). Systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence regarding the diagnostic benefits of MRI-TBx versus TRUS-Bx in detection of overall prostate cancer (primary objective) and significant/insignificant prostate cancer (secondary objective). A systematic review of Embase, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, Cinahl, and the Cochrane library was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Identified reports were critically appraised according to the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria. Only men with a positive MRI were included. The reports we included (16 studies) used both MRI-TBx and TRUS-Bx for prostate cancer detection. A cumulative total of 1926 men with positive MRI were included, with prostate cancer prevalence of 59%. MRI-TBx and TRUS-Bx did not significantly differ in overall prostate cancer detection (sensitivity 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-0.89, and 0.81, 95% CI 0.70-0.88, respectively). MRI-TBx had a higher rate of detection of significant prostate cancer compared to TRUS-Bx (sensitivity 0.91, 95% CI 0.87-0.94 vs 0.76, 95% CI 0.64-0.84) and a lower rate of detection of insignificant prostate cancer (sensitivity 0.44, 95% CI 0.26-0.64 vs 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.87). Subgroup analysis revealed an improvement in significant prostate cancer detection by MRI-TBx in men with previous negative biopsy, rather than in men with initial biopsy (relative sensitivity 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.57 vs 1.10, 95% CI 1.00-1.22). Because of underlying methodological flaws of MRI-TBx, the comparison of MRI-TBx and TRUS-Bx needs to be regarded with caution. In men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer and a subsequent positive MRI, MRI-TBx and

  12. Ultrasound induced green solvent extraction of oil from oleaginous seeds.

    PubMed

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline Abert; Fine, Frédéric; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction of rapeseed oil was investigated and compared with conventional extraction for energy efficiency, throughput time, extraction yield, cleanness, processing cost and product quality. A multivariate study enabled us to define optimal parameters (7.7 W/cm(2) for ultrasonic power intensity, 40 °C for processing temperature, and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/15) for ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from oilseeds to maximize lipid yield while reducing solvent consumption and extraction time using response surface methodology (RSM) with a three-variable central composite design (CCD). A significant difference in oil quality was noted under the conditions of the initial ultrasound extraction, which was later avoided using ultrasound in the absence of oxygen. Three concepts of multistage cross-current extraction were investigated and compared: conventional multistage maceration, ultrasound-assisted maceration and a combination, to assess the positive impact of using ultrasound on the seed oil extraction process. The study concludes that ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil is likely to reduce both economic and ecological impacts of the process in the fat and oil industry.

  13. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  14. A resonance-free nano-film airborne ultrasound emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, Maxim; Harrer, Andrea; Prager, Jens; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Beck, Uwe; Lange, Thorid; Weise, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a novel thermo-acoustic approach for the generation of broad band airborne ultrasound and investigate the applicability of resonance-free thermo-acoustic emitters for very short high pressure airborne ultrasound pulses. We report on measurements of thermo-acoustic emitter consisting of a 30 nm thin metallic film on a usual soda-lime glass substrate, generating sound pressure values of more than 140 dB at 60 mm distance from the transducer and compare the results with conventional piezoelectric airborne ultrasound transducers. Our experimental investigations show that such thermo-acoustic devices can be used as broad band emitters using pulse excitation.

  15. [Does ultrasound have an adverse effect on the fertility of women?].

    PubMed

    Quéreux, C; Mazili, M L; Desroches, A; Garnier, R; Slaoui, K; Bajolle, F; Wahl, P

    1986-01-01

    Fifty women who were subfertile received artificial insemination from donors (A.I.D.) with ultrasound monitoring of ovulation. They were compared with an identical number of women who were inseminated without ultrasound control. The series side by side showed that there was a lower fertilisation rate in those who were monitored (4.2% compared with 6.2%) per month on an average over six months as compared with those who were not monitored by ultrasound, and those who were monitored took significantly longer to become pregnant than those who were not monitored. Because of these results the authors wonder whether ultrasounds are harmful for ovulation.

  16. In vitro investigation of ultrasound-induced oxidative stress on human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rwei, Patrick; Alex Gong, Cihun-Siyong; Luo, Li-Jyuan; Lin, Meng-Bo; Lai, Jui-Yang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2017-01-22

    The effect of ultrasound exposure on human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) was investigated in vitro, specifically on the generation of oxidative stress upon ultrasound application using various clinically-relevant settings. In addition to ultrasound-induced heat effects, oxidative stress has been recently proposed as one of the main mechanisms for ultrasound-induced effects on human cells. In this work, the levels of biocompatibility and generation of oxidative stress by exposure of ultrasound to HLE-B3 were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively by the MTT assay, Live/Dead assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium level. Oxidative stress induction is traditionally achieved through administrations of H2O2 and thus the administration of H2O2 was used as the positive control group for comparison herein. Concerning the administrations of H2O2 are considered invasive and may potentially have side effects, ultrasound as physical stimulation could be a safer and non-invasive method to induce similar oxidative stress environments. The effect of ultrasound on cell viability and induction of oxidative stress increases with ultrasound intensity. The result reveals that the continuous ultrasound has a positive impact on the oxidative stress levels but does negatively on the cell viability, as compared to the pulsed ultrasound. Furthermore, our work demonstrates that the exposure of 58 kPa continuous ultrasound without microbubbles can maintain acceptable cell viability and produce oxidative stress effects similar to the traditional administrations of H2O2. In summary, exposure of ultrasound can generate oxidative stress comparable to traditional administrations of H2O2. The effect of generating oxidative stress is adjustable through ultrasound parameters, including the pulsed or continuous wave, the intensity of ultrasound and addition of microbubbles.

  17. Ultrasound for carpal tunnel syndrome screening in manual laborers.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Walker, Francis O; Blocker, Jill N; Schulz, Mark R; Arcury, Thomas A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Marín, Antonio J; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-07-01

    Manual laborers are at increased risk for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and a combination of history, physical examination, and nerve conduction studies is often used to screen for CTS in this population. Neuromuscular ultrasound may be a better screening tool, because it is painless. In this study we compare the accuracy of nerve conduction studies and ultrasound for CTS screening. Five hundred thirteen manual laborers were screened prospectively for CTS using nerve conduction studies and neuromuscular ultrasound, and the accuracy of the 2 techniques was compared using the Katz hand diagram as the diagnostic standard. The ROC curves for the 2 techniques were not significantly different (P = 0.542), indicating that the approaches had similar diagnostic accuracy. Neuromuscular ultrasound is a painless technique that has diagnostic accuracy similar to nerve conduction studies and can be used to screen large populations at risk for CTS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Characterization and Ultrasound-Pulse Mediated Destruction of Ultrasound Contrast Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik; Jain, Pankaj; Chatterjee, Dhiman

    2006-05-01

    Intravenously injected encapsulated microbubbles improve the contrast of an ultrasound image. Their destruction is used in measuring blood flow, stimulating arteriogenesis, and drug delivery. We measure attenuation and scattering of ultrasound through solution of commercial contrast agents such as Sonazoid and Definity. We have developed a number of different interfacial rheology models for the encapsulation of such microbubbles. By matching with experimentally measured attenuation, we obtain the characteristic rheological parameters. We compare model predictions with measured subharmonic responses. We also investigate microbubble destruction under acoustic excitation by measuring time-varying attenuation data.

  19. Tumor functional and molecular imaging utilizing ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical techniques.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Baohong; Rychak, Joshua

    2013-02-01

    Tumor functional and molecular imaging has significantly contributed to cancer preclinical research and clinical applications. Among typical imaging modalities, ultrasonic and optical techniques are two commonly used methods; both share several common features such as cost efficiency, absence of ionizing radiation, relatively inexpensive contrast agents, and comparable maximum-imaging depth. Ultrasonic and optical techniques are also complementary in imaging resolution, molecular sensitivity, and imaging space (vascular and extravascular). The marriage between ultrasonic and optical techniques takes advantages of both techniques. This review introduces tumor functional and molecular imaging using microbubble-based ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical imaging techniques.

