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Sample records for comparing observed growth

  1. Growth data of underprivileged children living in rural areas of Chin State, Burma/Myanmar, compared to the WHO reference growth standards: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Prenkert, Malin; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore growth data (height-for-age, weight-for-age and BMI-for-age) of children living in poor socioeconomic conditions in rural areas of Chin State, Burma/Myanmar; and to compare these data with the growth and development z-score (GDZ) values for school-aged children and adolescents, provided by the WHO. Setting A support and educational programme, run by the Swedish association Chin Development and Research Society (CDRS), was carried out among underprivileged school-aged children, unable to attend school without economic and practical support, living in villages and remote areas in Chin State. Participants Community leaders who were well familiar with the citizens in the community identified children in need of this support. Other community members could also suggest or apply for this. The sample includes all participating children in the CDRS programme at the time of the data collection in six townships. The children were placed in host families, close to a suitable school. Two samples with a total of 639 children from 144 villages and remote areas were obtained: 1. Children in the CDRS Chin Programme (CCP) (2007–2010) comprised 558 children: 50% girls and boys. 2. Children in the Chin Society (CCS) (2010) comprised 81 children: 44% girls and 56% boys. Primary outcome measures Growth data. Results All growth data from both groups deviated significantly from the WHO standard references (p≤0.001). The prevalence of stunting (height-for-age ≤–2SD) was 52% among girls and 68% among boys. High levels of wasting (weight-for-age ≤–2SD) were found among girls 29% and boys 36% aged 5–10 years. In addition, severe thinness (BMI-for-age ≤–2SD) was found among girls 31% and boys 44%, all results to be compared to the expected 2.27%. Conclusions Many more than expected—according to the WHO reference values—in CCP and CCS suffered from stunting, wasting and thinness. PMID:26787249

  2. Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This diagram shows a cross sectrion of the fluid volume of an individual cell in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  3. Direct observation of nanowire growth and decomposition.

    PubMed

    Rackauskas, Simas; Shandakov, Sergey D; Jiang, Hua; Wagner, Jakob B; Nasibulin, Albert G

    2017-09-26

    Fundamental concepts of the crystal formation suggest that the growth and decomposition are determined by simultaneous embedding and removal of the atoms. Apparently, by changing the crystal formation conditions one can switch the regimes from the growth to decomposition. To the best of our knowledge, so far this has been only postulated, but never observed at the atomic level. By means of in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy we monitored and examined the atomic layer transformation at the conditions of the crystal growth and its decomposition using CuO nanowires selected as a model object. The atomic layer growth/decomposition was studied by varying an O2 partial pressure. Three distinct regimes of the atomic layer evolution were experimentally observed: growth, transition and decomposition. The transition regime, at which atomic layer growth/decomposition switch takes place, is characterised by random nucleation of the atomic layers on the growing {111} surface. The decomposition starts on the side of the nanowire by removing the atomic layers without altering the overall crystal structure, which besides the fundamental importance offers new possibilities for the nanowire manipulation. Understanding of the crystal growth kinetics and nucleation at the atomic level is essential for the precise control of 1D crystal formation.

  4. Comparative analysis of animal growth: a primate continuum revealed by a new dimensionless growth rate coefficient.

    PubMed

    Vinicius, Lucio; Mumby, Hannah S

    2013-05-01

    The comparative analysis of animal growth still awaits full integration into life-history studies, partially due to the difficulty of defining a comparable measure of growth rate across species. Using growth data from 50 primate species, we introduce a modified "general growth model" and a dimensionless growth rate coefficient β that controls for size scaling and phylogenetic effects in the distribution of growth rates. Our results contradict the prevailing idea that slow growth characterizes primates as a group: the observed range of β values shows that not all primates grow slowly, with galago species exhibiting growth rates similar or above the mammalian average, while other strepsirrhines and most New World monkeys show limited reduction in growth rates. Low growth rate characterizes apes and some papionines. Phylogenetic regressions reveal associations between β and life-history variables, providing tests for theories of primate growth evolution. We also show that primate slow growth is an exclusively postnatal phenomenon. Our study exemplifies how the dimensionless approach promotes the integration of growth rate data into comparative life-history analysis, and demonstrates its potential applicability to other cases of adaptive diversification of animal growth patterns.

  5. Comparing Two Approaches for Assessing Observation Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todling, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Langland and Baker introduced an approach to assess the impact of observations on the forecasts. In that approach, a state-space aspect of the forecast is defined and a procedure is derived ultimately relating changes in the aspect with changes in the observing system. Some features of the state-space approach are to be noted: the typical choice of forecast aspect is rather subjective and leads to incomplete assessment of the observing system, it requires availability of a verification state that is in practice correlated with the forecast, and it involves the adjoint operator of the entire data assimilation system and is thus constrained by the validity of this operator. This article revisits the topic of observation impacts from the perspective of estimation theory. An observation-space metric is used to allow inferring observation impact on the forecasts without the limitations just mentioned. Using differences of observation-minus-forecast residuals obtained from consecutive forecasts leads to the following advantages: (i) it suggests a rather natural choice of forecast aspect that directly links to the data assimilation procedure, (ii) it avoids introducing undesirable correlations in the forecast aspect since verification is done against the observations, and (iii) it does not involve linearization and use of adjoints. The observation-space approach has the additional advantage of being nearly cost free and very simple to implement. In its simplest form it reduces to evaluating the statistics of observationminus- background and observation-minus-analysis residuals with traditional methods. Illustrations comparing the approaches are given using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System.

  6. Comparing Simulated and Observed Gross Primary Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K.

    2009-12-01

    As part of the North American Carbon Program (NACP) Site-level Interim Synthesis, we compare simulated and observed Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) from 21 models at 36 eddy covariance flux towers. Evaluation of terrestrial carbon models typically include comparison of simulated and observed Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) at eddy covariance Flux towers, but such comparisons rarely include ecosystem respiration (Re) and GPP because they are not directly measured and must be estimated from observed NEE. All 21 models participating in the NACP Site-Level Interim Synthesis ran simulations at each tower using a standard simulation protocol with gap-filled observed weather. The observed NEE at all 36 towers are partitioned into Re and GPP using a standard procedure. The gap-filled observed NEE, Re, and GPP include estimated uncertainties at multiple time scales due to random variability, gap-filling technique, friction velocity filtering, and flux partitioning. We quantify each model’s performance in reproducing the estimated GPP using uncertainty weighted cost functions, root-mean-square error (bias), correlations, and Taylor diagrams at the diurnal, seasonal, and annual time scales. We relate model performance to model characteristics, such as the type of photosynthesis model (light use efficiency vs. stomatal conductance), phenology (diagnostic vs. prognostic), values of common parameters, and representation of the physical environment (soil temperature, soil moisture, and vapor pressure deficit).

  7. Comparing InSAR observations of incremental fault growth in the 2005-2010 Dabbahu (Ethiopia) rifting episode with cumulative displacement-length measurements from high-resolution LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, B.; Wright, T.; Paton, D. A.; Rowland, J. V.; Vye, C.

    2012-12-01

    out in October 2009 covering the central section of the Dabbahu segment. The resulting DEM covers 800 km2 with, on average, one return every 4 m{2}, but including areas with 1 return per 0.25 m2. The height accuracy of the DEM is ˜ 10 cm. We identify the slipped structures by calculating the gradient of the unwrapped deformation. Once the structures have been identified and roughly picked we apply our new algorithm to pick hanging and footwall cut-offs along the surface faults and extract their displacement-length profiles from the LiDAR. At the same time we automatically extract the incremental line-of-sight fault offsets from the InSAR data, converting these into vertical throw using an average sense of motion on the faults. By comparing these two measurements we can directly measure how faults are growing, and test models of fault growth and linkage. During each event we observe reactivation of faults along the entire length of the dike with several 10s of fault segments involved in each case. We can further see that the deformation is not just located along the obvious surface faults but that a considerable amount is located on buried structures.

  8. Observation of Cluster Growth in an Ionomer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-22

    CLASSIFICATiON OF THIS PAGE All otter e0,t On$ 3re obsolete OBSERVATION OF CLUSTER FORMATION IN AN IONOMER A. F. Galambos, W. B. Stockton, J. T. Koberstein A...jim film was prepared by casting a 10% solution of the ionomer in a mixed solvent of 90% THF and 10% deionized water onto glass . The solvent was...ELE0 7 1E R&T Code 4132013 AU05O Technical Report No. 1 Observation of Cluster Growth in an Ionomer t) 00 A. F. Galambos, W. B. Stocktcn, J. T

  9. Geometry and growth contributions to cosmic shear observables

    DOE PAGES

    Matilla, Jose Manuel Zorrilla; Haiman, Zoltan; Petri, Andrea; ...

    2017-07-13

    We explore the sensitivity of weak-lensing observables to the expansion history of the Universe and to the growth of cosmic structures, as well as the relative contribution of both effects to constraining cosmological parameters. We utilize ray-tracing dark-matter-only N-body simulations and validate our technique by comparing our results for the convergence power spectrum with analytic results from past studies. We then extend our analysis to non-Gaussian observables which cannot be easily treated analytically. We study the convergence (equilateral) bispectrum and two topological observables, lensing peaks and Minkowski functionals, focusing on their sensitivity to the matter density Ωm and the darkmore » energy equation of state w. We find that a cancellation between the geometry and growth effects is a common feature for all observables and exists at the map level. It weakens the overall sensitivity by factors of up to 3 and 1.5 for w and Ωm, respectively, with the bispectrum worst affected. However, combining geometry and growth information alleviates the degeneracy between Ωm and w from either effect alone. As a result, the magnitudes of marginalized errors remain similar to those obtained from growth-only effects, but with the correlation between the two parameters switching sign. Furthermore, these results shed light on the origin of the cosmology sensitivity of non-Gaussian statistics and should be useful in optimizing combinations of observables.« less

  10. Geometry and growth contributions to cosmic shear observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matilla, José Manuel Zorrilla; Haiman, Zoltán; Petri, Andrea; Namikawa, Toshiya

    2017-07-01

    We explore the sensitivity of weak-lensing observables to the expansion history of the Universe and to the growth of cosmic structures, as well as the relative contribution of both effects to constraining cosmological parameters. We utilize ray-tracing dark-matter-only N -body simulations and validate our technique by comparing our results for the convergence power spectrum with analytic results from past studies. We then extend our analysis to non-Gaussian observables which cannot be easily treated analytically. We study the convergence (equilateral) bispectrum and two topological observables, lensing peaks and Minkowski functionals, focusing on their sensitivity to the matter density Ωm and the dark energy equation of state w . We find that a cancellation between the geometry and growth effects is a common feature for all observables and exists at the map level. It weakens the overall sensitivity by factors of up to 3 and 1.5 for w and Ωm, respectively, with the bispectrum worst affected. However, combining geometry and growth information alleviates the degeneracy between Ωm and w from either effect alone. As a result, the magnitudes of marginalized errors remain similar to those obtained from growth-only effects, but with the correlation between the two parameters switching sign. These results shed light on the origin of the cosmology sensitivity of non-Gaussian statistics and should be useful in optimizing combinations of observables.

  11. Comparing Graphene Growth on Cu(111) versus Oxidized Cu(111)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of graphene on catalytically active metallic surfaces via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is known to be one of the most reliable routes toward high-quality large-area graphene. This CVD-grown graphene is generally coupled to its metallic support resulting in a modification of its intrinsic properties. Growth on oxides is a promising alternative that might lead to a decoupled graphene layer. Here, we compare graphene on a pure metallic to graphene on an oxidized copper surface in both cases grown by a single step CVD process under similar conditions. Remarkably, the growth on copper oxide, a high-k dielectric material, preserves the intrinsic properties of graphene; it is not doped and a linear dispersion is observed close to the Fermi energy. Density functional theory calculations give additional insight into the reaction processes and help explaining the catalytic activity of the copper oxide surface. PMID:25611528

  12. Roles of Naturalistic Observation in Comparative Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David B.

    1977-01-01

    "Five roles are considered by which systematic, quantified field research can augment controlled laboratory experimentation in terms of increasing the validity of laboratory studies." Advocates that comparative psychologists should "take more initiative in designing, executing, and interpreting our experiments with regard to the natural history of…

  13. Roles of Naturalistic Observation in Comparative Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David B.

    1977-01-01

    "Five roles are considered by which systematic, quantified field research can augment controlled laboratory experimentation in terms of increasing the validity of laboratory studies." Advocates that comparative psychologists should "take more initiative in designing, executing, and interpreting our experiments with regard to the natural history of…

  14. Comparative Study of Bacterial Growth in Magnet Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Derek; Masood, Samina

    It has been shown that magnetic fields affect bacterial growth. A comparative study of growth rates for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria with different types of magnetic fields is done. Special focus is placed upon growth within liquid media, and the effect of magnetic fields relative to the chosen growth medium is considered.

  15. Kinetics of droplet growth observed in recent field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can indirectly influence global climate budget by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime, and coverage of clouds. While it is generally agreed that aerosol indirect effects act to cool the Earth-atmosphere system by increasing cloud reflectivity and coverage, the magnitudes of the indirect effects are poorly understood. The formation of cloud droplets from aerosol particles is kinetically controlled by the availability of water vapor, equilibrium water vapor pressure above the growing droplet surface, and both the gas phase and aerosol phase mass transfer resistances. It has been hypothesized that the formation of surface organic films or the delay in dissolution of solute could significantly delay the growth of cloud droplets. Such delay could lead to a higher maximum supersaturation within a rising cloud parcel, therefore higher droplet number concentration and smaller droplet size at constant liquid water content. When only a subset of the droplets experiences significant growth delay, the overall droplet size spectrum will be broadened, which facilitates the formation of precipitation. During three recent field campaigns (CalNex-LA, CARES, and Aerosol Intensive Observation Period at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the CCN activity and droplet growth of size selected particles ranging from 25 to 320 nm were characterized by a CCN counter under supersaturations from 0.1% to 0.8%. The three campaigns allow us to examine the droplet growth for many representative organic aerosol types, including biogenic SOA, anthropogenic SOA, and organic aerosols from biomass burning. The droplet growth of size-selected ambient particles inside the CCN counter was found to be influenced by a number of parameters, including particle critical supersaturation, heterogeneity in particle composition, and particle concentration. For example, reduced droplet growth due to water vapor depletion was observed when particle concentration was higher than 200 cm

  16. Plant development in space: Observations on root formation and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. G.; Kann, R. P.; Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1990-01-01

    Root growth in space is discussed and observations on root production from plants flown as part of the Chromex project that were defined as to their origin, stage of development and physiological status, are presented. Roots were generated from fully differentiated, aseptically maintained individuals of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae) under spaceflight conditions. Results are compared for tissue culture generated plantlets and comparably sized seedling clone individuals, both of which had their roots trimmed on Earth before they were loaded into NASA's plant growth unit and subjected to a 5 day shuttle flight (STS-29). Asepsis was maintained throughout the experiment. Overall root production was 40 to 50 percent greater under spaceflight conditions than during ground control tests. However, root formation slowed down towards the end of the flight. This decrease in new roots did not occur in the ground controls that sought to simulate flight except for microgravity.

  17. Plant development in space: Observations on root formation and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. G.; Kann, R. P.; Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1990-01-01

    Root growth in space is discussed and observations on root production from plants flown as part of the Chromex project that were defined as to their origin, stage of development and physiological status, are presented. Roots were generated from fully differentiated, aseptically maintained individuals of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae) under spaceflight conditions. Results are compared for tissue culture generated plantlets and comparably sized seedling clone individuals, both of which had their roots trimmed on Earth before they were loaded into NASA's plant growth unit and subjected to a 5 day shuttle flight (STS-29). Asepsis was maintained throughout the experiment. Overall root production was 40 to 50 percent greater under spaceflight conditions than during ground control tests. However, root formation slowed down towards the end of the flight. This decrease in new roots did not occur in the ground controls that sought to simulate flight except for microgravity.

  18. Comparative Views of Arctic Sea Ice Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA researchers have new insights into the mysteries of Arctic sea ice, thanks to the unique abilities of Canada's Radarsat satellite. The Arctic is the smallest of the world's four oceans, but it may play a large role in helping scientists monitor Earth's climate shifts.

    Using Radarsat's special sensors to take images at night and to peer through clouds, NASA researchers can now see the complete ice cover of the Arctic. This allows tracking of any shifts and changes, in unprecedented detail, over the course of an entire winter. The radar-generated, high-resolution images are up to 100 times better than those taken by previous satellites.

    The two images above are separated by nine days (earlier image on the left). Both images represent an area (approximately 96 by 128 kilometers; 60 by 80 miles)located in the Baufort Sea, north of the Alaskan coast. The brighter features are older thicker ice and the darker areas show young, recently formed ice. Within the nine-day span, large and extensive cracks in the ice cover have formed due to ice movement. These cracks expose the open ocean to the cold, frigid atmosphere where sea ice grows rapidly and thickens.

    Using this new information, scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., can generate comprehensive maps of Arctic sea ice thickness for the first time. 'Before we knew only the extent of the ice cover,' said Dr. Ronald Kwok, JPL principal investigator of a project called Sea Ice Thickness Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery. 'We also knew that the sea ice extent had decreased over the last 20 years, but we knew very little about ice thickness.'

    'Since sea ice is very thin, about 3 meters (10 feet) or less,'Kwok explained, 'it is very sensitive to climate change.'

    Until now, observations of polar sea ice thickness have been available for specific areas, but not for the entire polar region.

    The new radar mapping technique has also given scientists a close look at

  19. Comparative Views of Arctic Sea Ice Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA researchers have new insights into the mysteries of Arctic sea ice, thanks to the unique abilities of Canada's Radarsat satellite. The Arctic is the smallest of the world's four oceans, but it may play a large role in helping scientists monitor Earth's climate shifts.

    Using Radarsat's special sensors to take images at night and to peer through clouds, NASA researchers can now see the complete ice cover of the Arctic. This allows tracking of any shifts and changes, in unprecedented detail, over the course of an entire winter. The radar-generated, high-resolution images are up to 100 times better than those taken by previous satellites.

    The two images above are separated by nine days (earlier image on the left). Both images represent an area (approximately 96 by 128 kilometers; 60 by 80 miles)located in the Baufort Sea, north of the Alaskan coast. The brighter features are older thicker ice and the darker areas show young, recently formed ice. Within the nine-day span, large and extensive cracks in the ice cover have formed due to ice movement. These cracks expose the open ocean to the cold, frigid atmosphere where sea ice grows rapidly and thickens.

    Using this new information, scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., can generate comprehensive maps of Arctic sea ice thickness for the first time. 'Before we knew only the extent of the ice cover,' said Dr. Ronald Kwok, JPL principal investigator of a project called Sea Ice Thickness Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery. 'We also knew that the sea ice extent had decreased over the last 20 years, but we knew very little about ice thickness.'

    'Since sea ice is very thin, about 3 meters (10 feet) or less,'Kwok explained, 'it is very sensitive to climate change.'

    Until now, observations of polar sea ice thickness have been available for specific areas, but not for the entire polar region.

    The new radar mapping technique has also given scientists a close look at

  20. Comparative Effectiveness Research Using Observational Data: Active Comparators to Emulate Target Trials with Inactive Comparators

    PubMed Central

    Huitfeldt, Anders; Hernan, Miguel A.; Kalager, Mette; Robins, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Because a comparison of noninitiators and initiators of treatment may be hopelessly confounded, guidelines for the conduct of observational research often recommend using an “active” comparator group consisting of people who initiate a treatment other than the medication of interest. In this paper, we discuss the conditions under which this approach is valid if the goal is to emulate a trial with an inactive comparator. Identification of Effects: We provide conditions under which a target trial in a subpopulation can be validly emulated from observational data, using an active comparator that is known or believed to be inactive for the outcome of interest. The average treatment effect in the population as a whole is not identified, but under certain conditions this approach can be used to emulate a trial in the subset of individuals who were treated with the treatment of interest, in the subset of individuals who were treated with the treatment of interest but not with the comparator, or in the subset of individuals who were treated with both the treatment of interest and the active comparator. The Plausibility of the Comparability Conditions: We discuss whether the required conditions can be expected to hold in pharmacoepidemiologic research, with a particular focus on whether the conditions are plausible in situations where the standard analysis fails due to unmeasured confounding by access to health care or health seeking behaviors. Discussion: The conditions discussed in this paper may at best be approximately true. Investigators using active comparator designs to emulate trials with inactive comparators should exercise caution. PMID:27891526

  1. Viewing the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Joel Kearns viewing a laboratory demonstration of the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) experiment module. Principal Investigator is Alexander McPherson. First flight plarned for ISS.

  2. Comparing models for growth and management of forest tracts

    Treesearch

    J.J. Colbert; Michael Schuckers; Desta Fekedulegn

    2003-01-01

    The Stand Damage Model (SDM) is a PC-based model that is easily installed, calibrated and initialized for use in exploring the future growth and management of forest stands or small wood lots. We compare the basic individual tree growth model incorporated in this model with alternative models that predict the basal area growth of trees. The SDM is a gap-type simulator...

  3. COLONIAL GROWTH OF MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM OBSERVED WITH THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPE

    PubMed Central

    Shifrine, Moshe; Pangborn, Jack; Adler, Henry E.

    1962-01-01

    Shifrine, Moshe (University of California, Davis), Jack Pangborn, and Henry E. Adler. Colonial growth of Mycoplasma gallisepticum observed with the electron microscope. J. Bacteriol. 83:187–192. 1962.—Mycoplasma gallisepticum strain S6 was grown on collodion film on solid medium. Samples were removed every few hours, fixed, washed, shadowed, and observed with the electron microscope. Three distinct forms of growth were observed: elementary cells (hexagonally shaped), platycytes, and exoblasts. A tentative mode of growth was postulated. The significance of the angular morphology to the relation between mycoplasmas and L-forms of bacteria is discussed. Images PMID:13911868

  4. Observation of Single Colloidal Platinum Nanocrystal Growth Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haimei; Smith, Rachel; Jun, Young-wook; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-02-09

    It is conventionally assumed that the growth of monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals requires a temporally discrete nucleation followed by monomer attachment onto the existing nuclei. However, recent studies have reported violations of this classical growth model, and have suggested that inter-particle interactions are also involved during the growth. Mechanisms of nanocrystal growth still remain controversial. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we show that platinum nanocrystals can grow either by monomer attachment from solution onto the existing particles or by coalescence between the particles. Surprisingly, an initially broad size distribution of the nanocrystals can spontaneously narrow. We suggest that nanocrystals take different pathways of growth based on their size- and morphology-dependent internal energies. These observations are expected to be highly relevant for other nanocrystal systems.

  5. Comparing Learning from Observing and from Human Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muldner, Kasia; Lam, Rachel; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2014-01-01

    A promising instructional approach corresponds to" learning by observing others learn" (i.e., by watching tutorial dialogue between a tutor and tutee). However, more work is needed to understand this approach's pedagogical utility. Thus, in 2 experiments we compared student learning from collaborative observation of dialogue with 2 other…

  6. Laboratory Observations on Tidal Network Growth and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanon, L.; Carniello, L.; D'Alpaos, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of laboratory experiments carried out in a large experimental apparatus aimed at reproducing a typical lagoonal environment subject to tidal forcings. The experiments were designed in order to improve our understanding of the main processes governing tidal network initiation and its progressive morphodynamic evolution. In particular, the experiments summarized herein aimed at understanding the physical processes, as well as boundary and initial conditions, which lead to the initiation and subsequent development of a tidal channel network, starting from a plane horizontal tidal flat located behind a barrier island and connected through the sea by a single inlet. During the experiments we observed the growth and development of tidal networks and analyzed their most relevant geomorphic features, taking into account the role played by the characteristics of the tidal forcing in driving the development of channelled patterns. The experimental evidence suggests that general network evolution is substantially characterized by three processes: (1) channel elongation via headward growth, driven by the exceedance of a critical bottom shear stress; (2) incision and sinuosity gradually increasing with channels age; (3) formation of new lateral creeks and tributaries. The lack of external sediment supply, the absence of vegetation, and the prevalence of bedload transport prevented any deposition processes and lateral surface accretion, attributing a purely erosive character to the experimental lagoon. Nevertheless, the morphodynamic feedbacks occurring in the erosional case are essentially the same that occur under depositional conditions. In fact, in both cases, channel excavation is closely connected to concentration of tidal fluxes within the channel network during maximum ebb phase when maximum velocities and shear stresses are reached. In this experimental lagoon the main morphodynamic process responsible for tidal network initiation and development

  7. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Park, Chiwoo; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-01-08

    Direct observations of solution-phase nanoparticle growth using in situ liquid transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have demonstrated the importance of “non-classical” growth mechanisms, such as aggregation and coalescence, on the growth and final morphology of nanocrystals at the atomic and single nanoparticle scales. To date, groups have quantitatively interpreted the mean growth rate of nanoparticles in terms of the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) model for Ostwald ripening, but less attention has been paid to modeling the corresponding particle size distribution. Here we use in situ fluid stage scanning TEM to demonstrate that silver nanoparticles grow by a length-scale dependent mechanism, where individual nanoparticles grow by monomer attachment but ensemble-scale growth is dominated by aggregation. Although our observed mean nanoparticle growth rate is consistent with the LSW model, we show that the corresponding particle size distribution is broader and more symmetric than predicted by LSW. Following direct observations of aggregation, we interpret the ensemble-scale growth using Smoluchowski kinetics and demonstrate that the Smoluchowski model quantitatively captures the mean growth rate and particle size distribution.

  8. Seedling Growth Strategies in Bauhinia Species: Comparing Lianas and Trees

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhi-Quan; Poorter, Lourens; Cao, Kun-Fang; Bongers, Frans

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Lianas are expected to differ from trees in their growth strategies. As a result these two groups of woody species will have different spatial distributions: lianas are more common in high light environments. This study determines the differences in growth patterns, biomass allocation and leaf traits in five closely related liana and tree species of the genus Bauhinia. Methods Seedlings of two light-demanding lianas (Bauhinia tenuiflora and B. claviflora), one shade-tolerant liana (B. aurea), and two light-demanding trees (B. purpurea and B. monandra) were grown in a shadehouse at 25 % of full sunlight. A range of physiological, morphological and biomass parameters at the leaf and whole plant level were compared among these five species. Key Results The two light-demanding liana species had higher relative growth rate (RGR), allocated more biomass to leaf production [higher leaf mass fraction (LMF) and higher leaf area ratio (LAR)] and stem mass fraction (SMF), and less biomass to the roots [root mass fraction (RMF)] than the two tree species. The shade-tolerant liana had the lowest RGR of all five species, and had a higher RMF, lower SMF and similar LMF than the two light-demanding liana species. The two light-demanding lianas had lower photosynthetic rates per unit area (Aarea) and similar photosynthetic rates per unit mass (Amass) than the trees. Across species, RGR was positively related to SLA, but not to LAR and Aarea. Conclusions It is concluded that the faster growth of light-demanding lianas compared with light-demanding trees is based on morphological parameters (SLA, LMF and LAR), and cannot be attributed to higher photosynthetic rates at the leaf level. The shade-tolerant liana exhibited a slow-growth strategy, compared with the light-demanding species. PMID:17720978

  9. Direct observation of episodic growth in an abyssal xenophyophore (Protista)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooday, A. J.; Bett, B. J.; Pratt, D. N.

    1993-11-01

    Three specimens of the xenophyophore Reticulammina labyrinthica were photographed on the Madeira Abyssal Plain (31°6.1'N, 21°10.9'W; 4944 m) using the Bathysnap time-lapse camera system. During the 8 month observation period, the specimens underwent an estimated 3-10 fold increase in volume. Growth occurred episodically in several distinct phases, each lasting 2-3 days, during which sediment was collected and incorporated into the test. These phases were separated by fairly regular periods of about 2 months when the organisms showed little obvious activity. The growth phases were approximately synchronous between specimens. However, it is not clear whether the periodicity and apparent synchronization of these events resulted from an external (environmental) cue or whether growth is internally controlled and the synchronization arose by chance. These unique observations, which represent the first direct measurement of growth in any abyssal organism living outside a hydrothermal vent field, suggest that xenophyophores combine test growth with deposit feeding. The tests appear to grow more quickly, and to be more active, dynamic structures, than previously believed.

  10. "Lies, damned lies ..." and observational studies in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard K

    2013-06-01

    A new federal initiative has allocated $1.1 billion to comparative effectiveness research, and many have emphasized the importance of including observational studies in this effort. The rationale for using observational studies to assess comparative effectiveness is based on concerns that randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are not "real world" because they enroll homogeneous patient populations, measure study outcomes that are not important to patients, use protocols that are overly complex, are conducted in specialized centers, and use study treatments that are not consistent with usual care, and that RCTs are not always feasible because of a lack of equipoise, the need to assess delayed endpoints, and concerns that they take years to complete and are expensive. This essay questions the validity of each of these proposed limitations, summarizes concerns raised about the accuracy of results generated by observational studies, provides some examples of discrepancies between results of observational studies and RCTs that pertain to pulmonary and critical care, and suggests that using observational studies for comparative effectiveness research may increase rather than decrease the cost of health care and may harm patients.

  11. Comparing growth of ponderosa pine in two growing media

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese

    2009-01-01

    I compared growth of container ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings grown in a 1:1 (v:v) Sphagnum peat moss:coarse vermiculite medium (P:V) and a 7:3 (v:v) Sphagnum peat moss:Douglas-fir sawdust medium (P:S) at three different irrigation regimes. By using exponential fertilization techniques, I was able to supply seedlings with similar amounts...

  12. A Comparative Study of Cloud Observation between Instrumental Measurements and Visual Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Jeong, J. Y.; Park, D. O.; Kang, J. J.; Choi, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    The microphysical observations of clouds have been performed by human observers who record the amount, height, and type of cloud. However, the observational methods of clouds by human observers have their limitations due to its difficulties in the punctuality and weakness of assessment. The Automatic Cloud Observation System(ACOS) has been developed by NIMR to obtain continuous informationof the amount and height of clouds. A set of ACOS is composed of two cameras and the amounts and heights of clouds are retrieved from the sky images. Four sets of the ACOS were installed during last 4 years at four locations in South Korea. They are compared with cloud observation data from visual observations and instrumental measurements using ceilometers, radiometers, and another camera-type instrument named "Sky View". Recent two-year observation data are analyzed, focused on the differences of cloud amounts and heights between cloud observation methods.

  13. Comparing models of star formation simulating observed interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga, L. F.; Muñoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Rodrigues, I.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we make a comparison between different models of star formation to reproduce observed interacting galaxies. We use observational data to model the evolution of a pair of galaxies undergoing a minor merger. Minor mergers represent situations weakly deviated from the equilibrium configuration but significant changes in star fomation (SF) efficiency can take place, then, minor mergers provide an unique scene to study SF in galaxies in a realistic but yet simple way. Reproducing observed systems also give us the opportunity to compare the results of the simulations with observations, which at the end can be used as probes to characterize the models of SF implemented in the comparison. In this work we compare two different star formation recipes implemented in Gadget3 and GIZMO codes. Both codes share the same numerical background, and differences arise mainly in the star formation recipe they use. We use observations from Pico dos Días and GEMINI telescopes and show how we use observational data of the interacting pair in AM2229-735 to characterize the interacting pair. Later we use this information to simulate the evolution of the system to finally reproduce the observations: Mass distribution, morphology and main features of the merger-induced star formation burst. We show that both methods manage to reproduce roughly the star formation activity. We show, through a careful study, that resolution plays a major role in the reproducibility of the system. In that sense, star formation recipe implemented in GIZMO code has shown a more robust performance. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by Colciencias, Doctorado Nacional - 617 program.

  14. MHD models compared with Artemis observations at -60 Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencturk Akay, Iklim; Sibeck, David; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2016-07-01

    The distant magnetotail has been one of the least studied magnetic regions of the Earth's magnetosphere compared to the other near Earth both dayside and nightside magnetospheric regions owing to the limited number of spacecraft observations. Since 2011, ARTEMIS spacecraft give an excellent opportunity to study the magnetotail at lunar distances in terms of data quality and parameter space. This also gives opportunities to improve the magnetotail models at -60 Re and encourages the modelling studies of the distant magnetotail. Using ARTEMIS data in distant magnetotail, we create magnetic field and plasma flow vector maps in different planes and separated with IMF orientation to understand the magnetotail dynamics at this distance. For this study, we use CCMC's Run-on-Request resources of the MHD models; specifically SWMF-BATS-R-US, OpenGGCM, and LFM and perform the similar analysis with the models. Our main purpose in this study is to measure the performance of the MHD models at -60 Re distant magnetotail by comparing the model results with Artemis observations. In the literature, such a comprehensive comparative study is lacking in the distant tail. Preliminary results show that in general all three models underestimate the magnetic field structure while overestimating the flow speed. In the cross-sectional view, LFM seems to produce the better agreement with the observations. A clear dipolar magnetic field structure is seen with dawn-dusk asymmetry in all models owing to slight positive IMF By but the effect was found to be exaggerated. All models show tailward flows at this distance of the magnetotail, most possibly owing to the magnetic reconnection at the near Earth tail distances. A detailed comparison of several tail characteristics from the models will be presented and discussions will be given with respect to the observations from Artemis at this distance.

  15. Growth retardation in artistic compared with rhythmic elite female gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Neoklis A; Markou, Kostas B; Theodoropoulou, Anastasia; Benardot, Dan; Leglise, Michel; Vagenakis, Apostolos G

    2002-07-01

    We studied 129 female rhythmic gymnasts (RG) and 142 female artistic gymnasts (AG) who participated in the 1999 Gymnastics World Championship for RG in Osaka, Japan, and the 1999 and 2001 Gymnastics World Championships for AG in Tianjin, China (n = 48), and Ghent, Belgium (n = 94), respectively. RG were taller than average, with a mean height SD score above the 50th percentile, whereas AG were relatively short, with a mean height SD score below the 50th percentile. Both RG and AG followed their respective reported target height SD score, which was above the 50th percentile for the RG and below the 50th percentile for the AG. The RG followed a growth pattern that was higher than their reported target height, whereas AG exhibited a negative growth pattern. RG and AG weighed less than the population mean, with the mean weight for age below the 50th percentile for both groups. RG were taller than AG (t = 17.15; P < 0.001), with a higher reported target height SD score (t = 6.44; P < 0.001), a greater Delta height-reported target height (t = 2.74; P < 0.001), and a lower mean body fat (t = -11.83; P < 0.001) and body mass index (t = -10.73; P < 0.001) than AG. AG started their training at an earlier age than RG (t = 4.13; P < 0.001). Using multiple regression analysis, actual height SD score was independently influenced positively by weight SD score for both RG (b = 0.421; t = 4.317; P < 0.001) and AG (b = 1.404; t = 16.514; P = <0.001), and by reported target height only for RG (b = 0.299; t = 3.139; P = 0.002), and negatively by body mass index only for AG (b = -0.80; t = -9.88; P < 0.001). In conclusion, in elite female AG, a deterioration of growth potential was observed, whereas in RG the genetic predisposition to growth was preserved.

  16. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections: Comparing Observations and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Orlove, Matthew; SaintCyr, O.; Mays, L.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1996, the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs have detected "halo" CMEs that appear to be directed toward Earth, but information about the size and speed of these events seen face-on has been limited. From a single vantage point along the Sun-Earth line, the primary limitation has been ambiguity in fitting the cone model (or other forward-modeling techniques, e.g., Thernisian et al., 2006). But in the past few years, the STEREO mission has provided a view of Earth-directed events from the side. These events offer the opportunity to compare measurements (width and speed) of halo CMEs observed by STEREO with models that derive halo CME properties. We report here results of such a comparison on a large sample of LASCO CMEs in the STEREO era.

  17. Comparing soil moisture memory in satellite observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacke, Tobias; Hagemann, Stefan; Loew, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    A major obstacle to a correct parametrization of soil processes in large scale global land surface models is the lack of long term soil moisture observations for large parts of the globe. Currently, a compilation of soil moisture data derived from a range of satellites is released by the ESA Climate Change Initiative (ECV_SM). Comprising the period from 1978 until 2010, it provides the opportunity to compute climatological relevant statistics on a quasi-global scale and to compare these to the output of climate models. Our study is focused on the investigation of soil moisture memory in satellite observations and models. As a proxy for memory we compute the autocorrelation length (ACL) of the available satellite data and the uppermost soil layer of the models. Additional to the ECV_SM data, AMSR-E soil moisture is used as observational estimate. Simulated soil moisture fields are taken from ERA-Interim reanalysis and generated with the land surface model JSBACH, which was driven with quasi-observational meteorological forcing data. The satellite data show ACLs between one week and one month for the greater part of the land surface while the models simulate a longer memory of up to two months. Some pattern are similar in models and observations, e.g. a longer memory in the Sahel Zone and the Arabian Peninsula, but the models are not able to reproduce regions with a very short ACL of just a few days. If the long term seasonality is subtracted from the data the memory is strongly shortened, indicating the importance of seasonal variations for the memory in most regions. Furthermore, we analyze the change of soil moisture memory in the different soil layers of the models to investigate to which extent the surface soil moisture includes information about the whole soil column. A first analysis reveals that the ACL is increasing for deeper layers. However, its increase is stronger in the soil moisture anomaly than in its absolute values and the first even exceeds the

  18. Comparative Structure of Saturn's Rings from Cassini Radio Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; French, R. G.; Rappaport, N. J.; McGhee, C. A.; Wong, K.; Thomson, F. S.; Anabtawi, A.

    2007-10-01

    Radio occultations of Saturn's rings during the Cassini prime mission fall into three main groups, depending on the rings opening angle B. The first is a set of eight diametric occultations completed early in the mission (March-September/2005) when |B| was relatively large (19.5 to 23.5°). They permitted multiple-longitude profiling of relatively optically thick ring features, revealing detailed structure of enigmatic Ring B. The second is to be completed late in the mission when the rings are relatively closed (|B| < 10°). They will provide enhanced sensitivity to tenuous ring material, hence complementary information about small optical depth structure. Bridging the two groups is a third composed of two specially designed occultations recently completed (May-June/2007). They capture the intermediate range |B| 15°. Because the rings were still reasonably open, much of the structure was profiled. The different occultation geometry from the diametric group provided enhanced sensitivity to bending waves and other inclined features. We comparatively consider variability (or lack of) of observed ring structure with B and longitude. The variability when present can be true (dynamically forced features) or apparent (azimuthal asymmetry due to preferentially aligned gravitational wakes). The multiple-longitude coverage provides rich characterization of the true variability, including remarkable variations in the morphology of gap-embedded ringlets in Ring C, clear variations in the width of gaps in the Cassini Division, wavelike features in Ring C (the "Rosen Waves"), classical satellite wake profiles due to Pan, in addition to many density and few bending waves. For the apparent asymmetry, observed optical depth variations with B, viewing geometry, and wavelength constrain physical properties of the rings microstructure (particle sizes, particle-cluster sizes and orientation, spatial cluster density, vertical ring profile and physical thickness, ...). Complementary

  19. Comparing the incomparable: hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Foley, Robert N

    2004-01-01

    A randomized trial comparing survival in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis remains a utopian aspiration. Dialysis is still relatively rare on a population basis, and a natural tension exists between desirability and feasibility in terms of quality of evidence. In practice, it is very difficult to perform prospective comparisons with large groups of contemporary representative subjects, and much of the literature comes from retrospective national registries. This article considers several questions to address when trying to compare the outcomes of peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. Prognostic similarity at baseline is a fundamental issue. Traditionally, adjustment for known prognostic factors has been used in an attempt to minimize the bias caused by nonrandom treatment assignment. Propensity scores have been suggested to be superior, and matched-case analysis may also be a useful method for comparison. Other questions include, when, in relation to starting dialysis, to start the observation clock; the definition and handling of switches of dialysis therapy; and the decision to censor at transplantation. Finally, comparisons are complicated by hazards ratios that vary over time, and time-segmented analysis is obligatory. Many types of analytical approaches are needed to begin to appreciate outcome disparities between dialysis therapies.

  20. Comparative study on the growth mechanisms of PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Bikau; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2011-02-15

    The efficiencies of recently proposed, phenyl addition/cyclization (PAC), methyl addition/cyclization (MAC) and a popular hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition (HACA) mechanisms have been examined experimentally by detecting the gas phase reaction products of pyrolysis of toluene with/without addition of benzene + acetylene by using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) single photon ionization (SPI) time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Besides the observation of verities of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), intense mass peaks of indene, phenylacetylene and propyne confirmed a remarkable quenching of the major active species, benzyl, phenyl and methyl radicals by acetylene. In spite of quenching, only benzyl contributed products were diminished while phenyl and methyl contributed products were enhanced. Uniquely observed symmetrical PAHs; corrannulene/coronene; formed by the active involvement of PAC, HACA and/or MAC mechanisms, reflects the interdependencies of these mechanisms. Individually, PAC was found highly efficient for endless growth, HACA for filling triple fusing site and MAC for expanding cyclotetra/pentafused into benzenoid structure, respectively. (author)

  1. Cosmological observables, infrared growth of fluctuations, and scale-dependent anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giddings, Steven B.; Sloth, Martin S.

    2011-09-01

    We simplify and extend semiclassical methods in inflationary cosmology that capture leading IR corrections to correlators. Such IR effects can be absorbed into a coordinate change when examining sufficiently local observables, but not when comparing observations at large separation in scales, such as seen by a late-time observer. The analysis is facilitated by definition of a scale-dependent metric and physical momentum. These assist definition of “IR-safe” observables seen by a postinflationary observer, which are contrasted to those based on the local geometry of the reheating surface. For the former observables, the observer’s horizon provides an effective IR cutoff. IR growth of fluctuations contributes to enhanced statistical inhomogeneities/anisotropies at short scales, observation of which by a present-day observer might be sought in 21 cm measurements. Such IR corrections are argued to become large for a very late-time observer.

  2. Direct observation of epitaxial organic film growth: temperature-dependent growth mechanisms and metastability.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Helder; Schmidt, Thomas; Groh, Ullrich; Maier, Florian C; Lévesque, Pierre L; Fink, Rainer H; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Umbach, Eberhard

    2015-11-21

    The growth of the first ten layers of organic thin films on a smooth metallic substrate has been investigated in real-time using the model system PTCDA on Ag(111). The complex behaviour is comprehensively studied by electron microscopy, spectroscopy and diffraction in a combined PEEM/LEEM instrument revealing several new phenomena and yielding a consistent picture of this layer growth. PTCDA grows above room temperature in a Stranski-Krastanov mode, forming three-dimensional islands on a stable bi-layer, in competition with metastable 3rd and 4th layers. Around room temperature this growth mode changes into a quasi layer-by-layer growth, while at temperatures below about 250 K a Vollmer-Weber-like behaviour is observed. By means of laterally resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy the orientation of all adsorbed molecules is found to be homogeneously flat lying on the surface, even during the growth process. The films grow epitaxially, showing long-range order with rotational domains. For the monolayer these domains could be directly analysed, showing an average size of several micrometers extending over substrate steps.

  3. Comparing growth phenology of co-occurring deciduous and evergreen conifers exposed to drought

    PubMed Central

    Swidrak, Irene; Schuster, Roman; Oberhuber, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Plant phenological events are influenced by climate factors such as temperature and rainfall. To evaluate phenological responses to water availability in a Spring Heath-Pine wood (Erico-Pinetum typicum), the focus of this study was to determine intra-annual dynamics of apical and lateral growth of co-occurring early successional Larix decidua and Pinus sylvestris and late successional Picea abies exposed to drought. The effect of reduced plant water availability on growth phenology was investigated by conducting a rainfall exclusion experiment. Timing of key phenological dates (onset, maximum rate, end, duration) of growth processes were compared among species at the rain-sheltered and control plot during 2011 and 2012. Shoot and needle elongation were monitored on lateral branches in the canopy at c. 16 m height and radial growth was recorded by automatic dendrometers at c. 1.3 m height of > 120 yr old trees. Different sequences in aboveground growth phenology were detected among the three species under the same growing conditions. While onset of radial growth in April through early May was considerably preceded by onset of needle growth in Larix decidua (5 - 6 weeks) and shoot growth in Pinus sylvestris (c. 3 weeks), it occurred quite simultaneously with onset of shoot growth in Picea abies. Low water availability had a minor impact on onset of aboveground growth, which is related to utilization of stored water, but caused premature cessation of aboveground growth. At the control plot mean growing season length was 130 days in Pinus sylvestris, 95 days in Larix decidua and 73 days in Picea abies supporting the hypothesis that early successional species are resource expenders, while late successional species are more efficient in utilizing resources and develop safer life strategies. High synchronicity found in culmination of radial growth in late spring (mid-May through early June) prior to occurrence of more favourable environmental conditions in summer might

  4. Comparing growth phenology of co-occurring deciduous and evergreen conifers exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Swidrak, Irene; Schuster, Roman; Oberhuber, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Plant phenological events are influenced by climate factors such as temperature and rainfall. To evaluate phenological responses to water availability in a Spring Heath-Pine wood (Erico-Pinetum typicum), the focus of this study was to determine intra-annual dynamics of apical and lateral growth of co-occurring early successional Larix decidua and Pinus sylvestris and late successional Picea abies exposed to drought. The effect of reduced plant water availability on growth phenology was investigated by conducting a rainfall exclusion experiment. Timing of key phenological dates (onset, maximum rate, end, duration) of growth processes were compared among species at the rain-sheltered and control plot during 2011 and 2012. Shoot and needle elongation were monitored on lateral branches in the canopy at c. 16 m height and radial growth was recorded by automatic dendrometers at c. 1.3 m height of > 120 yr old trees. Different sequences in aboveground growth phenology were detected among the three species under the same growing conditions. While onset of radial growth in April through early May was considerably preceded by onset of needle growth in Larix decidua (5 - 6 weeks) and shoot growth in Pinus sylvestris (c. 3 weeks), it occurred quite simultaneously with onset of shoot growth in Picea abies. Low water availability had a minor impact on onset of aboveground growth, which is related to utilization of stored water, but caused premature cessation of aboveground growth. At the control plot mean growing season length was 130 days in Pinus sylvestris, 95 days in Larix decidua and 73 days in Picea abies supporting the hypothesis that early successional species are resource expenders, while late successional species are more efficient in utilizing resources and develop safer life strategies. High synchronicity found in culmination of radial growth in late spring (mid-May through early June) prior to occurrence of more favourable environmental conditions in summer might

  5. Methylphenidate in Pregnancy: A Multicenter, Prospective, Comparative, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Diav-Citrin, Orna; Shechtman, Svetlana; Arnon, Judy; Wajnberg, Rebecka; Borisch, Cornelia; Beck, Evelin; Richardson, Jonathan Luke; Bozzo, Pina; Nulman, Irena; Ornoy, Asher

    2016-09-01

    Methylphenidate is a central nervous system stimulant medicinally used in the treatment of attention-deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity (ADD/ADHD). Data on its use in human pregnancy are limited. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the risk of major congenital anomalies after pregnancy exposure to methylphenidate for medical indications. In a prospective, comparative, multicenter observational study performed in 4 participating Teratology Information Services (in Jerusalem, Berlin, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Toronto) between 1996 and 2013, methylphenidate-exposed pregnancies were compared with pregnancies counseled for nonteratogenic exposure (NTE) after matching by maternal age, gestational age, and year at initial contact. 382 methylphenidate-exposed pregnancies (89.5% in the first trimester) were followed up. The overall rate of major congenital anomalies was similar between the groups (10/309 = 3.2% [methylphenidate] vs 13/358 = 3.6% [NTE], P = .780). The rates of major congenital anomalies (6/247 = 2.4% [methylphenidate] vs 12/358 = 3.4% [NTE], P = .511) and cardiovascular anomalies (2/247 = 0.8% [methylphenidate] vs 3/358 = 0.8% [NTE], P = .970) were also similar after exclusion of genetic or cytogenetic anomalies and limiting methylphenidate exposure to the period of organogenesis (weeks 4-13 after the last menstrual period). There was a higher rate of miscarriages and elective terminations of pregnancy in the methylphenidate group. Significant predictors for the miscarriages using Cox proportional hazards model were methylphenidate exposure (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.98; 95% CI, 1.23-3.20; P = .005) and past miscarriage (adjusted HR = 1.35; 95% CI, 1.18-1.55; P < .001). The present study suggests that methylphenidate does not seem to increase the risk for major malformations. Further studies are required to establish its pregnancy safety and its possible association with miscarriages.

  6. Observation of number-density-dependent growth of plasmonic nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takashi; Wang, Xiaolong; Chatterjee, Souvik; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Interaction dynamics of laser pulses and nanoparticles are of great interest in recent years. In many cases, laser-nanoparticle interactions result in the formation of plasmonic nanobubbles, and the dynamics of nanoparticles and nanobubbles are inseparable. So far, very little attention has been paid to the number density. Here we report the first observation of number-density-dependent growth of plasmonic nanobubbles. Our results show that the nanobubbles growth depends (does not depend) on the number density at high (low) laser fluence, although the inter-particle distance in the solution is as long as 14–30 μm. This cannot be explained by the existing physical picture, and we propose a new model which takes into account the pressure waves arising from nanoparticles. The numerical results based on this model agree well with the experimental results. Our findings imply that the number density can be a new doorknob to control laser-nanobubble as well as laser-nanoparticle interactions. PMID:27354184

  7. Comparative observations on inorganic and organic lead neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Environmental and occupational exposure to lead still generates concern, and recent studies have focused such concern on the role of body burden of lead during the fetal/neonatal period, especially in the genesis of disturbed central nervous system development. This discussion provides some comparative observations on the neurotoxicity of inorganic and organic lead species. The characteristic acute, predominantly cerebellar encephalopathy associated with neonatal high lead exposure contrasts to the subtle, axo-dendritic disorganization shown to be associated with low-level neonatal inorganic Pb{sup 2+} exposure. There is a preferential involvement of the hippocampus in both low-level inorganic Pb{sup 2+} and organolead exposure, and the clinical syndromes of irritability, hyperactivity, aggression, and seizures are common features of disturbed hippocampal function. Neurotransmitter system abnormalities have been described with inorganic Pb{sup 2+}, but recent attention has focused on the abnormalities in glutamate, dopamine, and/or {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake, efflux, and metabolism. Abnormalities of GABA and glutamate metabolism are also found with the organolead species. Testable hypotheses are presented that may provide an understanding of the pathogenesis underlying dystrophic neuronal development under the influence of inorganic or organolead intoxication.

  8. In-situ observation of graphene growth on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odahara, Genki; Otani, Shigeki; Oshima, Chuhei; Suzuki, Masahiko; Yasue, Tsuneo; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2011-06-01

    Graphene growth of mono-, bi- and tri-layers on Ni(111) through surface segregation was observed in situ by low energy electron microscopy. The carbon segregation was controlled by adjusting substrate temperature from 1200 K to 1050 K. After the completion of the first layer at 1125 K, the second layer grew at the interface between the first-layer and the substrate at 1050 K. The third layer also started to grow at the same temperature, 1050 K. All the layers exhibited a 1 × 1 atomic structure. The edges of the first-layer islands were straight lines, reflecting the hexagonal atomic structure. On the other hand, the shapes of the second-layer islands were dendritic. The edges of the third-layer islands were again straight lines similar to those of the first-layer islands. The phenomena presumably originate from the changes of interfacial-bond strength of the graphene to Ni substrate depending on the graphene thickness. No nucleation site of graphene layers was directly observed. All the layers expanded out of the field of view and covered the surface. The number of nucleation sites is extremely small on Ni(111) surface. This finding might open the way to grow the high quality, single-domain graphene crystals.

  9. Prudhoe Bay Emissions Drive Particle Growth Events Observed in Barrow, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesar, K. R.; Cellini, J.; Peterson, P.; Jefferson, A.; Tuch, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Pratt, K.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic is rapidly warming with decreased sea ice extent opening the region to increased human activity. Understanding changes to particle number concentration and particle size distributions is important to constraining estimates of the effect of such activity on the region. Six years of semi-continuous, size-resolved particle number concentration measurements from the Barrow Observatory on the North Slope of Alaska were examined for evidence of particle growth events. From 2007 to 2015, 45 particle growth events were observed. Based on backward air mass trajectory analysis, roughly equal numbers of particle growth events were influenced by marine and Prudhoe Bay air masses, despite the prevailing transport of air from the Arctic Ocean compared to Prudhoe Bay. The normalized particle growth event frequency suggests that emissions from Prudhoe Bay could induce an average of over 40 particle growth events at Barrow annually, excluding the polar winter. Thus, emissions from the Prudhoe Bay region provide favorable conditions for particle growth observed at Barrow, AK. Development at Prudhoe Bay and throughout the Arctic region is expected to expand during the 21st century as the extent of summertime sea ice decreases. Elevated particle number concentrations due to human activity are likely to have profound impacts on the Arctic climate through direct, indirect, and surface albedo feedbacks, particularly through the addition of cloud condensation nuclei.

  10. Comparing apples with apples: it is time for standardized reporting of neonatal nutrition and growth studies.

    PubMed

    Cormack, Barbara E; Embleton, Nicholas D; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Hay, William W; Bloomfield, Frank H

    2016-06-01

    The ultimate goal of neonatal nutrition care is optimal growth, neurodevelopment, and long-term health for preterm babies. International consensus is that increased energy and protein intakes in the neonatal period improve growth and neurodevelopment, but after more than 100 y of research the optimum intakes of energy and protein remain unknown. We suggest an important factor contributing to the lack of progress is the lack of a standardized approach to reporting nutritional intake data and growth in the neonatal literature. We reviewed randomized controlled trials and observational studies documented in MEDLINE and the Web of Science from 2008 to 2015 that compared approximately 3 vs. 4 g.kg(-1).d(-1) protein for preterm babies in the first month after birth. Consistency might be expected in the calculation of nutritional intake and assessment of growth outcomes in this relatively narrow scope of neonatal nutrition research. Twenty-two studies were reviewed. There was substantial variation in methods used to estimate and calculate nutritional intakes and in the approaches used in reporting these intakes and measures of infant growth. Such variability makes comparisons amongst studies difficult and meta-analysis unreliable. We propose the StRONNG Checklist-Standardized Reporting Of Neonatal Nutrition and Growth to address these issues.

  11. Direct observation of interface instability during crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.; Feigelson, R. S.; Elwell, D.

    1982-01-01

    The general aim of this investigation was to study interface stability and solute segregation phenomena during crystallization of a model system. Emphasis was to be placed on direct observational studies partly because this offered the possibility at a later stage of performing related experiments under substantially convection-free conditions in the space shuttle. The major achievements described in this report are: (1) the development of a new model system for fundamental studies of crystal growth from the melt and the measurement of a range of material parameters necessary for comparison of experiment with theory. (2) The introduction of a new method of measuring segregation coefficient using absorption of a laser beam by the liquid phase. (3) The comparison of segregation in crystals grown by gradient freezing and by pulling from the melt. (4) The introduction into the theory of solute segregation of an interface field term and comparison with experiment. (5) The introduction of the interface field term into the theories of constitutional supercooling and morphological stability and assessment of its importance.

  12. Observations on the Growth of Roughness Elements Into Icing Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Tsao, Jen, Ching

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experiment conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center to understand the process by which icing feathers are formed in the initial stages of ice accretion formation on swept wings. Close-up photographic data were taken on an aluminum NACA 0012 swept wing tip airfoil. Two types of photographic data were obtained: time sequence close-up photographic data during the run and close-up photographic data of the ice accretion at the end of each run. Icing runs were conducted for short ice accretion times from 10 to 180 sec. The time sequence close-up photographic data was used to study the process frame by frame and to create movies of how the process developed. The movies confirmed that at glaze icing conditions in the attachment line area icing feathers develop from roughness elements. The close-up photographic data at the end of each run showed that roughness elements change into a pointed shape with an upstream facet and join on the side with other elements having the same change to form ridges with pointed shape and upstream facet. The ridges develop into feathers when the upstream facet grows away to form the stem of the feather. The ridges and their growth into feathers were observed to form the initial scallop tips present in complete scallops.

  13. Comparing Simulations and Observations of Reionization-Epoch Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2006-05-01

    We propose to test and constrain models of early galaxy formation through comparisons with observations of reionization-epoch (z>6) galaxies observed using Spitzer. The goals are to (1) Make predictions for z>6 objects using state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation tailored to study the reionization epoch; (2) Develop a publicly-available tool called SPOC designed to obtain detailed constraints on physical properties of observed galaxies through comparisons with simulated galaxy catalogs; and (3) Use SPOC to test and constrain models of galaxy formation through comparisons with rapidly- advancing observations in the new frontier of early universe studies. The results of this study will yield deeper insights into the galaxy formation process at these mostly unexplored epochs, with implications for understanding the formation of massive galaxies, studying the topology and evolution of IGM reionization, and designing future surveys to detect first objects. The SPOC tool will facilitate a closer connection between observations and theory by enabling the community to interpret data within the framework of current hierarchical structure formation models, in turn providing detailed tests of these models that is essential for driving the field forward.

  14. Comparative release of growth factors from PRP, PRF, and advanced-PRF.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Flückiger, Laura; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Sawada, Kosaku; Sculean, Anton; Schaller, Benoit; Miron, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    The use of platelet concentrates has gained increasing awareness in recent years for regenerative procedures in modern dentistry. The aim of the present study was to compare growth factor release over time from platelet-rich plasma (PRP), platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), and a modernized protocol for PRF, advanced-PRF (A-PRF). Eighteen blood samples were collected from six donors (3 samples each for PRP, PRF, and A-PRF). Following preparation, samples were incubated in a plate shaker and assessed for growth factor release at 15 min, 60 min, 8 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 10 days. Thereafter, growth factor release of PDGF-AA, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, EGF, and IGF was quantified using ELISA. The highest reported growth factor released from platelet concentrates was PDGF-AA followed by PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, and PDGF-AB. In general, following 15-60 min incubation, PRP released significantly higher growth factors when compared to PRF and A-PRF. At later time points up to 10 days, it was routinely found that A-PRF released the highest total growth factors. Furthermore, A-PRF released significantly higher total protein accumulated over a 10-day period when compared to PRP or PRF. The results from the present study indicate that the various platelet concentrates have quite different release kinetics. The advantage of PRP is the release of significantly higher proteins at earlier time points whereas PRF displayed a continual and steady release of growth factors over a 10-day period. Furthermore, in general, it was observed that the new formulation of PRF (A-PRF) released significantly higher total quantities of growth factors when compared to traditional PRF. Based on these findings, PRP can be recommended for fast delivery of growth factors whereas A-PRF is better-suited for long-term release.

  15. Understanding Small Solar Magnetic Elements: Comparing Models and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Steiner, O.; Grossmann-Doerth, U.

    1999-05-01

    We perform direct comparisons of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations with a full MHD model of the magnetized solar atmosphere. In this manner we investigate the evolution and dynamics of small magnetic elements by fully utilizing the diagnostics available with Stokes spectropolarimetry, both computed and observed. The model is a 2-D time-dependent numerical simulation of a small (~ 600 km diameter) magnetic feature embedded in a non-magnetized atmosphere (Steiner et al., 1998). At select time-steps, synthetic emergent Stokes I and V profiles are computed using a polarized radiation transfer code. The data consist of Stokes I and V spectra from the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter for seventeen small magnetic elements located near disk-center. For both the observed and computed Stokes spectra, diagnostics are computed including the emergent continuum intensity, V-crossing shift, and amplitude and area asymmetries of the V-profile. We find that it is possible to differentiate between salient processes occurring in the magnetic atmosphere (strong flows, gradients, etc.) by their spectropolarimetric signature; from this, we determine the dominant processes present in the observed magnetic structures. The results are extremely encouraging. We find good qualitative agreement between the amplitude and area asymmetries and their spatial variation. Quantitatively, the agreement is surprisingly good in many cases. While limitations exist for both the model and observations, this stringent test allows us to comment on the dynamics and possible evolutionary differences present in the observed magnetic features. This work is funded in part by NSF grant ATM-9710782. Reference: - Steiner, O., Grossmann-Doerth, U., Knolker, M., Schussler, M.: 1998, ApJ 495, 468

  16. Ion cyclotron instability at Io: Hybrid simulation results compared to in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šebek, Ondřej; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Walker, Raymond J.; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-08-01

    We present analysis of global three-dimensional hybrid simulations of Io's interaction with Jovian magnetospheric plasma. We apply a single-species model with simplified neutral-plasma chemistry and downscale Io in order to resolve the ion kinetic scales. We consider charge exchange, electron impact ionization, and photoionization by using variable rates of these processes to investigate their impact. Our results are in a good qualitative agreement with the in situ magnetic field measurements for five Galileo flybys around Io. The hybrid model describes ion kinetics self-consistently. This allows us to assess the distribution of temperature anisotropies around Io and thereby determine the possible triggering mechanism for waves observed near Io. We compare simulated dynamic spectra of magnetic fluctuations with in situ observations made by Galileo. Our results are consistent with both the spatial distribution and local amplitude of magnetic fluctuations found in the observations. Cyclotron waves, triggered probably by the growth of ion cyclotron instability, are observed mainly downstream of Io and on the flanks in regions farther from Io where the ion pickup rate is relatively low. Growth of the ion cyclotron instability is governed mainly by the charge exchange rate.

  17. Comparing Basal Area Growth Rates in Repeated Inventories: Simpson's Paradox in Forestry

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Thomas; Bernard R. Parresol

    1989-01-01

    Recent analyses of radial growth rates in southern commercial forests have shown that current rates are lower than past rates when compared diameter class by diameter class. These results have been interpreted as an indication that the growth rate of the forest is declining. In this paper, growth rates of forest populations in Alabama are studied. Basal area growth (a...

  18. Comparative growth and development of hexaploid and tetraploid reed canarygrass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) is a globally distributed forage species, a potential biofuel, and an important invasive weed. At more northern latitudes in exists as a tetraploid and at equatorial to mid-latitudes as a hexaploid, especially in Mediterranean climates. Growth and developme...

  19. A Distribution-Free Approach for Comparing Growth of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, E. S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of the relationship between first-year results for 115 Dutch medical students and achievement during medical school was studied using an item-response theory model for the longitudinal measure of change with stochastic parameters (developed by Albers et al., 1989) indicates that a low rate of growth in the first year persists. (SLD)

  20. Comparing probability distributions for the World's Maximum Observed Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markopoulos, Apostolos; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2017-04-01

    A database of annual maximum daily river discharges extracted from the Catalogue of World's Maximum Observed Floods (International Association of Hydrological Sciences) is analyzed.Several probability distributions are tested against each other in terms of the goodness of fit, in order to identify whether a single distribution can adequately describe all time series in spite of the various climatic regimes, location and geomorphologic conditions. The analysis is relevant to the ongoing and intensifying discussion about climate variability and the intensity of extreme phenomena such as river discharges.

  1. Whistler Observations on DEMETER Compared with FWM Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compston, A. J.; Cohen, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.; Parrot, M.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiation, which plays an important role in the Van Allen radiation belts, is injected into Earth's plasmasphere from two primary sources: man-made VLF transmitters and lightning discharges. Recent studies have called into question some of the numerical models that simulate radiation injection into the plasmasphere by VLF transmitters: specifically, said models have been shown to overestimate the electromagnetic fields by at least 10 dB when compared to satellite measurements. In this study, we compared lightning-induced whistlers on the low earth orbiting DEMETER satellite with an electromagnetic, frequency domain Full Wave Method (FWM) finite element numerical code. By correlating lightning discharge time, location, and peak current data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in the United States with burst mode electromagnetic field measurements of the whistlers on DEMETER, we were able to make an accurate estimate of the field strengths on DEMETER from the FWM simulation results for over 5000 lightning discharges over more than 10 different DEMETER passes during both the day and night. The FWM field estimates match the DEMETER measurements to less than 5 dB.

  2. Case B binary evolution compared to observed Algols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rensbergen, Walter

    We follow the path in the HR-diagram of binaries with a B-type primary at birth which form an Algol system during case B mass transfer. Our calculations were done with and without the assumption of conservative mass transfer, giving very different results for the distributions of mass ratios and orbital periods for the obtained Algols. The conservative model fits the observations poorly by producing far too many Algols with low mass ratios and large orbital periods. Liberal models yield better agreement between theory and obervations. The best agreement is obtained when ≍50% of the mass lost by the primary is trapped into a ring with radius ≍2.5 × the semi major axis of the binary orbit.

