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Sample records for comparing tiling array

  1. Design optimization methods for genomic DNA tiling arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bertone, Paul; Trifonov, Valery; Rozowsky, Joel S.; Schubert, Falk; Emanuelsson, Olof; Karro, John; Kao, Ming-Yang; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A recent development in microarray research entails the unbiased coverage, or tiling, of genomic DNA for the large-scale identification of transcribed sequences and regulatory elements. A central issue in designing tiling arrays is that of arriving at a single-copy tile path, as significant sequence cross-hybridization can result from the presence of non-unique probes on the array. Due to the fragmentation of genomic DNA caused by the widespread distribution of repetitive elements, the problem of obtaining adequate sequence coverage increases with the sizes of subsequence tiles that are to be included in the design. This becomes increasingly problematic when considering complex eukaryotic genomes that contain many thousands of interspersed repeats. The general problem of sequence tiling can be framed as finding an optimal partitioning of non-repetitive subsequences over a prescribed range of tile sizes, on a DNA sequence comprising repetitive and non-repetitive regions. Exact solutions to the tiling problem become computationally infeasible when applied to large genomes, but successive optimizations are developed that allow their practical implementation. These include an efficient method for determining the degree of similarity of many oligonucleotide sequences over large genomes, and two algorithms for finding an optimal tile path composed of longer sequence tiles. The first algorithm, a dynamic programming approach, finds an optimal tiling in linear time and space; the second applies a heuristic search to reduce the space complexity to a constant requirement. A Web resource has also been developed, accessible at http://tiling.gersteinlab.org, to generate optimal tile paths from user-provided DNA sequences. PMID:16365382

  2. Methylation profiling using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and tiling array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Hoi-Hung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Rennert, Owen M; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development and plays a role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. It is dynamically changed during germline development. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) is an efficient, cost-effective method for locus-specific and genome-wide analysis. Methylated DNA fragments are enriched by a 5-methylcytidine-recognizing antibody, therefore allowing the analysis of both CpG and non-CpG methylation. The enriched DNA fragments can be amplified and hybridized to tiling arrays covering CpG islands, promoters, or the entire genome. Comparison of different methylomes permits the discovery of differentially methylated regions that might be important in disease- or tissue-specific expression. Here, we describe an established MeDIP protocol and tiling array hybridization method for profiling methylation of testicular germ cells.

  3. Controlled Nucleation and Growth of DNA Tile Arrays within Prescribed DNA Origami Frames and Their Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Controlled nucleation of nanoscale building blocks by geometrically defined seeds implanted in DNA nanoscaffolds represents a unique strategy to study and understand the dynamic processes of molecular self-assembly. Here we utilize a two-dimensional DNA origami frame with a hollow interior and selectively positioned DNA hybridization seeds to control the self-assembly of DNA tile building blocks, where the small DNA tiles are directed to fill the interior of the frame through prescribed sticky end interactions. This design facilitates the construction of DNA origami/array hybrids that adopt the overall shape and dimensions of the origami frame, forming a 2D array in the core consisting of a large number of simple repeating DNA tiles. The formation of the origami/array hybrid was characterized with atomic force microscopy, and the nucleation dynamics were monitored by serial AFM scanning and fluorescence spectroscopy, which revealed faster kinetics of growth within the frame as compared to growth without the presence of a frame. Our study provides insight into the fundamental behavior of DNA-based self-assembling systems. PMID:24575893

  4. Double error shrinkage method for identifying protein binding sites observed by tiling arrays with limited replication

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchul; Bekiranov, Stefan; Lee, Jae K.; Park, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: ChIP–chip has been widely used for various genome-wide biological investigations. Given the small number of replicates (typically two to three) per biological sample, methods of analysis that control the variance are desirable but in short supply. We propose a double error shrinkage (DES) method by using moving average statistics based on local-pooled error estimates which effectively control both heterogeneous error variances and correlation structures of an extremely large number of individual probes on tiling arrays. Results: Applying DES to ChIP–chip tiling array study for discovering genome-wide protein-binding sites, we identified 8400 target regions that include highly likely TFIID binding sites. About 33% of these were well matched with the known transcription starting sites on the DBTSS library, while many other newly identified sites have a high chance to be real binding sites based on a high positive predictive value of DES. We also showed the superior performance of DES compared with other commonly used methods for detecting actual protein binding sites. Contact: tspark@snu.ac.kr; jaeklee@virginia.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19667080

  5. Fast Wavelet Based Functional Models for Transcriptome Analysis with Tiling Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Lieven; De Beuf, Kristof; Thas, Olivier; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2013-01-01

    For a better understanding of the biology of an organism, a complete description is needed of all regions of the genome that are actively transcribed. Tiling arrays are used for this purpose. They allow for the discovery of novel transcripts and the assessment of differential expression between two or more experimental conditions such as genotype, treatment, tissue, etc. In tiling array literature, many efforts are devoted to transcript discovery, whereas more recent developments also focus on differential expression. To our knowledge, however, no methods for tiling arrays have been described that can simultaneously assess transcript discovery and identify differentially expressed transcripts. In this paper, we adopt wavelet based functional models to the context of tiling arrays. The high dimensionality of the data triggered us to avoid inference based on Bayesian MCMC methods. Instead, we introduce a fast empirical Bayes method that provides adaptive regularization of the functional effects. A simulation study and a case study illustrate that our approach is well suited for the simultaneous assessment of transcript discovery and differential expression in tiling array studies, and that it outperforms methods that accomplish only one of these tasks. PMID:22499683

  6. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  7. Applications of DNA tiling arrays for whole-genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Mockler, Todd C; Chan, Simon; Sundaresan, Ambika; Chen, Huaming; Jacobsen, Steven E; Ecker, Joseph R

    2005-01-01

    DNA microarrays are a well-established technology for measuring gene expression levels. Microarrays designed for this purpose use relatively few probes for each gene and are biased toward known and predicted gene structures. Recently, high-density oligonucleotide-based whole-genome microarrays have emerged as a preferred platform for genomic analysis beyond simple gene expression profiling. Potential uses for such whole-genome arrays include empirical annotation of the transcriptome, chromatin-immunoprecipitation-chip studies, analysis of alternative splicing, characterization of the methylome (the methylation state of the genome), polymorphism discovery and genotyping, comparative genome hybridization, and genome resequencing. Here we review different whole-genome microarray designs and applications of this technology to obtain a wide variety of genomic scale information.

  8. Generalizing Moving Averages for Tiling Arrays Using Combined P-Value Statistics*

    PubMed Central

    Kechris, Katerina J; Biehs, Brian; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2010-01-01

    High density tiling arrays are an effective strategy for genome-wide identification of transcription factor binding regions. Sliding window methods that calculate moving averages of log ratios or t-statistics have been useful for the analysis of tiling array data. Here, we present a method that generalizes the moving average approach to evaluate sliding windows of p-values by using combined p-value statistics. In particular, the combined p-value framework can be useful in situations when taking averages of the corresponding test-statistic for the hypothesis may not be appropriate or when it is difficult to assess the significance of these averages. We exhibit the strengths of the combined p-values methods on Drosophila tiling array data and assess their ability to predict genomic regions enriched for transcription factor binding. The predictions are evaluated based on their proximity to target genes and their enrichment of known transcription factor binding sites. We also present an application for the generalization of the moving average based on integrating two different tiling array experiments. PMID:20812907

  9. Pressure gradient effects on heat transfer to reusable surface insulation tile-array gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the effect of pressure gradient on the heat transfer within space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile-array gaps under thick, turbulent boundary-layer conditions. Heat-transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a curved array of full-scale simulated RSI tiles in a tunnel-wall boundary layer at a nominal free-stream Mach number and free-stream Reynolds numbers. Transverse pressure gradients of varying degree were induced over the model surface by rotating the curved array with respect to the flow. Definition of the tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow was obtained by measurement of boundary-layer pitot pressure profiles, wall pressure, and heat transfer. Flat-plate heat-transfer data were correlated and a method was derived for prediction of heat transfer to a smooth curved surface in the highly three-dimensional tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow. Pressure on the floor of the RSI tile-array gap followed the trends of the external surface pressure. Heat transfer to the surface immediately downstream of a transverse gap is higher than that for a smooth surface at the same location. Heating to the wall of a transverse gap, and immediately downstream of it, at its intersection with a longitudinal gap is significantly greater than that for the simple transverse gap.

  10. Tiling array-driven elucidation of transcriptional structures based on maximum-likelihood and Markov models.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Tetsuro; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    Tiling arrays of high-density oligonucleotide probes spanning the entire genome are powerful tools for the discovery of new genes. However, it is difficult to determine the structure of the spliced product of a structurally unknown gene from noisy array signals only. Here we introduce a statistical method that estimates the precise splicing points and the exon/intron structure of a structurally unknown gene by maximizing the odds or the ratio of posterior probabilities of the structure under the observation of array signal intensities and nucleic acid sequences. Our method more accurately predicted the gene structures than the simple threshold-based method, and more correctly estimated the expression values of structurally unknown genes than the window-based method. It was observed that the Markov model contributed to the precision of splice points, and that the statistical significance of expression (P-value) represented the reliability of the estimated gene structure and expression value well. We have implemented the method as a program ARTADE (ARabidopsis Tiling Array-based Detection of Exons) and applied it to the Arabidopsis thaliana whole-genome array data analysis. The database of the predicted results and the ARTADE program are available at http://omicspace.riken.jp/ARTADE/.

  11. ENCODE Tiling Array Analysis Identifies Differentially Expressed Annotated and Novel 5′ Capped RNAs in Hepatitis C Infected Liver

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Christopher I.; Nelson, Cassie A.; Schwartz, Jason J.; Nix, David A.; Hagedorn, Curt H.

    2011-01-01

    Microarray studies of chronic hepatitis C infection have provided valuable information regarding the host response to viral infection. However, recent studies of the human transcriptome indicate pervasive transcription in previously unannotated regions of the genome and that many RNA transcripts have short or lack 3′ poly(A) ends. We hypothesized that using ENCODE tiling arrays (1% of the genome) in combination with affinity purifying Pol II RNAs by their unique 5′ m7GpppN cap would identify previously undescribed annotated and unannotated genes that are differentially expressed in liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Both 5′-capped and poly(A)+ populations of RNA were analyzed using ENCODE tiling arrays. Sixty-four annotated genes were significantly increased in HCV cirrhotic as compared to control liver; twenty-seven (42%) of these genes were identified only by analyzing 5′ capped RNA. Thirty-one annotated genes were significantly decreased; sixteen (50%) of these were identified only by analyzing 5′ capped RNA. Bioinformatic analysis showed that capped RNA produced more consistent results, provided a more extensive expression profile of intronic regions and identified upregulated Pol II transcriptionally active regions in unannotated areas of the genome in HCV cirrhotic liver. Two of these regions were verified by PCR and RACE analysis. qPCR analysis of liver biopsy specimens demonstrated that these unannotated transcripts, as well as IRF1, TRIM22 and MET, were also upregulated in hepatitis C with mild inflammation and no fibrosis. The analysis of 5′ capped RNA in combination with ENCODE tiling arrays provides additional gene expression information and identifies novel upregulated Pol II transcripts not previously described in HCV infected liver. This approach, particularly when combined with new RNA sequencing technologies, should also be useful in further defining Pol II transcripts differentially regulated in specific disease states and

  12. Nutrient export in tile drainage: Comparing manure injection to fertigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface tile drainage of agricultural land is implicated as a major source of nutrients to the Mississippi River. To protect water quality, land application of manure should maximize crop nutrient use and minimize nutrient loss. Weather constraints and regulations restrict the period during which...

  13. Identification of transcribed sequences in Arabidopsis thaliana by using high-resolution genome tiling arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Sethi, Himanshu; Liang, Shoudan; Nelson, David C.; Hegeman, Adrian; Nelson, Clark; Rancour, David; Bednarek, Sebastian; Ulrich, Eldon L.; Zhao, Qin; Wrobel, Russell L.; Newman, Craig S.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips, George N Jr; Markley, John L.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Using a maskless photolithography method, we produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with probe sequences tiled throughout the genome of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. RNA expression was determined for the complete nuclear, mitochondrial, and chloroplast genomes by tiling 5 million 36-mer probes. These probes were hybridized to labeled mRNA isolated from liquid grown T87 cells, an undifferentiated Arabidopsis cell culture line. Transcripts were detected from at least 60% of the nearly 26,330 annotated genes, which included 151 predicted genes that were not identified previously by a similar genome-wide hybridization study on four different cell lines. In comparison with previously published results with 25-mer tiling arrays produced by chromium masking-based photolithography technique, 36-mer oligonucleotide probes were found to be more useful in identifying intron-exon boundaries. Using two-dimensional HPLC tandem mass spectrometry, a small-scale proteomic analysis was performed with the same cells. A large amount of strongly hybridizing RNA was found in regions "antisense" to known genes. Similarity of antisense activities between the 25-mer and 36-mer data sets suggests that it is a reproducible and inherent property of the experiments. Transcription activities were also detected for many of the intergenic regions and the small RNAs, including tRNA, small nuclear RNA, small nucleolar RNA, and microRNA. Expression of tRNAs correlates with genome-wide amino acid usage.

  14. Technical note: comparing von Luschan skin color tiles and modern spectrophotometry for measuring human skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Swiatoniowski, Anna K; Quillen, Ellen E; Shriver, Mark D; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-06-01

    Prior to the introduction of reflectance spectrophotometry into anthropological field research during the 1950s, human skin color was most commonly classified by visual skin color matching using the von Luschan tiles, a set of 36 standardized, opaque glass tiles arranged in a chromatic scale. Our goal was to establish a conversion formula between the tile-based color matching method and modern reflectance spectrophotometry to make historical and contemporary data comparable. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the forehead, inner upper arms, and backs of the hands using both the tiles and a spectrophotometer on 246 participants showing a broad range of skin pigmentation. From these data, a second-order polynomial conversion formula was derived by jackknife analysis to estimate melanin index (M-index) based on tile values. This conversion formula provides a means for comparing modern data to von Luschan tile measurements recorded in historical reports. This is particularly important for populations now extinct, extirpated, or admixed for which tile-based measures of skin pigmentation are the only data available.

  15. An experimental summary of plasma arc exposures of space shuttle high-temperature reusable surface insulation tile array with a single missing tile (conducted at the Ames Research Center)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    A space shuttle high temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tile array with a single missing or lost tile was exposed to a hot gas simulated reentry environment to investigate the heating conditions in and around the vicinity of the missing HRSI tile. Heat flux and pressure data for the lost tile condition were obtained by the use of a water cooled lost tile calibration model. The maximum aluminum substrate temperature obtained during the simulated reentry was 128 C (263 F). The lost tile calibration data indicated a maximum heat flux in the lost tile cavity region of 63 percent of the upstream reference value. This test was conducted at the Ames Research Center in the 20 MW semielliptical thermal protection system (TPS) pilot plasma arc test facility.