  20. Synthesis of laboratory Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Jingam; Park, Donghee; Shin, Unchul; Moon, Sanghyub; Kim, Chihyun; Kim, Han Sung; Park, Hyunjin; Choi, Kiju; Jung, Bongkwang; Oh, Jaemin; Seo, Jongbum

    2013-10-21

    Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs) were developed to maximize reflection contrast so that organs can be seen clearly in ultrasound imaging. UCAs increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by linear and non-linear mechanisms and thus help more accurately visualize the internal organs and blood vessels. However, the UCAs on the market are not only expensive, but are also not optimized for use in various therapeutic research applications such as ultrasound-aided drug delivery. The UCAs fabricated in this study utilize conventional lipid and albumin for shell formation and perfluorobutane as the internal gas. The shape and density of the UCA bubbles were verified by optical microscopy and Cryo SEM, and compared to those of the commercially available UCAs, Definity® and Sonovue®. The size distribution and characteristics of the reflected signal were also analyzed using a particle size analyzer and ultrasound imaging equipment. Our experiments indicate that UCAs composed of spherical microbubbles, the majority of which were smaller than 1 um, were successfully synthesized. Microbubbles 10 um or larger were also identified when different shell characteristics and filters were used. These laboratory UCAs can be used for research in both diagnoses and therapies.

  1. Ultrasound and microstructures--a promising combination?

    PubMed

    Hübner, S; Kressirer, S; Kralisch, D; Bludszuweit-Philipp, C; Lukow, K; Jänich, I; Schilling, A; Hieronymus, H; Liebner, C; Jähnisch, K

    2012-02-13

    Short diffusion paths and high specific interfacial areas in microstructured devices can increase mass transfer rates and thus accelerate multiphase reactions. This effect can be intensified by the application of ultrasound. Herein, we report on the design and testing of a novel versatile setup for a continuous ultrasound-supported multiphase process in microstructured devices on a preparative scale. The ultrasonic energy is introduced indirectly into the microstructured device through pressurized water as transfer medium. First, we monitored the influence of ultrasound on the slug flow of a liquid/liquid two-phase system in a channel with a high-speed camera. To quantify the influence of ultrasound, the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate was utilized as a model reaction. Microstructured devices with varying channel diameter, shape, and material were applied with and without ultrasonication at flow rates in the mL min(-1) range. The continuous procedures were then compared and evaluated by performing a simplified life cycle assessment. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Ultrasound assisted engineering of lactose crystals.

    PubMed

    Dhumal, Ravindra S; Biradar, Shailesh V; Paradkar, Anant R; York, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To engineer lactose crystals of desired size, shape, surface and particle size distribution (PSD) as a carrier for dry powder inhalers (DPI) by ultrasound assisted in-situ seeding. Lactose crystals were obtained from solution by ultrasound assisted in-situ seeding, followed by growth in viscous glycerin solution. The crystals were characterized for physical properties and 63-90 mum size fractions of different batches were mixed with salbutamol sulphate (SS) and compared for in-vitro deposition. Cooling crystallization with stirring for 10-20 h resulted in crystals with wide PSD and varied shape. Application of ultrasound resulted in rapid and complete crystallization in 5 min with rod-shaped fine crystals (15-30 microm) and narrow PSD. In-situ seeded batches yielded micro-fine rod-shaped seed crystals. Seeding followed by growth in glycerin showed desirable size, high elongation ratio, smooth surface and narrow PSD, while growth under stirring showed high elongation ratio with rough surface. Crystals grown in glycerin showed highest dispersibility and fine particle fraction (FPF) of SS. Ultrasound assisted in-situ seeding, followed by ordered growth in glycerin offers rapid technique for separation of nuclei induction from crystal growth yielding desirable characteristics for better dispersion and in-vitro deposition when employed as DPI carrier.

  3. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  4. Correlation between MRI and biopsies under second look ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Neuville, M; de Rocquancourt, A; Cohen-Zarade, S; Chapellier-Canaud, M; Albiter, M; Hamy, A-S; Giachetti, S; Cuvier, C; Espié, M; de Kerviler, É; de Bazelaire, C

    2014-02-01

    the shape (Kappa=0.09) and weak for the contours (Kappa=0.23). Finally, the MRI overestimated the size of the targets compared to ultrasound (Student t-test, p=0.0001). The performance of second look ultrasound has to be performed after the detection of an abdnormality on MRI even for lesion classified BIRADS 3. The biopsy indications must be wide with insertion of a clip and a control MRI. Only this control allows to stop the investigation if the biopsied lesion is benign.

  5. 3D imaging options and ultrasound contrast agents for the ultrasound assessment of pediatric rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Madej, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    The application of 3D imaging in pediatric rheumatology helps to make the assessment of inflammatory changes more objective and to estimate accurately their volume and the actual response to treatment in the course of follow-up examinations. Additional interesting opportunities are opened up by the vascularity analysis with the help of power Doppler and color Doppler in 3D imaging. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations enable a more sensitive assessment of the vascularity of inflamed structures of the locomotor system, and a more accurate analysis of treatment's effect on changes in vascularity, and thereby the inflammation process activity, as compared to the classical options of power and color Doppler. The equipment required, time limitations, as well as the high price in the case of contrast-enhanced ultrasound, contribute to the fact that the 3D analysis of inflammatory changes and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations are not routinely applied for pediatric patients.

  6. Ultrasound and ultrasound-related techniques in endocrine diseases.

    PubMed

    Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Dietrich, Christoph F; David, Emanuele; Mastroeni, Giampiero; Ventura Spagnolo, Orazio; Sidhu, Paul S; Letizia, Claudio; Messineo, Daniela; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Radzina, Maija; Cantisani, Vito

    2017-09-05

    Ultrasound examination has become essential to evaluate morphology and size of several endocrine glands and detect the presence of lesions within these organs. Nevertheless, with the recent advances of ultrasound technology, we have opportunity to correlate the echostructure of thyroid, ovary, testis, parathyroids, etc. to their function. Thus, the ultrasound systems are in-office essential instruments for many clinical specialists. Herein we presented the most updated information about the use of ultrasound in specific endocrine-related issues, such as thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal gland, and testicle.

  7. Automatic segmentation of vessels in in-vivo ultrasound scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamimi-Sarnikowski, Philip; Brink-Kjær, Andreas; Moshavegh, Ramin; Arendt Jensen, Jørgen

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound has become highly popular to monitor atherosclerosis, by scanning the carotid artery. The screening involves measuring the thickness of the vessel wall and diameter of the lumen. An automatic segmentation of the vessel lumen, can enable the determination of lumen diameter. This paper presents a fully automatic segmentation algorithm, for robustly segmenting the vessel lumen in longitudinal B-mode ultrasound images. The automatic segmentation is performed using a combination of B-mode and power Doppler images. The proposed algorithm includes a series of preprocessing steps, and performs a vessel segmentation by use of the marker-controlled watershed transform. The ultrasound images used in the study were acquired using the bk3000 ultrasound scanner (BK Ultrasound, Herlev, Denmark) with two transducers "8L2 Linear" and "10L2w Wide Linear" (BK Ultrasound, Herlev, Denmark). The algorithm was evaluated empirically and applied to a dataset of in-vivo 1770 images recorded from 8 healthy subjects. The segmentation results were compared to manual delineation performed by two experienced users. The results showed a sensitivity and specificity of 90.41+/-11.2 % and 97.93+/-5.7% (mean+/-standard deviation), respectively. The amount of overlap of segmentation and manual segmentation, was measured by the Dice similarity coefficient, which was 91.25+/-11.6%. The empirical results demonstrated the feasibility of segmenting the vessel lumen in ultrasound scans using a fully automatic algorithm.

  8. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Russo, Giuseppe; Boccalini, Sara; Michaud, Johan; Klauser, Andrea; Serafini, Giovanni; Martinoli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this review is to illustrate the spectrum of ultrasound-guided procedures around the shoulder. The shoulder is affected by a wide range of both, traumatic and degenerative diseases. Ultrasound guidance is a low-cost and safe tool to perform minimally invasive interventional procedures around the shoulder. The clinical outcome is shown by the use of clinical scores: visual analogue scale (VAS), Constant's score and Shoulder Pain Disability Index (SPADI). Rotator cuff calcification is a common painful condition that occurs in up to 7.5 % of otherwise healthy adults. Ultrasound-guided procedures include single-needle and double-needle approach with different needles. These techniques are described and the results are critically compared. Ultrasound-guided viscosupplementation is a new therapeutic approach for treatment of several shoulder pain disorders: osteoarthritis, rotator cuff tear and tendinosis. In adhesive capsulitis, different therapeutic ultrasound-guided techniques such as corticosteroid injection, capsular distension (sodium chlorate solution; sodium chlorate and corticosteroids; air) and viscosupplementation are evaluated. Acromion-clavear injection of steroid and lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance is easy to perform and is indicated in conservative treatment of painful osteoarthrosis. The treatment of rotator cuff tendinosis and partial tears with ultrasound-guided injection of concentrated autologous platelets is also described.