  3. Comparative observations of plasma waves at the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the plasma-wave spectra from the four major outer planets are examined with particular attention given to the instabilities related to the precipitation of energetic particles. Wave-particle interactions involving hiss, chorus, and electron-cyclotron harmonic emissions are studied. These interactions contribute about 10 exp 13 W into the Jovian atmosphere, and the electron-cyclotron emissions on Saturn are shown to contribute significantly to the precipitation of energetic electrons. Whistler-mode waves are shown to exist at Uranus with intensities that could put 3-40 keV electrons on strong diffusion, but the amplitudes of the emissions are not sufficient to make them a significant part of precipitation. Weak electron-cyclotron harmonic emissions and whistler modes are detected at Neptune, suggesting that the present dataset is based on regions of low wave intensities.

  4. Comparing Observed Hurricane Conditions Against Potential Future Climate Change Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Climate Adaptation Science Investigators: (CASI) is to advance and apply NASA's scientific expertise and products to develop climate adaptation strategies that support NASA's overall mission by minimizing risks to each center's operations, physical assets, and personnel. Using Hurricane Katrina observations as a baseline, we use ADCIRC to model surge extent with simple modifications of the storm track. We examine two time now (T0) scenarios of present-day climatological factors: 1) translating the 2005 path 7 km west; and 2) rotating the approach angle from due-north to WNW. Second, we examine two future time scenarios (TX) by infusing climate change conditions, such as sea level rise and increased storm intensity, into a T0 baseline to assess future impacts. The primary goal of this work entails planning and protecting NASA assets and infrastructure. The adjacent communities, state and local emergency managers, gain benefit from this NASA work as data and analysis includes the surrounding geography.

  5. Differences in growth of Canadian children compared to the WHO 2006 Child Growth Standards.

    PubMed

    Park, Alison L; Tu, Karen; Ray, Joel G

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate if there are departures from the WHO Child Growth Standards (WHO-CGS) in postnatal growth of healthy 'Canadian' children in Ontario up to age 2 years, including by infant feeding and ethnicity. We included data on 9964 healthy, singleton children born in Ontario, Canada. Smoothed weight, length and body mass index (BMI) percentile curves were generated using quantile regression for the Canadian cohort from birth to age 2 years. Differences in percentile values were calculated comparing Canadian children vs. the WHO-CGS. Canadian children under age 2 years were longer than the WHO-CGS at the 10th (0.8 cm), 50th (1.3 cm) and 90th (1.9 cm) percentiles. Canadian children incrementally surpassed the WHO-CGS in weight after age 6 months, and in BMI after 9 months. By age 2 years, the 50th percentile weight of Canadian males was 823 g (95% confidence interval (CI) 680, 965) higher than the WHO-CGS 50th percentile. Weight differences were seen regardless of feeding practice, and were greatest among children of mothers born in Canada and Europe/Western nations, and least for those of East Asian/Pacific or South Asian heritage. Among Canadian breastfed males, 18% (95% CI 16, 19) of newborns and 26% (95% CI 20, 33) toddlers aged 2 years were classified by WHO-CGS as weighing >90th percentile - much higher than the expected rate of 10%. Similarities were seen for differences in BMI. Healthy Canadian infants/toddlers are longer and heavier than the WHO-CGS norms. Explanations for these discrepancies require further elucidation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Observation of dendritic growth under the influence of forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkina, O.; Shevchenko, N.; Eckert, S.

    2015-06-01

    The directional solidification of Ga-25wt%In alloys within a Hele-Shaw cell was visualized by X-ray radioscopy. The investigations are focused on the impact of melt convection on the dendritic growth. Natural convection occurs during a bottom up solidification because lighter solute is rejected during crystallization. Forced convection was produced by a specific electromagnetic pump. The direction of forced melt flow is almost horizontal at the solidification front. Melt flow induces various effects on grain morphology primarily caused by convective transport of solute, such as a facilitation of the growth of primary trunks or lateral branches, dendrite remelting, fragmentation or freckle formation depending on the dendrite orientation, the flow direction and intensity. Forced flow eliminates solutal plumes and damps local fluctuations of solute. A preferential growth of the secondary arms occurs at the upstream side of the dendrites, whereas high solute concentration at the downstream side inhibits the formation of secondary branches.

  7. Comparing remote-sensing observations of aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, R. S.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Kleidman, R. G.; Yorks, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    The interaction of clouds and aerosols is one of the least well-understood phenomena affecting climate change, atmospheric dynamics and weather. The Dark Target (DT) satellite retrieval algorithm provides a 10 km aerosol product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on Terra and Aqua. This geospatial product provides daily coverage of the global distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD). The coarse resolution leaves us with significant uncertainty in quantifying aerosol-cloud interactions, requiring us to use higher resolution data to improve our understanding. The DT algorithm was applied to high-resolution enhanced-MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS) data obtained during the "Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign over the U.S. in 2013. The instrument was deployed on the ER-2 high-altitude aircraft along side the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL), which took vertical profiles along the eMAS swath centerline. We identified 53 collocations with eMAS over ground-based AERONET sunphotometer sites, and found that eMAS AOD was biased by a factor of 2. When eMAS was far from clouds, and the AOD was low, there was little bias. However, in moderate or high aerosol regimes, eMAS retrieved rings of enhanced AOD around some of the identified clouds. Can we validate these rings of enhanced AOD? A cloud-distance layer was created for eMAS to study these areas and determine which cloud conditions might be correlated with them. In most cases, the AOD measurements converged to a clear sky value with increasing distance from cloud. Comparing these new values to Aeronet, the bias was reduced to a factor of 1.4. A cloud-direction layer was also created which revealed that within 5 km of clouds, there was generally a high bias on the sunward facing side of a cloud and low bias on the "shadow" side. Furthermore, there were many cases where the CPL indicated clouds that were not

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas putida F1 growth on benzoate and citrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are capable to proliferate under diverse environmental conditions and thus have a significant bioremediation potential. To enhance our understanding of their metabolic versatility, this study explores the changes in the proteome and physiology of Pseudomonas putida F1 resulting from its growth on benzoate, a moderate toxic compound that can be catabolized, and citrate, a carbon source that is assimilated through central metabolic pathways. A series of repetitive batch cultivations were performed to ensure a complete adaptation of the bacteria to each of these contrasting carbon sources. After several growth cycles, cell growth stabilized at the maximum level and exhibited a reproducible growth profile. The specific growth rates measured for benzoate (1.01 ± 0.11 h-1) and citrate (1.11 ± 0.12 h-1) were similar, while a higher yield was observed for benzoate (0.6 and 0.3 g cell mass per g of benzoate and citrate, respectively), reflecting the different degrees of carbon reduction in the two substrates. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed an enrichment of several oxygenases/dehydrogenases in benzoate-grown cells, indicative of the higher carbon reduction of benzoate. Moreover, the upregulation of all 14 proteins implicated in benzoate degradation via the catechol ortho-cleavage pathway was observed, while several stress-response proteins were increased to aid cells to cope with benzoate toxicity. Unexpectedly, citrate posed more challenges than benzoate in the maintenance of pH homeostasis, as indicated by the enhancement of the Na+/H+ antiporter and carbonic anhydrase. The study provides important mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas adaptation to varying carbon sources that are of great relevance to bioremediation efforts. PMID:24156539

  9. Comparing diameter growth of stands prior to canopy closure to diameter growth of stands after canopy closure

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Dean; D. Andrew Scott; Ray A. Newbold

    2010-01-01

    Three models are compared for their ability to account for differences in diameter growth associated with different stages of stand development. Data for the comparisons were collected in young loblolly pine plantations treated variously at time of planting for the first 10 years since establishment. Neither the growth-growing stock model nor the accelerated...

  10. The observed peripheral growth of disc galaxies from z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sachdeva, Sonali; Saha, Kanak; Singh, Harinder P.

    2017-03-01

    Using images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have computed both parametric and non-parametric measures, and examined the evolution in size, concentration, stellar mass, effective stellar mass density and asymmetry for a sample of 600 disc galaxies from z ~ 1 till z ~ 0. We find that disc galaxies have gained more than 50 per cent of their present stellar mass over the last 8 Gyr. Also, the increase in disc size is found to be peripheral. While the average total (Petrosian) radius almost doubles from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0, the average effective (half-light) radius undergoes a marginal increase in comparison. This indicates that galaxies grow more substantially in their outskirts, and is consistent with the inside-out growth picture. The substantial increase in mass and size indicates that accretion of external material has been a dominant mode of galaxy growth, where the circumgalactic environment plays a significant role.

  11. Special phase transformation and crystal growth pathways observed in nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Huang, Feng; Finnegan, Michael P; Waychunas, Glenn A; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-01-01

    Phase transformation and crystal growth in nanoparticles may happen via mechanisms distinct from those in bulk materials. We combine experimental studies of as-synthesized and hydrothermally coarsened titania (TiO2) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) with thermodynamic analysis, kinetic modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering, and UV-vis spectroscopy. At low temperatures, phase transformation in titania nanoparticles occurs predominantly via interface nucleation at particle–particle contacts. Coarsening and crystal growth of titania nanoparticles can be described using the Smoluchowski equation. Oriented attachment-based crystal growth was common in both hydrothermal solutions and under dry conditions. MD simulations predict large structural perturbations within very fine particles, and are consistent with experimental results showing that ligand binding and change in aggregation state can cause phase transformation without particle coarsening. Such phenomena affect surface reactivity, thus may have important roles in geochemical cycling.

  12. Comparative energetics of the observed and simulated global circulation during the special observing periods of FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, E. C.; Baker, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Energetics of the observed and simulated global circulation are evaluated in the zonal spectral domain for the special observing periods of FGGE. The study utilizes GLA analyses of FGGE observational data and parallel simulation experiments. There are noticeable differences in energy transformations between the observation and simulation during SOP-1. These include the baroclinic conversion C(n) by the zonal mean motion and short-wave disturbances, and the nonlinear wave-wave interaction L(n) at the long and short waves. The energy transformations of the short-wave disturbances are much more intense in the simulated circulation than in the observation. However, good agreement is noted in the conversion and dissipation of kinetic energy in the large- and cyclone-wave range n = 1-10. Spectral distributions of global energy transformations at the long- and cyclone-wave range indicate that the SOP-2 simulation agrees more closely with the observed fields than the SOP-1 simulation. Other pertinent points of energetics diagnosis are also included in the discussion.

  13. Addressing Informatics Barriers to Conducting Observational Comparative Effectiveness Research: A Comparative Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christopher P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The U.S. health care system has been under immense scrutiny for ever-increasing costs and poor health outcomes for its patients. Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) has emerged as a generally accepted practice by providers, policy makers, and scientists as an approach to identify the most clinical- and cost-effective interventions…

  14. Addressing Informatics Barriers to Conducting Observational Comparative Effectiveness Research: A Comparative Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christopher P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The U.S. health care system has been under immense scrutiny for ever-increasing costs and poor health outcomes for its patients. Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) has emerged as a generally accepted practice by providers, policy makers, and scientists as an approach to identify the most clinical- and cost-effective interventions…

  15. A comparative study of embryonic development of some bird species with different patterns of postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Blom, Jonas; Lilja, Clas

    2005-01-01

    Some studies show that birds with high postnatal growth rates (e.g. altricial species) are characterized by a rapid early development of "supply" organs, such as digestive organs. Birds with low postnatal growth rates (e.g. precocial species) exhibit a slower early development of these organs and a more rapid early development of other "demand" organs, such as brain, muscles, skeleton and feathers. To test whether these differences can be traced back to early embryonic development and whether they can be associated with changes in developmental timing, i.e. heterochrony, we compared embryos of the precocial quail and the altricial fieldfare, two bird species with low and high postnatal growth rates, respectively. We used classical staging techniques that use developmental landmarks to categorize embryonic maturity as well as morphological measurements. These techniques were combined with immune detection of muscle specific proteins in the somites. Our data showed that the anlagen of the head, brain and eyes develop earlier in the quail than in the fieldfare in contrast to the gut which develops earlier in the fieldfare than in the quail. Our data also showed that the quail and the fieldfare displayed different rates of myotome formation in the somites which contribute to muscle formation in the limbs and thorax. We believe these observations are connected with important differences in neonatal characteristics, such as the size of the brain, eyes, organs for locomotion and digestion. This leads us to the conclusion that selection for late ontogenetic characteristics can alter early embryonic development and that growth rate is of fundamental importance for the patterning of avian embryonic development. It also appears that this comparative system offers excellent opportunities to test hypotheses about heterochrony.

  16. Observation of two-dimensional fractal growth in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, C. H.; Liu, B. X.; Sun, J. G.; Li, H. D.

    1991-09-01

    We present an experimental scheme to produce and in situ observe two-dimensional diffusion-limited-aggregation-like structures in solids. It was done by irradiating a type-316 stainless steel in a high-voltage electron microscope. The ramified aggregates were found to be the Frank stacking faults of exactly an atomic thickness. Scaling analysis revealed that the observed clusters were statistically self-similar with a common fractal dimension of D=1.73+/-0.06. The differences between our observations and the diffusion-limited-aggregation model are ascribed to the effects of optics in the microscope, which in turn serve as a direct proof of the wavelet analysis for the fractals.

  17. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.

    2014-04-01

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow vi, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow ve can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J ×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×ve×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δBz. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  18. Laboratory Observation of Magnetic Field Growth Driven by Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Feng, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. The electron flows v_e can therefore be inferred, and we use this information to evaluate the Hall J × B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm’s Law. Mutually attracted and compressed flux ropes break the cylindrical symmetry. This simple and coherent example of shear flow supports magnetic field growth corresponding to non vanishing curl × v_e × B. In the absence of magnetic reconnection we measure and predict a quadrupole out of plane magnetic field δBz, even though this has historically been invoked to be the signature of Hall magnetic reconnection. This provides a natural and general mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  19. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T. P. Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  20. In-situ observation of impurity diffusion boundary layer in silicon Czochralski growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Eguchi, Minoru; Watanabe, Hisao; Hibiya, Taketoshi

    1990-01-01

    In-situ observation of the impurity diffusion boundary layer during single crystal growth of indium-doped silicon was carried out by X-ray radiography. The difference in the transmitted X-ray image compared with molten silicon just beneath the crystal-melt interface was attributed to the concentration of indium impurities having a larger absorption coefficient. The intensity profile of the transmitted X-ray can be reproduced by a transmittance calculation that considers the meniscus shape and impurity distribution. The impurity distribution profile near the crystal-melt interface was estimated using the Burton-Prim-Slichter (BPS) equation. The observed impurity diffusion boundary layer thickness was about 0.5 mm. It was found that the boundary layer thickness was not constant in the radial direction, which cannot be explained by the BPS theory, since it is based on a one-dimensional calculation.

  1. Dendritic gold nanowire growth observed in liquid with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Tobias; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-07-02

    The growth of nanoscale gold dendrites was studied in situ in a thin liquid film with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) windows. Gold nanoparticle seeds were covered by a thin liquid layer containing precursor solution. Dendrite nucleation was induced by the electron beam leading to an initial burst of growth. The growth then settled at tip velocities between 0.1 and 2.0 nm/s for different dendrites. Tip velocities fluctuated as different dendrite geometries grew from the tips. Those dendrites showing granularities in their structure experienced the largest growth speed. Comparison of the observed velocities with diffusion-limited growth rates suggests that dendrite growth in thin films at this scale is limited by diffusion. The described method may find application in research on the mechanisms behind dendrite growth and also to study other types of anisotropic growth of nanomaterials driven by crystal and twin geometries.

  2. Direct observation of the growth of gibbsite crystals by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freij, Sawsan J.; Parkinson, Gordon M.; Reyhani, Manijeh M.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to investigate the mechanism of gibbsite crystallization on all the morphologically important faces. Growth on single crystal faces has been observed by a series of ex situ experiments, in which the same area was repeatedly located and imaged after growth had occurred in synthetic solution. At the same supersaturation level and temperature, the ex situ experiments have revealed a variety of growth modes: (1) Continuous birth and spread on a flat surface, the nuclei forming as approximately circular features that develop into elongated features, indicating anisotropic growth, followed by restoration of the flatness of the original area after further growth. (2) Step growth followed by rough growth on a surface that contains growth hillocks. (3) Two-dimensional nucleation on a surface that contains a surface defect (tilt boundary). The results are used to establish a clearer picture of the growth mechanism of gibbsite, and the effect of the seed surface structure. On the prismatic faces of gibbsite, steps parallel to the (0 0 1) face and block formation were imaged. Step growth was observed in both the [0 0 1] direction and parallel to the (0 0 1) plane. No nucleation was observed, and no emergent screw dislocations have been resolved.

  3. Comparing basal area growth models, consistency of parameters, and accuracy of prediction

    Treesearch

    J.J. Colbert; Michael Schuckers; Desta Fekedulegn

    2002-01-01

    We fit alternative sigmoid growth models to sample tree basal area historical data derived from increment cores and disks taken at breast height. We examine and compare the estimated parameters for these models across a range of sample sites. Models are rated on consistency of parameters and on their ability to fit growth data from four sites that are located across a...

  4. Remote automated multi-generational growth and observation of an animal in low Earth orbit

    PubMed Central

    Oczypok, Elizabeth A.; Etheridge, Timothy; Freeman, Jacob; Stodieck, Louis; Johnsen, Robert; Baillie, David; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate survival of humanity is dependent upon colonization of other planetary bodies. Key challenges to such habitation are (patho)physiologic changes induced by known, and unknown, factors associated with long-duration and distance space exploration. However, we currently lack biological models for detecting and studying these changes. Here, we use a remote automated culture system to successfully grow an animal in low Earth orbit for six months. Our observations, over 12 generations, demonstrate that the multi-cellular soil worm Caenorhabditis elegans develops from egg to adulthood and produces progeny with identical timings in space as on the Earth. Additionally, these animals display normal rates of movement when fully fed, comparable declines in movement when starved, and appropriate growth arrest upon starvation and recovery upon re-feeding. These observations establish C. elegans as a biological model that can be used to detect changes in animal growth, development, reproduction and behaviour in response to environmental conditions during long-duration spaceflight. This experimental system is ready to be incorporated on future, unmanned interplanetary missions and could be used to study cost-effectively the effects of such missions on these biological processes and the efficacy of new life support systems and radiation shielding technologies. PMID:22130552

  5. Remote automated multi-generational growth and observation of an animal in low Earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Oczypok, Elizabeth A; Etheridge, Timothy; Freeman, Jacob; Stodieck, Louis; Johnsen, Robert; Baillie, David; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J

    2012-03-07

    The ultimate survival of humanity is dependent upon colonization of other planetary bodies. Key challenges to such habitation are (patho)physiologic changes induced by known, and unknown, factors associated with long-duration and distance space exploration. However, we currently lack biological models for detecting and studying these changes. Here, we use a remote automated culture system to successfully grow an animal in low Earth orbit for six months. Our observations, over 12 generations, demonstrate that the multi-cellular soil worm Caenorhabditis elegans develops from egg to adulthood and produces progeny with identical timings in space as on the Earth. Additionally, these animals display normal rates of movement when fully fed, comparable declines in movement when starved, and appropriate growth arrest upon starvation and recovery upon re-feeding. These observations establish C. elegans as a biological model that can be used to detect changes in animal growth, development, reproduction and behaviour in response to environmental conditions during long-duration spaceflight. This experimental system is ready to be incorporated on future, unmanned interplanetary missions and could be used to study cost-effectively the effects of such missions on these biological processes and the efficacy of new life support systems and radiation shielding technologies.

  6. Comparing growth development of Myriophyllum spp. in laboratory and field experiments for ecotoxicological testing.

    PubMed

    Knauer, Katja; Mohr, Silvia; Feiler, Ute

    2008-06-01

    BACKGROUND, GOALS AND SCOPE: Risk assessment of herbicides and the evaluation of contaminated sediments based on algae and the macrophyte Lemna sp. alone may underestimate the potential hazard of certain compounds. Therefore, various test systems with Myriophyllum spp. have been developed recently to assess the phytotoxicity in surface waters and natural sediments. In the present study, experiments investigating the growth development of Myriophyllum spp. were performed in the laboratory under defined conditions and in mesocosms under environmentally realistic exposure conditions to evaluate the suitability of these species as potential standard test organisms in ecotoxicological testing. This study provides data on the endpoints biomass, plant length and root development. Six independent experiments were performed to investigate the plant development of Myriophyllum spp. under control conditions. The main difference in the experiments was the complexity of the test systems ranging from simple laboratory experiments to complex outdoor mesocosm studies. At the start of each experiment, uniform cuttings of Myriophyllum spp. were placed in vessels with or without sediments to reduce variability between replicates. The endpoints considered in this investigation were biomass (fresh weight of the whole plant), length of the main shoot, length of the side shoots, total length of the plant (calculated from the length of the main and side shoots) and root formation. Root to shoot ratios were calculated as a further measure for plant development. Relative growth rates (RGR) based on plant length (RG(L)R) and on biomass (RG(B)R) were calculated. Despite the various experimental conditions, comparable growth was obtained in all test systems and the variability of endpoints, such as total length and biomass of plants, was low. It was observed that the RGR of M. spicatum in the simple laboratory test system with sediment were comparable to growth data obtained for M

  7. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  8. Astronauts Don Lind observes growth of crystals in VCGS aboard orbiter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-04-30

    51B-01-007 (30 April 1985) --- Astronaut Don L. Lind, 51-B Spacelab 3 mission specialist, observes the growth of mercuric iodide crystal in the vapor crystal growth system (VCGS) on the Spacelab 3 science module aboard the orbiter Challenger.

  9. Astronauts Lodewijk van den Berg observes growth of crystals in VCGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-04-30

    51B-06-010 (29 April-6 May 1985) --- Lodewijk van den Berg, 51-B payload specialist, observes the growth of mercuric iodide crystal in the vapor crystal growth system (VCGS) on the Spacelab 3 science module aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger.

  10. Comparative impacts of iron oxide nanoparticles and ferric ions on the growth of Citrus maxima.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Li, Junli; Gan, Qiuliang; Wang, Yunqiang; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-02-01

    The impacts of iron oxide nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3 NPs) and ferric ions (Fe(3+)) on plant growth and molecular responses associated with the transformation and transport of Fe(2+) were poorly understood. This study comprehensively compared and evaluated the physiological and molecular changes of Citrus maxima plants as affected by different levels of γ-Fe2O3 NPs and Fe(3+). We found that γ-Fe2O3 NPs could enter plant roots but no translocation from roots to shoots was observed. 20 mg/L γ-Fe2O3 NPs had no impact on plant growth. 50 mg/L γ-Fe2O3 NPs significantly enhanced chlorophyll content by 23.2% and root activity by 23.8% as compared with control. However, 100 mg/L γ-Fe2O3 NPs notably increased MDA formation, decreased chlorophyll content and root activity. Although Fe(3+) ions could be used by plants and promoted the synthesis of chlorophyll, they appeared to be more toxic than γ-Fe2O3 NPs, especially for 100 mg/L Fe(3+). The impacts caused by γ-Fe2O3 NPs and Fe(3+) were concentration-dependent. Physiological results showed that γ-Fe2O3 NPs at proper concentrations had the potential to be an effective iron nanofertilizer for plant growth. RT-PCR analysis showed that γ-Fe2O3 NPs had no impact on AHA gene expression. 50 mg/L γ-Fe2O3 NPs and Fe(3+) significantly increased expression levels of FRO2 gene and correspondingly had a higher ferric reductase activity compared to both control and Fe(II)-EDTA exposure, thus promoting the iron transformation and enhancing the tolerance of plants to iron deficiency. Relative levels of Nramp3 gene expression exposed to γ-Fe2O3 NPs and Fe(3+) were significantly lower than control, indicating that all γ-Fe2O3 NPs and Fe(3+) treatments could supply iron to C. maxima seedlings. Overall, plants can modify the speciation and transport of γ-Fe2O3 NPs or Fe(3+) for self-protection and development by activating many physiological and molecular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Converging Climate Sensitivities of European Forests Between Observed Radial Tree Growth and Vegetation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Babst, Flurin; Bellassen, Valentin; Frank, David; Launois, Thomas; Tan, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Poulter, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The impacts of climate variability and trends on European forests are unevenly distributed across different bioclimatic zones and species. Extreme climate events are also becoming more frequent and it is unknown how they will affect feed backs of CO2 between forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. An improved understanding of species differences at the regional scale of the response of forest productivity to climate variation and extremes is thus important for forecasting forest dynamics. In this study, we evaluate the climate sensitivity of above ground net primary production (NPP) simulated by two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM; ORCHIDEE and LPJ-wsl) against tree ring width (TRW) observations from about1000 sites distributed across Europe. In both the model simulations and the TRW observations, forests in northern Europe and the Alps respond positively to warmer spring and summer temperature, and their overall temperature sensitivity is larger than that of the soil-moisture-limited forests in central Europe and Mediterranean regions. Compared with TRW observations, simulated NPP from ORCHIDEE and LPJ-wsl appear to be overly sensitive to climatic factors. Our results indicate that the models lack biological processes that control time lags, such as carbohydrate storage and remobilization, that delay the effects of radial growth dynamics to climate. Our study highlights the need for re-evaluating the physiological controls on the climate sensitivity of NPP simulated by DGVMs. In particular, DGVMs could be further enhanced by a more detailed representation of carbon reserves and allocation that control year-to year variation in plant growth.

  12. Microphysical Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds Compared with Calipso and MLS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Toon, O. B.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lambert, A.; Brakebusch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form in the lower stratosphere during the polar night due to the cold temperature inside the polar vortex. PSCs are important to understand because they are responsible for the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole and the ozone depletion over the Arctic. In this work, we explore the formation and evolution of STS particles (Super-cooled Ternary Solution) and NAT (Nitric-acid Trihydrate) particles using the SD-WACCM/CARMA model. SD-WACCM/CARMA couples the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model using Specific Dynamics with the microphysics model (CARMA). The 2010-2011 Arctic winter has been simulated because the Arctic vortex remained cold enough for PSCs from December until the end of March (Manney et al., 2011). The unusual length of this cold period and the presence of PSCs caused strong ozone depletion. This model simulates the growth and evaporation of the STS particles instead of considering them as being in equilibrium as other models do (Carslaw et al., 1995). This work also explores the homogeneous nucleation of NAT particles and derives a scheme for NAT formation based on the observed denitrification during the winter 2010-2011. The simulated microphysical features (particle volumes, size distributions, etc.) of both STS (Supercooled Ternary Solutions) and NAT particles show a consistent comparison with historical observations. The modeled evolution of PSCs and gas phase ozone related chemicals inside the vortex such as HCl and ClONO2 are compared with the observations from MLS, MIPAS and CALIPSO over this winter. The denitrification history indicate the surface nucleation rate from Tabazadeh et al. (2002) removes too much HNO3 over the winter. With a small modification of the free energy term of the equation, the denitification and the PSC backscattering features are much closer to the observations. H2O, HCl, O3 and ClONO2 are very close to MLS and MIPAS observations inside the vortex. The model underestimates ozone

  13. In situ observation of step-edge in-plane growth of graphene in a STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Lin, Yung-Chang; Lu, Chun-Chieh; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Chiu, Po-Wen; Iijima, Sumio; Suenaga, Kazu

    2014-06-01

    It is extremely difficult to control the growth orientation of the graphene layer in comparison to Si or III-V semiconductors. Here we report a direct observation of graphene growth and domain boundary formation in a scanning transmission electron microscope, with residual hydrocarbon in the microscope chamber being used as the carbon source for in-plane graphene growth at the step-edge of bilayer graphene substrate. We show that the orientation of the growth is strongly influenced by the step-edge structure and areas grown from a reconstructed 5-7 edge are rotated by 30° with respect to the mother layer. Furthermore, single heteroatoms like Si may act as catalytic active sites for the step-edge growth. The findings provide an insight into the mechanism of graphene growth and defect reconstruction that can be used to tailor carbon nanostructures with desired properties.

  14. In situ observation of step-edge in-plane growth of graphene in a STEM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Lin, Yung-Chang; Lu, Chun-Chieh; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Chiu, Po-Wen; Iijima, Sumio; Suenaga, Kazu

    2014-01-01

    It is extremely difficult to control the growth orientation of the graphene layer in comparison to Si or III–V semiconductors. Here we report a direct observation of graphene growth and domain boundary formation in a scanning transmission electron microscope, with residual hydrocarbon in the microscope chamber being used as the carbon source for in-plane graphene growth at the step-edge of bilayer graphene substrate. We show that the orientation of the growth is strongly influenced by the step-edge structure and areas grown from a reconstructed 5–7 edge are rotated by 30° with respect to the mother layer. Furthermore, single heteroatoms like Si may act as catalytic active sites for the step-edge growth. The findings provide an insight into the mechanism of graphene growth and defect reconstruction that can be used to tailor carbon nanostructures with desired properties. PMID:24887183

  15. Comparative efficiency of measures of early fetal growth restriction for predicting adverse perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tuuli, Methodius G; Cahill, Alison; Stamilio, David; Macones, George; Odibo, Anthony O

    2011-06-01

    To estimate the comparative efficiency of first-trimester fetal growth restriction, second-trimester fetal growth restriction, and first-to-second-trimester growth lag for predicting adverse perinatal outcomes. This is a retrospective cohort study of pregnancies with reliable dating based on last menstrual periods and first-trimester ultrasound examinations. Pregnancies with multiple fetuses, aneuploidy, and major structural anomalies were excluded. Fetal crown-rump lengths at 10-14 weeks, estimated fetal weights based on fetal biometry at 18-22 weeks, and interval growth were measured and converted to gestational age-adjusted Z-scores. The primary outcome was small for gestational age (SGA) at delivery. Secondary outcomes were low birth weight, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and preeclampsia. Receiver-operating characteristics curves were used to identify the optimal definitions of early fetal growth restriction associated with SGA and to compare screening efficiencies. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders. Among 8,978 pregnancies meeting inclusion criteria, 551 (6.5%) neonates were SGA. Crown-rump length Z-score less than -1.0, estimated fetal weights Z-score less than -1.0, and growth Z-score less than -1.0 were identified as the optimal definitions of early fetal growth restriction associated with SGA (adjusted odds ratio 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.74], 3.44 [95% CI 2.85-4.15] and 2.61 [95% CI 2.09-3.25], respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of first- and second-trimester fetal growth restriction for predicting SGA were 21.4% and 83.4%, and 37.2% and 85.5%, respectively. The area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve for second-trimester fetal growth restriction was greater than that for first-trimester fetal growth restriction and first-to-second-trimester growth lag (0.70 compared with 0.59 and 0.66, P<.001). Second-trimester fetal growth restriction is superior to first-trimester fetal

  16. Study on in situ and real-time observation during process of SCN crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Songhe; Chen, Changle; Duan, Mengmeng

    2006-02-01

    Crystal growth is dynamic coupling of transportation process and growth process between interfaces. Convection during crystal growth will tend to changes of liquation component and the defect of impurity stripe. The convection and stability should further be studied to obtain the crystal of high quality. It is necessary to obtain surface configuration and distribution of temperature around liquation phase and solute concentration. The technique of in-situ and real-time observation is a brand new technique, which is widely applied to production and scientific research. Information of crystal growth will be obtained from the observation. But the in-situ and real-time observation is uncharitableness for the experiment equipment, some conditions matched to the character of crystal must be provided. In the paper a design with ingenious and cheap crystal growth cell and circulation system of constant-temperature water which is suitable for the experiment of observation is developed, and a combined light path based on the technique of flowing visualization is designed to match to the crystal cell. The combined light path which is made up of the schlieren method and the principle of Mach-zehnder interference is non destructive, high sensitivity and observable, so it is an effective method to study the crystal growth.

  17. Biases and systematics in the observational derivation of galaxy properties: comparing different techniques on synthetic observations of simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Giovanni; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Walcher, C. Jakob

    2015-12-01

    We study the sources of biases and systematics in the derivation of galaxy properties from observational studies, focusing on stellar masses, star formation rates, gas and stellar metallicities, stellar ages, magnitudes and colours. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, for which the real quantities are known, and apply observational techniques to derive the observables. We also analyse biases that are relevant for a proper comparison between simulations and observations. For our study, we post-process the simulation outputs to calculate the galaxies' spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using stellar population synthesis models and also generate the fully consistent far-UV-submillimetre wavelength SEDs with the radiative transfer code SUNRISE. We compared the direct results of simulations with the observationally derived quantities obtained in various ways, and found that systematic differences in all studied galaxy properties appear, which are caused by: (1) purely observational biases, (2) the use of mass-weighted and luminosity-weighted quantities, with preferential sampling of more massive and luminous regions, (3) the different ways of constructing the template of models when a fit to the spectra is performed, and (4) variations due to different calibrations, most notably for gas metallicities and star formation rates. Our results show that large differences can appear depending on the technique used to derive galaxy properties. Understanding these differences is of primary importance both for simulators, to allow a better judgement of similarities and differences with observations, and for observers, to allow a proper interpretation of the data.

  18. Live versus Video Observations: Comparing the Reliability and Validity of Two Methods of Assessing Classroom Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curby, Timothy W.; Johnson, Price; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Carlis, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    When conducting classroom observations, researchers are often confronted with the decision of whether to conduct observations live or by using pre-recorded video. The present study focuses on comparing and contrasting observations of live and video administrations of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-PreK (CLASS-PreK). Associations between…

  19. Live versus Video Observations: Comparing the Reliability and Validity of Two Methods of Assessing Classroom Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curby, Timothy W.; Johnson, Price; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Carlis, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    When conducting classroom observations, researchers are often confronted with the decision of whether to conduct observations live or by using pre-recorded video. The present study focuses on comparing and contrasting observations of live and video administrations of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-PreK (CLASS-PreK). Associations between…

  20. Comparative effects of recombinant ovine placental lactogen and bovine growth hormone on galactopoiesis in ewes.

    PubMed

    Min, S H; Mackenzie, D D; McCutcheon, S N; Breier, B H; Gluckman, P D

    1997-04-01

    The effects of recombinant ovine placental lactogen and bovine growth hormone on milk yield, milk composition, and concentrations of blood hormones and metabolites were compared in ewes during an established lactation. Beginning on d 17 of lactation, ewes were treated for 5 d with twice daily subcutaneous injections of ovine placental lactogen (n = 9), bovine growth hormone (n = 10) at a dose of 0.10 mg/d per kg of body weight, or saline (n = 10). Circulating concentrations of ovine placental lactogen were 24.6 +/- 1.6 ng/ml on d 5 for ewes treated with ovine placental lactogen, but concentrations of ovine placental lactogen were undetectable in ewes treated with either saline or bovine growth hormone. Treatment with bovine growth hormone increased circulating concentrations of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and nonesterified fatty acids and decreased urea concentrations relative to those in ewes treated with ovine placental lactogen or saline. Compared with saline treatment, no parameters were affected by treatment with ovine placental lactogen. Treatment with bovine growth hormone or ovine placental lactogen treatment had no significant effects on plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose, or creatinine. Treatment with bovine growth hormone, but not ovine placental lactogen, increased yields of milk, fat, and lactose. Weight of the mammary gland was increased by bovine growth hormone, but not by ovine placental lactogen. Despite the fact that ovine placental lactogen is a potent somatogen, it does not appear to exhibit the same galactopoietic activity as bovine growth hormone in lactating ewes.

  1. Comparative growth of spotted fever group Rickettsia spp. strains in Vero cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Arannadia Barbosa; Duarte, Myrian Morato; Vizzoni, Vinicius Figueiredo; Duré, Ana Íris de Lima; Lopéz, Diego Montenegro; Nogueira, Rita de Maria Seabra; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes; Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Gazêta, Gilberto Salles

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, the spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia parkeri related species are the etiological agents of spotted fever rickettsiosis. However, the SFG, Rickettsia rhipicephali, that infects humans, has never been reported. The study of growth dynamics can be useful for understanding the infective and invasive capacity of these pathogens. Here, the growth rates of the Brazilian isolates R. rickettsii str. Taiaçu, R. parkeri str. At#24, and R. rhipicephali HJ#5, were evaluated in Vero cells by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. R. rhipicephali showed different kinetic growth compared to R. rickettsii and R. parkeri. PMID:27508322

  2. Comparative growth of spotted fever group Rickettsia spp. strains in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arannadia Barbosa; Duarte, Myrian Morato; Vizzoni, Vinicius Figueiredo; Duré, Ana Íris de Lima; Lopéz, Diego Montenegro; Nogueira, Rita de Maria Seabra; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes; Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Gazêta, Gilberto Salles

    2016-08-01

    In Brazil, the spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia parkeri related species are the etiological agents of spotted fever rickettsiosis. However, the SFG, Rickettsia rhipicephali, that infects humans, has never been reported. The study of growth dynamics can be useful for understanding the infective and invasive capacity of these pathogens. Here, the growth rates of the Brazilian isolates R. rickettsii str. Taiaçu, R. parkeri str. At#24, and R. rhipicephali HJ#5, were evaluated in Vero cells by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. R. rhipicephali showed different kinetic growth compared to R. rickettsii and R. parkeri.

  3. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; McMurry, Peter H.; Smith, James N.; Pierce, Jeffery R.

    2016-07-01

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters ˜ 1 to 30-100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid-base chemistry in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the observed differing growth

  4. Direct observation of the transition from calcite to aragonite growth as induced by abalone shell proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J B; Paloczi, G T; Kindt, J H; Michenfelder, M; Smith, B L; Stucky, G; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    2000-01-01

    The mixture of EDTA-soluble proteins found in abalone nacre are known to cause the nucleation and growth of aragonite on calcite seed crystals in supersaturated solutions of calcium carbonate. Past atomic force microscope studies of the interaction of these proteins with calcite crystals did not observe this transition because no information about the crystal polymorph on the surface was obtained. Here we have used the atomic force microscope to directly observe changes in the atomic lattice on a calcite seed crystal after the introduction of abalone shell proteins. The observed changes are consistent with a transition to (001) aragonite growth on a (1014) calcite surface. PMID:11106633

  5. Growth laws for delta crevasses in the Mississippi River Delta: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yocum, T. A.; Georgiou, I. Y.

    2016-02-01

    River deltas are accumulations of sedimentary deposits delivered by rivers via a network of distributary channels. Worldwide they are threatened by environmental changes, including subsidence, global sea level rise and a suite of other local factors. In the Mississippi River Delta (MRD) these impacts are exemplified, and have led to proposed solutions to build land that include sediment diversions, thereby reinitiating the delta cycle. While economically efficient, there are too few analogs of small deltas aside from laboratory studies, numerical modeling studies, theoretical approaches, and limited field driven observations. Anthropogenic crevasses in the modern delta are large enough to overcome limitations of laboratory deltas, and small enough to allow for "rapid" channel and wetland development, providing an ideal setting to investigate delta development mechanics. Crevasse metrics were obtained using a combination of geospatial tools, extracting key parameters (bifurcation length and width, channel order and depth) that were non-dimensionalized and compared to river-dominated delta networks previously studied. Analysis showed that most crevasses in the MRD appear to obey delta growth laws and delta allometry relationships, suggesting that crevasses do exhibit similar planform metrics to larger Deltas; the distance to mouth bar versus bifurcation order demonstrated to be a very reasonable first order estimate of delta-top footprint. However, some crevasses exhibited different growth metrics. To better understand the hydrodynamic and geomorphic controls governing crevasse evolution in the MRD, we assess delta dynamics via a suite of field observations and numerical modeling in both well-established and newly constructed crevasses. Our analysis suggests that delta development is affected by the relative influence of external (upstream and downstream) and internal controls on the hydrodynamic and sediment transport patterns in these systems.

  6. Direct observation of liquid nucleus growth in homogeneous melting of colloidal crystals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziren; Wang, Feng; Peng, Yi; Han, Yilong

    2015-01-01

    The growth behaviour of liquid nucleus is crucial for crystal melting, but its kinetics is difficult to predict and remains challenging in experiment. Here we directly observed the growth of individual liquid nuclei in homogeneous melting of three-dimensional superheated colloidal crystals with single-particle dynamics by video microscopy. The growth rate of nucleus at weak superheating is well fitted by generalizing the Wilson–Frenkel law of crystallization to melting and including the surface tension effects and non-spherical-shape effects. As the degree of superheating increases, the growth rate is enhanced by nucleus shape fluctuation, nuclei coalescence and multimer attachment. The results provide new guidance for the refinement of nucleation theory, especially for the poorly understood strong-superheating regime. The universal Lindemann parameter observed at the superheat limit and solid–liquid interfaces indicates a connection between homogeneous and heterogeneous melting. PMID:25897801

  7. Observations of growth process of chemically vapor deposited diamond single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideaki; Nakamura, Tadashi; Iwahara, Hiroyasu; Sakamoto, Hiromichi

    1991-02-01

    The growth process and morphological variations of diamond single crystals obtained by microwave plasma CVD of the CO-H 2 reactant system were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The optimum conditions for spontaneous nucleation and growth of diamond on a (100) Si wafer were microwave power of 550 W, total pressure of 30-60 Torr, total flow rate of 200 ml/min and CO concentration of 5-10 vol%. Cubo-octahedral single crystals of diamond composed of {111} and {100} planes were grown epitaxially for 50 h by treating the coarse seed crystals of natural diamonds under the above growth conditions. Concave and terrace parts of the growing crystal surface were preferentially grown, resulting in the formation of symmetric single crystals. Typical trigonal pit patterns were formed on {111} planes of the developing crystal surface, while pyramidal shaped growth steps were observed on the {100} planes.

  8. Comparative evaluation of mathematical functions to describe growth and efficiency of phosphorus utilization in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Kebreab, E; Schulin-Zeuthen, M; Lopez, S; Soler, J; Dias, R S; de Lange, C F M; France, J

    2007-10-01

    Success of pig production depends on maximizing return over feed costs and addressing potential nutrient pollution to the environment. Mathematical modeling has been used to describe many important aspects of inputs and outputs of pork production. This study was undertaken to compare 4 mathematical functions for the best fit in terms of describing specific data sets on pig growth and, in a separate experiment, to compare these 4 functions for describing of P utilization for growth. Two data sets with growth data were used to conduct growth analysis and another data set was used for P efficiency analysis. All data sets were constructed from independent trials that measured BW, age, and intake. Four growth functions representing diminishing returns (monomolecular), sigmoidal with a fixed point of inflection (Gompertz), and sigmoidal with a variable point of inflection (Richards and von Bertalanffy) were used. Meta-analysis of the data was conducted to identify the most appropriate functions for growth and P utilization. Based on Bayesian information criteria, the Richards equation described the BW vs. age data best. The additional parameter of the Richards equation was necessary because the data required a lower point of inflection (138 d) than the Gompertz, with a fixed point of inflexion at 1/e times the final BW (189 d), could accommodate. Lack of flexibility in the Gompertz equation was a limitation to accurate prediction. The monomolecular equation was best at determining efficiencies of P utilization for BW gain compared with the sigmoidal functions. The parameter estimate for the rate constant in all functions decreased as available P intake increased. Average efficiencies during different stages of growth were calculated and offer insight into targeting stages where high feed (nutrient) input is required and when adjustments are needed to accommodate the loss of efficiency and the reduction of potential pollution problems. It is recommended that the Richards

  9. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  10. Comparison of Dynamically Modeled EMIC Wave Activity with in situ Observations: Implications for Wave Growth Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, J. P., II; Elkington, S. R.; Usanova, M.; Bortnik, J.

    2016-12-01

    We employed a 3D test particle simulation and a global magnetohydrodynamic code to compute Electromagnetic Ion-Cyclotron (EMIC) wave saturation amplitudes from the linear theory of wave growth. This provided a global dynamical picture of EMIC wave activity for a geomagnetic storm observed on 29 June 2007 by THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) spacecraft. Comparison of these amplitudes with values derived from on-board plasma measurements suggest re-evaluation of EMIC wave growth assumptions is necessary. We will present these comparisons along with analysis regarding the applicablity of the linear theory of wave growth during this event.

  11. Phacoemulsification versus extracapsular cataract extraction: a comparative study of cell survival and growth on the human capsular bag in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, M; Wormstone, I; Duncan, G; Davies, P

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Phacoemulsification is rapidly replacing conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) as the method of choice for cataract surgery in the Western world. However, posterior capsule opacification (PCO) still remains the major postoperative complication, affecting 20-50% of patients, and results from persistent cell growth of epithelial cells remaining after surgery. This study aimed to compare cell survival and growth on capsular bags following ECCE and phacoemulsification surgery using an established human capsular bag culture system.
METHODS—Sham ECCE and phacoemulsification cataract operations were performed on pairs of human donor eyes. Capsular bags were dissected free, pinned flat on a petri dish, and incubated with Eagle's minimum essential medium (EMEM) alone or EMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS). Ongoing observations were made using phase contrast microscopy.
RESULTS—Cell growth was observed across the posterior capsule of all preparations studied. It was found that there was no significant difference in the rate of cell growth on the posterior capsule with the two extraction methods, such that 50% confluency was achieved in 7.0 (SD 1.8) (n=7) days for ECCE and 7.43 (2.1) (n=7) days for phacoemulsification surgery. The physical changes to the capsule as a result of cell growth, such as wrinkling and capsular tensioning, were also seen in both groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Cell survival and growth is dependent on the donor, rather than the surgical technique performed. There is no significant difference between phacoemulsification and ECCE surgery on the rate and nature of cell growth on the posterior capsule in vitro.

 PMID:9486036

  12. New Observations and Insights into the Morphology and Growth Kinetics of Hydrate Films

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng-Li; Sun, Chang-Yu; Liu, Bei; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chen, Guang-Jin; Sum, Amadeu K.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of film growth of hydrates of methane, ethane, and methane-ethane mixtures were studied by exposing a single gas bubble to water. The morphologies, lateral growth rates, and thicknesses of the hydrate films were measured for various gas compositions and degrees of subcooling. A variety of hydrate film textures was revealed. The kinetics of two-dimensional film growth was inferred from the lateral growth rate and initial thickness of the hydrate film. A clear relationship between the morphology and film growth kinetics was observed. The shape of the hydrate crystals was found to favour heat or mass transfer and favour further growth of the hydrate film. The quantitative results on the kinetics of film growth showed that for a given degree of subcooling, the initial film thicknesses of the double hydrates were larger than that of pure methane or ethane hydrate, whereas the thickest hydrate film and the lowest lateral growth rate occurred when the methane mole fraction was approximately 0.6. PMID:24549241

  13. New observations and insights into the morphology and growth kinetics of hydrate films.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Li; Sun, Chang-Yu; Liu, Bei; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chen, Guang-Jin; Sum, Amadeu K

    2014-02-19

    The kinetics of film growth of hydrates of methane, ethane, and methane-ethane mixtures were studied by exposing a single gas bubble to water. The morphologies, lateral growth rates, and thicknesses of the hydrate films were measured for various gas compositions and degrees of subcooling. A variety of hydrate film textures was revealed. The kinetics of two-dimensional film growth was inferred from the lateral growth rate and initial thickness of the hydrate film. A clear relationship between the morphology and film growth kinetics was observed. The shape of the hydrate crystals was found to favour heat or mass transfer and favour further growth of the hydrate film. The quantitative results on the kinetics of film growth showed that for a given degree of subcooling, the initial film thicknesses of the double hydrates were larger than that of pure methane or ethane hydrate, whereas the thickest hydrate film and the lowest lateral growth rate occurred when the methane mole fraction was approximately 0.6.

  14. Longitudinal Lung Function Growth of Mexican Children Compared with International Studies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Briseño, David; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Mendoza, Laura; García-Sancho, Cecilia; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to compare the longitudinal lung function growth of Mexican children and adolescents with the collated spirometric reference proposed for international use and with that of Mexican-Americans from the National Health State Examination Survey III (NHANES) III study. Materials and Methods A cohort of Mexican children in third year of primary school was followed with spirometry twice a year through secondary school. Multilevel mixed-effects lineal models separated by gender were fit for the spirometric variables of 2,641 respiratory-healthy Mexican children expressed as Z-scores of tested reference equations. Impact of adjustment by sitting height on differences with Mexican-American children was observed in a subsample of 1,987 children. Results At same gender, age, and height, Mexican children had increasingly higher forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and Forced vital capacity (FVC) than the children from the collated reference study (mean Z-score, 0.68 for FEV1 and 0.51 for FVC) and than Mexican-American children (Z-score, 0.23 for FEV1 and 0.21 for FVC) respectively. Differences with Mexican-Americans were not reduced by adjusting by sitting height. Conclusions For reasons that remain unclear, the gender-, age-, and height-adjusted lung function of children from Mexico City is higher than that reported by several international studies. PMID:24143231

  15. Longitudinal lung function growth of Mexican children compared with international studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Briseño, David; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Mendoza, Laura; García-Sancho, Cecilia; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the longitudinal lung function growth of Mexican children and adolescents with the collated spirometric reference proposed for international use and with that of Mexican-Americans from the National Health State Examination Survey III (NHANES) III study. A cohort of Mexican children in third year of primary school was followed with spirometry twice a year through secondary school. Multilevel mixed-effects lineal models separated by gender were fit for the spirometric variables of 2,641 respiratory-healthy Mexican children expressed as Z-scores of tested reference equations. Impact of adjustment by sitting height on differences with Mexican-American children was observed in a subsample of 1,987 children. At same gender, age, and height, Mexican children had increasingly higher forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and Forced vital capacity (FVC) than the children from the collated reference study (mean Z-score, 0.68 for FEV1 and 0.51 for FVC) and than Mexican-American children (Z-score, 0.23 for FEV1 and 0.21 for FVC) respectively. Differences with Mexican-Americans were not reduced by adjusting by sitting height. For reasons that remain unclear, the gender-, age-, and height-adjusted lung function of children from Mexico City is higher than that reported by several international studies.

  16. Improved growth of preterm infants receiving mother's own raw milk compared with pasteurized donor milk.

    PubMed

    Montjaux-Régis, N; Cristini, C; Arnaud, C; Glorieux, I; Vanpee, M; Casper, C

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether growth, feeding tolerance and infectious events of preterm infants is related to the proportion of intake of mother's own raw milk (maternal milk) versus pooled pasteurized banked breast milk (donor milk). This is a prospective observational study of 55 premature infants born less than 32 weeks of gestational age admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at the Children's Hospital of Toulouse during two 6-month periods from 2003 to 2005. Enrolled infants were exclusively on enteral feeds with maternal milk ± donor milk. Mean gestational age was 28.6 weeks (SD 1.5) and mean birth weight 1105 grams (SD 282). During the time of exclusively breast milk feeds, weight gain (g/kg/day) was correlated to the proportion of maternal milk consumed (p = 0.0048, r = 0.4). Necrotizing enterocolitis was inversely correlated to the amount of maternal milk. The amount of maternal milk did not impact on infectious events. Mother's own raw milk improves weight gain compared with donor milk in preterm infants. Lactation strategies should be sought that helps mothers to increase their milk production. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  17. Growth characteristics of atypical mycobacteria in water and their comparative resistance to disinfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, L A; Petersen, N J; Favero, M S; Aguero, S M

    1978-01-01

    With the increasing significance of group IV atypical mycobacteria as etiological agents in a variety of infections, studies were conducted to determine their growth capabilities in water and their comparative resistance to disinfectants used to decontaminate hospital equipment. Isolates of Mycobaterium chelonei (TM strains) from peritoneal fluids of patients and peritoneal dialysis machines were able to multiply in commercial distilled water, with generation times at 25 degrees C ranging from 8 to 15 h. Levels of 10(5) to 10(6) cells per ml were attained, and these stationary-phase populations declined only slightly over a 1-year period. Results of studies to determine resistance to disinfectants showed the following. (i) TM strains of M. chelonei cultured in commercial distilled water showed survivors in 2% aqueous formaldehyde (HCHO) solutions up to 24 h; in 8% HCHO, only a 2-log reduction in viable counts was observed over a 2-h sampling period. Reference ATCC strains of M. chelonei and M. fortuitum were rapidly inactivated, with no survivors after 2 h of exposure to 2% HCHO or 15 min of exposure to 8% HCHO. (ii) In 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde, TM strains survived 60 min. whereas ATCC strains showed no survivors after 2 min of contact time. (iii) All M. chelonei and M. fortuitum strains survived 60 min of exposure to concentrations of 0.3 and 0.7 microgram of free chlorine per ml at pH 7. PMID:104656

  18. Real-Time Observation of Atomic Layer Deposition Inhibition: Metal Oxide Growth on Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    DOE PAGES

    Avila, Jason R.; DeMarco, Erica J.; Emery, Jonathan D.; ...

    2014-07-21

    Through in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) monitoring we resolve the growth of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and subsequent metal oxide deposition with high resolution. Here, we introduce the fitting of mass deposited during each atomic layer deposition (ALD) cycle to an analytical island-growth model that enables quantification of growth inhibition, nucleation density, and the uninhibited ALD growth rate. A long-chain alkanethiol was self-assembled as a monolayer on gold-coated quartz crystals in order to investigate its effectiveness as a barrier to ALD. Compared to solution-loading, vapor-loading is observed to produce a SAM with equal or greater inhibition-ability in minutes vs. days.more » The metal oxide growth temperature and the choice of precursor also significantly affect the nucleation density, which ranges from 0.001 to 1 sites/nm2. Finally, we observe a minimum 100 cycle inhibition of an oxide ALD process, ZnO, under moderately optimized conditions.« less

  19. Real-Time Observation of Atomic Layer Deposition Inhibition: Metal Oxide Growth on Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Jason R.; DeMarco, Erica J.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Farha, Omar K.; Pellin, Michael J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Martinson, Alex B. F.

    2014-07-21

    Through in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) monitoring we resolve the growth of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and subsequent metal oxide deposition with high resolution. Here, we introduce the fitting of mass deposited during each atomic layer deposition (ALD) cycle to an analytical island-growth model that enables quantification of growth inhibition, nucleation density, and the uninhibited ALD growth rate. A long-chain alkanethiol was self-assembled as a monolayer on gold-coated quartz crystals in order to investigate its effectiveness as a barrier to ALD. Compared to solution-loading, vapor-loading is observed to produce a SAM with equal or greater inhibition-ability in minutes vs. days. The metal oxide growth temperature and the choice of precursor also significantly affect the nucleation density, which ranges from 0.001 to 1 sites/nm2. Finally, we observe a minimum 100 cycle inhibition of an oxide ALD process, ZnO, under moderately optimized conditions.

  20. Constraining lightning channel growth dynamics by comparison of time domain electromagnetic simulations to Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Bitzer, P. M.; Burchfield, J.

    2015-12-01

    Major unknowns in lightning research include the mechanism and dynamics of lightning channel extension. Such processes are most simple during the initial growth of the channel, when the channel is relatively short and has not yet branched extensively throughout the cloud. During this initial growth phase, impulsive electromagnetic emissions (preliminary breakdown pulses) can be well-described as produced by current pulses generated as the channel extends, but the overall growth rate, channel geometry, and degree of branching are not known. We approach such issues by examining electric field change measurements made with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA) during the first few milliseconds of growth of a lightning discharge. We compare HAMMA observations of electromagnetic emissions and overall field change to models of lightning channel growth and development and attempt to constrain channel growth rate, degree of branching, channel physical properties, and uniformity of thunderstorm electric field. Preliminary comparisons suggest that the lightning channel branches relatively early in the discharge, though more complete and detailed analysis will be presented.

  1. Direct observation of grain growth from molten silicon formed by micro-thermal-plasma-jet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Shohei; Fujita, Yuji; Kamikura, Takahiro; Sakaike, Kohei; Akazawa, Muneki; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Hanafusa, Hiroaki; Higashi, Seiichiro

    2012-10-22

    Phase transformation of amorphous-silicon during millisecond annealing using micro-thermal-plasma-jet irradiation was directly observed using a high-speed camera with microsecond time resolution. An oval-shaped molten-silicon region adjacent to the solid phase crystallization region was clearly observed, followed by lateral large grain growth perpendicular to a liquid-solid interface. Furthermore, leading wave crystallization (LWC), which showed intermittent explosive crystallization, was discovered in front of the moving molten region. The growth mechanism of LWC has been investigated on the basis of numerical simulation implementing explosive movement of a thin liquid layer driven by released latent heat diffusion in a lateral direction.

  2. Comparing immune-tumor growth models with drug therapy using optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Marisa C.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Costa, M. Fernanda P.; Fernandes, Edite M. G. P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare the dynamics of three tumor growth models that include an immune system and a drug administration therapy using optimal control. The objective is to minimize a combined function of the total of tumor cells over time and a chemotherapeutic drug administration.

  3. Facial growth in patients with apert and crouzon syndromes compared to normal children.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Jacobus H; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M; Buschang, Peter H; Prahl-Andersen, Birte

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate vertical and sagittal facial growth in children with Apert and Crouzon syndromes and compare it to the growth patterns of a nonsyndromic control group. Case-control study. Department of Orthodontics, Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Centre, Sophia, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Sixty-two patients (37 patients with Crouzon syndrome and 25 patients with Apert syndrome) born between 1971 and 2001 (age range 3.9 to 32 years) and 482 nonsyndromic children as a control group. Lateral cephalograms performed prior to any midfacial surgery of 62 patients and 482 nonsyndromic children were traced and horizontal and vertical measurements were digitized. Cephalometric measurements of SNA, SNB, ANB, NSMe, and SN/palatal plane angles and lower facial height ratio. Horizontal measurements for the syndromic groups showed no change in SNA angle during growth. SNA angles were lower in patients with Apert syndrome compared to patients with Crouzon syndrome. The syndromic groups showed smaller values for ANB angles compared to the nonsyndromic group. Vertical measurements showed increased lower facial height ratios for the syndromic groups compared to control subjects. There was an increasing counterclockwise rotation of the palatal plane in relation to the anterior cranial base in syndromic patients. NSMe angles among the three groups were not significantly different. Based on the growth differences identified, the sagittal and vertical jaw relationships differ in patients with Crouzon syndrome, patients with Apert syndrome, and control subjects. Syndromic patients show aggravation of midfacial underdevelopment and anterior rotation of the mandible.

  4. Globular-cluster stars - Results of theoretical evolution and pulsation studies compared with the observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iben, I., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Survey of recently published studies on globular clusters, and comparison of stellar evolution and pulsation theory with reported observations. The theory of stellar evolution is shown to be capable of describing, in principle, the behavior of a star through all quasi-static stages. Yet, as might be expected, estimates of bulk properties obtained by comparing observations with results of pulsation and stellar atmosphere theory differ somewhat from estimates of these same properties obtained by comparing observations with results of evolution theory. A description is given of how such estimates are obtained, and suggestions are offered as to where the weak points in each theory may lie.

  5. New observational constraints on the growth of the first supermassive black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Treister, E.; Schawinski, K.; Volonteri, M.; Natarajan, P.

    2013-12-01

    We constrain the total accreted mass density in supermassive black holes at z > 6, inferred via the upper limit derived from the integrated X-ray emission from a sample of photometrically selected galaxy candidates. Studying galaxies obtained from the deepest Hubble Space Telescope images combined with the Chandra 4 Ms observations of the Chandra Deep Field-South, we achieve the most restrictive constraints on total black hole growth in the early universe. We estimate an accreted mass density <1000 M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} at z ∼ 6, significantly lower than the previous predictions from some existing models of early black hole growth and earlier prior observations. These results place interesting constraints on early black hole growth and mass assembly by accretion and imply one or more of the following: (1) only a fraction of the luminous galaxies at this epoch contain active black holes; (2) most black hole growth at early epochs happens in dusty and/or less massive—as yet undetected—host galaxies; (3) there is a significant fraction of low-z interlopers in the galaxy sample; (4) early black hole growth is radiatively inefficient, heavily obscured, and/or due to black hole mergers as opposed to accretion; or (5) the bulk of the black hole growth occurs at late times. All of these possibilities have important implications for our understanding of high-redshift seed formation models.

  6. Gender differences in scalp hair growth rates are maintained but reduced in pattern hair loss compared to controls.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, D J J; Rushton, D H

    2016-08-01

    Hair loss is related to follicular density, programmed regrowth and hair productivity. The dissatisfaction with hair growth in patients experiencing hair loss might be due to slower linear hair growth rate (LHGR). LHGR and hair diameter was evaluated in Caucasian controls and patients with patterned hair loss employing the validated non-invasive, contrast-enhanced-phototrichogram with exogen collection. We evaluated 59,765 anagen hairs (controls 24,609, patients 35,156) and found thinner hairs grew slower than thicker hairs. LHGR in normal women was generally higher than in normal men. LHGR correlates with hair diameter (P < 0.006) and global thinning is associated with slower growth rates. Compared with hair of equal thickness in controls, subjects affected with patterned hair loss showed reduced hair growth rates, an observation found in both male and female patients. Males with pattern hair loss showed further reduction in growth rates as clinical severity worsened. However, sample size limitations prevented statistical evaluation of LHGR in severely affected females. Caucasian ethnicity. In pattern hair loss, LHGR significantly contributes to the apparent decrease in hair volume in affected areas. In early onset, LHRG might have a prognostic value in females but not in males. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Global Observation of Substorm Growth Phase Processes in the Polar Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M.; OFillingim, M. O.; Chua, D.; Wilber, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Global images of the polar cap region during the substorm growth phase by the Polar Ultraviolet Imager reveals evidence of the processes which are not completely explained by current models. In particular, it was found that size of the polar cap region increases during the growth phase even if the interplanetary magnetic field has no southward component. Three phenomena were observed to produce an increase in the size of the polar cap: (1) motion of the auroral oval to lower latitude, (2) thinning of the auroral oval, and (3) reduction of intense aurora[ precipitation in the polar region. Correlation of image intensities with in situ particle measurements from the FAST satellite are being conducted to study the three growth phase phenomena; and to help identify the source regions of the particles, the mechanisms involved in producing the auroral structures and what may be reducing the polar cap precipitation during the substorm growth phase.

  8. Solar irradiance computations compared with observations at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network Payerne site

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Daniela; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Long, Charles N.; Ohmura, Atsumu

    2008-07-18

    Radiative transfer model calculations of solar fluxes during cloud free periods often show considerable discrepancies with surface radiation observations. Many efforts have been undertaken to explain the differences between modeled and observed shortwave downward radiation (SDR). In this study, MODTRAN4v3r1TM (designed later simply as MODTRANTM) was used for model simulations and compared with high quality radiation observations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) site at Payerne, Switzerland. Results are presented for cloud free shortwave downward radiation calculations. The median differences of modeled minus observed global SDR are small (< 1%) and within the instrumental error. The differences of modeled and observed direct and diffuse SDR show larger discrepancies of -1.8% and 5.2% respectively. The diffuse SDR is generally overestimated by the model and more important, the model to observation linear regression slope and zero-intercept differs significantly from their ideal values of 1 and 0. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are presented and discussed and some modifications are investigated for decreasing such differences between modeled and observed diffuse SDR. However, we could not resolve all the discrepancies. The best agreement is obtained when comparing model simulations whose 550nm aerosol optical depth input is inferred from observations using nine spectral channels, and using BSRN observations performed with a new and more precise shading disk and sun tracker system. In this case, the median bias between model simulations and observed diffuse SDR is -0.4 Wm-2 (< 1%).

  9. Comparative data on the differentiation and growth of bone ornamentation in gnathostomes (Chordata: Vertebrata).

    PubMed

    de Buffrénil, Vivian; Clarac, François; Canoville, Aurore; Laurin, Michel

    2016-05-01

    Bone ornamentation, in the form of rounded pits framed by a network of ridges, is a frequent feature among a great diversity of gnathostome taxa. However, the basic osteogenic processes controlling the differentiation and development of these reliefs remain controversial. The present study is a broad comparative survey of this question with the classical methods used in hard tissue histology and paleohistology. Distinct processes, unevenly distributed among taxa, are involved in the creation and growth of pits and ridges. The simplest one is mere differential growth between pit bottom (slow growth) and ridge top (faster growth). The involvement of several complex remodeling processes, with the local succession of resorption and reconstruction cycles, is frequent and occurs in all major gnathostome clades. Some broad, inclusive clades (e.g., Temnospondyli) display consistency in the mechanisms controlling ornamentation, whereas other clades (e.g., Actinopterygii) are characterized by the diversity of the mechanisms involved. If osteogenic mechanisms are taken into account, bone ornamentation should be considered as a character extremely prone to homoplasy. Maximum likelihood (ML) optimizations reveal that the plesiomorphic mechanism creating ornamentation is differential apposition rate over pits (slow growth) and ridges (faster growth). In some taxas e.g., temnospondyls vs lissamphibians or pseudosuchians, bone ornamentation is likely to be a homoplastic feature due to a convergence process driven by similar selective pressures. ML models of character evolution suggest that the presence of resorption in the development of ornamentation may be selectively advantageous, although support for this conclusion is only moderate.