  16. CMARRT: A Tool for the Analysis of ChIP-chip Data from Tiling Arrays by Incorporating the Correlation Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Pei Fen; Chun, Hyonho; Keleş, Sündüz

    2010-01-01

    Whole genome tiling arrays at a user specified resolution are becoming a versatile tool in genomics. Chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarrays (ChIP-chip) is a powerful application of these arrays. Although there is an increasing number of methods for analyzing ChIP-chip data, perhaps the most simple and commonly used one, due to its computational efficiency, is testing with a moving average statistic. Current moving average methods assume exchangeability of the measurements within an array. They are not tailored to deal with the issues due to array designs such as overlapping probes that result in correlated measurements. We investigate the correlation structure of data from such arrays and propose an extension of the moving average testing via a robust and rapid method called CMARRT. We illustrate the pitfalls of ignoring the correlation structure in simulations and a case study. Our approach is implemented as an R package called CMARRT and can be used with any tiling array platform. PMID:18229712

  17. Analysis of RNAseq datasets from a comparative infectious disease zebrafish model using GeneTiles bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Veneman, Wouter J; de Sonneville, Jan; van der Kolk, Kees-Jan; Ordas, Anita; Al-Ars, Zaid; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2015-03-01

    We present a RNA deep sequencing (RNAseq) analysis of a comparison of the transcriptome responses to infection of zebrafish larvae with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Mycobacterium marinum bacteria. We show how our developed GeneTiles software can improve RNAseq analysis approaches by more confidently identifying a large set of markers upon infection with these bacteria. For analysis of RNAseq data currently, software programs such as Bowtie2 and Samtools are indispensable. However, these programs that are designed for a LINUX environment require some dedicated programming skills and have no options for visualisation of the resulting mapped sequence reads. Especially with large data sets, this makes the analysis time consuming and difficult for non-expert users. We have applied the GeneTiles software to the analysis of previously published and newly obtained RNAseq datasets of our zebrafish infection model, and we have shown the applicability of this approach also to published RNAseq datasets of other organisms by comparing our data with a published mammalian infection study. In addition, we have implemented the DEXSeq module in the GeneTiles software to identify genes, such as glucagon A, that are differentially spliced under infection conditions. In the analysis of our RNAseq data, this has led to the possibility to improve the size of data sets that could be efficiently compared without using problem-dedicated programs, leading to a quick identification of marker sets. Therefore, this approach will also be highly useful for transcriptome analyses of other organisms for which well-characterised genomes are available.

  18. Identification of a novel gene by whole human genome tiling array.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hirokazu; Yagi, Tomohito; Tanaka, Masami; Tokuda, Yuichi; Kamoi, Kazumi; Hongo, Fumiya; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Nakano, Masakazu; Miki, Tsuneharu; Tashiro, Kei

    2013-03-01

    When the whole human genome sequence was determined by the Human Genome Project, the number of identified genes was fewer than expected. However, recent studies suggest that undiscovered transcripts still exist in the human genome. Furthermore, a new technology, the DNA microarray, which can simultaneously characterize huge amounts of genome sequence data, has become a useful tool for analyzing genetic changes in various diseases. A version of this tool, the tiling DNA microarray, was designed to search all the transcripts of the entire human genome, and provides huge amounts of data, including both exon and intron sequences, by a simple process. Although some previous studies using tiling DNA microarray analysis have indicated that numerous novel transcripts can be found in the human genome, none of them has reported any novel full-length human genes. Here, to find novel genes, we analyzed all the transcripts expressed in normal human prostate cells using this microarray. Because the optimal analytical parameters for using tiling DNA microarray data for this purpose had not been established, we established parameters for extracting the most likely regions for novel transcripts. The three parameters we optimized were the threshold for positive signal intensity, the Max gap, and the Min run, which we set to detect all transcriptional regions that were above the average length of known exons and had a signal intensity in the top 5%. We succeeded in obtaining the full-length sequence of one novel gene, located on chromosome 12q24.13. We named the novel gene "POTAGE". Its 5841-bp mRNA consists of 26 exons. We detected part of exon 2 in the tiling data analysis. The full-length sequence was then obtained by RT-PCR and RACE. Although the function of POTAGE is unclear, its sequence showed high homology with genes in other species, suggesting it might have an important or essential function. This study demonstrates that the tiling DNA microarray can be useful for

  19. Aerodynamic heating to the gaps and surfaces of simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile arrays in turbulent flow at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, I.; Avery, D. E.; Chapman, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made on a simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile array in a turbulent boundary layer to determine aerodynamic-heating distributions representative of those expected on the surface of the shuttle orbiter during earth entry due to the presence of longitudinal and transverse surface gaps. The tests were conducted in an 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel in a test medium of methane-air combustion products at a nominal Mach number of 6.6 and over a free-stream Reynolds number range from 2,000,000 to 4,900,000 per meter (600,000 to 1,500,000 per foot). The results were used to assess the aerodynamic heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, boundary-layer displacement thickness, in-line and staggered tile arrangement, and tile protrusion.

  20. BioTile, A Perl based tool for the identification of differentially enriched regions in tiling microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide tiling array experiments are increasingly used for the analysis of DNA methylation. Because DNA methylation patterns are tissue and cell type specific, the detection of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with small effect size is a necessary feature of tiling microarray ‘peak’ finding algorithms, as cellular heterogeneity within a studied tissue may lead to a dilution of the phenotypically relevant effects. Additionally, the ability to detect short length DMRs is necessary as biologically relevant signal may occur in focused regions throughout the genome. Results We present a free open-source Perl application, Binding Intensity Only Tile array analysis or “BioTile”, for the identification of differentially enriched regions (DERs) in tiling array data. The application of BioTile to non-smoothed data allows for the identification of shorter length and smaller effect-size DERs, while correcting for probe specific variation by inversely weighting on probe variance through a permutation corrected meta-analysis procedure employed at identified regions. BioTile exhibits higher power to identify significant DERs of low effect size and across shorter genomic stretches as compared to other peak finding algorithms, while not sacrificing power to detect longer DERs. Conclusion BioTile represents an easy to use analysis option applicable to multiple microarray platforms, allowing for its integration into the analysis workflow of array data analysis. PMID:23452827

  1. Interference Lattice-based Loop Nest Tilings for Stencil Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    A common method for improving performance of stencil operations on structured multi-dimensional discretization grids is loop tiling. Tile shapes and sizes are usually determined heuristically, based on the size of the primary data cache. We provide a lower bound on the numbers of cache misses that must be incurred by any tiling, and a close achievable bound using a particular tiling based on the grid interference lattice. The latter tiling is used to derive highly efficient loop orderings. The total number of cache misses of a code is the sum of (necessary) cold misses and misses caused by elements being dropped from the cache between successive loads (replacement misses). Maximizing temporal locality is equivalent to minimizing replacement misses. Temporal locality of loop nests implementing stencil operations is optimized by tilings that avoid data conflicts. We divide the loop nest iteration space into conflict-free tiles, derived from the cache miss equation. The tiling involves the definition of the grid interference lattice an equivalence class of grid points whose images in main memory map to the same location in the cache-and the construction of a special basis for the lattice. Conflicts only occur on the boundaries of the tiles, unless the tiles are too thin. We show that the surface area of the tiles is bounded for grids of any dimensionality, and for caches of any associativity, provided the eccentricity of the fundamental parallelepiped (the tile spanned by the basis) of the lattice is bounded. Eccentricity is determined by two factors, aspect ratio and skewness. The aspect ratio of the parallelepiped can be bounded by appropriate array padding. The skewness can be bounded by the choice of a proper basis. Combining these two strategies ensures that pathologically thin tiles are avoided. They do not, however, minimize replacement misses per se. The reason is that tile visitation order influences the number of data conflicts on the tile boundaries. If two

  2. Massively Parallel Implementation of Explicitly Correlated Coupled-Cluster Singles and Doubles Using TiledArray Framework.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chong; Calvin, Justus A; Pavošević, Fabijan; Zhang, Jinmei; Valeev, Edward F

    2016-12-29

    A new distributed-memory massively parallel implementation of standard and explicitly correlated (F12) coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with canonical O(N(6)) computational complexity is described. The implementation is based on the TiledArray tensor framework. Novel features of the implementation include (a) all data greater than O(N) is distributed in memory and (b) the mixed use of density fitting and integral-driven formulations that optionally allows to avoid storage of tensors with three and four unoccupied indices. Excellent strong scaling is demonstrated on a multicore shared-memory computer, a commodity distributed-memory computer, and a national-scale supercomputer. The performance on a shared-memory computer is competitive with the popular CCSD implementations in ORCA and Psi4. Moreover, the CCSD performance on a commodity-size cluster significantly improves on the state-of-the-art package NWChem. The large-scale parallel explicitly correlated coupled-cluster implementation makes routine accurate estimation of the coupled-cluster basis set limit for molecules with 20 or more atoms. Thus, it can provide valuable benchmarks for the merging reduced-scaling coupled-cluster approaches. The new implementation allowed us to revisit the basis set limit for the CCSD contribution to the binding energy of π-stacked uracil dimer, a challenging paradigm of π-stacking interactions from the S66 benchmark database. The revised value for the CCSD correlation binding energy obtained with the help of quadruple-ζ CCSD computations, -8.30 ± 0.02 kcal/mol, is significantly different from the S66 reference value, -8.50 kcal/mol, as well as other CBS limit estimates in the recent literature.

  3. An experimental investigation of heat transfer to reusable surface insulation tile array gaps in a turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradient. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the effect of pressure gradient on the heat transfer to space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile array gaps under thick, turbulent boundary layer conditions. Heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a curved array of full-scale simulated RSI tiles in a tunnel wall boundary layer at a nominal freestream Mach number of 10.3 and freestream unit Reynolds numbers of 1.6, 3.3, and and 6.1 million per meter. Transverse pressure gradients were induced over the model surface by rotating the curved array with respect to the flow. Definition of the tunnel wall boundary layer flow was obtained by measurement of boundary layer pitot pressure profiles, and flat plate wall pressure and heat transfer. Flat plate wall heat transfer data were correlated and a method was derived for prediction of smooth, curved array heat transfer in the highly three-dimensional tunnel wall boundary layer flow and simulation of full-scale space shuttle vehicle pressure gradient levels was assessed.

  4. Restriction Site Tiling Analysis: accurate discovery and quantitative genotyping of genome-wide polymorphisms using nucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput genotype data can be used to identify genes important for local adaptation in wild populations, phenotypes in lab stocks, or disease-related traits in human medicine. Here we advance microarray-based genotyping for population genomics with Restriction Site Tiling Analysis. The approach simultaneously discovers polymorphisms and provides quantitative genotype data at 10,000s of loci. It is highly accurate and free from ascertainment bias. We apply the approach to uncover genomic differentiation in the purple sea urchin. PMID:20403197

  5. Computational Methods for the Analysis of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Raj; Lockwood, William W.; Lam, Wan L.

    2006-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) is a technique for assaying the copy number status of cancer genomes. The widespread use of this technology has lead to a rapid accumulation of high throughput data, which in turn has prompted the development of computational strategies for the analysis of array CGH data. Here we explain the principles behind array image processing, data visualization and genomic profile analysis, review currently available software packages, and raise considerations for future software development. PMID:17992253

  6. Tiled Multicore Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael B.; Lee, Walter; Miller, Jason E.; Wentzlaff, David; Bratt, Ian; Greenwald, Ben; Hoffmann, Henry; Johnson, Paul R.; Kim, Jason S.; Psota, James; Saraf, Arvind; Shnidman, Nathan; Strumpen, Volker; Frank, Matthew I.; Amarasinghe, Saman; Agarwal, Anant

    For the last few decades Moore’s Law has continually provided exponential growth in the number of transistors on a single chip. This chapter describes a class of architectures, called tiled multicore architectures, that are designed to exploit massive quantities of on-chip resources in an efficient, scalable manner. Tiled multicore architectures combine each processor core with a switch to create a modular element called a tile. Tiles are replicated on a chip as needed to create multicores with any number of tiles. The Raw processor, a pioneering example of a tiled multicore processor, is examined in detail to explain the philosophy, design, and strengths of such architectures. Raw addresses the challenge of building a general-purpose architecture that performs well on a larger class of stream and embedded computing applications than existing microprocessors, while still running existing ILP-based sequential programs with reasonable performance. Central to achieving this goal is Raw’s ability to exploit all forms of parallelism, including ILP, DLP, TLP, and Stream parallelism. Raw approaches this challenge by implementing plenty of on-chip resources - including logic, wires, and pins - in a tiled arrangement, and exposing them through a new ISA, so that the software can take advantage of these resources for parallel applications. Compared to a traditional superscalar processor, Raw performs within a factor of 2x for sequential applications with a very low degree of ILP, about 2x-9x better for higher levels of ILP, and 10x-100x better when highly parallel applications are coded in a stream language or optimized by hand.

  7. Empirical covariance modeling for 21 cm power spectrum estimation: A method demonstration and new limits from early Murchison Widefield Array 128-tile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Neben, Abraham R.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Tegmark, Max; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Carroll, P.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hernquist, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D. C.; Kim, H. S.; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; McKinley, B.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Offringa, A. R.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Sethi, S.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Wyithe, S.; Bernardi, G.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Srivani, K. S.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-06-01

    The separation of the faint cosmological background signal from bright astrophysical foregrounds remains one of the most daunting challenges of mapping the high-redshift intergalactic medium with the redshifted 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen. Advances in mapping and modeling of diffuse and point source foregrounds have improved subtraction accuracy, but no subtraction scheme is perfect. Precisely quantifying the errors and error correlations due to missubtracted foregrounds allows for both the rigorous analysis of the 21 cm power spectrum and for the maximal isolation of the "EoR window" from foreground contamination. We present a method to infer the covariance of foreground residuals from the data itself in contrast to previous attempts at a priori modeling. We demonstrate our method by setting limits on the power spectrum using a 3 h integration from the 128-tile Murchison Widefield Array. Observing between 167 and 198 MHz, we find at 95% confidence a best limit of Δ2(k )<3.7 ×104 mK2 at comoving scale k =0.18 h Mpc-1 and at z =6.8 , consistent with existing limits.