  9. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  10. Biofouling control with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.R.

    2000-06-01

    Experiments have been carried out on a small-scale simulated cooling water system using a monoculture of Pseudomonas fluorescens to represent the slime-forming microbial community, to examine the opportunities for control using ultrasound. Glass tubes (18 mm I.D. x 1 m long) through which contaminated water flowed at 1 m/s were dosed with ultrasound along the tube axis. Glass tubes were employed to facilitate the use of infrared absorbance for biofilm accumulation assessment. The preliminary results demonstrate that control of biofilm formation and the removal of established biofilms on the inside of tubes may be achieved by the technology, but there may be some limitations with respect to removal.

  11. Sparsity driven ultrasound imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; C¸etin, Müjdat; Karl, W. Clem

    2012-01-01

    An image formation framework for ultrasound imaging from synthetic transducer arrays based on sparsity-driven regularization functionals using single-frequency Fourier domain data is proposed. The framework involves the use of a physics-based forward model of the ultrasound observation process, the formulation of image formation as the solution of an associated optimization problem, and the solution of that problem through efficient numerical algorithms. The sparsity-driven, model-based approach estimates a complex-valued reflectivity field and preserves physical features in the scene while suppressing spurious artifacts. It also provides robust reconstructions in the case of sparse and reduced observation apertures. The effectiveness of the proposed imaging strategy is demonstrated using experimental data. PMID:22352501

  12. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  13. Two-dimensional ultrasound measurement of thyroid gland volume: a new equation with higher correlation with 3-D ultrasound measurement.

    PubMed

    Ying, Michael; Yung, Dennis M C; Ho, Karen K L

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new two-dimensional (2-D) ultrasound thyroid volume estimation equation using three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound as the standard of reference, and to compare the thyroid volume estimation accuracy of the new equation with three previously reported equations. 2-D and 3-D ultrasound examinations of the thyroid gland were performed in 150 subjects with normal serum thyrotropin (TSH, thyroid-stimulating hormone) and free thyroxine (fT4) levels (63 men and 87 women, age range: 17 to 71 y). In each subject, the volume of both thyroid lobes was measured by 3-D ultrasound. On 2-D ultrasound, the craniocaudal (CC), lateromedial (LM) and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions of the thyroid lobes were measured. The equation was derived by correlating the volume of the thyroid lobes measured with 3-D ultrasound and the product of the three dimensions measured with 2-D ultrasound using linear regression analysis, in 75 subjects without thyroid nodule. The accuracy of thyroid volume estimation of the new equation and the three previously reported equations was evaluated and compared in another 75 subjects (without thyroid nodule, n = 30; with thyroid nodule, n = 45). It is suggested that volume of thyroid lobe may be estimated as: volume of thyroid lobe = 0.38.(CC.LM.AP) + 1.76. Result showed that the new equation (16.9% to 36.1%) had a significantly smaller thyroid volume estimation error than the previously reported equations (20.8% to 54.9%) (p < 0.05). There was a significantly larger thyroid volume estimation error when thyroid glands with nodules were examined (p < 0.05). With the use of the appropriate thyroid volume equation, 2-D ultrasound can be a useful alternative in thyroid volume measurement when 3-D ultrasound is not available.

  14. Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. B.; Piro, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital synthetic aperture techniques to obtain high resolution ultrasound images of eye and orbit was proposed. The parameters of the switched array configuration to reduce data collection time to a few milliseconds to avoid eye motion problems in the eye itself were established. An assessment of the effects of eye motion on the performance of the system was obtained. The principles of synthetic techniques are discussed. Likely applications are considered.

  15. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  16. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    texture mapping hardware," IEEE Tranactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Submitted. [14] C.R. Castro Pareja , J.M. Jagadeesh and R. Shekhar...modulation in real-time three-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging systems "* Carlos R. Castro Pareja , Masters of Science, The Ohio...C.R. Castro Pareja , "An architecture for real-time image registration," M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, March 2002. 14. C.R. Castro Pareja , R

  17. Pleural ultrasound for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    2016-11-01

    Pleural ultrasonography is useful for identifying and characterising pleural effusions, solid pleural lesions (nodules, masses, swellings) and pneumothorax. Pleural ultrasonography is also considered the standard care for guiding interventionist procedures on the pleura at the patient's bedside (thoracentesis, drainage tubes, pleural biopsies and pleuroscopy). Hospitals should promote the acquisition of portable ultrasound equipment to increase the patient's safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasound of adnexal masses.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mukund; Ganesan, Karthik; Munshi, Harsha Navani; Ganesan, Subramania; Lawande, Ashwin

    2008-04-01

    Current advancements in imaging technology, especially three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound and contrast-enhanced imaging, have increased the diagnostic yield of adnexal masses. The benefit of ultrasound is the characterization of an adnexal mass, suggesting the probable etiology of the mass. Masses may be divided as solid, cystic, or complex. It is predominantly the solid and complex masses that need a thorough evaluation. The role of color-flow imaging is now gaining importance and criteria for distinguishing between benign and malignant masses are often possible. Availability of a scoring system enables the differentiation of small adnexal masses. Several benign lesions may present as complex masses but can be distinguished and diagnosed on sonography. The availability of 3D ultrasound has been of great use to understand spatial relations and vascular morphology. Sonography allows a more detailed assessment of morphologic features of an adnexal mass. With a benign-appearing adnexal mass on sonography, the need for any further diagnostic tests is often obviated.

  19. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity) and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined. PMID:21910870

  20. Physics and instrumentation of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, John P

    2007-08-01

    A thorough understanding of the physics of ultrasound waves and the instrumentation will provide the user with a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound machine combines two technologies: image production (M-mode and 2-dimensional imaging) with Doppler assessment (continuous and pulse wave as well as color-flow mapping). These distinct technologies have been combined to provide the examiner with the ability to make accurate and comprehensive diagnoses and guide therapeutic intervention.

  1. Manipulating neuronal activity with low frequency transcranial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michele Elizabeth

    Stimulation of the rodent cerebral cortex is used to investigate the underlying biological basis for the restorative effects of slow wave sleep. Neuronal activation by optogenetic and ultrasound stimulation elicits changes in action potentials across the cerebral cortex that are recorded as electroencephalograms. Optogenetic stimulation requires an invasive implantation procedure limiting its application in human studies. We sought to determine whether ultrasound stimulation could be as effective as optogenetic techniques currently used, in an effort to further understand the physiological and metabolic requirements of sleep. We successfully recorded electroencephalograms in response to transcranial ultrasound stimulation of the barrel cortex at 1 and 7 Hz frequencies, comparing them to those recorded in response to optogenetic stimuli applied at the same frequencies. Our results showed application of a 473 nm blue LED positioned 6 cm above the skull and ultrasound stimulation at an output voltage of 1000 mVpp produced electroencephalograms with physiological responses of similar amplitude. We concluded that there exists an intensity-proportionate response in the optogenetic stimulation, but not with ultrasound stimulation at the frequencies we surveyed. Activation of neuronal cells in response to optogenetic stimulation in a Thy1-ChR2 transgenic mouse line is specifically targeted to pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex. ChR2 responses to optogenetic stimulation are mediated by a focal activation of neuronal ion channels. We measured electrophysiological responses to ultrasound stimulation, comparing them to those recorded from optogenetic stimuli. Our results show striking similarities between ultrasound-induced responses and optogenetically-induced responses, which may indicate that transcranial ultrasound stimulation is also mediated by ion channel dependent processes in cerebral cortical neurons. The biophysical substrates for electrical excitability of

  2. Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Uterine Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    Focused ultrasound surgery for uterine fibroids Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive treatment option for ... whether you're a good candidate for focused ultrasound surgery, your doctor may perform a pelvic magnetic ...

  3. Doppler Ultrasound: What Is It Used for?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your neck (carotid artery stenosis) A Doppler ultrasound can estimate how fast blood flows by measuring the rate of change in its pitch (frequency). During a Doppler ultrasound, a technician trained in ultrasound imaging (sonographer) presses ...

  4. Clinician-performed thyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Coltrera, Marc D

    2014-08-01

    This article is intended to demystify the process for those with a potential interest in acquiring ultrasound skills. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of head and neck ultrasound but, rather, is focused on the bare minimum requirements and considerations involved in clinician-performed ultrasound. The article covers the initial diagnosis and the unparalleled usefulness of ultrasound for surgical planning just before incision. Further readings are listed at the end of the article to direct the reader to some excellent texts to help build confidence and experience.