  10. Comparative analysis of the interaction between habitat and growth form in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Nakov, Teofil; Ashworth, Matt; Theriot, Edward C

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the evolutionary history of growth form (solitary-colonial) and its interaction with species' habitat (planktonic-benthic) across a multi-gene phylogeny encompassing a broad sample of the order-level diversity of diatoms. We treated these characters broadly, modeling the evolution of aggregation of cells into a colony irrespective of the way aggregation is achieved, and relating the growth form to a broad concept of niche location: in the plankton or benthos. The results showed that habitat shifts are rare implying conservatism in niche location at the level of large clades. On the other hand, the evolutionary history of growth form is more dynamic with evolutionary rates that vary across the tree. Analyses of a possible interaction revealed that shifts in growth form are independent of habitat and that traversing between habitats does not hinge upon species' growth form. Our findings help to fill a gap in the understanding of diatom niche and growth form macroevolution and contribute toward a platform for the comparative study of the mechanisms underlying diatom species and functional diversity.

  11. Body parameters of Czech breastfed children compared to the Czech references and WHO growth standards.

    PubMed

    Riedlová, Jitka; Vignerová, Jana; Paulová, Markéta; Musil, Vladimír; Brabec, Marek; Schneidrová, Dagmar

    2017-08-22

    The study concerns the comparison of percentile curves of Czech breastfed children with Czech national references from 1991 and 2001 and WHO growth standards. Growth charts of breastfed children demonstrate different curve shapes, especially in the first months of life. Incorrect interpretation of the growth curve could lead to premature introduction of complementary foods or infant formula. The comparison of four body parameters of Czech breastfed children with currently used Czech national references and WHO standards in order to recommend that Czech paediatricians use either Czech references or WHO standards in their practice. Nine hundred and sixty breastfed children were included in the study of length-for-age, head circumference-for-age, weight-for-age and weight-for-length parameters. All percentile curves were compared. Values of the 50th percentile expressed in z-scores based on both Czech references and WHO standards were tested. The study confirmed results of previous surveys documenting that growth of breastfed children is specific. Nevertheless, percentile curves of growth parameters of Czech breastfed children are closer to Czech references than WHO standards. The Czech national references fulfil the needs of Czech paediatricians (with pointing to specifics of breastfed child growth) and WHO standards are suitable, especially for international comparison.

  12. Comparative analysis of the interaction between habitat and growth form in diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Nakov, Teofil; Ashworth, Matt; Theriot, Edward C

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the evolutionary history of growth form (solitary–colonial) and its interaction with species' habitat (planktonic–benthic) across a multi-gene phylogeny encompassing a broad sample of the order-level diversity of diatoms. We treated these characters broadly, modeling the evolution of aggregation of cells into a colony irrespective of the way aggregation is achieved, and relating the growth form to a broad concept of niche location: in the plankton or benthos. The results showed that habitat shifts are rare implying conservatism in niche location at the level of large clades. On the other hand, the evolutionary history of growth form is more dynamic with evolutionary rates that vary across the tree. Analyses of a possible interaction revealed that shifts in growth form are independent of habitat and that traversing between habitats does not hinge upon species' growth form. Our findings help to fill a gap in the understanding of diatom niche and growth form macroevolution and contribute toward a platform for the comparative study of the mechanisms underlying diatom species and functional diversity. PMID:24983594

  13. Prediction of Future Observations in Polynomial Growth Curve Models. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    UNIT NUMBERS University of Pittsburgh, Ninth Floor, PE6llO2F; 2304/A5 Schenley Hall, Pittsburgh PA 15260 It CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12...8217. DSIM Enitvd, ’ SR-TR. 8 3 0491 PREDICTION OF FUTURE OBSERVATIONS IN POLYNOMIAL GROWTH CURVE MODELS PART - 1 C. Radhakrishna Rao University of Pittsburgh

  14. Assimilation of active and passive microwave observations for improved estimates of soil moisture and crop growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An Ensemble Kalman Filter-based data assimilation framework that links a crop growth model with active and passive (AP) microwave models was developed to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation biomass over a growing season of soybean. Complementarities in AP observations were incorpo...

  15. Compatibility between observed and executed finger movements: comparing symbolic, spatial, and imitative cues.

    PubMed

    Brass, M; Bekkering, H; Wohlschläger, A; Prinz, W

    2000-11-01

    Intuitively, one can assume that imitating a movement is an easier task than responding to a symbolic stimulus like a verbal instruction. Support for this suggestion can be found in neuropsychological research as well as in research on stimulus-response compatibility. However controlled experimental evidence for this assumption is still lacking. We used a stimulus-response compatibility paradigm to test the assumption. In a series of experiments, it was tested whether observed finger movements have a stronger influence on finger movement execution than a symbolic or spatial cue. In the first experiment, we compared symbolic cues with observed finger movements using an interference paradigm. Observing finger movements strongly influenced movement execution, irrespective of whether the finger movement was the relevant or the irrelevant stimulus dimension. In the second experiment, effects of observed finger movements and spatial finger cues were compared. The observed finger movement dominated the spatial finger cue. A reduction in the similarity of observed and executed action in the third experiment led to a decrease of the influence of observed finger movement, which demonstrates the crucial role of the imitative relation of observed and executed action for the described effects. The results are discussed in relation to recent models of stimulus-response compatibility. Neurocognitive support for the strong relationship between movement observation and movement execution is reported. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor I acts as an angiogenic agent in rabbit cornea and retina: comparative studies with basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Grant, M B; Mames, R N; Fitzgerald, C; Ellis, E A; Aboufriekha, M; Guy, J

    1993-04-01

    The release of growth factors from ischaemic retina has been hypothesized as the central stimulus for retinal neovascularization in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Two of the growth factors implicated are insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor. We examined the effect of insulin-like growth factor-I on in vivo neovascularization using the established angiogenic model of the rabbit cornea (n = 30), and also compared the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor using two new in vivo systems. Either supraphysiologic concentrations of each growth factor (600 micrograms) were injected intravitreally into pigmented rabbits (n = 21) or porous polyfluorotetraethylene chambers filled with an emulsion containing collagen and growth factor (500 ng) were placed on the retina surface (n = 8). Our results demonstrate that when insulin-like growth factor-I was implanted together with a slow release carrier into the pocket of the normally avascular cornea, insulin-like growth factor-I (10 micrograms/pellet) induced angiogenesis in all rabbits. This degree of angiogenesis was comparable to that previously shown for basic fibroblast growth factor. For the intravitreal studies, the fibrotic component was greater in the basic fibroblast growth factor injected eyes, whereas the vascular component was accentuated in the eyes injected with insulin-like growth factor-I. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated areas of vascular proliferation in both groups. Porous polyfluorotetraethylene chamber studies with insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor demonstrated vascular proliferation in the vicinity of the chamber similar to the intravitreal injected eyes, but to a lesser degree than the injected eyes. Our experiments overall support the angiogenic potential of both insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor and support distinct but complimentary roles for each growth factor in the

  17. Are observation selection methods important when comparing early warning score performance?

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Stuart W; Kovacs, Caroline; Briggs, Jim; Meredith, Paul; Schmidt, Paul E; Featherstone, Peter I; Prytherch, David R; Smith, Gary B

    2015-05-01

    Sicker patients generally have more vital sign assessments, particularly immediately before an adverse outcome, and especially if the vital sign monitoring schedule is driven by an early warning score (EWS) value. This lack of independence could influence the measured discriminatory performance of an EWS. We used a population of 1564,143 consecutive vital signs observation sets collected as a routine part of patients' care. We compared 35 published EWSs for their discrimination of the risk of death within 24h of an observation set using (1) all observations in our dataset, (2) one observation per patient care episode, chosen at random and (3) one observation per patient care episode, chosen as the closest to a randomly selected point in time in each episode. We compared the area under the ROC curve (AUROC) as a measure of discrimination for each of the 35 EWSs under each observation selection method and looked for changes in their rank order. There were no significant changes in rank order of the EWSs based on AUROC between the different observation selection methods, except for one EWS that included age among its components. Whichever method of observation selection was used, the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) showed the highest discrimination of risk of death within 24h. AUROCs were higher when only one observation set was used per episode of care (significantly higher for many EWSs, including NEWS). Vital sign measurements can be treated as if they are independent - multiple observations can be used from each episode of care--when comparing the performance and ranking of EWSs, provided no EWS includes age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oestrogens, via transforming growth factor alpha, modulate basic fibroblast growth factor synthesis in hypothalamic astrocytes: in vitro observations.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, M; Martini, L; Melcangi, R C

    2002-10-01

    The data presented here show that, in cultures of type 1 astrocytes obtained from the hypothalamus of neonatal female rat, 17beta-oestradiol is able to increase both the mRNA and the protein levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In particular, after 24 h of exposure to 17beta-oestradiol (10(-9) and 10(-10) m), an increase of messenger levels of bFGF appears in hypothalamic type 1 astrocytes. Similarly, an induction of bFGF protein is also evident at this time of exposure. The effect on the mRNA and protein levels of bFGF is blocked by the presence in the medium of an antibody raised against the transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) receptor. This observation indicates that, TGFalpha, whose synthesis is modulated by oestrogens in hypothalamic astrocytes and which is able to increase, both the mRNA and the protein levels of bFGF in our experimental model, may act as the mediator of the oestrogenic induction of bFGF. Hypothalamic astrocytes, together with hypothalamic neurones synthesizing and secreting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), form the LHRH network in conjunction with other neuronal systems. Gonadal steroids in general, and oestrogens in particular, play an important role in the control of the activity of this network. In addition, bFGF and TGFalpha, two growth factors released from astrocytes, are able to influence the activity of LHRH neurones. The present observations suggest that oestrogens may also act on LHRH neurones in an indirect fashion (i.e. by modulating the expression of bFGF and TGFalpha in glial cells).

  19. Comparing GOSAT Observations of Localized CO2 Enhancements by Large Emitters with Inventory-Based Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardanan, Rajesh; Maksyutov, Shamil; Oda, Tomohiro; Saito, Makoto; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ganshin, Alexander; Stohl, Andreas; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Yoshida, Yukio; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    We employed an atmospheric transport model to attribute column-averaged CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2) observed by Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to emissions due to large sources such as megacities and power plants. XCO2 enhancements estimated from observations were compared to model simulations implemented at the spatial resolution of the satellite observation footprint (0.1deg × 0.1deg). We found that the simulated XCO2 enhancements agree with the observed over several continental regions across the globe, for example, for North America with an observation to simulation ratio of 1.05 +/- 0.38 (p<0.1), but with a larger ratio over East Asia (1.22 +/- 0.32; p<0.05). The obtained observation-model discrepancy (22%) for East Asia is comparable to the uncertainties in Chinese emission inventories (approx.15%) suggested by recent reports. Our results suggest that by increasing the number of observations around emission sources, satellite instruments like GOSAT can provide a tool for detecting biases in reported emission inventories.

  20. Comparing GOSAT Observations of Localized CO2 Enhancements by Large Emitters with Inventory-Based Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardanan, Rajesh; Maksyutov, Shamil; Oda, Tomohiro; Saito, Makoto; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ganshin, Alexander; Stohl, Andreas; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Yoshida, Yukio; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    We employed an atmospheric transport model to attribute column-averaged CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2) observed by Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to emissions due to large sources such as megacities and power plants. XCO2 enhancements estimated from observations were compared to model simulations implemented at the spatial resolution of the satellite observation footprint (0.1deg × 0.1deg). We found that the simulated XCO2 enhancements agree with the observed over several continental regions across the globe, for example, for North America with an observation to simulation ratio of 1.05 +/- 0.38 (p<0.1), but with a larger ratio over East Asia (1.22 +/- 0.32; p<0.05). The obtained observation-model discrepancy (22%) for East Asia is comparable to the uncertainties in Chinese emission inventories (approx.15%) suggested by recent reports. Our results suggest that by increasing the number of observations around emission sources, satellite instruments like GOSAT can provide a tool for detecting biases in reported emission inventories.

  1. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Lesley A.; Jackson, Brian E.; Fonteno, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics) has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain. PMID:27135334

  2. Characteristics of proportionate growth observed in instability patterns of miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Ramachandran, Radha; Nagel, Sidney R.; Nagel lab Team

    2014-11-01

    As a baby mammal grows, different parts of its body develop at the nearly the same rate and thus to a good approximation in direct proportion to one another. This type of growth is called proportionate growth. As familiar as it appears to us, it is very rarely found in physical systems outside of the biological world. We here show an example of proportionate growth that occurs in the instability formed when a less viscous liquid, of viscosity ηin displaces a more viscous miscible one, of viscosity ηout. We investigate the growth of these patterns in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry. Within a range of viscosity ratios 0.1 <ηin /ηout <0.3, we observe the formation of small blunt structures that form at the edges of an inner circular region devoid of fingers. As the pattern grows, the size of these structures increases in proportion to the size of the inner circle, such that even small details in the shape of the pattern remain essentially unchanged during growth. These characteristics of proportionate growth are reflected in the shape of the interface in the third dimension as well.

  3. Plasma-Assisted Growth of Silicon Nanowires by Sn Catalyst: Step-by-Step Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Chen, Wanghua; Misra, Soumyadeep; Foldyna, Martin; Johnson, Erik V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive study of the silicon nanowire growth process has been carried out. Silicon nanowires were grown by plasma-assisted-vapor-solid method using tin as a catalyst. We have focused on the evolution of the silicon nanowire density, morphology, and crystallinity. For the first time, the initial growth stage, which determines the nanowire (NW) density and growth direction, has been observed step by step. We provide direct evidence of the merging of Sn catalyst droplets and the formation of Si nanowires during the first 10 s of growth. We found that the density of Sn droplets decreases from 9000 Sn droplets/μm2 to 2000 droplets/μm2 after just 10 s of growth. Moreover, the long and straight nanowire density decreases from 170/μm2 after 2 min of growth to less than 10/μm2 after 90 min. This strong reduction in nanowire density is accompanied by an evolution of their morphology from cylindrical to conical, then to bend conical, and finally, to a bend inverted conical shape. Moreover, the changes in the crystalline structure of nanowires are from (i) monocrystalline to (ii) monocrystalline core/defective crystalline shell and then to (iii) monocrystalline core/defective crystalline shell/amorphous shell. The evolutions of NW properties have been explained in detail.

  4. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants.

    PubMed

    Judd, Lesley A; Jackson, Brian E; Fonteno, William C

    2015-07-03

    The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics) has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain.

  5. Observed forest sensitivity to climate implies large changes in 21st century North American forest growth.

    PubMed

    Charney, Noah D; Babst, Flurin; Poulter, Benjamin; Record, Sydne; Trouet, Valerie M; Frank, David; Enquist, Brian J; Evans, Margaret E K

    2016-09-01

    Predicting long-term trends in forest growth requires accurate characterisation of how the relationship between forest productivity and climatic stress varies across climatic regimes. Using a network of over two million tree-ring observations spanning North America and a space-for-time substitution methodology, we forecast climate impacts on future forest growth. We explored differing scenarios of increased water-use efficiency (WUE) due to CO2 -fertilisation, which we simulated as increased effective precipitation. In our forecasts: (1) climate change negatively impacted forest growth rates in the interior west and positively impacted forest growth along the western, southeastern and northeastern coasts; (2) shifting climate sensitivities offset positive effects of warming on high-latitude forests, leaving no evidence for continued 'boreal greening'; and (3) it took a 72% WUE enhancement to compensate for continentally averaged growth declines under RCP 8.5. Our results highlight the importance of locally adapted forest management strategies to handle regional differences in growth responses to climate change. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  6. Comparative effects of vivax malaria, fever and diarrhoea on child growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gwenyth; Yori, Pablo; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Pan, William; Caulfield, Laura; Gilman, Robert H; Sanders, John W; Delgado, Hermann Silva; Kosek, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background The adverse impact of Plasmodium vivax on child health beyond acute febrile illness is poorly studied. The effect of vivax malaria on child growth was evaluated and compared with diarrhoeal disease and non-specific fever. Methods Using data from a 43-month longitudinal cohort of children 0–72 months of age (n = 442) in the Peruvian Amazon, ponderal and linear growth velocities over 2-, 4- and 6-month periods were examined using longitudinal models and related to the incidence of disease during the same period. Results An episode of vivax malaria led to 138.6 g (95% confidence interval (CI) 81.9–195.4), 108.6 g (62.8–153.2) and 61 g (20.9–101.1) less weight gain over 2-, 4- and 6-month intervals, respectively. These deficits were larger than both diarrhoea (21.9, 17.2 and 13.8 g less weight gain, respectively) and fever (39.0, 30.3 and 25.6 g less weight gain, respectively). An incident episode of vivax also led to 0.070 cm (0.004–0.137) and 0.083 cm (0.015–0.151) less linear growth over 4 and 6 months, respectively, which were also larger than deficits from diarrhoea (0.029 and 0.028 cm, respectively) and fever (not associated with linear growth deficits). Despite the larger effect of P. vivax incident episodes on growth of a particular child, diarrhoeal disease had a larger cumulative impact on growth deficits as diarrhoeal incidence rates in this community are >10-fold higher than vivax malaria. Conclusions Disease control measures for vivax malaria and diarrhoeal disease have the potential to improve the growth of children in endemic areas. PMID:22258823

  7. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    DOE PAGES

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; ...

    2016-07-28

    observed differing growth pathways, while also predicting that ELVOCs contribute more to growth than organic salt formation. However, most MABNAG model simulations tend to underpredict the observed growth rates between 10 and 20 nm in diameter; this underprediction may come from neglecting the contributions to growth from semi-to-low-volatility species or accretion reactions. Our results suggest that in addition to sulfuric acid, ELVOCs are also very important for growth in this rural setting. We discuss the limitations of our study that arise from not accounting for semi- and low-volatility organics, as well as nitrogen-containing species beyond ammonia and amines in the model. Quantitatively understanding the overall budget, evolution, and thermodynamic properties of lower-volatility organics in the atmosphere will be essential for improving global aerosol models.« less

  8. Chick metabolic rate and growth in three species of albatross: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R A; Green, J A; Phalan, B; Croxall, J P; Butler, P J

    2003-05-01

    The relative importance of genetic vs. environmental factors in determining the pattern of avian post-embryonic development is much debated. Previous cross-fostering of albatrosses suggested that although inter-specific variation in growth rate was determined primarily by differences in dietary energy content, species-specific constraints might have evolved that could limit maximal growth, even in chicks fed at similar rates and on similar diets. This study aimed to determine whether intrinsic differences in resting metabolic rate were apparent during the linear phase of growth in chicks of three species (black-browed, grey-headed and light-mantled sooty albatrosses). There was a gradual increase in absolute, and a reduction in mass-specific metabolic rate from 5.0 W kg(-1) during the earliest part of linear growth, to 3.5 W kg(-1) by the time chicks reached peak mass. These values are considerably higher than in resting adults of comparable or lower mass, presumably reflecting the large size and high metabolic demand of organs involved in rapid nutrient processing and tissue synthesis by chicks. The lack of any detectable inter-specific variation in the pattern of metabolic rate changes casts some doubt on the existence of fundamental differences in growth rate that cannot be attributed simply to differences in dietary energy or nutrient delivery rate.

  9. Effect of Prudhoe Bay emissions on atmospheric aerosol growth events observed in Utqiaġvik (Barrow), Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesar, Katheryn R.; Cellini, Jillian; Peterson, Peter K.; Jefferson, Anne; Tuch, Thomas; Birmili, Wolfram; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-03-01

    The Arctic is a rapidly changing ecosystem, with complex aerosol-cloud-climate feedbacks contributing to more rapid warming of the region as compared to the mid-latitudes. Understanding changes to particle number concentration and size distributions is important to constraining estimates of the effect of anthropogenic activity on the region. During six years of semi-continuous measurements of particle number size distributions conducted near Utqiaġvik (Barrow), Alaska, 37 particle-growth events were observed. The majority of events occurred during spring and summer with a monthly maximum in June, similar to other Arctic sites. Based on backward air mass trajectory analysis, similar numbers of particle-growth events were influenced by marine (46%) and Prudhoe Bay air masses (33%), despite air primarily coming from the Arctic Ocean (75 ± 2% of days) compared to Prudhoe Bay (8 ± 2% of days). The corresponding normalized particle-growth event frequency suggests that emissions from Prudhoe Bay could induce an average of 92 particle-growth events, more than all other air mass sources combined, at Barrow annually. Prudhoe Bay is currently the third largest oil and gas field in the United States, and development in the Arctic region is expected to expand throughout the 21st century as the extent of summertime sea ice decreases. Elevated particle number concentrations due to human activity are likely to have profound impacts on climate change in the Arctic through direct, indirect, and surface albedo feedbacks, particularly through the addition of cloud condensation nuclei.

  10. Comparative assessment of growth and biodegradation potential of soil isolate in the presence of pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Jilani, Seema

    2013-01-01

    In Pakistan, to increase agricultural production, higher amounts of fertilizers and pesticides are being used. The residues of the applied pesticides stay in the environment and therefore causing contamination of air, water and land. Moreover, agricultural industries are also contributing relatively high quantities of toxic pesticides into the environment. Since most of them have no treatment facilities. These pesticides may be toxic, mutagenic or carcinogenic. They may be bioaccumulated or biomagnified by the biota. Therefore its removal from environmental systems needs special attention. In this study, bacterial isolate, Pseudomonas, designated as IES-Ps-1, was used to assess its potential for pesticide removal from industrial wastewater using the biosimulator (activated sludge process). During experimental studies conducted in the flask as well as in biosimulator, it was observed that IES-Ps-1 grows normally at low concentrations of added insecticides when compared with the control test (without pesticide). However, at high concentrations the microbial count decreased but no death occurred and the culture remained in lag phase. In many cases, the growth of organisms in the presence of the particular substrate serves as an indication about its metabolic potential. However, to confirm these results, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and HPLC analysis were performed. Under aerobic culture conditions using mechanical aerators in biosimulator, almost complete removal of Cypermethrin at 20 mg/L dose occurred during 48 h. The study findings indicate that IES-Ps-1 strain, can be used for the treatment of the pesticide contaminated environment. Such study may be valuable to scientist and engineers, who are trying to develop methods for the treatment of toxic organic waste using the biological treatment process. PMID:23961243

  11. Observations of and a new model for fetch-limited wave growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Surface Contour Radar (SCR) is a 36-GHz computer-controlled airborne radar which generates a false-color coded elevation map of the sea surface below the aircraft in real time. In the present paper, SCR observations are discussed which demonstrate the existence of a full developed sea state. These observations are used to judge the validity of growth rates for fetch-limited wave spectrum development and lead to new refinements in the modeling of wave generation by wind. It is noted that the observations have resolved an apparent paradox in the JONSWAP and Donelan et al. (1985) fetch-limited algorithms.

  12. Healthcare outcomes assessed with observational study designs compared with those assessed in randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Anglemyer, Andrew; Horvath, Hacsi T; Bero, Lisa

    2014-04-29

    Researchers and organizations often use evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the efficacy of a treatment or intervention under ideal conditions. Studies of observational designs are often used to measure the effectiveness of an intervention in 'real world' scenarios. Numerous study designs and modifications of existing designs, including both randomized and observational, are used for comparative effectiveness research in an attempt to give an unbiased estimate of whether one treatment is more effective or safer than another for a particular population.A systematic analysis of study design features, risk of bias, parameter interpretation, and effect size for all types of randomized and non-experimental observational studies is needed to identify specific differences in design types and potential biases. This review summarizes the results of methodological reviews that compare the outcomes of observational studies with randomized trials addressing the same question, as well as methodological reviews that compare the outcomes of different types of observational studies. To assess the impact of study design (including RCTs versus observational study designs) on the effect measures estimated.To explore methodological variables that might explain any differences identified.To identify gaps in the existing research comparing study designs. We searched seven electronic databases, from January 1990 to December 2013.Along with MeSH terms and relevant keywords, we used the sensitivity-specificity balanced version of a validated strategy to identify reviews in PubMed, augmented with one term ("review" in article titles) so that it better targeted narrative reviews. No language restrictions were applied. We examined systematic reviews that were designed as methodological reviews to compare quantitative effect size estimates measuring efficacy or effectiveness of interventions tested in trials with those tested in observational studies

  13. A comparative study of the proteoglycan of growth cartilage of normal and rachitic chicks.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, I R; Roughley, P J

    1978-01-01

    1. Proteoglycan was isolated from growth cartilage of normal and rachitic chicks. 2. The proteoglycan from normal cartilage showed differences in chemical composition and physical properties from a comparable fraction isolated from bovine nasal cartilage. 3. The proteoglycan from rachitic-chick cartilage was of smaller size than tis normal counterpart, though of similar average chemical composition. 4. Differences between proteoglycan from normal and rachitic cartilages can be explained in terms of limited proteolytic cleavage. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:666731

  14. Effects of human population growth on the Fraser and Okanagan River systems, Canada: a comparative inquiry.

    PubMed

    Northcote, T G

    1996-10-01

    The author compares the impact of human population growth on the Fraser and Okanagan river systems in Canada. The effects "on water, fisheries and other aquatic resources of the two basins are explored along with possibilities and suggestions for their sustainable development. The latter, despite some glimmers of hope, will not be tenable without major changes in public attitude, in government policy at all levels, and in other measures which to many may seem impossible." excerpt

  15. Formation and growth of nucleated particles into cloud condensation nuclei: Comparison of a global microphysics model with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Adams, P. J.; Riipininen, I.; Pierce, J. R.; Trivitayanurak, W.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosol nucleation occurs frequently in the atmosphere and is an important source of particle number. Observations suggest that nucleated particles are capable of growing to sufficiently large sizes that they act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but some global models have reported that CCN concentrations are only modestly sensitive to large changes in nucleation rates. The connection between nucleation and CCN represents a key uncertainty in understanding the CCN budget and its implications for Earth's radiative balance. Here we present a novel approach for evaluating, in observations and models, the impact of single-day nucleation and growth events on the regional CCN budget. We also compare model-predicted nucleation rates, diameter growth rates, condensation and coagulation sinks, and survival probabilities to observations. This work uses the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional algorithm (TOMAS) hosted by the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate nucleation events predicted by ternary (with a 10-5 tuning factor) or activation nucleation over one year. To evaluate model performance, we compare GEOS-Chem-TOMAS output in 30-minute intervals against a full year of size distribution datasets measured at the five following locations: Pittsburgh, Hyytiälä, Atlanta, St. Louis, and Po Valley. Results show that GEOS-Chem-TOMAS does not understate the importance of nucleation to CCN concentrations, as most metrics are within a 50% error in the model-measurement agreement and tend to be biased high. Median survival probabilities to 100 nm within one day for the model and measurements range from less than 1% to 9% across the five locations we considered. The strength of the coagulation sink and the infrequency of strong growth events (greater than 10 nm h-1) are mainly responsible for these relatively low single-day survival probabilies. Additionally, both observations and models suggest that single-day nucleation and growth events contribute less than 5% to

  16. In situ observations of austenite grain growth in Fe-C-Mn-Si super bainitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Xu, Guang; Zhang, Yu-long; Hu, Hai-jiang; Zhou, Lin-xin; Xue, Zheng-liang

    2013-11-01

    In situ observations of austenite grain growth in Fe-C-Mn-Si super bainitic steel were conducted on a high-temperature laser scanning confocal microscope during continuous heating and subsequent isothermal holding at 850, 1000, and 1100°C for 30 min. A grain growth model was proposed based on experimental results. It is indicated that the austenite grain size increases with austenitizing temperature and holding time. When the austenitizing temperature is above 1100°C, the austenite grains grow rapidly, and abnormal austenite grains occur. In addition, the effect of heating rate on austenite grain growth was investigated, and the relation between austenite grains and bainite morphology after bainitic transformations was also discussed.

  17. Assessing Observer Accuracy in Continuous Recording of Rate and Duration: Three Algorithms Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudford, Oliver C.; Martin, Neil T.; Hui, Jasmine K. Y.; Taylor, Sarah Ann

    2009-01-01

    The three algorithms most frequently selected by behavior-analytic researchers to compute interobserver agreement with continuous recording were used to assess the accuracy of data recorded from video samples on handheld computers by 12 observers. Rate and duration of responding were recorded for three samples each. Data files were compared with…

  18. Helping Teenagers Stop Smoking: Comparative Observations across Youth Settings in Cardiff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Hannah; Maher, Alison; Sage, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents comparative observations between schools/colleges, youth centres, and specialist youth provision, in relation to delivery of the 2tuff2puff six-week smoking cessation and awareness programme to young people in Cardiff. Design: A six-week smoking cessation programme was delivered to 12-23 year olds in various youth…

  19. On the Law of Comparative Judgment: Scaling with Intransitive Observers and Multidimensional Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, R. Bruce, IV; Buhyoff, Gregory J.

    1981-01-01

    Intransitives in observers' preference judgements for multidimensional natural landscape scenes are examined. Thurstone's Law of Comparative Judgement (LCJ) psychophysical scaling routine is used to scale landscape preference. Both the method of Rank Ordering (RO) and the method of Paired Comparisons (PC) are used to gather the raw data necessary…

  20. Helping Teenagers Stop Smoking: Comparative Observations across Youth Settings in Cardiff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Hannah; Maher, Alison; Sage, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents comparative observations between schools/colleges, youth centres, and specialist youth provision, in relation to delivery of the 2tuff2puff six-week smoking cessation and awareness programme to young people in Cardiff. Design: A six-week smoking cessation programme was delivered to 12-23 year olds in various youth…

  1. On the Law of Comparative Judgment: Scaling with Intransitive Observers and Multidimensional Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, R. Bruce, IV; Buhyoff, Gregory J.

    1981-01-01

    Intransitives in observers' preference judgements for multidimensional natural landscape scenes are examined. Thurstone's Law of Comparative Judgement (LCJ) psychophysical scaling routine is used to scale landscape preference. Both the method of Rank Ordering (RO) and the method of Paired Comparisons (PC) are used to gather the raw data necessary…

  2. Comparing growth rates of Arctic Cod Boreogadus saida across the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frothingham, A. M.; Norcross, B.

    2016-02-01

    Dramatic changes to the Arctic have highlighted the need for a greater understanding of the present ecosystem. Arctic Cod, Boreogadus saida, commonly dominate fish assemblages in the Arctic region and inhabit two geographically unique seas in the U.S. Due to the importance of Arctic Cod in the Arctic food web, establishing current benchmark information such as growth rates, will provide a better understanding as to how the species will adapt to the effects of climate change. To investigate differences in Arctic Cod life history across nearly 1500 km of vital habitat, growth rates were examined using a von Bertalanffy growth equation. Arctic Cod were collected from 2009 to 2014 from the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Arctic Cod collected from the Chukchi Sea had an overall smaller maximum achievable length (210 mm) compared to the Beaufort Sea (253 mm) despite a larger sample size in the Chukchi Sea (n=1569) than the Beaufort Sea (n=1140). Growth rates indicated faster growth in the Chukchi Sea (K =0.33) than in the Beaufort Sea (K= 0.29). Arctic Cod collected from the Chukchi Sea had similar achievable maximum lengths throughout, but those collected from the southern Chukchi Sea grew at faster rates (K=0.45).Arctic Cod in the eastern Beaufort Sea region had a higher overall maximum achievable length (243 mm) than in the western Beaufort Sea region (186 mm). Knowledge about contemporary growth rates of Arctic Cod in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas can be used in future comparisons to evaluate potential effects of increasing climate change and anthropogenic influences.

  3. Microstructural Changes in MBE Growth of Low-Temperature Gallium Arsenide Observed by in Situ Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Kurt Gerard

    1995-01-01

    An ellipsometer system has been developed for in-situ monitoring of III-V semiconductor growth using molecular beam epitaxy. Included as part of this work, a software package was developed for the calibration, acquisition, display and modeling of ellipsometry data. This calibration software addresses the arbitrary orientations of the analyzer and polarizer components that are present in the mounting of the ellipsometer on the MBE system. In addition, this package calculated the trajectory followed during the growth of a homogeneous film. The materials used in the modeling are restricted to either an isotropic material or a uniaxial material with the optic axis oriented normal to the surface. External to the real-time software package, a general scheme for the analysis of ellipsometric data was developed using MATLAB. The ellipsometer described above was utilized to reproducibly grow and monitor the growth of low temperature (LT) GaAs films in-situ. In particular the capping of GaAs(001) with As was monitored and a method was developed which could be used to characterize the growth temperature of GaAs in the vicinity of 190^circ C. This method utilizes the temperature for the formation of a thin film of As on GaAs(001). Using this technique to set the growth conditions, LT-GaAs films were grown and monitored in real-time with the ellipsometer and characterized ex-situ with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM.) The ellipsometry data allowed for the observation of the formation of the epitaxial LT-GaAs film and a subsequent region of changing dielectric properties. These results are correlated with observation in double crystal X-ray diffraction (DXRD) and TEM analysis, showing that the refractive index can be used to indicate the composition of the LT-GaAs films and that the ellipsometer can observe the breakdown in the crystallinity of the LT-GaAs layers.

  4. Observations on Some of the Mycelial Growth and Pigmentation Characteristics of Cordyceps militaris Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bhushan; Lee, Won-Ho; Han, Sang-Kuk

    2006-01-01

    Characteristic growth patterns of Cordyceps militaris isolates on various media, under varying light conditions and at varying incubation periods were examined. Light was found to be the most critical single factor in determining the density, texture, and pigmentation of the mycelial culture of the fungus. However, under the light condition, the degree of pigmentation and mycelial density were found to be affected by the incubation period and type of medium. Irrespective of the variations in medium type or incubation period, there was no pigmentation of the mycelium under dark condition. Radial growth of the mycelium was faster under dark incubation rather than under light incubation. Abundant mycelial density and darkest pigmentation of C. militaris isolates were produced in nutritionally rich media like SDAY, SMAY and CZYA, suggesting that these media may fulfill all the requirements for vegetative growth of the fungus. Growth characteristics of C. militaris isolates could be easily observed by the simple agar culture method, which would be useful to characterize the phenotypic characteristics of large number of pure cultures of the fungus under given conditions of growth factors such as medium, light and temperature. PMID:24039476

  5. Diagnostics comparing sea surface temperature feedbacks from operational hurricane forecasts to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Ian D.; Marchok, Timothy; Vecchi, Gabriel A.

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines the ability of recent versions of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Operational Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM) to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricane intensity and hurricane-induced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) cooling. The analysis was performed by taking a Lagrangian composite of all hurricanes in the North Atlantic from 1998-2009 in observations and 2005-2009 for the GHM. A marked improvement in the intensity-SST relationship for the GHM compared to observations was found between the years 2005 and 2006-2009 due to the introduction of warm-core eddies, a representation of the loop current, and changes to the drag coefficient parameterization for bulk turbulent flux computation. A Conceptual Hurricane Intensity Model illustrates the essential steady-state characteristics of the intensity-SST relationship and is explained by two coupled equations for the atmosphere and ocean. The conceptual model qualitatively matches observations and the 2006-2009 period in the GHM, and presents supporting evidence for the conclusion that weaker upper oceanic thermal stratification in the Gulf of Mexico, caused by the introduction of the loop current and warm core eddies, is crucial to explaining the observed SST-intensity pattern. The diagnostics proposed by the conceptual model offer an independent set of metrics for comparing operational hurricane forecast models to observations.

  6. Comparing the Scoring of Human Decomposition from Digital Images to Scoring Using On-site Observations.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, Gretchen R; Bytheway, Joan A; Connor, Melissa

    2017-01-25

    When in forensic casework or empirical research in-person assessment of human decomposition is not possible, the sensible substitution is color photographic images. To date, no research has confirmed the utility of color photographic images as a proxy for in situ observation of the level of decomposition. Sixteen observers scored photographs of 13 human cadavers in varying decomposition stages (PMI 2-186 days) using the Total Body Score system (total n = 929 observations). The on-site TBS was compared with recorded observations from digital color images using a paired samples t-test. The average difference between on-site and photographic observations was -0.20 (t = -1.679, df = 928, p = 0.094). Individually, only two observers, both students with <1 year of experience, demonstrated TBS statistically significantly different than the on-site value, suggesting that with experience, observations of human decomposition based on digital images can be substituted for assessments based on observation of the corpse in situ, when necessary.

  7. Comparing Temperature and Precipitation Extremes Across Multiple Reanalyses and Gridded in Situ Observational Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat, M.; Alexander, L. V.; Sillmann, J.; Wild, S.; Zwiers, F. W.; Lippmann, T.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in climate extremes are often monitored using global gridded datasets of climate extremes based on in situ observations or reanalysis data. This study assesses the consistency of temperature and precipitation extremes between these datasets. We compare temporal evolution and spatial patterns of annual climate extremes indices across multiple global gridded datasets of in situ observations and reanalyses to make inferences on the robustness of the obtained results. While there are distinct differences in the actual values of extremes, normalized time series generally compare well and temporal correlations are high for temperature extremes, in particular for the most recent three decades when satellite data are available for assimilation. Extreme precipitation is characterized by higher temporal and spatial variability than extreme temperatures, and there is less agreement between different datasets than for temperature. However, reasonable agreement between gridded precipitation extremes from the different datasets remains. While there is general agreement between the different reanalyses and gridded observational data in regions with dense observational coverage, different reanalyses show trends of partly opposing signs in areas where in situ observations are sparse, e.g. over parts of Africa and tropical South America. However, in the absence of reliable observations it is difficult to assess which reanalyses are more realistic here than others. Using data from the 20th Century reanalysis and a novel century-long gridded dataset of extremes we also investigate consistency of extremes from these two datasets back to the beginning of the 20th Century. Global average time series of different extremes indices compare generally well over the past 70 years but show larger differences before around 1940. However, in areas with good observational coverage, including North America, Europe and Australia, agreement remains strong also throughout the earlier decades

  8. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Drugs and Growth: An Italian Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Germinario, Elena A.P.; Arcieri, Romano; Bonati, Maurizio; Zuddas, Alessandro; Masi, Gabriele; Vella, Stefano; Chiarotti, Flavia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study was conducted to assess the long-term effect of methylphenidate (MPH) or atomoxetine (ATX) on growth in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug-naïve children. Design The study was an observational, post-marketing, fourth phase study. Methods Data on height and weight were collected at baseline and every 6 months up to 24 months. Results Both ATX and MPH lead to decreased height gain (assessed by means of z-scores); the effect was significantly higher for ATX than for MPH. At any time, height z-score decrease in the ATX group was higher than the corresponding decrease observed in the MPH group, but the difference was significantly relevant only during the first year of treatment. An increment of average weight was observed both in patients treated with MPH and in those treated with ATX. However, using Tanner's percentile, a subset of patients showed a degree of growth lower than expected. This negative effect was significantly higher for ATX than for MPH. Conclusions We conclude that ADHD drugs show a negative effect on linear growth in children in middle term. Such effect appears more evident for ATX than for MPH. PMID:24024538

  9. Observation of an ordered structure in the initial stage of Ge/Si heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, N.; Koide, Y.; Itoh, K.; Zaima, S.; Yasuda, Y.

    1990-12-01

    An ordered structure with the double periodicity in a <111> direction has been found by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation in the initial stage of Ge films grown on (100)Si and (811)Si substrate surfaces by GeH4 gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The ordered structure is formed on {111} planes parallel to the side planes of <011> steps on {811} facets of Ge growing islands on both substrates. The formation is observed at substrate temperatures of 300-700 °C and is considered to result from solid phase reactions at the interfaces during growth.

  10. Regression modeling of longitudinal data with outcome-dependent observation times: extensions and comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kay See; French, Benjamin; Troxel, Andrea B

    2014-11-30

    Conventional longitudinal data analysis methods assume that outcomes are independent of the data-collection schedule. However, the independence assumption may be violated, for example, when a specific treatment necessitates a different follow-up schedule than the control arm or when adverse events trigger additional physician visits in between prescheduled follow-ups. Dependence between outcomes and observation times may introduce bias when estimating the marginal association of covariates on outcomes using a standard longitudinal regression model. We formulate a framework of outcome-observation dependence mechanisms to describe conditional independence given observed observation-time process covariates or shared latent variables. We compare four recently developed semi-parametric methods that accommodate one of these mechanisms. To allow greater flexibility, we extend these methods to accommodate a combination of mechanisms. In simulation studies, we show how incorrectly specifying the outcome-observation dependence may yield biased estimates of covariate-outcome associations and how our proposed extensions can accommodate a greater number of dependence mechanisms. We illustrate the implications of different modeling strategies in an application to bladder cancer data. In longitudinal studies with potentially outcome-dependent observation times, we recommend that analysts carefully explore the conditional independence mechanism between the outcome and observation-time processes to ensure valid inference regarding covariate-outcome associations.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of four representative plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some Pseudomonas strains function as predominant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Within this group, Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas fluorescens are non-pathogenic biocontrol agents, and some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains are PGPR. P. chlororaphis GP72 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with a fully sequenced genome. We conducted a genomic analysis comparing GP72 with three other pseudomonad PGPR: P. fluorescens Pf-5, P. aeruginosa M18, and the nitrogen-fixing strain P. stutzeri A1501. Our aim was to identify the similarities and differences among these strains using a comparative genomic approach to clarify the mechanisms of plant growth-promoting activity. Results The genome sizes of GP72, Pf-5, M18, and A1501 ranged from 4.6 to 7.1 M, and the number of protein-coding genes varied among the four species. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) analysis assigned functions to predicted proteins. The COGs distributions were similar among the four species. However, the percentage of genes encoding transposases and their inactivated derivatives (COG L) was 1.33% of the total genes with COGs classifications in A1501, 0.21% in GP72, 0.02% in Pf-5, and 0.11% in M18. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that GP72 and Pf-5 were the most closely related strains, consistent with the genome alignment results. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) between GP72 and Pf-5 revealed 3544 conserved genes. There were fewer conserved genes when GP72 CDSs were compared with those of A1501 and M18. Comparisons among the four Pseudomonas species revealed 603 conserved genes in GP72, illustrating common plant growth-promoting traits shared among these PGPR. Conserved genes were related to catabolism, transport of plant-derived compounds, stress resistance, and rhizosphere colonization. Some strain-specific CDSs were related to different kinds of biocontrol activities or plant growth promotion. The GP72 genome

  12. [The comparative evaluation of differential diagnostic characteristics of Endo growth medium of different manufacturers].

    PubMed

    Shepelin, A P; Martchikhina, I I; Polosenko, O V; Skladan, G Ye

    2013-05-01

    The article deals with the results of comparative study of differential diagnostic characteristics of Endo growth medium of different foreign manufacturers permitted to be applied in the Russian Federation and the national Endo agar. The enhanced kit of museum test-strains and clinical material from patients were used. It is established that morphology, size and number of clumps of most enterobacteria growing in Tndo medium manufactured by Merck, Pronadisa, HiMedia and the state research center of applied microbiology and biotechnology have minor morphological differences and match the characteristics declared by manufacturers. The indicator of degree of detection (degree of inoculation) of pathogenic enterobacteria from clinical material onto Endo medium manufactured by the state research center of applied microbiology and biotechnology matched the indicators of media from foreign manufacturers. It is demonstrated that Endo growth medium manufactured by the state research center of applied microbiology and biotechnology not only is equal to import analogues but in particular cases even excels them.

  13. Comparative studies on algal toxicity testing using fluorometric microplate and Erlenmeyer flask growth-inhibition assays.

    PubMed

    Eisentraeger, Adolf; Dott, Wolfgang; Klein, Joern; Hahn, Stefan

    2003-03-01

    Two fluorometric microplate algae growth-inhibition assays with a liquid volume of 2 mL and 200 microL per well are presented, and comparative studies on the toxicity of chemicals are carried out with Erlenmeyer flask assays. The test procedures are in accordance with the standards ISO 8692 (DIN 38412 L9 and EN 28692), OECD 201 and DIN 38412 L33. By testing four toxicants several times laboratory internal repeatability is proven. Statistical evaluation demonstrates that the results obtained with both the 24-well and the 96-well microplates are nearly identical with the results of the Erlenmeyer flask assay. Therefore, the microplate growth-inhibition assays can be applied for the testing of a wide range of chemicals and environmental samples if some methodical aspects are taken into account. Apart from that, there is a strong need for harmonization if the dependency of the EC values on the toxicological endpoint is considered.

  14. Thresholds for sterol-limited growth of Daphnia magna: a comparative approach using 10 different sterols.

    PubMed

    Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Oexle, Sarah; Wacker, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Arthropods are incapable of synthesizing sterols de novo and thus require a dietary source to cover their physiological demands. The most prominent sterol in animal tissues is cholesterol, which is an indispensable structural component of cell membranes and serves as precursor for steroid hormones. Instead of cholesterol, plants and algae contain a variety of different phytosterols. Consequently, herbivorous arthropods have to metabolize dietary phytosterols to cholesterol to meet their requirements for growth and reproduction. Here, we investigated sterol-limited growth responses of the freshwater herbivore Daphnia magna by supplementing a sterol-free diet with increasing amounts of 10 different phytosterols and comparing thresholds for sterol-limited growth. In addition, we analyzed the sterol composition of D. magna to explore sterol metabolic constraints and bioconversion capacities. We show that dietary phytosterols strongly differ in their potential to support somatic growth of D. magna. The dietary threshold concentrations obtained by supplementing the different sterols cover a wide range (3.5-34.4 μg mg C(-1)) and encompass the one for cholesterol (8.9 μg mg C(-1)), indicating that certain phytosterols are more efficient in supporting somatic growth than cholesterol (e.g., fucosterol, brassicasterol) while others are less efficient (e.g., dihydrocholesterol, lathosterol). The dietary sterol concentration gradients revealed that the poor quality of particular sterols can be alleviated partially by increasing dietary concentrations, and that qualitative differences among sterols are most pronounced at low to moderate dietary concentrations. We infer that the dietary sterol composition has to be considered in zooplankton nutritional ecology to accurately assess potential sterol limitations under field conditions.

  15. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  16. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  17. Comparative studies of thin film growth on aluminium by AFM, TEM and GDOES characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jiantao; Thompson, George E.

    2016-07-01

    In this present study, comparative studies of trivalent chromium conversion coating formation, associated with aluminium dissolution process, have been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). High-resolution electron micrographs revealed the evident and uniform coating initiation on the whole surface after conversion treatment for only 30 s, although a network of metal ridges was created by HF etching pre-treatment. In terms of conversion treatment process on electropolished aluminium, constant kinetics of coating growth, ∼0.30 ± 0.2 nm/s, were found after the prolonged conversion treatment for 600 s. The availability of electrolyte anions for coating deposition determined the growth process. Simultaneously, a proceeding process of aluminium dissolution during conversion treatment, of ∼0.11 ± 0.02 nm/s, was found for the first time, indicating constant kinetics of anodic reactions. The distinct process of aluminium consumption was assigned with loss of corrosion protection of the deposited coating material as evidenced in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Based on the present data, a new mechanism of coating growth on aluminium was proposed, and it consisted of an activation period (0-30 s), a linear growth period (0.30 nm/s, up for 600 s) and limited growth period (0.17 nm/s, 600-1200 s). In addition, the air-drying post-treatment and a high-vacuum environment in the microscope revealed a coating shrinkage, especially in the coatings after conversion treatments for longer time.

  18. GRACE principles: recognizing high-quality observational studies of comparative effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Nancy A; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; McNeil, Barbara J; Berger, Marc L; Walker, Alec M; Ollendorf, Daniel A; Gliklich, Richard E

    2010-06-01

    Nonrandomized comparative effectiveness studies contribute to clinical and biologic understanding of treatments by themselves, via subsequent confirmation in a more targeted randomized clinical trial, or through advances in basic science. Although methodological challenges and a lack of accepted principles to assess the quality of nonrandomized studies of comparative effectiveness have limited the practical use of these investigations, even imperfect studies can contribute useful information if they are thoughtfully designed, well conducted, carefully analyzed, and reported in a manner that addresses concerns from skeptical readers and reviewers. The GRACE (Good Research for Comparative Effectiveness) principles have been developed to help healthcare providers, researchers, journal readers, and editors evaluate the quality inherent in observational research studies of comparative effectiveness. The GRACE principles were developed by experienced academic and private sector researchers and were vetted over several years through presentation, critique, and consensus building among outcomes researchers, pharmacoepidemiologists, and other medical scientists and via formal review by the International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology. In contrast to other documents that guide systematic review and reporting, the GRACE principles are high-level concepts about good practice for nonrandomized comparative effectiveness research. The GRACE principles comprise a series of questions to guide evaluation. No scoring system is provided or encouraged, as interpretation of these observational studies requires weighing of all available evidence, tempered by judgment regarding the applicability of the studies to routine care.

  19. Comparing growth patterns among field populations of cereal aphids reveals factors limiting their maximum abundance.

    PubMed

    Honek, A; Jarosik, V; Dixon, A F G

    2006-06-01

    Cereal stands in central Europe are commonly infested with three species of aphids that may become serious pests. With increasing abundance, the proportion of a particular species in the total aphid population may remain constant, suggesting a density-independent exponential growth, or the proportion can change, suggesting density-dependent constraints on growth. The constraints that affect particular species, and thus their relative abundance, were studied. The proportionality between maximum abundances of the cereal aphids was studied using a 10-year census of the numbers of aphids infesting 268 winter wheat plots. For two species their abundance on leaves and ears was compared. With increasing aphid density the maximum abundance of Rhopalosiphum padi (Linnaeus) remained proportional, but not that of Sitobion avenae (Fabricius), which was constrained by the smaller surface area of ears compared to leaves. There was no evidence of inter-specific competition. Maximum abundance of R. padi and Metopolophium dirhodum (Walker) on leaves did not change proportionally as the proportion of M. dirhodum decreased with increasing overall aphid density. This decrease was probably caused by the restricted distribution of M. dirhodum, which is confined to leaves, where space is limiting. No change in proportion between populations was detected when the average densities were below 0.54 aphids per leaf or ear. Non-proportional relationships between aphid populations appeared to be due to spatial constraints, acting upon the more abundant population. Detecting the limitation of population growth can help with the assessment of when density-independent exponential growth is limited by density-dependent factors. This information may help in the development of models of cereal aphid population dynamics.

  20. Global observation of nitrous oxide: changes in growth rate and spatial patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. D.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Dutton, G. S.; Nance, J. D.; Crotwell, A. M.; Mondeel, D. J.; Elkins, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) currently exerts the third largest climate forcing of the long-lived greenhouse gases, after CO2 and CH4. N2O is also involved in the destruction of stratospheric ozone. It is produced by microbial activity in soils and oceans, and also by industry. The atmospheric burden of N2O has increased more than 20% from its preindustrial level of ~270 nmol mol-1 (ppb). Much of this increase is related to the application of nitrogen-containing fertilizers, including manure. The NOAA Global Monitoring Division has measured the atmospheric mole fraction of N2O at Earth's surface in air samples collected around the globe (since the late 1970s) and at in situ sites mostly in the Western Hemisphere (since 1998). ). Measurements of the global burden and growth rate constrain global emissions, e.g. 18.2 ± 2.7 Tg N yr-1 in 2013, where most of the uncertainty is related to uncertainty in the global lifetime. The average growth rate of N2O from 1990 to 2010 was ~0.75 ppb yr-1. Since 2004, however, the growth rate has been increasing, and is now about 25% higher than the 1990-2010 average. Between 2010 and 2013 the growth rate averaged ~0.95 ppb yr-1. As the growth rate increased from 2004-2013, gradients derived from surface, zonal-mean N2O mole fraction, such the mean pole-to-pole difference, and the difference between NH temperate latitudes and the southern polar region, decreased. This suggests a change in the distribution of N2O emissions over this period. We will present our N2O data and examine trends, gradients, and other features that could shed light on recent changes in the growth rate. We will also compare N2O gradients to those of other trace gases, such as SF6.

  1. Comparative age and growth of common snook Centropomus undecimalis (Pisces: Centropomidae) from coastal and riverine areas in Southern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Perera-Garcia, Martha A; Mendoza-Carranza, Manuel; Contreras-Sánchez, Wilfrido; Ferrara, Allyse; Huerta-Ortiz, Maricela; Hernández-Gómez, Raúl E

    2013-06-01

    Common snook Centropomus unidecimalis is an important commercial and fishery species in Southern Mexico, however the high exploitation rates have resulted in a strong reduction of its abundances. Since, the information about its population structure is scarce, the objective of the present research was to determine and compare the age structure in four important fishery sites. For this, age and growth of common snook were determined from specimens collected monthly, from July 2006 to March 2008, from two coastal (Barra Bosque and Barra San Pedro) and two riverine (San Pedro and Tres Brazos) commercial fishery sites in Tabasco, Mexico. Age was determined using sectioned saggitae otoliths and data analyzed by von Bertalanffy and Levenberg-Marquardt among others. Estimated ages ranged from 2 to 17 years. Monthly patterns of marginal increment formation and the percentage of otoliths with opaque rings on the outer edge demonstrated that a single annulus was formed each year. The von Bertalanffy parameters were calculated for males and females using linear adjustment and the non-linear method of Levenberg-Marquardt. The von Bertalanffy growth equations were FLt = 109.21(1-e-0.2(t+0.57)) for Barra Bosque, FLt = 94.56(1-e-027(t+0.485)) for Barra San Pedro, FLt = 97.15(1-e 0.17(t + 1.32)) for San Pedro and FLt = 83.77(1-e-026(t + 0.49)) for Tres Brazos. According to (Hotelling's T2, p < 0.05) test growth was significantly greater for females than for males. Based on the Chen test, von Bertalanffy growth curves were different among the study sites (RSS, p < 0.05). Based on the observed differences in growth parameters among sampling sites (coastal and riverine environments) future research need to be conducted on migration and population genetics, in order to delineate the stock structure of this population and support management programs.

  2. Comparing the diameters and visual albedos derived from radar and infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P.; Howell, E.; Nolan, M.; Springmann, A.; Vervack, R., Jr.; Fernandez, Y.; Magri, C.

    2014-07-01

    Radar observations provide direct measurements of the physical sizes of near-Earth objects, independent of visual albedo, composition, and thermal properties, which can act as calibration or sanity checks for models of thermal-infrared emission by small bodies. Thermal modeling of infrared observations by the NEOWISE [1--3] and ExploreNEOs (Spitzer) [4--6] programs has provided diameters and visual albedos for several hundred near-Earth objects. Meanwhile, since 1998, the Arecibo radar program has detected over 350 near-Earth objects, including more than 40 objects from each of the NEOWISE and ExploreNEOs catalogs, providing rotation-rate, size, and shape constraints depending on the strength and resolution of the received echoes. In addition, our observations with the SpeX instrument on the NASA IRTF provide a sample of roughly two dozen objects, observed on multiple dates at different viewing geometries, that were also observed by the Arecibo radar and NEOWISE and/or ExploreNEOs programs. We will compare the diameters and visual albedos inferred from radar to those derived from thermal modeling of infrared observations from WISE, Spitzer, and/or the IRTF, and look for correlations between the outliers and their sizes, shapes, compositions, and viewing geometries, all of which can affect the assumptions made in the process of standard thermal modeling.

  3. An Automated Comparative Observation System for Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence of Vegetation Canopies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xijia; Liu, Zhigang; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Weiwei; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Detecting sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) offers a new approach for remote sensing photosynthesis. However, to analyse the response characteristics of SIF under different stress states, a long-term time-series comparative observation of vegetation under different stress states must be carried out at the canopy scale, such that the similarities and differences in SIF change law can be summarized under different time scales. A continuous comparative observation system for vegetation canopy SIF is designed in this study. The system, which is based on a high-resolution spectrometer and an optical multiplexer, can achieve comparative observation of multiple targets. To simultaneously measure the commonly used vegetation index and SIF in the O2-A and O2-B atmospheric absorption bands, the following parameters are used: a spectral range of 475.9 to 862.2 nm, a spectral resolution of approximately 0.9 nm, a spectral sampling interval of approximately 0.4 nm, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be as high as 1000:1. To obtain data for both the upward radiance of the vegetation canopy and downward irradiance data with a high SNR in relatively short time intervals, the single-step integration time optimization algorithm is proposed. To optimize the extraction accuracy of SIF, the FluorMOD model is used to simulate sets of data according to the spectral resolution, spectral sampling interval and SNR of the spectrometer in this continuous observation system. These data sets are used to determine the best parameters of Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD), Three FLD (3FLD) and the spectral fitting method (SFM), and 3FLD and SFM are confirmed to be suitable for extracting SIF from the spectral measurements. This system has been used to observe the SIF values in O2-A and O2-B absorption bands and some commonly used vegetation index from sweet potato and bare land, the result of which shows: (1) the daily variation trend of SIF value of sweet potato leaves is basically same

  4. An Automated Comparative Observation System for Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence of Vegetation Canopies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xijia; Liu, Zhigang; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Weiwei; Wu, Jun

    2016-05-27

    Detecting sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) offers a new approach for remote sensing photosynthesis. However, to analyse the response characteristics of SIF under different stress states, a long-term time-series comparative observation of vegetation under different stress states must be carried out at the canopy scale, such that the similarities and differences in SIF change law can be summarized under different time scales. A continuous comparative observation system for vegetation canopy SIF is designed in this study. The system, which is based on a high-resolution spectrometer and an optical multiplexer, can achieve comparative observation of multiple targets. To simultaneously measure the commonly used vegetation index and SIF in the O₂-A and O₂-B atmospheric absorption bands, the following parameters are used: a spectral range of 475.9 to 862.2 nm, a spectral resolution of approximately 0.9 nm, a spectral sampling interval of approximately 0.4 nm, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be as high as 1000:1. To obtain data for both the upward radiance of the vegetation canopy and downward irradiance data with a high SNR in relatively short time intervals, the single-step integration time optimization algorithm is proposed. To optimize the extraction accuracy of SIF, the FluorMOD model is used to simulate sets of data according to the spectral resolution, spectral sampling interval and SNR of the spectrometer in this continuous observation system. These data sets are used to determine the best parameters of Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD), Three FLD (3FLD) and the spectral fitting method (SFM), and 3FLD and SFM are confirmed to be suitable for extracting SIF from the spectral measurements. This system has been used to observe the SIF values in O₂-A and O₂-B absorption bands and some commonly used vegetation index from sweet potato and bare land, the result of which shows: (1) the daily variation trend of SIF value of sweet potato leaves is

  5. Demystifying the Enigma of Smoking – An Observational Comparative Study on Tobacco Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Nallakunta, Rajesh; Reddy, Sudhakara Reddy; Chennoju, Sai Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is a hazardous habit which causes definite changes in the oral cavity, consequently there exist changes in the mucosa when subjected to smoking. Palatal mucosa is first to be affected. The present study determines the palatal status in reverse smokers and conventional smokers. Aim To study and compare the clinical, cytological and histopathological changes in palatal mucosa among reverse and conventional smokers. Materials and Methods Study sample was categorized into two groups. Group 1 comprised of 20 subjects with the habit of reverse smoking and Group 2 comprised of 20 subjects with the habit of conventional smoking. Initially, clinical appearance of the palatal mucosa was recorded, followed by a cytological smear and biopsy of the involved area among all the subjects. The findings were studied clinically, the specimens were analysed cytologically and histopathologically, and compared among the two groups. Results The severity of clinical changes of the palatal mucosa among reverse smokers was statistically significant when compared to those of conventional smokers. There was no statistically significant difference observed in cytological staging between the groups with a p-value of 0.35. The histopathological changes in both the groups showed a significant difference with a p-value of 0.02. A significant positive correlation was observed between the clinical appearance, and cytological, histopathological changes. Conclusion Profound clinically aggressive changes were observed in group I compared to group II. Severity of dysplastic changes have been detected in few subjects through histopathological examination irrespective of no prominent clinical and cytological changes observed among the two groups. PMID:27190962

  6. Direct observation of crystal growth from solution using optical investigation of a growing crystal face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, Ravindra

    1994-01-01

    The first technical report for the period 1 Jan. 1993 till 31 Dec. 1993 for the research entitled, 'Direct observation of crystal growth from solution using Optical Investigation of a growing crystal Face' is presented. The work on the project did not start till 1 June 1993 due to the non-availability of the required personnel. The progress of the work during the period 1 June 1993 till the end of 1993 is described. Significant progress was made for testing various optical diagnostic techniques for monitoring crystal solution. Some of the techniques that are being tested are: heterodyne detection technique, in which changes in phase are measured as a interferometric function of time/crystal growth; a conventional technique, in which a fringe brightness is measured as a function of crystal growth/time; and a Mach-Zehnder interferometric technique in which a fringe brightness is measured as a function of time to obtain information on concentration changes. During the second year it will be decided to incorporate the best interferometric technique along with the ellipsometric technique, to obtain real time in-situ growth rate measurements. A laboratory mock-up of the first two techniques were made and tested.

  7. [Comparative observation on acupuncture-moxibustion and western medication for treatment of sudden deafness].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin-hua; Ding, Ya-nan; Chang, Xiang-hui; Ouyang, Yu-lu; Xie, Qiang

    2010-08-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect on sudden deafness between acupuncture and moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer and routine medication. Eighty cases of sudden deafness were randomly divided into two groups, 40 cases in each one. Acupuncture and moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer was adopted in observation group on Yongquan (KI 1) (with reducing and slightly heavy manipulation), Tinggong (SI 19), Tinghui (GB 2) and Ermen (TE 21), and associated with suspending moxibustion for thermal sensitization on Yongquan (KI 1). In control group, the routine medications were given. The therapeutic effects of two groups were compared with each other. After three sessions of treatment, dB value of hearing loss in two groups decreased (P<0.05, P<0.01), but the improvement of hearing in observation group was superior to that in control group (P<0.05). The total effective rate was 80.0% (32/40) in observation group, which was better than that 55.0% (22/40) in control group (P<0.05). Acupuncture and moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer presents superior therapeutic effect on sudden deafness as compared with the routine western therapy.

  8. Comparing USGS national seismic hazard maps with internet-based macroseismic intensity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Sum; Schorlemmer, Danijel

    2016-04-01

    Verifying a nationwide seismic hazard assessment using data collected after the assessment has been made (i.e., prospective data) is a direct consistency check of the assessment. We directly compared the predicted rate of ground motion exceedance by the four available versions of the USGS national seismic hazard map (NSHMP, 1996, 2002, 2008, 2014) with the actual observed rate during 2000-2013. The data were prospective to the two earlier versions of NSHMP. We used two sets of somewhat independent data, namely 1) the USGS "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) intensity reports, 2) instrumental ground motion records extracted from ShakeMap stations. Although both are observed data, they come in different degrees of accuracy. Our results indicated that for California, the predicted and observed hazards were very comparable. The two sets of data gave consistent results, implying robustness. The consistency also encourages the use of DYFI data for hazard verification in the Central and Eastern US (CEUS), where instrumental records are lacking. The result showed that the observed ground-motion exceedance was also consistent with the predicted in CEUS. The primary value of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of DYFI data, originally designed for community communication instead of scientific analysis, for the purpose of hazard verification.

  9. Anatomical knowledge gain through a clay-modeling exercise compared to live and video observations.

    PubMed

    Kooloos, Jan G M; Schepens-Franke, Annelieke N; Bergman, Esther M; Donders, Rogier A R T; Vorstenbosch, Marc A T M

    2014-01-01

    Clay modeling is increasingly used as a teaching method other than dissection. The haptic experience during clay modeling is supposed to correspond to the learning effect of manipulations during exercises in the dissection room involving tissues and organs. We questioned this assumption in two pretest-post-test experiments. In these experiments, the learning effects of clay modeling were compared to either live observations (Experiment I) or video observations (Experiment II) of the clay-modeling exercise. The effects of learning were measured with multiple choice questions, extended matching questions, and recognition of structures on illustrations of cross-sections. Analysis of covariance with pretest scores as the covariate was used to elaborate the results. Experiment I showed a significantly higher post-test score for the observers, whereas Experiment II showed a significantly higher post-test score for the clay modelers. This study shows that (1) students who perform clay-modeling exercises show less gain in anatomical knowledge than students who attentively observe the same exercise being carried out and (2) performing a clay-modeling exercise is better in anatomical knowledge gain compared to the study of a video of the recorded exercise. The most important learning effect seems to be the engagement in the exercise, focusing attention and stimulating time on task.