  8. An integrated mBAND and submegabase resolution tiling set (SMRT) CGH array analysis of focal amplification, microdeletions, and ladder structures consistent with breakage-fusion-bridge cycle events in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gloria; Karaskova, Jana; Beheshti, Ben; Vukovic, Bisera; Bayani, Jane; Selvarajah, Shamini; Watson, Spencer K; Lam, Wan L; Zielenska, Maria; Squire, Jeremy A

    2005-04-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is characterized by chromosomal instability and high-copy-number gene amplification. The breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle is a well-established mechanism of genomic instability in tumors and in vitro models used to study the origins of complex chromosomal rearrangements and cancer genome amplification. However, until now, there have been no high-resolution cytogenetic or genomic array studies of BFB events in OS. In the present study, multicolor banding (mBAND) FISH and submegabase resolution tiling set (SMRT) array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) were used to identify and map genomic signatures of BFB events in four OS cell lines and one patient tumor. The expected intermediates associated with BFB-dicentric chromosomes, inverted duplications, and intra- and interchromosomal amplifications-were identified. mBAND analysis provided detailed mapping of rearrangements in 1p, 6p, and 8q and showed that translocation junctions were often in close proximity to fragile sites. More detailed mBAND studies of OS cell line MG-63 revealed ladderlike FISH signals of equally spaced interchromosomal coamplifications of 6p21, 8q24, and 9p21-p22 in a homogeneously staining region (hsr). Focal amplifications that concordantly mapped to the hsr were localized to discrete genomic intervals by SMRT array CGH. The complex amplicon structure in this hsr suggests focal amplifications immediately adjacent to microdeletions. Moreover, the genomic regions in which there was deletion/amplification had a preponderance of fragile sites. In summary, this study has provided further support for the role of the BFB mechanism and fragile sites in facilitating gene amplification and chromosomal rearrangement in OS.

  9. Preassembly Of Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izu, Y. D.; Yoshioka, E. N.; Rosario, T.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for preassembling high-temperature insulating tiles speeds and simplifies installation and repair and reduces damage from handling. Preassembly concept facilitates placement of tiles on gently contoured surfaces as well as on flat ones. Tiles bonded to nylon mesh with room-temperature-vulcanizing silicon rubber. Spacing between tiles is 0.03 in. Applications include boilers, kilns, and furnaces.

  10. A comparative study of the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, S.; Erasmus, R.; Jivan, H.; Pelwan, C.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of radiation on the light transmittance of plastic scintillators was studied experimentally. The high optical transmittance property of plastic scintillators makes them essential in the effective functioning of the Tile calorimeter of the ATLAS detector at CERN. This significant role played by the scintillators makes this research imperative in the movement towards the upgrade of the tile calorimeter. The radiation damage of polyvinyl toluene (PVT) based plastic scintillators was studied, namely, EJ-200, EJ-208 and EJ-260, all manufactured and provided to us by ELJEN technology. In addition, in order to compare to scintillator brands actually in use at the ATLAS detector currently, two polystyrene (PS) based scintillators and an additional PVT based scintillator were also scrutinized in this study, namely, Dubna, Protvino and Bicron, respectively. All the samples were irradiated using a 6 MeV proton beam at different doses at iThemba LABS Gauteng. The radiation process was planned and mimicked by doing simulations using a SRIM program. In addition, transmission spectra for the irradiated and unirradiated samples of each grade were obtained, observed and analyzed.

  11. Handmade Tile Mosaics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Just like the classroom, children's outdoor environments should be filled with artistic creations that add sparkle and imagination to the space. One of the author's favorite ways to add art to the outdoors is by installing a mosaic mural of child-made tiles. The process of making the tiles is fun for all; each tile is a charming work of art in…

  12. Hemispheric Imaging of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen with a Phased Array Antenna System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnholds, Stefan J.; De Bruyn, A. Ger; Bregman, Jaap D.; Bij De Vaate, Jan Geralt

    2004-06-01

    The thousand element array (THEA) system is a phased array system consisting of 1 m2 tiles having 64 Vivaldi elements each, arranged on a regular 8-by-8 grid, which has been developed as a demonstrator of technology and applicability for SKA. In this paper we present imaging results of Galactic neutral hydrogen with THEA. Measurements have been taken using a dense 2-by-2 array of four tiles as a four tile adder. The results are compared with results from the Leiden-Dwingeloo Survey, showing qualitative agreement, but also indicating that further studies are needed on the instrumental characteristics.

  13. Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

  14. Generalized quasiperiodic Rauzy tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Julien; Mosseri, Rémy

    2001-05-01

    We present a geometrical description of new canonical d-dimensional codimension one quasiperiodic tilings based on generalized Fibonacci sequences. These tilings are made up of rhombi in 2d and rhombohedra in 3d as the usual Penrose and icosahedral tilings. Thanks to a natural indexing of the sites according to their local environment, we easily write down, for any approximant, the sites coordinates, the connectivity matrix and we compute the structure factor.

  15. Rewaterproofing Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lleger, L. J.; Wade, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Waterproofing agent, vaporized in bubbler transported by gas flowing in system and deposits in pores of tiles. Vapor carried through hole of approximately 1/16 inch (1.6.mm) diameter made in tile coating. Technique used to waterproof buildups (concrete and brick) and possibly fabrics.

  16. Distributed graph visualization on tiled displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sangwon

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed force-directed layout algorithm in order to handle large graph data on tiled display that consists of multiple computing machines and multiple displays connected to each computing machine through Ethernet. The distributed tiled display makes one big screen using multiple displays in order to discern data obviously. Besides, multiple computing devices on tiled displays share the parts of an entire dataset. Therefore, it can dramatically reduce the processing time to visualize data on screen compared with the processing time on a single machine.

  17. Array comparative genomic hybridization in retinoma and retinoblastoma tissues.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Amenduni, Mariangela; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Katzaki, Eleni; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Marozza, Annabella; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Toti, Paolo; Lazzi, Stefano; Bruttini, Mirella; De Filippis, Roberta; De Francesco, Sonia; Longo, Ilaria; Meloni, Ilaria; Mari, Francesca; Acquaviva, Antonio; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2009-03-01

    In retinoblastoma, two RB1 mutations are necessary for tumor development. Recurrent genomic rearrangements may represent subsequent events required for retinoblastoma progression. Array-comparative genomic hybridization was carried out in 18 eye samples, 10 from bilateral and eight from unilateral retinoblastoma patients. Two unilateral cases also showed areas of retinoma. The most frequent imbalance in retinoblastomas was 6p gain (40%), followed by gains at 1q12-q25.3, 2p24.3-p24.2, 9q22.2, and 9q33.1 and losses at 11q24.3, 13q13.2-q22.3, and 16q12.1-q21. Bilateral cases showed a lower number of imbalances than unilateral cases (P = 0.002). Unilateral cases were divided into low-level (< or = 4) and high-level (> or = 7) chromosomal instability groups. The first group presented with younger age at diagnosis (mean 511 days) compared with the second group (mean 1606 days). In one retinoma case ophthalmoscopically diagnosed as a benign lesion no rearrangements were detected, whereas the adjacent retinoblastoma displayed seven aberrations. The other retinoma case identified by retrospective histopathological examination shared three rearrangements with the adjacent retinoblastoma. Two other gene-free rearrangements were retinoma specific. One rearrangement, dup5p, was retinoblastoma specific and included the SKP2 gene. Genomic profiling indicated that the first retinoma was a pretumoral lesion, whereas the other represents a subclone of cells bearing 'benign' rearrangements overwhelmed by another subclone presenting aberrations with higher 'oncogenic' potential. In summary, the present study shows that bilateral and unilateral retinoblastoma have different chromosomal instability that correlates with the age of tumor onset in unilateral cases. This is the first report of genomic profiling in retinoma tissue, shedding light on the different nature of lesions named 'retinoma'.

  18. A Comparative Study of Inspection Techniques for Array Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohammed, Jelila; Green, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inspection techniques for Column Grid Array (CGA) packages. The CGA is a method of chip scale packaging using high temperature solder columns to attach part to board. It is becoming more popular over other techniques (i.e. quad flat pack (QFP) or ball grid array (BGA)). However there are environmental stresses and workmanship challenges that require good inspection techniques for these packages.

  19. Identification of Genome-Wide Mutations in Ciprofloxacin-Resistant F. tularensis LVS Using Whole Genome Tiling Arrays and Next Generation Sequencing

    DOE PAGES

    Jaing, Crystal J.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Thissen, James B.; ...

    2016-09-26

    Francisella tularensis is classified as a Class A bioterrorism agent by the U.S. government due to its high virulence and the ease with which it can be spread as an aerosol. It is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) is a broad spectrum antibiotic effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Increased Cipro resistance in pathogenic microbes is of serious concern when considering options for medical treatment of bacterial infections. Identification of genes and loci that are associated with Ciprofloxacin resistance will help advance the understanding of resistance mechanisms and may, in the future, providemore » better treatment options for patients. It may also provide information for development of assays that can rapidly identify Cipro-resistant isolates of this pathogen. In this study, we then selected a large number of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) isolates that survived in progressively higher Ciprofloxacin concentrations, screened the isolates using a whole genome F. tularensis LVS tiling microarray and Illumina sequencing, and identified both known and novel mutations associated with resistance. For genes containing mutations encode DNA gyrase subunit A, a hypothetical protein, an asparagine synthase, a sugar transamine/perosamine synthetase and others. Finally, structural modeling performed on these proteins provides insights into the potential function of these proteins and how they might contribute to Cipro resistance mechanisms.« less

  20. Identification of Genome-Wide Mutations in Ciprofloxacin-Resistant F. tularensis LVS Using Whole Genome Tiling Arrays and Next Generation Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, Crystal J.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Thissen, James B.; Zemla, Adam; Gardner, Shea N.; Vergez, Lisa M.; Bourguet, Feliza; Mabery, Shalini; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y.; Koshinsky, Heather; Jackson, Paul J.; Wang, Junwen

    2016-09-26

    Francisella tularensis is classified as a Class A bioterrorism agent by the U.S. government due to its high virulence and the ease with which it can be spread as an aerosol. It is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) is a broad spectrum antibiotic effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Increased Cipro resistance in pathogenic microbes is of serious concern when considering options for medical treatment of bacterial infections. Identification of genes and loci that are associated with Ciprofloxacin resistance will help advance the understanding of resistance mechanisms and may, in the future, provide better treatment options for patients. It may also provide information for development of assays that can rapidly identify Cipro-resistant isolates of this pathogen. In this study, we then selected a large number of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) isolates that survived in progressively higher Ciprofloxacin concentrations, screened the isolates using a whole genome F. tularensis LVS tiling microarray and Illumina sequencing, and identified both known and novel mutations associated with resistance. For genes containing mutations encode DNA gyrase subunit A, a hypothetical protein, an asparagine synthase, a sugar transamine/perosamine synthetase and others. Finally, structural modeling performed on these proteins provides insights into the potential function of these proteins and how they might contribute to Cipro resistance mechanisms.

  1. Identification of Genome-Wide Mutations in Ciprofloxacin-Resistant F. tularensis LVS Using Whole Genome Tiling Arrays and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jaing, Crystal J.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Thissen, James B.; Zemla, Adam; Vergez, Lisa M.; Bourguet, Feliza; Mabery, Shalini; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y.; Koshinsky, Heather; Jackson, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is classified as a Class A bioterrorism agent by the U.S. government due to its high virulence and the ease with which it can be spread as an aerosol. It is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) is a broad spectrum antibiotic effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Increased Cipro resistance in pathogenic microbes is of serious concern when considering options for medical treatment of bacterial infections. Identification of genes and loci that are associated with Ciprofloxacin resistance will help advance the understanding of resistance mechanisms and may, in the future, provide better treatment options for patients. It may also provide information for development of assays that can rapidly identify Cipro-resistant isolates of this pathogen. In this study, we selected a large number of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) isolates that survived in progressively higher Ciprofloxacin concentrations, screened the isolates using a whole genome F. tularensis LVS tiling microarray and Illumina sequencing, and identified both known and novel mutations associated with resistance. Genes containing mutations encode DNA gyrase subunit A, a hypothetical protein, an asparagine synthase, a sugar transamine/perosamine synthetase and others. Structural modeling performed on these proteins provides insights into the potential function of these proteins and how they might contribute to Cipro resistance mechanisms. PMID:27668749

  2. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of olfactory neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guled, Mohamed; Myllykangas, Samuel; Frierson, Henry F; Mills, Stacey E; Knuutila, Sakari; Stelow, Edward B

    2008-06-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma is an unusual neuroectodermal malignancy, which is thought to arise at the olfactory membrane of the sinonasal tract. Due to its rarity, little is understood regarding its molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities. The aim of the current study is to identify specific DNA copy number changes in olfactory neuroblastoma. Thirteen dissected tissue samples were analyzed using array comparative genomic hybridization. Our results show that gene copy number profiles of olfactory neuroblastoma samples are complex. The most frequent changes included gains at 7q11.22-q21.11, 9p13.3, 13q, 20p/q, and Xp/q, and losses at 2q31.1, 2q33.3, 2q37.1, 6q16.3, 6q21.33, 6q22.1, 22q11.23, 22q12.1, and Xp/q. Gains were more frequent than losses, and high-stage tumors showed more alterations than low-stage olfactory neuroblastoma. Frequent changes in high-stage tumors were gains at 13q14.2-q14.3, 13q31.1, and 20q11.21-q11.23, and loss of Xp21.1 (in 66% of cases). Gains at 5q35, 13q, and 20q, and losses at 2q31.1, 2q33.3, and 6q16-q22, were present in 50% of cases. The identified regions of gene copy number change have been implicated in a variety of tumors, especially carcinomas. In addition, our results indicate that gains in 20q and 13q may be important in the progression of this cancer, and that these regions possibly harbor genes with functional relevance in olfactory neuroblastoma.

  3. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, A.

    2015-07-01

    TileCal is the Hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitised every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution will review in a first part the performances of the calorimeter during run 1, obtained from calibration data, and from studies of the response of particles from collisions. In a second part it will present the solutions being investigated for the ongoing and future upgrades of the calorimeter electronics. (authors)

  4. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  5. Geopolymers as potential repair material in tiles conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldes, Catarina F. M.; Lima, Augusta M.; Delgado-Rodrigues, José; Mimoso, João Manuel; Pereira, Sílvia R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The restoration materials currently used to fill gaps in historical architectural tiles (e.g. lime or organic resin pastes) usually show serious drawbacks in terms of compatibility, effectiveness or durability. The existing solutions do not fully protect Portuguese faïence tiles ( azulejos) in outdoor conditions and frequently result in further deterioration. Geopolymers can be a potential solution for tile lacunae infill, given the chemical-mineralogical similitude to the ceramic body, and also the durability and versatile range of physical properties that can be obtained through the manipulation of their formulation and curing conditions. This work presents and discusses the viability of the use of geopolymeric pastes to fill lacunae in tiles or to act as "cold" cast ceramic tile surrogates reproducing missing tile fragments. The formulation of geopolymers, namely the type of activators, the alumino-silicate source, the quantity of water required for adequate workability and curing conditions, was studied. The need for post-curing desalination was also considered envisaging their application in the restoration of outdoor historical architectural tiles frequently exposed to adverse environmental conditions. The possible advantages and disadvantages of the use of geopolymers in the conservation of tiles are also discussed. The results obtained reveal that geopolymers pastes are a promising material for the restoration of tiles, when compared to other solutions currently in use.