  5. Ultrasound promoted catalytic liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol for Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Xin, Fang; Li, Xunfeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The apparent kinetic of the ultrasound assisted liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over Raney nickel catalyst was determined in the temperature range of 346-353 K. Comparison of the effects of ultrasound and mechanical agitation on the isopropanol dehydrogenation was investigated. The ultrasound assisted dehydrogenation rate was significantly improved when relatively high power density was used. Moreover, the Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump (IAH-CHP) with ultrasound irradiation, in which the endothermic reaction is exposure to ultrasound, was proposed. A mathematical model was established to evaluate its energy performance in term of the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency, into which the apparent kinetic obtained in this work was incorporated. The operating performances between IAH-CHP with ultrasound and mechanical agitation were compared. The results indicated that the superiority of the IAH-CHP system with ultrasound was present even if more than 50% of the power of the ultrasound equipment was lost.

  6. Quantitative analysis with the optoacoustic/ultrasound system OPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Christoph; Zell, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan; Vogel, Mika W.; Niessner, Reinhard

    2009-02-01

    The OPUS (Optoacoustic plus Ultrasound) system is a combination of a medical ultrasound scanner with a highrepetition rate, wavelength-tunable laser system and a suitable triggering interface to synchronize the laser and the ultrasound system. The pulsed laser generates an optoacoustic (OA), or photoacoustic (PA), signal which is detected by the ultrasound system. Alternatively, imaging in conventional ultrasound mode can be performed. Both imaging modes can be superimposed. The laser light is coupled into the tissue laterally, parallel to the ultrasound transducer, which does not require for any major modification to the transducer or the ultrasound beam forming. This was a basic requirement on the instrument, as the intention of the project was to establish the optoacoustic imaging modality as add-on to a conventional standard ultrasound instrument. We believe that this approach may foster the introduction of OA imaging as routine tool in medical diagnosis. Another key aspect of the project was to exploit the capabilities of OA imaging for quantitative analysis. The intention of the presented work is to summarize all steps necessary to extract the significant information from the PA raw data, which are required for the quantification of local absorber distributions. We show results of spatially resolved absorption measurements in scattering samples and a comparison of four different image reconstruction algorithms, regarding their influence on lateral resolution as well as on the signal to noise ratio for different sample depths and absorption values. The reconstruction algorithms are based on Fourier transformation, on a generalized 2D Hough transformation, on circular back-projection and the classical delay-and-sum approach which is implemented in most ultrasound scanners. Furthermore, we discuss the influence of a newly developed laser source, combining diode and flash lamp pumping. Compared to all-flash-lamp pumped systems it features a significantly higher

  7. Can anatomists teach living anatomy using ultrasound as a teaching tool?

    PubMed

    Jurjus, Rosalyn A; Dimorier, Kathryn; Brown, Kirsten; Slaby, Frank; Shokoohi, Hamid; Boniface, Keith; Liu, Yiju Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bedside ultrasound by an increasing number of medical specialties has created the need for more ultrasound exposure and teaching in medical school. Although there is a widespread support for more vertical integration of ultrasound teaching throughout the undergraduate curriculum, little is known about whether the quality of ultrasound teaching differs if performed by anatomists or clinicians. The purpose of this study is to compare medical students' evaluation of ultrasound anatomy teaching by clinicians and anatomists. Hands-on interactive ultrasound sessions were scheduled as part of the gross anatomy course following principles of adult learning and instructional design. Seven teachers (three anatomists and four clinicians) taught in each session. Before each session, anatomists were trained in ultrasound by clinicians. Students were divided into groups, rotated teachers between sessions, and completed evaluations. Results indicated students perceived the two groups as comparable for all factors except for knowledge organization and the helpfulness of ultrasound for understanding anatomy (P < 0.001). However, results from unpaired samples t-tests demonstrated a nonstatistically significant difference between the groups within each session for both questions. Moreover, students' test performance for both groups was similar. This study demonstrated that anatomists can teach living anatomy using ultrasound with minimal training as well as clinicians, and encourage the teaching of living anatomy by anatomists in human anatomy courses using ultrasound. Repeating this study at a multicenter level is currently being considered to further validate our conclusion. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1-4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5-12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound.

  9. Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE)- Concept of Operations Evaluation for Using Remote Guidance Ultrasound for Planetary Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; Peterson, Sean; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Douglas; Ham, David; Amponsah, David; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Use of remote guidance (RG) techniques aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has enabled astronauts to collect diagnostic-level ultrasound images. Exploration class missions will require this cohort of (typically) non-formally trained sonographers to operate with greater autonomy given the longer communication delays (2 seconds for ISS vs. >6 seconds for missions beyond the Moon) and communication blackouts. To determine the feasibility and training requirements for autonomous ultrasound image collection by non-expert ultrasound operators, ultrasound images were collected from a similar cohort using three different image collection protocols: RG only, RG with a computer-based learning tool (LT), and autonomous image collection with LT. The groups were assessed for both image quality and time to collect the images. Methods Subjects were randomized into three groups: RG only, RG with LT, and autonomous with LT. Each subject received 10 minutes of standardized training before the experiment. The subjects were tasked with making the following ultrasound assessments: 1) bone fracture and 2) focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) to assess a patient s abdomen. Human factors-related questionnaire data were collected immediately after the assessments. Results The autonomous group did not out-perform the two groups that received RG. The mean time for the autonomous group to collect images was less than the RG groups, however the mean image quality for the autonomous group was less compared to both RG groups. Discussion Remote guidance continues to produce higher quality ultrasound images than autonomous ultrasound operation. This is likely due to near-instant feedback on image quality from the remote guider. Expansion in communication time delays, however, diminishes the capability to provide this feedback, thus requiring more autonomous ultrasound operation. The LT has the potential to be an excellent training and coaching component for

  10. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Fenster, A; Downey, D B; Cardinal, H N

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound is an inexpensive and widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of a number of diseases. In the past two decades, it has benefited from major advances in technology and has become an indispensable imaging modality, due to its flexibility and non-invasive character. In the last decade, research investigators and commercial companies have further advanced ultrasound imaging with the development of 3D ultrasound. This new imaging approach is rapidly achieving widespread use with numerous applications. The major reason for the increase in the use of 3D ultrasound is related to the limitations of 2D viewing of 3D anatomy, using conventional ultrasound. This occurs because: (a) Conventional ultrasound images are 2D, yet the anatomy is 3D, hence the diagnostician must integrate multiple images in his mind. This practice is inefficient, and may lead to variability and incorrect diagnoses. (b) The 2D ultrasound image represents a thin plane at some arbitrary angle in the body. It is difficult to localize the image plane and reproduce it at a later time for follow-up studies. In this review article we describe how 3D ultrasound imaging overcomes these limitations. Specifically, we describe the developments of a number of 3D ultrasound imaging systems using mechanical, free-hand and 2D array scanning techniques. Reconstruction and viewing methods of the 3D images are described with specific examples. Since 3D ultrasound is used to quantify the volume of organs and pathology, the sources of errors in the reconstruction techniques as well as formulae relating design specification to geometric errors are provided. Finally, methods to measure organ volume from the 3D ultrasound images and sources of errors are described.

  11. Ultra fast ultrasound-assisted decopperization from copper anode slime.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixing; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Gengwei; Zhang, Libo; Peng, Jinhui

    2017-05-01

    An ultra fast decopperization method from the anode slime has been developed based on the ultrasound-assisted leaching. The effects of parameters such as ultrasound power, leaching time, sulfuric acid concentration and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the concentration of Cu in residue was only 2.64%. The removal efficiency increases considerably and the decopperization time was significantly shortened comparing with conventional method (>10%, 24h). Se and Te have not been detected in lixivium, indicating the selective leaching of Cu. In addition, the mineralogical characteristics of the untreated anode slime and the residues after ultrasound-assisted decopperization are investigated. The results revealed that the increasing of decopperization efficiency was attributed to the change of the phase composition and the morphology and size of samples during ultrasound-assisted decopperization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Biopty gun superior to aspiration.