  10. A comparative study of multiwavelength theoretical and observed light curves of Cepheid variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Marconi, Marcella; Rejkuba, Marina; Singh, Harinder P.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-04-01

    We analyse the theoretical light curves of Cepheid variables at optical (UBVRI) and near-infrared (JKL) wavelengths using the Fourier decomposition and principal component analysis methods. The Cepheid light curves are based on the full-amplitude, non-linear, convective hydrodynamical models for chemical compositions representative of Cepheids in the Galaxy (Y = 0.28, Z = 0.02), Large Magellanic Cloud (Y = 0.25, Z = 0.008) and Small Magellanic Cloud (Y = 0.25, Z = 0.004). We discuss the variation of light-curve parameters with different compositions and mass-luminosity levels as a function of period and wavelength, and compare our results with observations. For a fixed composition, the theoretical amplitude parameters decrease while the phase parameters increase with wavelength, similar to the observed Fourier parameters. The optical amplitude parameters obtained using canonical mass-luminosity Cepheid models exhibit a large offset with respect to the observations for periods between 7 and 11 d, when compared to the non-canonical mass-luminosity levels. The central minimum of the Hertzsprung progression for amplitude parameters shifts to the longer periods with decrease/increase in metallicity/wavelength for both theoretical and observed light curves. The principal components for Magellanic Cloud Cepheid models are consistent with observations at optical wavelengths. We also observe two distinct populations in the first principal component for optical and near-infrared wavelengths while the J band contributes to both populations. Finally, we take into account the variation in the convective efficiency by increasing the adopted mixing length parameter from the standard 1.5 to 1.8. This results in a zero-point offset in the bolometric mean magnitudes and in amplitude parameters (except close to 10 d), reducing the systematically large difference in theoretical amplitudes.

  11. Direct TEM observations of growth mechanisms of two-dimensional MoS2 flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Linfeng; Lei, Shuijin; Zhang, Wei-Bing; Lu, Wei; Lin, Ziyuan; Lam, Chi Hang; Chai, Yang; Wang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    A microscopic understanding of the growth mechanism of two-dimensional materials is of particular importance for controllable synthesis of functional nanostructures. Because of the lack of direct and insightful observations, how to control the orientation and the size of two-dimensional material grains is still under debate. Here we discern distinct formation stages for MoS2 flakes from the thermolysis of ammonium thiomolybdates using in situ transmission electron microscopy. In the initial stage (400 °C), vertically aligned MoS2 structures grow in a layer-by-layer mode. With the increasing temperature of up to 780 °C, the orientation of MoS2 structures becomes horizontal. When the growth temperature reaches 850 °C, the crystalline size of MoS2 increases by merging adjacent flakes. Our study shows direct observations of MoS2 growth as the temperature evolves, and sheds light on the controllable orientation and grain size of two-dimensional materials.

  12. Direct TEM observations of growth mechanisms of two-dimensional MoS2 flakes

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Linfeng; Lei, Shuijin; Zhang, Wei-Bing; Lu, Wei; Lin, Ziyuan; Lam, Chi Hang; Chai, Yang; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A microscopic understanding of the growth mechanism of two-dimensional materials is of particular importance for controllable synthesis of functional nanostructures. Because of the lack of direct and insightful observations, how to control the orientation and the size of two-dimensional material grains is still under debate. Here we discern distinct formation stages for MoS2 flakes from the thermolysis of ammonium thiomolybdates using in situ transmission electron microscopy. In the initial stage (400 °C), vertically aligned MoS2 structures grow in a layer-by-layer mode. With the increasing temperature of up to 780 °C, the orientation of MoS2 structures becomes horizontal. When the growth temperature reaches 850 °C, the crystalline size of MoS2 increases by merging adjacent flakes. Our study shows direct observations of MoS2 growth as the temperature evolves, and sheds light on the controllable orientation and grain size of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27412892

  13. Comparative rice seed toxicity tests using filter paper, growth pouch-tm, and seed tray methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.

    1993-01-01

    Paper substrate, especially circular filter paper placed inside a Petri dish, has long been used for the plant seed toxicity test (PSTT). Although this method is simple and inexpensive, recent evidence indicates that it gives results that are significantly different from those obtained using a method that does not involve paper, especially when testing metal cations. The study compared PSTT using three methods: filter paper, Growth Pouch-TM, and seed tray. The Growth Pouch-TM is a commercially available device. The seed tray is a newly designed plastic receptacle placed inside a Petri dish. The results of the Growth Pouch-TM method showed no toxic effects on rice for Ag up to 40 mg L-1 and Cd up to 20 mg L-1. Using the seed tray method, IC50 (50% inhibitory effect concentration) values were 0.55 and 1.4 mg L-1 for Ag and Cd, respectively. Although results of filter paper and seed tray methods were nearly identical for NaF, Cr(VI), and phenol, the toxicities of cations Ag and Cd were reduced by using the filter paper method; IC50 values were 22 and 18 mg L-1, respectively. The results clearly indicate that paper substrate is not advisable for PSTT.

  14. Comparative Growth and Development of Spiders Reared on Live and Dead Prey

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu; Zhang, Fan; Gui, Shaolan; Qiao, Huping; Hose, Grant C.

    2013-01-01

    Scavenging (feeding on dead prey) has been demonstrated across a number of spider families, yet the implications of feeding on dead prey for the growth and development of individuals and population is unknown. In this study we compare the growth, development, and predatory activity of two species of spiders that were fed on live and dead prey. Pardosa astrigera (Lycosidae) and Hylyphantes graminicola (Lyniphiidae) were fed live or dead fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster. The survival of P. astrigera and H. graminicola was not affected by prey type. The duration of late instars of P. astrigera fed dead prey were longer and mature spiders had less protein content than those fed live prey, whereas there were no differences in the rate of H. graminicola development, but the mass of mature spiders fed dead prey was greater than those fed live prey. Predation rates by P. astrigera did not differ between the two prey types, but H. graminicola had a higher rate of predation on dead than alive prey, presumably because the dead flies were easier to catch and handle. Overall, the growth, development and reproduction of H. graminicola reared with dead flies was better than those reared on live flies, yet for the larger P. astrigera, dead prey may suit smaller instars but mature spiders may be best maintained with live prey. We have clearly demonstrated that dead prey may be suitable for rearing spiders, although the success of the spiders fed such prey appears size- and species specific. PMID:24386248

  15. Characterization of a comparative model of the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Jorissen, R N; Epa, V C; Treutlein, H R; Garrett, T P; Ward, C W; Burgess, A W

    2000-02-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) receptor is a tyrosine kinase that mediates the biological effects of ligands such as EGF and transforming growth factor alpha. An understanding of the molecular basis of its action has been hindered by a lack of structural and mutational data on the receptor. We have constructed comparative models of the four extracellular domains of the EGF receptor that are based on the structure of the first three domains of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor. The first and third domains of the EGF receptor, L1 and L2, are right-handed beta helices. The second and fourth domains of the EGF receptor, S1 and S2, consist of the modules held together by disulfide bonds, which, except for the first module of the S1 domain, form rod-like structures. The arrangement of the L1 and S1 domains of the model are similar to that of the first two domains of the IGF-1 receptor, whereas that of the L2 and S2 domains appear to be significantly different. Using the EGF receptor model and limited information from the literature, we have proposed a number of regions that may be involved in the functioning of the receptor. In particular, the faces containing the large beta sheets in the L1 and L2 domains have been suggested to be involved with ligand binding of EGF to its receptor.

  16. Characterization of a comparative model of the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jorissen, R. N.; Epa, V. C.; Treutlein, H. R.; Garrett, T. P.; Ward, C. W.; Burgess, A. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) receptor is a tyrosine kinase that mediates the biological effects of ligands such as EGF and transforming growth factor alpha. An understanding of the molecular basis of its action has been hindered by a lack of structural and mutational data on the receptor. We have constructed comparative models of the four extracellular domains of the EGF receptor that are based on the structure of the first three domains of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor. The first and third domains of the EGF receptor, L1 and L2, are right-handed beta helices. The second and fourth domains of the EGF receptor, S1 and S2, consist of the modules held together by disulfide bonds, which, except for the first module of the S1 domain, form rod-like structures. The arrangement of the L1 and S1 domains of the model are similar to that of the first two domains of the IGF-1 receptor, whereas that of the L2 and S2 domains appear to be significantly different. Using the EGF receptor model and limited information from the literature, we have proposed a number of regions that may be involved in the functioning of the receptor. In particular, the faces containing the large beta sheets in the L1 and L2 domains have been suggested to be involved with ligand binding of EGF to its receptor. PMID:10716183

  17. Comparative growth and development of spiders reared on live and dead prey.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu; Zhang, Fan; Gui, Shaolan; Qiao, Huping; Hose, Grant C

    2013-01-01

    Scavenging (feeding on dead prey) has been demonstrated across a number of spider families, yet the implications of feeding on dead prey for the growth and development of individuals and population is unknown. In this study we compare the growth, development, and predatory activity of two species of spiders that were fed on live and dead prey. Pardosa astrigera (Lycosidae) and Hylyphantes graminicola (Lyniphiidae) were fed live or dead fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster. The survival of P. astrigera and H. graminicola was not affected by prey type. The duration of late instars of P. astrigera fed dead prey were longer and mature spiders had less protein content than those fed live prey, whereas there were no differences in the rate of H. graminicola development, but the mass of mature spiders fed dead prey was greater than those fed live prey. Predation rates by P. astrigera did not differ between the two prey types, but H. graminicola had a higher rate of predation on dead than alive prey, presumably because the dead flies were easier to catch and handle. Overall, the growth, development and reproduction of H. graminicola reared with dead flies was better than those reared on live flies, yet for the larger P. astrigera, dead prey may suit smaller instars but mature spiders may be best maintained with live prey. We have clearly demonstrated that dead prey may be suitable for rearing spiders, although the success of the spiders fed such prey appears size- and species specific.

  18. Experimental observations of root growth in a controlled photoelastic granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Serge; Bares, Jonathan; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Fourcaud, Thierry

    The mechanism of root growth in soil is a key issue to understand both how to improve plant development and how to stabilize grounds. However, no experimental studies have been carried out to directly observe root development and surrounding stress while imposing specific grain configurations or mechanical loading. We present a novel set-up which permits to observe the development of chickpea root networks in a 2D granular material made of bidisperse photoelastic discs while imposing the position of the grains, the intergranular spacing and the nature of the system confinement: (i) open cell, (ii) confined cell (iii) sheared cell. In the experimental apparatus several root development cells are treated in parallel to increase the statistical meaning of the observations. Evolution of the root network is followed as well as position and pressure inside each disc by mean of a camera and classical photoelastic techniques. Preliminary results will be presented.

  19. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Growth and Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S; Specht, E

    2005-06-14

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  20. Experimental observations of root growth in a controlled photoelastic granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barés, Jonathan; Mora, Serge; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Fourcaud, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel root observation apparatus capable of measuring the mechanical evolution of both the root network and the surrounding granular medium. The apparatus consists of 11 parallel growth frames, two of them being shearable, where the roots grow inside a photo-elastic or glass granular medium sandwiched between two pieces of glass. An automated system waters the plant and image each frame periodically in white light and between crossed polarisers. This makes it possible to follow (i) the root tips and (ii) the grain displacements as well as (iii) their inner pressure. We show how a root networks evolve in a granular medium and how it can mechanically stabilize it. This constitutes a model experiment to move forward in the understanding of the complex interaction between root growth and surrounding soil mechanical evolution.

  1. The effect of sulphate on magnesite growth: in-situ and ex-situ nanoscale observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Helen E.; Satoh, Hisao; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Putnis, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The composition of a solution has important implications for growth mechanisms and the incorporation of impurities during growth. For example, the presence of sulphate during CO2 sequestration in Mg-silicate rocks such as ophiolites is expected to restrict magnesite (MgCO3) growth due to the formation of Mg-sulphate ion pairs in solution (Pye et al. 1998), which lower the solution supersaturation with respect to magnesite. Conversely, direct interactions of sulphate with the magnesite surface, observed during dissolution (King and Putnis, 2013), could limit the negative effects of Mg-sulphate ion pair formation in solution by aiding growth through assisted desolvation of the Mg2+ ion (e.g., Piana et al. 2006). Furthermore, if the adsorbed sulphate is incorporated into the magnesite structure during growth it removes the need for expensive SO2 flue gas scrubbers as both CO2 and SO2 can be sequestered simultaneously. To explore the implications of sulphate in solution for CO2 sequestration we have observed the growth of cleaved magnesite {104} surfaces in-situ using phase shift interferometry (PSI), a technique specially designed to monitor ultra-slow growing or dissolving mineral surfaces. In addition, we have conducted batch experiments in Teflon-lined steel autoclaves and examined the surfaces ex-situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). All experiments were conducted at 90 ° C in solutions of 0.2 M NaHCO3 and 0.8 M NaCl or 0.4 M Na2SO4. Supersaturation of the solution was varied by changing the concentration of either MgCl2 for Cl-rich or MgSO4 in sulphate-rich solutions. For the PSI experiments a pressure of 1 MPa was used to prevent the formation of bubbles. In these experiments magnesite was grown in a flowing solution (100 μL/min) for 12 hours, whereas the batch experiments were conducted for 1-7 days under static conditions. The in-situ observations from the PSI experiments indicate that the presence of sulphate increased the rate of obtuse step

  2. The energy budget of stellar magnetic fields: comparing non-potential simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, L. T.; Jardine, M. M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Mackay, D. H.; See, V.; Donati, J.-F.; Folsom, C. P.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.

    2017-03-01

    The magnetic geometry of the surface magnetic fields of more than 55 cool stars have now been mapped using spectropolarimetry. In order to better understand these observations, we compare the magnetic field topology at different surface scale sizes of observed and simulated cool stars. For ease of comparison between the high-resolution non-potential magnetofrictional simulations and the relatively low-resolution observations, we filter out the small-scale field in the simulations using a spherical harmonics decomposition. We show that the large-scale field topologies of the solar-based simulations produce values of poloidal/toroidal fields and fractions of energy in axisymmetric modes which are similar to the observations. These global non-potential evolution model simulations capture key magnetic features of the observed solar-like stars through the processes of surface flux transport and magnetic flux emergence. They do not, however, reproduce the magnetic field of M-dwarfs or stars with dominantly toroidal field. Furthermore, we analyse the magnetic field topologies of individual spherical harmonics for the simulations and discover that the dipole is predominately poloidal, while the quadrupole shows the highest fraction of toroidal fields. Magnetic field structures smaller than a quadrupole display a fixed ratio between the poloidal and toroidal magnetic energies.

  3. Cost of growth in cells and organisms: general rules and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Wieser, W

    1994-02-01

    In a crude fashion it can be said that metabolizable energy (M) is partitioned into metabolic work, paid for by 'oxidations' (R), and 'assimilation', i.e. production (P), so that M = R+P. However, a fraction of R is required to meet the expenses of production and if these expenses represent, Joule for Joule, a constant proportion of the amount produced, then Rt = Rm+cP, where Rt = total metabolic expenditures, Rm = metabolic expenditures for maintaining the non-producing organism, and cP = Rp = metabolic expenditures connected with the processes of production. The partitioning of metabolizable energy into R and P as well as into Rm and Rp may vary depending on the phylogeny and life-history of the species concerned and on ecological circumstances. Thus selection is expected to act on both ratios, R/P and Rm/Rp. By comparing the ratios P/(P+Rp) (the apparent efficiency of production) and Rp/P (the apparent metabolic cost of production) in different types of organisms, one finds that a value of P/(P+Rp) = 0.75, equal to 75% efficiency, 10 mgdbm/mmol ATP, and 16 mumolO2/mg dbm (when I mg identical to 22 J), can be used as a 'consensus value' for the average efficiency, or cost, of the transformation of metabolizable energy into production in a wide range of organisms, from bacteria to mammals. This value corresponds to about three times the theoretical cost of synthesizing the same amount of tissue on the basis of known biochemical principles. The reasons why the empirical costs of production are higher than the theoretical costs of synthesis by what appears to be a common factor may be quite different in bacteria, small ectothermic and large endothermic organisms. Deviations from the consensus value may be due to differences in energy density of the nutrients assimilated and the tissues synthesized. Further complications arise because of interactions between P, Rp, and Rm. In microorganisms the existence of a constant and a variable component of maintenance

  4. Comparing Aircraft Observations of Snowfall to Forecasts Using Single or Two Moment Bulk Water Microphysics Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthan, A.

    2010-12-01

    High resolution weather forecast models with explicit prediction of hydrometeor type, size distribution, and fall speed may be useful in the development of precipitation retrievals, by providing representative characteristics of frozen hydrometeors. Several single or double-moment microphysics schemes are currently available within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, allowing for the prediction of up to three ice species. Each scheme incorporates different assumptions regarding the characteristics of their ice classes, particularly in terms of size distribution, density, and fall speed. In addition to the prediction of hydrometeor content, these schemes must accurately represent the vertical profile of water vapor to account for possible attenuation, along with the size distribution, density, and shape characteristics of ice crystals that are relevant to microwave scattering. An evaluation of a particular scheme requires the availability of field campaign measurements. The Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) obtained measurements of ice crystal shapes, size distributions, fall speeds, and precipitation during several intensive observation periods. In this study, C3VP observations obtained during the 22 January 2007 synoptic-scale snowfall event are compared against WRF model output, based upon forecasts using four single-moment and two double-moment schemes available as of version 3.1. Schemes are compared against aircraft observations by examining differences in size distribution, density, and content. In addition to direct measurements from aircraft probes, simulated precipitation can also be converted to equivalent, remotely sensed characteristics through the use of the NASA Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. Outputs from high resolution forecasts are compared against radar and satellite observations emphasizing differences in assumed crystal shape and size distribution characteristics.

  5. Comparing Aircraft Observations of Snowfall to Forecasts Using Single or Two Moment Bulk Water Microphysics Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution weather forecast models with explicit prediction of hydrometeor type, size distribution, and fall speed may be useful in the development of precipitation retrievals, by providing representative characteristics of frozen hydrometeors. Several single or double-moment microphysics schemes are currently available within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, allowing for the prediction of up to three ice species. Each scheme incorporates different assumptions regarding the characteristics of their ice classes, particularly in terms of size distribution, density, and fall speed. In addition to the prediction of hydrometeor content, these schemes must accurately represent the vertical profile of water vapor to account for possible attenuation, along with the size distribution, density, and shape characteristics of ice crystals that are relevant to microwave scattering. An evaluation of a particular scheme requires the availability of field campaign measurements. The Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) obtained measurements of ice crystal shapes, size distributions, fall speeds, and precipitation during several intensive observation periods. In this study, C3VP observations obtained during the 22 January 2007 synoptic-scale snowfall event are compared against WRF model output, based upon forecasts using four single-moment and two double-moment schemes available as of version 3.1. Schemes are compared against aircraft observations by examining differences in size distribution, density, and content. In addition to direct measurements from aircraft probes, simulated precipitation can also be converted to equivalent, remotely sensed characteristics through the use of the NASA Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. Outputs from high resolution forecasts are compared against radar and satellite observations emphasizing differences in assumed crystal shape and size distribution characteristics.

  6. Identifying tools for comparing simulations and observations of spectral-line data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Ward, Caleb G.; Offner, Stella; Loeppky, Jason L.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2017-10-01

    We present a statistical framework to compare spectral-line data cubes of molecular clouds and use the framework to perform an analysis of various statistical tools developed from methods proposed in the literature. We test whether our methods are sensitive to changes in the underlying physical properties of the clouds or whether their behaviour is governed by random fluctuations. We perform a set of 32 self-gravitating magnetohydrodynamic simulations that test all combinations of five physical parameters - Mach number, plasma parameter, virial parameter, driving scales and solenoidal driving fraction - each of which can be set to a low or high value. We create mock observational data sets of 13CO(1-0) emission from each simulation. We compare these mock data to those generated from a set of baseline simulations using pseudo-distance metrics based on 18 different statistical techniques that have previously been used to study molecular clouds. We analyse these results using methods from the statistical field of experimental design and find that several of the statistics can reliably track changes in the underlying physics. Our analysis shows that the interactions between parameters are often among the most significant effects. A small fraction of statistics are also sensitive to changes in magnetic field properties. We use this framework to compare the set of simulations to observations of three nearby star-forming regions: NGC 1333, Oph A and IC 348. We find that no one simulation agrees significantly better with the observations, although there is evidence that the high Mach number simulations are more consistent with the observations.

  7. In situ observations of bubble growth in basaltic, andesitic and rhyodacitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Ni, H.; Keppler, H.

    2014-02-01

    Bubble growth strongly affects the physical properties of degassing magmas and their eruption dynamics. Natural samples and products from quench experiments provide only a snapshot of the final state of volatile exsolution, leaving the processes occurring during its early stages unconstrained. In order to fill this gap, we present in situ high-temperature observations of bubble growth in magmas of different compositions (basalt, andesite and rhyodacite) at 1,100 to 1,240 °C and 0.1 MPa (1 bar), obtained using a moissanite cell apparatus. The data show that nucleation occurs at very small degrees of supersaturaturation (<60 MPa in basalt and andesite, 200 MPa in rhyodacite), probably due to heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles occurring simultaneously with the nucleation of crystals. During the early stages of exsolution, melt degassing is the driving mechanism of bubble growth, with coalescence becoming increasingly important as exsolution progresses. Ostwald ripening occurs only at the end of the process and only in basaltic melt. The average bubble growth rate ( G R) ranges from 3.4 × 10-6 to 5.2 × 10-7 mm/s, with basalt and andesite showing faster growth rates than rhyodacite. The bubble number density ( N B) at nucleation ranges from 7.9 × 104 mm-3 to 1.8 × 105 mm-3 and decreases exponentially over time. While the rhyodacite melt maintained a well-sorted bubble size distribution (BSD) through time, the BSDs of basalt and andesite are much more inhomogeneous. Our experimental observations demonstrate that bubble growth cannot be ascribed to a single mechanism but is rather a combination of many processes, which depend on the physical properties of the melt. Depending on coalescence rate, annealing of bubbles following a single nucleation event can produce complex bubble size distributions. In natural samples, such BSDs may be misinterpreted as resulting from several separate nucleation events. Incipient crystallization upon cooling of a magma may allow

  8. Comparing different Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation observations using modeling of water vapor jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Hansen, Candice; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Motivation: On March 11, 2016 the Cassini UVIS observed its 6th star occultation by Enceladus' plume. This observation was aimed to determine variability in the total gas flux from the Enceladus' southern polar region. The analysis of the received data suggests that the total gas flux is moderately increased comparing to the average gas flux observed by UVIS from 2005 to 2011 [1]. However, UVIS detected variability in individual jets. In particular, Baghdad 1 is more collimated in 2016 than in 2005, meaning its gas escapes at higher velocity.Model and fits: We use 3D DSMC model for water vapor jets to compare different UVIS occultation observations from 2005 to 2016. The model traces test articles from jets' sources [2] into space and results in coordinates and velocities for a set of test particles. We convert particle positions into the particle number density and integrate along UVIS line of sight (LoS) for each time step of the UVIS observation using precise observational geometry derived from SPICE [3]. We integrate all jets that are crossed by the LoS and perform constrained least-squares fit of resulting modeled opacities to the observed data to solved for relative strengths of jets. The geometry of each occultation is specific, for example, during solar occultation in 2010 UVIS LoS was almost parallel to tiger stripes, which made it possible to distinguish jets venting from different tiger stripes. In 2011 Eps Orionis occultation LoS was perpendicular to tiger stripes and thus many of the jets were geometrically overlapping. Solar occultation provided us with the largest inventory of active jets - our model fit detects at least 43 non-zero jet contributions. Stellar occultations generally have lower temporal resolution and observe only a sub-set of these jets: 2011 Eps Orionis needs minimum 25 non-zero jets to fit UVIS data. We will discuss different occultations and models fits, including the most recent Epsilon Orionis occultation of 2016.[1] Hansen et al

  9. Mid-Continental Intensive Field Campaign Atmospheric CO2 Observations Compared to Forward Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L. I.; Davis, K. J.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A.; Andrews, A. E.; Jacobson, A. R.; Corbin, K.

    2009-12-01

    Two commonly used approaches to study source/sinks of CO2 are the “bottom-up” and the “top-down” methods. Because of the large discrepancies between these approaches, the North America Carbon Program devised the Mid-Continental Intensive field campaign (MCI). The MCI campaign aims at improving the carbon flux estimates of both approaches with a combination of atmospheric transport models, a denser network of in-situ atmospheric CO2 measurements and agricultural inventories. The first step in evaluating and improving inverse models is to compare observed CO2 concentrations and predicted concentrations from forwards models. This study shows a model-data comparison at multiple temporal and spatial scales for the 2007 growing season. In-situ tower-based observations are compared to two different forwards models: NOAA’s Carbon Tracker and CSU’s SiBcrop-RAMS. Observations from two tall towers of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and five towers of Ring2 PSU network are used for this comparison. The towers are located in an intensively agricultural region of the North American continent. Comparisons to date show that both models predict higher mid-summer concentrations at three sites located in the “corn belt.” Both models have difficulty reproducing the observed monthly-average spatial gradient across these sites. The models also underestimate the maximum observed spatial gradients in daytime, daily-averaged boundary layer concentrations. These results suggest that the rapid photosynthetic rates found in corn are not yet well-simulated in these models, and that these data, when used in inversions, will provide a valuable constraint on regional fluxes.

  10. Time Series Analysis of Remote Sensing Observations for Citrus Crop Growth Stage and Evapotranspiration Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, S. A.; Chakraborty, M.; Suradhaniwar, S.; Adinarayana, J.; Durbha, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite based earth observation (EO) platforms have proved capability to spatio-temporally monitor changes on the earth's surface. Long term satellite missions have provided huge repository of optical remote sensing datasets, and United States Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat program is one of the oldest sources of optical EO datasets. This historical and near real time EO archive is a rich source of information to understand the seasonal changes in the horticultural crops. Citrus (Mandarin / Nagpur Orange) is one of the major horticultural crops cultivated in central India. Erratic behaviour of rainfall and dependency on groundwater for irrigation has wide impact on the citrus crop yield. Also, wide variations are reported in temperature and relative humidity causing early fruit onset and increase in crop water requirement. Therefore, there is need to study the crop growth stages and crop evapotranspiration at spatio-temporal scale for managing the scarce resources. In this study, an attempt has been made to understand the citrus crop growth stages using Normalized Difference Time Series (NDVI) time series data obtained from Landsat archives (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/). Total 388 Landsat 4, 5, 7 and 8 scenes (from year 1990 to Aug. 2015) for Worldwide Reference System (WRS) 2, path 145 and row 45 were selected to understand seasonal variations in citrus crop growth. Considering Landsat 30 meter spatial resolution to obtain homogeneous pixels with crop cover orchards larger than 2 hectare area was selected. To consider change in wavelength bandwidth (radiometric resolution) with Landsat sensors (i.e. 4, 5, 7 and 8) NDVI has been selected to obtain continuous sensor independent time series. The obtained crop growth stage information has been used to estimate citrus basal crop coefficient information (Kcb). Satellite based Kcb estimates were used with proximal agrometeorological sensing system

  11. Bayesian Techniques for Comparing Time-dependent GRMHD Simulations to Variable Event Horizon Telescope Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junhan; Marrone, Daniel P.; Chan, Chi-Kwan; Medeiros, Lia; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a millimeter-wavelength, very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment that is capable of observing black holes with horizon-scale resolution. Early observations have revealed variable horizon-scale emission in the Galactic Center black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Comparing such observations to time-dependent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations requires statistical tools that explicitly consider the variability in both the data and the models. We develop here a Bayesian method to compare time-resolved simulation images to variable VLBI data, in order to infer model parameters and perform model comparisons. We use mock EHT data based on GRMHD simulations to explore the robustness of this Bayesian method and contrast it to approaches that do not consider the effects of variability. We find that time-independent models lead to offset values of the inferred parameters with artificially reduced uncertainties. Moreover, neglecting the variability in the data and the models often leads to erroneous model selections. We finally apply our method to the early EHT data on Sgr A*.

  12. Cassini CAPS-ELS observations of carbon-based anions and aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Ravindra; Coates, Andrew; Wellbrock, Anne; Kataria, Dhiren; Jones, Geraint; Lewis, Gethyn; Waite, J.

    2016-06-01

    Cassini observations of Titans ionosphere revealed an atmosphere rich in positively charged ions with masses up to > 350 amu and negatively charged ions and aerosols with mass over charge ratios as high as 13,800 amu/q. The detection of negatively charged molecules by the Cassini CAPS Electron Spectrometer (CAPS-ELS) was particularly surprising and showed how the synthesis of large aerosol-size particles takes place at altitudes much greater than previously thought. Here, we present further analysis into this CAPS-ELS dataset, through an enhanced understanding of the instrument's response function. In previous studies the intrinsic E/E energy resolution of the instrument did not allow specific species to be identified and the detections were classified into broad mass ranges. In this study we use an updated fitting procedure to show how the ELS mass spectrum can be resolved into specific peaks at multiples of carbon-based anions up to > 100 amu/q. The negatively charged ions and aerosols in Titans ionosphere increase in mass with decreasing altitude, the lightest species being observed close to Titan's exobase of ˜1,450km and heaviest species observed at altitudes < 950km. We identify key stages in this apparent growth process and report on key intermediaries which appear to trigger the rapid growth of the larger aerosol-size particles.

  13. In situ observation of elementary growth processes of protein crystals by advanced optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sazaki, Gen; Van Driessche, Alexander E S; Dai, Guoliang; Okada, Masashi; Matsui, Takuro; Otálora, Fermin; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Nakajima, Kazuo

    2012-07-01

    To start systematically investigating the quality improvement of protein crystals, the elementary growth processes of protein crystals must be first clarified comprehensively. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has made a tremendous contribution toward elucidating the elementary growth processes of protein crystals and has confirmed that protein crystals grow layer by layer utilizing kinks on steps, as in the case of inorganic and low-molecular-weight compound crystals. However, the scanning of the AFM cantilever greatly disturbs the concentration distribution and solution flow in the vicinity of growing protein crystals. AFM also cannot visualize the dynamic behavior of mobile solute and impurity molecules on protein crystal surfaces. To compensate for these disadvantages of AFM, in situ observation by two types of advanced optical microscopy has been recently performed. To observe the elementary steps of protein crystals noninvasively, laser confocal microscopy combined with differential interference contrast microscopy (LCM-DIM) was developed. To visualize individual mobile protein molecules, total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy, which is widely used in the field of biological physics, was applied to the visualization of protein crystal surfaces. In this review, recent progress in the noninvasive in situ observation of elementary steps and individual mobile protein molecules on protein crystal surfaces is outlined.

  14. Intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor versus observation in acute central serous chorioretinopathy: one-year results.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Uk; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) compared with observation for treating acute central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). A retrospective study of 36 patients with acute CSC, including 21 patients treated with anti-VEGF (anti-VEGF group) and 15 patients with observation (observation group). Patients in the anti-VEGF group received a single dose of bevacizumab or ranibizumab at baseline. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central foveal thickness (CFT) and resolution of subretinal fluid (SRF) on optical coherence tomography (OCT) were assessed. The integrity of the foveal inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) line at 12 months was also analyzed. Resolution of SRF was achieved in 20 of 21 eyes in the anti-VEGF group and in 12 of 15 eyes in the observation group (p = 0.151). Mean BCVA and CFT were not different between the two groups at 12 months (p > 0.05). The amount of change in BCVA, however, differed significantly between the groups (p = 0.044). Final OCT more frequently detected the foveal IS/OS line in the anti-VEGF group than in the observation group (p = 0.012). In terms of BCVA, anti-VEGF and observation only had similar therapeutic effects in acute CSC patients. In some patients, however, the rapid resolution of SRF by anti-VEGF might reduce the risk of photoreceptor degeneration and improve long-term visual acuity.

  15. Observational evidence of the nonlinear wave growth theory of plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, Y.; Nakamura, S.; Summers, D.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, it has been revealed by measurements from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission that plasmaspheric hiss is a coherent emission containing discrete rising tone and falling tone elements [1]. Here, we test the recently developed nonlinear wave growth theory of plasmaspheric hiss [2] against EMFISIS observations of hiss. Wave forms of the hiss emissions at different frequencies are extracted from the EMFISIS burst-mode data by means of band-pass filters. From the phase variation of the waveforms we calculate the instantaneous frequencies and wave amplitudes. We obtain parameters of the energetic electrons by fitting the theoretical optimum wave amplitude as a function of frequency at the equator where hiss elements are generated. Through the propagation process from the equator to the observation point, the wave packet of the hiss element undergoes convective wave growth due to the nonlinear interaction with energetic electrons. The frequency sweep rate of the hiss element at a higher latitude is modified by the variation of the group velocity as a function of the frequency. We obtain the theoretical relation between the wave amplitude and frequency sweep rates at the observation point by applying the convective growth rates and dispersion factors to the known relation at the equator. By plotting the theoretical relation over scatter plots of the wave amplitudes and the frequency sweep rates for rising-tone elements, we find good agreement between the hiss observations and the nonlinear theory. We also find that the duration periods of the hiss elements are in good agreement with the nonlinear transition time necessary for the formation of a resonant current through coherent nonlinear wave-particle interactions. [1] Summers, D., Y. Omura, S. Nakamura, and C. A. Kletzing (2014), Fine structure of plasmaspheric hiss, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, 9134-9149, doi:10

  16. Growth of a young pingo in the Canadian Arctic observed by RADARSAT-2 interferometric satellite radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey V.; Lantz, Trevor C.; Kokelj, Steven V.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Advancements in radar technology are increasing our ability to detect Earth surface deformation in permafrost environments. In this paper we use satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) to describe the growth of a large, relatively young pingo in the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands. High-resolution RADARSAT-2 imagery (2011-2014) analyzed with the Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) DInSAR revealed a maximum 2.7 cm yr-1 of domed uplift located in a drained lake basin. Satellite measurements suggest that this feature is one of the largest diameter pingos in the region that is presently growing. Observed changes in elevation were modeled as a 348 × 290 m uniformly loaded elliptical plate with clamped edge. Analysis of historical aerial photographs suggested that ground uplift at this location initiated sometime between 1935 and 1951 following drainage of the residual pond. Uplift is largely due to the growth of intrusive ice, because the 9 % expansion of pore water associated with permafrost aggradation into saturated sands is not sufficient to explain the observed short- and long-term deformation rates. The modeled thickness of ice-rich permafrost using the Northern Ecosystem Soil Temperature (NEST) was consistent with the maximum height of this feature. Modeled permafrost aggradation from 1972 to 2014 approximated elevation changes estimated from aerial photographs for that time period. Taken together, these lines of evidence indicate that uplift is at least in part a result of freezing of the sub-pingo water lens. Seasonal variations in the uplift rate seen in the DInSAR data closely match the modeled seasonal pattern in the deepening rate of freezing front. This study demonstrates that interferometric satellite radar can detect and contribute to understanding the dynamics of terrain uplift in response to permafrost aggradation and ground ice development in remote polar environments. The present-day growth rate is smaller than

  17. Simulations of Solar Induced Fluorescence compared to observations from GOSAT and GOME-2 Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, I. T.; Berry, J. A.; Frankenberg, C.; Joiner, J.; Van der Tol, C.; Lee, J. E.; Denning, S.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) are currently retrieved from the GOSAT and GOME-2 satellites, and will become available from OCO-2 shortly. The GOSAT (and OCO-2) satellite has a midday overpass time, while GOME-2 has a variable observation of approximately 0800-1100 local time. Previous studies have demonstrated a linear relationship between SIF and Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), but lack the ability to investigate causes of spatiotemporal variability. We demonstrate an ability to simulate SIF using a landsurface model (the Simple Biosphere Model; SIB) for direct comparison to observations. We calculate fluorescence yield based on known relationships between photosynthesis and fluorescence, and calculate total SIF using existing leaf-to-canopy scaling factors. We find that simulated SIF exceeds GOSAT retrieved SIF, especially in tropical and Boreal forests. Simulated SIF exceeds GOME-2 values in Boreal forest and in lower-productivity areas such as marginal desert and tundra. Observed SIF GOME-2 in croplands is significantly higher than simulations. SIF simulated for low- and high-productivity grassland and savanna show much less seasonal and interannual amplitude when compared to values from both satellites, implicating that model phenology and/or response to meteorological forcing is damped. Simulated SIF seasonal cycles are similar to observed from both satellites, and simulations are able to reproduce drought events such as occurred in Russia in 2010 and the Central USA in 2012. As simulated SIF more closely resembles observations, model estimates of GPP become more robust, as does our ability to understand and recreate the mechanisms involved in vegetation response to seasonal cycles and anomalous stress events such as drought.

  18. COMPARING THE LIGHT CURVES OF SIMULATED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS USING DATA-DRIVEN MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kessler, Richard; Graziani, Carlo; Jordan, George C. IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Long, Min; Van Rossum, Daniel R.

    2013-08-20

    We propose a robust, quantitative method to compare the synthetic light curves of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion model with a large set of observed SNe Ia, and derive a figure of merit for the explosion model's agreement with observations. The synthetic light curves are fit with the data-driven model SALT2 which returns values for stretch, color, and magnitude at peak brightness, as well as a goodness-of-fit parameter. Each fit is performed multiple times with different choices of filter bands and epoch range in order to quantify the systematic uncertainty on the fitted parameters. We use a parametric population model for the distribution of observed SN Ia parameters from large surveys, and extend it to represent red, dim, and bright outliers found in a low-redshift SN Ia data set. We discuss the potential uncertainties of this population model and find it to be reliable given the current uncertainties on cosmological parameters. Using our population model, we assign each set of fitted parameters a likelihood of being observed in nature, and a figure of merit based on this likelihood. We define a second figure of merit based on the quality of the light curve fit, and combine the two measures into an overall figure of merit for each explosion model. We compute figures of merit for a variety of one-, two-, and three-dimensional explosion models and show that our evaluation method allows meaningful inferences across a wide range of light curve quality and fitted parameters.

  19. Comparing eyewitness-derived trajectories of bright meteors to instrumentally-observed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, D. E.

    2017-09-01

    The NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is often called upon to analyze meteors of public interest observed over the United States. Data from meteor networks are often utilized to accomplish this, as are recordings from the general public. When these methods fail, eyewitness reports are the only resource which can be leveraged. The MEO developed a tool to crudely calculate the trajectories of bright meteors from the eyewitness reports submitted to the American Meteor Society. The tool was tested on eyewitness data for 33 cases and compared to observed data from the NASA All Sky Fireball Network. The tool performed better for cases with more than 75 eyewitness reports than those with fewer than 75, by almost a factor of two across all metrics except for the end height. For these cases, the eyewitness-derived trajectory was about 50 km from the observed trajectory, the radiant was within 15°, and the speed was within 20% of that observed on average. A description of the tool, example case studies, and general trends are described.

  20. Coronal Mass Ejections and Dimmings: A Comparative Study using MHD Simulations and SDO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Meng; Cheung, Mark; DeRosa, Marc L.; Nitta, Nariaki; Schrijver, Karel

    2017-08-01

    Solar coronal dimmings have been observed extensively in the past two decades. Due to their close association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), there is a critical need to improve our understanding of the physical processes that cause dimmings and determine their relationship with CMEs. In this study, we investigate coronal dimmings by combining simulation and observational efforts. By utilizing a data-driven global magnetohydrodynamics model (AWSoM: Alfven-wave Solar Model), we simulate coronal dimmings resulting from different CME energetics and flux rope configurations. We synthesize the emissions of different EUV spectral bands/lines and compare with SDO/AIA and EVE observations. A detailed analysis of simulation and observation data suggests that the “core” dimming is mainly caused by the mass loss from the CME, while the “remote” dimming could have a different origin (e.g., plasma heating). Moreover, the interaction between the erupting flux rope with different orientations and the global solar corona could significantly influence the coronal dimming patterns. Using metrics such as dimming depth, dimming slope, and recovery time, we investigate the relationship between dimmings and CME properties (e.g., CME mass, CME speed) in the simulation. Our result suggests that coronal dimmings encode important information about CMEs. We also discuss how our knowledge about solar coronal dimmings could be extended to the study of stellar CMEs.

  1. Quality standards for real-world research. Focus on observational database studies of comparative effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Roche, Nicolas; Reddel, Helen; Martin, Richard; Brusselle, Guy; Papi, Alberto; Thomas, Mike; Postma, Dirjke; Thomas, Vicky; Rand, Cynthia; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David

    2014-02-01

    Real-world research can use observational or clinical trial designs, in both cases putting emphasis on high external validity, to complement the classical efficacy randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high internal validity. Real-world research is made necessary by the variety of factors that can play an important a role in modulating effectiveness in real life but are often tightly controlled in RCTs, such as comorbidities and concomitant treatments, adherence, inhalation technique, access to care, strength of doctor-caregiver communication, and socio-economic and other organizational factors. Real-world studies belong to two main categories: pragmatic trials and observational studies, which can be prospective or retrospective. Focusing on comparative database observational studies, the process aimed at ensuring high-quality research can be divided into three parts: preparation of research, analyses and reporting, and discussion of results. Key points include a priori planning of data collection and analyses, identification of appropriate database(s), proper outcomes definition, study registration with commitment to publish, bias minimization through matching and adjustment processes accounting for potential confounders, and sensitivity analyses testing the robustness of results. When these conditions are met, observational database studies can reach a sufficient level of evidence to help create guidelines (i.e., clinical and regulatory decision-making).

  2. Comparing a Carbon Budget for the Amazon Basin Derived from Aircraft Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, V. Y.; Dayalu, A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Gerbig, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present and compare a carbon budget for the Brazilian Amazon Basin based on the Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA) aircraft program, which occurred in November 2008 & May 2009, to other published carbon budgets. In particular, we compare our budget and analysis to others also derived from aircraft observations. Using mesoscale meteorological fields from ECMWF and WRF, we drive the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model and couple the footprint, or influence, to a biosphere model represented by the Vegetation Photosynthesis Respiration Model (VPRM). Since it is the main driver for the VPRM, we use observed shortwave radiation from towers in Brazil and French Guyana to examine the modeled shortwave radiation data from GL 1.2 (a global radiation model based on GOES 8 visible imagery), ECMWF, and WRF to determine if there are any biases in the modeled shortwave radiation output. We use WRF-STILT and ECMWF-STILT, GL 1.2 shortwave radiation, temperature, and vegetation maps (IGBP and SYNMAP) updated by landuse scenarios modeled by Sim Amazonia 2 and Sim Brazil, to compute hourly a priori CO2 fluxes by calculating Gross Ecosystem Exchange and Respiration for the 4 significant vegetation types across two (wet and dry) seasons as defined by 10-years of averaged TRIMM precipitation data. SF6 from stations and aircraft observations are used to determine the anthropogenic CO2 background and the lateral boundary conditions are taken from CarbonTracker2013B. The BARCA aircraft mixing ratios are then used as a top down constraint in an inversion framework that solves for the parameters controlling the fluxes for each vegetation type. The inversion provides scaling factors for GEE and R for each vegetation type in each season. From there, we derive a budget for the Basin and compare/contrast with other published basinwide CO2 fluxes.

  3. Polar-Region Distributions of Poynting Flux: Global Models Compared With Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, P. D.; Lotko, W.; Murr, D.; Gagne, J. R.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Low-altitude distributions of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon- Fedder-Mobarry global simulation model of the magnetosphere are compared with distributions derived from SuperDARN, the Iridium satellite constellation, and the Weimer 2005 empirical model for a one-hour interval (1400-1500 UT) on 23 November 1999 during which the interplanetary magnetic field was steady and southward. Synthetic measurements along a pseudo-satellite track are also obtained from each distribution and compared with measurements from the DMSP F13 satellite. Previous studies of the event are supplemented here with updated simulation results for the electric potential and field-aligned currents, new simulation diagnostics for the Poynting flux incident on the ionosphere, and comparisons of observational and simulation results with the Weimer empirical model. The location and extent of the simulated Poynting fluxes that occur in the afternoon sector, between the Region-1 and 2 currents, are consistent with the observed and empirically modeled locations, but the magnitudes exhibit significant differences (locally up to ~100% both higher and lower). Elsewhere, the distribution of simulated fluxes more closely resembles the empirically modeled values than the observed ones and in general is greater in magnitude by about 100%. Additionally, the fraction of simulated Poynting flux that flow into the polar cap region (above 75 deg) is about one third of the total flowing into the ionosphere above 60 deg; a similar value is found for both the observed and the empirically modeled fluxes. The effect of including the parallel potential drop in the self-consistent mapping of electric potential between the ionosphere and inner boundary of the simulation domain is also examined. Globally the effect is small (< 5%); however, in regions where the field-aligned potential drop is appreciable, local changes of 100% or more are found in the magnitude of the

  4. Quantitative observations of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in a low alloy steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth, da/dt, was studied in AISI-SAE 4130 low alloy steel in gaseous hydrogen and distilled water environments as a function of applied stress intensity, K, at various temperatures, hydrogen pressures, and alloy strength levels. At low values of K, da/dt was found to exhibit a strong exponential K dependence (Stage 1 growth) in both hydrogen and water. At intermediate values of K, da/dt exhibited a small but finite K dependence (Stage 2), with the Stage 2 slope being greater in hydrogen than in water. In hydrogen, at a constant K, (da/dt) sub 2 varied inversely with alloy strength level and varied essentially in the same complex manner with temperature and hydrogen pressure as noted previously. The results of this study provide support for most of the qualitative predictions of the lattice decohesion theory as recently modified by Oriani. The lack of quantitative agreement between data and theory and the inability of theory to explain the observed pressure dependence of slow crack growth are mentioned and possible rationalizations to account for these differences are presented.

  5. Comparing Simulations and Observations of Galaxy Evolution: Methods for Constraining the Nature of Stellar Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummels, Cameron

    Computational hydrodynamical simulations are a very useful tool for understanding how galaxies form and evolve over cosmological timescales not easily revealed through observations. However, they are only useful if they reproduce the sorts of galaxies that we see in the real universe. One of the ways in which simulations of this sort tend to fail is in the prescription of stellar feedback, the process by which nascent stars return material and energy to their immediate environments. Careful treatment of this interaction in subgrid models, so-called because they operate on scales below the resolution of the simulation, is crucial for the development of realistic galaxy models. Equally important is developing effective methods for comparing simulation data against observations to ensure galaxy models which mimic reality and inform us about natural phenomena. This thesis examines the formation and evolution of galaxies and the observable characteristics of the resulting systems. We employ extensive use of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations in order to simulate and interpret the evolution of massive spiral galaxies like our own Milky Way. First, we create a method for producing synthetic photometric images of grid-based hydrodynamical models for use in a direct comparison against observations in a variety of filter bands. We apply this method to a simulation of a cluster of galaxies to investigate the nature of the red-sequence/blue-cloud dichotomy in the galaxy color-magnitude diagram. Second, we implement several subgrid models governing the complex behavior of gas and stars on small scales in our galaxy models. Several numerical simulations are conducted with similar initial conditions, where we systematically vary the subgrid models, afterward assessing their efficacy through comparisons of their internal kinematics with observed systems. Third, we generate an additional method to compare observations with simulations, focusing on the tenuous circumgalactic

  6. A comparative study between a high-gain interconnected observer and an adaptive observer applied to IM-based WECS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naifar, Omar; Boukettaya, Ghada; Oualha, Abdelmajid; Ouali, Abderrazak

    2015-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of the potentialities of induction motor sensorless strategies in speed control applications. A comparison study is carried out between two observation approaches dedicated to speed control strategies of induction machine (IM)-based wind energy conversion systems (WECS) under parametric variations, such as: i) the adaptive observer approach, which is based on the speed adaptation law and ii) the interconnected observer, that offers robustness and stability of the system with reduced CPU time. The comparison study is achieved considering four performance criteria: stability, robustness with respect to the variations of the machine inductances, robustness with respect to the variations of the machine resistances, feasibility of the torque estimation. It has been found that the introduced interconnected observer exhibits a higher performance than the traditional adaptive one, with respect to the above-cited comparison criteria.

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Prenatal Care and Fetal Growth in Eight South American Countries

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Cristina; Lopez Camelo, Jorge; Wehby, George L.

    2014-01-01

    There has been little work that comprehensively compared the relationship between prenatal care and infant health across multiple countries using similar data sources and analytical models. Such comparative analyses are useful for understanding the background of differences in infant health between populations. We evaluated the association between prenatal care visits and fetal growth measured by birth weight (BW) in grams or low birth weight (<2500 grams; LBW) adjusted for gestational age in eight South American countries using similarly collected data across countries and the same analytical models. OLS and logistic regressions were estimated adjusting for a large set of relevant infant, maternal, and household characteristics and birth year and hospital fixed effects. Birth data were acquired from 140 hospitals that are part of the Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC) network. The analytical sample included 56,014 live-born infants (∼69% of total sample) with complete data born without congenital anomalies in the years 1996–2011 in Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Venezuela, Ecuador, Colombia, Bolivia, and Uruguay. Prenatal care visits were significantly (at p<.05) and positively associated with BW and negatively associated with LBW for all countries. The OLS coefficients ranged from 9 grams per visit in Bolivia to 36 grams in Uruguay. The association with LBW was strongest for Chile (OR = 0.87 per visit) and lowest for Argentina and Venezuela (OR = 0.95). The association decreased in the recent decade compared to earlier years. Our findings suggest that estimates of association between prenatal care and fetal growth are population-specific and may not be generalizable to other populations. Furthermore, as one of the indicators for a country’s healthcare system for maternal and child health, prenatal care is a highly variable indicator between countries in South America. PMID:24625630

  8. A comparative analysis of prenatal care and fetal growth in eight South American countries.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Cristina; Lopez Camelo, Jorge; Wehby, George L

    2014-01-01

    There has been little work that comprehensively compared the relationship between prenatal care and infant health across multiple countries using similar data sources and analytical models. Such comparative analyses are useful for understanding the background of differences in infant health between populations. We evaluated the association between prenatal care visits and fetal growth measured by birth weight (BW) in grams or low birth weight (<2500 grams; LBW) adjusted for gestational age in eight South American countries using similarly collected data across countries and the same analytical models. OLS and logistic regressions were estimated adjusting for a large set of relevant infant, maternal, and household characteristics and birth year and hospital fixed effects. Birth data were acquired from 140 hospitals that are part of the Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC) network. The analytical sample included 56,014 live-born infants (∼69% of total sample) with complete data born without congenital anomalies in the years 1996-2011 in Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Venezuela, Ecuador, Colombia, Bolivia, and Uruguay. Prenatal care visits were significantly (at p<.05) and positively associated with BW and negatively associated with LBW for all countries. The OLS coefficients ranged from 9 grams per visit in Bolivia to 36 grams in Uruguay. The association with LBW was strongest for Chile (OR = 0.87 per visit) and lowest for Argentina and Venezuela (OR = 0.95). The association decreased in the recent decade compared to earlier years. Our findings suggest that estimates of association between prenatal care and fetal growth are population-specific and may not be generalizable to other populations. Furthermore, as one of the indicators for a country's healthcare system for maternal and child health, prenatal care is a highly variable indicator between countries in South America.

  9. The birth and growth of a solar wind cavity around a comet - Rosetta observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, E.; Nilsson, H.; Alho, M.; Goetz, C.; Tsurutani, B.

    2017-07-01

    The Rosetta mission provided detailed observations of the growth of a cavity in the solar wind around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. As the comet approached the Sun, the plasma of cometary origin grew enough in density and size to present an obstacle to the solar wind. Our results demonstrate how the initial slight perturbations of the solar wind prefigure the formation of a solar wind cavity, with a particular interest placed on the discontinuity (solar wind cavity boundary) passing over the spacecraft. The slowing down and heating of the solar wind can be followed and understood in terms of single particle motion. We propose a simple geometric illustration that accounts for the observations, and shows how a cometary magnetosphere is seeded from the gradual steepening of an initially slight solar wind perturbation. A perspective is given concerning the difference between the diamagnetic cavity and the solar wind cavity.

  10. Laser observations of wave growth and foam density for fetch limited 25 M/SEC winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. B.; Cardone, V.

    1970-01-01

    The variability of sea surface conditions has been observed from a low flying aircraft by a laser wave profiling system for fetch limited wind speeds of 25 M/SEC. in the North Sea. Wave profiles obtained with the laser system have been analyzed and show that wave growth occurs simultaneously at all frequencies and that an equilibrium value for the higher frequency components is eventually reached, but not before substantially higher (overshoot) values are obtained. Simultaneous photography of the surface has been analyzed and show that 32 percent of the surface is covered with white caps, foam and streaks. This result is in good agreement with a semi-empirical relationship incorporating both the wind speed and the local wave spectrum which predicts 26 percent white water for the conditions observed.

  11. Differentiation and growth of bone ornamentation in vertebrates: a comparative histological study among the Crocodylomorpha.

    PubMed

    de Buffrénil, V; Clarac, F; Fau, M; Martin, S; Martin, B; Pellé, E; Laurin, M

    2015-04-01

    Bone ornamentation, that is, hollow (pits and grooves) or protruding (ridges) repetitive reliefs on the surface of dermal bones, is a frequent, though poorly studied and understood, feature in vertebrates. One of the most typical examples of this characteristic is given by the Crurotarsi, a taxon formed by the crocodilians and their closest allies, which generally display deep ornamentation on skull roof and osteoderms. However, the ontogenetic process responsible for the differentiation and development of this character remains controversial. This study was conducted to settle the question on histological and microanatomical evidence in several crurotarsan taxa. Observational and experimental data in extant and extinct crocodyliforms show that bone ornamentation is initially created, and later maintained during somatic growth (that is indefinite in crocodilians), by a complex process of bone remodeling comprising local resorption of superficial bone cortices, followed by partial reconstruction. The superficial reliefs of crocodilian dermal bones are thus permanently modified through pit enlargement, drift, stretching, shrinking, or complete filling. Ridges are also remodeled in corresponding ways. These processes allow accommodation of unitary ornamental motifs to the overall dimensions of the bones during growth. A parsimony optimization based on the results of this study, but integrating also published data on bone histology in non-crocodyliform crurotarsans and some non-crurotarsan taxa, suggests that the peculiar mechanism described above for creating and maintaining bone ornamentation is a general feature of the Crurotarsi and is quite distinct from that attributed by previous authors to other vertebrates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Direct observation of atomic-level nucleation and growth processes from an ultrathin metallic glass films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K. Q.; Cao, C. R.; Sun, Y. T.; Li, J.; Bai, H. Y.; Zheng, D. N. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Wang, W. H. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn; Gu, L. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn

    2016-01-07

    Till date, there have been no direct atomic-level experimental observations of the earliest stages of the nucleation and growth processes of nanocrystals formed by thermally induced crystallization in ultrathin metallic glasses (MGs). Here, we present a study of the crystallization process in atomically thin and highly stable MG films using double spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-TEM). Taking advantage of the stability of MG films with a slow crystallization process and the atomic-level high resolution of Cs-TEM, we observe the formation of the nucleus precursor of nanocrystals formed by atom aggregation followed by concomitant coalescence and stepwise evolution of the shape of the nanocrystals with a monodispersed and separated bimodal size distribution. Molecular dynamics simulation of the atomic motion in the glass film on a rigid amorphous substrate confirms the stepwise evolution processes of atom aggregation, cluster formation, cluster movement on the substrate, and cluster coalescence into larger crystalline particles. Our results might provide a better fundamental understanding of the nucleation and growth processes of nanocrystals in thin MG films.

  13. Direct observation of atomic-level nucleation and growth processes from an ultrathin metallic glass films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K. Q.; Cao, C. R.; Sun, Y. T.; Li, J.; Bai, H. Y.; Gu, L.; Zheng, D. N.; Wang, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Till date, there have been no direct atomic-level experimental observations of the earliest stages of the nucleation and growth processes of nanocrystals formed by thermally induced crystallization in ultrathin metallic glasses (MGs). Here, we present a study of the crystallization process in atomically thin and highly stable MG films using double spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-TEM). Taking advantage of the stability of MG films with a slow crystallization process and the atomic-level high resolution of Cs-TEM, we observe the formation of the nucleus precursor of nanocrystals formed by atom aggregation followed by concomitant coalescence and stepwise evolution of the shape of the nanocrystals with a monodispersed and separated bimodal size distribution. Molecular dynamics simulation of the atomic motion in the glass film on a rigid amorphous substrate confirms the stepwise evolution processes of atom aggregation, cluster formation, cluster movement on the substrate, and cluster coalescence into larger crystalline particles. Our results might provide a better fundamental understanding of the nucleation and growth processes of nanocrystals in thin MG films.

  14. Seeded growth of ferrite nanoparticles from Mn oxides: observation of anomalies in magnetic transitions.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyon-Min; Zink, Jeffrey I; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-07-28

    A series of magnetically active ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared by using Mn oxide NPs as seeds. A Verwey transition is identified in Fe3O4 NPs with an average diameter of 14.5 nm at 96 K, where a sharp drop of magnetic susceptibility occurs. In MnFe2O4 NPs, a spin glass-like state is observed with the decrease in magnetization below the blocking temperature due to the disordered spins during the freezing process. From these MnFe2O4 NPs, MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs are prepared by seeded growth. The structure of the core is cubic spinel (Fd3¯m), and the shell is composed of iron-manganese oxide (Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O) with a rock salt structure (Fm3¯m). Moiré fringes appear perpendicular to the 〈110〉 directions on the cubic shape NPs through the plane-matched epitaxial growth. These fringes are due to the difference in the lattice spacings between MnFe2O4 and Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O. Exchange bias is observed in these MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs with an enhanced coercivity, as well as the shift of hysteresis along the field direction.

  15. Comparative effects of auxin and abscisic acid on growth, hydrogen ion efflux and gravitropism in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.; Mulkey, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to test the idea that auxin action on root growth may be mediated by H(+) movement, the correlation of auxin action on growth and H(+) movement in roots was examined along with changes in H(+) efflux patterns associated with the asymmetric growth which occurs during gravitropism. The effects of indoleacetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (AbA) on growth, H(+) secretion, and gravitropism in roots were compared. Results show a close correlation existent between H(+) efflux and growth in maize roots. In intact roots there is strong H(+) efflux from the elongation zone. Growth-promoting concentrations of IAA stimulate H(+) efflux. During gravitropism the H(+) efflux from the elongation zone becomes asymmetric; the evidence indicates that auxin redistribution contributes to the development of acid efflux asymmetry. That AbA stimulates root growth is reflected in its ability to stimulate H(+) efflux from apical root segments.

  16. Comparing ED(MF)n in the gray zone to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brast, Maren; Schemann, Vera; Moseley, Christopher; Crewell, Susanne; Neggers, Roel

    2017-04-01

    A new scale-adaptive shallow cumulus parameterization scheme is confronted with measurements made during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) at the Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE). The Eddy-Diffusivity Multiple Mass-Flux (or ED(MF)n) scheme is a bin-macrophysics scheme, in which subgrid transport and clouds are formulated in terms of discretized size densities. It is implemented into a large-eddy simulation (LES) model, replacing the original subgrid transport scheme. This way the ED(MF)n can be tested in an idealized setting, covering the boundary layer gray zone. The LES is driven with large-scale forcings derived from analyses of the weather prediction model COSMO-DE, resulting in a reasonably accurate simulation of the measured conditions. During the HOPE campaign the boundary layer was measured extensively, supplying a wealth of data that can be used to evaluate parameterizations. Both long-term averages and individual shallow cumulus days are investigated. The LES is run with and without ED(MF)n for various resolutions, and the modeled boundary layer is compared to the observations from HOPE. This allows investigating the question how well the scale-adaptive scheme reproduces simulated and observed meteorology across the gray zone.

  17. A Hierarchical and Dynamic Seascape Framework for Scaling and Comparing Ocean Biodiversity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanaugh, M.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Montes, E.; Santora, J. A.; Chavez, F.; Messié, M.; Doney, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    The pelagic ocean is a complex system in which physical, chemical and biological processes interact to shape patterns on multiple spatial and temporal scales and levels of ecological organization. Monitoring and management of marine seascapes must consider a hierarchical and dynamic mosaic, where the boundaries, extent, and location of features change with time. As part of a Marine Biodiversity Observing Network demonstration project, we conducted a multiscale classification of dynamic coastal seascapes in the northeastern Pacific and Gulf of Mexico using multivariate satellite and modeled data. Synoptic patterns were validated using mooring and ship-based observations that spanned multiple trophic levels and were collected as part of several long-term monitoring programs, including the Monterey Bay and Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuaries. Seascape extent and habitat diversity varied as a function of both seasonal and interannual forcing. We discuss the patterns of in situ observations in the context of seascape dynamics and the effect on rarefaction, spatial patchiness, and tracking and comparing ecosystems through time. A seascape framework presents an effective means to translate local biodiversity measurements to broader spatiotemporal scales, scales relevant for modeling the effects of global change and enabling whole-ecosystem management in the dynamic ocean.

  18. Observation of fresh Bos indicus embryos comparing stereoscopic and phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M E; Galina, C S; Moreno-Mendoza, N; Alarcón, M A; Godínez, B; Lammoglia, M A

    2014-05-01

    Summary The precision of embryo evaluation using stereoscopic microscopy (SM) and inverted phase contrast microscopy (PCM) was compared in 20 Bos indicus cows superovulated at two different times of the year. In total, 118 embryos were collected and classified according to their developmental stage and quality by two independent evaluators using SM and inverted PCM. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to determine concordance between SM and PCM observations. A good level of agreement (k = 0.616) was found for quality level, and a moderate one (k = 0.464) for developmental stage, particularly at the morula stage. Using the TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling) technique, concordance level was deemed to be low with the SM (k = 0.169), and poor with the PCM (k = 0.217). Differences in concordance levels were also found between observations made at the two times of year, 78 embryos were evaluated in the rainy season when concordance level was good (k = 0.68), in contrast to the 40 embryos evaluated in the dry season when agreement was found to be poor (k = 0.24). In conclusion, inverted PCM was somewhat more effective for evaluating embryos, particularly at the morula stage. However, considering the high cost of an inverted PCM, the differences observed do not justify its purchase for routine embryo evaluation.

  19. Comparative Effects of CT Imaging Measurement on RECIST End Points and Tumor Growth Kinetics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, CH; Bies, RR; Wang, Y; Sharma, MR; Karovic, S; Werk, L; Edelman, MJ; Miller, AA; Vokes, EE; Oto, A; Ratain, MJ; Schwartz, LH

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessments of tumor burden and modeling of longitudinal growth could improve phase II oncology trials. To identify obstacles to wider use of quantitative measures we obtained recorded linear tumor measurements from three published lung cancer trials. Model‐based parameters of tumor burden change were estimated and compared with similarly sized samples from separate trials. Time‐to‐tumor growth (TTG) was computed from measurements recorded on case report forms and a second radiologist blinded to the form data. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)‐based progression‐free survival (PFS) measures were perfectly concordant between the original forms data and the blinded radiologist re‐evaluation (intraclass correlation coefficient = 1), but these routine interrater differences in the identification and measurement of target lesions were associated with an average 18‐week delay (range, −20 to 55 weeks) in TTG (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.32). To exploit computational metrics for improving statistical power in small clinical trials will require increased precision of tumor burden assessments. PMID:26790562

  20. Growth of InAs by MOVPE: A comparative study using arsine, tertiarybutylarsine and phenylarsine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, S. K.; Martin, R. W.; Mason, N. J.; Walker, P. J.

    1989-09-01

    The growth of bulk heteroepitaxial layers of InAs on GaAs substrates (and in some cases on InP substrates) by atmospheric pressure MOVPE is described. The indium source used was trimethylindium and we present a comparative study of the use of arsine, tertiarybutylarsine (TBAs) or phenylarsine (PhAs). The quality of the epitaxial layers was established from electrical and morphology measurements and showed a marked improvement with TBAs as a result of improved pyrolysis at lower temperatures. The 77 K mobility was found to increase from about 11,000 cm 2/V·s for samples grown from arsine, to nearly 30,000 cm 2/V·s for those grown from tertiarybutylarsine. The use of tertiarybutylarsine allows low growth temperatures close to those used in MBE to be used in MOVPE. PhAs was found to pyrolyse at a temperature very similar to arsine and grown layers were very similar to those obtained from arsine.

  1. Comparative growth and survival of diploid and triploid Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromism ossambicus) reared in indoor tanks.

    PubMed

    Nwachi, O F; Esa, Yuzine B

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of cold shock on fertilized eggs of Oreochromis mossambicus was during triploid production. Two males (150 ? 224 g) and six gravid females (150 g to 264 g) were collected. The females were injected with ovulin at a dosage rate of 0.5ml kg(-1), the eggs were stripped into a dry bowl, fertilised with milt, divided into two groups (A and B) and incubated. After three minutes, group A was cold shocked at 50C for a period for 5 min, while group B was incubated normally. Tilapia larvae hatchlings were triplicated and stocked at a density of 200 larvae / liter in the aquaria for four weeks. Results showed that triploid fish had a lower hatchability (58%) and survival rate (47%) than diploid fish (of 85 and 70%, respectively), but a higher specific growth rate of 1.097 as compared to diploid at 0.931. While the improved growth rates have great commercial applications. Further research should be conducted to improve the lower hatchability and survivability of triploid tilapia. ?