  6. Molecular random tilings as glasses

    PubMed Central

    Garrahan, Juan P.; Stannard, Andrew; Blunt, Matthew O.; Beton, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that p-terphenyl-3,5,3′,5′-tetracarboxylic acid adsorbed on graphite self-assembles into a two-dimensional rhombus random tiling. This tiling is close to ideal, displaying long-range correlations punctuated by sparse localized tiling defects. In this article we explore the analogy between dynamic arrest in this type of random tilings and that of structural glasses. We show that the structural relaxation of these systems is via the propagation–reaction of tiling defects, giving rise to dynamic heterogeneity. We study the scaling properties of the dynamics and discuss connections with kinetically constrained models of glasses. PMID:19720990

  7. Comparative study of absorption in tilted silicon nanowire arrays for photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowire arrays have been shown to demonstrate light trapping properties and promising potential for next-generation photovoltaics. In this paper, we show that the absorption enhancement in vertical nanowire arrays on a perfectly electric conductor can be further improved through tilting. Vertical nanowire arrays have a 66.2% improvement in ultimate efficiency over an ideal double-pass thin film of the equivalent amount of material. Tilted nanowire arrays, with the same amount of material, exhibit improved performance over vertical nanowire arrays across a broad range of tilt angles (from 38° to 72°). The optimum tilt of 53° has an improvement of 8.6% over that of vertical nanowire arrays and 80.4% over that of the ideal double-pass thin film. Tilted nanowire arrays exhibit improved absorption over the solar spectrum compared with vertical nanowires since the tilt allows for the excitation of additional modes besides the HE 1m modes that are excited at normal incidence. We also observed that tilted nanowire arrays have improved performance over vertical nanowire arrays for a large range of incidence angles (under about 60°). PMID:25435833

  8. Comparative study of absorption in tilted silicon nanowire arrays for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Kayes, Md Imrul; Leu, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowire arrays have been shown to demonstrate light trapping properties and promising potential for next-generation photovoltaics. In this paper, we show that the absorption enhancement in vertical nanowire arrays on a perfectly electric conductor can be further improved through tilting. Vertical nanowire arrays have a 66.2% improvement in ultimate efficiency over an ideal double-pass thin film of the equivalent amount of material. Tilted nanowire arrays, with the same amount of material, exhibit improved performance over vertical nanowire arrays across a broad range of tilt angles (from 38° to 72°). The optimum tilt of 53° has an improvement of 8.6% over that of vertical nanowire arrays and 80.4% over that of the ideal double-pass thin film. Tilted nanowire arrays exhibit improved absorption over the solar spectrum compared with vertical nanowires since the tilt allows for the excitation of additional modes besides the HE 1m modes that are excited at normal incidence. We also observed that tilted nanowire arrays have improved performance over vertical nanowire arrays for a large range of incidence angles (under about 60°).

  9. Tiling strategies for optical follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers by telescopes with a wide field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Bloemen, Steven; Nelemans, Gijs; Groot, Paul J.; Price, Larry R.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Binary neutron stars are among the most promising candidates for joint gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy. The goal of this work is to investigate various observing strategies that telescopes with wide field of view might incorporate while searching for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave triggers. Methods: We examined various strategies of scanning the gravitational-wave sky localizations on the mock 2015-16 gravitational-wave events. First, we studied the performance of the sky coverage using a naive tiling system that completely covers a given confidence interval contour using a fixed grid. Then we propose the ranked-tiling strategy where we sample the localization in discrete two-dimensional intervals that are equivalent to the telescope's field of view and rank them based on their sample localizations. We then introduce an optimization of the grid by iterative sliding of the tiles. Next, we conducted tests for all the methods on a large sample of sky localizations that are expected in the first two years of operation of the Laser interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. We investigated the performance of the ranked-tiling strategy for telescope arrays and compared their performance against monolithic telescopes with a giant field of view. Finally, we studied the ability of optical counterpart detection by various types of telescopes. Results: Our analysis reveals that the ranked-tiling strategy improves the localization coverage over the contour-covering method. The improvement is more significant for telescopes with larger fields of view. We also find that while optimizing the position of the tiles significantly improves the coverage compared to contour-covering tiles. For ranked-tiles the same procedure leads to negligible improvement in the coverage of the sky localizations. We observed that distributing the field of view of the telescopes into arrays of multiple telescopes significantly

  10. Planar tilings by polyominoes, polyhexes, and polyiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Glenn C.

    2005-02-01

    Using computer programs, we enumerate and classify the tiling behavior of small polyominoes (n[less-than-or-equals, slant]9), polyhexes (n[less-than-or-equals, slant]7), and polyiamonds (n[less-than-or-equals, slant]10). For tiles that tile the Euclidean plane, we give diagrams illustrating how they tile. We also show several larger tiles whose minimal fundamental domain in any admitted (periodic) tiling is significantly larger than for any previously known tile.

  11. An efficient pseudomedian filter for tiling microrrays

    PubMed Central

    Royce, Thomas E; Carriero, Nicholas J; Gerstein, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    Background Tiling microarrays are becoming an essential technology in the functional genomics toolbox. They have been applied to the tasks of novel transcript identification, elucidation of transcription factor binding sites, detection of methylated DNA and several other applications in several model organisms. These experiments are being conducted at increasingly finer resolutions as the microarray technology enjoys increasingly greater feature densities. The increased densities naturally lead to increased data analysis requirements. Specifically, the most widely employed algorithm for tiling array analysis involves smoothing observed signals by computing pseudomedians within sliding windows, a O(n2logn) calculation in each window. This poor time complexity is an issue for tiling array analysis and could prove to be a real bottleneck as tiling microarray experiments become grander in scope and finer in resolution. Results We therefore implemented Monahan's HLQEST algorithm that reduces the runtime complexity for computing the pseudomedian of n numbers to O(nlogn) from O(n2logn). For a representative tiling microarray dataset, this modification reduced the smoothing procedure's runtime by nearly 90%. We then leveraged the fact that elements within sliding windows remain largely unchanged in overlapping windows (as one slides across genomic space) to further reduce computation by an additional 43%. This was achieved by the application of skip lists to maintaining a sorted list of values from window to window. This sorted list could be maintained with simple O(log n) inserts and deletes. We illustrate the favorable scaling properties of our algorithms with both time complexity analysis and benchmarking on synthetic datasets. Conclusion Tiling microarray analyses that rely upon a sliding window pseudomedian calculation can require many hours of computation. We have eased this requirement significantly by implementing efficient algorithms that scale well with genomic

  12. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Luis A M; Facio, Dario S; Mosquera, Maria J

    2016-03-04

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a 'green' product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  13. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascosa, Luis A. M.; Facio, Dario S.; Mosquera, Maria J.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  14. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  15. Optical design and studies of a tiled single grating pulse compressor for enhanced parametric space and compensation of tiling errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daiya, D.; Patidar, R. K.; Sharma, J.; Joshi, A. S.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-04-01

    A new optical design of tiled single grating pulse compressor has been proposed, set-up and studied. The parametric space, i.e. the laser beam diameters that can be accommodated in the pulse compressor for the given range of compression lengths, has been calculated and shown to have up to two fold enhancement in comparison to our earlier proposed optical designs. The new optical design of the tiled single grating pulse compressor has an additional advantage of self compensation of various tiling errors like longitudinal and lateral piston, tip and groove density mismatch, compared to the earlier designs. Experiments have been carried out for temporal compression of 650 ps positively chirped laser pulses, at central wavelength 1054 nm, down to 235 fs in the tiled grating pulse compressor set up with the proposed design. Further, far field studies have been performed to show the desired compensation of the tiling errors takes place in the new compressor.

  16. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Blake

    1995-01-01

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  17. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  18. Covering the Plane with Rep-Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnaugh, Linda S.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use geometric figures, rep-tiles, to design a tile floor. Rep-tiles are geometric figures of which copies can fit together to form a larger similar figure. Includes reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  19. Substructure procedure for including tile flexibility in stress analysis of shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    A substructure procedure to include the flexibility of the tile in the stress analysis of the shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) is described. In this procedure, the TPS is divided into substructures of (1) the tile which is modeled by linear finite elements and (2) the SIP which is modeled as a nonlinear continuum. This procedure was applied for loading cases of uniform pressure, uniform moment, and an aerodynamic shock on various tile thicknesses. The ratios of through-the-thickness stresses in the SIP which were calculated using a flexible tile compared to using a rigid tile were found to be less than 1.05 for the cases considered.

  20. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency.

  1. Stochastic segmentation models for array-based comparative genomic hybridization data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tze Leung; Xing, Haipeng; Zhang, Nancy

    2008-04-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a high throughput, high resolution technique for studying the genetics of cancer. Analysis of array-CGH data typically involves estimation of the underlying chromosome copy numbers from the log fluorescence ratios and segmenting the chromosome into regions with the same copy number at each location. We propose for the analysis of array-CGH data, a new stochastic segmentation model and an associated estimation procedure that has attractive statistical and computational properties. An important benefit of this Bayesian segmentation model is that it yields explicit formulas for posterior means, which can be used to estimate the signal directly without performing segmentation. Other quantities relating to the posterior distribution that are useful for providing confidence assessments of any given segmentation can also be estimated by using our method. We propose an approximation method whose computation time is linear in sequence length which makes our method practically applicable to the new higher density arrays. Simulation studies and applications to real array-CGH data illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach.

  2. Genomic Array as Compared to Karyotyping in Myelodysplastic Syndromes in a Prospective Clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian J; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; ElIdrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van der Reijden, Bert; Cremers, Eline M P; Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A; Chitu, Dana A; Cunha, Sonia M; Vellenga, Edo; Klein, Saskia K; Wijermans, Pierre; de Greef, Georgine E; Schaafsma, M R; Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Jansen, Joop H

    2017-02-25

    Karyotyping is considered as the gold standard in the genetic subclassification of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling is a high-resolution tool that also enables genome wide analysis. We compared karyotyping with oligo/SNP-based array profiling in 104 MDS patients from the HOVON-89 study. Oligo/SNP-array identified all cytogenetically defined genomic lesions, except for subclones in two cases and balanced translocations in three cases. On the other hand oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling had a higher success rate, showing 55 abnormal cases, while an abnormal karyotype was found in only 35 patients. In 9 patients whose karyotyping was unsuccessful because of insufficient metaphases or failure, oligo/SNP-based array analysis was successful. Based on cytogenetic visible abnormalities as identified by oligo/SNP-based genomic array prognostic scores based on IPSS/-R were assigned. These prognostic scores were identical to the IPSS/-R scores as obtained with karyotyping in 95-96% of the patients. In addition to the detection of cytogenetically defined lesions, oligo/SNP-based genomic profiling identified focal copy number abnormalities or regions of copy neutral loss of heterozygosity that were out of the scope of karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of interest, in 26 patients we demonstrated such cytogenetic invisible abnormalities. These abnormalities often involved regions that are recurrently affected in hematological malignancies, and may therefore be of clinical relevance. Our findings indicate that oligo/SNP-based genomic array can be used to identify the vast majority of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS. Furthermore, oligo/SNP-based array profiling yields additional genetic abnormalities that may be of clinical importance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectral response data for development of cool coloured tile coverings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbra, Antonio; Tarozzi, Luca; Muscio, Alberto; Corticelli, Mauro A.

    2011-03-01

    Most ancient or traditional buildings in Italy show steep-slope roofs covered by red clay tiles. As the rooms immediately below the roof are often inhabited in historical or densely urbanized centres, the combination of low solar reflectance of tile coverings and low thermal inertia of either wooden roof structures or sub-tile insulation panels makes summer overheating a major problem. The problem can be mitigated by using tiles coated with cool colours, that is colours with the same spectral response of clay tiles in the visible, but highly reflecting in the near infrared range, which includes more than half of solar radiation. Cool colours can yield the same visible aspect of common building surfaces, but higher solar reflectance. Studies aimed at developing cool colour tile coverings for traditional Italian buildings have been started. A few coating solutions with the typical red terracotta colour have been produced and tested in the laboratory, using easily available materials. The spectral response and the solar reflectance have been measured and compared with that of standard tiles.

  4. Kinetics of DNA Tile Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile–tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency. PMID:24794259

  5. Complex Archimedean tiling self-assembled from DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-05-22

    Archimedean tilings are periodic polygonal tessellations that are created by placing regular polygons edge-to-edge around a vertex to fill the plane. Here we show that three- and four-arm DNA junction tiles with specifically designed arm lengths and intertile sticky-end interactions can be used to form sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) tessellation patterns. We demonstrate two different complex Archimedean patterns, (3(3).4(2)) and (3(2).4.3.4), and the formation of 2D lattices, 3D tubes, and sealed polygon-shaped pockets from the tessellations. The successful growth of hybrid DNA tile motif arrays suggests that it maybe possible to generate 2D quasi-crystals from DNA building blocks.

  6. Foam on Tile Impact Modeling for the STS-107 Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stellingwerf, R. F.; Robinson, J. H.; Richardson, S.; Evans, S. W.; Stallworth, R.; Hovater, M.