    PubMed

    Ragde, H; Aldape, H C; Bagley, C M

    1988-12-01

    We used a 7 MHz transrectal ultrasound scanner to perform guided core biopsy and aspiration cytologies on 292 patients with findings suspicious for prostate cancer. One hundred two cancers were identified, 35 of which were not palpable and were detected only by ultrasound. Aspiration needles were guided by ultrasound through the center of the suspicious lesion. Core biopsies were performed using an 18-gauge Tru-Cut type of needle with an automatic, spring-powered needle biopsy device (Biopty). All patients received only local anesthetic and biopsies were done as an outpatient office procedure. The core biopsies gave excellent specimens which detected 89 percent of the cancers, whereas the aspiration method detected 51 percent (P less than 0.001). Aspiration cytology was significantly less sensitive among well-differentiated compared with moderately differentiated cancers. High-resolution transrectal ultrasound and the Biopty device are detecting and documenting prostate cancer with much greater sensitivity than preceding techniques have achieved.

  13. Intraperitoneal blood missed on a FAST examination using portable ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Blaivas, Michael; Theodoro, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    Bedside ultrasonography is rapidly gaining popularity in the evaluation of emergency patients. Several manufacturers have developed hand-held ultrasound machines that make the technology easy to transport and available in settings where such diagnostic tests were previously unobtainable. The miniaturization of equipment often means compromises and no studies exist comparing the high quality imaging capabilities of larger conventional ultrasound units to hand-held machines on actual patients. We present 3 cases in which intra-abdominal fluid stripes, important markers of intraperitoneal bleeding, were not visible with a popular hand-held unit, but were identified with a larger mobile ultrasound machine. These findings should caution emergency physicians to be aware of this limitation along with the many advantages of these new and popular hand-held ultrasound units.

  14. Large area MEMS based ultrasound device for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodnicki, Robert; Thomenius, Kai; Ming Hooi, Fong; Sinha, Sumedha P.; Carson, Paul L.; Lin, Der-Song; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Woychik, Charles

    2011-08-01

    We present image results obtained using a prototype ultrasound array that demonstrates the fundamental architecture for a large area MEMS based ultrasound device for detection of breast cancer. The prototype array consists of a tiling of capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (cMUTs) that have been flip-chip attached to a rigid organic substrate. The pitch on the cMUT elements is 185 μm and the operating frequency is nominally 9 MHz. The spatial resolution of the new probe is comparable to those of production PZT probes; however the sensitivity is reduced by conditions that should be correctable. Simulated opposed-view image registration and Speed of Sound volume reconstruction results for ultrasound in the mammographic geometry are also presented.

  15. Numerical simulation of piezoelectric effect of bone under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    The piezoelectric effect of bone under ultrasound irradiation was numerically simulated using an elastic finite-difference time-domain method with piezoelectric constitutive equations (PE-FDTD method). First, to demonstrate the validity of the PE-FDTD method, the ultrasound propagation in piezoelectric ceramics was simulated and then compared with the experimental results. The simulated and experimental waveforms propagating through the ceramics were in good agreement. Next, the piezoelectric effect of human cortical bone on the ultrasound propagation was investigated by PE-FDTD simulation. The simulated result showed that the difference between the waveforms propagating through the bone without and with piezoelectricity was negligible. Finally, the spatial distributions of the electric fields in a human femur induced by ultrasound irradiation were simulated. The electric fields were changed by a bone fracture, which depended on piezoelectric anisotropy. In conclusion, the PE-FDTD method is considered to be useful for investigating the piezoelectric effect of bone.

  16. Comparison of optical coherence reflectometry and ultrasound central corneal pachymetry.

    PubMed

    Gillis, A; Zeyen, T

    2004-01-01

    In 50 eyes of 25 patients we prospectively measured the central corneal thickness (CCT) comparing the OLCR (Optical Low Coherence Reflectometry) pachymeter with the contact ultrasound pachymeter. The OLCR system was mounted on to a Haag-Streit slit lamp. Every single measurement was the result of 5 scans. With the contact ultrasound Sonomed pachymeter we performed 5 separate measurements and calculated the mean. The correlation between the two measurements was excellent (r = 0.99). The mean standard deviation (SD) of the measurements taken with the non-contact OLCR pachymeter was significantly lower than with the contact ultrasound pachymeter, 0.49 microm and 4.71 microm respectively (p < 0.01). The variability of the CCT measurements taken with the non-contact OLCR pachymeter is significantly lower than the variability of the CCT measurements taken with the contact ultrasound pachymetry.

  17. Intracranial Applications of MR Imaging-Guided Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Khanna, N; Gandhi, D; Steven, A; Frenkel, V; Melhem, E R

    2017-03-01

    Initially used in the treatment of prostate cancer and uterine fibroids, the role of focused ultrasound has expanded as transcranial acoustic wave distortion and other limitations have been overcome. Its utility relies on focal energy deposition via acoustic wave propagation. The duty cycle and intensity of focused ultrasound influence the rate of energy deposition and result in unique physiologic and biomechanical effects. Thermal ablation via high-intensity continuous exposure generates coagulative necrosis of tissues. High-intensity, pulsed application reduces temporally averaged energy deposition, resulting in mechanical effects, including reversible, localized BBB disruption, which enhances neurotherapeutic agent delivery. While the precise mechanisms remain unclear, low-intensity, pulsed exposures can influence neuronal activity with preservation of cytoarchitecture. Its noninvasive nature, high-resolution, radiation-free features allow focused ultrasound to compare favorably with other modalities. We discuss the physical characteristics of focused ultrasound devices, the biophysical mechanisms at the tissue level, and current and emerging applications.

  18. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  19. Ultrasound scoring in combination with ultrasound elastography for differentiating benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jun; Shen, Ye; Lü, Jieqiong; Wang, Jianming

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of ultrasound scores obtained by conventional ultrasonography and ultrasound elastography in the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules in Chinese patients. This study included 297 patients who were referred for surgery for compressive symptoms or suspicion of malignancy. Five hundred and twelve thyroid nodules were examined by ultrasonography. The final diagnosis was based on histological findings. A seven-point ultrasound scoring system based on conventional ultrasonography and a five-point scoring system based on ultrasound elastography were applied independently or in combination. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were graphed, and the areas under the curves (AUCs) were compared using the χ(2) -test. Solid composition, hypo-echoic appearance, an irregular or blurred margin, an aspect ratio ≥1, intranodular blood flow and presence of microcalcifications were significant predictors of malignant thyroid nodules. The AUC (95% CI) was 0·9067 (0·8817-0·9318) for the ultrasound scores based on conventional ultrasonography and 0·9080 (0·8842-0·9317) for the elasticity scores. The combination of these two scoring systems provided good accuracy with an AUC (95% CI) of 0·9415 (0·9223-0·9606), which was significantly higher than that obtained with the conventional ultrasound scores (χ(2)  = 36·03, P < 0·001) or the elasticity scores (χ(2)  = 12·80, P < 0·001) individually. When we set the cut-point to ≥5, the sensitivity and specificity were 85·22% and 87·38%, respectively. Elastography in combination with conventional ultrasonography is a promising imaging-based approach that can assist in the differential diagnosis of thyroid cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Livingstone, Margaret S; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-21

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation--the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  1. Beating the blues: is there any music in fighting cyanobacteria with ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Tolman, Yora

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis that cyanobacteria can be controlled by commercially available ultrasound transducers was tested in laboratory experiments with cultures of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp., Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Microcystis aeruginosa and the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus that were grown in the absence or presence of ultrasound (mix of 20, 28 and 44 kHz). The Scenedesmus experiment also included a treatment with the zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna. Chlorophyll-a and biovolume-based growth of Anabaena was significantly lower in ultrasound exposed cultures than in controls. Particle based growth rates were higher in ultrasound treatments. Filaments were significantly shorter in ultrasound exposed cultures reflecting filament breakage. Photosystem II efficiency was not affected by ultrasound. In Cylindrospermopsis chlorophyll-a based growth rates and photosystem II efficiencies were similar in controls and ultrasound treatments, but biovolume-based growth was significantly lower in ultrasound exposed cultures compared to controls. Despite biovolume growth rates of the filamentous cyanobacteria were reduced in ultrasound treatments compared to controls, growth remained positive implying still a population increase. In Microcystis and Scenedesmus growth rates were similar in controls and ultrasound treatments. Hence, no effect of ultrasound on these phytoplankton species was found. Ultrasound should not be viewed "environmental friendly" as it killed all Daphnia within 15 min, releasing Scenedesmus from grazing control in the cultures. Based on our experiments and critical literature review, we conclude that there is no music in controlling cyanobacteria in situ with the commercially available ultrasound transducers we have tested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES FOR CATALYST PREPARATION: USE OF ULTRASOUND AND MICROWAVE IRRADIATION FOR THE PREPARATION OF VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST AND THEIR ACTIVITY FOR HYDROCARBON OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) has been prepared using ultrasound and microwave irradiation methods and compared with the catalyst prepared by conventional method for both the phase composition and activity for hydrocarbon oxidation. It is found that ultrasound irradiation metho...