  2. Predictors of treatment with dialysis modalities in observational studies for comparative effectiveness research*

    PubMed Central

    Kuttykrishnan, Sooraj; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Brunelli, Steve; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Katz, Ronit; Molnar, Miklos Z.; Nissenson, Allen; Ravel, Vanessa; Streja, Elani; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2015-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine has identified the comparative effectiveness of renal replacement therapies as a kidney-related topic among the top 100 national priorities. Given the importance of ensuring internal and external validity, the goal of this study was to identify potential sources of bias in observational studies that compare outcomes with different dialysis modalities. Methods This observational cohort study used data from the electronic medical records of all patients that started maintenance dialysis in the calendar years 2007–2011 and underwent treatment for at least 60 days in any of the 2217 facilities operated by DaVita Inc. Each patient was assigned one of six dialysis modalities for each 91-day period from the date of first dialysis (thrice weekly in-center hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD), less-frequent HD, home HD, frequent HD and nocturnal in-center HD). Results Of the 162 644 patients, 18% underwent treatment with a modality other than HD for at least one 91-day period. Except for PD, patients started treatment with alternative modalities after variable lengths of treatment with HD; the time until a change in modality was shortest for less-frequent HD (median time = 6 months) and longest for frequent HD (median time = 15 months). Between 30 and 78% of patients transferred to another dialysis facility prior to change in modality. Finally, there were significant differences in baseline and time-varying clinical characteristics associated with dialysis modality. Conclusions This analysis identified numerous potential sources of bias in studies of the comparative effectiveness of dialysis modalities. PMID:25883196

  3. Key Process Uncertainties in Soil Carbon Dynamics: Comparing Multiple Model Structures and Observational Meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, B. N.; Moore, J.; Averill, C.; Abramoff, R. Z.; Bradford, M.; Classen, A. T.; Hartman, M. D.; Kivlin, S. N.; Luo, Y.; Mayes, M. A.; Morrison, E. W.; Riley, W. J.; Salazar, A.; Schimel, J.; Sridhar, B.; Tang, J.; Wang, G.; Wieder, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) dynamics are crucial to understanding and predicting C cycle responses to global change and soil C modeling is a key tool for understanding these dynamics. While first order model structures have historically dominated this area, a recent proliferation of alternative model structures representing different assumptions about microbial activity and mineral protection is providing new opportunities to explore process uncertainties related to soil C dynamics. We conducted idealized simulations of soil C responses to warming and litter addition using models from five research groups that incorporated different sets of assumptions about processes governing soil C decomposition and stabilization. We conducted a meta-analysis of published warming and C addition experiments for comparison with simulations. Assumptions related to mineral protection and microbial dynamics drove strong differences among models. In response to C additions, some models predicted long-term C accumulation while others predicted transient increases that were counteracted by accelerating decomposition. In experimental manipulations, doubling litter addition did not change soil C stocks in studies spanning as long as two decades. This result agreed with simulations from models with strong microbial growth responses and limited mineral sorption capacity. In observations, warming initially drove soil C loss via increased CO2 production, but in some studies soil C rebounded and increased over decadal time scales. In contrast, all models predicted sustained C losses under warming. The disagreement with experimental results could be explained by physiological or community-level acclimation, or by warming-related changes in plant growth. In addition to the role of microbial activity, assumptions related to mineral sorption and protected C played a key role in driving long-term model responses. In general, simulations were similar in their initial responses to perturbations but diverged over

  4. Comparative effect of methioninyl adenylate on the growth of Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Enouf, J; Laurence, F; Farrugia, G; Blanchard, P; Robert-Gero, M

    1976-10-11

    The bacteriostatic effect of methioninyl adenylate(MAMP)--a specific inhibitor of the enzyme methionyl-tRNA synthetase--was investigated on Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 0.1 mM of this molecule added to the culture, inhibits the growth of S. typhimurium. The inhibition is specifically reversible by 0.1 mM L-methionine. In the same conditions even 1-2 mM MAMP has a very slight effect on the growth rate of P. aeruginosa and only during the first two generations. The same observation was made with the two other members of the fluorescens group P.fluorescens and P.putida. The growth rate of P. testosteroni with 1 mM MAMP in the medium is similar to the growth rate of P. aeruginosa but the other member of the acidovorans group P. acidovorans is much more affected by the smae concentration of the inhibitor. --P. multivorans is inhibited by MAMP like P. acidovorans but with a somewhat higher yield at the end of the culture. --MAMP has no effect on P. alcaligenes. The possible reasons for the weak bacteriostatic effect of MAMP on P. aeruginosa were investigated. It was established that the inhibitor enters the cells and is not used as a carbon and energy source. The intracellular methionine concentration in S. typhimurium and in P. aeruginosa is about the same and does not increase when bacteria are cultivated with MAMP. The MTS of the two microorganisms is inhibited by MAMP in vitro to about the same extent. Furthermore the tRNAmet from P. aeruginosa are fully acylated after 3 to 4 generations with this compound. Nevertheless MAMP elicits higher MTS activity in P. aeruginosa and in P. acidovorans after 1 h of incubation. The most striking difference between S. typhimurium and P. aeruginosa is that the intra and extracellular level of 5'phosphodiesterase which degrades MAMP is 10-20 fold higher in the second than in the first species.

  5. Comparative analysis of Salmonella genomes identifies a metabolic network for escalating growth in the inflamed gut.

    PubMed

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-03-18

    The Salmonella genus comprises a group of pathogens associated with illnesses ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. We performed an in silico analysis of comparatively reannotated Salmonella genomes to identify genomic signatures indicative of disease potential. By removing numerous annotation inconsistencies and inaccuracies, the process of reannotation identified a network of 469 genes involved in central anaerobic metabolism, which was intact in genomes of gastrointestinal pathogens but degrading in genomes of extraintestinal pathogens. This large network contained pathways that enable gastrointestinal pathogens to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients as well as many of the biochemical reactions used for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars. Thus, comparative genome analysis identifies a metabolic network that provides clues about the strategies for nutrient acquisition and utilization that are characteristic of gastrointestinal pathogens. IMPORTANCE While some Salmonella serovars cause infections that remain localized to the gut, others disseminate throughout the body. Here, we compared Salmonella genomes to identify characteristics that distinguish gastrointestinal from extraintestinal pathogens. We identified a large metabolic network that is functional in gastrointestinal pathogens but decaying in extraintestinal pathogens. While taxonomists have used traits from this network empirically for many decades for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars, our findings suggest that it is part of a "business plan" for growth in the inflamed gastrointestinal tract. By identifying a large metabolic network characteristic of Salmonella serovars associated with gastroenteritis, our in silico analysis provides a blueprint for potential strategies to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients and edge out competing gut microbes.

  6. Observation of plasma instabilities related to dust particle growth mechanisms in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Drenik, A.; Margot, J.

    2013-10-15

    Instabilities are observed in the self-bias voltage measured on a probe immersed in microwave plasma excited at Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR). Observed in the MHz range, they were systematically measured in dust-free or dusty plasmas (obtained for different conditions of applied microwave powers and acetylene flow rates). Two characteristic frequencies, well described as lower hybrid oscillations, can be defined. The first one, in the 60–70 MHz range, appears as a sharp peak in the frequency spectra and is observed in every case. Attributed to ions, its position shift observed with the output power highlights that nucleation process takes place in the dusty plasma. Attributed to lower hybrid oscillation of powders, the second broad peak in the 10–20 MHz range leads to the characterization of dust particles growth mechanisms: in the same way as in capacitively coupled plasmas, accumulation of nucleus confined near the probe in the magnetic field followed by aggregation takes place. Then, the measure of electrical instabilities on the self-bias voltage allows characterizing the discharge as well as the chemical processes that take place in the magnetic field region and their kinetics.

  7. Using radiative kernels to compare feedback behavior over different time scales in CMIP output and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, K. M.; Flink, M. M.; Jonko, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate climate projections require an understanding of feedback behavior on centennial timescales. Unfortunately, satellite and reanalysis observations are available only for the last few decades. We seek to determine the extent to which the relatively short observation-based records can constrain model estimates of long-term (century-scale) climate change in response to anthropogenic forcing. The radiative kernel technique allows us to study feedbacks related to temperature, water vapor, surface albedo, and clouds in a consistent fashion. We are using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) simulations to determine whether (modeled) feedbacks differ for interannual- and decadal-scale versus centennial-scale climate change. We also are comparing short-term feedbacks derived from satellite (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, AIRS) and reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data with modeled feedbacks. We use two strategies. The first is the standard kernel technique where feedbacks are determined by differencing mean variables between two states. Preliminary work with CMIP3 indicates that averaging periods (e.g., 10 years versus 20 years) can change feedback estimates by more 20%. In general, we expect longer averaging periods to result in more accurate estimates of feedbacks. However, transient GCMs runs (as well as observational data sets) may be only a few decades long. In these cases, we must determine the best averaging period to balance the increase of noise caused by a shorter averaging period and the decrease of climate signal resulting from averaging periods that are closer together. To address this issue, the second strategy is a modified kernel technique where anomalies from the mean climate are combined with the kernel for every month of the time series. This technique is more appropriate in cases where there is not a large external forcing. We are calculating feedbacks in the CMIP5 simulations using both strategies with different averaging periods and start

  8. Engagement as a Driver of Growth of Online Health Forums: Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Gopalsamy, Rahul; Semenov, Alexander; Pasiliao, Eduardo; McIntosh, Scott; Nikolaev, Alexander

    2017-08-29

    The emerging research on nurturing the growth of online communities posits that it is in part attributed to network effects, wherein every increase in the volume of user-generated content increases the value of the community in the eyes of its potential new members. The recently introduced metric engagement capacity offers a means of quantitatively assessing the ability of online platform users to engage each other into generating content; meanwhile, the quantity engagement value is useful for quantifying communication-based platform use. If the claim that higher engagement leads to accelerated growth holds true for online health forums (OHFs), then engagement tracking should become an important tool in the arsenal of OHF managers. Indeed, it might allow for quantifying the ability of an OHF to exploit network effects, thus predicting the OHF's future success. This study aimed to empirically analyze the relationship between internal OHF use (quantified using engagement measurement), and external growth. We collected data from 7 OHFs posted between the years 1999 and 2016. Longitudinal analyses were conducted by evaluating engagement in the OHFs over time. We analyzed 2-way causality effects between the engagement value and metrics evaluating OHF growth using Granger causality tests. User activity metrics per week were correlated with engagement metrics, followed by linear regression analyses. Observational data showed a 1-way causal relationship between the OHF engagement value and reach (P=.02). We detected a 2-way causal relationship between the engagement value and delurking, with further analysis indicating that the engagement value was more likely to cause delurking (P<.001 with lag 2; for the reverse hypothesis, P=.01 with lag 2). Users who engaged each other more were more likely (up to 14 times, depending on how much one user engaged another) to develop personal connections. Finally, we found that the more engaging an OHF user was in a given week, the more

  9. Engagement as a Driver of Growth of Online Health Forums: Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gopalsamy, Rahul; Semenov, Alexander; Pasiliao, Eduardo; McIntosh, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Background The emerging research on nurturing the growth of online communities posits that it is in part attributed to network effects, wherein every increase in the volume of user-generated content increases the value of the community in the eyes of its potential new members. The recently introduced metric engagement capacity offers a means of quantitatively assessing the ability of online platform users to engage each other into generating content; meanwhile, the quantity engagement value is useful for quantifying communication-based platform use. If the claim that higher engagement leads to accelerated growth holds true for online health forums (OHFs), then engagement tracking should become an important tool in the arsenal of OHF managers. Indeed, it might allow for quantifying the ability of an OHF to exploit network effects, thus predicting the OHF’s future success. Objective This study aimed to empirically analyze the relationship between internal OHF use (quantified using engagement measurement), and external growth. Methods We collected data from 7 OHFs posted between the years 1999 and 2016. Longitudinal analyses were conducted by evaluating engagement in the OHFs over time. We analyzed 2-way causality effects between the engagement value and metrics evaluating OHF growth using Granger causality tests. User activity metrics per week were correlated with engagement metrics, followed by linear regression analyses. Results Observational data showed a 1-way causal relationship between the OHF engagement value and reach (P=.02). We detected a 2-way causal relationship between the engagement value and delurking, with further analysis indicating that the engagement value was more likely to cause delurking (P<.001 with lag 2; for the reverse hypothesis, P=.01 with lag 2). Users who engaged each other more were more likely (up to 14 times, depending on how much one user engaged another) to develop personal connections. Finally, we found that the more engaging an

  10. Observations and modelling of fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay, Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Makshtas, Aleksandr; Grubiy, Andrey; Kustov, Vasiliy

    2016-04-01

    Fast ice is one of the main features of sea ice cover in the Laptev Sea. The formation of this immobile ice which occupies up to 30% of the sea area and significantly affects the intensity of air-sea energy exchange in the coastal zones had been investigated during winter 2014-2015 in the Tiksi Bay (Buor-Khaya Gulf). The temperature measurements within sea ice thickness and under-ice sea layer using GeoPrecision thermistor string of 10 sensors together with measurements of snow and ice thicknesses were carried out at the distance of 0.5 km from the shore at the 3.5 m water depth. According to measurements temperature variations qualitatively repeat air temperature variations and, damping with depth, approach to sea water freezing temperature. Vertical temperature distributions allow to recognize snow, ice and water layers by profile inclination in each layer. The temperature profiles within growing ice were quasi-linear, indicating permanence of heat flux inside ice. The linearity of temperature profiles increased during ice growth. For calculations of fast ice evolution one-dimensional thermodynamic model was used. Besides the empirical formulae, based on frost degree-days, developed in 1930th for the Tiksi Bay was applied. Numerical experiments were carried out with constant values of thermal properties of all media and 10 ppt water salinity, as initial condition. The daily average data from Hydrometeorological Observatory Tiksi, located approximately 1 km from the site of ice observations, were used as atmospheric forcing. For the examined area evolutions of ice cover thickness estimated from direct measurements, the thermodynamic model and the empirical formulae were almost identical. The result indicates stability of hydrological and meteorological conditions, determining fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay during last 75 years. Model simulations showed that in shallow waters the growth of ice thickness is stabilized due to increase of sub-ice water layer

  11. Characteristics of formation and growth of atmospheric nanoparticles observed at four regional background sites in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yumi; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Park, Jin-Soo; Lim, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Jihyung; Lim, Han-Cheol; Ryu, Jegyu; Lee, Chul-Kyu; Heo, Bok-Haeng

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of atmospheric nanoparticles were conducted at four sites on the west coast of the Korean Peninsula by using identical scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPSs) in October 2012. The new particle formation and subsequent growth (NPF) of atmospheric nanoparticles, which were identified by the cyclostationary empirical orthogonal function (CSEOF) analysis technique, was observed on 11 out of 21 days at the Baengnyeong-do Comprehensive Monitoring Observatory (BCMO); and on 10 out of 21 days at the Korea Global Atmosphere Watch Center (KGAWC) from October 9 to 29, 2012. We also observed NPF events for 9 out of 21 days at both the Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) and the Jeju Comprehensive Monitoring Observatory (JCMO). During the study period, NPF was simultaneously observed for five days at all four sites, which indicates that the NPF event had a spatial extent of at least 540 km. A cold, dry and cloud-free continental air mass originated from northern China, formed favorable environmental conditions (e.g., increasing solar insolation at the surface) on simultaneous NPF at the four sites. These synoptic weather patterns were closely associated with an extraordinary typhoon passing over the south of Japan. The mean values of particle formation rates at BCMO (1.26 cm- 3 s- 1) and KGAWC (1.49 cm- 3 s- 1) were relatively higher than those at GCO (0.39 cm- 3 s- 1) and JCMO (0.74 cm- 3 s- 1), however, the growth rate showed a similar level among four sites. An increase in the spatial homogeneity and inter-site correlation of atmospheric particles among the four sites was apparent for small particles (diameter < 30 nm) on simultaneous NPF event days.

  12. An observational, prospective study comparing tibial and humeral intraosseous access using the EZ-IO.

    PubMed

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Chan, Yiong Huak; Oh, Jen Jen; Ngo, Adeline Su-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative to conventional intravenous access. The proximal tibia and proximal humerus have been proposed as suitable sites for IO access. A nonrandomized, prospective, observational study comparing flow rates and insertion success with tibial and humeral IO access in adults using the EZ-IO-powered drill device was conducted. The tibia was the first site of insertion, and a second IO was inserted in the humerus if clinically indicated for the same patient. Twenty-four patients were recruited, with 24 tibial and 11 humeral insertions. All EZ-IO insertions were successful at the first attempt except for 1 tibial insertion that was successful on the second attempt. All insertions were achieved within 20 seconds. Mean ease of IO insertion score (1=easiest to 10=most difficult) was 1.1 for both sites. We found tibial flow rates to be significantly faster using a pressure bag (165 mL/min) compared with those achieved without a pressure bag (73 mL/min), with a difference of 92 mL/min (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52, 132). Similarly, humeral flow rates were significantly faster using a pressure bag (153 mL/min) compared with humeral those achieved without pressure bag (84 mL/min), with a difference of 69 mL/min (95% CI: 39, 99). Comparing matched pairs (same patient), there was no significant difference in flow rates between tibial and humeral sites, with or without pressure bag infusion. Both sites had high-insertion success rates. Flow rates were significantly faster with a pressure bag infusion than without. However, we did not find any significant difference in tibial or humeral flow rates.

  13. Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions in Australian landscapes: Comparing ground based mobile surveying data to GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, S.; Iverach, C.; Kelly, B. F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is threatening the health and stability of the natural world and human society. Such concerns were emphasized at COP21 conference in Paris 2015 which highlighted the global need to improve our knowledge of sources of greenhouse gas and to develop methods to mitigate the effects of their emissions. Ongoing spatial and temporal measurements of greenhouse gases at both point and regional scales is important for clarification of climate change mechanisms and accounting. The Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is designed to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from orbit. As existing ground monitoring stations are limited and still unevenly distributed, satellite observations provide important frequent, spatially extensive, but low resolution observations. Recent developments in portable laser based greenhouse gas measurement systems have enabled the rapid measurement of greenhouse gases in ppb at the ground surface. This study was conducted to map major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the eastern states of Australia at the landscape scale and to compare the results to GOSAT observations. During April 2016 we conducted a regional CH4 and CO2 mobile survey, using an LGR greenhouse gas analyzer. Measurements were made along a 4000 KM circuit through major cities, country towns, dry sclerophyll forests, coastal wetlands, coal mining regions, coal seam gas developments, dryland farming and irrigated agricultural landscapes. The ground-based survey data were then compared with the data (L2) from GOSAT. Ground-based mobile surveys showed that there are clear statistical differences in the ground level atmospheric concentration of CH4 and CO2 associated with all major changes in land use. These changes extend for kilometers, and cover one or more GOSAT pixels. In the coal mining districts the ground-level atmospheric concentration of CH4 exceeded 2 ppm for over 40 km, yet this was not discernable in the retrieved data (L2

  14. Comparing satellite- to ground-based automated and manual cloud coverage observations - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, A.; Lockhoff, M.; Schrempf, M.; Tohsing, K.; Liley, B.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2015-05-01

    In this case study we compare cloud fractional cover measured by radiometers on polar satellites (AVHRR) and on one geostationary satellite (SEVIRI) to ground-based manual (SYNOP) and automated observations by a cloud camera (Hemispherical Sky Imager, HSI). These observations took place in Hannover, Germany, and in Lauder, New Zealand, over time frames of 3 and 2 months, respectively. Daily mean comparisons between satellite derivations and the ground-based HSI found the deviation to be 6 ± 14% for AVHRR and 8 ± 16% for SEVIRI, which can be considered satisfactory. AVHRR's instantaneous differences are smaller (2 ± 22%) than instantaneous SEVIRI cloud fraction estimates (8 ± 29%) when compared to HSI due to resolution and scenery effect issues. All spaceborne observations show a very good skill in detecting completely overcast skies (cloud cover ≥ 6 oktas) with probabilities between 92 and 94% and false alarm rates between 21 and 29% for AVHRR and SEVIRI in Hannover, Germany. In the case of a clear sky (cloud cover lower than 3 oktas) we find good skill with detection probabilities between 72 and 76%. We find poor skill, however, whenever broken clouds occur (probability of detection is 32% for AVHRR and 12% for SEVIRI in Hannover, Germany). In order to better understand these discrepancies we analyze the influence of algorithm features on the satellite-based data. We find that the differences between SEVIRI and HSI cloud fractional cover (CFC) decrease (from a bias of 8 to almost 0%) with decreasing number of spatially averaged pixels and decreasing index which determines the cloud coverage in each "cloud-contaminated" pixel of the binary map. We conclude that window size and index need to be adjusted in order to improve instantaneous SEVIRI and AVHRR estimates. Due to its automated operation and its spatial, temporal and spectral resolution, we recommend as well that more automated ground-based instruments in the form of cloud cameras should be installed

  15. Growth of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions by coagulation and fragmentation in a turbulent protoplanetary disk: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sébastien; Aléon, Jérôme; Chaumard, Noël; Baillié, Kévin; Taillifet, Esther

    2015-05-01

    Whereas it is generally accepted that calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from chondritic meteorites formed in a hot environment in the solar protoplanetary disk, the conditions of their formation remain debated. Recent laboratory studies of CAIs have provided new kind of data: their size distributions. We report that size distributions of CAIs measured in laboratory from sections of carbonaceous chondrites have a power law size distribution with cumulative size exponent between -1.7 and -1.9, which translates into cumulative size exponent between -2.5 and -2.8 after correction for sectioning. To explain these observations, numerical simulations were run to explore the growth of CAIs from micrometer to centimeter sizes, in a hot and turbulent protoplanetary disk through the competition of coagulation and fragmentation. We show that the size distributions obtained in growth simulations are in agreement with CAIs size distributions in meteorites. We explain the CAI sharp cut-off of their size distribution at centimeter sizes as the direct result from the famous fragmentation barrier, provided that CAI fragment for impact velocities larger than 10 m/s. The growth/destruction timescales of millimeter- and centimeter-sized CAIs is inversely proportional to the local dust/gas ratio and is about 10 years at 1300 K and up to 104 years at 1670 K. This implies that the most refractory CAIs are expected to be smaller in size owing to their long growth timescale compared to less refractory CAIs. Conversely, the least refractory CAIs could have been recycled many times during the CAI production era which may have profound consequences for their radiometric age.

  16. Comparative ELM study between the observation by ECEI and linear/nonlinear simulation in the KSTAR plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwoo; Park, Hyeon K.; Yun, Gunsu; Lee, Jaehyun; Lee, Jieun; Lee, Woochang; Jardin, Stephen; Xu, X. Q.; Kstar Team

    2015-11-01

    The modeling of the Edge-localized-mode (ELM) should be rigorously pursued for reliable and robust ELM control for steady-state long-pulse H-mode operation in ITER as well as DEMO. In the KSTAR discharge #7328, a linear stability of the ELMs is investigated using M3D-C1 and BOUT + + codes. This is achieved by linear simulation for the n = 8 mode structure of the ELM observed by the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems. In the process of analysis, variations due to the plasma equilibrium profiles and transport coefficients on the ELM growth rate are investigated and simulation results with the two codes are compared. The numerical simulations are extended to nonlinear phase of the ELM dynamics, which includes saturation and crash of the modes. Preliminary results of the nonlinear simulations are compared with the measured images especially from the saturation to the crash. This work is supported by NRF of Korea under contract no. NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029865, US DoE by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and US DoE by PPPL under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. The GRACE Checklist: A Validated Assessment Tool for High Quality Observational Studies of Comparative Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Nancy A; Bryant, Allison; Velentgas, Priscilla

    2016-10-01

    Recognizing the growing need for robust evidence about treatment effectiveness in real-world populations, the Good Research for Comparative Effectiveness (GRACE) guidelines have been developed for noninterventional studies of comparative effectiveness to determine which studies are sufficiently rigorous to be reliable enough for use in health technology assessments. To evaluate which aspects of the GRACE Checklist contribute most strongly to recognition of quality. We assembled 28 observational comparative effectiveness articles published from 2001 to 2010 that compared treatment effectiveness and/or safety of drugs, medical devices, and medical procedures. Twenty-two volunteers from academia, pharmaceutical companies, and government agencies applied the GRACE Checklist to those articles, providing 56 assessments. Ten senior academic and industry experts provided assessments of overall article quality for the purpose of decision support. We also rated each article based on the number of annual citations and impact factor of the journal in which the article was published. To identify checklist items that were most predictive of quality, classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, a binary, recursive, partitioning methodology, was used to create 3 decision trees, which compared the 56 article assessments with 3 external quality outcomes: (1) expert assessment of overall quality, (2) citation frequency, and (3) impact factor. A fourth tree looked at the composite outcome of all 3 quality indicators. The best predictors of quality included the following: use of concurrent comparators, limiting the study to new initiators of the study drug, equivalent measurement of outcomes in study groups, collecting data on most if not all known confounders or effect modifiers, accounting for immortal time bias in the analysis, and use of sensitivity analyses to test how much effect estimates depended on various assumptions. Only sensitivity analyses appeared consistently as

  18. Comparative Analyses of the CSSS Calculation in the UCSD Tomographic Solar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, T.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Zhao, X. P.

    2005-04-01

    We describe a new method to derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) out to 1 AU from photospheric magnetic field measurements. The method uses photospheric magnetograms to calculate a source surface magnetic field at 15R⊙. Specifically, we use Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) magnetograms as input for the Stanford Current-Sheet Source-Surface (CSSS) model. Beyond the source surface the magnetic field is convected along velocity flow lines derived by a tomographic technique developed at UCSD and applied to interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations. We compare the results with in situ data smoothed by an 18-h running mean. Radial and tangential magnetic field amplitudes fit well for the 20 Carrington rotations studied, which are largely from the active phase of the solar cycle. We show exemplary results for Carrington rotation 1965, which includes the Bastille Day event.

  19. Comparative observation of skeletal-dental abnormalities in wild, domestic, and laboratory rabbits.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Ayako; Hori, Yutaka; Ichihara, Nobutsune; Asari, Masao; Wiggs, Robert B

    2007-12-01

    Dietary habits must be considered as one of the major potential factors resulting in acquired malocclusions in rabbits. Although the dentition of the wild rabbit and the domesticated laboratory rabbit are basically identical, dietary habits are noticeably different. Therefore, the prevalence of tooth problems between these lagomorph species were investigated anatomically and radiographically. Mean measurements of the skull and dental arches suggested that wild rabbits have slightly shorter and wider skulls and dental arches compared with domestic laboratory rabbits. Root elongation of incisors and check teeth, and periodontal disease were more frequently observed in domestic laboratory rabbits. Diagnostic radiographs from domestic pet rabbits showed relatively higher crowns, severe root elongation, and advanced periodontitis. These results do not provide definitive evidence that dietary habits cause malocclusions, however they suggest that diet is a major factor in the initiation of malocclusions in rabbits.

  20. Comparative analysis of atmosphere temperature variability for Northern Eurasia based on the Reanalysis and in-situ observed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgina, T.; Genina, E.; Gordov, E.; Nikitchuk, K.

    2009-04-01

    At present numerous data archives which include meteorological observations as well as climate processes modeling data are available for Earth Science specialists. Methods of mathematical statistics are widely used for their processing and analysis. In many cases they represent the only way of quantitative assessment of the meteorological and climatic information. Unified set of analysis methods allows us to compare climatic characteristics calculated on the basis of different datasets with the purpose of performing more detailed analysis of climate dynamics for both regional and global levels. The report presents the results of comparative analysis of atmosphere temperature behavior for the Northern Eurasia territory for the period from 1979 to 2004 based on the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis, NCEP/DOE Reanalysis AMIP II, JMA/CRIEPI JRA-25 Reanalysis, ECMWF ERA-40 Reanalysis data and observation data obtained from meteorological stations of the former Soviet Union. Statistical processing of atmosphere temperature data included analysis of time series homogeneity of climate indices approved by WMO, such as "Number of frost days", "Number of summer days", "Number of icing days", "Number of tropical nights", etc. by means of parametric methods of mathematical statistics (Fisher and Student tests). That allowed conducting comprehensive research of spatio-temporal features of the atmosphere temperature. Analysis of the atmosphere temperature dynamics revealed inhomogeneity of the data obtained for large observation intervals. Particularly, analysis performed for the period 1979 - 2004 showed the significant increase of the number of frost and icing days approximately by 1 day for every 2 years and decrease roughly by 1 day for 2 years for the number of summer days. Also it should be mentioned that the growth period mean temperature have increased by 1.5 - 2° C for the time period being considered. The usage of different Reanalysis datasets in conjunction with in-situ observed

  1. Comparability of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis enrolled in clinical trials or in observational cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Pagnoux, Christian; Carette, Simon; Khalidi, Nader A.; Walsh, Michael; Hiemstra, Thomas F.; Cuthbertson, David; Langford, Carol; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Monach, Paul A.; Moreland, Larry; Mouthon, Luc; Seo, Phil; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven; Westman, Kerstin; Hoglund, Peter; Harper, Lorraine; Flossmann, Oliver; Luqmani, Raashid; Savage, Caroline; Rasmussen, Niels; de Groot, Kirstin; Tesar, Vladimir; Jayne, David; Merkel, Pater A.; Guillevin, Loic

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the differences between patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) entered into randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and those followed in large observational cohorts. Methods The main characteristics and outcomes of patients with generalised and/or severe GPA or MPA with a five-factor score ≥1 enrolled in the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG) or the US-Canadian-based Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium cohorts were compared to those enrolled in one of 2 FVSG clinical RCTs (WEG91, WEGENT) or 3 European Vasculitis Society clinical trials (CYCLOPS, CYCAZAREM, IMPROVE). Results 657 patients (65.3% with GPA) in RCTs were compared to 437 in cohorts (90.6% with GPA). RCT patients were older at diagnosis than the cohort patients (56.6±13.9 vs. 46.8±17.3 years), had higher Birmingham vasculitis activity score (19.5±9.1 vs. 16.9±7.4), and more frequent kidney disease (84.0% vs. 54.9%) but fewer ear, nose, and throat symptoms (56.8% vs. 72.2%). At 56 months post-diagnosis, mortality and relapse rates, adjusted for age and renal function, were higher for patients with GPA in RCTs vs. cohorts (10.7% vs. 2.5% [p=0.001] and 22.5% vs. 15.6% [p=0.03], respectively) but similar for patients with MPA (6.2% vs. 6.6% [p=0.92] and 16.6% vs. 10.1% [p=0.39], respectively). Conclusion Patients with GPA or MPA in RCTs and those in observational cohorts show important differences that should be remembered when interpreting results based on these study populations. PMID:26016754

  2. Statistical properties of a utility measure of observer performance compared to area under the ROC curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Samuelson, Frank W.; Gallas, Brandon D.; Boone, John M.; Niklason, Loren T.

    2013-03-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has become a common tool for evaluating diagnostic imaging technologies, and the primary endpoint of such evaluations is the area under the curve (AUC), which integrates sensitivity over the entire false positive range. An alternative figure of merit for ROC studies is expected utility (EU), which focuses on the relevant region of the ROC curve as defined by disease prevalence and the relative utility of the task. However if this measure is to be used, it must also have desirable statistical properties keep the burden of observer performance studies as low as possible. Here, we evaluate effect size and variability for EU and AUC. We use two observer performance studies recently submitted to the FDA to compare the EU and AUC endpoints. The studies were conducted using the multi-reader multi-case methodology in which all readers score all cases in all modalities. ROC curves from the study were used to generate both the AUC and EU values for each reader and modality. The EU measure was computed assuming an iso-utility slope of 1.03. We find mean effect sizes, the reader averaged difference between modalities, to be roughly 2.0 times as big for EU as AUC. The standard deviation across readers is roughly 1.4 times as large, suggesting better statistical properties for the EU endpoint. In a simple power analysis of paired comparison across readers, the utility measure required 36% fewer readers on average to achieve 80% statistical power compared to AUC.

  3. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patrick T.; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C.; Mauget, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20th century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal. PMID:25898351

  4. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick T; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C; Mauget, Steven A

    2015-04-21

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20(th) century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal.

  5. COMPARING THE OBSERVABLE PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES ON AND OFF THE ANDROMEDA PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-20

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  6. The highs and lows of cloud radiative feedback: Comparing observational data and CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenney, A.; Randall, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Clouds play a complex role in the climate system, and remain one of the more difficult aspects of the future climate to predict. Over subtropical eastern ocean basins, particularly next to California, Peru, and Southwest Africa, low marine stratocumulus clouds (MSC) help to reduce the amount of solar radiation that reaches the surface by reflecting incident sunlight. The climate feedback associated with these clouds is thought to be positive. This project looks at CMIP5 models and compares them to observational data from CERES and ERA-Interim to try and find observational evidence and model agreement for low, marine stratocumulus cloud feedback. Although current evidence suggests that the low cloud feedback is positive (IPCC, 2014), an analysis of the simulated relationship between July lower tropospheric stability (LTS) and shortwave cloud forcing in MSC regions suggests that this feedback is not due to changes in LTS. IPCC, 2013: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 1535 pp.

  7. Evaluation concepts to compare observed and simulated deposition areas of mass movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, Micha; Scheidl, Christian; Kaitna, Roland

    2017-04-01

    A delineation of potentially endangered areas by geophysical mass flows, like debris flows, rock and snow avalanches, is an important for regional and urban planning. For this numerical simulation programs have become an important tool in engineering hazard assessment. However, when being confronted with the evaluation of model performance and sensitivity there are no standard, objective approaches. In this contribution we present a new approach to quantitatively compare 2D simulations of observed and simulated deposition patterns - a concept derived from a literature review of 75 peer reviewed articles which inverse modelled real events of different types of mass flows. It seems that existing evaluation concepts with respect to the deposition distribution does only account for one or a combination of two possible evaluation errors based on overestimation, underestimation and/or overlap of the simulation outcome with the observed reference. The proposed evaluation concept integrates all three possible errors and yields a single metric between -1 (no fit) and 1 (perfect fit). Combined with a ternary plot we further show that the proposed evaluation concept might act as a simple decision support tool to i) identify weaknesses and strengths of the simulation model, ii) to find the best simulation setup and iii) to test whether higher complexity of simulation models are balanced by higher accuracies. This method shall help developers and end-users of simulation models to better understand model behavior and provide a possibility for comparison of model results, independent of simulation platform and type of mass flow.

  8. Video techniques and data compared with observation in emergency trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, C; Xiao, Y

    2003-01-01

    Video recording is underused in improving patient safety and understanding performance shaping factors in patient care. We report our experience of using video recording techniques in a trauma centre, including how to gain cooperation of clinicians for video recording of their workplace performance, identify strengths of video compared with observation, and suggest processes for consent and maintenance of confidentiality of video records. Video records are a rich source of data for documenting clinician performance which reveal safety and systems issues not identified by observation. Emergency procedures and video records of critical events identified patient safety, clinical, quality assurance, systems failures, and ergonomic issues. Video recording is a powerful feedback and training tool and provides a reusable record of events that can be repeatedly reviewed and used as research data. It allows expanded analyses of time critical events, trauma resuscitation, anaesthesia, and surgical tasks. To overcome some of the key obstacles in deploying video recording techniques, researchers should (1) develop trust with video recorded subjects, (2) obtain clinician participation for introduction of a new protocol or line of investigation, (3) report aggregated video recorded data and use clinician reviews for feedback on covert processes and cognitive analyses, and (4) involve multidisciplinary experts in medicine and nursing. PMID:14645896

  9. Io's Volcanism: Thermo-Physical Models of Silicate Lava Compared with Observations of Thermal Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Ashely G.

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of thermal infrared outbursts from the jovian satellite Io indicate that at least some of these volcanic events are due to silicate lava. Analysis of the January 9, 1990 outburst indicates that this was an active eruption consisting of a large lava flow (with mass eruption rate of order 10(exp 5) cubic m/sec) and a sustained area at silicate liquidus temperatures. This is interpreted as a series of fire fountains along a rift zone. A possible alternative scenario is that of an overflowing lava lake with extensive fire fountaining. The January 9, 1990 event is unique as multispectral observations with respect to time were obtained. In this paper, a model is presented for the thermal energy lost by active and cooling silicate lava flows and lakes on Io. The model thermal emission is compared with Earth-based observations and Voyager IRIS data. The model (a) provides an explanation of the thermal anomalies on Io's surface; (b) provides constraints on flow behavior and extent and infers some flow parameters; and (c) determines flow geometry and change in flow size with time, and the temperature of each part of the flow or lava lake surface as a function of its age. Models of heat output from active lava flows or inactive but recently emplaced lava flows or overturning lava lakes alone are unable to reproduce the observations. If the January 9, 1990 event is the emplacement of a lava flow, the equivalent of 27 such events per year would yield a volume of material sufficient, if uniformly distributed, to resurface all of Io at a rate of 1 cm/year.

  10. Comparing Vesta's Surface Roughness to the Moon Using Bistatic Radar Observations by the Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, E. M.; Heggy, E.; Kofman, W. W.; Moghaddam, M.

    2015-12-01

    The first orbital bistatic radar (BSR) observations of a small body have been conducted opportunistically by NASA's Dawn spacecraft at Asteroid Vesta using the telecommunications antenna aboard Dawn to transmit and the Deep Space Network 70-meter antennas on Earth to receive. Dawn's high-gain communications antenna continuously transmitted right-hand circularly polarized radio waves (4-cm wavelength), and due to the opportunistic nature of the experiment, remained in a fixed orientation pointed toward Earth throughout each BSR observation. As a consequence, Dawn's transmitted radio waves scattered from Vesta's surface just before and after each occultation of the Dawn spacecraft behind Vesta, resulting in surface echoes at highly oblique incidence angles of greater than 85 degrees, and a small Doppler shift of ~2 Hz between the carrier signal and surface echoes from Vesta. We analyze the power and Doppler spreading of Vesta's surface echoes to assess surface roughness, and find that Vesta's area-normalized radar cross section ranges from -8 to -17 dB, which is notably much stronger than backscatter radar cross section values reported for the Moon's limbs (-20 to -35 dB). However, our measurements correspond to the forward scattering regime--such that at high incidence, radar waves are expected to scatter more weakly from a rough surface in the backscatter direction than that which is scattered forward. Using scattering models of rough surfaces observed at high incidence, we report on the relative roughness of Vesta's surface as compared to the Moon and icy Galilean satellites. Through this, we assess the dominant processes that have influenced Vesta's surface roughness at centimeter and decimeter scales, which are in turn applicable to assisting future landing, sampling and orbital missions of other small bodies.

  11. Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens.

    PubMed

    Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y; Guy, Robert D; Street, Nathaniel R; Robinson, Kathryn M; Silim, Salim N; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Jansson, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Populus species with wide geographic ranges display strong adaptation to local environments. We studied the clinal patterns in phenology and ecophysiology in allopatric Populus species adapted to similar environments on different continents under common garden settings. As a result of climatic adaptation, both Populus tremula L. and Populus balsamifera L. display latitudinal clines in photosynthetic rates (A), whereby high-latitude trees of P. tremula had higher A compared to low-latitude trees and nearly so in P. balsamifera (p = 0.06). Stomatal conductance (g s) and chlorophyll content index (CCI) follow similar latitudinal trends. However, foliar nitrogen was positively correlated with latitude in P. balsamifera and negatively correlated in P. tremula. No significant trends in carbon isotope composition of the leaf tissue (δ(13)C) were observed for both species; but, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) was negatively correlated with the latitude of origin in P. balsamifera. In spite of intrinsically higher A, high-latitude trees in both common gardens accomplished less height gain as a result of early bud set. Thus, shoot biomass was determined by height elongation duration (HED), which was well approximated by the number of days available for free growth between bud flush and bud set. We highlight the shortcoming of unreplicated outdoor common gardens for tree improvement and the crucial role of photoperiod in limiting height growth, further complicating interpretation of other secondary effects.

  12. Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens

    PubMed Central

    Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y.; Guy, Robert D.; Street, Nathaniel R.; Robinson, Kathryn M.; Silim, Salim N.; Albrectsen, Benedicte R.; Jansson, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Populus species with wide geographic ranges display strong adaptation to local environments. We studied the clinal patterns in phenology and ecophysiology in allopatric Populus species adapted to similar environments on different continents under common garden settings. As a result of climatic adaptation, both Populus tremula L. and Populus balsamifera L. display latitudinal clines in photosynthetic rates (A), whereby high-latitude trees of P. tremula had higher A compared to low-latitude trees and nearly so in P. balsamifera (p = 0.06). Stomatal conductance (gs) and chlorophyll content index (CCI) follow similar latitudinal trends. However, foliar nitrogen was positively correlated with latitude in P. balsamifera and negatively correlated in P. tremula. No significant trends in carbon isotope composition of the leaf tissue (δ13C) were observed for both species; but, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) was negatively correlated with the latitude of origin in P. balsamifera. In spite of intrinsically higher A, high-latitude trees in both common gardens accomplished less height gain as a result of early bud set. Thus, shoot biomass was determined by height elongation duration (HED), which was well approximated by the number of days available for free growth between bud flush and bud set. We highlight the shortcoming of unreplicated outdoor common gardens for tree improvement and the crucial role of photoperiod in limiting height growth, further complicating interpretation of other secondary effects. PMID:26236324

  13. Effect of accreditation on the quality of chronic disease management: a comparative observational study.

    PubMed

    van Doorn-Klomberg, Arna L; Braspenning, Jozé C C; Wolters, René J; Bouma, Margriet; Wensing, Michel

    2014-11-04

    Practice accreditation is widely used to assess and improve quality of healthcare providers. Little is known about its effectiveness, particularly in primary care. In this study we examined the effect of accreditation on quality of care regarding diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). A comparative observational study with two cohorts was performed. We included 138 Dutch family practices that participated in the national accreditation program for primary care. A first cohort of 69 practices was measured at start and completion of a 3-year accreditation program. A second cohort of 69 practices was included and measured simultaneously with the final measurement of the first cohort. In separate multilevel regression analyses, we compared both within-group changes in the first cohort and between-groups differences at follow-up (first cohort) and start (second cohort). Outcome measures consisted of 24 systematically developed indicators of quality of care in targeted chronic diseases. In the within-group comparison, we found improvements on 6 indicators related to diabetes (feet examination, cholesterol measurement, lipid lowering medication prescription) and COPD (spirometry performance, stop smoking advice). In the between-groups comparison we found that first cohort practices performed better on 4 indicators related to diabetes (cholesterol outcome) and CVD (blood pressure outcome, smoke status registration, glucose measurement). Improvements of the quality of primary care for patients with chronic diseases were found, but few could be attributed to the accreditation program. Further development of accreditation is needed to enhance its effectiveness on chronic disease management.

  14. Comparing human observer performance in detecting microcalcifications with energy weighting and photon counting breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Kesava; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    Breast CT (BCT) using a photon counting detector (PCD) has a number of advantages that can potentially improve clinical performance. Previous computer simulation studies showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for microcalcifications is higher with energy weighted photon counting BCT as compared to cesium iodide energy integrating detector (CsI-EID) based BCT. CsI-EID inherently weighs the incident x-ray photons in direct proportion to the energy (contradicting the information content) which is not an optimal approach. PCD do not inherently weigh the incident photons. By choosing optimal energy weights, higher SNR can be achieved for microcalcifications and hence better detectability. In this simulation study, forward projection data of a numerical breast phantom with microcalcifications inserted were acquired using CsI-EID and PCD. The PCD projections were optimally weighed, and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. We compared observer performance in identifying microcalcifications in the reconstructed images using ROC analysis. ROC based results show that the average area(s) under curve(s) (AUC) for AUCPCD based methods are higher than the average AUCCsI-EID method.

  15. Pregnancy outcome following gestational exposure to TNF-alpha-inhibitors: a prospective, comparative, observational study.

    PubMed

    Diav-Citrin, Orna; Otcheretianski-Volodarsky, Anna; Shechtman, Svetlana; Ornoy, Asher

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate pregnancy safety of anti-TNF-α medications. Prospective, comparative, observational study done at the Israeli Teratology Information Service between 2002 and 2011. 83 anti-TNF-α-exposed-pregnancies (97.6% in the first trimester, T1) were followed-up and compared with 86 disease-matched (DM) and 341 non-teratogenic-exposed (NTE) pregnancies. The anti-TNF-α group consisted of 35 infliximab-, 25 etanercept-, and 23 adalimumab-exposed pregnancies. The rate of major congenital anomalies did not significantly differ between the three groups [3/65 (4.6%) (anti-TNF-α, T1), 5/79 (6.3%) (DM), 8/336 (2.4%) (NTE)], even after excluding genetic or cytogenetic anomalies [3/65 (4.6%) (anti-TNF-α, T1), 4/79 (5.1%) (DM), 6/336 (1.8%) (NTE)]. There were no cases of VATER/VACTERL association. The present study suggests that anti-TNF-α treatment does not pose a major teratogenic risk in humans. This conclusion is based on relatively small numbers of exposed pregnancies and should be interpreted with caution. Larger studies are needed to establish anti-TNF-α pregnancy safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pregnancy outcome following in utero exposure to hydroxychloroquine: a prospective comparative observational study.

    PubMed

    Diav-Citrin, Orna; Blyakhman, Shani; Shechtman, Svetlana; Ornoy, Asher

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate pregnancy safety of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for rheumatologic diseases. Prospective comparative observational study done at the Israeli teratology information service between 1998 and 2006. 114 HCQ-exposed pregnancies (98.2% in the first trimester, T1) were followed-up and compared with 455 pregnancies of women counseled for non-teratogenic exposure. The difference in the rate of congenital anomalies was not statistically significant [7/97 (7.2%) vs. 15/440 (3.4%), p=0.094]. The analysis was repeated among those exposed in T1 excluding genetic or cytogenetic anomalies or congenital infections [5/95 (5.3%) vs. 14/440 (3.2%), p=0.355]. There were no cases of neonatal lupus erythematosus. The gestational age at delivery was earlier, rate of preterm delivery higher, and birth weight lower, in the HCQ group. The present study suggests that HCQ treatment in pregnancy is not a major human teratogen. The earlier gestational age and lower birth weight might be associated with maternal disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Some New Observations on Activation Energy of Crystal Growth for Thermally Activated Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Mehta, N; Kumar, A

    2016-02-18

    Calorimetric study of glass/crystal phase transformation in disordered semiconductors is a significant tool for understanding their crystallization kinetics. Such studies provide the basis for practical application of glasses. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is one of the advanced techniques for the analysis of thermally induced crystallization in glassy or amorphous systems. We are reporting the nonisothermal DSC measurements on four amorphous systems of Se70Te30 alloy with Ag, Cd, Sb, and Zn as chemical modifiers. In general, the rate constant (K) shows Arrhenian dependence on temperature (T), i.e., K = K0 exp (-Eg/RT) where Eg is the activation energy of crystal growth and K0 is called the pre-exponential factor of rate constant. In the present work, an experiment is designed to see the effect of composition on the activation energy of crystal growth. We have found Meyer-Neldel relation (MNR) between Eg and K0 for present systems. Another interesting feature of present work is the observation of further relation between Meyer-Neldel prefactor and Meyer-Neldel energy.

  18. Connecting Observations of Hematite (a Fe2O3) Growth Catalyzed by Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Yanina, Svetlana; Gorski, Christopher A.; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Scherer, Michelle

    2010-01-14

    Electron exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in iron oxides and oxyhydroxides is important for understanding degradation of environmental pollutants through its apparent constitutive role underlying highly reactive “sorbed Fe(II)” and by catalyzing phase interconversion among these minerals. Although a mechanistic understanding of relationships between interfacial Fe(II)ads-Fe(III)oxide electron transfer, bulk electron conduction, and phase transformation behavior is emerging, much remains unclear in part due to poorly interconnected investigations. The focus of this study is on reconciling two mutually similar observations of Fe(II)-catalyzed hematite growth documented spectroscopically and microscopically under substantially different chemical conditions. Here we employ iron isotopic labeling to demonstrate that hematite grown on the (001) surface in Fe(II)-oxalate solution at low pH and elevated temperature has temperature-dependent magnetic properties that closely correspond to those of hematite grown in Fe(II) solution at circumneutral pH at room temperature. The temperature evolution and extent of the Morin transition displayed in these two materials strongly suggest a mechanistic link between the two studies, and that this mechanism involves in part trace structural Fe(II) incorporation into the growing hematite. Our findings indicate that Fe(II) catalyzed growth of hematite on hematite can occur under environmentally relevant conditions and may be due to bulk electron conduction previously demonstrated for hematite single crystals.

  19. Connecting observations of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) growth catalyzed by Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Rosso, Kevin M; Yanina, Svetlana V; Gorski, Christopher A; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Scherer, Michelle M

    2010-01-01

    Electron exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in iron oxides and oxyhydroxides is important for understanding degradation of environmental pollutants through its apparent constitutive role underlying highly reactive "sorbed Fe(II)" and by catalyzing phase interconversion among these minerals. Although a mechanistic understanding of relationships between interfacial Fe(II)(ads)-Fe(III)(oxide) electron transfer, bulk electron conduction, Fe(II) release, and phase transformation behavior is emerging, much remains unclear, in part due to poorly interconnected investigations. The focus of this study is on reconciling two mutually similar observations of Fe(II)-catalyzed hematite growth documented spectroscopically and microscopically under substantially different chemical conditions. Here, we employ iron isotopic labeling to demonstrate that hematite grown on the (001) surface in Fe(II)-oxalate solution at pH 2.10 and 348 K has magnetic properties that closely correspond to those of hematite grown in Fe(II) solution at pH 7.4 and room temperature. The temperature evolution and extent of the Morin transition displayed in these two materials strongly suggest a mechanistic link involving trace structural Fe(II) incorporation into the growing hematite. Our findings indicate that Fe(II) catalyzed growth of hematite on hematite can occur under environmentally relevant conditions and may be due to bulk electron conduction previously demonstrated for hematite single crystals.

  20. Gender gap, inflammation and acute coronary disease: are women resistant to atheroma growth? Observations at autopsy.

    PubMed

    Frink, Richard J

    2009-06-01

    Gender differences that exist in patients with acute coronary disease (ACD) are unexplained. We sought to determine if these differences could be related to differences in the pathologic substrate found in the coronary arteries at the time of death. The hearts of 83 patients (64 men and 19 women) who died of ACD were obtained fresh and uncut at the autopsy table. The coronary arteries were injected with a colored barium gelatin mass. After formalin fixation, the epicardial arteries were dissected intact, decalcified and cut at 2-3 mm intervals, with all segments mounted for histologic study. The severity of luminal stenosis and the frequency of adventitial inflammation, intimal calcification and atheromas were determined microscopically for each segment. Plaque burden was determined histologically by assessing the severity of luminal stenosis for each coronary segment. The number of plaque ruptures (PRs), with and without luminal thrombosis, were tabulated for each heart in the study. These results were compared with 22 control patients who died of noncoronary disease. There are gender similarities as well as significant differences in the pathologic substrate of patients who die of ACD. Active, inflammatory atherosclerosis and associated ACDs develop earlier in life in men than in women, and are associated with death at an earlier age, producing a "gender gap." There were no significant gender differences in the frequency of PRs. The women were significantly older than the men and had more extensive active disease, but had the same overall plaque burden as men, suggesting women may be resistant to plaque growth, particularly atheroma growth. Gender gap appears to be related to factors peculiar to women who resist atheroma growth, delaying PR and the onset of ACD.

  1. Potential for observing and discriminating impact craters and comparable volcanic landforms on Magellan radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of small terrestrial craters by Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) at high resolution (approx. 25 m) and of comparatively large Venusian craters by Venera 15/16 images at low resolution (1000 to 2000 m) and shorter wavelength show similarities in the radar responses to crater morphology. At low incidence angles, the responses are dominated by large scale slope effects on the order of meters; consequently it is difficult to locate the precise position of crater rims on the images. Abrupt contrasts in radar response to changing slope (hence incidence angle) across a crater produce sharp tonal boundaries normal to the illumination. Crater morphology that is radially symmetrical appears on images to have bilateral symmetry parallel to the illumination vector. Craters are compressed in the distal sector and drawn out in the proximal sector. At higher incidence angles obtained with the viewing geometry of SIR-A, crater morphology appears less compressed on the images. At any radar incidence angle, the distortion of a crater outline is minimal across the medial sector, in a direction normal to the illumination. Radar bright halos surround some craters imaged by SIR-A and Venera 15 and 16. The brightness probably denotes the radar response to small scale surface roughness of the surrounding ejecta blankets. Similarities in the radar responses of small terrestrial impact craters and volcanic craters of comparable dimensions emphasize the difficulties in discriminating an impact origin from a volcanic origin in the images. Similar difficulties will probably apply in discriminating the origin of small Venusian craters, if they exist. Because of orbital considerations, the nominal incidence angel of Magellan radar at the center of the imaging swath will vary from about 45 deg at 10 deg N latitude to about 16 deg at the north pole and at 70 deg S latitude. Impact craters and comparable volcanic landforms will show bilateral symmetry parallel to the illumination

  2. Creating a Common Data Model for Comparative Effectiveness with the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Resnic, F.S.; Robbins, S.L.; Denton, J.; Nookala, L.; Meeker, D.; Ohno-Machado, L.; Matheny, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Adoption of a common data model across health systems is a key infrastructure requirement to allow large scale distributed comparative effectiveness analyses. There are a growing number of common data models (CDM), such as Mini-Sentinel, and the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) CDMs. Objectives In this case study, we describe the challenges and opportunities of a study specific use of the OMOP CDM by two health systems and describe three comparative effectiveness use cases developed from the CDM. Methods The project transformed two health system databases (using crosswalks provided) into the OMOP CDM. Cohorts were developed from the transformed CDMs for three comparative effectiveness use case examples. Administrative/billing, demographic, order history, medication, and laboratory were included in the CDM transformation and cohort development rules. Results Record counts per person month are presented for the eligible cohorts, highlighting differences between the civilian and federal datasets, e.g. the federal data set had more outpatient visits per person month (6.44 vs. 2.05 per person month). The count of medications per person month reflected the fact that one system’s medications were extracted from orders while the other system had pharmacy fills and medication administration records. The federal system also had a higher prevalence of the conditions in all three use cases. Both systems required manual coding of some types of data to convert to the CDM. Conclusions The data transformation to the CDM was time consuming and resources required were substantial, beyond requirements for collecting native source data. The need to manually code subsets of data limited the conversion. However, once the native data was converted to the CDM, both systems were then able to use the same queries to identify cohorts. Thus, the CDM minimized the effort to develop cohorts and analyze the results across the sites. PMID:26448797

  3. EuroInf: a multicenter comparative observational study of apomorphine and levodopa infusion in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Reddy, Prashanth; Katzenschlager, Regina; Antonini, Angelo; Todorova, Antoniya; Odin, Per; Henriksen, Tove; Martin, Anne; Calandrella, Daniela; Rizos, Alexandra; Bryndum, Narissah; Glad, Arne; Dafsari, Haidar Salimi; Timmermann, Lars; Ebersbach, Georg; Kramberger, Milica G; Samuel, Michael; Wenzel, Karoline; Tomantschger, Volker; Storch, Alexander; Reichmann, Heinz; Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Trost, Maja; Svenningsson, Per; Palhagen, Sven; Volkmann, Jens; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2015-04-01

    Subcutaneous apomorphine infusion (Apo) and intrajejunal levodopa infusion (IJLI) are two treatment options for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and refractory motor complications, with varying cost of treatment. There are no multicenter studies comparing the effects of the two strategies. This open-label, prospective, observational, 6-month, multicenter study compared 43 patients on Apo (48.8% males, age 62.3 ± 10.6 years; disease duration: 14 ± 4.4 years; median H & Y stage 3; interquartile range [IQR]: 3-4) and 44 on IJLI (56.8% males, age 62.7 ± 9.1 years; disease duration: 16.1 ± 6.7 years; median H & Y stage 4; IQR, 3-4). Cohen's effect sizes (≥0.8 considered as large) were "large" with both therapies with respect to total motor, nonmotor, and quality-of-life scores. The Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS) with Apo showed moderate improvement, whereas sleep/fatigue, gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dimensions of the NMSS showed significantly higher improvement with IJLI. Seventy-five percent on IJLI improved in their quality-of-life and nonmotor symptoms (NMS), whereas in the Apo group, a similar proportion improved in quality of life, but 40% in NMS. Adverse effects included peritonitis with IJLI and skin nodules on Apo. Based on this open-label, nonrandomized, comparative study, we report that, in advanced Parkinson's patients, both IJLI and Apo infusion therapy appear to provide a robust improvement in motor symptoms, motor complications, quality-of-life, and some NMS. Controlled, randomized studies are required.

  4. In multiple situational light settings, visual observation for skin colour assessment is comparable with colorimeter measurement.

    PubMed

    Wright, C Y; Wilkes, M; du Plessis, J L; Reeder, A I; Albers, P N

    2016-08-01

    Finding inexpensive and reliable techniques for assessing skin colour is important, given that it is related to several adverse human health outcomes. Visual observation is considered a subjective approach assessment and, even when made by trained assessor, concern has been raised about the need for controlled lighting in the study venue. The aim of this study is to determine whether visual skin colour assessments correlate with objective skin colour measurements in study venues with different lighting types and configurations. Two trained investigators, with confirmed visual acuity, visually classified the inner, upper arm skin colour of 556 adults using Munsell(®) colour classifications converted to Individual Typology Angle (°ITA) values based on published data. Skin colour at the same anatomic site was also measured using a colorimeter. Each participant was assessed in one of 10 different buildings, each with a different study day. Munsell(®) -derived °ITA values were compared to colorimeter °ITA values for the full sample and by building/day. We found a strong positive, monotonic correlation between Munsell(®) derived °ITA values and colorimeter °ITA values for all participants (Spearman ρ = 0.8585, P < 0.001). Similar relationships were found when Munsell(®) and colorimeter °ITA values were compared for participants assessed in the same building for all 10 buildings (Spearman ρ values ranged from 0.797 to 0.934, all correlations were statistically significant at P < 0.001). It is possible to visually assess individual skin colour in multiple situational lighting settings and retrieve results that are comparable with objective measurements of skin colour. This was true for individuals of varying population groups and skin pigmentation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Methodological Challenges When Comparing Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of International Observational Registries.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Askling, Johan; Berglind, Niklas; Franzen, Stefan; Frisell, Thomas; Garwood, Christopher; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Holmqvist, Marie; Horne, Laura; Lampl, Kathy; Michaud, Kaleb; Nyberg, Fredrik; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Reed, George; Symmons, Deborah P M; Tanaka, Eiichi; Tran, Trung N; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ho, Meilien

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons of data from different registries can be helpful in understanding variations in many aspects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study aim was to assess and improve the comparability of demographic, clinical, and comorbidity data from 5 international RA registries. Using predefined definitions, 2 subsets of patients (main cohort and subcohort) from 5 international observational registries (Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America Registry [CORRONA], the Swedish Rheumatology Quality of Care Register [SRR], the Norfolk Arthritis Register [NOAR], the Institute of Rheumatology Rheumatoid Arthritis cohort [IORRA], and CORRONA International) were evaluated and compared. Patients ages >18 years with RA, and present in or recruited to the registry from January 1, 2000, were included in the main cohort. Patients from the main cohort with positive rheumatoid factor and/or erosive RA who had received ≥1 synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), and switched to or added another DMARD, were included in the subcohort at time of treatment switch. Age and sex distributions were fairly similar across the registries. The percentage of patients with a high Disease Activity Score in 28 joints score varied between main cohorts (17.5% IORRA, 18.9% CORRONA, 24.7% NOAR, 27.7% CORRONA International, and 36.8% SRR), with IORRA, CORRONA, and CORRONA International including more prevalent cases of RA; the differences were smaller for the subcohort. Prevalence of comorbidities varied across registries (e.g., coronary artery disease ranged from 1.5% in IORRA to 7.9% in SRR), partly due to the way comorbidity data were captured and general cultural differences; the pattern was similar for the subcohorts. Despite different inclusion criteria for the individual RA registries, it is possible to improve the comparability and interpretability of differences across RA registries by applying well-defined cohort definitions. © 2015, American College of

  6. Observed and predicted responses of plant growth to climate across Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Andrew G.; Goetz, Scott J.; Fiske, Gregory J.

    2005-08-01

    Using satellite observations from 1981-2000, and data interpolated from surface weather stations, we examined the association between gross photosynthetic activity (Pg) and climate across the boreal forest and tundra of Canada. The response of annual and interannual Pg was tightly coupled to climate, and seasonal associations between Pg and climate varied with plant functional types. The most important variable for modeling summer growth of conifer forests was the previous spring minimum temperature, whereas tundra responded primarily to summer maximum temperature. Using general circulation model predictors to 2050, we project that tundra will continue to grow vigorously in the coming decades while conifer forests will not. Increased tundra productivity will likely be associated with changes in vegetation composition (e.g., woody proliferation). If these biotic responses are stationary and persist as predicted, terrestrial carbon budgets will need to be modified.

  7. Sonographic Growth Charts for Kidney Length in Normal Korean Children: a Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min-Su; Hwang, Geol; Han, Sanghoon; Kang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Young Don; Kang, Ki-Soo; Shin, Kyung-Sue; Lee, Mu Sook; Choi, Guk Myung; Han, Kyoung Hee

    2016-07-01

    Kidney length is the most useful parameter for clinical measurement of kidney size, and is useful to distinguish acute kidney injury from chronic kidney disease. In this prospective observational study of 437 normal children aged between 0 and < 13 years, kidney length was measured using sonography. There were good correlations between kidney length and somatic values, including age, weight, height, and body surface area. The rapid growth of height during the first 2 years of life was intimately associated with a similar increase in kidney length, suggesting that height should be considered an important factor correlating with kidney length. Based on our findings, the following regression equation for the reference values of bilateral kidney length for Korean children was obtained: kidney length of the right kidney (cm) = 0.051 × height (cm) + 2.102; kidney length of the left kidney (cm) = 0.051 × height (cm) + 2.280. This equation may aid in the diagnosis of various kidney disorders.

  8. Cinematographic observations of growth cycles of Chlamydia trachomatis in primary cultures of human amniotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Neeper, I D; Patton, D L; Kuo, C C

    1990-01-01

    Time-lapse cinematography was used to study the growth cycle of Chlamydia trachomatis in primary cell cultures of human amnion. Twelve preterm and twelve term placentas were obtained within 8 h of delivery, and epithelial cells were dissociated from the amniotic membranes by trypsinization and grown in Rose chambers. The epithelial nature of the cultured cells was documented by morphology and by immunofluorescence staining for cytoskeletal proteins, which matched the staining of intact amnion. With regular feedings, uninfected cultures remained healthy for up to 30 days. Confluent cultures (7 to 10 days) were infected with a genital strain (E/UW-5/CX) of C. trachomatis at 10(5) infectious units per chamber. Infections were done in culture medium without cycloheximide, which is often used to induce susceptibility of the cells. Between 66 and 90% of the cells were infected. Intracytoplasmic inclusions were visible by 18 h post infection (p.i.) and grew larger as the organisms inside multiplied. By 72 h p.i., the inclusions occupied the entire cytoplasm of the host cells. Further growth of the inclusions overdistended and ruptured the host cells on days 3 to 7. Cells not infected by the original inoculum became infected on day 5 or 6 p.i. by the chlamydial particles released from the ruptured cells. No amniotic cell was ever observed to survive the infection. The data presented support the hypothesis that amniotic epithelium is susceptible to infection and damage by C. trachomatis. This culture system provided detailed and dynamic observations of chlamydial infection under conditions more nearly physiologic than previously reported. Images PMID:2365450

  9. Phenotypic diversity of diploid and haploid Emiliania huxleyi cells and of cells in different growth phases revealed by comparative metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Mausz, Michaela A; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In phytoplankton a high species diversity of microalgae co-exists at a given time. But diversity is not only reflected by the species composition. Within these species different life phases as well as different metabolic states can cause additional diversity. One important example is the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Diploid cells play an important role in marine ecosystems since they can form massively abundant algal blooms but in addition the less abundant haploid life phase of E. huxleyi occurs in lower quantities. Both life phases may fulfill different functions in the plankton. We hypothesize that in addition to the functional diversity caused by this life phase transition the growth stage of cells can also influence the metabolic composition and thus the ecological impact of E. huxleyi. Here we introduce a metabolomic survey in dependence of life phases as well as different growth phases to reveal such changes. The comparative metabolomic approach is based on the extraction of intracellular metabolites from intact microalgae, derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Automated data processing and statistical analysis using canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) revealed unique metabolic profiles for each life phase. Concerning the correlations of metabolites to growth phases, complex patterns were observed. As for example the saccharide mannitol showed its highest concentration in the exponential phase, whereas fatty acids were correlated to stationary and sterols to declining phase. These results are indicative for specific ecological roles of these stages of E. huxleyi and are discussed in the context of previous physiological and ecological studies.