    2004-01-01

    Following the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia during reentry a NASA/Contractor investigation team was formed to examine the probable damage inflicted on Orbiter Thermal Protection System elements by impact of External Tank insulating foam projectiles. The authors formed a working subgroup within the larger team to apply the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code SPHC to the damage estimation problem. Numerical models of the Orbiter's tiles and of the Tank's foam were constructed and used as inputs into the code. Material properties needed to properly model the tiles and foam were obtained from other working subgroups who performed tests on these items for this purpose. Two- and three-dimensional models of the tiles were constructed, including the glass outer layer, the main body of LI-900 insulation, the densified lower layer of LI-900, the Nomex felt mounting layer, and the Aluminum 2024 vehicle skin. A model for the BX-250 foam including porous compression, elastic rebound, and surface erosion was developed. Code results for the tile damage and foam behavior were extensively validated through comparison with Southwest Research Institute foam-on-tile impact experiments carried out in 1999. These tests involved small projectiles striking individual tiles and small tile arrays. Following code and model validation we simulated impacts of larger foam projectiles on the examples of tile systems used on the Orbiter. Results for impacts on the main landing gear door are presented in this paper, including effects of impacts at several angles, and of rapidly rotating projectiles. General results suggest that foam impacts on tiles at about 500 mph could cause appreciable damage if the impact angle is greater than about 20 degrees. Some variations of the foam properties, such as increased brittleness or increased density could increase damage in some cases. Rotation up to 17 rps failed to increase the damage for the two cases considered. This does not rule out other cases

  7. Using Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Diagnose Pallister-Killian Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Na; Lee, Jiwon; Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun

    2017-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by isochromosome 12p and tissue-limited mosaic tetrasomy 12p. In this study, we diagnosed three pediatric patients who were suspicious of having PKS using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and FISH analyses performed on peripheral lymphocytes. Patients 1 and 2 presented with craniofacial dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and a developmental delay. Array CGH revealed two to three copies of 12p in patient 1 and three copies in patient 2. FISH analysis showed trisomy or tetrasomy 12p. Patient 3, who had clinical features comparable to those of patients 1 and 2, was diagnosed by using FISH analysis alone. Here, we report three patients with mosaic tetrasomy 12p. There have been only reported cases diagnosed by chromosome analysis and FISH analysis on skin fibroblast or amniotic fluid. To our knowledge, patient 1 was the first case diagnosed by using array CGH performed on peripheral lymphocytes in Korea. PMID:27834069

  8. Using Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Diagnose Pallister-Killian Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Na; Lee, Jiwon; Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Kim, Sun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by isochromosome 12p and tissue-limited mosaic tetrasomy 12p. In this study, we diagnosed three pediatric patients who were suspicious of having PKS using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and FISH analyses performed on peripheral lymphocytes. Patients 1 and 2 presented with craniofacial dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and a developmental delay. Array CGH revealed two to three copies of 12p in patient 1 and three copies in patient 2. FISH analysis showed trisomy or tetrasomy 12p. Patient 3, who had clinical features comparable to those of patients 1 and 2, was diagnosed by using FISH analysis alone. Here, we report three patients with mosaic tetrasomy 12p. There have been only reported cases diagnosed by chromosome analysis and FISH analysis on skin fibroblast or amniotic fluid. To our knowledge, patient 1 was the first case diagnosed by using array CGH performed on peripheral lymphocytes in Korea.

  9. Copy-number variations on the X chromosome in Japanese patients with mental retardation detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Honda, Shozo; Hayashi, Shin; Imoto, Issei; Toyama, Jun; Okazawa, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Inazawa, Johji

    2010-09-01

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is a common, clinically complex and genetically heterogeneous disease arising from many mutations along the X chromosome. Although research during the past decade has identified >90 XLMR genes, many more remain uncharacterized. In this study, copy-number variations (CNVs) were screened in individuals with MR from 144 families by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) using a bacterial artificial chromosome-based X-tiling array. Candidate pathogenic CNVs (pCNVs) were detected in 10 families (6.9%). Five of the families had pCNVs involving known XLMR genes, duplication of Xq28 containing MECP2 in three families, duplication of Xp11.22-p11.23 containing FTSJ1 and PQBP1 in one family, and deletion of Xp11.22 bearing SHROOM4 in one family. New candidate pCNVs were detected in five families as follows: identical complex pCNVs involved in dup(X)(p22.2) and dup(X)(p21.3) containing part of REPS2, NHS and IL1RAPL1 in two unrelated families, duplication of Xp22.2 including part of FRMPD4, duplication of Xq21.1 including HDX and deletion of Xq24 noncoding region in one family, respectively. Both parents and only mother samples were available in six and three families, respectively, and pCNVs were inherited from each of their mothers in those families other than a family of the proband with deletion of SHROOM4. This study should help to identify the novel XLMR genes and mechanisms leading to MR and reveal the clinical conditions and genomic background of XLMR.

  10. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  11. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  12. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Tile Calorimeter System, ATLAS

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. The bulk of its upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC phase (Phase-II) where the peak luminosity will increase 5 times compared to the design luminosity (1034 cm-2s-1) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). An additional increase of the average luminosity with a factor of 2 can be achieved by luminosity levelling. This upgrade is expected to happen around 2024. The TileCal upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off- detector electronics to the extent that all calorimeter signals will be digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Extensive test beam studies will determine which option will be selected. 10 Gbps optical links are used to read out all digitized data to the counting room while 5 Gbps down-links are used for synchronization, configuration and detector control. For the off-detector electronics a pre-processor (sROD) is being developed, which takes care of the initial trigger processing while temporarily storing the main data flow in pipeline and derandomizer memories. One demonstrator prototype module with the new calorimeter module electronics, but still compatible with the present system, is planned to be inserted in ATLAS this year.

  13. Chemical Composition of Ceramic Tile Glazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufrik, S. S.; Kurian, N. N.; Zhukova, I. I.; Znosko, K. F.; Belkov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out laser emission and x-ray fluorescence spectral analysis of glaze before and after its application to ceramic tile produced by Keramin JSC (Belarus). We have studied the internal microstructure of the ceramic samples. It was established that on the surface and within the bulk interior of all the samples, there are micropores of sizes ranging from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers and microcracks as long as several hundred micrometers. The presence of micropores on the surface of the ceramic tile leads to an increase in the water absorption level and a decrease in frost resistance. It was found that a decrease in the surface tension of ceramic tile coatings is promoted by substitution of sodium by potassium, silica by boric anhydride, magnesium and barium by calcium, CaO by sodium oxide, and SiO2 by chromium oxide. We carried out a comparative analysis of the chemical composition of glaze samples using S4 Pioneer and ElvaX x-ray fluorescence spectrometers and also an LIBS laser emission analyzer.

  14. Radiation hardness of 3HF-tile/O2-WLS-fiber calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.W.; Hu, L.D.; Liu, N.Z.

    1993-11-01

    The radiation hardness of a 3HF-tile/O2-WLS-fiber calorimeter with two different tile/fiber patterns has been studied. Two calorimeter modules were irradiated up to 10 Mrad with the BEPC 1.3 GeV electron beam. The radiation damage of these modules is compared with our previous measurements from SCSN81-tile/BCF91A-WLS-fiber modules. The longitudinal damage profiles are fitted as a function of depth.

  15. Optically Tiled Flat Panel Displays. A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    distortion. The fabrication of a traditional rotational symmetric Fresnel lens could be possible using diamond turning methods. However the rotational...and allow the microlens array to be located next to the LCD module output polarizer and immediately followed by the negative Fresnel lens and then the...microlenses remapping the pixels onto a diffuser through a 4 negative Fresnel lens (Figure 11). This method could tile together LCD modules separated by a

  16. Machine learning models for lung cancer classification using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Aliferis, C F; Hardin, D; Massion, P P

    2002-01-01

    Array CGH is a recently introduced technology that measures changes in the gene copy number of hundreds of genes in a single experiment. The primary goal of this study was to develop machine learning models that classify non-small Lung Cancers according to histopathology types and to compare several machine learning methods in this learning task. DNA from tumors of 37 patients (21 squamous carcinomas, and 16 adenocarcinomas) were extracted and hybridized onto a 452 BAC clone array. The following algorithms were used: KNN, Decision Tree Induction, Support Vector Machines and Feed-Forward Neural Networks. Performance was measured via leave-one-out classification accuracy. The best multi-gene model found had a leave-one-out accuracy of 89.2%. Decision Trees performed poorer than the other methods in this learning task and dataset. We conclude that gene copy numbers as measured by array CGH are, collectively, an excellent indicator of histological subtype. Several interesting research directions are discussed.

  17. Theoretical and experimental comparative analysis of beamforming methods for loudspeaker arrays under given performance constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Ferdinando; Fazi, Filippo Maria; Nelson, Philip A.; Shin, Mincheol; Fontana, Simone; Yue, Lang

    2016-07-01

    Methods for beamforming are available that provide the signals used to drive an array of sources for the implementation of systems for the so-called personal audio. In this work, performance of the delay-and-sum (DAS) method and of three widely used methods for optimal beamforming are compared by means of computer simulations and experiments in an anechoic environment using a linear array of sources with given constraints on quality of the reproduced field at the listener's position and limit to input energy to the array. Using the DAS method as a benchmark for performance, the frequency domain responses of the loudspeaker filters can be characterized in three regions. In the first region, at low frequencies, input signals designed with the optimal methods are identical and provide higher directivity performance than that of the DAS. In the second region, performance of the optimal methods are similar to the DAS method. The third region starts above the limit due to spatial aliasing. A method is presented to estimate the boundaries of these regions.

  18. Comparing three methods for variance estimation with duplicated high density oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Pan, Wei

    2002-08-01

    Microarray experiments are being increasingly used in molecular biology. A common task is to detect genes with differential expression across two experimental conditions, such as two different tissues or the same tissue at two time points of biological development. To take proper account of statistical variability, some statistical approaches based on the t-statistic have been proposed. In constructing the t-statistic, one needs to estimate the variance of gene expression levels. With a small number of replicated array experiments, the variance estimation can be challenging. For instance, although the sample variance is unbiased, it may have large variability, leading to a large mean squared error. For duplicated array experiments, a new approach based on simple averaging has recently been proposed in the literature. Here we consider two more general approaches based on nonparametric smoothing. Our goal is to assess the performance of each method empirically. The three methods are applied to a colon cancer data set containing 2,000 genes. Using two arrays, we compare the variance estimates obtained from the three methods. We also consider their impact on the t-statistics. Our results indicate that the three methods give variance estimates close to each other. Due to its simplicity and generality, we recommend the use of the smoothed sample variance for data with a small number of replicates.

  19. Comparative protein profiling of serum and plasma using an antibody suspension bead array approach.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Jochen M; Igel, Ulrika; Kato, Bernet S; Nicholson, George; Karpe, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2010-02-01

    In the pursuit towards a systematic analysis of human diseases, array-based approaches within antibody proteomics offer high-throughput strategies to discover protein biomarkers in serum and plasma. To investigate the influence of sample preparation on such discovery attempts, we report on a systematic effort to compare serum and plasma protein profiles determined with an antibody suspension bead array. The intensity levels were used to define protein profiles and no significant differences between serum and plasma were observed for 79% of the 174 antibodies (targeting 156 proteins). By excluding 36 antibodies giving rise to differential intensity levels, cluster analysis revealed donor-specific rather than preparation-dependent grouping. With a cohort from a clinically relevant medical condition, the metabolic syndrome, the influence of the sample type on a multiplexed biomarker discovery approach was further investigated. Independent comparisons of protein profiles in serum and plasma revealed an antibody targeting ADAMTSL-4, a protein that would qualify to be studied further in association with the condition. In general, the preparation type had an impact on the results of the applied antibody suspension bead array, and while the technical variability was equal, plasma offered a greater biological variability and allowed to give rise to more discoveries than serum.

  20. Detection of genomic imbalances by array based comparative genomic hybridisation in fetuses with multiple malformations

    PubMed Central

    Le Caignec, C; Boceno, M; Saugier-Veber, P; Jacquemont, S; Joubert, M; David, A; Frebourg, T; Rival, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Malformations are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in full term infants and genomic imbalances are a significant component of their aetiology. However, the causes of defects in many patients with multiple congenital malformations remain unexplained despite thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Methods: We used a commercially available array based comparative genomic hybridisation method (array CGH), able to screen all subtelomeric regions, main microdeletion syndromes, and 201 other regions covering the genome, to detect submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in 49 fetuses with three or more significant anomalies and normal karyotype. Results: Array CGH identified eight genomic rearrangements (16.3%), all confirmed by quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments. Subtelomeric and interstitial deletions, submicroscopic duplications, and a complex genomic imbalance were identified. In four de novo cases (15qtel deletion, 16q23.1–q23.3 deletion, 22q11.2 deletion, and mosaicism for a rearranged chromosome 18), the genomic imbalance identified clearly underlay the pathological phenotype. In one case, the relationship between the genotype and phenotype was unclear, since a subtelomeric 6q deletion was detected in a mother and her two fetuses bearing multiple malformations. In three cases, a subtelomeric 10q duplication, probably a genomic polymorphism, was identified. Conclusions: The detection of 5/49 causative chromosomal imbalances (or 4/49 if the 6qtel deletion is not considered as causative) suggests wide genome screening when standard chromosome analysis is normal and confirms that array CGH will have a major impact on pre and postnatal diagnosis as well as providing information for more accurate genetic counselling. PMID:15689449

  1. Development of SiPM-based scintillator tile detectors for a multi-layer fast neutron tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R.; Jakubek, J.; Prokopovich, D.; Uher, J.

    2012-10-01

    We are developing thin tile scintillator detectors with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout for use in a multi-layer fast-neutron tracker. The tracker is based on interleaved Timepix and plastic scintillator layers. The thin 15 × 15 × 2 mm plastic scintillators require suitable optical readout in order to detect and measure the energy lost by energetic protons that have been recoiled by fast neutrons. Our first prototype used dual SiPMs, coupled to opposite edges of the scintillator tile using light-guides. An alternative readout geometry was designed in an effort to increase the fraction of scintillation light detected by the SiPMs. The new prototype uses a larger SiPM array to cover the entire top face of the tile. This paper details the comparative performance of the two prototype designs. A deuterium-tritium (DT) fast-neutron source was used to compare the relative light collection efficiency of the two designs. A collimated UV light source was scanned across the detector face to map the uniformity. The new prototype was found to have 9.5 times better light collection efficiency over the original design. Both prototypes exhibit spatial non-uniformity in their response. Methods of correcting this non-uniformity are discussed.

  2. A Custom Rat and Baboon Hypertension Gene Array to Compare Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Northcott, Carrie A.; Glenn, Jeremy P.; Shade, Robert E.; Kammerer, Candace M.; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Fink, Gregory D.; Haywood, Joseph R.; Cox, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    One challenge in understanding the polygenic disease of hypertension is elucidating the genes involved and defining responses to environmental factors. Many studies focus on animal models of hypertension; however, this does not necessarily extrapolate to humans. Current technology and cost limitations are prohibitive in fully evaluating hypertension within humans. Thus, we have designed a single array platform that allows direct comparison of genes relevant to hypertension in animal models and non-human primates/human hypertension. The custom array is targeted to 328 genes known to be potentially related to blood pressure control. Studies compared gene expression in the kidney from normotensive rats and baboons. We found 74 genes expressed in both the rat and baboon kidney, 41 genes expressed in the rat kidney that were not detected in the baboon kidney and 34 genes expression in the baboon kidney that were not detected in the rat kidney. To begin the evaluation of the array in a pathological condition, kidney gene expression was compared between the salt sensitive DOCA rat model of hypertension and sham animals. Gene expression in renal cortex and medulla from hypertensive DOCA compared with sham rats revealed 3 genes differentially expressed in the renal cortex: Annexin A1 (up-regulated; relative intensity: 1.316 ± 0.321 vs. 2.312 ± 0.283), Glutamate-cysteine ligase (down-regulated; relative intensity: 3.738 ± 0.174 vs. 2.645 ± 0.364) and Glutathione-S transferase (down-regulated; relative intensity: 5.572 ± 0.246 vs. 4.215 ± 0.411) and 21 genes differentially expressed in renal medulla. Interestingly, few genes were differentially expressed in the kidney in the DOCA-salt model of hypertension; this may suggest that the complexity of hypertension may be the result of only a few gene-by-environment responsive events. PMID:22228705

  3. Tiling spaces are inverse limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadun, Lorenzo

    2003-11-01

    Let M be an arbitrary Riemannian homogeneous space, and let Ω be a space of tilings of M, with finite local complexity (relative to some symmetry group Γ) and closed in the natural topology. Then Ω is the inverse limit of a sequence of compact finite-dimensional branched manifolds. The branched manifolds are (finite) unions of cells, constructed from the tiles themselves and the group Γ. This result extends previous results of Anderson and Putnam, of Ormes, Radin, and Sadun, of Bellissard, Benedetti, and Gambaudo, and of Gähler. In particular, the construction in this paper is a natural generalization of Gähler's.