  3. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES FOR CATALYST PREPARATION: USE OF ULTRASOUND AND MICROWAVE IRRADIATION FOR THE PREPARATION OF VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST AND THEIR ACTIVITY FOR HYDROCARBON OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) has been prepared using ultrasound and microwave irradiation methods and compared with the catalyst prepared by conventional method for both the phase composition and activity for hydrocarbon oxidation. It is found that ultrasound irradiation metho...

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Conduction Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bum Jun; Joeng, Eui Soo; Choi, Jun Kyu; Kang, Seok; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the utility of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) ultrasound-guided conduction technique compared to that of the conventional nerve conduction technique. Methods Fifty-eight legs of 29 healthy participants (18 males and 11 females; mean age, 42.7±14.9 years) were recruited. The conventional technique was performed bilaterally. The LFCN was localized by ultrasound. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the LFCN and the distance between the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the LFCN was measured. The nerve conduction study was repeated with the corrected cathode location. Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes of the LFCN were recorded and compared between the ultrasound-guided and conventional techniques. Results Mean body mass index of the participants was 23.7±3.5 kg/m2, CSA was 4.2±1.9 mm2, and the distance between the ASIS and LFCN was 5.6±1.7 mm. The mean amplitude values were 6.07±0.52 µV and 6.66±0.54 µV using the conventional and ultrasound-guided techniques, respectively. The SNAP amplitude of the LFCN using the ultrasound-guided technique was significantly larger than that recorded using the conventional technique. Conclusion Correcting the stimulation position using the ultrasound-guided technique helped obtain increased SNAP amplitude. PMID:25750871

  5. Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas using vector velocity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lange, Theis; Heerwagen, Søren; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Rix, Marianne; Lönn, Lars; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-11-01

    Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis was measured using the angle-independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging and compared with flow measurements using the ultrasound dilution technique during dialysis. Using an UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) with a linear transducer, 20 arteriovenous fistulas were scanned directly on the most superficial part of the fistula just before dialysis. Vector Flow Imaging volume flow was estimated with two different approaches, using the maximum and the average flow velocities detected in the fistula. Flow was estimated to be 242 mL/min and 404 mL/min lower than the ultrasound dilution technique estimate, depending on the approach. The standard deviations of the two Vector Flow Imaging approaches were 175.9 mL/min and 164.8 mL/min compared with a standard deviation of 136.9 mL/min using the ultrasound dilution technique. The study supports that Vector Flow Imaging is applicable for volume flow measurements. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of Rotator Cuff Tears: Ultrasound Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Okoroha, Kelechi R; Mehran, Nima; Duncan, Jonathan; Washington, Travis; Spiering, Tyler; Bey, Michael J; Van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are both capable of diagnosing full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, it is unknown which imaging modality is more accurate and precise in evaluating the characteristics of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a surgical population. This study reviewed 114 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear over a 1-year period. Of these patients, 61 had both preoperative MRI and ultrasound for review. Three musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated each ultrasound and MRI in a randomized and blinded fashion on 2 separate occasions. Tear size, retraction status, muscle atrophy, and fatty infiltration were analyzed and compared between the 2 modalities. Ultrasound measurements were statistically smaller in both tear size (P=.001) and retraction status (P=.001) compared with MRI. The 2 image modalities showed comparable intraobserver reliability in assessment of tear size and retraction status. However, MRI showed greater interobserver reliability in assessment of tear size, retraction status, and atrophy. Independent observers are more likely to agree on measurements of the characteristics of rotator cuff tears when using MRI compared with ultrasound. As tear size increases, the 2 image modalities show greater differences in measurement of tear size and retraction status. Additionally, compared with MRI, ultrasound shows consistently low reliability in detecting subtle, but clinically important, degeneration of the soft tissue envelope. Although it is inexpensive and convenient, ultrasound may be best used to identify a tear, and MRI is superior for use in surgical planning for larger tears. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e124-e130.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  8. Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder P; Kumar, Shwetam; Kathiria, Atman V; Harjai, Rachit; Jawed, Akram; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered. PMID:27857468

  9. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  10. Abdominal ultrasound and medical education.

    PubMed

    García de Casasola Sánchez, G; Torres Macho, J; Casas Rojo, J M; Cubo Romano, P; Antón Santos, J M; Villena Garrido, V; Diez Lobato, R

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound is a very versatile diagnostic modality that permits real-time visualization of multiple internal organs. It is of invaluable help for the physical examination of the patients. To assess if ultrasound can be incorporated into medical education and if the students can perform a basic abdominal ultrasound examination without the necessity of a long period of training. Twelve medical students were trained in basic abdominal ultrasound during a 15-h training program including a 5-h theoretical and practical course and supervised practice in 20 selected patients. Subsequently, we conducted an evaluation test that assessed the ability of students to obtain the ultrasound views and to detect various pathologies in five different patients. The students were able to correctly identify the abdominal views more than 90% of the times. This percentage was only lower (80%) in the right subcostal view to locate the gallbladder. The accuracy or global efficiency of the ultrasound for the diagnosis of relevant pathological findings of the patients was greater than 90% (91.1% gallstones, abdominal aortic aneurysm 100%; splenomegaly 98.3%, ascites 100%; dilated inferior vena cava 100%; acute urinary retention 100%). The ultrasound may be a feasible learning tool in medical education. Ultrasound can help students to improve the physical examination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasound speckle tracking for radial, longitudinal and circumferential strain estimation of the carotid artery--an in vitro validation via sonomicrometry using clinical and high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Matilda; Heyde, Brecht; Kremer, Florence; Brodin, Lars-Åke; D'hooge, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasound speckle tracking for carotid strain assessment has in the past decade gained interest in studies of arterial stiffness and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to validate and directly contrast carotid strain assessment by speckle tracking applied on clinical and high-frequency ultrasound images in vitro. Four polyvinyl alcohol phantoms mimicking the carotid artery were constructed with different mechanical properties and connected to a pump generating carotid flow profiles. Gray-scale ultrasound long- and short-axis images of the phantoms were obtained using a standard clinical ultrasound system, Vivid 7 (GE Healthcare, Horten, Norway) and a high-frequency ultrasound system, Vevo 2100 (FUJIFILM, VisualSonics, Toronto, Canada) with linear-array transducers (12L/MS250). Radial, longitudinal and circumferential strains were estimated using an in-house speckle tracking algorithm and compared with reference strain acquired by sonomicrometry. Overall, the estimated strain corresponded well with the reference strain. The correlation between estimated peak strain in clinical ultrasound images and reference strain was 0.91 (p<0.001) for radial strain, 0.73 (p<0.001) for longitudinal strain and 0.90 (p<0.001) for circumferential strain and for high-frequency ultrasound images 0.95 (p<0.001) for radial strain, 0.93 (p<0.001) for longitudinal strain and 0.90 (p<0.001) for circumferential strain. A significant larger bias and root mean square error was found for circumferential strain estimation on clinical ultrasound images compared to high frequency ultrasound images, but no significant difference in bias and root mean square error was found for radial and longitudinal strain when comparing estimation on clinical and high-frequency ultrasound images. The agreement between sonomicrometry and speckle tracking demonstrates that carotid strain assessment by ultrasound speckle tracking is feasible.

  12. Ultrasound tomography device

    SciTech Connect

    Hassler, D.; Trautenberg, E.

    1984-10-23

    An ultrasound tomography device for scanning an object under examination from a plurality of directions. Coronal slice images of the plane or planes near or at the female breast wall are obtained. A sagittal scanner is used to obtain numerous small sectional oblique views of the slice to be viewed. A full image of the coronal slice plane is reconstructed through section by section combination of the images obtained from the several small sagittal sections. By providing the sagittal scanner with a scanning motion as well as with translational mobility a full composite view is provided.

  13. Ultrasound attenuation in ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Shliomis, Mark; Mond, Michael; Morozov, Konstantin

    2008-08-15

    The absorption of acoustic energy by internal degrees of freedom of short chains is proposed as a new viable mechanism of ultrasound attenuation in ferrofluids. It is demonstrated that even though the volume fraction of the chains may be quite small, such an effect may reach the order of magnitude of viscous damping. In addition, by investigating the statistical properties of dimers in ferrofluids, it is shown that an applied magnetic field modifies the sound attenuation in a highly anisotropic manner. The proposed mechanism provides new insight into the fundamental issue of colloidal response, and, in particular, may lead to its utilization in novel experimental concepts.