  10. Comparative population growth of Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia pulex (Cladocera) exposed to zinc toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Jonathan Raul; Sarma, S S S; Nandini, S

    2010-01-01

    Population growth of two cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia pulex) exposed to 4 different concentrations of ZnCl(2) (0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg L(-1), plus controls) at one algal food (Scenedesmus acutus) density (0.5 X 10(6) cells mL(-1)) was quantified for 30 days. Population densities of C. dubia and D. pulex decreased with increasing concentration of Zn in the medium. At a concentration of 1 mg L(-1) of ZnCl(2), both C. dubia and D. pulex did not reproduce and died within a week. The peak population densities of C. dubia ranged from 0.2 to 6.0 ind. mL(-1), depending on the Zn level in the medium, whereas this range was lower for D. pulex (0.2 to 4.1 ind. mL(-1)). The peak population density was inversely related to the Zn concentration. The rate of population increase (r) varied from -0.12 to +0.14 and -0.02 to +0.23 per day for C. dubia and D. pulex, respectively, depending on the Zn level in the medium. Statistically, both the peak population density and the r were significantly affected by the heavy metal concentration in the medium. Multiple comparison tests showed that the rate of population increase (r) of D. pulex in the lowest ZnCl(2) level (0.125 mg L(-1)) was significantly higher than controls. However, under similar conditions, the r of C. dubia was significantly lower than controls. With a further increase in Zn level, the growth rates of both the cladoceran species were significantly reduced as compared to controls. The results are discussed in relation to published data on the toxicity of zinc to freshwater zooplankton.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Human Growth Hormone in Serum Using SPRi, Nano-SPRi and ELISA Assays

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Vincent C.; Sandros, Marinella G.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and selective methods for the detection of human growth hormone (hGH) over a wide range of concentrations (high levels of 50-100 ng ml−1 and minimum levels of 0.03 ng ml−1) in circulating blood are essential as variable levels may indicate altered physiology. For example, growth disorders occurring in childhood can be diagnosed by measuring levels of hGH in blood. Also, the misuse of recombinant hGH in sports not only poses an ethical issue it also presents serious health threats to the abuser. One popular strategy for measuring hGH misuse, relies on the detection of the ratio of 22 kDa hGH to total hGH, as non-22 kDa endogenous levels drop after exogenous recombinant hGH (rhGH) administration.Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an analytical tool that allows direct (label-free) monitoring and visualization of biomolecular interactions by recording changes of the refractive index adjacent to the sensor surface in real time. In contrast, the most frequently used colorimetric method, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) uses enzyme labeled detection antibodies to indirectly measure analyte concentration after the addition of a substrate that induces a color change. To increase detection sensitivity, amplified SPRi uses a sandwich assay format and near infrared quantum dots (QDs) to increase signal strength. After direct SPRi detection of recombinant rhGH in spiked human serum, the SPRi signal is amplified by the sequential injection of detection antibody coated with near-infrared QDs (Nano-SPRi). In this study, the diagnostic potential of direct and amplified SPRi was assessed for measuring rhGH spiked in human serum and compared directly with the capabilities of a commercially available ELISA kit. PMID:26780354

  12. Comparative studies on the influence of "simulated weigthlessness" on fish otolith growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brungs, Sonja; Hendrik Anken, Ralf; Li, Xiao-Yan; Hauslage, Jens; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding; Hilbig, Reinhard; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of all developing sensory systems. Concerning the vestibular organ of fish, it has been shown earlier that the growth of inner ear otoliths of developing Cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) and Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is slowed down by increased gravity (hypergravity) as an adaptation. Several studies proposed that otolith growth actively is adjusted via a feedback mechanism to produce a test mass of the appropriate physical capacity. Applying diminished gravity such as microgravity during spaceflight yielded an opposite effect, i.e., larger than normal otoliths in swordtails Xiphophorus helleri. Since there are no data on spaceflown early larval stages of the Cichlid fish and the Zebrafish available, these model organisms were subjected to simulated weightlessness using a submersed clinostat with one axis of rotation (O. mossambicus) and rotating-wall vessels (RWVs; O. mossambicus was maintained within a submersed RWV, which was recently developed at DLR, whereas D. rerio was kept within a modified RWV, developed by NASA). Developmental stages were subjected to clinorotation (60 rpm) and wall vessel rotation (Cichlid fish: 44 rpm; Zebrafish: 12.5 rpm; at these speeds, the larvae did neither sediment nor were they centrifuged away from the center of the RWVs) at a point of time when inner ear otolith mineralisation began. The experimental runs were discontinued when the animals hatched (O. mossambicus, stage 12, reached after 2-3 days at 22° C) or when they began to actively move within the devices (D. rerio, after 6 days at 28° C). After clinostat exposure, both utricular and saccular otoliths (Lapilli and Sagittae, respectively) of the Cichlids were significantly larger as compared to otoliths from the 1g controls. A similar result was obtained after wall vessel rotation for 3 and 6 days of the Zebrafish. These results support the idea that a feedback mechanism correlates the gravity level with the physical capacity

  13. Committing driving violations: an observational study comparing city, town and village.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Tova; Ben-Eliyahu, Adar; Nemrodov, Dan; Biegel, Ariela; Perlman, Amotz

    2009-01-01

    This article compares observed driving behavior in a city, a town, and a village. Unobtrusive observations were made at intersections in each residential type. Five violation types were observed: (a) not wearing a seat belt (seat belt violation); (b) not using a safety seat for a child (safety seat violation for children); (c) not using a speaker while speaking on the phone (on-phone violation); (d) failing to comply with a 'give way' sign ('give way' sign violation); and (e) stopping in an undesignated area (undesignated stop violation). It was expected that in accordance with the anonymity hypothesis that the bigger residential areas' rate of traffic violations would be higher. The effects of the residential type, drivers' gender, and age were assessed using the multiple regression model. The stepwise method of evaluation was employed. The model converged on step 3 (Adjusted R square=0.039). Residential type and gender contributed significantly to the model. Consistent with prior research, male drivers committed more violations than female drivers. Chi-square analyses were used to test the distribution of violations by the settlement types. Overall, more drivers committed violations in the two small residential areas than in the city, with 30% of city drivers, 43% of town drivers, and 51% of village drivers committing at least one violation (chi2 (2)=37.65, p<0.001). Moreover, in the town and the village, a combination of one or more violations was committed more often than in the city(chi2 (1)=34.645, p<0.001). Accordingly, more drivers committed violations in the two small settlements (48.4%) than in the city (30.6%). Possible explanations for the observed results were provided in the Discussion section. The conclusions of this paper are that drivers in small villages tend to disobey traffic laws. Therefore, efforts have to be made in companies to take this issue in consideration while running fleets in companies located in small places far from the center.

  14. Borehole Temperature Observations Compared to Synthetic Subsurface Temperatures Generated by Proxy Climate Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Pollack, H. N.

    2002-12-01

    The array of proxy climate reconstructions for the Northern Hemisphere over the past millennium (Briffa and Osborn, Science 295, 2002) are all consistent in their representation of the 20th century warming, but diverge in their representations of the 11th through 19th centuries. The 'end-member' reconstructions of this array are represented by the MBH history (Mann, Bradley and Hughes, Geophys. Res. Lett. 26, 1999) which shows a slow cooling from 1000-1900, and the ECS history (Espers, Cook and Schweingruber, Science 295, 2002) which shows a net warming over much of that time interval. Temperature changes at the surface impose a downward-propagating thermal anomaly on the subsurface temperature field. Implicit in every proxy history of surface temperature is a subsurface temperature anomaly generated by the surface temperature model. We have calculated synthetic subsurface temperature anomalies for these 'end-member' proxy reconstructions, and compare the synthetic anomalies to borehole temperature observations. For this comparison we have selected 213 borehole sites, all logged in the 1990s and well-distributed longitudinally over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. The synthetic subsurface temperature anomaly profile generated by the ECS reconstruction is close to the borehole observations, whereas the subsurface anomaly associated with the MBH reconstruction is significantly different. Because of its long multi-century cooling trend, the MBH model predicts a negative subsurface temperature anomaly below a depth of about 70m, a characteristic that is absent in both the ECS subsurface signature and in the borehole observations. We recognize that both the ECS reconstruction and the borehole temperatures are essentially extra-tropical records restricted to the continents, whereas the MBH reconstruction utilizes both tropical and extra-tropical data from both continents and oceans. However, to reconcile the significant difference between the negative

  15. The growth of epitaxial uranium oxide observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Caculitan, N; Siekhaus, W J

    2005-12-12

    Raman spectroscopy can be performed with micrometer resolution and can thus be used to determine the dependence of oxide thickness on the substrate's grain structure or local impurity inclusions. The Raman signal amplitude emitted from an epitaxial uranium oxide layer as a function of oxide thickness has been modeled for light of 632.8 nm wavelength incident on the oxide and reflected from the uranium substrate using the optical properties determined by spectrophotometry. The model shows that the Raman signal increases with oxide thickness and saturates at about 150 nm thickness. The model was compared with the measured Raman signal amplitude of an epitaxial uranium oxide layer growing in air with a known time dependence of oxide growth.

  16. Growth Rate of Cosmological Perturbations at z∼0.1 from a New Observational Test.

    PubMed

    Feix, Martin; Nusser, Adi; Branchini, Enzo

    2015-07-03

    Spatial variations in the distribution of galaxy luminosities, estimated from redshifts as distance proxies, are correlated with the peculiar velocity field. Comparing these variations with the peculiar velocities inferred from galaxy redshift surveys is a powerful test of gravity and dark-energy theories on cosmological scales. Using ∼2×10(5) galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 7, we perform this test in the framework of gravitational instability to estimate the normalized growth rate of density perturbations fσ8=0.37±0.13 at z∼0.1, which is in agreement with the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This unique measurement is complementary to those obtained with more traditional methods, including clustering analysis. The estimated accuracy at z∼0.1 is competitive with other methods when applied to similar data sets.

  17. Observation of dust particle growth and fallout in RF-excited silane discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, W. . Siemens Research Lab. Technical Univ. of Munich, Garching ); Koehler, W.E.; Roemheld, M.; Seeboeck, R.J. . Siemens Research Lab.); Veprek, S. . Inst. for Chemistry of Information Recording)

    1994-04-01

    Particles formed during plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon thin films which fall to the film surface, either during or after the process, may have a severely deleterious effect on film properties. In order to understand the mechanisms of particle formation and fallout the authors have investigated the growth and dynamics of particles in RF discharges in pure silane. The diameter of particles formed within the first 20 s of the discharge was investigated by electron microscopy of substrates with fallen out particles. Furthermore the authors used a He-Ne laser in combination with a diode array camera to measure temporally and spatially resolved light scattering from particles and deduced their sinking speed after switching off the discharge. The results are compared to a theoretical model on the particle dynamics.

  18. A free-boundary model of diffusive valley growth: theory and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Robert; Cohen, Yossi; Seybold, Hansjörg; Stansifer, Eric; McDonald, Robb; Mineev-Weinstein, Mark; Rothman, Daniel H.

    2017-06-01

    Valleys that form around a stream head often develop characteristic finger-like elevation contours. We study the processes involved in the formation of these valleys and introduce a theoretical model that indicates how shape may inform the underlying processes. We consider valley growth as the advance of a moving boundary travelling forward purely through linearly diffusive erosion, and we obtain a solution for the valley shape in three dimensions. Our solution compares well to the shape of slowly growing groundwater-fed valleys found in Bristol, Florida. Our results identify a new feature in the formation of groundwater-fed valleys: a spatially variable diffusivity that can be modelled by a fixed-height moving boundary.

  19. Growth of a young pingo in the Canadian Arctic observed by RADARSAT-2 interferometric satellite radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, S. V.; Lantz, T. C.; Kokelj, S. V.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Advancements in radar technology are increasing our ability to detect earth surface deformation in permafrost environments. In this paper we use satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) to describe the growth of a previously unreported pingo in the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands. High-resolution RADARSAT-2 imagery (2011-2014) analyzed with the Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) DInSAR revealed a maximum 2.7 cm yr-1 of domed uplift located in a drained lake basin. Observed changes in elevation were modeled as a 348 m × 290 m uniformly loaded elliptical plate with clamped edge. Model results suggest that this feature is one of the largest diameter pingos in the region that is presently growing. Analysis of historical aerial photographs showed that ground uplift at this location initiated sometime between 1935 and 1951 following lake drainage. Uplift is largely due to the growth of intrusive ice, because the 9 % expansion of pore water associated with permafrost aggradation into saturated sands is not sufficient to explain the observed short- and long-term deformation rates. The modeled thickness of permafrost using the Northern Ecosystem Soil Temperature (NEST) was consistent with the maximum height of this feature and the 1972-2014 elevation changes estimated from aerial photographs, suggesting that permafrost aggradation is resulting in the freezing a sub-pingo water lens. Seasonal variation in the uplift rate seen in the DInSAR data also matches the modeled seasonal pattern in the deepening rate of freezing front. This study demonstrates that interferometric satellite radar can successfully contribute to understanding the dynamics of terrain uplift in response to permafrost aggradation and ground ice development in remote polar environments, and highlights possible application of detecting deformation of Martian landscapes. However, our DInSAR data did not show clear growth at other smaller pingos in contrast with field studies

  20. Observation of New Particle Formation and Growth Events in Asian Continental Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Yoon, S.; Kim, K.; Choi, W.; Lim, H.; Hong, C.

    2012-12-01

    This study is based on 3-year continuous measurements (January 2008-December 2010) of aerosol number size distributions recorded with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) at two regional background stations, Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) and Korea Global Atmosphere Watch Center (KGAWC), in Korea. We identified new particle formation and growth (NPF) events by applying the Cyclostationary Empirical Orthogonal Function (CSEOF) technique to aerosol number size distributions. Based on the first mode loading vectors and the corresponding principle components in the CSEOF analysis, we classified strong, weak, and non NPF days. A strong NPF event was observed on 7.5% of days (60 days out of a total 800 days) at GCO and on 14.6% of days (140 days out of a total 958 days) at KGAWC. The maximum occurrence of strong NPF events was reported in spring at GCO, but in winter at KGAWC. Only 16 of these days were considered as simultaneous NPF events, and 7 days were identical NPF events. The airmass history analysis on simultaneous NPF days indicated the NPF events to be associated with a fast-moving cold and dry airmass from the Asian continent after the passage of a frontal system. The particle formation rate (FR) and growth rate (GR) were estimated to be 1.44 (1.20) cm-3 s-1 and 4.4 (4.7) nm h-1, respectively, at GCO and KGAWC (in parentheses). Almost identical values for the condensation sink were estimated in strong NPF (8.3 ~ 10-3 s-1) and non NPF (8.2 ~ 10-3 s-1) events at GCO, whereas the condensation sink for strong NPF days (8.5 ~ 10-5 s-1) was lower than that of non NPF days (1.1 ~ 10-2 s-1) at KGAWC. The FR, GR, condensation sink, and vapor source rate at both GCO and KGAWC were lower than those reported in polluted urban areas, but higher than those at clean sites. In this study, we also present direct observational evidence that freshly nucleated particles are capable of growing to sufficiently large sizes and act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The

  1. THE STAR FORMATION RATE OF TURBULENT MAGNETIZED CLOUDS: COMPARING THEORY, SIMULATIONS, AND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-20

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)-the Krumholz and McKee (KM), Padoan and Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle and Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC-all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter {alpha}{sub vir}; (2) sonic Mach number M; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma {beta}=2M{sub A}{sup 2}/M{sup 2} with the Alfven Mach number M{sub A}. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} and Mach numbers M=3-50 and M{sub A}=1-{infinity}, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between M=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and {alpha}{sub vir} {approx} 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for M=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvenic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies {epsilon} = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  2. The Star Formation Rate of Turbulent Magnetized Clouds: Comparing Theory, Simulations, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)—the Krumholz & McKee (KM), Padoan & Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle & Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC—all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter αvir (2) sonic Mach number {M}; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma \\beta =2 {M}_A^2/ {M}^2 with the Alfvén Mach number {M}_A. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 × 106 M ⊙ and Mach numbers {M}=3-50 and {M}_A=1-∞, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between {M}=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and αvir ~ 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for {M}=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvénic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies epsilon = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  3. Instrumenting the Conifers: A Look at Daily Tree Growth and Locally Observed Environmental Conditions Across Four Mountain Sites in the Central Great Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, S.; Biondi, F.; Johnson, B. G.

    2012-12-01

    Tree growth is often used as a proxy for past environmental conditions or as an indicator of developing trends. Reconstructions of drought, precipitation, temperature, and other phenomena derived from tree-growth indices abound in scientific literature aimed at informing policy makers. Observations of tree recruitment or death in treeline populations are frequently tied to climatic fluctuation in cause-effect hypotheses. Very often these hypotheses are based on statistical relationships between annual-to-seasonal tree growth measurements and some environmental parameter measured or modeled off-site. Observation of daily tree growth in conjunction with in-situ environmental measurements at similar timescales takes us one step closer to quantifying the uncertainty in reconstruction or predictive studies. In four separate sites in two different mountain ranges in the central Great Basin, co-located observations of conifer growth activity and local atmospheric and soils conditions have been initiated. Species include Pinus longaeva (Great Basin bristlecone pine), Pinus flexilis (limber pine), Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce), Pinus monophylla (singleleaf pinyon pine), Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine), Abies concolor (white fir), and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir). Measurements of sub-hourly tree radial length change and sap flow activity are compared with a suite of in-situ observations including air temperature, precipitation, photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR), relative humidity, soil temperature, and soil moisture/water content. Subalpine study site located at 3360 m elevation in the Snake Range, Nevada

  4. Formation and growth rates of atmospheric nanoparticles: four years of observations at two West Siberian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Davydov, Denis K.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Arshinova, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    In spite of fact that the first report on the new particle formation (NPF) itself was done by John Aitken more than one century ago (Aitken, 1898), a phenomenon of NPF bursts taken place in the atmosphere was discovered not very long ago. Nevertheless, to date it is known that they may occur quite often in a variety of environments (Kulmala et al., 2004; Hirsikko et al., 2011). Siberia occupies a vast area covered by forests, but the comprehensive data on burst frequency, as well as on formation and growth rates of freshly nucleated particles in this key region are still lacking. Continuous measurements of aerosol size distribution carried out in recent years at two West Siberian stations (TOR-station - 56o28'41"N, 85o03'15"E; Fonovaya Observatory - 56o25'07"N, 84o04'27"E) allowed this gap in data to be filled up. Analysis of the size spectra classified in accordance with criteria proposed by Dal Maso et al. (2005) and Hammed et al. (2007) enabled a conclusion to be drawn that NPF events in Wets Siberia are more often observed during spring (from March to May) and early autumn (secondary frequency peak in September). On average, particle formation bursts took place on 23-28 % of all days. Such a seasonal pattern of the NPF occurrence is very similar to one observed at SMEAR II Station (Hyytiälä, Finland; Dal Maso et al. 2005, 2007). Formation rates (FR) of particles with diameters below 25 nm varied in a wide range from 0.1 to 10 cm-3 s-1. Mean values of FR for the entire period of observations were 1.7 cm-3s-1 (median = 1.13 cm-3 s-1) at TOR-station and 0.88 cm-3 s-1 (median = 0.69 cm-3 s-1) at Fonovaya Observatory. Enhanced values of FR are usually observed from spring to autumn. Mean growth rates of observed at TOR-station and Fonovaya Observatory were 6.5 nm h-1 (median = 5.0 nm h-1) and 8.3 nm h-1 (median = 6.4 nm h-1), respectively. This work was supported by the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); State contracts of

  5. Comparing Stable Water Isotope Variation in Atmospheric Moisture Observed over Coastal Water and Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C. T.; Rambo, J. P.; Welp, L. R.; Bible, K.; Hollinger, D. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Stable oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopologues of atmospheric moisture are strongly influenced by large-scale synoptic weather cycles, surface evapotranspiration and boundary layer mixing. Atmospheric water isotope variation has been shown to empirically relate to relative humidity (Rh) of near surface moisture, and to a less degree, air temperature. Continuous δ18O and δD measurements are becoming more available, providing new opportunities to investigate processes that control isotope variability. This study shows the comparison of δ18O and δD measured at a continental location and over coastal waters for 3 seasons (spring to fall, 2014). The surface moisture isotope measurements were made using two LGR spectroscopy water vapor isotope analyzers (Los Gatos Research Inc.), one operated in an old-growth coniferous forest at Wind River field station, WA (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W), and another sampling marine air over seawater at the Scripps Pier in San Diego, CA (32.8654°N, 117.2536°W), USA. Isotope variations were measured at 1Hz and data were reported as hourly averages with an overall accuracy of ±0.1‰ for δ18O, ±0.5‰ for δ2H. Day-to-day variations in δ18O and δD are shown strongly influenced by synoptic weather events at both locations. Boundary layer mixing between surface moisture and the dry air entrained from the free troposphere exerts a midday maximum and a consistent diel pattern in deuterium excess (dx). At the forest site, surface moisture also interacts with leaf water through transpiration during the day and re-equilibration at night. The latter occurs by retro-diffusion of atmospheric H2O molecules into leaf intercellular space, which becomes intensified as Rh increaes after nightfall, and continues until sunrise, to counter-balance the evaporative isotopic enrichment in leaf water on a daily basis. These vegetation effects lead to negative dx values consistently observed at nighttime in this continental location that were not

  6. Comparing the relationships between aerosol optical depth and cloud properties in observations and global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Quaas, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols impact the climate both directly, through their interaction with radiation and indirectly, via their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying cloud properties. The influence of aerosols on cloud properties is highly uncertain. Many relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties have been observed using satellite data, but previous work has shown that some of these relationships are the product of the strong AOD-cloud fraction (CF) relationship. The confounding influence of local meteorology obscures the magnitude of any aerosol impact on CF, and so also the impact of aerosol on other cloud properties. For example, both AOD and CF are strongly influenced by relative humidity, which can generate a correlation between them. Previous studies have used reanalysis data to account for confounding meteorological variables. This requires knowledge of the relevant meteorological variables and is limited by the accuracy of the reanalysis data. Recent work has shown that by using the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) to mediate the AOD-CF relationship, the impact of relative humidity can be significantly reduced. This method removes the limitations imposed by the finite accuracy of reanalysis data. In this work we investigate the impact of the CDNC mediation on the AOD-CF relationship and on the relationship between AOD and other cloud properties in global atmospheric models. By comparing pre-industrial and present day runs, we investigate the success of the CDNC mediated AOD-CF relationship to predict the change in CF from the pre-industrial to the present day using only observations of the present day relationships between clouds and aerosol properties. This helps to determine whether the satellite-derived relationship provides a constraint on the aerosol indirect forcing due to changes in CF.

  7. Comparing and contrasting observed adaptations in three deltas: the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra, Mahanadi and Volta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Suckall, N.; Mensah, A.; Mondal, S.; Dey, S.; Hazra, S.

    2015-12-01

    In low and middle-income countries, many deltaic communities directly depend on the natural environment for income and well-being. Current environmental concerns that threaten deltaic communities, such as increasing salinity, sedimentation, erosion and subsidence are likely to be exacerbated by climate change and variability, for example sea-level rise, increased storminess and rising temperatures. Such changes, along with other social and environmental stressors, mean that communities must adapt. This paper outlines findings of a systematic review of the peer-reviewed and grey literature that examines observed adaptations in three deltas of differing sizes in various geographical contexts: the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra in India and Bangladesh, the Mahanadi in India, and the Volta in Ghana. It compares and contrasts various elements of observed adaptations, including who is driving the adaptation, the beneficiaries, barriers to participation and evidence for maladaptation. The predominant drivers of adaptation vary from government (at state level in India and national level in Bangladesh) and NGOs (in Ghana). Autonomous adaptations are not widely reported in the literature from any of the deltas. In all three deltas there is a focus on supporting adaptation in farming rather than fishing; despite the fact that fisheries contribute to local food security as well as national economies. Lack of access to financial, natural, physical and human capital are common barriers to adaptation in all three deltas. Additionally the Indian literature in particular highlights the lack of coordination between different government departments, coupled with an excessively top-down (state-driven) approach to adaptation. Maladaptation is most commonly reported in the literature from Bangladesh, for example, loss of employment of inland fishermen in embanked areas. The paper concludes by highlighting some of the implications of these findings for adaptation policy in deltas.

  8. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Birdwell, Leah; Lodish, Maya; Tirosh, Amit; Chittiboina, Prashant; Keil, Meg; Lyssikatos, Charlampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Feelders, Richard A.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. Study design A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Coagulation profiles were taken before and 6-12 months after surgery and compared with 18 normocortisolemic children, 13.7 ± 3.6 years. Results At baseline, patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the procoagulant factor VIII (FVIII) vs controls (145 IU/dL ± 84 vs 99 ± 47, P = .04); 6-12 months after surgery, FVIII levels decreased to 111 ± 47, P = .05. Patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin, 96 ± 17% vs 82 ± 26%, P = .015. After surgery, antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin levels decreased to 82 ± 24%, P < .001. Anticoagulants were greater in patients with Cushing syndrome vs controls at baseline, including protein C (138 ± 41% vs 84 ± 25%, P < .001), protein S (94 ± 19% vs 74 ± 19%, P = .001), and antithrombin III (96 ± 18% vs 77 ± 13%, P < .0001). The 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels correlated positively with FVIII levels, r = 0.43, P = .004. Conclusion Children with Cushing syndrome had elevated procoagulants, antifibrinolytics, and anticoagulants at baseline compared with controls; normalization of coagulation measures was seen after surgical cure. Despite the increase in anticoagulants, hypercortisolemia is associated with a hypercoagulable state in children, as is the case in adults. This finding has potential implications for prevention of venous thromboembolism in children with Cushing syndrome. PMID:27496264

  9. A Proxy System Modeling Toolbox for Comparing Water Isotope Observations to Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dee, S. G.; Emile-Geay, J.; Evans, M. N.; Noone, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations which integrate both climate physics and the processes by which climate variations are imprinted in and sampled from paleoclimate archives may facilitate differentiation of the climate signal from random and systematic sources of uncertainty. We simulate the former using a newly developed efficient water-isotope-enabled atmospheric GCM, SPEEDY-IER (Molteni, 2003, Dee et al., submitted), and the latter using a toolbox of proxy system models (PSMs, Evans et al., 2013), synthesized, organized and coded within a self-consistent framework (Dee et al., in prep). SPEEDY-IER is forced with SSTs from the Last Millennium PMIP3 integration of the CCSM4 model (Landrum et al., 2012); relevant climate and isotope variables are extracted from the GCM simulation and used to drive PSMs. Through comparing simulated climate fields to simulated observations, we evaluate the extent to which linear and univariate calibrations on local temperature are valid, given bias in the simulated SST, moisture divergence, and associated isotopic composition of water vapor and precipitation. Taking this a step further, PSMs that incorporate the physical, biological, structural, and time-uncertain aspects of each proxy system help to explicitly quantify the errors accompanying the assumption of linear univariate response of proxy systems to climate forcing. We demonstrate the utility of the PSM toolbox with an integrative multi-PSM simulation spanning a realistic pan-tropical pacific proxy network of tree-ring cellulose, speleothem, and ice core oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O). The multi-PSM simulation is used as a testing ground to assess the robustness of frequently invoked teleconnections relating tropical SSTs to terrestrial hydroclimate proxies. By exploring modeled connections between ocean climate and the proxies (both by individual proxy class and for the entire network), we identify which tropical SST signals can be captured by the proxy network, track the individual

  10. Comparing the Behavioural Effects of Exogenous Growth Hormone and Melatonin in Young and Old Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Cristina; Gamundí, Antoni; Fiol, Maria A.; Tresguerres, Jesús A. F.; Akaârir, Mourad; Rial, Rubén V.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and melatonin are two hormones with quite different physiological effects. Curiously, their secretion shows parallel and severe age-related reductions. This has promoted many reports for studying the therapeutic supplementation of both hormones in an attempt to avoid or delay the physical, physiological, and psychological decay observed in aged humans and in experimental animals. Interestingly, the effects of the external administration of low doses of GH and of melatonin were surprisingly similar, as both hormones caused significant improvements in the functional capabilities of aged subjects. The present report aims at discerning the eventual difference between cognitive and motor effects of the two hormones when administered to young and aged Wistar rats. The effects were tested in the radial maze, a test highly sensitive to the age-related impairments in working memory and also in the rotarod test, for evaluating the motor coordination. The results showed that both hormones caused clear improvements in both tasks. However, while GH improved the cognitive capacity and, most importantly, the physical stamina, the effects of melatonin should be attributed to its antioxidant, anxiolytic, and neuroprotective properties. PMID:28050228

  11. Comparing the Behavioural Effects of Exogenous Growth Hormone and Melatonin in Young and Old Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Pere; Nicolau, Cristina; Gamundí, Antoni; Fiol, Maria A; Tresguerres, Jesús A F; Akaârir, Mourad; Rial, Rubén V

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and melatonin are two hormones with quite different physiological effects. Curiously, their secretion shows parallel and severe age-related reductions. This has promoted many reports for studying the therapeutic supplementation of both hormones in an attempt to avoid or delay the physical, physiological, and psychological decay observed in aged humans and in experimental animals. Interestingly, the effects of the external administration of low doses of GH and of melatonin were surprisingly similar, as both hormones caused significant improvements in the functional capabilities of aged subjects. The present report aims at discerning the eventual difference between cognitive and motor effects of the two hormones when administered to young and aged Wistar rats. The effects were tested in the radial maze, a test highly sensitive to the age-related impairments in working memory and also in the rotarod test, for evaluating the motor coordination. The results showed that both hormones caused clear improvements in both tasks. However, while GH improved the cognitive capacity and, most importantly, the physical stamina, the effects of melatonin should be attributed to its antioxidant, anxiolytic, and neuroprotective properties.

  12. Comparing Resistance, Resilience, and Stability of Replicate Moving Bed Biofilm and Suspended Growth Combined Nitritation-Anammox Reactors.

    PubMed

    Wells, G F; Shi, Y; Laureni, M; Rosenthal, A; Szivák, I; Weissbrodt, D G; Joss, A; Buergmann, H; Johnson, D R; Morgenroth, E

    2017-04-04

    Combined partial nitritation-anammox (PN/A) systems are increasingly employed for sustainable nitrogen removal from wastewater, but process instabilities present ongoing challenges for practitioners. The goal of this study was to elucidate differences in process stability between PN/A process variations employing two distinct aggregate types-biofilm (in moving bed biofilm reactors, MBBRs) and suspended growth biomass. Triplicate reactors for each process variation were studied under baseline conditions and in response to a series of transient perturbations. MBBRs displayed elevated NH4+ removal rates relative to suspended growth counterparts over six months of unperturbed baseline operation, but also exhibited significantly greater variability in performance. Transient perturbations led to strikingly divergent yet reproducible behavior in biofilm versus suspended growth systems. A temperature perturbation prompted a sharp reduction in NH4+ removal rates with no NO2- accumulation and rapid recovery in MBBRs, compared to a similar reduction in NH4+ removal rates but strong NO2- accumulation in suspended growth reactors. Pulse additions of a nitrification inhibitor (allylthiourea) prompted only moderate declines in performance in suspended growth reactors compared to sharp decreases in NH4+ removal rates in MBBRs. Quantitative FISH demonstrated a significant enrichment of anammox in MBBRs compared to suspended growth reactors, and conversely a proportionally higher AOB abundance in suspended growth reactors. Overall, MBBRs displayed significantly increased susceptibility to transient perturbations employed in this study compared to suspended growth counterparts (stability parameter), including significantly longer recovery times (resilience). No significant difference in maximum impact of perturbations (resistance) was apparent. Taken together, our results suggest that aggregate architecture (biofilm versus suspended growth) in PN/A processes exerts an unexpectedly

  13. Diagnostic boundaries of autism disorder vs pervasive developmental disorder nos comparative observational study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Carigi, Tiziana; Muratori, Filippo; Termine, Cristiano; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Derhemi, Ledhina; Di Nardo, Roberta; Rossi, Giorgio; Balottin, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs), and above all diagnosis of the different PDD subtypes, is an ongoing challenge in psychopathology. Application of categorical criteria is complex and problematic in the clinical field where the boundaries dividing some of the PDD entities are blurred, creating particular problems for the clinician. A dimensional clinical approach, considering autistic symptom severity, level of functioning, developmental characteristics and symptoms other than the ones typically observed in autism, may be a more suitable approach in the clinical field and could provide the clinician treating these disorders with empirical guidance. To identify the clinical features that might differentiate the PDD subtypes, we conducted a comparative study in a clinical sample of children affected by autism disorder (AD) or pervasive developmental disorders not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and a mini critical review of the available literature addressing clinical and psychopathological differences between the two subtypes. The results of both our study and our literature review seem to show little support for the current PDD subtypes. In such a framework, the most significant element in clinical practice appears to be a deep knowledge of the characteristics of the individual in question. By adopting a broad and multi-faceted perspective, it becomes possible to define the most effective rehabilitation treatment. This applies particularly to the pharmacological treatment, since, to date, no specific therapies for PDDs are known and the choice of pharmacotherapy can be decided only on the basis of the patient's general profile and specific features.

  14. A Field Guide to Extra-Tropical Cyclones: Comparing Models to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, M.

    2008-12-01

    Climate it is said is the accumulation of weather. And weather is not the concern of climate models. Justification for this latter sentiment has long hidden behind coarse model resolutions and blunt validation tools based on climatological maps and the like. The spatial-temporal resolutions of today's models and observations are converging onto meteorological scales however, which means that with the correct tools we can test the largely unproven assumption that climate model weather is correct enough, or at least lacks perverting biases, such that its accumulation does in fact result in a robust climate prediction. Towards this effort we introduce a new tool for extracting detailed cyclone statistics from climate model output. These include the usual cyclone distribution statistics (maps, histograms), but also adaptive cyclone- centric composites. We have also created a complementary dataset, The MAP Climatology of Mid-latitude Storminess (MCMS), which provides a detailed 6 hourly assessment of the areas under the influence of mid- latitude cyclones based on Reanalysis products. Using this we then extract complimentary composites from sources such as ISCCP and GPCP to create a large comparative dataset for climate model validation. A demonstration of the potential usefulness of these tools will be shown. dime.giss.nasa.gov/mcms/mcms.html

  15. Comparative incidence of pregnancy outcomes in treated obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome: the NOH-APS observational study.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Sylvie; Cochery-Nouvellon, Eva; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Mercier, Erick; Marchetti, Tess; Balducchi, Jean-Pierre; Marès, Pierre; Gris, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-16

    The incidence of pregnancy outcomes for women with the purely obstetric form of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) treated with prophylactic low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus low-dose aspirin (LDA) has not been documented. We observed women without a history of thrombosis who had experienced 3 consecutive spontaneous abortions before the 10th week of gestation or 1 fetal loss at or beyond the 10th week. We compared the frequencies of complications during new pregnancies between treated women with APS (n = 513; LMWH + LDA) and women negative for antiphospholipid antibodies as controls (n = 791; no treatment). Among APS women, prior fetal loss was a risk factor for fetal loss, preeclampsia (PE), premature birth, and the occurrence of any placenta-mediated complication. Being positive for anticardiolipin immunoglobulin M antibodies was a risk factor for any placenta-mediated complication. Among women with a history of recurrent abortion, APS women were at a higher risk than other women of PE, placenta-mediated complications, and neonatal mortality. Among women with prior fetal loss, LMWH + LDA-treated APS women had lower pregnancy loss rates but higher PE rates than other women. Improved therapies, in particular better prophylaxis of late pregnancy complications, are urgently needed for obstetric APS and should be evaluated according to the type of pregnancy loss.

  16. The dynamics of human-water systems: comparing observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, G.; Ciullo, A.; Castellarin, A.; Viglione, A.

    2016-12-01

    Real-word data of human-flood interactions are compared to the results of stylized socio-hydrological models. These models build on numerous examples from different parts of the world and consider two main prototypes of floodplain systems. Green systems, whereby societies cope with flood risk via non-structural measures, e.g. resettling out of floodplain areas ("living with floods" approach); and Technological systems, whereby societies cope with flood risk by also via structural measures, e.g. building levees ("fighting floods" approach). The floodplain systems of the Tiber River in Rome and the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Rivers in Bangladesh systems are used as case studies. The comparison of simulations and observations shows the potential of socio-hydrological models in capturing the dynamics of risk emerging from the interactions and feedbacks between social and hydrological processes, such as learning and forgetting effects. It is then discussed how the proposed approach can contribute to a better understanding of flood risk changes and therefore support the process of disaster risk reduction.

  17. Detection of pulmonary nodule growth with dose reduced chest tomosynthesis: a human observer study using simulated nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderman, Christina; Johnsson, Ã. se; Vikgren, Jenny; Rossi Norrlund, Rauni; Molnar, David; Mirzai, Maral; Svalkvist, Angelica; Mânsson, Lars Gunnar; Bâth, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Chest tomosynthesis may be a suitable alternative to computed tomography for the clinical task of follow up of pulmonary nodules. The aim of the present study was to investigate the detection of pulmonary nodule growth suggestive of malignancy using chest tomosynthesis. Previous studies have indicated remained levels of detection of pulmonary nodules at dose levels corresponding to that of a conventional lateral radiograph, approximately 0.04 mSv, which motivated to perform the present study this dose level. Pairs of chest tomosynthesis image sets, where the image sets in each pair were acquired of the same patient at two separate occasions, were included in the study. Simulated nodules with original diameters of approximately 8 mm were inserted in the pairs of image sets, simulating situations where the nodule had remained stable in size or increased isotropically in size between the two different imaging occasions. Four different categories of nodule growth were included, corresponding to a volume increase of approximately 21 %, 68 %, 108 % and 250 %. All nodules were centered in the depth direction in the tomosynthesis images. All images were subjected to a simulated dose reduction, resulting in images corresponding to an effective dose of 0.04 mSv. Four observers were given the task of rating their confidence that the nodule was stable in size or not on a five-level rating scale. This was done both before any size measurements were made of the nodule as well as after measurements were performed. Using Receiver operating characteristic analysis, the rating data for the nodules that were stable in size was compared to the rating data for the nodules simulated to have increased in size. Statistically significant differences between the rating distributions for the stable nodules and all of the four nodule growth categories were found. For the three largest nodule growths, nearly perfect detection of nodule growth was seen. In conclusion, the present study

  18. Comparative genomic analysis and phenazine production of Pseudomonas chlororaphis, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yawen; Shen, Xuemei; Peng, Huasong; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis HT66, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that produces phenazine-1-carboxamide with high yield, was compared with three genomic sequenced P. chlororaphis strains, GP72, 30–84 and O6. The genome sizes of four strains vary from 6.66 to 7.30 Mb. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences indicated 4833 conserved genes in 5869–6455 protein-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the four strains are closely related to each other. Its competitive colonization indicates that P. chlororaphis can adapt well to its environment. No virulence or virulence-related factor was found in P. chlororaphis. All of the four strains could synthesize antimicrobial metabolites including different phenazines and insecticidal protein FitD. Some genes related to the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis were detected among the four strains. It was shown that P. chlororaphis is a safe PGPR in agricultural application and could also be used to produce some phenazine antibiotics with high-yield. PMID:26484173

  19. Comparative transcriptomics analyses of the different growth states of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Li, Haitao; Qi, Tianjie; Yan, Xixin; Wang, Boli; Guan, Jitao; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii is an important bacterial pathogen commonly associated with hospital acquired infections. A. baumannii can remain viable and hence virulent in the environment for a long period of time due primarily to its ability to form biofilms. A total of 459 cases of MDR A. baumannii our hospital collected from March 2014 to March 2015 were examined in this study, and a representative isolate selected for high-throughput mRNA sequencing and comparison of gene expression profiles under the biofilm and exponential growth conditions. Our study found that the same bacteria indeed exhibited differential mRNA expression under different conditions. Compared to the rapidly growing bacteria, biofilm bacteria had 106 genes upregulated and 92 genes downregulated. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that many of these genes are involved in the formation and maintenance of biofilms, whose expression also depends on the environment and specific signaling pathways and transcription factors that are absent in the log phase bacteria. These differentially expressed mRNAs might contribute to A. baumannii's unique pathogenicity and ability to inflict chronic and recurrent infections.

  20. Comparative effects of inorganic and organic nitrogen on the growth and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yan, YangWei; Dai, RuiHua; Liu, Yan; Gao, JiaYi; Wu, XuanHao

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen causes the frequent occurrence of harmful algal blooms and possible microcystin production. The effects of ammonia and alanine (Ala) on the growth and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated using an isotope tracer ((15)N). The results indicated that Ala was directly used by M. aeruginosa and contributed to biomass formation amounting to 2.1 × 10(7) cells mL(-1) on day 48, compared with only 6.2 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) from ammonia alone. Microcystin-LR production with Ala was less than that of ammonia, which peaked at 50.2 fg cell(-1) on day 6. Liquid chromatographic analysis with tandem mass spectrometry of (15)N-microcystin-LR suggested that (15)N from ammonia was probably synthesized into the arginine residue. By contrast, (15)N from Ala was assimilated into the Ala, leucine, the iso-linked (2R,3S)-3-methylaspartic acid, arginine, and certain unusual C20 amino acid residues. The results represent the forward steps in the determination of the nitrogen forms that fuel toxin production and blooms.

  1. Studies on comparative population growth of some species of the rotifer Lecane (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Serrania-Soto, C R; Sarma, S S S; Nandini, S

    2011-07-01

    We compared the population growth patterns of 5 species of the rotifer genus Lecane [(L. quadridentata (Ehrenberg, 1830), L. comuta (Muller, 1786), L. papuana (Murray, 1913), L. unguitata (Fadeev, 1925) and L. pyriformis (Daday, 1905)] ranging in adult average body size from 30 to 140 microm. All species were cultured under laboratory conditions for 25-30 days using the green alga Scenedesmus acutus as the exclusive diet, at a density of 1.0 x 10(6) cells ml(-1) at 24 degrees C. Regardless of the species, lecanids reached their peak population densities after 4 weeks. Peak population densities ranged from 15 to 320 ind. ml(-1), depending on body size. There was an inverse curvilinear relation between body lengths and peak population abundances (densities) of the Lecane species. Egg ratios (eggs per female) for the tested species were < 0.6 during the exponential phase but declined to 0.1 (or lower) as the population density increased. The rates of population increase for the lecanids were in general lower(0.10 to 0.21 day (-1)) than other well-studied rotifer species including members of Brachionidae.

  2. Comparing inversion techniques for constraining CO2 fluxes in the Brazilian Amazon Basin with aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, V. Y.; Gerbig, C.; Longo, M.; Koch, F.; Nehrkorn, T.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Ceballos, J. C.; Longo, K.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    aircraft mixing ratios are applied as a top down constraint in Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) and Bayesian inversion frameworks that solves for parameters controlling the flux. Posterior parameter estimates are used to estimate the carbon budget of the BAB. Preliminary results show that the STILT-VPRM model simulates the net emission of CO2 during both transition periods reasonably well. There is significant enhancement from biomass burning during the November 2008 profiles and some from fossil fuel combustion during the May 2009 flights. ΔCO/ΔCO2 emission ratios are used in combination with continuous observations of CO to remove the CO2 contributions from biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion from the observed CO2 measurements resulting in better agreement of observed and modeled aircraft data. Comparing column calculations for each of the vertical profiles shows our model represents the variability in the diurnal cycle. The high altitude CO2 values from above 3500m are similar to the lateral boundary conditions from CarbonTracker 2010 and GEOS-Chem indicating little influence from surface fluxes at these levels. The MLE inversion provides scaling factors for GEE and R for each of the 8 vegetation types and a Bayesian inversion is being conducted. Our initial inversion results suggest the BAB represents a small net source of CO2 during both of the BARCA intensives.

  3. A PROSPECTIVE, OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF SOLUBLE FLT-1 AND VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR IN SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Nathan I.; Yano, Kiichiro; Okada, Hitomi; Fischer, Christopher; Howell, Michael; Spokes, Katherine C.; Ngo, Long; Angus, Derek C.; Aird, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Prior murine and human studies suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contributes to endothelial cell activation and severity of illness in sepsis. Furthermore, circulating levels of soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFLT) levels were found to increase as part of the early response to sepsis in mice. The objective of the study was to evaluate the blood levels of free VEGF-A and sFLT in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected infection and to assess the relationship of these levels with severity of illness and inflammation. It was a prospective, observational study initiated in the ED of an urban, tertiary care, university hospital. Inclusion criteria were (1) ED patients aged 18 years or older and (2) clinical suspicion of infection. Eighty-three patients were enrolled in the study. The major findings were that (1) the mean VEGF and sFLT levels were increasingly higher across the following groups: noninfected control patients, infected patients without shock, and septic shock patients; (2) initial and 24-h VEGF levels had a significant correlation with the presence of septic shock at 24 h; (3) initial and 24-h sFLT levels correlated with Acute Physiology Age Chronic Health Evaluation II and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment scores initially and at 24 h; and (4) VEGF and sFLT levels correlated with inflammatory cascade activation. This is the first report of sFLT as a potential new marker of severity in patients with sepsis. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor and its signaling axis are important in the endothelial cell response to sepsis, and further elucidation of these mechanisms may lead to advances in future diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18598002

  4. Detection of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Comparing Cobas 4800 EGFR Assay With Sanger Bidirectional Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ardakani, Nima Mesbah; Giardina, Tindaro; Grieu-Iacopetta, Fabienne; Tesfai, Yordanos; Carrello, Amerigo; Taylor, Jeremy; Robinson, Cleo; Spagnolo, Dominic; Amanuel, Benhur

    2016-09-01

    Accurate detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a crucial role in the current treatment of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and identification of clinically relevant mutations would qualify patients for treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Historically, Sanger sequencing has been used as the reference standard assay for EGFR mutational analysis; however, Cobas 4800 is a relatively new method. In the present study, we compared the performance of the Cobas assay against that of Sanger sequencing. A total of 493 consecutive formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of lung adenocarcinoma were simultaneously tested for EGFR mutations using both methods. After exclusion of the invalid results (n = 19), 474 samples from 455 patients were analyzed. The Cobas assay showed a mutation detection rate comparable to that of Sanger sequencing (18.1% vs. 17.9%, respectively; P < .05). Excellent agreement of 98.9% (κ, 0.964) was observed between the 2 methods. The Cobas assay is a fast and diagnostically robust platform with high analytical sensitivity; however, it is limited by its detection range and low tolerance to low DNA quality. Sanger sequencing is mostly affected by its lower analytic sensitivity. Ultimately, a dual testing strategy will be justified to increase the detection of novel mutations and reduce the false-negative results within an acceptable turnaround time. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative RNA-sequencing of the acarbose producer Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 cultivated in different growth media.

    PubMed

    Schwientek, Patrick; Wendler, Sergej; Neshat, Armin; Eirich, Christina; Rückert, Christian; Klein, Andreas; Wehmeier, Udo F; Kalinowski, Jörn; Stoye, Jens; Pühler, Alfred

    2013-08-20

    Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 is known as the producer of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, a potent drug in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted the first whole transcriptome analysis of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110, using RNA-sequencing technology for comparative gene expression studies between cells grown in maltose minimal medium, maltose minimal medium with trace elements, and glucose complex medium. We first studied the behavior of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 cultivations in these three media and found that the different media had significant impact on growth rate and in particular on acarbose production. It was demonstrated that Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 grew well in all three media, but acarbose biosynthesis was only observed in cultures grown in maltose minimal medium with and without trace elements. When comparing the expression profiles between the maltose minimal media with and without trace elements, only few significantly differentially expressed genes were found, which mainly code for uptake systems of metal ions provided in the trace element solution. In contrast, the comparison of expression profiles from maltose minimal medium and glucose complex medium revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes, of which the most conspicuous genes account for iron storage and uptake. Furthermore, the acarbose gene cluster was found to be highly expressed in maltose-containing media and almost silent in the glucose-containing medium. In addition, a putative antibiotic biosynthesis gene cluster was found to be similarly expressed as the acarbose cluster.

  6. Fluid flow and pattern selection in dendritic growth - Ground based in situ observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Liu, Shan; Lu, Deyang; Zhou, Yaohe; Cheng, Gongshan

    1989-02-01

    Model experiments on fluid flow and pattern selection have been done by creating flow in liquid regions close to the growth fronts in dendritic growth of SCN-aceton dilute alloys. The kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth were measured as a function of thermal gradient, growth velocity, and flow velocity. The present paper provides the first study of convection effects on constrained dendritic and cellular growth which focuses on the tip morphology and develops a boundary layer analysis. All of the problems addressed have application to the interpretation of the experimental phenomena arising from solidification and fluid dynamics on earth and in a space laboratory.

  7. Comparative studies on phosphorus uptake and growth kinetics of the microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis and the macroalga Ulva pertusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Chunrong; Dong, Shuanglin

    2004-04-01

    Short-term uptake experiments and long-term semicontinuous culture experiments were performed under the condition of phosphorus (P) limitation to estimate and compare the P uptake and growth kinetics of the microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis and the macroalga Ulva pertusa. Two new parameters, the maximum specific uptake rate ( V {m/sp}) and the maximal growth efficiency (β), are introduced to achieve uniformity for the comparison of nutrient uptake and growth efficiency between microalgae and macroalgae. T. subcordiformis possesses 3 times lower half saturation uptake constant, 4 times higher maximal growth rate and 20 times higher maximum specific uptake rate than U. pertusa, while U. pertusa possesses 4 times higher maximal growth efficiency than T. subcordiformis.

  8. Three-dimensional simulations of gravitationally confined detonations compared to observations of SN 1991T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Kromer, Markus; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, Franco; Marquardt, Kai; Fink, Michael; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Sim, Stuart A.; Taubenberger, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model has been proposed as a possible explosion mechanism for Type Ia supernovae in the single-degenerate evolution channel. It starts with ignition of a deflagration in a single off-centre bubble in a near-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. Driven by buoyancy, the deflagration flame rises in a narrow cone towards the surface. For the most part, the main component of the flow of the expanding ashes remains radial, but upon reaching the outer, low-pressure layers of the white dwarf, an additional lateral component develops. This causes the deflagration ashes to converge again at the opposite side, where the compression heats fuel and a detonation may be launched. We first performed five three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the deflagration phase in 1.4 M⊙ carbon/oxygen white dwarfs at intermediate-resolution (2563 computational zones). We confirm that the closer the initial deflagration is ignited to the centre, the slower the buoyant rise and the longer the deflagration ashes takes to break out and close in on the opposite pole to collide. To test the GCD explosion model, we then performed a high-resolution (5123 computational zones) simulation for a model with an ignition spot offset near the upper limit of what is still justifiable, 200 km. This high-resolution simulation met our deliberately optimistic detonation criteria, and we initiated a detonation. The detonation burned through the white dwarf and led to its complete disruption. For this model, we determined detailed nucleosynthetic yields by post-processing 106 tracer particles with a 384 nuclide reaction network, and we present multi-band light curves and time-dependent optical spectra. We find that our synthetic observables show a prominent viewing-angle sensitivity in ultraviolet and blue wavelength bands, which contradicts observed SNe Ia. The strong dependence on the viewing angle is caused by the asymmetric distribution of the deflagration ashes

  9. A highly efficacious pediculicide based on dimeticone: Randomized observer blinded comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Heukelbach, Jorg; Pilger, Daniel; Oliveira, Fabíola A; Khakban, Adak; Ariza, Liana; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Background Infestation with the human head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis) occurs worldwide. Existing treatment options are limited, and reports of resistance to commonly used pediculicides have been increasing. In this trial we assessed the efficacy of a product containing a high (92%) concentration of the silicone oil dimeticone (identical in composition to NYDA®), as compared to a 1% permethrin lotion. Methods Randomized, controlled, observer blinded clinical trial. Participants were recruited from a poor urban neighbourhood in Brazil where pediculosis capitis was highly prevalent. To minimize reinfestation during the trial, participants (145 children aged 5–15 years with head lice infestations) were transferred to a holiday resort outside the endemic area for a period of 9 days. Two applications of dimeticone or 1% permethrin were done, seven days apart. Outcome measures were defined as cure (absence of vital head lice) after first application and before and after second applications, degree of itching, cosmetic acceptability, and clinical pathology. Results Overall cure rates were: day 2 – dimeticone 94.5% (95% CI: 86.6% – 98.5%) and permethrin 66.7% (95% CI: 54.6% – 77.3%; p < 0.0001); day 7 – dimeticone 64.4% (95% CI: 53.3% – 75.3%) and permethrin 59.7% (95% CI: 47.5% – 71.1%; p = 0.5); day 9 – dimeticone 97.2% (95% CI: 90.3% – 99.7%) and permethrin 67.6% (95% CI: 55.4%-78.2%); p < 0.0001). Itching was reduced similarly in both groups. Cosmetic acceptability was significantly better in the dimeticone group as compared to the permethrin group (p = 0.01). Two mild product-related incidents occurred in the dimeticone group. Conclusion The dimeticone product is a safe and highly efficacious pediculicide. Due to its physical mode of action (interruption of the lice's oxygen supply of the central nervous system), development of resistance is unlikely. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15117709. PMID:18783606

  10. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Birdwell, Leah; Lodish, Maya; Tirosh, Amit; Chittiboina, Prashant; Keil, Meg; Lyssikatos, Charlampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Feelders, Richard A; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Coagulation profiles were taken before and 6-12 months after surgery and compared with18 normocortisolemic children, 13.7 ± 3.6 years. At baseline, patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the procoagulant factor VIII (FVIII) vs controls (145 IU/dL ± 84 vs 99 ± 47, P = .04); 6-12 months after surgery, FVIII levels decreased to 111 ± 47, P = .05. Patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin, 96 ± 17% vs 82 ± 26%, P = .015. After surgery, antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin levels decreased to 82 ± 24%, P < .001. Anticoagulants were greater in patients with Cushing syndrome vs controls at baseline, including protein C (138 ± 41% vs 84 ± 25%, P < .001), protein S (94 ± 19% vs 74 ± 19%, P = .001), and antithrombin III (96 ± 18% vs 77 ± 13%, P < .0001). The 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels correlated positively with FVIII levels, r = 0.43, P = .004. Children with Cushing syndrome had elevated procoagulants, antifibrinolytics, and anticoagulants at baseline compared with controls; normalization of coagulation measures was seen after surgical cure. Despite the increase in anticoagulants, hypercortisolemia is associated with a hypercoagulable state in children, as is the case in adults. This finding has potential implications for prevention of venous thromboembolism in children with Cushing syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00001595. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. European Adrenal Insufficiency Registry (EU-AIR): a comparative observational study of glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Bertil; Fitts, David; Marelli, Claudio; Murray, Robert D; Quinkler, Marcus; Zelissen, Pierre M J

    2014-05-09

    Increased morbidity and mortality associated with conventional glucocorticoid replacement therapy for primary adrenal insufficiency (primary AI; estimated prevalence 93-140/million), secondary AI (estimated prevalence, 150-280/million, respectively) or congenital adrenal hyperplasia (estimated prevalence, approximately 65/million) may be due to the inability of typical glucocorticoid treatment regimens to reproduce the normal circadian profile of plasma cortisol. A once-daily modified-release formulation of hydrocortisone has been developed to provide a plasma cortisol profile that better mimics the daytime endogenous profile of cortisol. Here, we describe the protocol for the European Adrenal Insufficiency Registry (EU-AIR), an observational study to assess the long-term safety of modified-release hydrocortisone compared with conventional glucocorticoid replacement therapies in routine clinical practice (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01661387). Patients enrolled in EU-AIR have primary or secondary AI and are receiving either modified-release or conventional glucocorticoid replacement therapy. The primary endpoints of EU-AIR are the incidence of intercurrent illness, adrenal crisis and serious adverse events (SAEs), as well as the duration of SAEs and dose changes related to SAEs. Data relating to morbidity, mortality, adverse drug reactions, dosing and concomitant therapies will be collected. Patient diaries will record illness-related dose changes between visits. All decisions concerning medical care are made by the registry physician and patient. Enrolment is targeted at achieving 3600 patient-years of treatment (1800 patient-years per group) for the primary analysis, which is focused on determining the non-inferiority of once-daily modified-release replacement therapy compared with conventional glucocorticoid therapy. Recruitment began in August 2012 and, as of March 2014, 801 patients have been enrolled. Fifteen centres are participating in Germany, the UK

  12. Comparative physiology of a central hardwood old-growth forest canopy and forest gap

    Treesearch

    A. R. Gillespie; J. Waterman; K. Saylors

    1993-01-01

    Concerns of poor oak regeneration, changing climate, biodiversity patterns, and carbon cycling in the Central Hardwoods have prompted ecological and physiological studies of old-growth forests and their role in maintaining the landscape. To examine the effects of old-growth canopy structure on the physiological productivity of overstory and understory species, we...

  13. Preschool Children's Explanations of Plant Growth and Rain Formation: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Hatzinikita, Vassilia

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the different types and characteristics of preschool children's explanations of plant growth and rain formation. The children's explanations were categorized as naturalistic, non-naturalistic, or synthetic, i.e., explanations containing both naturalistic and non-naturalistic parts. In regards to plant growth the children…

  14. Preschool Children's Explanations of Plant Growth and Rain Formation: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Hatzinikita, Vassilia

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the different types and characteristics of preschool children's explanations of plant growth and rain formation. The children's explanations were categorized as naturalistic, non-naturalistic, or synthetic, i.e., explanations containing both naturalistic and non-naturalistic parts. In regards to plant growth the children…

  15. Diversity in human hair growth, diameter, colour and shape. An in vivo study on young adults from 24 different ethnic groups observed in the five continents.

    PubMed

    Loussouarn, Geneviève; Lozano, Isabelle; Panhard, Ségolène; Collaudin, Catherine; El Rawadi, Charles; Genain, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Based on previous findings, from a worldwide study, classified the shapes of human hair into 8 major types, from straight to highly curly. This clearly extended the usual classification of hair into African, Asian or Caucasian types. However, determinations of hair growth parameters and hair density were excluded from such studies. To measure and compare the hair growth profiles of young adults without alopecia living in the five continents. 2249 young adults (18-35 years, females and males) without alopecia, originating from 24 various human ethnic groups were included in the study. Total hair density, telogen percentage and growth rate on three different scalp areas were measured, using non-invasive validated techniques. Natural hair colour level, curliness and hair diameter were additionally recorded, when practically possible. Diversity in hair growth parameters among the entire cohort was a key finding, with differences linked to scalp area, gender and geographic origin. Statistical approaches depicted African hair as having lower density and a slower growth rate. Asian hair showed a thicker diameter, with faster growth. Caucasian hair showed a high total hair density. On the one hand, this inter-continental study of hair growth parameters provides initial valuable base-line data on hair in young adults without alopecia, and on the other hand, further extends our knowledge of this unique human appendage, with some mosaic features, observed worldwide.

  16. Growth responses following a single intra-muscular hGH plasmid administration compared to daily injections of hGH in dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Higuti, Eliza; Cecchi, Claudia R; Oliveira, Nelio A J; Vieira, Daniel P; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2012-12-01

    In previous work, sustained levels of circulating human growth hormone (hGH) and a highly significant weight increase were observed after electrotransfer of naked plasmid DNA (hGH-DNA) into the muscle of immunodeficient dwarf mice (lit/scid). In the present study, the efficacy of this in vivo gene therapy strategy is compared to daily injections (5 μg/twice a day) of recombinant hGH (r-hGH) protein, as assessed on the basis of several growth parameters. The slopes of the two growth curves were found to be similar (P > 0.05): 0.095 g/mouse/d for protein and 0.094 g/mouse/d for DNA injection. In contrast, the weight increases averaged 35.5% (P < 0.001) and 23.1% (P < 0.01) for protein and DNA administration, respectively, a difference possibly related to the electroporation methodology. The nose-to-tail linear growth increases were 15% and 9.6% for the protein and DNA treatments, respectively, but mouse insulin-like growth factor I (mIGF-I) showed a greater increase over the control with DNA (5- to 7-fold) than with protein (3- to 4-fold) administration. The weight increases of several organs and tissues (kidneys, spleen, liver, heart, quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles) were 1.3- to 4.6-fold greater for protein than for DNA administration, which gave a generally more proportional growth. Glucose levels were apparently unaffected, suggesting the absence of effects on glucose tolerance. A gene transfer strategy based on a single hGH-DNA administration thus appears to be comparable to repeated hormone injections for promoting growth and may represent a feasible alternative for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency.

  17. Determination of dark energy by the Einstein Telescope: Comparing with CMB, BAO, and SNIa observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; van den Broeck, C.; Baskaran, D.; Li, T. G. F.

    2011-01-01

    A design study is currently in progress for a third-generation gravitational-wave (GW) detector called the Einstein Telescope (ET). An important kind of source for ET will be the inspiral and merger of binary neutron stars up to z˜2. If binary neutron star mergers are the progenitors of short-hard γ-ray bursts, then some fraction of them will be seen both electromagnetically and through GW, so that the luminosity distance and the redshift of the source can be determined separately. An important property of these “standard sirens” is that they are self-calibrating: the luminosity distance can be inferred directly from the GW signal, with no need for a cosmic distance ladder. Thus, standard sirens will provide a powerful independent check of the ΛCDM model. In previous work, estimates were made of how well ET would be able to measure a subset of the cosmological parameters (such as the dark energy parameter w0) it will have access to, assuming that the others had been determined to great accuracy by alternative means. Here we perform a more careful analysis by explicitly using the potential Planck cosmic microwave background data as prior information for these other parameters. We find that ET will be able to constrain w0 and wa with accuracies Δw0=0.099 and Δwa=0.302, respectively. These results are compared with projected accuracies for the JDEM baryon acoustic oscillations project and the SNAP type Ia supernovae observations.

  18. Determination of dark energy by the Einstein Telescope: Comparing with CMB, BAO, and SNIa observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W.; Baskaran, D.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Li, T. G. F.

    2011-01-15

    A design study is currently in progress for a third-generation gravitational-wave (GW) detector called the Einstein Telescope (ET). An important kind of source for ET will be the inspiral and merger of binary neutron stars up to z{approx}2. If binary neutron star mergers are the progenitors of short-hard {gamma}-ray bursts, then some fraction of them will be seen both electromagnetically and through GW, so that the luminosity distance and the redshift of the source can be determined separately. An important property of these 'standard sirens' is that they are self-calibrating: the luminosity distance can be inferred directly from the GW signal, with no need for a cosmic distance ladder. Thus, standard sirens will provide a powerful independent check of the {Lambda}CDM model. In previous work, estimates were made of how well ET would be able to measure a subset of the cosmological parameters (such as the dark energy parameter w{sub 0}) it will have access to, assuming that the others had been determined to great accuracy by alternative means. Here we perform a more careful analysis by explicitly using the potential Planck cosmic microwave background data as prior information for these other parameters. We find that ET will be able to constrain w{sub 0} and w{sub a} with accuracies {Delta}w{sub 0}=0.099 and {Delta}w{sub a}=0.302, respectively. These results are compared with projected accuracies for the JDEM baryon acoustic oscillations project and the SNAP type Ia supernovae observations.