  4. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R. [Oak Ridge, TN; Frame, Barbara J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-12-14

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  5. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R. [Oak Ridge, TN; Frame, Barbara J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-01-02

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  6. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  7. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  8. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of DNA Tile-Based Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shuoxing

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an attractive building material for creating complex architectures at the nanometer scale that simultaneously affords versatility and modularity. Particularly, the programmability of DNA enables the assembly of basic building units into increasingly complex, arbitrary shapes or patterns. With the expanding complexity and functionality of DNA toolboxes, a quantitative understanding of DNA self-assembly in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics, will provide researchers with more subtle design guidelines that facilitate more precise spatial and temporal control. This dissertation focuses on studying the physicochemical properties of DNA tile-based self-assembly process by recapitulating representative scenarios and intermediate states with unique assembly pathways. First, DNA double-helical tiles with increasing flexibility were designed to investigate the dimerization kinetics. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles result from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. Next, the thermodynamics and kinetics of single tile attachment to preformed "multitile" arrays were investigated to test the fundamental assumptions of tile assembly models. The results offer experimental evidences that double crossover tile attachment is determined by the electrostatic environment and the steric hindrance at the binding site. Finally, the assembly of double crossover tiles within a rhombic DNA origami frame was employed as the model system to investigate the competition between unseeded, facet and seeded nucleation. The results revealed that preference of nucleation types can be tuned by controlling the rate-limiting nucleation step. The works presented in this dissertation will be helpful for refining the DNA tile assembly model for future designs and simulations. Moreover, The works presented here could also be

  9. A Global User-Driven Model for Tile Prefetching in Web Geographical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shaoming; Chong, Yanwen; Zhang, Hang; Tan, Xicheng

    2017-01-01

    A web geographical information system is a typical service-intensive application. Tile prefetching and cache replacement can improve cache hit ratios by proactively fetching tiles from storage and replacing the appropriate tiles from the high-speed cache buffer without waiting for a client’s requests, which reduces disk latency and improves system access performance. Most popular prefetching strategies consider only the relative tile popularities to predict which tile should be prefetched or consider only a single individual user's access behavior to determine which neighbor tiles need to be prefetched. Some studies show that comprehensively considering all users’ access behaviors and all tiles’ relationships in the prediction process can achieve more significant improvements. Thus, this work proposes a new global user-driven model for tile prefetching and cache replacement. First, based on all users’ access behaviors, a type of expression method for tile correlation is designed and implemented. Then, a conditional prefetching probability can be computed based on the proposed correlation expression mode. Thus, some tiles to be prefetched can be found by computing and comparing the conditional prefetching probability from the uncached tiles set and, similarly, some replacement tiles can be found in the cache buffer according to multi-step prefetching. Finally, some experiments are provided comparing the proposed model with other global user-driven models, other single user-driven models, and other client-side prefetching strategies. The results show that the proposed model can achieve a prefetching hit rate in approximately 10.6% ~ 110.5% higher than the compared methods. PMID:28085937

  10. Genome profiling of chondrosarcoma using oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Meera; Ulger, Celal; Yasar, Duygu; Limaye, Neha; Kurvathi, Rohini; Streck, Deanna; Benevenia, Joseph; Patterson, Francis; Dermody, James J; Toruner, Gokce A

    2009-07-15

    Chondrosarcomas of the bone are malignant hyaline cartilage-forming tumors with an annual incidence rate of 3.6% of all primary bone malignancies in the United States. Specimens of 25 chondrosarcomas (10 grade I, 9 grade II, 1 grade III, and 5 dedifferentiated) from 23 patients were collected from the Department of Pathology at the University Hospital at UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School from 1996 to 2007. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) studies were performed on frozen tumor specimens. Recurrent deletions observed in at least in six tumors were 5q13.2, 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q12 approximately q13, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There was a statistically significant association between high-grade tumor (grade III and dedifferentiated) and the recurrent genetic deletions at 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There is consistency between increased levels of aneuploidy and the progression of chondrosarcoma from lower to higher grades.

  11. Custom Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization: the Importance of DNA Quality, an Expert Eye, and Variant Validation

    PubMed Central

    Lantieri, Francesca; Malacarne, Michela; Gimelli, Stefania; Santamaria, Giuseppe; Coviello, Domenico; Ceccherini, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    The presence of false positive and false negative results in the Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) design is poorly addressed in literature reports. We took advantage of a custom aCGH recently carried out to analyze its design performance, the use of several Agilent aberrations detection algorithms, and the presence of false results. Our study provides a confirmation that the high density design does not generate more noise than standard designs and, might reach a good resolution. We noticed a not negligible presence of false negative and false positive results in the imbalances call performed by the Agilent software. The Aberration Detection Method 2 (ADM-2) algorithm with a threshold of 6 performed quite well, and the array design proved to be reliable, provided that some additional filters are applied, such as considering only intervals with average absolute log2ratio above 0.3. We also propose an additional filter that takes into account the proportion of probes with log2ratio exceeding suggestive values for gain or loss. In addition, the quality of samples was confirmed to be a crucial parameter. Finally, this work raises the importance of evaluating the samples profiles by eye and the necessity of validating the imbalances detected. PMID:28287439

  12. Foam on Tile Impact Modeling for the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stellingwerf, R. F.; Robinson, J. H.; Richardson, S.; Evans, S. W.; Stallworth, R.; Hovater, M.

    2003-01-01

    Following the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia during reentry a NASA-wide investigation team was formed to examine the probable damage inflicted on Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS) elements by impact of External Tank insulating foam projectiles. Our team was to apply rigorous, physics-based analysis techniques to help determine parameters of interest for an experimental test program, utilize validated codes to investigate the full range of impact scenarios, and use analysis derived models to predict aero-thermal-structural responses to entry conditions. We were to operate on a non-interference basis with the j Team, and were to supply significant findings to that team and to the Orbiter Vehicle Engineering Working Group, being responsive to any solicitations for support from these entities. The authors formed a working sub-group within the larger team to apply the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code SPHC to the damage estimation problem. Numerical models of the LI-900 TPS tiles and of the BX-250 foam were constructed and used as inputs into the code. Material properties needed to properly model the tiles and foam were obtained from other working sub-groups who performed tests on these items for this purpose. Two- and three- dimensional models of the tiles were constructed, including the glass outer layer, the densified lower layer of LI-900 insulation, the Nomex felt Strain Isolation Pad (SIP) mounting layer, and the underlying aluminum 2024 vehicle skin. A model for the BX-250 foam including porous compression, elastic rebound, and surface erosion was developed. Code results for the tile damage and foam behavior were extensively validated through comparison with the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) foam-on-tile impact experiments carried out in 1999. These tests involved small projectiles striking individual tiles and small tile arrays. Following code and model validation we simulated impacts of larger ET foam projectiles on the TPS tile systems used

  13. Summer Thermal Performance of Ventilated Roofs with Tiled Coverings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoloni, M.; Bottarelli, M.; Piva, S.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal performance of a ventilated pitched roof with tiled coverings is analysed and compared with unventilated roofs. The analysis is carried out by means of a finite element numerical code, by solving both the fluid and thermal problems in steady-state. A whole one-floor building with a pitched roof is schematized as a 2D computational domain including the air-permeability of tiled covering. Realistic data sets for wind, temperature and solar radiation are used to simulate summer conditions at different times of the day. The results demonstrate that the batten space in pitched roofs is an effective solution for reducing the solar heat gain in summer and thus for achieving better indoor comfort conditions. The efficiency of the ventilation is strictly linked to the external wind conditions and to buoyancy forces occurring due to the heating of the tiles.

  14. The Level-1 Tile-Muon Trigger in the Tile Calorimeter upgrade program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). TileCal provides highly-segmented energy measurements for incident particles. Information from TileCal's outermost radial layer can assist in muon tagging in the Level-1 Muon Trigger by rejecting fake muon triggers due to slow charged particles (typically protons) without degrading the efficiency of the trigger. The main activity of the Tile-Muon Trigger in the ATLAS Phase-0 upgrade program was to install and to activate the TileCal signal processor module for providing trigger inputs to the Level-1 Muon Trigger. This report describes the Tile-Muon Trigger, focusing on the new detector electronics such as the Tile Muon Digitizer Board (TMDB) that receives, digitizes and then provides the signal from eight TileCal modules to three Level-1 muon endcap Sector-Logic Boards.

  15. Whole Genome Amplification of Labeled Viable Single Cells Suited for Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding details of a complex biological system makes it necessary to dismantle it down to its components. Immunostaining techniques allow identification of several distinct cell types thereby giving an inside view of intercellular heterogeneity. Often staining reveals that the most remarkable cells are the rarest. To further characterize the target cells on a molecular level, single cell techniques are necessary. Here, we describe the immunostaining, micromanipulation, and whole genome amplification of single cells for the purpose of genomic characterization. First, we exemplify the preparation of cell suspensions from cultured cells as well as the isolation of peripheral mononucleated cells from blood. The target cell population is then subjected to immunostaining. After cytocentrifugation target cells are isolated by micromanipulation and forwarded to whole genome amplification. For whole genome amplification, we use GenomePlex(®) technology allowing downstream genomic analysis such as array-comparative genomic hybridization.

  16. Statistical magnetometry on isolated NiCo nanowires and nanowire arrays: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergelius, Philip; Garcia Fernandez, Javier; Martens, Stefan; Zocher, Michael; Böhnert, Tim; Vega Martinez, Victor; de la Prida, Victor Manuel; Görlitz, Detlef; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-04-01

    The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method can be used to extract information about the interaction and switching field distribution of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, yet it remains challenging to acquire reliable values. Within ordered pores of anodic alumina templates we electrochemically synthesize eight different Ni x Co1-x samples with x varying between 0.05 and 1. FORC diagrams are acquired using vibrating sample magnetometry. By dissolving the template and using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we measure the hysteresis loops of up to 100 different and isolated nanowires for each sample to gain precise information about the intrinsic switching field distribution. Values of the interaction field are extracted from a deshearing of the major hysteresis loop. We present a comparative study between all methods in order to evaluate and reinforce current FORC theory with experimental findings.

  17. Customized Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of 25 Phosphatase-encoding Genes in Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    LACZMANSKA, IZABELA; SKIBA, PAWEL; KARPINSKI, PAWEL; BEBENEK, MAREK; M. SASIADEK, MARIA

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Molecular mechanisms of alterations in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) genes in cancer have been previously described and include chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations, and epigenetic silencing. However, little is known about small intragenic gains and losses that may lead to either changes in expression or enzyme activity and even loss of protein function. Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to investigate 25 phosphatase genes using customized array comparative genomic hybridization in 16 sporadic colorectal cancer tissues. Results: The analysis revealed two unique small alterations: of 2 kb in PTPN14 intron 1 and of 1 kb in PTPRJ intron 1. We also found gains and losses of whole PTPs gene sequences covered by large chromosome aberrations. Conclusion: In our preliminary studies using high-resolution custom microarray we confirmed that PTPs are frequently subjected to whole-gene rearrangements in colorectal cancer, and we revealed that non-polymorphic intragenic changes are rare. PMID:28031238

  18. Malignant canine mammary tumours: Preliminary genomic insights using oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridisation analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marta; Dias-Pereira, Patrícia; Williams, Christina; Lopes, Carlos; Breen, Matthew

    2017-03-28

    Neoplastic mammary disease in female dogs represents a major health concern for dog owners and veterinarians, but the genomic basis of the disease is poorly understood. In this study, we performed high resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridisation (oaCGH) to assess genome wide DNA copy number changes in 10 malignant canine mammary tumours from seven female dogs, including multiple tumours collected at one time from each of three female dogs. In all but two tumours, genomic imbalances were detected, with losses being more common than gains. Canine chromosomes 9, 22, 26, 27, 34 and X were most frequently affected. Dissimilar oaCGH ratio profiles were observed in multiple tumours from the same dogs, providing preliminary evidence for probable independent pathogenesis. Analysis of adjacent samples of one tumour revealed regional differences in the number of genomic imbalances, suggesting heterogeneity within tumours.

  19. Characterization of color texture: color texture based sorting of tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourada, Y.; Lafon, Dominique; Eterradossi, O.

    1998-09-01

    Many materials used by the building industry show a color texture which affects the product commercial value. This texture can be seen as the spatial arrangement of regions of acceptable color differences. This work describes an appearance based automated sorting via color texture analysis, using ceramic tiles as example. Textural analysis of the tiles digital images expressed in CIEL*a*b* color system is performed through the analysis of intrinsic features of each region and relationships between regions. Results obtained through the automated process are compared to a visual sorting which leads to calculation of application dependant color and texture tolerances.

  20. Developing tiled projection display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Paris, J.; Stevens, R. L.

    2000-06-08

    Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing high-resolution semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation [EVL, PowerWall]. In this way, they complement other technologies such as the CAVE [Cruz-Niera92] or ImmersaDesk, [Czernuszenko97], which by design give up pure resolution in favor of width of view and stereo. However, the largest impact may well be in using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building ''information'' or ''active'' spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows [IPSI, Childers00, Raskar98, ROME, Stanford, UNC]. These environments may prove to be the ultimate successor of the desktop metaphor for information technology work.

  1. Shuttle Upgrade Program: Tile TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; DiFiore, Robert; Irby, Ed; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the areas where the thermal protection system on the Space Shuttle Orbiter could be improved is the RSI (Reusable Surface Insulation) tile. The improvement would be in damage resistance that would reduce the resultant maintenance and inspection required. It has performed very well in every other aspect. Improving the system's damage resistance has been the subject of much research over the past several years. One of the results of that research was a new system developed for damage prone areas on the orbiter (i.e., base heat shield). That system, designated as TUFI, Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation, was successfully demonstrated as an experiment on the Orbiter and is now baselined for the base heat shield. This paper describes the results of a current research program to further improve the TUFI tile system, thus making it applicable to more areas on the orbiter. The way to remove the current limitations of the TUFI system (i.e., weight or thermal conductivity differences between it and the baseline tile (LI-900)) is to improve the characteristics of LI-900 or AETB-8. Specifically this paper describes the results of two efforts. The first shows performance data of an improved LI-900 system involving the application of TUFI and the second describes data that shows a reduced difference in thermal conductivity between the advanced TUFI substrate (AETB-8) now used on the orbiter and LI-900.