  14. Application of breast ultrasound in a mammography-based Chinese breast screening study.

    PubMed

    Ya-jie, Ji; Wei-jun, Peng; Cai, Chang; Jian-hui, Ding; Wei, Zeng; Min, Chen; Guang-yu, Liu

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical significance of the combined use of mammography + ultrasound as a new breast screening strategy. The inclusion criteria were: (1) females aged >40yrs; (2) breast cancer diagnosis by the breast image screening personnel at FUSCC; (3) screening by both ultrasound and mammography; (4) mammographic/sonographic images analyzed independently by different radiologists; and (5) follow-up for at least 1 year. Fifty-four women were enrolled. The analysis included diagnostic sensitivity of mammography, ultrasound, and mammography + ultrasound. The sensitivities of mammography and mammography + ultrasound were compared overall as well as among different age groups/breast densities. The screening sensitivity of mammography, ultrasound, and mammography + ultrasound was 79.6, 57.4, and 92.6 %, respectively. The difference between mammography and mammography + ultrasound was significant (P < 0.05). The benefit of including ultrasound with mammography as a new breast image screening strategy was found statistically significant in patients with dense breast on mammogram while it was non-significant in younger (<50 years) women. We, therefore, concluded that mammography + ultrasound increased the diagnostic sensitivity of breast screening; hence it was more desirable for women with dense breast on mammography.

  15. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to adequate resources, and appropriate integration into existing medical education curricula. As focused ultrasonography increasingly penetrates academic and community practices, access to ultrasound equipment and trained faculty is improving. However, there has remained the major challenge of determining at which level is integrating ultrasound training within the medical training paradigm most appropriate. Methods The Ohio State University College of Medicine has developed a novel vertical curriculum for focused ultrasonography which is concordant with the 4-year medical school curriculum. Given current evidenced-based practices, a curriculum was developed which provides medical students an exposure in focused ultrasonography. The curriculum utilizes focused ultrasonography as a teaching aid for students to gain a more thorough understanding of basic and clinical science within the medical school curriculum. The objectives of the course are to develop student understanding in indications for use, acquisition of images, interpretation of an ultrasound examination, and appropriate decision-making of ultrasound findings. Results Preliminary data indicate that a vertical ultrasound curriculum is a feasible and effective means of teaching focused ultrasonography. The foreseeable limitations include faculty skill level and training, initial cost of equipment, and incorporating additional information into an already saturated medical school curriculum. Conclusions Focused

  16. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bahner, David P; Adkins, Eric J; Hughes, Daralee; Barrie, Michael; Boulger, Creagh T; Royall, Nelson A

    2013-07-02

    Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to adequate resources, and appropriate integration into existing medical education curricula. As focused ultrasonography increasingly penetrates academic and community practices, access to ultrasound equipment and trained faculty is improving. However, there has remained the major challenge of determining at which level is integrating ultrasound training within the medical training paradigm most appropriate. The Ohio State University College of Medicine has developed a novel vertical curriculum for focused ultrasonography which is concordant with the 4-year medical school curriculum. Given current evidenced-based practices, a curriculum was developed which provides medical students an exposure in focused ultrasonography. The curriculum utilizes focused ultrasonography as a teaching aid for students to gain a more thorough understanding of basic and clinical science within the medical school curriculum. The objectives of the course are to develop student understanding in indications for use, acquisition of images, interpretation of an ultrasound examination, and appropriate decision-making of ultrasound findings. Preliminary data indicate that a vertical ultrasound curriculum is a feasible and effective means of teaching focused ultrasonography. The foreseeable limitations include faculty skill level and training, initial cost of equipment, and incorporating additional information into an already saturated medical school curriculum. Focused ultrasonography is an evolving concept in medicine

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  18. What's new in urologic ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Anupam; Naranje, Priyanka; Pavunesan, Santhosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an imaging technology that has evolved swiftly and has come a long way since its beginnings. It is a commonly used initial diagnostic imaging modality as it is rapid, effective, portable, relatively inexpensive, and causes no harm to human health. In the last few decades, there have been significant technological improvements in the equipment as well as the development of contrast agents that allowed ultrasound to be even more widely adopted for urologic imaging. Ultrasound is an excellent guidance tool for an array of urologic interventional procedures and also has therapeutic application in the form of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tumor ablation. This article focuses on the recent advances in ultrasound technology and its emerging clinical applications in urology. PMID:26166960

  19. [Determination of femoral head position with transinguinal ultrasound in DDH treatment].

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, O; Zieger, M; Wirth, T; Fernandez, F F

    2009-01-01

    Determination of the femoral head position after closed or open reduction and application of a spica cast is possible by X-ray, MRI, CT or transinguinal ultrasound. In this study we compared the efficacy of transinguinal ultrasound and radiography. Further options with transinguinal ultrasound such as the determination of soft tissue and intraoperative possibilities are also described. In a first cohort of 25 patients with 33 affected hips ultrasound and radiography were compared. In a second cohort of 8 patients with 11 affected hips ultrasound and arthrography were compared. 32 radiographs proved to be not useful for the precise determination of the femoral head position. In all ultrasound images the criteria described by van Douveren et al. could be identified. All ultrasound images in the study were useful and gave reliable information with regard to the femoral head position. Consequently, standard radiographic documentation is no longer used as a standard in our clinic. MRI and CT are reserved for special cases. We recommend transinguinal ultrasound as a standard diagnostic method for determination of the femoral head position in hip spica casts. With a portable ultasound system, determination of the hip position using transinguinal ultrasound is immediately possible in the operating theatre. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  20. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound as a New Investigative Tool in Diagnostic Imaging of Muscle Injuries-A Pilot Study Evaluating Conventional Ultrasound, CEUS, and Findings in MRI.

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, Thilo; Heiss, Rafael; Swoboda, Bernd; Kellermann, Marion; Gelse, Kolja; Grim, Casper; Strobel, Deike; Wildner, Dane

    2017-07-11

    To emphasize the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the imaging of muscle injuries with different degrees of severity by comparing findings to established imaging modalities such as conventional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Case series. Institutional study. Conventional ultrasound and CEUS were performed in the Department of Internal Medicine. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in the Department of Radiology within the Magnetom Avanto 1.5T and Magnetom Skyra fit 3T (Siemens Healthineers, Erlangen, Germany) and in the Institution of Imaging Diagnostics and Therapy (Magnetom Avanto 1.5T; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Fifteen patients who underwent an acute muscle injury were recruited. The appearance and detectable size of muscle injuries were compared between each imaging modality. The injuries were assessed by 3 independent observers and blinded between imaging modalities. All 15 injuries were identified on MRI and CEUS, whereas 10 injuries showed abnormalities in conventional ultrasound. The determination and measurement revealed significant differences between conventional ultrasound and CEUS depending on injury severity. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed an impairment of microcirculation in grade I lesions (corresponding to intramuscular edema observed in MRI), which was not detectable using conventional ultrasound. Our results indicate that performing CEUS seems to be a sensitive additional diagnostic modality in the early assessment of muscle injuries. Our results highlight the advantages of CEUS in the imaging of low-grade lesions when compared with conventional ultrasound, as this was the more accurate modality for identifying intramuscular edema.