  19. Filtering and Gridding Satellite Observations of Cloud Variables to Compare with Climate Model Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, K.; Nasiri, S. L.; Smith, N.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate models have improved considerably over the years, yet clouds still represent a large factor of uncertainty for these models. Comparisons of model-simulated cloud variables with equivalent satellite cloud products are the best way to start diagnosing the differences between model output and observations. Gridded (level 3) cloud products from many different satellites and instruments are required for a full analysis, but these products are created by different science teams using different algorithms and filtering criteria to create similar, but not directly comparable, cloud products. This study makes use of a recently developed uniform space-time gridding algorithm to create a new set of gridded cloud products from each satellite instrument's level 2 data of interest which are each filtered using the same criteria, allowing for a more direct comparison between satellite products. The filtering is done via several variables such as cloud top pressure/height, thermodynamic phase, optical properties, satellite viewing angle, and sun zenith angle. The filtering criteria are determined based on the variable being analyzed and the science question at hand. Each comparison of different variables may require different filtering strategies as no single approach is appropriate for all problems. Beyond inter-satellite data comparison, these new sets of uniformly gridded satellite products can also be used for comparison with model-simulated cloud variables. Of particular interest to this study are the differences in the vertical distributions of ice and liquid water content between the satellite retrievals and model simulations, especially in the mid-troposphere where there are mixed-phase clouds to consider. This presentation will demonstrate the proof of concept through comparisons of cloud water path from Aqua MODIS retrievals and NASA GISS-E2-[R/H] model simulations archived in the CMIP5 data portal.

  20. CFD Simulations of Supersonic Highly Swirling Flow Exiting a Turbine Vane Row Compared with Experimental Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff S.; Richardson, Brian R.; Schmauch, Preston; Kenny, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been heavily involved in developing the J2-X engine. The Center has been testing a Work Horse Gas Generator (WHGG) to supply gas products to J2-X turbine components at realistic flight-like operating conditions. Three-dimensional time accurate CFD simulations and analytical fluid analysis have been performed to support WHGG tests at MSFC. The general purpose CFD program LOCI/Chem was utilized to simulate flow of products from the WHGG through a turbine manifold, a stationary row of turbine vanes, into a Can and orifice assembly used to control the back pressure at the turbine vane row and finally through an aspirator plate and flame bucket. Simulations showed that supersonic swirling flow downstream of the turbine imparted a much higher pressure on the Can wall than expected for a non-swirling flow. This result was verified by developing an analytical model that predicts wall pressure due to swirling flow. The CFD simulations predicted that the higher downstream pressure would cause the pressure drop across the nozzle row to be approximately half the value of the test objective. With CFD support, a redesign of the Can orifice and aspirator plate was performed. WHGG experimental results and observations compared well with pre-test and post-test CFD simulations. CFD simulations for both quasi-static and transient test conditions correctly predicted the pressure environment downstream of the turbine row and the behavior of the gas generator product plume as it exited the WHGG test article, impacted the flame bucket and interacted with the external environment.

  1. Russian geomagnetic recordings in 1850-1862 compared to modern observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljanen, Ari; Myllys, Minna; Nevanlinna, Heikki

    2014-04-01

    We analyse geomagnetic recordings at four subauroral and midlatitude Russian observatories in 1850-1862. The data consist of spot readings made once in hour of the north and east components of the magnetic field. We use the hourly change of the horizontal field vector as the measure of activity. We compare these values to data from modern observatories at corresponding magnetic latitudes (Nurmijärvi, Finland, magnetic latitude ~57 N; Tartu, Estonia, ~54.5 N; Dourbes, Belgium, ~46 N) by reducing their data to the 1-h format. The largest variations at the Russian observatories occurred during the Carrington storm in September 1859 and they reached about 1000 nT/h, which was the instrumental off-scale limit. When the time stamp for the spot readings happens to be optimal, the top variation in the Nurmijärvi data is about 3700 nT/h (July 1982), and at Tartu the maximum is about 1600 nT/h (November 2004). At a midlatitude site Nertchinsk in Russia (magnetic latitude ~45 N), the variation during the Carrington storm was at the off-scale limit, and exceeded the value observed at Dourbes during the Halloween storm in October 2003. At Nertchinsk, the Carrington event was at least four times larger than any other storm in 1850-1862. Despite the limitations of the old recordings and in using only hourly spot readings, the Carrington storm was definitely a very large event at midlatitudes. At higher latitudes, it remains somewhat unclear whether it exceeds the largest modern storms, especially the one in July 1982.

  2. In situ observation of fractal growth during a-Si crystallization in a Cu3Si matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, S. W.; Li, Jian; Mayer, J. W.

    1991-11-01

    We observe that the crystallization of amorphous Si thin films in contact with a copper silicide layer occurs at a temperature of around 485 °C in the form of dendrites with a fractal dimension of 1.7. The in situ observation of both the silicidation reaction, forming Cu3Si, and the subsequent crystallization of the remaining amorphous silicon in the silicide matrix, were observed during annealing in a transmission electron microscope. We estimate the radial growth rate of these crystallites at 5 nm/s at this temperature. The fractal dimension of the dendrites indicates a growth process similar to one known as diffusion-limited aggregation.

  3. Comparative effects of plant growth regulators on leaf and stem explants of Labisia pumila var. alata

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Anna Pick Kiong; Tan, Kinn Poay; Hussein, Sobri

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Labisia pumila var. alata, commonly known as ‘Kacip Fatimah’ or ‘Selusuh Fatimah’ in Southeast Asia, is traditionally used by members of the Malay community because of its post-partum medicinal properties. Its various pharmaceutical applications cause an excessive harvesting and lead to serious shortage in natural habitat. Thus, this in vitro propagation study investigated the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on in vitro leaf and stem explants of L. pumila. Methods: The capabilities of callus, shoot, and root formation were evaluated by culturing both explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with various PGRs at the concentrations of 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 mg/L. Results: Medium supplemented with 3 mg/L indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) showed the optimal callogenesis from both leaf and stem explants with (72.34±19.55)% and (70.40±14.14)% efficacy, respectively. IBA was also found to be the most efficient PGR for root induction. A total of (50.00±7.07)% and (77.78±16.47)% of root formation were obtained from the in vitro stem and leaf explants after being cultured for (26.5±5.0) and (30.0±8.5) d in the medium supplemented with 1 and 3 mg/L of IBA, respectively. Shoot formation was only observed in stem explant, with the maximum percentage of formation ((100.00±0.00)%) that was obtained in 1 mg/L zeatin after (11.0±2.8) d of culture. Conclusions: Callus, roots, and shoots can be induced from in vitro leaf and stem explants of L. pumila through the manipulation of types and concentrations of PGRs. PMID:23825148

  4. Comparative effects of plant growth regulators on leaf and stem explants of Labisia pumila var. alata.

    PubMed

    Ling, Anna Pick Kiong; Tan, Kinn Poay; Hussein, Sobri

    2013-07-01

    Labisia pumila var. alata, commonly known as 'Kacip Fatimah' or 'Selusuh Fatimah' in Southeast Asia, is traditionally used by members of the Malay community because of its post-partum medicinal properties. Its various pharmaceutical applications cause an excessive harvesting and lead to serious shortage in natural habitat. Thus, this in vitro propagation study investigated the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on in vitro leaf and stem explants of L. pumila. The capabilities of callus, shoot, and root formation were evaluated by culturing both explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with various PGRs at the concentrations of 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 mg/L. Medium supplemented with 3 mg/L indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) showed the optimal callogenesis from both leaf and stem explants with (72.34 ± 19.55)% and (70.40 ± 14.14)% efficacy, respectively. IBA was also found to be the most efficient PGR for root induction. A total of (50.00 ± 7.07)% and (77.78 ± 16.47)% of root formation were obtained from the in vitro stem and leaf explants after being cultured for (26.5 ± 5.0) and (30.0 ± 8.5) d in the medium supplemented with 1 and 3 mg/L of IBA, respectively. Shoot formation was only observed in stem explant, with the maximum percentage of formation ((100.00 ± 0.00)%) that was obtained in 1 mg/L zeatin after (11.0 ± 2.8) d of culture. Callus, roots, and shoots can be induced from in vitro leaf and stem explants of L. pumila through the manipulation of types and concentrations of PGRs.

  5. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED: 1. Observed characteristics of the auroral electron energies compared with observations performed using HST/STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; André, Nicolas; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Shiota, Daikou; Tadokoro, Hiroyasu; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Temporal variation of Jupiter's northern aurora is detected using the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics (EXCEED) on board JAXA's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. The wavelength coverage of EXCEED includes the H2 Lyman and Werner bands at 80-148 nm from the entire northern polar region. The prominent periodic modulation of the observed emission corresponds to the rotation of Jupiter's main auroral oval through the aperture, with additional superposed -50%-100% temporal variations. The hydrocarbon color ratio (CR) adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED is defined as the ratio of the emission intensity in the long wavelength range of 138.5-144.8 nm to that in the short wavelength range of 126.3-130 nm. This CR varies with the planetary rotation phase. Short- (within one planetary rotation) and long-term (> one planetary rotation) enhancements of the auroral power are observed in both wavelength ranges and result in a small CR variation. The occurrence timing of the auroral power enhancement does not clearly depend on the central meridian longitude. Despite the limitations of the wavelength coverage and the large field of view of the observation, the auroral spectra and CR-brightness distribution measured using EXCEED are consistent with other observations.

  6. Distinct Cloud Droplet Growth Kinetics Observed Above the Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, C. R.; Chuang, P. Y.; Nenes, A.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of aerosols on cloud properties is an important modulator of the climate system, and remains one of the most uncertain components of the anthropogenic influence on the radiative budget of the atmosphere. Traditional Kohler theory predicts the ability of an atmospheric particle of known size and composition to act as a cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) at equilibrium. However, it is not known to what extent particles exist in the atmosphere that may be prevented from acting as CCN by kinetic limitations. We measured the rate of cloud droplet formation at various sites across the United States during the summer of 2006. Our results suggested that kinetically-limited drops, with apparent mass accommodation coefficients (α) up to 10× lower than those observed for lab-generated ammonium sulfate particles, may be prevalent in the free troposphere. Here we report the results of similar measurements made in 2007 at a high-elevation site near the California coast that is typically above the marine boundary layer. We found that the ambient aerosol at this site was an external mixture of particles with distinct growth kinetics: approximately 50% of the time, we observed two or more modes in the α spectrum. The slower mode typically contained 25% to 50% of the total CCN at ~0.4% supersaturation. These results cannot be explained without incorporating kinetic effects into Kohler theory. By varying the chamber parameters (supersaturation ratio, residence time), we determine whether these kinetic limitations are more consistent with a model of lower α or a delay to activation.

  7. In situ observation of containerless protein crystallization by magnetically levitating crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Syou; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi; Udagawa, Chikako; Morimoto, Shotaro; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    We report on the results of the crystal growth of hen-egg lysozyme by magnetically levitating crystals in a small amount of buffer solution. The concentrations of lysozyme and the precipitating agent (gadolinium chloride) were 6.53 wt % and 0.362 mol/kg, respectively. Gadolinium chloride, which induces the magneto-Archimedes effect, was utilized to levitate the crystals with Bz · (dBz/dz) = 22.46 T2/m, where Bz is the vertical (z) component of the magnetic flux density vector. Although the collected crystals were small, we succeeded in maintaining the levitation of the crystals into a specific place in the liquid phase from the beginning of nucleation. In situ observation revealed that a state of pseudo-weightlessness was generated in the vicinity of the magnet bore edge, and small crystals were concentrated inside the domain moving along an hourglass-shaped surface. We found by numerical computations that the formation of the hourglass-shaped domain is attributable to the radial component of the magnetic force.

  8. A new design strategy for observing lithium oxide growth-evolution interactions using geometric catalyst positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Won -Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Li, Jinyang; Tong, Xiao; Taylor, Andre D.

    2016-06-21

    Understanding the catalyzed formation and evolution of lithium-oxide products in Li-O2 batteries is central to the development of next-generation energy storage technology. Catalytic sites, while effective in lowering reaction barriers, often become deactivated when placed on the surface of an oxygen electrode due to passivation by solid products. Here we investigate a mechanism for alleviating catalyst deactivation by dispersing Pd catalytic sites away from the oxygen electrode surface in a well-structured anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous membrane interlayer. We observe the cross-sectional product growth and evolution in Li-O2 cells by characterizing products that grow from the electrode surface. Morphological and structural details of the products in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed cells are investigated independently from the influence of the oxygen electrode. We find that the geometric decoration of catalysts far from the conductive electrode surface significantly improves the reaction reversibility by chemically facilitating the oxidation reaction through local coordination with PdO surfaces. Lastly, the influence of the catalyst position on product composition is further verified by ex situ Xray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in addition to morphological studies.

  9. A new design strategy for observing lithium oxide growth-evolution interactions using geometric catalyst positioning

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Won -Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Li, Jinyang; ...

    2016-06-21

    Understanding the catalyzed formation and evolution of lithium-oxide products in Li-O2 batteries is central to the development of next-generation energy storage technology. Catalytic sites, while effective in lowering reaction barriers, often become deactivated when placed on the surface of an oxygen electrode due to passivation by solid products. Here we investigate a mechanism for alleviating catalyst deactivation by dispersing Pd catalytic sites away from the oxygen electrode surface in a well-structured anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous membrane interlayer. We observe the cross-sectional product growth and evolution in Li-O2 cells by characterizing products that grow from the electrode surface. Morphological andmore » structural details of the products in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed cells are investigated independently from the influence of the oxygen electrode. We find that the geometric decoration of catalysts far from the conductive electrode surface significantly improves the reaction reversibility by chemically facilitating the oxidation reaction through local coordination with PdO surfaces. Lastly, the influence of the catalyst position on product composition is further verified by ex situ Xray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in addition to morphological studies.« less

  10. Sonographic Growth Charts for Kidney Length in Normal Korean Children: a Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Kidney length is the most useful parameter for clinical measurement of kidney size, and is useful to distinguish acute kidney injury from chronic kidney disease. In this prospective observational study of 437 normal children aged between 0 and < 13 years, kidney length was measured using sonography. There were good correlations between kidney length and somatic values, including age, weight, height, and body surface area. The rapid growth of height during the first 2 years of life was intimately associated with a similar increase in kidney length, suggesting that height should be considered an important factor correlating with kidney length. Based on our findings, the following regression equation for the reference values of bilateral kidney length for Korean children was obtained: kidney length of the right kidney (cm) = 0.051 × height (cm) + 2.102; kidney length of the left kidney (cm) = 0.051 × height (cm) + 2.280. This equation may aid in the diagnosis of various kidney disorders. PMID:27366007

  11. A new design strategy for observing lithium oxide growth-evolution interactions using geometric catalyst positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Won -Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Li, Jinyang; Tong, Xiao; Taylor, Andre D.

    2016-06-21

    Understanding the catalyzed formation and evolution of lithium-oxide products in Li-O2 batteries is central to the development of next-generation energy storage technology. Catalytic sites, while effective in lowering reaction barriers, often become deactivated when placed on the surface of an oxygen electrode due to passivation by solid products. Here we investigate a mechanism for alleviating catalyst deactivation by dispersing Pd catalytic sites away from the oxygen electrode surface in a well-structured anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous membrane interlayer. We observe the cross-sectional product growth and evolution in Li-O2 cells by characterizing products that grow from the electrode surface. Morphological and structural details of the products in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed cells are investigated independently from the influence of the oxygen electrode. We find that the geometric decoration of catalysts far from the conductive electrode surface significantly improves the reaction reversibility by chemically facilitating the oxidation reaction through local coordination with PdO surfaces. Lastly, the influence of the catalyst position on product composition is further verified by ex situ Xray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in addition to morphological studies.

  12. A New Design Strategy for Observing Lithium Oxide Growth-Evolution Interactions Using Geometric Catalyst Positioning.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Li, Jinyang; Tong, Xiao; Taylor, André D

    2016-08-10

    Understanding the catalyzed formation and evolution of lithium-oxide products in Li-O2 batteries is central to the development of next-generation energy storage technology. Catalytic sites, while effective in lowering reaction barriers, often become deactivated when placed on the surface of an oxygen electrode due to passivation by solid products. Here we investigate a mechanism for alleviating catalyst deactivation by dispersing Pd catalytic sites away from the oxygen electrode surface in a well-structured anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous membrane interlayer. We observe the cross-sectional product growth and evolution in Li-O2 cells by characterizing products that grow from the electrode surface. Morphological and structural details of the products in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed cells are investigated independently from the influence of the oxygen electrode. We find that the geometric decoration of catalysts far from the conductive electrode surface significantly improves the reaction reversibility by chemically facilitating the oxidation reaction through local coordination with PdO surfaces. The influence of the catalyst position on product composition is further verified by ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in addition to morphological studies.

  13. Comparing ecosystem engineering efficiency of two plant species with contrasting growth strategies.

    PubMed

    Bouma, T J; De Vries, M B; Herman, P M J

    2010-09-01

    Many ecosystems are greatly affected by ecosystem engineering, such as coastal salt marshes, where macrophytes trap sediment by reducing hydrodynamic energy. Nevertheless, little is known about the costs and benefits that are imposed on engineering species by the traits that underlie their ecosystem engineering capacity. We addressed this topic by comparing ecosystem engineering efficiency defined as the benefit-cost ratio per unit of biomass investment for two species from the intertidal habitat: the stiff grass Spartina anglica and the flexible grass Puccinellia maritima. These species were selected for their ability to modify their habitat by trapping large quantities of sediment despite their contrasting growth form. On a biomass basis, dissipation of hydrodynamic energy from waves (a proxy for benefits associated with ecosystem engineering capability as it relates to the sediment trapping capability) was strikingly similar for both salt marsh species, indicating that both species are equally effective in modifying their habitat. The drag forces per unit biomass (a proxy for costs associated with ecosystem engineering ability as it relates to the requirements on tissue construction and shoot anchoring to prevent breaking and/or washing away) were slightly higher in the species with flexible shoots. As a result, stiff Spartina vegetation had slightly higher ecosystem engineering efficiency, due to lower engineering costs rather than to a higher engineering effect. Thus, Spartina is a slightly more efficient rather than a more effective ecosystem engineer. Ecosystem engineering efficiency was found to be a species-specific characteristic, independent of vegetation density and relatively constant in space. Analyzing ecosystem engineering by quantifying trade-offs offers a useful way toward developing a better understanding of different engineering strategies.

  14. Growth

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; George A. Schier

    1985-01-01

    This chapter considers aspen growth as a process, and discusses some characteristics of the growth and development of trees and stands. For the most part, factors affecting growth are discussed elsewhere, particularly in the GENETICS AND VARIATION chapter and in chapters in PART 11. ECOLOGY. Aspen growth as it relates to wood production is examined in the WOOD RESOURCE...

  15. Effect of puberty on rates of bone growth and mineralisation: with observations in male delayed puberty.

    PubMed Central

    Krabbe, S; Christiansen, C; Rødbro, P; Transbøl, I

    1979-01-01

    The bone mineral content (BMC) and body height were measured in 301 normal children and adolescents aged 7--20 years, and in 8 boys with constitutional delayed puberty aged 14--17 years. Serum testosterone was measured in the last group as well as in a subpopulation of the normal children and adolescents. The growth spurt, which coincided with a steep increase of serum testosterone in boys, indicated a great change in skeletal growth and mineralisation in both sexes. After the growth spurt, linear growth slowed down considerably while bone mineralisation rose steeply. When low levels of serum testosterone were maintained, as in delayed puberty, these combined changes of skeletal growth and mineralisation did not occur. It is suggested that gonadal hormones are the true initiators of the short-lived growth spurt as well as of prolonged acceleration of bone mineralisation. PMID:533299

  16. Comparing nonsynergistic gamma models with interaction models to predict growth of emetic Bacillus cereus when using combinations of pH and individual undissociated acids as growth-limiting factors.

    PubMed

    Biesta-Peters, Elisabeth G; Reij, Martine W; Gorris, Leon G M; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2010-09-01

    A combination of multiple hurdles to limit microbial growth is frequently applied in foods to achieve an overall level of protection. Quantification of hurdle technology aims at identifying synergistic or multiplicative effects and is still being developed. The gamma hypothesis states that inhibitory environmental factors aiming at limiting microbial growth rates combine in a multiplicative manner rather than synergistically. Its validity was tested here with respect to the use of pH and various concentrations of undissociated acids, i.e., acetic, lactic, propionic, and formic acids, to control growth of Bacillus cereus in brain heart infusion broth. The key growth parameter considered was the maximum specific growth rate, mu(max), as observed by determination of optical density. A variety of models from the literature describing the effects of various pH values and undissociated acid concentrations on mu(max) were fitted to experimental data sets and compared based on a predefined set of selection criteria, and the best models were selected. The cardinal model developed by Rosso (for pH dependency) and the model developed by Luong (for undissociated acid) were found to provide the best fit and were combined in a gamma model with good predictive performance. The introduction of synergy factors into the models was not able to improve the quality of the prediction. On the contrary, inclusion of synergy factors led to an overestimation of the growth boundary, with the inherent possibility of leading to underestimation of the risk under the conditions tested in this research.

  17. Association between small for gestational age and intrauterine fetal death: comparing a customized South Korean growth standard versus a population-based fetal growth chart.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myoungjin; Baek, Min Jung; Ahn, Eunhee; Odibo, Anthony O

    2016-03-01

    To determine if a customized growth standard developed for an ethnically homogeneous South Korean population is better at identifying (SGA) fetuses at risk for intra-uterine fetal death (IUFD), compared with a current population based-growth standard. A retrospective cohort study comparing the identification of SGA fetuses at risk for IUFD using a customized versus a population based-chart. The association between a SGA infant defined as a birth weight <10th percentile using the South Korean population chart versus the customized chart and IUFD were compared. Intrauterine fetal death was defined as fetal demise occurring after 20 weeks gestation. Statistical analyses including OR, 95% confidence interval (CI), and screening accuracy using each chart were performed. The customized singleton chart identified 11 (8.2%) of the SGA pregnancies detected by the population chart and classified 15 additional fetuses as SGA. Those identified as SGA using the customized chart had an OR for IUFD that was approximately 15 times as high as those identified using the population chart. The customized chart also showed a higher sensitivity and specificity for identifying SGA pregnancies at risk for IUFD. In this ethnically homogenous population, the customized growth chart showed improved discrimination in identifying SGA pregnancies at risk for fetal death than the population-based growth chart.

  18. Development of density plumes of dissolved CO2: Comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Karen; Vosper, Hayley; Rochelle, Chris; Noy, Dave; Chadwick, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The long-term trapping of CO2 within deep geological storage reservoirs will be dependent upon CO2-water-rock geochemical reactions. The first, and most important, steps in this process will be dissolution of CO2 into the reservoir porewater and the transport of this dissolved CO2 through the reservoir. As part of the CO2CARE project we have investigated these via laboratory tests using a water-filled porous medium. Key experimental parameters were measured to determine system permeability, so that a high-resolution numerical model could be built in an attempt to reproduce the observed system behaviour. The Hele-Shaw cell comprised two glass sheets 65 cm wide and 36 cm high, separated by a spacing of 1.1 mm, and filled with closely-packed glass beads 0.4-0.6 mm in diameter. The surface of the glass was treated to prevent the formation of a higher permeability zone along this interface. A pH-sensitive dye was added to the pore-filling water to show where it had been acidified due to the presence of CO2. CO2 gas was introduced to a space at the top of the cell, which created a thin, diffusion-controlled boundary layer of CO2-rich water below the CO2-water interface. CO2 dissolution increased water density, resulting in gravitational instabilities and the formation of many small, downward-migrating plumes. Time-lapse photography was used to track the formation and progress of these plumes. As the plumes grew they increased in length relative to their width, and decreased in number over time. They also became more complex with time, splitting and forming several lobes, whose outer edges became more diffuse as they mixed with the CO2-poor water. The onset time of plume development and the horizontal wavelength (spacing) of the descending plumes are diagnostic measures of the system properties, notably permeability. They were analysed from the time-lapse images and expressed as probability density functions based on histograms of the observations. The derived

  19. Observation of new particle formation and growth events in Asian continental outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yumi; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Kwang-Yul; Lim, Han-Cheol; Ryu, Jegyu

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on 3-year continuous measurements (January 2008-December 2010) of aerosol number size distributions recorded with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) at two regional background stations, Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) and Korea Global Atmosphere Watch Center (KGAWC), in Korea. We identified new particle formation and growth (NPF) events by applying the Cyclostationary Empirical Orthogonal Function (CSEOF) technique to aerosol number size distributions. Based on the first mode loading vectors and the corresponding principle components in the CSEOF analysis, we classified strong, weak, and non NPF days. A strong NPF event was observed on 7.5% of days (60 days out of a total 800 days) at GCO and on 14.6% of days (140 days out of a total 958 days) at KGAWC. The maximum occurrence of strong NPF events was reported in spring at GCO, but in winter at KGAWC. Only 16 of these days were considered as simultaneous NPF events, and 7 days were identical NPF events. The airmass history analysis on simultaneous NPF days indicated the NPF events to be associated with a fast-moving cold and dry airmass from the Asian continent after the passage of a frontal system. The particle formation rate (FR) and growth rate (GR) were estimated to be 1.44 (1.20) cm-3 s-1 and 4.4 (4.7) nm h-1, respectively, at GCO and KGAWC (in parentheses). Almost identical values for the condensation sink were estimated in strong NPF (8.3 × 10-3 s-1) and non NPF (8.2 × 10-3 s-1) events at GCO, whereas the condensation sink for strong NPF days (8.5 × 10-5 s-1) was lower than that of non NPF days (1.1 × 10-2 s-1) at KGAWC. The FR, GR, condensation sink, and vapor source rate at both GCO and KGAWC were lower than those reported in polluted urban areas, but higher than those at clean sites.

  20. A comparative field study of growth and survival of Sierran conifer seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    This study is a comparison of seedling growth and survival of seven species of conifers that make up the mid-elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest--Abies concolor, Abies magnifica, Calocedrus decurrens, Pinus jeffreyi, Pinus lambertiana, Pinus ponderosa, and Sequoiadendron giganteum. The field experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that seedling demography is affected by the study species` relatively shade and drought tolerances. Six discrete treatments were created in the first experiment by using three elevations (1,600 m, 1,900, m, and 2,200 m) and two natural light levels (closed canopy shade and open gap sun) at each elevation. One or two-year old seedlings were planted in the ground in replicate plots in each treatment and followed for two growing seasons. Four responses were analyzed--survival, height growth, diameter growth, and mass growth (total mass as well as root mass and shoot mass separately).

  1. Comparative Effect of ACTH and Related Peptides on Proliferation and Growth of Rat Adrenal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Claudimara Ferini Pacicco; de Mendonca, Pedro O. R.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is a polypeptide precursor known to yield biologically active peptides related to a range of functions. These active peptides include the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which is essential for maintenance of adrenal growth and steroidogenesis, and the alpha-melanocyte stimulation hormone, which plays a key role in energy homeostasis. However, the role of the highly conserved N-terminal region of POMC peptide fragments has begun to be unraveled only recently. Here, we review the cascade of events involved in regulation of proliferation and growth of murine adrenal cortex triggered by ACTH and other POMC-derived peptides. Key findings regarding signaling pathways and modulation of genes and proteins required for the regulation of adrenal growth are summarized. We have outlined the known mechanisms as well as future challenges for research on the regulation of adrenal proliferation and growth triggered by these peptides. PMID:27242663

  2. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  3. Ambient observations of dimers from terpene oxidation in the gas phase: Implications for new particle formation and growth: Ambient Observations of Gas-Phase Dimers

    DOE PAGES

    Mohr, Claudia; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Yli-Juuti, Taina; ...

    2017-03-28

    Here, we present ambient observations of dimeric monoterpene oxidation products (C16–20HyO6–9) in gas and particle phases in the boreal forest in Finland in spring 2013 and 2014, detected with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer with a filter inlet for gases and aerosols employing acetate and iodide as reagent ions. These are among the first online dual-phase observations of such dimers in the atmosphere. Estimated saturation concentrations of 10-15 to 10-6 µg m-3 (based on observed thermal desorptions and group-contribution methods) and measured gas-phase concentrations of 10-3 to 10-2 µg m-3 (~106–107 molecules cm-3) corroborate a gas-phase formation mechanism. Regular newmore » particle formation (NPF) events allowed insights into the potential role dimers may play for atmospheric NPF and growth. The observationally constrained Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth indicates a contribution of ~5% to early stage particle growth from the ~60 gaseous dimer compounds.« less

  4. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  5. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  6. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuk, Jong Min; Park, Jungwon; Ercius, Peter; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hellebusch, Danny J.; Crommie, Michael F.; Lee, Jeong Yong; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-12-12

    We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in-situ electron microscopy based upon entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. We employ this cell to achieve high-resolution imaging of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. The ability to directly image and resolve critical steps at atomic resolution provides new insights into nanocrystal coalescence and reshaping during growth.

  7. Night Airglow Observations from Orbiting Spacecraft Compared with Measurements from Rockets.

    PubMed

    Koomen, M J; Gulledge, I S; Packer, D M; Tousey, R

    1963-06-07

    A luminous band around the night-time horizon, observed from orbiting capsules by J. H. Glenn and M. S. Carpenter, and identified as the horizon enhancement of the night airglow, is detected regularly in rocket-borne studies of night airglow. Values of luminance and dip angle of this band derived from Carpenter's observations agree remarkably well with values obtained from rocket data. The rocket results, however, do not support Carpenter's observation that the emission which he saw was largely the atomic oxygen line at 5577 A, but assign the principal luminosity to the green continuum.

  8. Comparative analysis of decametre "drift pair" bursts observed in 2002 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volvach, Ya. S.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report about new observations of solar "drift pair" (DP) bursts by means of the UTR-2 radio telescope at frequencies 10-30 MHz. Our experimental data include both "forward" and "reverse" bursts with high frequency and time resolution. The records of 301 bursts, observed in 10-12 July of 2015, are investigated. The main properties of these bursts (frequency bandwidth, central frequency and others) have been analysed. In this report our main attention is paid to the comparison of our observations with the similar observations of decametre DPs performed earlier during 13-15 July of 2002 in the same frequency range. Common features of DPs in the two different pieces of data samples have been found. This may indicate the possible presence of stability in the frequency-time properties of decametre DPs from one cycle of solar activity to another.

  9. Comparative study of aerosols observed by YAG lidar and airborne detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirono, M.; Fujiwara, M.; Shibata, T.

    1985-01-01

    The causal relationships of very large (tropical) volcanic eruptions and El Nino Southern Oscillations (ENSO) based on the unequal atmospheric heating by aerosols observed by lidar and airborne detectors are discussed.

  10. Comparative study of aerosols observed by YAG lidar and airborne detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirono, M.; Fujiwara, M.; Shibata, T.

    1985-01-01

    The causal relationships of very large (tropical) volcanic eruptions and El Nino Southern Oscillations (ENSO) based on the unequal atmospheric heating by aerosols observed by lidar and airborne detectors are discussed.

  11. Comparative secretome analysis of Streptomyces scabiei during growth in the presence or absence of potato suberin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Suberin is a recalcitrant plant biopolymer composed of a polyphenolic and a polyaliphatic domain. Although suberin contributes to a significant portion of soil organic matter, the biological process of suberin degradation is poorly characterized. It has been suggested that Streptomyces scabiei, a plant pathogenic bacterium, can produce suberin-degrading enzymes. In this study, a comparative analysis of the S. scabiei secretome from culture media supplemented or not with potato suberin was carried out to identify enzymes that could be involved in suberin degradation. Methods S. scabiei was grown in the presence of casein only or in the presence of both casein and suberin. Extracellular proteins from 1-, 3- and 5-day-old supernatants were analyzed by LC-MS/MS to determine their putative functions. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to monitor the expression level of genes encoding several proteins potentially involved in suberin degradation. Results The effect of suberin on the extracellular protein profile of S. scabiei strain has been analyzed. A total of 246 proteins were found to be common in the data sets from both casein medium (CM) and casein-suberin medium (CSM), whereas 124 and 139 proteins were detected only in CM or CSM, respectively. The identified proteins could be divided into 19 functional groups. Two functional groups of proteins (degradation of aromatic compounds and secondary metabolism) were only associated with the CSM. A high proportion of the proteins found to be either exclusively produced, or overproduced, in presence of suberin were involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Most of the proteins included in the lipid metabolism class have been detected in CSM. Apart from lipid metabolism proteins, other identified proteins, particularly two feruloyl esterases, may also actively participate in the breakdown of suberin architecture. Both feruloyl esterase genes were overexpressed between 30 to 340 times in the presence of suberin. Conclusion

  12. Validity of the modified RULA for computer workers and reliability of one observation compared to six.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Yafa; Lerman, Yehuda; Gefen, Amit; Ratzon, Navah Z

    2014-01-01

    Awkward body posture while typing is associated with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Valid rapid assessment of computer workers' body posture is essential for the prevention of MSD among this large population. This study aimed to examine the validity of the modified rapid upper limb assessment (mRULA) which adjusted the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) for computer workers. Moreover, this study examines whether one observation during a working day is sufficient or more observations are needed. A total of 29 right-handed computer workers were recruited. RULA and mRULA were conducted. The observations were then repeated six times at one-hour intervals. A significant moderate correlation (r = 0.6 and r = 0.7 for mouse and keyboard, respectively) was found between the assessments. No significant differences were found between one observation and six observations per working day. The mRULA was found to be valid for the assessment of computer workers, and one observation was sufficient to assess the work-related risk factor.

  13. Effects of amines on particle growth observed in new particle formation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Ye, Xingnan; Jiang, Shuqing; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin; Xie, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ruyu

    2016-01-01

    Particle size distributions in the range of 0.01-10 µm were measured in urban Shanghai in the summer of 2013 using a Wide-range Particle Spectrometer (WPS). Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected concurrently using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI), which aided our in-depth understanding of the new particle formation (NPF) mechanism in the polluted Yangtze River Delta area. During the observations, 16 NPF events occurred at high temperatures (~34.7°C) on clear and sunny days. In the ammonium-poor PM1.0 (particulate matter less than 1.0 µm), sulfate and ammonium accounted for 92% of the total water-soluble inorganic species. Six aminiums were detected in these MOUDI samples, among which the group of diethylaminium and trimethylaminium (DEAH+ + TMAH+) was the most abundant. The very high level of aminiums (average concentration up to 86.4 ng m-3 in PM1.8), together with highly acidic aerosols, provided insight into the frequent NPF events. The high mass ratio of total aminiums to NH4+ (>0.2 for PM0.056) further highlighted the important role of amines in promoting NPF. The concentration of DEAH+ + TMAH+ in new particles below 180 nm was strongly correlated with aerosol phase acidity, indicating that acid-base reactions dominated the aminium formation in NPF events. The unexpected enhancement of DEAH+ + TMAH+ on a nonevent day was attributed to the transportation of an SO2 plume. Our results reveal that the heterogeneous uptake of amines is dominated by the acid-base reaction mechanism, which can effectively contribute to particle growth in NPF events.

  14. Adult height after long term treatment with recombinant growth hormone for idiopathic isolated growth hormone deficiency: observational follow up study of the French population based registry

    PubMed Central

    Carel, Jean-Claude; Ecosse, Emmanuel; Nicolino, Marc; Tauber, Maïté; Leger, Juliane; Cabrol, Sylvie; Bastié-Sigeac, Irène; Chaussain, Jean-Louis; Coste, Joël

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of recombinant growth hormone for increasing adult height in children treated for idiopathic isolated growth hormone deficiency. Design Observational follow up study. Setting Population based registry. Participants All 2852 French children diagnosed as having isolated idiopathic growth hormone deficiency whose treatment started between 1987 and 1992 and ended before 1996. Main outcome measures Change in height between the start of treatment and adulthood; classification of patients according to whether treatment was completed as scheduled or stopped early. Results Adult height was obtained for 2165 (76%) patients. The mean dose of growth hormone at start of treatment was 0.42 IU/kg/week. Height gain was 1.1 (SD 0.9) standard deviation (SD) scores, resulting in an adult height of –1.6 (0.9) SD score (girls, 154 (5) cm; boys, 167 (6) cm). Patients who completed the treatment gained 1.0 (0.7) SD score of height in 3.6 (1.4) years. Patients with treatments stopped early gained 0.6 (0.6) SD score in 2.7 (1.4) years while receiving treatment and a further 0.4 (0.9) SD score after the end of treatment. Most of the variation in height gain was explained by regression towards the mean, patients' characteristics, and delay in starting puberty. Severe growth hormone deficiency was associated with better outcome. Each year of treatment was associated with a gain of 0.2 SD score(1.3 cm). Conclusion The effect of growth hormone is unclear in many patients treated for so called idiopathic isolated growth hormone deficiency. Most of the patients have pubertal delay and a spontaneous growth potential, which must be taken into account when measuring the effect and cost effectiveness of treatments. Growth hormone deficiency should be clearly distinguished from pubertal delay, and criteria should restrict the definition to patients with severely and permanently altered growth hormone secretion as our results support the use of growth hormone in

  15. Comparative Growth Behaviour and Biofunctionality of Lactic Acid Bacteria During Fermentation of Soy Milk and Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Hati, Subrota; Patel, Nikita; Mandal, Surajit

    2017-04-29

    The study reports the growth, acidification and proteolysis of eight selected lactic acid bacteria in skim and soy milk. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and antimicrobial profiles of skim and soy milk fermented by the lactic acid bacteria were also determined. Among eight lactic cultures (S. thermophilus MD2, L. helveticus V3, L. rhamnosus NS6, L. rhamnosus NS4, L. bulgaricus NCDC 09, L. acidophilus NCDC 15, L. acidophilus NCDC 298 and L. helveticus NCDC 292) studied, L. bulgaricus NCDC 09 and S. thermophilus MD2 decreased the pH of skim and soy milk in greater extent. Acid production (i.e. titratable acidity) by L. bulgaricus NCDC 09 and L. helveticus V3 was higher than other strains. Higher viable counts were observed in S. thermophilus MD2 and L. helveticus V3. Higher proteolysis was exhibited by S. thermophilus MD2 and L. rhamnosus NS6 in both skim and soy milk. Milk fermented by S. thermophilus (MD2) exhibited highest angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. Antimicrobial activities of cell-free supernatant of milk fermented by S. thermophilus MD2 and L. helveticus V3 were higher. All the tested lactic acid bacteria performed better in skim milk as compared to soy milk.

  16. In Vivo Bioluminescence Tomography for Monitoring Breast Tumor Growth and Metastatic Spreading: Comparative Study and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mollard, Séverine; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Giacometti, Sarah; Serdjebi, Cindy; Benzekry, Sebastien; Ciccolini, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the reliability and precision of Diffuse Luminescent Imaging Tomography (DLIT) for monitoring primary tumor and metastatic spreading in breast cancer mice, and to develop a biomathematical model to describe the collected data. Using orthotopic mammary fat pad model of breast cancer (MDAMB231-Luc) in mice, we monitored tumor and metastatic spreading by three-dimensional (3D) bioluminescence and cross-validated it with standard bioluminescence imaging, caliper measurement and necropsy examination. DLIT imaging proved to be reproducible and reliable throughout time. It was possible to discriminate secondary lesions from the main breast cancer, without removing the primary tumor. Preferential metastatic sites were lungs, peritoneum and lymph nodes. Necropsy examinations confirmed DLIT measurements. Marked differences in growth profiles were observed, with an overestimation of the exponential phase when using a caliper as compared with bioluminescence. Our mathematical model taking into account the balance between living and necrotic cells proved to be able to reproduce the experimental data obtained with a caliper or DLIT imaging, because it could discriminate proliferative living cells from a more composite mass consisting of tumor cells, necrotic cell, or inflammatory tissues. DLIT imaging combined with mathematical modeling could be a powerful and informative tool in experimental oncology. PMID:27812027

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of solid state recrystallization I: Observation of grain growth in annealed iron nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jinfan; Bartell, Lawrence S.

    2012-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of solid state recrystallization and grain growth in iron nanoparticles containing 1436 atoms were carried out. During the period of relaxation of supercooled liquid drops and during thermal annealing of the solids they froze to, changes in disorder were followed by monitoring changes in energy and the migration of grain boundaries. All 27 polycrystalline nanoparticles, which were generated with different grain boundaries, were observed to recystallize into single crystals during annealing. Larger grains consumed the smaller ones. In particular, two sets of solid particles, designated as A and B, each with two grains, were treated to generate 18 members of each set with different thermal histories. This provided small ensembles (of 18 members each) from which rates at which the larger grain engulfed the smaller one, could be determined. The rate was higher, the smaller the degree of misorientation between the grains, a result contrary to the general rule based on published experiments, but the reason was clear. Crystal A, which happened to have a somewhat lower angle of misorientation, also had a higher population of defects, as confirmed by its higher energy. Accordingly, its driving force to recrystallize was greater. Although the mechanism of recrystallization is commonly called nucleation, our results, which probe the system on an atomic scale, were not able to identify nuclei unequivocally. By contrast, our technique can and does reveal nuclei in the freezing of liquids and in transformations from one solid phase to another. An alternative rationale for a nucleation-like process in our results is proposed. - Graphical Abstract: Time dependence of energy per atom in the quenching of liquid nanoparticles A-C of iron. Nanoparticle C freezes directly into a single crystal but A and B freeze to solids with two grains. A and B eventually recrystallize into single crystals. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid state material

  18. Using data assimilation to compare models of Mars and Venus atmospheres with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn

    2016-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimally reconstructs a best estimate of the atmospheric state by combining observations and an a priori provided by a numerical model. The aim of data assimilation is to extrapolate in space and time observations of the atmosphere with the means of a model in order to recover the state of the atmosphere as completely and as accurately as possible.In this work, we employ a state-of-the-art Martian Global Climate Model to assimilate vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, airborne dust, and water ice clouds retrieved from observations of the Mars Climate Sounder onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The assimilation is carried out using an Ensemble Kalman Filter technique, that maps covariances between model variables. Therefore, observations of one variable (e.g. temperature) can be used to estimate other unobserved variables (e.g. winds), using covariances constructed from an ensemble of model simulations for which initial states slightly differ. Using this method, one can estimate dust from temperature observations only, confirming the presence of detached layers of dust in the atmosphere from their thermal signature. Then, the joint assimilation of temperature, dust, and water ice clouds shows that the performance of the assimilation is limited due to model biases, such as an incorrect phasing of the thermal tide and observed dust diurnal variations unexplained by a model. However, dust estimation makes possible the predictability of the atmosphere, up to around ten days in the most favorable cases, a great improvement over previous studies.Future developments for an improved assimilation strongly suggest to assimilate model parameters, such as the ones for the representation of parameterized atmospheric gravity waves.Also, in the light of the recent global observations of the Venusian atmosphere from the Akastuki spacecraft, the case for the first-ever assimilation of Venus will be made.

  19. Interprofessional primary care team meetings: a qualitative approach comparing observations with personal opinions

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia; Daniëls, Ramon; Lenzen, Stephanie Anna; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background. The number of people with multiple chronic conditions requiring primary care services increases. Professionals from different disciplines collaborate and coordinate care to deal with the complex health care needs. There is lack of information on current practices regarding interprofessional team (IPT) meetings. Objectives. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the process of interprofessional collaboration in primary care team meetings in the Netherlands by observing the current practice and exploring personal opinions. Methods. Qualitative study involving observations of team meetings and interviews with participants. Eight different IPT meetings (n = 8) in different primary care practices were observed by means of video recordings. Experiences were explored by conducting individual semi-structured interviews (n = 60) with participants (i.e. health care professionals from different disciplines) of the observed team meetings. The data were analysed by means of content analysis. Results. Most participants expressed favourable opinions about their team meetings. However, observations showed that team meetings were more or less hectic, and lacked a clear structure and team coordinator or leader. There appears to be a discrepancy between findings from observations and interviews. From the interviews, four main themes were extracted: (1) Team structure and composition, (2) Patient-centredness, (3) Interaction and (4) Attitude and motivation. Conclusion. IPT meetings could benefit from improvements in structure, patient-centredness and leadership by the chairpersons. Given the discrepancy between observations and interviews, it would appear useful to improve team members’ awareness of aspects that could be improved before training them in dealing with specific challenges. PMID:28122925

  20. Interprofessional primary care team meetings: a qualitative approach comparing observations with personal opinions.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia; Daniëls, Ramon; Lenzen, Stephanie Anna; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna

    2017-02-01

    The number of people with multiple chronic conditions requiring primary care services increases. Professionals from different disciplines collaborate and coordinate care to deal with the complex health care needs. There is lack of information on current practices regarding interprofessional team (IPT) meetings. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the process of interprofessional collaboration in primary care team meetings in the Netherlands by observing the current practice and exploring personal opinions. Qualitative study involving observations of team meetings and interviews with participants. Eight different IPT meetings (n = 8) in different primary care practices were observed by means of video recordings. Experiences were explored by conducting individual semi-structured interviews (n = 60) with participants (i.e. health care professionals from different disciplines) of the observed team meetings. The data were analysed by means of content analysis. Most participants expressed favourable opinions about their team meetings. However, observations showed that team meetings were more or less hectic, and lacked a clear structure and team coordinator or leader. There appears to be a discrepancy between findings from observations and interviews. From the interviews, four main themes were extracted: (1) Team structure and composition, (2) Patient-centredness, (3) Interaction and (4) Attitude and motivation. IPT meetings could benefit from improvements in structure, patient-centredness and leadership by the chairpersons. Given the discrepancy between observations and interviews, it would appear useful to improve team members' awareness of aspects that could be improved before training them in dealing with specific challenges. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Quantifying the Hawthorne Effect in Hand Hygiene Compliance Through Comparing Direct Observation With Automated Hand Hygiene Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Stefan; Reischke, Jana; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Winning, Johannes; Gastmeier, Petra; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Scherag, André; Pletz, Mathias W

    2015-08-01

    To quantify the Hawthorne effect of hand hygiene performance among healthcare workers using direct observation. Prospective observational study. Intensive care unit, university hospital. Direct observation of hand hygiene compliance over 48 audits of 2 hours each. Simultaneously, hand hygiene events (HHEs) were recorded using electronic alcohol-based handrub dispensers. Directly observed and electronically recorded HHEs during the 2 hours of direct observation were compared using Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman plots. To quantify the Hawthorne effect, we compared the number of electronically recorded HHEs during the direct observation periods with the re-scaled electronically recorded HHEs in the 6 remaining hours of the 8-hour working shift. A total of 3,978 opportunities for hand hygiene were observed during the 96 hours of direct observation. Hand hygiene compliance was 51% (95% CI, 49%-53%). There was a strong positive correlation between directly observed compliance and electronically recorded HHEs (ρ=0.68 [95% CI, 0.49-0.81], P<.0001). In the 384 hours under surveillance, 4,180 HHEs were recorded by the electronic dispensers. Of those, 2,029 HHEs were recorded during the 96 hours in which direct observation was also performed, and 2,151 HHEs were performed in the remaining 288 hours of the same working shift that were not under direct observation. Healthcare workers performed 8 HHEs per hour when not under observation compared with 21 HHEs per hour during observation. Directly and electronically observed HHEs were in agreement. We observed a marked influence of the Hawthorne effect on hand hygiene performance.

  2. Comparative effects of different triazole compounds on growth, photosynthetic pigments and carbohydrate metabolism of Solenostemon rotundifolius.

    PubMed

    Kishorekumar, A; Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Sankar, B; Sridharan, R; Panneerselvam, R

    2007-11-15

    The effects of two triazole compounds, triadimefon and hexaconazole, on the growth and carbohydrate metabolism were studied in Solenostemon rotundifolius Poir., Morton plants under pot culture. Plants were treated with triadimefon at 15mg l(-1) and hexaconazole at 10mg l(-1) separately by soil drenching on 80, 110 and 140 days after planting (DAP). The plants were harvested randomly and growth parameters were studied on 90, 120 and 150 DAP for determining the effect of both the triazole on growth and chlorophyll pigments. These triazole compounds increased the chlorophyll pigments. However, both the treatments decreased the fresh and dry weights of shoot and leaf area. Both these triazole resulted in a marginal increase in starch content and decreased the sugar contents. The carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes alpha- and beta-amylase activities were reduced and invertase activity increased in S. rotundifolius under triadimefon and hexaconazole treatments.

  3. A New Method to Compare Statistical Tree Growth Curves: The PL-GMANOVA Model and Its Application with Dendrochronological Data

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, Martin; Peña Ramírez, Víctor M.; von Rosen, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Growth curves are monotonically increasing functions that measure repeatedly the same subjects over time. The classical growth curve model in the statistical literature is the Generalized Multivariate Analysis of Variance (GMANOVA) model. In order to model the tree trunk radius (r) over time (t) of trees on different sites, GMANOVA is combined here with the adapted PL regression model Q = A·T+E, where for and for , A =  initial relative growth to be estimated, , and E is an error term for each tree and time point. Furthermore, Ei[–b·r]  = , , with TPR being the turning point radius in a sigmoid curve, and at is an estimated calibrating time-radius point. Advantages of the approach are that growth rates can be compared among growth curves with different turning point radiuses and different starting points, hidden outliers are easily detectable, the method is statistically robust, and heteroscedasticity of the residuals among time points is allowed. The model was implemented with dendrochronological data of 235 Pinus montezumae trees on ten Mexican volcano sites to calculate comparison intervals for the estimated initial relative growth . One site (at the Popocatépetl volcano) stood out, with being 3.9 times the value of the site with the slowest-growing trees. Calculating variance components for the initial relative growth, 34% of the growth variation was found among sites, 31% among trees, and 35% over time. Without the Popocatépetl site, the numbers changed to 7%, 42%, and 51%. Further explanation of differences in growth would need to focus on factors that vary within sites and over time. PMID:25402427

  4. A new method to compare statistical tree growth curves: the PL-GMANOVA model and its application with dendrochronological data.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Martin; Peña Ramírez, Víctor M; von Rosen, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Growth curves are monotonically increasing functions that measure repeatedly the same subjects over time. The classical growth curve model in the statistical literature is the Generalized Multivariate Analysis of Variance (GMANOVA) model. In order to model the tree trunk radius (r) over time (t) of trees on different sites, GMANOVA is combined here with the adapted PL regression model Q = A · T+E, where for b ≠ 0 : Q = Ei[-b · r]-Ei[-b · r1] and for b = 0 : Q  = Ln[r/r1], A =  initial relative growth to be estimated, T = t-t1, and E is an error term for each tree and time point. Furthermore, Ei[-b · r]  = ∫(Exp[-b · r]/r)dr, b = -1/TPR, with TPR being the turning point radius in a sigmoid curve, and r1 at t1 is an estimated calibrating time-radius point. Advantages of the approach are that growth rates can be compared among growth curves with different turning point radiuses and different starting points, hidden outliers are easily detectable, the method is statistically robust, and heteroscedasticity of the residuals among time points is allowed. The model was implemented with dendrochronological data of 235 Pinus montezumae trees on ten Mexican volcano sites to calculate comparison intervals for the estimated initial relative growth A. One site (at the Popocatépetl volcano) stood out, with A being 3.9 times the value of the site with the slowest-growing trees. Calculating variance components for the initial relative growth, 34% of the growth variation was found among sites, 31% among trees, and 35% over time. Without the Popocatépetl site, the numbers changed to 7%, 42%, and 51%. Further explanation of differences in growth would need to focus on factors that vary within sites and over time.

  5. Comparative studies on polar ionosphere and magnetotail dynamics based on simultaneous multi-point observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoko; Hirahara, Masafumi; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Ebihara, Yusuke; Asamura, Kazushi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Seki, Kanako; Miyashita, Yukinaga

    For observations of the nightside polar ionosphere, the Reimei satellite is capable of simultane-ous observations for auroral 2D distribution by Multi-spectral Aurora Imaging Camera (MAC) and auroral particles by Electron/Ion Energy Spectrum Analyzer (ESA/ISA). Reimei has been observing the auroral fine structures at altitudes of about 640km by the unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolutions and promoting the understanding of the their fine structures. On the other hand, the field-aligned electric field and Alfven waves have been investigated in the auroral acceleration region by using data of FAST, Polar, Akebono and the other satel-lites. The phenomena in this region are thought to be due to the fluctuation of plasma and electromagnetic field in the magnetotail. In addition to the auroral observations of the polar ionosphere, the data comparison between in the magnetotail and in the polar ionosphere will give us more comprehensive understandings of the auroral phenomena. For observations of the magnetotail, we use data by THEMIS satellites consisting of 5 probes. The simultaneous multipoint observations by these satellites are useful for the distinction between temporal vari-ation and spatial distribution. THEMIS-GBOs(Ground-based observatories) which are located on the Northern America also enable us to observe global aurora. In this presentation, in the dataset for 1.5-years interval possibly providing the simultaneous observations by Reimei and THEMIS, we focus on the data obtained on Feb. 9, 2008. When Reimei passed over Canada(70ILAT) from poleward to equatorward, the Inverted-V precipitating electrons signa-tures lasted about 13 seconds corresponding to 0.7 ILAT width, and the characteristic electron energy was 1-5keV according to the ESA measurement. Near the poleward edge observed for three seconds, a south-eastward flow and a folded arc were observed and then stable and faint aurora was observed according to the MAC. These two types of auroras

  6. Ionospheric simulation compared with Dynamics Explorer observations for November 22, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Bowline, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Sharber, J. R.; Winningham, J. D.; Brace, L. H.

    1992-01-01

    The present study uses an extensive DE-2 data base to both constrain inputs to a time-dependent ionospheric model (TDIM) for a simulation of the ionosphere and then check the simulated densities. The investigation was carried out for both a quiet period and a substorm period. The quiet-day study produced very good agreement between modeled and observed electron densities in the topside ionosphere with two significant exceptions: First, across the polar region the DE-2 LANG densities showed fine structure in addition to the overall regional density morphology. Second, a surprising discrepancy arose in the presunrise and midlatitude trough. The TDIM densities were an order of magnitude lower than those observed by DE-2. The substorm study showed remarkably good agreement with the observed densities.

  7. Comparing regional modeling (CHIMERE) and satellite observations of aerosols (PARASOL): Methodology and case study over Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromatas, Stavros

    2010-05-01

    S. Stromatas (1), S. Turquety (1), H. Chepfer (1), L. Menut (1), B. Bessagnet (2), JC Pere (2), D. Tanré (3) . (1) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, CNRS/IPSL, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France, (2) INERIS, Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Parc technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, FRANCE, (3) Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique/CNRS Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille, 59650 - Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. Atmospheric suspended particles (aerosols) have significant radiative and environmental impacts, affecting human health, visibility and climate. Therefore, they are regulated by air quality standards worldwide, and monitored by regional observation networks. Satellite observations vastly improve the horizontal and temporal coverage, providing daily distributions. Aerosols are currently estimated using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals, a quantitative measure of the extinction of solar radiation by aerosol scattering and absorption between the point of observation and the top of the atmosphere. Even though remarkable progresses in aerosol modeling by chemistry-transport models (CTM) and measurement experiments have been made in recent years, there is still a significant divergence between the modeled and observed results. However, AOD retrievals from satellites remains a highly challenging task mostly because it depends on a variety of different parameters such as cloud contamination, surface reflectance contributions and a priori assumptions on aerosol types, each one of them incorporating its own difficulties. Therefore, comparisons between CTM and observations are often difficult to interpret. In this presentation, we will discuss comparisons between regional modeling (CHIMERE CTM) over Mexico and satellite observations obtained by the POLDER instrument embarked on PARASOL micro-satellite. After a comparison of the model AOD with the retrieved L2 AOD, we will present an alternative

  8. Comparing tracking scenarios to LAGEOS and Etalon by simulating realistic SLR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andritsch, Florian; Grahsl, Andrea; Dach, Rolf; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    A tool for simulating realistic Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) observation scenarios was developed. Analyzing the available observations a profile for each station regarding tracking density, maintenance outage, weather condition on one hand and specific noise behavior for the different targets on the other hand was established. Thus, the simulation is able to reproduce the real and generate realistic, synthetic observation scenarios. Single observations can be added or removed as well as the targets exchanged at specific epochs without affecting the remaining observations. The operational International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) standard solution provides an important contribution to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). It contains station and geocenter coordinates, and Earth rotation parameters (ERPs). Today they are based on observations to the LAGEOS and Etalon satellites only. Apart from a few limited-time tracking campaigns and suggested priorities among the targets provided by the ILRS each station has their own tracking scheduling and the number of available normal points (NPs, binned full-rate data) available for each satellite are varying from station to station. The purpose of this study is to optimize the tracking scenarios on the stations regarding the main parameters of the analysis (station and geocenter coordinates as well as ERPs). Is it helpful to increase the number of NPs to these standard targets (e.g., by tracking less other satellites) or does a reduction of the tracking not harm the solutions (e.g., to generate the opportunity to support also other satellite missions)? Is it beneficial to coordinate the tracking of the stations in one region to focus on one common or better different targets? These and other related questions will be answered by this study.

  9. Bias in Observational Studies of Prevalent Users: Lessons for Comparative Effectiveness Research From a Meta-Analysis of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Danaei, Goodarz; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are usually the preferred strategy with which to generate evidence of comparative effectiveness, but conducting an RCT is not always feasible. Though observational studies and RCTs often provide comparable estimates, the questioning of observational analyses has recently intensified because of randomized-observational discrepancies regarding the effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy on coronary heart disease. Reanalyses of observational data that excluded prevalent users of hormone replacement therapy led to attenuated discrepancies, which begs the question of whether exclusion of prevalent users should be generally recommended. In the current study, the authors evaluated the effect of excluding prevalent users of statins in a meta-analysis of observational studies of persons with cardiovascular disease. The pooled, multivariate-adjusted mortality hazard ratio for statin use was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65, 0.91) in 4 studies that compared incident users with nonusers, 0.70 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.78) in 13 studies that compared a combination of prevalent and incident users with nonusers, and 0.54 (95% CI: 0.45, 0.66) in 13 studies that compared prevalent users with nonusers. The corresponding hazard ratio from 18 RCTs was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.91). It appears that the greater the proportion of prevalent statin users in observational studies, the larger the discrepancy between observational and randomized estimates. PMID:22223710

  10. Addition of Escherichia coli K-12 Growth Observation and Gene Essentiality Data to the EcoCyc Database

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Amanda; Paley, Suzanne; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Shearer, Alexander; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    The sets of compounds that can support growth of an organism are defined by the presence of transporters and metabolic pathways that convert nutrient sources into cellular components and energy for growth. A collection of known nutrient sources can therefore serve both as an impetus for investigating new metabolic pathways and transporters and as a reference for computational modeling of known metabolic pathways. To establish such a collection for Escherichia coli K-12, we have integrated data on the growth or nongrowth of E. coli K-12 obtained from published observations using a variety of individual media and from high-throughput phenotype microarrays into the EcoCyc database. The assembled collection revealed a substantial number of discrepancies between the high-throughput data sets, which we investigated where possible using low-throughput growth assays on soft agar and in liquid culture. We also integrated six data sets describing 16,119 observations of the growth of single-gene knockout mutants of E. coli K-12 into EcoCyc, which are relevant to antimicrobial drug design, provide clues regarding the roles of genes of unknown function, and are useful for validating metabolic models. To make this information easily accessible to EcoCyc users, we developed software for capturing, querying, and visualizing cellular growth assays and gene essentiality data. PMID:24363340

  11. Comparative Study of Population Growth and Agricultural Change: C - Case Study of India. Asian Population Studies Series No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok (Thailand).

    This report, the third in a series of five reports of the Comparative Study of Population Growth and Agricultural Change, describes a study of the two states of India (Punjaband and Orissa) which attempted to clarify the relationship between population pressure and agricultural change through a time series analysis. This study: (1) outlines trends…

  12. A comparative analysis of the diversity of woody vegetation in old-growth and secondary southern Appalachian cove forests

    Treesearch

    Lyle J. Guyon; Gary L. Rolfe; John M. Edgington; Guillermo A. Mendoza

    2003-01-01

    Characteristics of woody vegetation were compared across six different southern Appalachian cove forests. Trees greater than 6.35 cm dbh were point sampled and regeneration was tallied on 25 m² subplots at all study sites. Overstory composition and structure differed between secondary and old-growth sites, which were dominated by yellow-poplar and eastern...

  13. Chiropractic Use and Changes in Health among Older Medicare Beneficiaries: A Comparative Effectiveness Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Paula Anne; Hockenberry, Jason; Bentler, Suzanne; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chiropractic on five outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries: increased difficulties performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and Lower Body Functions, as well as lower self-rated health and increased depressive symptoms. Methods Among all beneficiaries, we estimated the effect of chiropractic use on changes in health outcomes among those who used chiropractic compared to those who did not, and among beneficiaries with back conditions we estimated the effect of chiropractic use relative to medical care, both over a 2–15 year period. Two analytic approaches were used—one assumed no selection bias, while the other adjusted for potential selection bias using propensity score methods. Results Among all beneficiaries, propensity score analyses indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, and depressive symptoms, although there were increased risks associated with chiropractic for declines in lower body function and self-rated health. Propensity score analyses among beneficiaries with back conditions indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, lower body function, and depressive symptoms, although there was an increased risk associated with chiropractic use for declines in self-rated health. Conclusion The evidence in this study suggests that chiropractic treatment has comparable effects on functional outcomes when compared to medical treatment for all Medicare beneficiaries, but increased risk for declines in self-rated health among beneficiaries with back conditions. PMID:24144425

  14. Direct atomic-scale observation of layer-by-layer oxide growth during magnesium oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, He; Wu, Shujing; Sheng, Huaping; Liu, Chun; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Zhou, Zhichao; Zhao, Dongshan E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Wang, Jianbo E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale oxide growth dynamics are directly revealed by in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy during the oxidation of Mg surface. The oxidation process is characterized by the layer-by-layer growth of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanocrystal via the adatom process. Consistently, the nucleated MgO crystals exhibit faceted surface morphology as enclosed by (200) lattice planes. It is believed that the relatively lower surface energies of (200) lattice planes should play important roles, governing the growth mechanism. These results facilitate the understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth mechanism that will have an important impact on the development of magnesium or magnesium alloys with improved resistance to oxidation.

  15. Lysed BCG vaccines. 1. Observations on optimal conditions for BCG growth and lysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Diena, B B; Greenberg, L

    1967-01-01

    As a first step towards the production of a lysed BCG vaccine that would have reduced toxicity and allergenicity and yet be immunogenic, the growth and lysis of BCG bacilli under strictly controlled conditions have been studied.BCG grown in both Dubos and Aldridge liquid media showed an arithmetic linear growth, preceded by a very short logarithmic phase. This suggested that some of the cell population became metabolically inactive at a very early stage, possibly owing to suboptimal conditions of growth.Glycine, lysozyme and lithium chloride initiated lysis of BCG growth in the aforementioned media 24-48 hours after inoculation. After 2 weeks' incubation approximately 50% of the original BCG culture was lysed and the viable count had fallen 1000-fold. The autolytic pattern of BCG in a nitrogen-deficient, chemically defined Aldridge medium is also described.

  16. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible un...

  17. Comparative Analysis of Oscillations of a Solar Quiet Region Using Multi-Wavelength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the temporal behavior of a solar quiet region using a set of multi-wavelength observations obtained during a coordinated campaign. The observations were acquired by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on-board SOHO and the UV filters of the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). A large range of height in the solar atmosphere, from the deep photosphere to the upper chromosphere is covered by these instruments. We investigate the oscillation properties of the intensities and velocities in distinct regions of the quiet Sun, i.e. internetwork, bright points (NBP) defining the network boundaries and dark mottles forming a well-defined rosette, as observed by the different instruments and in the different heights. The variations of the intensities and velocities are studied with wavelet analysis. The aim of our work is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in the different examined regions, as well as comprehensive information on the interaction of the oscillations and the magnetic field.

  18. Comparing Vignette Instruction and Assessment Tasks to Classroom Observations and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Carolyn; Maeder, Dale W.