  2. Application of a target array Comparative Genomic Hybridization to prenatal diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While conventional G-banded karyotyping still remains a gold standard in prenatal genetic diagnoses, the widespread adoption of array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH) technology for postnatal genetic diagnoses has led to increasing interest in the use of this same technology for prenatal diagnosis. We have investigated the value of our own designed DNA chip as a prenatal diagnostic tool for detecting submicroscopic deletions/duplications and chromosome aneuploidies. Methods We designed a target bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based aCGH platform (MacArray™ M-chip), which specifically targets submicroscopic deletions/duplications for 26 known genetic syndromes of medical significance observed prenatally. To validate the DNA chip, we obtained genomic DNA from 132 reference materials generated from patients with 22 genetic diseases and 94 clinical amniocentesis samples obtained for karyotyping. Results In the 132 reference materials, all known genomic alterations were successfully identified. In the 94 clinical samples that were also subjected to conventional karyotyping, three cases of balanced chromosomal aberrations were not detected by aCGH. However, we identified eight cases of microdeletions in the Yq11.23 chromosomal region that were not found by conventional karyotyping. This region harbors the DAZ gene, and deletions may lead to non-obstructive spermatogenesis. Conclusions We have successfully designed and applied a BAC-based aCGH platform for prenatal diagnosis. This platform can be used in conjunction with conventional karyotyping and will provide rapid and accurate diagnoses for the targeted genomic regions while eliminating the need to interpret clinically-uncertain genomic regions. PMID:20576126

  3. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization for the Genomewide Detection of Submicroscopic Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M. ; de Vries, Bert B. A. ; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo ; Janssen, Irene M. ; Feuth, Ton ; Choy, Chik On ; Straatman, Huub ; van der Vliet, Walter ; Huys, Erik H. L. P. G. ; van Rijk, Anke ; Smeets, Dominique ; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A. ; Knoers, Nine V. ; van der Burgt, Ineke ; de Jong, Pieter J. ; Brunner, Han G. ; van Kessel, Ad Geurts ; Schoenmakers, Eric F. P. M. ; Veltman, Joris A. 

    2003-01-01

    Microdeletions and microduplications, not visible by routine chromosome analysis, are a major cause of human malformation and mental retardation. Novel high-resolution, whole-genome technologies can improve the diagnostic detection rate of these small chromosomal abnormalities. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization allows such a high-resolution screening by hybridizing differentially labeled test and reference DNAs to arrays consisting of thousands of genomic clones. In this study, we tested the diagnostic capacity of this technology using ∼3,500 flourescent in situ hybridization–verified clones selected to cover the genome with an average of 1 clone per megabase (Mb). The sensitivity and specificity of the technology were tested in normal-versus-normal control experiments and through the screening of patients with known microdeletion syndromes. Subsequently, a series of 20 cytogenetically normal patients with mental retardation and dysmorphisms suggestive of a chromosomal abnormality were analyzed. In this series, three microdeletions and two microduplications were identified and validated. Two of these genomic changes were identified also in one of the parents, indicating that these are large-scale genomic polymorphisms. Deletions and duplications as small as 1 Mb could be reliably detected by our approach. The percentage of false-positive results was reduced to a minimum by use of a dye-swap-replicate analysis, all but eliminating the need for laborious validation experiments and facilitating implementation in a routine diagnostic setting. This high-resolution assay will facilitate the identification of novel genes involved in human mental retardation and/or malformation syndromes and will provide insight into the flexibility and plasticity of the human genome. PMID:14628292

  4. Array-Based Genomic Comparative Hybridization Analysis of Field Strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Melissa L.; Oneal, Michael J.; Gardner, Stuart W.; Strait, Erin L.; Nettleton, Dan; Thacker, Eileen L.; Minion, F. Chris

    2007-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia and a major factor in the porcine respiratory disease complex. A clear understanding of the mechanisms of pathogenesis does not exist, although it is clear that M. hyopneumoniae adheres to porcine ciliated epithelium by action of a protein called P97. Previous studies have shown variation in the gene encoding the P97 cilium adhesin in different strains of M. hyopneumoniae, but the extent of genetic variation among field strains across the genome is not known. Since M. hyopneumoniae is a worldwide problem, it is reasonable to expect that a wide range of genetic variability may exist given all of the different breeds and housing conditions. This variation may impact the overall virulence of a single strain. Using microarray technology, this study examined the potential variation of 14 field strains compared to strain 232, on which the array was based. Genomic DNA was obtained, amplified with TempliPhi, and labeled indirectly with Alexa dyes. After genomic hybridization, the arrays were scanned and data were analyzed using a linear statistical model. The results indicated that genetic variation could be detected in all 14 field strains but across different loci, suggesting that variation occurs throughout the genome. Fifty-nine percent of the variable loci were hypothetical genes. Twenty-two percent of the lipoprotein genes showed variation in at least one field strain. A permutation test identified a location in the M. hyopneumoniae genome where there is spatial clustering of variability between the field strains and strain 232. PMID:17873054

  5. [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder analyzed with array comparative genome hybridization method. Case report].

    PubMed

    Duga, Balázs; Czakó, Márta; Komlósi, Katalin; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Sümegi, Katalin; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Márton; Melegh, Béla

    2014-10-05

    One of the most common psychiatric disorders during childhood is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which affects 5-6% of children worldwide. Symptoms include attention deficit, hyperactivity, forgetfulness and weak impulse control. The exact mechanism behind the development of the disease is unknown. However, current data suggest that a strong genetic background is responsible, which explains the frequent occurrence within a family. Literature data show that copy number variations are very common in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The authors present a patient with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who proved to have two approximately 400 kb heterozygous microduplications at 6p25.2 and 15q13.3 chromosomal regions detected by comparative genomic hybridization methods. Both duplications affect genes (6p25.2: SLC22A23; 15q13.3: CHRNA7) which may play a role in the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This case serves as an example of the wide spectrum of indication of the array comparative genome hybridization method.

  6. Allelic genome structural variations in maize detected by array comparative genome hybridization.

    PubMed

    Beló, André; Beatty, Mary K; Hondred, David; Fengler, Kevin A; Li, Bailin; Rafalski, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymorphisms such as insertion/deletions and duplications affecting genome segments larger than 1 kb are known as copy-number variations (CNVs) or structural variations (SVs). They have been recently studied in animals and humans by using array-comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), and have been associated with several human diseases. Their presence and phenotypic effects in plants have not been investigated on a genomic scale, although individual structural variations affecting traits have been described. We used aCGH to investigate the presence of CNVs in maize by comparing the genome of 13 maize inbred lines to B73. Analysis of hybridization signal ratios of 60,472 60-mer oligonucleotide probes between inbreds in relation to their location in the reference genome (B73) allowed us to identify clusters of probes that deviated from the ratio expected for equal copy-numbers. We found CNVs distributed along the maize genome in all chromosome arms. They occur with appreciable frequency in different germplasm subgroups, suggesting ancient origin. Validation of several CNV regions showed both insertion/deletions and copy-number differences. The nature of CNVs detected suggests CNVs might have a considerable impact on plant phenotypes, including disease response and heterosis.

  7. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated.

  8. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy.

  9. An efficient analog Hamming distance comparator realized with a unipolar memristor array: a showcase of physical computing

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ning; Yoon, Jung Ho; Hu, Miao; Merced-Grafals, E. J.; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Li, Zhiyong; Holder, Helen; Xia, Qiangfei; Williams, R. Stanley; Zhou, Xing; Yang, J. Joshua

    2017-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel physical computing paradigm based on an engineered unipolar memristor that exhibits symmetric SET switching with respect to voltage polarity. A one-dimensional array of these devices was sufficient to demonstrate an efficient Hamming distance comparator for two strings of analog states represented by voltages from the physical world. The comparator first simultaneously applies the two sets of voltages to the array of memristors, each of which is initially in its high resistance state and switches to its low resistance state only if the two voltages applied on that memristor differ by more than the switching threshold. An accurate analog representation of the Hamming distance is then obtained by applying a reading voltage to the memristors and summing all the resultant currents. The comparator with a small footprint can directly process analog signals and store computation results without power, representing a promising application for analog computing based on memristor crossbar arrays. PMID:28054642

  10. An efficient analog Hamming distance comparator realized with a unipolar memristor array: a showcase of physical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Ning; Yoon, Jung Ho; Hu, Miao; Merced-Grafals, E. J.; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Li, Zhiyong; Holder, Helen; Xia, Qiangfei; Williams, R. Stanley; Zhou, Xing; Yang, J. Joshua

    2017-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel physical computing paradigm based on an engineered unipolar memristor that exhibits symmetric SET switching with respect to voltage polarity. A one-dimensional array of these devices was sufficient to demonstrate an efficient Hamming distance comparator for two strings of analog states represented by voltages from the physical world. The comparator first simultaneously applies the two sets of voltages to the array of memristors, each of which is initially in its high resistance state and switches to its low resistance state only if the two voltages applied on that memristor differ by more than the switching threshold. An accurate analog representation of the Hamming distance is then obtained by applying a reading voltage to the memristors and summing all the resultant currents. The comparator with a small footprint can directly process analog signals and store computation results without power, representing a promising application for analog computing based on memristor crossbar arrays.

  11. Global Swath and Gridded Data Tiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Charles K.

    2012-01-01

    This software generates cylindrically projected tiles of swath-based or gridded satellite data for the purpose of dynamically generating high-resolution global images covering various time periods, scaling ranges, and colors called "tiles." It reconstructs a global image given a set of tiles covering a particular time range, scaling values, and a color table. The program is configurable in terms of tile size, spatial resolution, format of input data, location of input data (local or distributed), number of processes run in parallel, and data conditioning.

  12. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  13. Positive feedback fishery: Population consequences of `crab-tiling' on the green crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, E. V.; Thompson, R. C.; Coleman, R. A.; Attrill, M. J.

    2008-11-01

    Collection of marine invertebrates for use as fishing bait is a substantial activity in many parts of the world, often with unknown ecological consequences. As new fisheries develop, it is critical for environmental managers to have high quality ecological information regarding the potential impacts, in order to develop sound management strategies. Crab-tiling is a largely unregulated and un-researched fishery, which operates commercially in the south-west UK. The target species is the green crab Carcinus maenas. Those crabs which are pre-ecdysis and have a carapace width greater than 40 mm are collected to be sold to recreational anglers as bait. Collection involves laying artificial structures on intertidal sandflats and mudflats in estuaries. Crabs use these structures as refugia and are collected during low tide. However, the effect that this fishery has on populations of C. maenas is not known. The impact of crab-tiling on C. maenas population structure was determined by sampling crabs from tiled estuaries and non-tiled estuaries using baited drop-nets. A spatially and temporarily replicated, balanced design was used to compare crab abundance, sizes and sex ratios between estuaries. Typically, fisheries are associated with a reduction in the abundance of the target species. Crab-tiling, however, significantly increased C. maenas abundance. This was thought to be a result of the extra habitat in tiled estuaries, which probably provides protection from natural predators, such as birds and fish. Although crabs were more abundant in tiled estuaries than non-tiled estuaries, the overall percentage of reproductively active crabs in non-tiled estuaries was greater than in tiled estuaries. As with most exploited fisheries stocks, crabs in exploited (tiled) estuaries tended to be smaller, with a modal carapace width of 20-29 mm rather than 30-39 mm in non-tiled estuaries. The sex ratio of crabs however; was not significantly different between tiled and non-tiled

  14. Statistical methods for detecting genomic alterations through array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuedong; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (ABCGH) is an emerging high-resolution and high-throughput molecular genetic technique that allows genome-wide screening for chromosome alterations associated with tumorigenesis. Like the cDNA microarrays, ABCGH uses two differentially labeled test and reference DNAs which are cohybridized to cloned genomic fragments immobilized on glass slides. The hybridized DNAs are then detected in two different fluorochromes, and the significant deviation from unity in the ratios of the digitized intensity values is indicative of copy-number differences between the test and reference genomes. Proper statistical analyses need to account for many sources of variation besides genuine differences between the two genomes. In particular, spatial correlations, the variable nature of the ratio variance and non-Normal distribution call for careful statistical modeling. We propose two new statistics, the standard t-statistic and its modification with variances smoothed along the genome, and two tests for each statistic, the standard t-test and a test based on the hybrid adaptive spline (HAS). Simulations indicate that the smoothed t-statistic always improves the performance over the standard t-statistic. The t-tests are more powerful in detecting isolated alterations while those based on HAS are more powerful in detecting a cluster of alterations. We apply the proposed methods to the identification of genomic alterations in endometrium in women with endometriosis.

  15. Array comparative genomic hybridization-based characterization of genetic alterations in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Johannes; Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Killian, Jonathan Keith; Suuriniemi, Miia; Wang, Yonghong; Lucchi, Marco; Smith, William I; Meltzer, Paul; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2010-07-20

    The goal of this study was to characterize and classify pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors based on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Using aCGH, we performed karyotype analysis of 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors, 13 SCLC cell lines, 19 bronchial carcinoids, and 9 gastrointestinal carcinoids. In contrast to the relatively conserved karyotypes of carcinoid tumors, the karyotypes of SCLC tumors and cell lines were highly aberrant. High copy number (CN) gains were detected in SCLC tumors and cell lines in cytogenetic bands encoding JAK2, FGFR1, and MYC family members. In some of those samples, the CN of these genes exceeded 100, suggesting that they could represent driver alterations and potential drug targets in subgroups of SCLC patients. In SCLC tumors, as well as bronchial carcinoids and carcinoids of gastrointestinal origin, recurrent CN alterations were observed in 203 genes, including the RB1 gene and 59 microRNAs of which 51 locate in the DLK1-DIO3 domain. These findings suggest the existence of partially shared CN alterations in these tumor types. In contrast, CN alterations of the TP53 gene and the MYC family members were predominantly observed in SCLC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the aCGH profile of SCLC cell lines highly resembles that of clinical SCLC specimens. Finally, by analyzing potential drug targets, we provide a genomics-based rationale for targeting the AKT-mTOR and apoptosis pathways in SCLC.

  16. New Tools for Embryo Selection: Comprehensive Chromosome Screening by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Ana Cristina; Milán, Miguel; Al-Asmar, Nasser; García-Herrero, Sandra; Mir, Pere; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n = 203); repetitive implantation failure (n = 188); severe male factor (n = 116); previous trisomic pregnancy (n = 33); and advanced maternal age (n = 880). CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n = 774); mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n = 320); mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n = 235); and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n = 91). Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5–54.2%) and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0–62.9%) were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1%) due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3%) and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%). We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation. PMID:24877108

  17. Liquid scintillator tiles for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amouzegar, M.; Belloni, A.; Bilki, B.; Calderon, J.; Barbaro, P. De; Eno, S. C.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hirschauer, J.; Jeng, G. Y.; Pastika, N. J.; Pedro, K.; Rumerio, Paolo; Samuel, J.; Sharp, E.; Shin, Y. H.; Tiras, E.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Wetzel, J.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Youn, S. W.