  1. Temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography in verification of endotracheal tube placement.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Rudolph, S S; Børglum, J; Isbye, D L

    2011-11-01

    This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung ultrasound with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation. A prospective, paired, and investigator-blinded study carried out in the operating theatre. Twenty-five adult patients requiring endotracheal intubation were included. During intubation, transtracheal ultrasound was performed to visualize passage of the endotracheal tube. During bag ventilation, bilateral lung ultrasound was performed for the detection of lung sliding as a sign of ventilation simultaneous with capnography and auscultation of the epigastrium and chest. Primary outcome measure was time difference to confirmed endotracheal intubation between ultrasound and auscultation alone. Secondary outcome measure was time difference between ultrasound and auscultation combined with capnography. Both methods verified endotracheal tube placement in all patients. In 68% of patients, endotracheal tube placement was visualized by real-time transtracheal ultrasound. Comparing ultrasound with the combination of auscultation and capnography, there was a significant difference between the two methods. Median time for ultrasound was 40 s [interquartile range (IQR) 35-48 s] vs. 48 s (IQR 45-53 s), P < 0.0001. Mean difference was -7.1 s in favour of ultrasound [95% confidence interval (CI) -9.4--4.8 s]. No significant difference was found between ultrasound compared with auscultation alone. Median time for auscultation alone was 42 s (IQR 37-47 s), P = 0.6, with a mean difference of -0.88 s in favour of ultrasound (95% CI -4.2-2.5 s). Verification of endotracheal tube placement with ultrasound is as fast as auscultation alone and faster than the standard method of auscultation and capnography. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  2. Spectral clustering algorithms for ultrasound image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Archip, Neculai; Rohling, Robert; Cooperberg, Peter; Tahmasebpour, Hamid; Warfield, Simon K

    2005-01-01

    Image segmentation algorithms derived from spectral clustering analysis rely on the eigenvectors of the Laplacian of a weighted graph obtained from the image. The NCut criterion was previously used for image segmentation in supervised manner. We derive a new strategy for unsupervised image segmentation. This article describes an initial investigation to determine the suitability of such segmentation techniques for ultrasound images. The extension of the NCut technique to the unsupervised clustering is first described. The novel segmentation algorithm is then performed on simulated ultrasound images. Tests are also performed on abdominal and fetal images with the segmentation results compared to manual segmentation. Comparisons with the classical NCut algorithm are also presented. Finally, segmentation results on other types of medical images are shown.

  3. Ultrasound assisted phytosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Sathya, K; Saravanathamizhan, R; Baskar, G

    2017-11-01

    The present work deals with the ultrasound assisted green synthesis of iron oxide nano particle using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract as a reducing agent. The synthesized iron oxide nanoparticle was confirmed by UV spectra. The characterization was done to know more about morphology and size of the particle by SEM analysis which shows spherical particles with size ranging from 20 to 90nm. The antimicrobial activity of the leaf extract and the synthesized nanoparticles was studied against the pathogens Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus niger. The ultrasound assisted iron oxide nanoparticle shows higher scavenging activity and antimicrobial activity compared with iron oxide nanoparticle synthesized by magnetic stirrer and Coriandrum sativum leaf extract. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Site-specific ultrasound reflection properties and superficial collagen content of bovine knee articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laasanen, Mikko S.; Saarakkala, Simo; Töyräs, Juha; Rieppo, Jarno; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2005-07-01

    Previous quantitative 2D-ultrasound imaging studies have demonstrated that the ultrasound reflection measurement of articular cartilage surface sensitively detects degradation of the collagen network, whereas digestion of cartilage proteoglycans has no significant effect on the ultrasound reflection. In this study, the first aim was to characterize the ability of quantitative 2D-ultrasound imaging to detect site-specific differences in ultrasound reflection and backscattering properties of cartilage surface and cartilage-bone interface at visually healthy bovine knee (n = 30). As a second aim, we studied factors controlling ultrasound reflection properties of an intact cartilage surface. The ultrasound reflection coefficient was determined in time (R) and frequency domains (IRC) at medial femoral condyle, lateral patello-femoral groove, medial tibial plateau and patella using a 20 MHz ultrasound imaging instrument. Furthermore, cartilage surface roughness was quantified by calculating the ultrasound roughness index (URI). The superficial collagen content of the cartilage was determined using a FT-IRIS-technique. A significant site-dependent variation was shown in cartilage thickness, ultrasound reflection parameters, URI and superficial collagen content. As compared to R and IRC, URI was a more sensitive parameter in detecting differences between the measurement sites. Ultrasound reflection parameters were not significantly related to superficial collagen content, whereas the correlation between R and URI was high. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface showed insignificant site-dependent variation. The current results suggest that ultrasound reflection from the intact cartilage surface is mainly dependent on the cartilage surface roughness and the collagen content has a less significant role.

  5. Implantable ultrasound devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkomerson, David; Chilipka, Thomas; Bogan, John; Blebea, John; Choudry, Rashad; Wang, John; Salvatore, Michael; Rotella, Vittorio; Soundararajan, Krishnan

    2008-03-01

    Using medical implants to wirelessly report physiological data is a technique that is rapidly growing. Ultrasound is well-suited for implants -- it requires little power and this form of radiated energy has no ill effects on the body. We report here on techniques we have developed in our experience gained in implanting over a dozen Doppler ultrasound flow-measuring implants in dogs. The goal of our implantable device is to measure flow in an arterial graft. To accomplish this, we place a Doppler transducer in the wall of a graft and an implant unit under the skin that energizes the 20 MHz Doppler transducer system, either when started by external command or by internal timetable. The implant records the digitized Doppler real and imaginary channels and transmits the data to a nearby portable computer for storage and evaluation. After outlining the overall operation of the system, we will concentrate on three areas of implant design where special techniques are required: ensuring safety, including biocompatibility to prevent the body from reacting to its invasion; powering the device, including minimizing energy used so that a small battery can provide long-life; and transmitting the data obtained.

  6. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  7. Accelerated Focused Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    White, P. Jason; Thomenius, Kai; Clement, Gregory T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most, basic trade-offs in ultrasound imaging involves frame rate, depth, and number of lines. Achieving good spatial resolution and coverage requires a large number of lines, leading to decreases in frame rate. An even more serious imaging challenge occurs with imaging modes involving spatial compounding and 3-D/4-D imaging, which are severely limited by the slow speed of sound in tissue. The present work can overcome these traditional limitations, making ultrasound imaging many-fold faster. By emitting several beams at once, and by separating the resulting overlapped signals through spatial and temporal processing, spatial resolution and/or coverage can be increased by many-fold while leaving frame rates unaffected. The proposed approach can also be extended to imaging strategies that do not involve transmit beamforming, such as synthetic aperture imaging. Simulated and experimental results are presented where imaging speed is improved by up to 32-fold, with little impact on image quality. Object complexity has little impact on the method’s performance, and data from biological systems can readily be handled. The present work may open the door to novel multiplexed and/or multidimensional protocols considered impractical today. PMID:20040398

  8. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  9. Ultrasound in cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Mandila, Christina; Poularas, John; Panou, Fotios

    2017-04-01

    In the perioperative period, the emergency department or the intensive care unit accurate assessment of variable chest pain requires meticulous knowledge, diagnostic skills, and suitable usage of various diagnostic modalities. In addition, in polytrauma patients, cardiac injury including aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and pericardial effusion should be immediately revealed and treated. In these patients, arrhythmias, mainly tachycardia, cardiac murmurs, or hypotension must alert physicians to suspect cardiovascular trauma, which would potentially be life threatening. Ultrasound of the heart using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography are valuable diagnostic tools that can be used interchangeably in conjunction with other modalities such as the electrocardiogram and computed tomography for the diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities in trauma patients. Although ultrasound of the heart is often underused in the setting of trauma, it does have the advantages of being easily accessible, noninvasive, and rapid bedside assessment tool. This review article aims to analyze the potential cardiac injuries in trauma patients, and to provide an elaborate description of the role of echocardiography for their accurate diagnosis.

  10. Determination of hip reduction in spica cast treatment for DDH: a comparison of radiography and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Zieger, Michael; Langendoerfer, Michael; Wirth, Thomas; Fernandez, Francisco F

    2009-08-01

    In this retrospective study we compared the efficacy of ultrasound and radiography for determining the position of the femoral head after closed or open reduction in DDH. The ultrasound was performed using the van Douveren technique by a transinguinal approach through a perineal window of the spica cast. Sixty-eight a.p. radiographs of the pelvis were correlated to 68 ultrasound images. Thirty-two radiographs were not useful for precisely determining the femoral head position, whereas the criteria described by van Douveren et al. could be identified in all ultrasound images. All ultrasound images in the study were useful and gave reliable information about the position of the femoral head. Consequently, standard radiographic documentation is no longer used as a standard in our clinic. MRI and CT are reserved for special cases. We recommend transinguinal ultrasound as a standard diagnostic method to determine the position of the femoral head in hip spica casts safely and reliably.

  11. [An adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization based on image contrast analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongquan

    2011-12-01

    In order to get real time ultrasound images with clear structure and improved contrast, an adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization method based on image contrast analysis was investigated. It firstly introduced the dynamic beamforming of ultrasound system, as well as the definition of assumed system's sound speed and the true sound speed propagated in tissues the degrade image quality due to their mismatch was also discussed. After given the pixel gray level value based ultrasound image contrast ratio,