    2011-01-01

    The growing body of research on the use of vignettes in teacher education courses suggests that vignette-based instruction and assessment tasks may represent a viable alternative to traditional forms of scaffolded instruction and reflective essays following classroom observations, thereby creating a bridge between college and K-12 classrooms for…

  19. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  20. Comparing Global Atmospheric CO2 Flux and Transport Models with Remote Sensing (and Other) Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Pawson, S.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Andrews, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    We report recent progress derived from comparison of global CO2 flux and transport models with new remote sensing and other sources of CO2 data including those from satellite. The overall objective of this activity is to improve the process models that represent our understanding of the workings of the atmospheric carbon cycle. Model estimates of CO2 surface flux and atmospheric transport processes are required for initial constraints on inverse analyses, to connect atmospheric observations to the location of surface sources and sinks, to provide the basic framework for carbon data assimilation, and ultimately for future projections of carbon-climate interactions. Models can also be used to test consistency within and between CO2 data sets under varying geophysical states. Here we focus on simulated CO2 fluxes from terrestrial vegetation and atmospheric transport mutually constrained by analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office for the period 2000 through 2009. Use of assimilated meteorological data enables direct model comparison to observations across a wide range of scales of variability. The biospheric fluxes are produced by the CASA model at 1x1 degrees on a monthly mean basis, modulated hourly with analyzed temperature and sunlight. Both physiological and biomass burning fluxes are derived using satellite observations of vegetation, burned area (as in GFED-3), and analyzed meteorology. For the purposes of comparison to CO2 data, fossil fuel and ocean fluxes are also included in the transport simulations. In this presentation we evaluate the model’s ability to simulate CO2 flux and mixing ratio variability in comparison to remote sensing observations from TCCON, GOSAT, and AIRS as well as relevant in situ observations. Examples of the influence of key process representations are shown from both forward and inverse model comparisons. We find that the model can resolve much of the synoptic, seasonal, and interannual

  1. Comparing Global Atmospheric CO2 Flux and Transport Models with Remote Sensing (and Other) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Pawson, S.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Andrews, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report recent progress derived from comparison of global CO2 flux and transport models with new remote sensing and other sources of CO2 data including those from satellite. The overall objective of this activity is to improve the process models that represent our understanding of the workings of the atmospheric carbon cycle. Model estimates of CO2 surface flux and atmospheric transport processes are required for initial constraints on inverse analyses, to connect atmospheric observations to the location of surface sources and sinks, to provide the basic framework for carbon data assimilation, and ultimately for future projections of carbon-climate interactions. Models can also be used to test consistency within and between CO2 data sets under varying geophysical states. Here we focus on simulated CO2 fluxes from terrestrial vegetation and atmospheric transport mutually constrained by analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office for the period 2000 through 2009. Use of assimilated meteorological data enables direct model comparison to observations across a wide range of scales of variability. The biospheric fluxes are produced by the CASA model at 1x1 degrees on a monthly mean basis, modulated hourly with analyzed temperature and sunlight. Both physiological and biomass burning fluxes are derived using satellite observations of vegetation, burned area (as in GFED-3), and analyzed meteorology. For the purposes of comparison to CO2 data, fossil fuel and ocean fluxes are also included in the transport simulations. In this presentation we evaluate the model's ability to simulate CO2 flux and mixing ratio variability in comparison to remote sensing observations from TCCON, GOSAT, and AIRS as well as relevant in situ observations. Examples of the influence of key process representations are shown from both forward and inverse model comparisons. We find that the model can resolve much of the synoptic, seasonal, and interannual

  2. Comparative growth of trichoderma strains in different nutritional sources, using bioscreen c automated system

    PubMed Central

    Rossi-Rodrigues, Bianca Caroline; Brochetto-Braga, Márcia Regina; Tauk-Tornisielo, Sâmia Maria; Carmona, Eleonora Cano; Arruda, Valeska Marques; Chaud Netto, José

    2009-01-01

    Trichoderma is one of the fungi genera that produce important metabolites for industry. The growth of these organisms is a consequence of the nutritional sources used as also of the physical conditions employed to cultivate them. In this work, the automated Bioscreen C system was used to evaluate the influence of different nutritional sources on the growth of Trichoderma strains (T. hamatum, T. harzianum, T. viride, and T. longibrachiatum) isolated from the soil in the Juréia-Itatins Ecological Station (JIES), São Paulo State - Brazil. The cultures were grown in liquid culture media containing different carbon- (2%; w/v) and nitrogen (1%; w/v) sources at 28ºC, pH 6.5, and agitated at 150 rpm for 72 h. The results showed, as expected, that glucose is superior to sucrose as a growth-stimulating carbon source in the Trichoderma strains studied, while yeast extract and tryptone were good growth-stimulating nitrogen sources in the cultivation of T. hamatum and T. harzianum. PMID:24031380

  3. Comparative growth and toxin profile of cultured Ostreopsis ovata from the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic Seas.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Franca; Pezzolesi, Laura; Feller, Andrea; Riccardi, Manuela; Ciminiello, Patrizia; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Tartaglione, Luciana; Dello Iacovo, Emma; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Forino, Martino; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2010-01-01

    Massive blooms of the benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis ovata Fukuyo have recently occurred along the whole Italian coastlines, both Tyrrhenian and Adriatic, resulting sometimes in benthonic biocenosis sufferings and, occasionally, in human health problems. In this work, two strains of O. ovata collected in 2006 along the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian coastlines and grown in culture were studied to characterize their growth and toxin profile. The two strains showed different cell volumes, the Adriatic strain being nearly twice bigger than the Tyrrhenian, but they had similar slow growth rates. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses indicated that both strains produce putative palytoxin (pPLTX) and ovatoxin-a (OVTX-a), a palytoxin-like compound presenting 2 oxygen atoms less than palytoxin. Toxin content was determined at the end of the stationary and exponential growth phases and reached the highest value in the Adriatic strain at the end of the stationary phase, with concentrations of 353.3 microg l(-1) for OVTX-a and 30.4 microg l(-1) for pPLTX. Toxin released in the growth medium was also measured and resulted to be the highest at the end of the stationary phase, suggesting that a long lasting bloom could enhance the toxin content in the water and cause toxic effects in people inhaling the aerosol.

  4. Preschool Children's Explanations of Plant Growth and Rain Formation: A Comparative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Hatzinikita, Vassilia

    2006-09-01

    This paper explores the different types and characteristics of preschool children's explanations of plant growth and rain formation. The children's explanations were categorized as naturalistic, non-naturalistic, or synthetic, i.e., explanations containing both naturalistic and non-naturalistic parts. In regards to plant growth the children tended to rely on synthetic or on naturalistic explanations, which involved direct and indirect agents (such as water, a person, fertilizers, roots) enabling the plant to grow. Non-naturalistic explanations of plant growth, or the non-naturalistic parts of synthetic explanations, were mainly animistic (anthropomorphic). In the case of rain formation the children most frequently used non-naturalistic explanations, which were mainly teleological or metaphysical. The naturalistic explanations recorded on rain formation, as well as the naturalistic parts of synthetic explanations tended to have a non-agentive character, i.e., children considered rainwater as preexisting in containers such as the clouds. Overall, the explanations recorded about plant growth tended to be more complex than the ones for rain formation. It is suggested that science activities designed for preschool children should take into account the types and characteristics of their explanations in order to select which phenomena are appropriate for this age group, and aim at fostering the children's ability at formulating naturalistic explanations.

  5. Comparing states with and without growth management analysis based on indicators with policy implications comment.

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kline

    2000-01-01

    In a recent volume of this journal, Nelson (Land Use Policy 16 (1999) 121) defines and computes several statewide indicators designed to evaluate the effectiveness of growth management efforts in Oregon and Florida. Two indicators are intended to measure how well states have contained urban sprawl and preserved farmland. They are computed using US Census of Population...

  6. Comparative effects of constant versus fluctuating thermal regimens on yellow perch growth, feed conversion and survival

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of fluctuating or constant thermal regimens on growth, mortality, and feed conversion were determined for juvenile yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Yellow perch averaging 156mm total length and 43g body weight were held in replicate 288L circular tanks for 129 days under: 1) a diel therm...

  7. Mental imagery of positive and neutral memories: A fMRI study comparing field perspective imagery to observer perspective imagery.

    PubMed

    Grol, Maud; Vingerhoets, Guy; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-02-01

    Imagery perspective can influence what information is recalled, processing style, and emotionality; however, the understanding of possible mechanisms mediating these observed differences is still limited. We aimed to examine differences between memory recall from a field perspective and observer perspective at the neurobiological level, in order to improve our understanding of what is underlying the observed differences at the behavioral level. We conducted a fMRI study in healthy individuals, comparing imagery perspectives during recall of neutral and positive autobiographical memories. Behavioral results revealed field perspective imagery of positive memories, as compared to observer perspective, to be associated with more positive feelings afterwards. At the neurobiological level, contrasting observer perspective to field perspective imagery was associated with greater activity, or less decrease relative to the control visual search task, in the right precuneus and in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ). Greater activity in the right TPJ during an observer perspective as compared to field perspective could reflect performing a greater shift of perspective and mental state during observer perspective imagery than field perspective imagery. Differential activity in the precuneus may reflect that during observer perspective imagery individuals are more likely to engage in (self-) evaluative processing and visuospatial processing. Our findings contribute to a growing understanding of how imagery perspective can influence the type of information that is recalled and the intensity of the emotional response. Observer perspective imagery may not automatically reduce emotional intensity but this could depend on how the imagined situation is evaluated in relation to the self-concept.

  8. Ion release from copper phosphate cement and influence on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jennifer; Blackwell, Alison

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a black copper cement (BCC), an established restorative material (a conventional glass ionomer cement) and two temporary restorative materials (a zinc phosphate and a zinc polycarboxylate cement) on the growth of Streptococcus mutans in vitro, and to correlate bacterial growth with ion release from each material. Test specimens were eluted in either 0.1 M lactic acid, pH 4, or 0.1 M sodium chloride, pH 7. At 2 days, 7 days, 28 days and 6 months, eluates were inoculated with S. mutans and bacterial growth was recorded. Metal ion (Cu(2+), Zn(2+ )and Mg(2+)) and fluoride release were measured. At most immersion times, the different materials had a statistically significant inhibitory effect on bacterial growth compared to the respective control, at both pH levels. The inhibitory effect decreased with time and in most cases was associated with high levels of ion release at the beginning of the experimental period, followed by significantly lower levels. For BCC, there were statistically significant relationships between the median rates of growth of S. mutans in the presence of BCC eluates and the median values for release of copper and zinc, although not magnesium. Of the different materials, BCC demonstrated greatest antibacterial activity.

  9. Observing Political Systems: Political Systems, Unit One. Comparing Political Experiences, Experimental Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Judith A.; Patrick, John J.

    This first of three units of "Comparing Political Experiences", a first-semester course, provides 18 activities which introduce 12th-grade students to political system concepts that they will work with in-depth in succeeding units. The activities and readings, divided into seven sections, stress the development of political knowledge,…

  10. In situ observation of mono-molecular growth steps on aqueous solution grown crystals and the transport of molecules to the crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsukamoto, Katsuo

    1987-01-01

    Direct in situ observation of mono-molecular growth steps on a crystal growing in an aqueous solution became possible. The combination of this method with high resolution Schlieren methods or interferometry, permits the growth mechanism of crystals to be investigated directly. Since the observation of growth steps on crystals is the most direct and sensitive way for investigating a crystal growth mechanism, it would contribute to revealing fundamental differences between the growth in space and on Earth. The method was recently extended to in situ observation of the growth processes at high temperatures (1800K).

  11. [The origin of femoral trochlear dysplasia: comparative anatomy, evolution, and growth of the patellofemoral joint].

    PubMed

    Tardieu, C; Dupont, J Y

    2001-06-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of the femoropatellar morphology examining the evolutionary aspects to search for the origin of trochelar dysplasia. Trochlear dysplasia is frequent in the human population and, when associated with morphological and positional abnormalities of the patella, can lead to patellar pain syndrome in minor cases or patellar dislocation in severe cases. There is no strict relationship between the observed anomalies and clinical expression. The shape of the articular surfaces is variable in mammals depending on their type of locomotion: unguligrade, digitigrade, plantigrade. In greater apes, the femoral diaphysis is straight and the trochlea is flat and symmetrical. The patella does not tend to dislocate laterally since the knee under load is always flexed. In human adults, the femoral diaphysis has a valgus obliquity angle of 8 degrees to 10 degrees. Consequently, the trochlea has a deepened sulcus and an elevated lateral lip, avoiding lateral patellar dislocation, especially during initial knee flexion. In the human newborn, the femoral diaphysis is vertical. As the child starts walking, the femoral obliquity angle develops between 1 and 7 years of age, inducing a secondary valgus of the extensor apparatus. This obliquity does not develop in non-walking children. Fossil femurs of australopithecus demonstrate that a high obliquity angle had appeared more than 3 million years ago, but also exhibit a poorly deepened trochlea and a slight elevation of the lateral facet. At 1.8 million years, the fossils have the oblique diaphysis, the strongly deepened sulcus and the strongly elevated lateral facet. The obliquity angle of the femoral diaphysis is the leading feature which initiated the later modifications of the patellofemoral joint that over 3 million years were never inscribed in the human genoma. Lateral trochleal lip and deep sulcus are features that were first acquired, then once selected, genetically assimilated, and now appear on

  12. Comparable effects of low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation at the frequency of 51.8 and 53 GHz and antibiotic ceftazidime on Lactobacillus acidophilus growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Soghomonyan, Diana; Trchounian, Armen

    2013-01-01

    The effects of low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) with the frequencies of 51.8 and 53 GHz on Lactobacillus acidophilus growth and survival were revealed. These effects were compared with antibacterial effects of antibiotic ceftazidime. Decrease in bacterial growth rate by EMI was comparable with the inhibitory effect of ceftazidime (minimal inhibitory concentration-16 μM) and no enhanced action was observed with combined effects of EMI and the antibiotic. However, EMI-enhanced antibiotic inhibitory effect on bacterial survival. The kinetics of the bacterial suspension oxidation-reduction potential up to 24 h of the growth was changed by EMI and ceftazidime. The changes were more strongly expressed by combined effects of EMI and antibiotic especially up to 12 h. Moreover, EMI did not change overall energy (glucose)-dependent H(+) efflux across the membrane but it increased N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD)-inhibited H(+) efflux. In contrast, this EMI in combination with ceftazidime decreased DCCD-sensitive H(+) efflux. Low-intensity EMI had inhibitory effect on L. acidophilus bacterial growth and survival. The effect on bacterial survival was more significant in the combination with ceftazidime. The H(+)-translocating F 0 F 1-ATPase, for which DCCD is specific inhibitor, might be a target for EMI and ceftazidime. The revealed bactericide effects on L. acidophilus can be applied in biotechnology, food producing and safety technology.

  13. Comparing 3D Solar Model Atmospheres with Observations: Hydrogen Lines and Centre-to-limb Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Asplund, Martin; Trampedach, Regner

    Three dimensional hydrodynamical stellar model atmospheres represent a major step forward in stellar spectroscopy. Making use of radiative-hydrodynamical convection simulations that contain no adjustable free parameters, the model atmospheres provide a robust and realistic treatment of convection. These models have been applied to several lines in the Sun and other stars, yielding an excellent agreement with observations (e.g., Asplund et al. (2000) [1]).

  14. June 13, 2013 U.S. East Coast Meteotsunami: Comparing a Numerical Model With Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Becker, N. C.; Weinstein, S.; Whitmore, P.; Knight, W.; Kim, Y.; Bouchard, R. H.; Grissom, K.

    2013-12-01

    On June 13, 2013, a tsunami struck the U.S. East Coast and caused several reported injuries. This tsunami occurred after a derecho moved offshore from North America into the Atlantic Ocean. The presence of this storm, the lack of a seismic source, and the fact that tsunami arrival times at tide stations and deep ocean-bottom pressure sensors cannot be attributed to a 'point-source' suggest this tsunami was caused by atmospheric forces, i.e., a meteotsunami. In this study we attempt to reproduce the observed phenomenon using a numerical model with idealized atmospheric pressure forcing resembling the propagation of the observed barometric anomaly. The numerical model was able to capture some observed features of the tsunami at some tide stations, including the time-lag between the time of pressure jump and the time of tsunami arrival. The model also captures the response at a deep ocean-bottom pressure gauge (DART 44402), including the primary wave and the reflected wave. There are two components of the oceanic response to the propagating pressure anomaly, inverted barometer response and dynamic response. We find that the dynamic response over the deep ocean to be much smaller than the inverted barometer response. The time lag between the pressure jump and tsunami arrival at tide stations is due to the dynamic response: waves generated and/or reflected at the shelf-break propagate shoreward and amplify due to the shoaling effect. The evolution of the derecho over the deep ocean (propagation direction and intensity) is not well defined, however, because of the lack of data so the forcing used for this study is somewhat speculative. Better definition of the pressure anomaly through increased observation or high resolution atmospheric models would improve meteotsunami forecast capabilities.

  15. A Model for Lower Hybrid Wave Excitation Compared with Observations by Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of lower hybrid wave (LHW) excitation due to the O+ relative drift in a plasma subjected to low-frequency waves (LFWs) is used for analysis of Viking satellite data for events in the cusp/cleft region. In some cases, such a mechanism leads to LHW energy densities and ion distribution functions close to those observed, suggesting the proposed mechanism is a plausible candidate to explain certain classes of LHW generation events in space plasmas.

  16. Comparative transcriptomics of the response of Escherichia coli to the disinfectant monochloramine and to growth conditions inducing monochloramine resistance.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Holder, Diane; Xi, Chuanwu; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2010-09-01

    Escherichia coli growth in biofilms and growth at a suboptimal temperature of 20 °C have been shown to decrease sensitivity to monochloramine (Berry, D., C. Xi, L. Raskin. 2009. Environ. Sci. Technol. 43, 884-889). In order to better understand why growth conditions affect sensitivity to monochloramine, a comparative transcriptomic approach was used to identify common patterns of differentially-expressed genes under these growth conditions and during monochloramine exposure. This approach revealed a set of differentially-expressed genes shared under multiple conditions (planktonic growth at 20 °C, biofilm growth, and exposure of planktonic cells to monochloramine), with nine genes shared under all three conditions. Functional gene categories enriched in the shared gene sets included: general metabolic inhibition, redox and oxidoreductase response, cell envelope integrity response, control of iron and sulfur transport metabolism and several genes of unknown function. Single gene deletion mutant analyses verified that loss of 15 of the 24 genes up-regulated during monochloramine exposure as well as during other tested conditions increased E. coli sensitivity to monochloramine up to two fold. Constitutive expression of down-regulated genes in single gene mutants yielded mixed results, indicating that the expression of some down-regulated genes actually decreases sensitivity to monochloramine. These results contribute to the understanding of the bacterial response to disinfectants by characterizing the overlap between growth condition associated stress responses and monochloramine-associated stress responses. This characterization highlights the bacterial responses responsible for decreased sensitivity to monochloramine under different growth conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Relationship between Growth Scores and the Overall Observation Ratings for Teachers in a Public School System in Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joshua; Lampley, James H.; Foley, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the TVAAS growth score given by the Tennessee Department of Education and the overall Tennessee Educator Assessment Model (TEAM) observation rating for teachers in grades 3 through 8. The participating county public school system for this study is located in Northeast Tennessee.…

  18. Low-frequency waves at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Observations compared to numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenders, C.; Perschke, C.; Goetz, C.; Richter, I.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2016-10-01

    Context. A new type of low-frequency wave was detected by the magnetometer of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium at the comet during the initial months after the arrival of the Rosetta spacecraft at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This large-amplitude, nearly continuous wave activity is observed in the frequency range from 30 mHz to 80 mHz where 40 mHz to 50 mHz is the dominant frequency. This type of low frequency is not closely related to the gyrofrequency of newborn cometary ions, which differs from previous wave activity observed in the interaction region of comets with the solar wind. Aims: This work aims to reveal a global view on the wave activity region using simulations of the comet-solar wind interaction region. Parameters, such as wavelength, propagation direction, and propagation patterns, are within the focus of this study. While the Rosetta observations only provide local information, numerical simulations provide further information on the global wave properties. Methods: Standard hybrid simulations were applied to the comet-solar wind interaction scenario. In the model, the ions were described as particles, which allows us to describe kinetic processes of the ions. The electrons were described as a fluid. Results: The simulations exhibit a threefold wave structure of the interaction region. A Mach cone and a Whistler wing are observed downstream of the comet. The third kind of wave activity found are low-frequency waves at 97 mHz, which corresponds to the waves observed by Richter et al. (2015, Ann. Geophys., 33, 1031). These waves are caused by the initial pick-up of the cometary ions that are perpendicular to the solar wind flow and in the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The associated electric current becomes unstable. The simulations show that wave activity is only detectable in the + E hemisphere and that the Mach cone and whistler wings need to be distinguished from the newly found instability driven wave activity. The movie associated to

  19. Safety and efficacy of hysteroscopic sterilization compared with laparoscopic sterilization: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jialin; Pfeifer, Samantha; Schlegel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of hysteroscopic sterilization with the “Essure” device with laparoscopic sterilization in a large, all-inclusive, state cohort. Design Population based cohort study. Settings Outpatient interventional setting in New York State. Participants Women undergoing interval sterilization procedure, including hysteroscopic sterilization with Essure device and laparoscopic surgery, between 2005 and 2013. Main outcomes measures Safety events within 30 days of procedures; unintended pregnancies and reoperations within one year of procedures. Mixed model accounting for hospital clustering was used to compare 30 day and 1 year outcomes, adjusting for patient characteristics and other confounders. Time to reoperation was evaluated using frailty model for time to event analysis. Results We identified 8048 patients undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization and 44 278 undergoing laparoscopic sterilization between 2005 and 2013 in New York State. There was a significant increase in the use of hysteroscopic procedures during this period, while use of laparoscopic sterilization decreased. Patients undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization were older than those undergoing laparoscopic sterilization and were more likely to have a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (10.3% v 7.2%, P<0.01), major abdominal surgery (9.4% v 7.9%, P<0.01), and cesarean section (23.2% v 15.4%, P<0.01). At one year after surgery, hysteroscopic sterilization was not associated with a higher risk of unintended pregnancy (odds ratio 0.84 (95% CI 0.63 to 1.12)) but was associated with a substantially increased risk of reoperation (odds ratio 10.16 (7.47 to 13.81)) compared with laparoscopic sterilization. Conclusions Patients undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization have a similar risk of unintended pregnancy but a more than 10-fold higher risk of undergoing reoperation compared with patients undergoing laparoscopic sterilization. Benefits and risks of both procedures

  20. Growth performance and carcass characteristics of Improvac-treated male pigs compared with barrows.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Anna; Grosse Beilage, Elisabeth; Henning, Martina; Bekendorf, Torsten; Krieter, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the effects of using Improvac (Pfizer Animal Health, Germany) on growth performance and meat characteristics in cross-bred male pigs. In addition average daily weight gain of immunised and surgically castrated males was estimated in order to demonstrate differences in growing patterns in these two treatment groups. The study was carried out in two identical batches. Pigs within batches (n = 446) were allocated to two different treatment groups: immunisation (IM) versus surgical castration (CM). Within treatment groups pigs were randomly assigned to two different diets (low- and high-lysine diet) in order to examine interactions of growth performance and castration technique. Vaccination was performed on the day of entry to the fattening unit and four to six weeks prior to slaughter. At the second vaccination IM-pigs showed significantly lower body weights than the control group (p < 0.05) in both batches. Throughout the whole fattening period CM-pigs tended to have a higher feed intake than IM-pigs while IM-pigs had a significantly lower (better) feed conversion ratio than CM-pigs (p < 0.05).The different lysine content of the diets had no coherent effect on any of the growth performance parameters analysed. Immunised pigs of both feeding groups and in both batches showed a tendency towards a lower carcass weight, back fat values and dressing percentages than surgically castrated pigs.The castration technique had no significant effect on meat quality parameters such as drip loss, shear force or cooking loss while intramuscular fat content (IMF) in immunised pigs fed high-lysine diets (IM(high)) tended to be higher than IMF in immunised pigs fed low-lysine diets (IM(low)). This effect was not seen in surgical castrates in either batch. Immunisation against GnRH offers a good approach to produce taint-free pork while ensuring boar-like growth for a large part of the fattening period.

  1. What controls the speed of rip currents? Comparing field observations, numerical simulations, and a parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.; Warner, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Wave breaking on alongshore non-uniform beaches can drive rip currents near bathymetric depressions. Understanding the controls on the speed of these offshore-directed flows is important for improving predictions of beach hazards, the transport of pollutants and larvae, and morphological evolution. To investigate the response of nearshore flows to non-uniform bathymetry, five channels (on average 30-m wide and 2-m deep) were dredged across the surf zone on the Outer Banks of NC at different times using the propellers of a landing craft, and the subsequent evolution of waves, currents, and morphology was observed for a range of incident wave conditions. In addition, flows are simulated with the COAWST modeling system for the observed incident waves and rip channel bathymetry, and for an extended range of wave conditions and rip channel geometries. A parameter for the maximum offshore-directed flow speed in the surf zone is derived using depth-averaged momentum balances and continuity. The most important terms controlling the offshore-directed flow (rip current) speed are the incident wave height and angle, the water depths in the channel and on the sandbar crest or the terrace through which the channel is incised, and the ratio of wave height to water depth at breaking. The parameter accounts for several wave-breaking regimes, and includes the effect of the suppression of cross-shore flows by the inertia of breaking-wave driven alongshore currents. The parameter has skill predicting the observed and simulated offshore-directed flow speed. Supported by ASDR&E, NDSEG, ONR, and NSF.

  2. Nanoflare Properties throughout Active Regions: Comparing SDO/AIA Observations with Modeled Active Region Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, Nicholeen; Klimchuk, J.

    2012-05-01

    Coronal plasma in active regions is typically measured to be at temperatures near 1-3 MK. Is the majority of the coronal plasma in hydrostatic equilibrium, maintained at these temperatures through a form of quasi-steady heating, or is this simply a measure of the average temperature of widely varying, impulsively heated coronal plasma? Addressing this question is complicated by the fact that the corona is optically thin: many thousands of flux tubes which are heated completely independently are contributing to the total emission along a given line of sight. There is a large body of work focused on the heating of isolated features - coronal loops - which are impulsively heated, however it is the diffuse emission between loops which often comprises the majority of active region emission. Therefore in this study we move beyond isolated features and analyze all of the emission in an entire active region from all contributing flux tubes. We investigate light curves systematically using SDO/AIA observations. We also model the active region corona as a line-of-sight integration of many thousands of completely independently heated flux tubes. The emission from these flux tubes may be time dependent, quasi-steady, or a mix of both, depending on the cadence of heat release. We demonstrate that despite the superposition of randomly heated flux tubes, different distributions of nanoflare cadences produce distinct signatures in light curves observed with multi-wavelength and high time cadence data, such as those from SDO/AIA. We conclude that the majority of the active region plasma is not maintained in hydrostatic equilibrium, rather it is undergoing dynamic heating and cooling cycles. The observed emission is consistent with heating through impulsive nanoflares, whose energy is a function of location within the active region. This research was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at GSFC/NASA.

  3. Seasonal and diurnal variations in AMPERE observations of the Birkeland currents compared to modeled results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxon, J. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2016-05-01

    We reduce measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) to give the total Birkeland (field-aligned) current flowing in both hemispheres in monthly and hourly bins. We analyze these totals using 6 years of data (2010-2015) to examine solar zenith angle-driven variations in the total Birkeland current flowing in both hemispheres, simultaneously, for the first time. A diurnal variation is identified in the total Birkeland current flowing, consistent with variations in the solar zenith angle. A seasonal variation is also identified, with more current flowing in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere during Bartels rotations in northern (southern) summer. For months close to equinox, more current is found to flow in the Northern Hemisphere, contrary to our expectations. We also conduct the first test of the Milan (2013) model for estimating Birkeland current magnitudes, with modifications made to account for solar contributions to ionospheric conductance based on the observed variation of the Birkeland currents with season and time of day. The modified model, using the value of ΦD averaged by Bartels rotation (scaled by 1.7), is found to agree with the observed AMPERE currents, with a correlation of 0.87 in the Northern Hemisphere and 0.86 in the Southern Hemisphere. The improvement over the correlation with dayside reconnection rate is demonstrated to be a significant improvement to the model. The correlation of the residuals is found to be consistent with more current flowing in the Northern Hemisphere. This new observation of systematically larger current flowing in the Northern Hemisphere is discussed in the context of previous results which suggest that the Northern Hemisphere may react more strongly to dayside reconnection than the Southern Hemisphere.

  4. Nanoflare Properties throughout Active Regions: Comparing SDO/AIA Observations with Modeled Active Region Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen

    2012-01-01

    Coronal plasma in active regions is typically measured to be at temperatures near 1-3 MK. Is the majority of the coronal plasma in hydrostatic equilibrium, maintained at these temperatures through a form of quasi-steady heating, or is this simply a measure of the average temperature of widely varying, impulsively heated coronal plasma? Addressing this question is complicated by the fact that the corona is optically thin: many thousands of flux tubes which are heated completely independently are contributing to the total emission along a given line of sight. There is a large body of work focused on the heating of isolated features - coronal loops - which are impulsively heated, however it is the diffuse emission between loops which often comprises the majority of active region emission. Therefore in this study we move beyond isolated features and analyze all of the emission in an entire active region from all contributing flux tubes. We investigate light curves systematically using SDO/AIA observations. We also model the active region corona as a line-of-sight integration of many thousands of completely independently heated flux tubes. The emission from these flux tubes may be time dependent, quasi-steady, or a mix of both, depending on the cadence of heat release. We demonstrate that despite the superposition of randomly heated flux tubes, different distributions of nanoflare cadences produce distinct signatures in light curves observed with multi-wavelength and high time cadence data, such as those from SDO/AIA. We conclude that the majority of the active region plasma is not maintained in hydrostatic equilibrium, rather it is undergoing dynamic heating and cooling cycles. The observed emission is consistent with heating through impulsive nanoflares, whose energy is a function of location within the active region.

  5. Comparing simulated PSC optical properties with CALIPSO observations during the 2010 Antarctic winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunqian; Toon, Owen B.; Pitts, Michael C.; Lambert, Alyn; Bardeen, Charles; Kinnison, Douglas E.

    2017-01-01

    We simulate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the Antarctic winter of 2010 using the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model/Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (SD-WACCM/CARMA) model. The current PSC model contains microphysical schemes for supercooled ternary solutions (STS) and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, as well as a prognostic treatment for PSC ice particles and dehydration. Our simulations and CALIPSO satellite data suggest two major NAT particle formation mechanisms. The first mechanism is the nucleation of NAT from STS. Our model, with homogeneous nucleation rates of NAT from STS constrained by observations from the Arctic winter of 2010-2011, reproduces optical properties observed by CALIPSO over Antarctica in May and the timing of denitrification observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder within their uncertainties. On the other hand, the CALIPSO data indicate that our simulations are missing clouds containing small NAT particles with large number densities. We suggest these particles are most likely to form from ice clouds or STS in gravity waves, as found by previous investigations. The simulated cloud coverage agrees with the CALIPSO cloud coverage within a few percent on average with a correlation coefficient of 0.83. However, using the CALIPSO classification algorithm, simulated ice clouds often fall into Mix categories under the denitrified and dehydrated conditions. The model needs an improved ice microphysical representation, not only to allow ice particles to be a source of NAT but also to provide information on ice cloud particle number and size so that ice cloud optical properties can be more precisely calculated for comparison with CALIPSO data.

  6. Accuracy of comparing bone quality to chocolate bars for patient information purposes: observational study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Phil; Jones, Sarah; Stone, Debbie

    2007-12-22

    To test whether standard information for patients using Crunchie and Aero chocolate bars to explain bone health and risk of fracture is robust. Observational study. Domestic kitchen in rural west Wales. 10 Crunchie bars and 10 Aero bars. Fracture after falls from varying heights. Both Crunchie and Aero bars exhibited the same T and Z scores for bone density. Crunchie bars had a lower chocolate mass index than the Aero bars. Crunchie bars are more liable to fracture. Using Crunchie and Aero chocolate bars to explain bone structure to patients may be visually attractive but oversimplifies the situation.

  7. Comparative Allometric Growth of the Mimetic Ephippid Reef Fishes Chaetodipterus faber and Platax orbicularis

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Breno; Sakai, Yoichi; Pereira, Pedro H. C.; Gasset, Eric; Buchet, Vincent; Maamaatuaiahutapu, Moana; Ready, Jonathan S.; Oliveira, Yrlan; Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Vallinoto, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Mimesis is a relatively widespread phenomenon among reef fish, but the ontogenetic processes relevant for mimetic associations in fish are still poorly understood. In the present study, the allometric growth of two allopatric leaf-mimetic species of ephippid fishes, Chaetodipterus faber from the Atlantic and Platax orbicularis from the Indo-Pacific, was analyzed using ten morphological variables. The development of fins was considered owing to the importance of these structures for mimetic behaviors during early life stages. Despite the anatomical and behavioral similarities in both juvenile and adult stages, C. faber and P. orbicularis showed distinct patterns of growth. The overall shape of C. faber transforms from a rounded-shape in mimetic juveniles to a lengthened profile in adults, while in P. orbicularis, juveniles present an oblong profile including dorsal and anal fins, with relative fin size diminishing while the overall profile grows rounder in adults. Although the two species are closely-related, the present results suggest that growth patterns in C. faber and P. orbicularis are different, and are probably independent events in ephippids that have resulted from similar selective processes. PMID:26630347

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi; Naik, Smitha; Lerra, Sahul; Tiwari, Priya; Mamta; Katakwar, Payal; Tak, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cyst and tumors arise from tissue remains of odontogenesis, these interactions have been considered to play an important role in the tumorigenesis of odontogenic lesions. The connective tissue stroma has an essential role in the preservation of epithelial tissues and minor alterations in the epithelium are followed by corresponding changes in the stroma, such as angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the first factor which maintains its position as the most critical driver of vascular formation and is required to initiate the formation of immature vessels, with this aim, present study was executed to evaluate VEGF expression in kertocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst (RC). Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out comprising a total of 31 cases; 13 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), nine cases of dentigerous cyst (DC) and nine cases of RC. The sections were stained immunohistochemically with VEGF antibody and were evaluated for the presence and intensity of the immuno reactive cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test to inter-compare the VEGF expression between KCOT, DC, and RC. Results: VEGF expression in the epithelium and connective tissue was significantly higher in KCOT compared to dentigerous and RC. One case of KCOT with carcinomatous change also revealed positive results for the VEGF expression in the dysplastic epithelium, tumor islands, and connective tissue. The significant difference was observed on inter-comparison of the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC, whereas no significant difference was observed in the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC. Conclusion: The present study data supports the literature finding that angiogenesis can be important in the progression and enlargement of odontogenic cysts similarly to what occurs in neoplastic conditions and further it can be concluded that

  9. The growth response of some Chytridiomycota to temperatures commonly observed in the soil.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Frank H; Letcher, Peter M; Commandeur, Zoe; Jeong, Cho Eun; McGee, Peter A

    2005-06-01

    Chytridiomycota were isolated into pure culture from cool temperate and warm semi-arid soils of eastern Australia. In pure culture these fungi responded variably to the range of temperatures commonly recorded in their environment. All members of the Blastocladiales, Spizellomycetales and Chytridiales grew in culture at temperatures up to 30 degrees C. Some isolates from the Blastocladiales and Spizellomycetales continued to grow at or above 37 degrees. Some isolates of the Chytridiales grew up to but not beyond 35 degrees. All isolates in the Chytridiales were able to resume growth at 20 degrees after brief exposure to temperatures higher than the maximum growth temperature, but were killed by exposure to higher temperatures for 7 d. Because in the natural soil habitat temperature may exceed the maximum for growth it may be a limiting factor that determines the distribution of chytrids in the soil.

  10. Universal Patterns of Cluster Growth in Aqueous Sugars Observed by Dynamic Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tri; Sidebottom, David

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic light scattering was performed on aqueous sugar solutions to monitor the growth of sugar clusters as a function of sugar concentration and temperature. Three sugars (glucose, maltose and sucrose) were investigated. Analysis of the hydrodynamic radius of the diffusing clusters suggests a two-stage process of cluster growth. At low volume fractions of sugar, a cluster phase consisting of nearly monodisperse clusters forms with a mean cluster mass that increases in proportion to the volume fraction. A second stage of growth develops when clusters reach a size where they begin to overlap. In this later stage, cluster-cluster aggregation occurs and the cluster size grows in a common, but temperature dependent, power law fashion in advance of a percolation threshold near 83 wt% sugar. This work is supported by a grant from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (R01EB009644).

  11. Comparative study of a substorm event by satellite observation and model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ma, ShuYing; Ridley, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    A substorm event has been simulated for the first time by using SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework) developed by the University of Michigan. The model results have been validated using Geotail and Cluster satellite observations. The substorm onset occurs at 22:08 UT on September 28 2004, as identified from FUV WIC observations on the NASA IMAGE spacecraft. SWMF can couple effectively the magnetosphere, inner magnetosphere and ionosphere processes and is driven by the solar wind and IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) parameters, which are measured by ACE satellite and time delayed to the upstream boundary of the model. It shows that (1) SWMF can predict well the large-scale variations of the magnetospheric magnetic field and ionospheric currents during the substorm event; and (2) the accuracy of the time delay of the solar wind from ACE to the outer boundary of the model has great effects on the model results. Finally, the substorm trigger mechanism has been discussed and the way of improvement of the model has been pointed out.

  12. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed photosynthetic CO2 uptake in two coniferous forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Ibrom, Andreas; Jarvis, Paul G; Clement, Robert; Morgenstern, Kai; Oltchev, Alexander; Medlyn, Belinda E; Wang, Ying Ping; Wingate, Lisa; Moncrieff, John B; Gravenhorst, Gode

    2006-07-01

    Gross canopy photosynthesis (P(g)) can be simulated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon dioxide (CO2) flux measurements above the forest canopy. We compare the two estimates and illustrate our findings with two case studies. We used the three-dimensional canopy model MAESTRA to simulate P(g) of two spruce forests differing in age and structure. Model parameter acquisition and model sensitivity to selected model parameters are described, and modeled results are compared with independent flux estimates. Despite higher photon fluxes at the site, an older German Norway spruce (Picea abies L. (Karst.)) canopy took up 25% less CO2 from the atmosphere than a young Scottish Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) plantation. The average magnitudes of P(g) and the differences between the two canopies were satisfactorily represented by the model. The main reasons for the different uptake rates were a slightly smaller quantum yield and lower absorptance of the Norway spruce stand because of a more clumped canopy structure. The model did not represent the scatter in the turbulent CO2 flux densities, which was of the same order of magnitude as the non-photosynthetically-active-radiation-induced biophysical variability in the simulated P(g). Analysis of residuals identified only small systematic differences between the modeled flux estimates and turbulent flux measurements at high vapor pressure saturation deficits. The merits and limitations of comparative analysis for quality evaluation of both methods are discussed. From this analysis, we recommend use of both parameter sets and model structure as a basis for future applications and model development.

  13. Physeal Growth Arrest by Excessive Compression: Histological, Biochemical, and Micro-CT Observations in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Joon; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Lee, Hye Ran; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Background Compressive force across the growth plate may cause retardation and even arrest of physeal growth. The purpose of this study was to investigate histologic changes, metabolic changes in terms of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration, and contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (CEMCT) findings of physeal cartilage in a rabbit model of physeal damage caused by excessive compression. Methods Compressive forces were applied via external fixators for two weeks to the growth plates of distal femurs and proximal tibiae of right hind-legs in 8-week-old rabbits. Left hind-legs remained intact and were used as controls. Forty-four bone specimens containing growth plates of distal femurs or proximal tibiae were harvested one week (n = 12) and four weeks (n = 32) after surgery, and examined for histologic findings (H&E staining) and GAGs quantification in physeal cartilage. After incubation in an ionic contrast material for 48 hours, specimens were scanned by CEMCT, and the pixel values of physeal cartilage were measured. Results CEMCT showed a thin, highly attenuated line parallel to the growth plate in compressed specimens harvested at four weeks after surgery, which was found to be transversely connected trabecular bone. In these specimens, GAG content in physeal cartilage was significantly lower, and CEMCT pixel values of physeal cartilage were significantly higher than in the specimens from the contralateral control side. Conclusions Excessive compressive force applied to growth plates produces altered histologic features and metabolic function in terms of decreased GAG content in physeal cartilage, changes that can be demonstrated by CEMCT. PMID:22162794

  14. Superior growth performance in broiler chicks fed chelated compared to inorganic zinc in presence of elevated dietary copper.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junmei; Shirley, Robert B; Dibner, Julia J; Wedekind, Karen J; Yan, Frances; Fisher, Paula; Hampton, Thomas R; Evans, Joseph L; Vazquez-Añon, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the antagonism of elevated dietary Cu (250 mg/kg) from CuSO4 on three different Zn sources (ZnSO4 · H2O; [Zn bis(-2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)butanoic acid)], Zn(HMTBa)2, a chelated Zn methionine hydroxy analogue; and Zn-Methionine), as measured using multiple indices of animal performance in ROSS 308 broilers. Three experiments were conducted in broiler chicks fed a semi-purified diet. All birds were fed a Zn-deficient diet (8.5 mg/kg diet) for 1 wk, and then provided with the experimental diets for 2 wks. Experiment 1 was a 2 × 2 factorial design with two levels of Cu (8 vs. 250 mg/kg diet from CuSO4) and two Zn sources at 30 mg/kg [ZnSO4 · H2O vs. Zn(HMTBa)2]. Elevated Cu impaired growth performance only in birds fed ZnSO4. Compared to ZnSO4 · H2O, Zn(HMTBa)2 improved feed intake (12 %; P < 0.001) and weight gain (12 %, P < 0.001) and the benefits were more pronounced in the presence of 250 mg/kg diet Cu. Experiment 2 was a dose titration of ZnSO4 · H2O and Zn(HMTBa)2 at 30, 45, 60, and 75 mg/kg diet in the presence of 250 mg/kg CuSO4. Feed:gain was decreased and tibia Zn was increased with increasing Zn levels from 30 to 75 mg/kg. Birds fed Zn(HMTBa)2 consumed more food and gained more weight compared to birds fed ZnSO4, especially at lower supplementation levels (30 and 45 mg/kg; interaction P < 0,05). Experiment 3 compared two organic Zn sources (Zn(HMTBa)2 vs. Zn-Methionine) at 30 mg/kg with or without 250 mg/kg CuSO4. No interactions were observed between Zn sources and Cu levels on performance or tissue mineral concentrations. High dietary Cu decreased weight gain (P < 0.01). Tibia Cu and liver Cu were significantly increased with 250 mg/kg dietary Cu supplementation (P < 0.01). No difference was observed between the two Zn sources. Dietary 250 mg/kg Cu significantly impaired feed intake and weight gain in birds fed ZnSO4 · H2O, but had less impact in birds fed

  15. Comparative study of the effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor on corneal epithelial wound healing and neovascularization in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yan, Limeng; Wu, Wei; Wang, Zhichong; Li, Chaoyang; Lu, Xiaohe; Duan, Hucheng; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Xiaoran; Wan, Pengxia; Song, Yiyue; Tang, Jing; Han, Yu

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on corneal wound healing and neovascularization (CNV). The positive effects of 10 ng/ml rhEGF and bFGF on the proliferation of corneal epithelial cells (SD-HCEC1s), rabbit keratocyte cells (RKCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as well as the effects on the migration capacity on HUVECs were observed. An animal central corneal wound and CNV model was established in rabbits. One eye of each group was chosen randomly for topical administration of rhEGF, bFGF or normal saline, and variability in the area of corneal epithelial wound healing and CNV was observed. The optimal concentration of rhEGF and bFGF for the proliferation of corneal epithelial cells was 10 ng/ml. The promotive effect of 10 ng/ml rhEGF on the proliferation of RKCs and HUVECs was less than that of 10 ng/ml bFGF. In the animal experiment, the healing rate of the corneal epithelium in the rhEGF group was better than in the other groups on day 1. On day 3, the healing rates of the 3 groups were nearly equal. The CNV area in the rhEGF group was less than that of the bFGF group. rhEGF and bFGF both had promotive effects on corneal epithelial wound healing, but rhEGF had a weaker promotive effect on CNV than bFGF. With long-term application of growth factor drugs, rhEGF is suggested for lessening the growth of CNV. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Variability in solar radiation and temperature explains observed patterns and trends in tree growth rates across four tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shirley Xiaobi; Davies, Stuart J; Ashton, Peter S; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Supardi, M N Nur; Kassim, Abd Rahman; Tan, Sylvester; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2012-10-07

    The response of tropical forests to global climate variability and change remains poorly understood. Results from long-term studies of permanent forest plots have reported different, and in some cases opposing trends in tropical forest dynamics. In this study, we examined changes in tree growth rates at four long-term permanent tropical forest research plots in relation to variation in solar radiation, temperature and precipitation. Temporal variation in the stand-level growth rates measured at five-year intervals was found to be positively correlated with variation in incoming solar radiation and negatively related to temporal variation in night-time temperatures. Taken alone, neither solar radiation variability nor the effects of night-time temperatures can account for the observed temporal variation in tree growth rates across sites, but when considered together, these two climate variables account for most of the observed temporal variability in tree growth rates. Further analysis indicates that the stand-level response is primarily driven by the responses of smaller-sized trees (less than 20 cm in diameter). The combined temperature and radiation responses identified in this study provide a potential explanation for the conflicting patterns in tree growth rates found in previous studies.

  17. New Particle Formation and Growth in CMAQ: Application of Comprehensive Modal Methods to Observations during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary formation and subsequent growth of ultrafine atmospheric particles is an important source of larger particles that can activate clouds and affect their microphysical properties. It is likewise important for models attempting to quantify cloud-aerosol feedbacks to realistically account for this pervasive pathway. Representing these phenomena accurately in models requires in-depth knowledge of the chemical interactions that lead to new particle formation as well as the availability of condensable species to sustain a growth event. Further, models must represent the numerical aspects of particle growth reasonably well in order to preserve the essential characteristics of the aerosol size distribution (e.g. unimodal vs. bimodal, peak diameter, etc). Such characteristics are critical for calculating the number of particles participating as nuclei for liquid and solid hydrometeors. We implement into the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model a new aerosol processing module designed for robust prediction of particle number concentrations, sources and sinks. The new module leverages the speed and flexibility of modal aerosol techniques with state-of-the-art, schemes for treating new particle formation, coagulation, and intermodal transference. Moreover, we incorporate an updated treatment of organic aerosol (OA) formation and explore the sensitivity of growth rates predicted by the CMAQ model to the uncertain OA formation parameters. We apply the new model to observations made during the CalNex 2010 campaign and evaluate model performance against observed number concentrations, time-dependent growth rates, and size distributions.

  18. Observations on selectivity loss during tungsten CVD. [Growth on SiO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for the loss of selectivity during tungsten CVD (i.e., growth on SiO/sub 2/) were investigated using a dual vacuum system composed of a growth chamber and a UHV analysis chamber equipped with Auger and mass spectroscopy. An oxide-covered silicon sample could be transferred between the two chambers while under vacuum to maintain surface composition integrity. With this experimental system, we have found evidence for a selectivity loss mechanism which involves desorption of tungsten subfluorides from tungsten surfaces. The disproportionation of the subflorides then produces a reactive state of tungsten on the SiO/sub 2/ surfaces that leads directly to selectivity loss.

  19. On-line observation of cell growth in a three-dimensional matrix on surface-modified microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Kyriakides, Themis R; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2009-06-01

    Despite many successful applications of microelectrode arrays (MEAs), typical two-dimensional in-vitro cultures do not project the full scale of the cell growth environment in the three-dimensional (3D) in-vivo setting. This study aims to on-line monitor in-vitro cell growth in a 3D matrix on the surface-modified MEAs with a dynamic perfusion culture system. A 3D matrix consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel supplemented with poly-D-lysine was subsequently synthesized in situ on the self-assembled monolayer modified MEAs. FTIR spectrum analysis revealed a peak at 2100 cm(-1) due to the degradation of the structure of the 3D matrix. After 2 wks, microscopic examination revealed that the non-degraded area was around 1500 microm(2) and provided enough space for cell growth. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the degraded 3D matrix was non-cytotoxic allowing the growth of NIH3T3 fibroblasts and cortical neurons in vitro. Time-course changes of total impedance including resistance and reactance were recorded for 8 days to evaluate the cell growth in the 3D matrix on the MEA. A consistent trend reflecting changes of reactance and total impedance was observed. These in-vitro assays demonstrate that our 3D matrix can construct a biomimetic system for cell growth and analysis of cell surface interactions.

  20. OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH OF ALLOY 152 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-08-15

    Significant intergranular (IG) crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests has been documented during tests in simulated PWR primary water on two alloy 152 specimens cut from a weldment produced by ANL. The cracking morphology was observed to change from transgranular (TG) to mixed mode (up to ~60% IG) during gentle cycling and cycle + hold loading conditions. Measured crack growth rates under these conditions often suggested a moderate degree of environmental enhancement consistent with faster growth on grain boundaries. However, overall SCC propagation rates at constant stress intensity (K) or constant load were very low in all cases. Initial SCC rates up to 6x10-9 mm/s were occasionally measured, but constant K/load growth rates dropped below ~1x10-9 mm/s with time even when significant IG engagement existed. Direct comparisons were made among loading conditions, measured crack growth response and cracking morphology during each test to assess IGSCC susceptibility of the alloy 152 specimens. These results were analyzed with respect to our previous SCC crack growth rate measurements on alloy 152/52 welds.

  1. Comparative Study of the Effects of Citral on the Growth and Injury of Listeria innocua and Listeria monocytogenes Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Angulo, Angela B.; Zanini, Surama F.; Rosenthal, Amauri; Rodrigo, Dolores; Klein, Günter; Martínez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of citral on growth and on the occurrence of sublethal damage in Listeria innocua Serovar 6a (CECT 910) and Listeria monocytogenes Serovar 4b (CECT 4032) cells that were exposed to citral as a natural antimicrobial agent. Two initial inoculum concentrations were considered in this investigation: 102 and 106 cfu/mL. Citral exhibited antilisterial activity against L. innocua and L. monocytogenes, and the observed effects were dependent on the concentration of citral present in the culture medium (0, 0.150 and 0.250 μL/mL) (p ≤ 0.05). L. innocua had a shorter lag phase than L. monocytogenes, and the two species had nearly identical maximum specific growth rates. These results indicate that L. innocua could be used as surrogate for L. monocytogenes when testing the effects of this antimicrobial. Significant differences in the lag phase and growth rate were observed between the small and large inoculum concentration (p ≤ 0.05). Citral-treated L. innocua and L. monocytogenes that were recovered on selective medium (i.e., TSA-YE-SC) had a shorter lag phase and a higher maximum specific growth rate than cells that were recovered on non-selective medium (i.e., TSA-YE) (p ≤ 0.05). This result suggests that damage occurs at sublethal concentrations of citral. PMID:25643164

  2. GEM-CEDAR Challenge: Comparing Ionospheric Models with Poynting Flux from DMSP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria; Shim, Ja-Soon; Hesse, Michael; Knipp, Delores J.; Weimer, Daniel R.; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Ridley, Aaron J.; Raeder, Joachim; Maruyama, Naomi; Kilcomons, Liam; Wittberger, Michael James

    2011-01-01

    As part to the GEM-CEDAR challenge we are extending the model-data comparisons to electrodynamic in-situ measurements in low-Earth orbit. We use DMSP observations of electric and magnetic fields to compute Poynting Flux values along the satellite track in high latitudes including the auroral zones and the polar cap. Models of the ionosphere that include electrodynamic parameters have been run for five events selected for the GEM-CEDAR modeling challenge for which DMSP data are available for comparison. Combined with a magnetic field model we use the modeled electric fields to compute Poynting Flux and Joule Dissipation values from outputs of CTIPe, TIE-GCM, the ionospheric electrodynamics solvers of the SWMF, LFM and OpenGGCM magnetosphere-ionosphere coupled models, and the Weimer electric field model. The online metrics analysis tool at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has been updated to handle the analysis of separate short segments of available data (high-latitude sections of the satellite orbit) with model outputs to analyze how well auroral patterns are being reproduced by the models. We present initial results from the new analysis tool in terms of model yields (ratio of the difference between maximum and minimum values of model results to the observation), timing/location errors of local maxima in the inbound and outbound auroral crossings as well as cross-correlations for individual passes. We collect the information for many DMSP passes and present an analysis for model performance during quiet and geomagnetically disturbed time periods using half-orbit integrated values as well.

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ASYMMETRY ORIGIN OF GALAXIES IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS. I. OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Coziol, R. E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.m

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents the first of two analyses about the influence of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies observed in the nearby universe. For our study, we used three different samples representing different density environments: galaxies in Compact Groups (HCGs), Isolated Pairs of Galaxies (KPGs), and Isolated Galaxies (KIGs), which were taken as references. Usingboth characteristic isophotal parameters and evidence of asymmetries in the optical and the near-infrared, we are able to establish differences in the characteristics of galaxies with different morphologies in different environments, allowing us to better understand their different formation histories. In this first paper, we present the isophotal and asymmetry analyses of a sample of 214 galaxies in different environments observed in the optical (V and I images). For each galaxy, we have determined different characteristic isophotal parameters and V - I color profiles, as a function of semi-major axis, and performed a full asymmetry analysis in residual images using the V filter. Evidence of asymmetry in the optical is almost missing in the KIG sample and significantly more common in the KPG than in the HCG samples. Our isophotal analysis suggests that the stellar populations in the HCG galaxies are older and more dynamically relaxed than in the KPG. The HCG galaxies seem to be at a more advanced stage of interaction than the KPGs. One possible explanation is that these structures formed at different epochs: compact groups of galaxies would have formed before close pairs of galaxies, which only began interacting recently. However, similarities in the formation process of galaxies with same morphology suggest CGs and close pairs of galaxies share similar conditions; they are new structures forming relatively late in low-density environments.

  4. GEM-CEDAR Challenge: Comparing Ionospheric Models with Poynting Flux from DMSP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria; Shim, Ja-Soon; Hesse, Michael; Knipp, Delores J.; Weimer, Daniel R.; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Ridley, Aaron J.; Raeder, Joachim; Maruyama, Naomi; hide

    2011-01-01

    As part to the GEM-CEDAR challenge we are extending the model-data comparisons to electrodynamic in-situ measurements in low-Earth orbit. We use DMSP observations of electric and magnetic fields to compute Poynting Flux values along the satellite track in high latitudes including the auroral zones and the polar cap. Models of the ionosphere that include electrodynamic parameters have been run for five events selected for the GEM-CEDAR modeling challenge for which DMSP data are available for comparison. Combined with a magnetic field model we use the modeled electric fields to compute Poynting Flux and Joule Dissipation values from outputs of CTIPe, TIE-GCM, the ionospheric electrodynamics solvers of the SWMF, LFM and OpenGGCM magnetosphere-ionosphere coupled models, and the Weimer electric field model. The online metrics analysis tool at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has been updated to handle the analysis of separate short segments of available data (high-latitude sections of the satellite orbit) with model outputs to analyze how well auroral patterns are being reproduced by the models. We present initial results from the new analysis tool in terms of model yields (ratio of the difference between maximum and minimum values of model results to the observation), timing/location errors of local maxima in the inbound and outbound auroral crossings as well as cross-correlations for individual passes. We collect the information for many DMSP passes and present an analysis for model performance during quiet and geomagnetically disturbed time periods using half-orbit integrated values as well.

  5. Comparing the effects of excess copper in the leaves of Brassica juncea (L. Czern) and Brassica napus (L.) seedlings: Growth inhibition, oxidative stress and photosynthetic damage.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Gábor; Kumar, Devanand; Lehotai, Nóra; Pető, Andrea; Molnár, Árpád; Rácz, Éva; Ördög, Attila; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Laskay, Gábor

    2015-06-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to compare the effects of excess copper (Cu) on growth and photosynthesis in young Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We compared the effects of excess Cu on the two Brassica species at different physiological levels from antioxidant levels to photosynthetic activity. Nine-day-old plants were treated with Cu (10, 25 and 50 μM CuSO4) for 7 and 14 days. Both species took up Cu from the external solution to a similar degree but showed slight root-to-shoot translocation. Furthermore, after seven days of treatment, excess Cu significantly decreased other microelement content, such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn), especially in the shoots of B. napus. As a consequence, the leaves of young Brassica napus plants showed decreased concentrations of photosynthetic pigments and more intense growth inhibition; however, accumulation of highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) were not detected. After 14 days of Cu exposure the reduction of Fe and Mn contents and shoot growth proved to be comparable in the two species. Moreover, a significant Cu-induced hROS accumulation was observed in both Brassica species. The diminution in pigment contents and photosynthetic efficiency were more pronounced in B. napus during prolonged Cu exposure. Based on all the parameters, B. juncea appears to be more resistant to excess Cu than B. napus, rendering it a species with higher potential for phytoremediation.

  6. Atomic Force Microscope Observation of Growth and Defects on As-Grown (111) 3C-SiC Mesa Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Powell, J. Anthony

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents experimental atomic force microscope (AFM) observations of the surface morphology of as-grown (111) silicon-face 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms. Wide variations in 3C surface step structure are observed as a function of film growth conditions and film defect content. The vast majority of as-grown 3C-SiC surfaces consisted of trains of single bilayer height (0.25 nm) steps. Macrostep formation (i.e., step-bunching) was rarely observed, and then only on mesa heterofilms with extended crystal defects. As supersaturation is lowered by decreasing precursor concentration, terrace nucleation on the top (111) surface becomes suppressed, sometimes enabling the formation of thin 3C-SiC film surfaces completely free of steps. For thicker films, propagation of steps inward from mesa edges is sometimes observed, suggesting that enlarging 3C mesa sidewall facets begin to play an increasingly important role in film growth. The AFM observation of stacking faults (SF's) and 0.25 nm Burgers vector screw component growth spirals on the as-grown surface of defective 3C films is reported.

  7. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe-B spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0-5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. The observations strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via a local upward FAC.

  8. A Comparative Observational Study of YSO Classification in Four Small Star-forming H ii Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung-Ju; Kerton, C. R.; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a new young stellar object (YSO) identification and classification technique using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. We compare this new technique with previous WISE YSO detection and classification methods that used either infrared colors or spectral energy distribution slopes. In this study, we also use the new technique to detect and examine the YSO population associated with four small H ii regions: KR 7, KR 81, KR 120, and KR 140. The relatively simple structure of these regions allows us to effectively use both spatial and temporal constraints to identify YSOs that are potential products of triggered star formation. We are also able to identify regions of active star formation around these H ii regions that are clearly not influenced by the H ii region expansion, and thus demonstrate that star formation is on-going on megayear timescales in some of these molecular clouds.

  9. Changes in hospital costs after introducing an intermediate care unit: a comparative observational study

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Barbara CJ; Dirksen, Carmen D; Nieman, Fred HM; van Merode, Godefridus; Poeze, Martijn; Ramsay, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The high cost of critical care resources has resulted in strategies to reduce the costs of ruling out low-risk patients by developing intermediate care units (IMCs). The aim of this study was to compare changes in total hospital costs for intensive care patients before and after the introduction of an IMC at the University Hospital Maastricht. Methods The design was a comparative longitudinal study. The setting was a university hospital with a mixed intensive care unit (ICU), an IMC, and general wards. Changes in total hospital costs were measured for patients who were admitted to the ICU before and after the introduction of the IMC. The comparison of interest was the opening of a six-bed mixed IMC. Results The mean total hospital cost per patient increased significantly. Before the introduction of the IMC, the total hospital cost per patient was €12,961 (± €14,530) and afterwards it rose to €16,513 (± €17,718). Multiple regression analysis was used to determine to what extent patient characteristics explained these higher hospital costs using mortality, type of stay, diagnostic categories, length of ICU and ward stay, and the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS) as predictors. More surgical patients, greater requirements of therapeutic interventions on the ICU admission day, and longer ICU stay in patients did explain the increase in hospital costs, rather than the introduction of the IMC. Conclusion After the introduction of the IMC, the higher mean total hospital costs for patients with a high TISS score and longer ICU stay explained the cost increase. PMID:18482443

  10. A retrospective observational study comparing hair apposition technique, suturing and stapling for scalp lacerations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aim Scalp lacerations are commonly encountered in patients presenting to emergency department with trauma. Lacerations are repaired with suturing, stapling, adhesive tapes, and tissue adhesives. In this study, we aimed to compare the effectiveness of suturing, stapling, and hair apposition techniques used in repair of scalp lacerations in patients who presented to emergency department with scalp laceration. Materials and method After obtaining approval of local ethics committee, we examined the effects of the three technique used to repair scalp lacerations on wound healing, complication rate, and patient satisfaction by recording data. Categorical variables were expressed as n and %. X2 test was used for statistical analysis. A p value less than 0.05 was accepted statistically significant. Results Our study included a total of 134 patients of whom were treated 37 (27.6%) with hair apposition technique 49, 48 (35.8%) with suturing, and (36.6%) with stapling. There was a significant difference between the scalp repair technique and 7th and 15th day patient satisfaction rates in favor of the hair apposition technique (p < 0.05). There was a significant difference between the scalp repair technique and cosmetic problems after 15 days (p < 0.05). Cosmetic problems 15 days after the procedure were significantly lower in the hair apposition technique. Conclusion In patients presenting to emergency departments with linear scalp laceration suturing, stapling, and hair apposition techniques can be safely applied. However, hair apposition technique has the advantages of being more satisfying, and having lower cosmetic problem and complication rates compared with other techniques. PMID:23885743

  11. OBSERVATIONS ON THE GROWTH OF ALPHA-IRON SINGLE CRYSTALS BY HALOGEN REDUCTION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    By increasing the scale of the conventional technique for growing Fe whiskers, single crystals were produced of alpha - iron 1 to 2 mm in diameter and...reproducible source of high purity, single crystals of alpha - iron of reasonable experimental size, conveniently preoriented by growth.

  12. OBSERVATIONS ON THE 10-DAY CHIRONOMUS TENTANS SURVIVAL AND GROWTH BIOASSAY IN EVALUATING GREAT LAKES SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 10-day bioassay with larval chironomids (Chironomus tentans) was used to evaluate sediment samples from harbors at Michigan City, IN, St. Joseph, MI, Grand Haven, MI and Toledo, OH for toxicity, based on the endpoints of survival, dry weight, and growth. Larval responses in se...

  13. Observation of an Organic-Inorganic Lattice Match during Biomimetic Growth of (001)-Oriented Calcite Crystals under Floating Sulfate Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kewalramani, S.; Kim, K; Stripe, B; Evmenenko, G; Dommett, G; Dutta, P

    2008-01-01

    Macromolecular layers rich in amino acids and with some sulfated polysaccharides appear to control oriented calcite growth in living organisms. Calcite crystals nucleating under floating acid monolayers have been found to be unoriented on average. We have now observed directly, using in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, that there is a 1:1 match between the monolayer unit cell and the unit cell of the (001) plane of calcite. Thus, sulfate head groups appear to act as templates for the growth of (001)-oriented calcite crystals, which is the orientation commonly found in biominerals.

  14. Understanding the multifactorial control of growth hormone release by somatotropes: lessons from comparative endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Durán-Prado, Mario; Luque, Raúl M; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Quintero, Ana; Gutiérrez-Pascual, Ester; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Malagón, María M; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Castaño, Justo P

    2009-04-01

    Control of postnatal growth is the main, but not the only, role for growth hormone (GH) as this hormone also contributes to regulating metabolism, reproduction, immunity, development, and osmoregulation in different species. Likely owing to this variety of group-specific functions, GH production is differentially regulated across vertebrates, with an apparent evolutionary trend to simplification, especially in the number of stimulatory factors governing substantially GH release. Thus, teleosts exhibit a multifactorial regulation of GH secretion, with a number of factors, from the newly discovered fish GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) to pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) but also gonadotropin-releasing hormone, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin(s) directly controlling somatotropes. In amphibians and reptiles, GH secretion is primarily stimulated by the major hypothalamic peptides GHRH and PACAP and inhibited by somatostatin(s), while other factors (ghrelin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone) also influence GH release. Finally, in birds and mammals, primary control of GH secretion is exerted by a dual interplay between GHRH and somatostatin. In addition, somatotrope function is modulated by additional hypothalamic and peripheral factors (e.g., ghrelin, leptin, insulin-like growth factor-I), which together enable a balanced integration of feedback signals related to processes in which GH plays a relevant regulatory role, such as metabolic and energy status, reproductive, and immune function. Interestingly, in contrast to the high number of stimulatory factors impinging upon somatotropes, somatostatin(s) stand(s) as the main primary inhibitory regulator(s) for this cell type.

  15. Are periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after revision of total disc replacement comparable to the reactions observed after total hip or knee revision surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Ilona M.; Austen, Shennah; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Kurtz, Steven M.; ten Broeke, René H.M.; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Willems, Paul C.; van Ooij, André

    2011-01-01

    Study design Comparative study. Objective To compare periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after total disc replacement (TDR), total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. Summary of background data Prosthetic wear debris leading to particle disease, followed by osteolysis, is often observed after THA and TKA. Although the presence of polyethylene (PE) particles and periprosthetic inflammation after TDR has been proven recently, osteolysis is rarely observed. The clinical relevance of PE wear debris in the spine remains poorly understood. Methods Number, size and shape of PE particles, as well as quantity and type of inflammatory cells in periprosthetic tissue retrieved during Charité TDR (n=22), THA (n=10) and TKA (n=4) revision surgery were compared. Tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and examined by using light microscopy with bright