    2016-11-28

    Future experiments in high energy and nuclear physics may require large, inexpensive calorimeters that can continue to operate after receiving doses of 50 Mrad or more. Also, the light output of liquid scintillators suffers little degradation under irradiation. However, many challenges exist before liquids can be used in sampling calorimetry, especially regarding developing a packaging that has sufficient efficiency and uniformity of light collection, as well as suitable mechanical properties. We present the results of a study of a scintillator tile based on the EJ-309 liquid scintillator using cosmic rays and test beam on the light collection efficiency and uniformity, and some preliminary results on radiation hardness.

  18. Liquid scintillator tiles for calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouzegar, M.; Belloni, A.; Bilki, B.; Calderon, J.; De Barbaro, P.; Eno, S. C.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hirschauer, J.; Jeng, G. Y.; Pastika, N. J.; Pedro, K.; Rumerio, Paolo; Samuel, J.; Sharp, E.; Shin, Y. H.; Tiras, E.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Wetzel, J.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Youn, S. W.

    2016-11-01

    Future experiments in high energy and nuclear physics may require large, inexpensive calorimeters that can continue to operate after receiving doses of 50 Mrad or more. The light output of liquid scintillators suffers little degradation under irradiation. However, many challenges exist before liquids can be used in sampling calorimetry, especially regarding developing a packaging that has sufficient efficiency and uniformity of light collection, as well as suitable mechanical properties. We present the results of a study of a scintillator tile based on the EJ-309 liquid scintillator using cosmic rays and test beam on the light collection efficiency and uniformity, and some preliminary results on radiation hardness.

  19. Thermal Characterization of TPS Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kacmar, C. J.; LaCivita, K. J.; Jata, K. V.; Sathish, S.

    2006-03-06

    The Thermal Protection System (TPS) used on space shuttles protects the metallic structure from the large amounts of heat created during travel through the atmosphere, both on takeoff and reentry. The shuttle experiences high thermo-acoustic loading and impact damage from micro-meteorites, which can cause disbonds, delaminations, chips, cracks, and other defects to the TPS system. To enhance durability and damage tolerance, new TPS tiles with an added protective ceramic-matrix-composite layer are being developed. This paper explores the use of pulsed thermography as a quick, diverse, non-destructive technique, to characterize the TPS system. The pulsed thermography images obtained are presented and analyzed.

  20. Revealing Transcriptome Landscape of Mouse Spermatogonial Cells by Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap.; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Spermatogenesis is a highly regulated developmental process by which spermatogonia develop into mature spermatozoa. This process involves many testis- or male germ cell-specific events through tightly regulated gene expression programs. In the past decade the advent of microarray technologies has allowed functional genomic studies of male germ cell development, resulting in the identification of genes governing various processes. A major limitation with conventional gene expression microarray is that there is a bias from gene probe design. The gene probes for expression microarrays are usually represented by a small number probes located at the 3’ end of a transcirpt. Tiling microarrays eliminate such issue by interrogating the genome in an unbiased fashion through probes tiled for the entire genome. These arrays provide a higher genomic resolution and allow identification of novel transcripts. To reveal the complexity of the genomic landscape of developing male germ cells, we applied tiling microarray to evaluate the transcriptome in spermatogonial cells. Over 50% of the mouse and rat genome are expressed during testicular development. More than 47% of transcripts are uncharacterized. The results suggested the transcription machinery in spermaotogonial cells are more complex than previously envisioned. PMID:22144238

  1. Effects of thermal blooming on systems comprised of tiled subapertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leakeas, Charles L.; Bartell, Richard J.; Krizo, Matthew J.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Whiteley, Matthew R.

    2010-04-01

    Laser weapon systems comprise of tiled subapertures are rapidly emerging in the directed energy community. The Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy (AFIT/CDE), under sponsorship of the HEL Joint Technology Office has developed performance models of such laser weapon system configurations consisting of tiled arrays of both slab and fiber subapertures. These performance models are based on results of detailed waveoptics analyses conducted using WaveTrain. Previous performance model versions developed in this effort represent system characteristics such as subaperture shape, aperture fill factor, subaperture intensity profile, subaperture placement in the primary aperture, subaperture mutual coherence (piston), subaperture differential jitter (tilt), and beam quality wave-front error associated with each subaperture. The current work is a prerequisite for the development of robust performance models for turbulence and thermal blooming effects for tiled systems. Emphasis is placed on low altitude tactical scenarios. The enhanced performance model developed will be added to AFIT/CDE's HELEEOS parametric one-on-one engagement level model via the Scaling for High Energy Laser and Relay Engagement (SHaRE) toolbox.

  2. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  3. Array comparative genomic hybridization and cytogenetic analysis in pediatric acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A J; Yanofsky, R; Vallente, R; Bal, S; Schroedter, I; Liang, L; Mai, S

    2011-10-01

    Most patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (all) are reported to have acquired chromosomal abnormalities in their leukemic bone marrow cells. Many established chromosome rearrangements have been described, and their associations with specific clinical, biologic, and prognostic features are well defined. However, approximately 30% of pediatric and 50% of adult patients with all do not have cytogenetic abnormalities of clinical significance. Despite significant improvements in outcome for pediatric all, therapy fails in approximately 25% of patients, and these failures often occur unpredictably in patients with a favorable prognosis and "good" cytogenetics at diagnosis.It is well known that karyotype analysis in hematologic malignancies, although genome-wide, is limited because of altered cell kinetics (mitotic rate), a propensity of leukemic blasts to undergo apoptosis in culture, overgrowth by normal cells, and chromosomes of poor quality in the abnormal clone. Array comparative genomic hybridization (acgh-"microarray") has a greatly increased genomic resolution over classical cytogenetics. Cytogenetic microarray, which uses genomic dna, is a powerful tool in the analysis of unbalanced chromosome rearrangements, such as copy number gains and losses, and it is the method of choice when the mitotic index is low and the quality of metaphases is suboptimal. The copy number profile obtained by microarray is often called a "molecular karyotype."In the present study, microarray was applied to 9 retrospective cases of pediatric all either with initial high-risk features or with at least 1 relapse. The conventional karyotype was compared to the "molecular karyotype" to assess abnormalities as interpreted by classical cytogenetics. Not only were previously undetected chromosome losses and gains identified by microarray, but several karyotypes interpreted by classical cytogenetics were shown to be discordant with the microarray results. The complementary use of microarray

  4. Parametric Multi-Level Tiling of Imperfectly Nested Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Albert; Baskaran, Muthu M.; Bastoul, Cedric; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Norris, Boyana; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-05-18

    Tiling is a critical loop transformation for generating high-performance code on modern architectures. Efficient generation of multilevel tiled code is essential to exploit several levels of parallelism and/or to maximize data reuse in deep memory hierarchies. Tiled loops with parameterized tile sizes (not compile time constants) facilitate runtime feedback and dynamic optimizations used in iterative compilation and automatic tuning. The existing parametric multilevel tiling approach has focused on transformation for perfectly nested loops, where all assignment statements are contained inside the innermost loop of a loop nest. Previous solutions to tiling for imperfect loop nests are limited to the case where tile sizes are fixed. In this paper, we present an approach to parameterized multilevel tiling for imperfectly nested loops. Our tiling algorithm generates loops that iterate over full rectangular tiles that are amenable for potential compiler optimizations such as register tiling. Experimental results using a number of computational benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our tiling approach.

  5. Programmable disorder in random DNA tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, Grigory; Petersen, Philip; Qian, Lulu

    2016-11-01

    Scaling up the complexity and diversity of synthetic molecular structures will require strategies that exploit the inherent stochasticity of molecular systems in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate a framework for programming random DNA tilings and show how to control the properties of global patterns through simple, local rules. We constructed three general forms of planar network—random loops, mazes and trees—on the surface of self-assembled DNA origami arrays on the micrometre scale with nanometre resolution. Using simple molecular building blocks and robust experimental conditions, we demonstrate control of a wide range of properties of the random networks, including the branching rules, the growth directions, the proximity between adjacent networks and the size distribution. Much as combinatorial approaches for generating random one-dimensional chains of polymers have been used to revolutionize chemical synthesis and the selection of functional nucleic acids, our strategy extends these principles to random two-dimensional networks of molecules and creates new opportunities for fabricating more complex molecular devices that are organized by DNA nanostructures.

  6. On the Challenge of Keeping ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Raw Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiskaridze, V. K.

    2012-08-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) for the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently taking data with proton-proton collisions. The TileCal read-out system was initially designed to reconstruct the data in real-time and to store for each channel the signal amplitude, time and quality factor at the required high rate. This approach implied discarding 80% of the raw data that correspond to noise or small signals. Practical experience operating in this scheme with increasing rate have led to several modifications and understanding that some kind of data compression is helpful during data processing and storing. An alternate approach is to use online reconstruction for Level 2 triggering only and to implement a data flow lossless compression scheme for further offiine analysis. A new version of the lossless compression algorithm is proposed which allows to both save the complete raw data and to feed the trigger with the reconstructed signal amplitude and time. It does not increase the data flow as compared to the existing approach and the size of the data fragments transmitted is more stable. We will describe the lossless compression algorithm as a possible upgrade of the Tile data acquisition and highlight some details of the implementation. We will report on its testing and validation and on the overall performance measured on high rate tests, calibration and √ {s} = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions runs.

  7. The Sad Case of the Columbine Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes free-speech challenge to school district's guidelines for acceptable expressions on ceramic tiles painted by Columbine High School students to express their feelings about the massacre. Tenth Circuit found that tile painting constituted school-sponsored speech and thus district had the constitutional authority under "Hazelwood School…

  8. Bonding Heat-Resistant Fabric to Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Acid etching, densification, and silica cement ensure strong bond. Key step in preparation for bonding to glazed tile is etching quartz fabric and tile with acid. This increases adhesion of silica cement used to form bond. Procedures use high-temperature materials exclusively and therefore suitable for securing flexible seals and heat barriers around doors and viewing ports in furnaces and kilns.

  9. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  10. Comparative efficiency analysis of fiber-array and conventional beam director systems in volume turbulence.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Mikhail; Filimonov, Grigory; Ovchinnikov, Vladimir; Polnau, Ernst; Lachinova, Svetlana; Weyrauch, Thomas; Mangano, Joseph

    2016-05-20

    The performance of two prominent laser beam projection system types is analyzed through wave-optics numerical simulations for various atmospheric turbulence conditions, propagation distances, and adaptive optics (AO) mitigation techniques. Comparisons are made between different configurations of both a conventional beam director (BD) using a monolithic-optics-based Cassegrain telescope and a fiber-array BD that uses an array of densely packed fiber collimators. The BD systems considered have equal input power and aperture diameters. The projected laser beam power inside the Airy size disk at the target plane is used as the performance metric. For the fiber-array system, both incoherent and coherent beam combining regimes are considered. We also present preliminary results of side-by-side atmospheric beam projection experiments over a 7-km propagation path using both the AO-enhanced beam projection system with a Cassegrain telescope and the coherent fiber-array BD composed of 21 densely packed fiber collimators. Both wave-optics numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that, for similar system architectures and turbulence conditions, coherent fiber-array systems are more efficient in mitigation of atmospheric turbulence effects and generation of a hit spot of the smallest possible size on a remotely located target.

  11. BICEP3 performance overview and planned Keck Array upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, J. A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Alexander, K. D.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Boenish, H.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Buza, V.; Connors, J.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Halpern, M.; Harrison, S.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Kang, J.; Karkare, K. S.; Karpel, E.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Megerian, K. G.; Monticue, V.; Namikawa, T.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pryke, C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Schwarz, R.; Sorenson, C.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Steinbach, B.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Tucker, C.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wandui, A.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Willmert, J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Bicep3 is a 520mm aperture, compact two-lens refractor designed to observe the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 95 GHz. Its focal plane consists of modularized tiles of antenna-coupled transition edge sensors (TESs), similar to those used in Bicep2 and the Keck Array. The increased per-receiver optical throughput compared to Bicep2/Keck Array, due to both its faster f=1:7 optics and the larger aperture, more than doubles the combined mapping speed of the Bicep/Keck program. The Bicep3 receiver was recently upgraded to a full complement of 20 tiles of detectors (2560 TESs) and is now beginning its second year of observation (and first science season) at the South Pole. We report on its current performance and observing plans. Given its high per-receiver throughput while maintaining the advantages of a compact design, Bicep3- class receivers are ideally suited as building blocks for a 3rd-generation CMB experiment, consisting of multiple receivers spanning 35 GHz to 270 GHz with total detector count in the tens of thousands. We present plans for such an array, the new "BICEP Array" that will replace the Keck Array at the South Pole, including design optimization, frequency coverage, and deployment/observing strategies.

  12. Liquid scintillator tiles for calorimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Amouzegar, M.; Belloni, A.; Bilki, B.; ...

    2016-11-28

    Future experiments in high energy and nuclear physics may require large, inexpensive calorimeters that can continue to operate after receiving doses of 50 Mrad or more. Also, the light output of liquid scintillators suffers little degradation under irradiation. However, many challenges exist before liquids can be used in sampling calorimetry, especially regarding developing a packaging that has sufficient efficiency and uniformity of light collection, as well as suitable mechanical properties. We present the results of a study of a scintillator tile based on the EJ-309 liquid scintillator using cosmic rays and test beam on the light collection efficiency and uniformity,more » and some preliminary results on radiation hardness.« less

  13. Analysis of Molecular Cytogenetic Alteration in Rhabdomyosarcoma by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunxia; Li, Dongliang; Jiang, Jinfang; Hu, Jianming; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Yunzhao; Cui, Xiaobin; Qi, Yan; Zou, Hong; Zhang, WenJie; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcoma with poor prognosis. The genetic etiology of RMS remains largely unclear underlying its development and progression. To reveal novel genes more precisely and new therapeutic targets associated with RMS, we used high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to explore tumor-associated copy number variations (CNVs) and genes in RMS. We confirmed several important genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR). We then performed bioinformatics-based functional enrichment analysis for genes located in the genomic regions with CNVs. In addition, we identified miRNAs located in the corresponding amplification and deletion regions and performed miRNA functional enrichment analysis. aCGH analyses revealed that all RMS showed specific gains and losses. The amplification regions were 12q13.12, 12q13.3, and 12q13.3–q14.1. The deletion regions were 1p21.1, 2q14.1, 5q13.2, 9p12, and 9q12. The recurrent regions with gains were 12q13.3, 12q13.3–q14.1, 12q14.1, and 17q25.1. The recurrent regions with losses were 9p12–p11.2, 10q11.21–q11.22, 14q32.33, 16p11.2, and 22q11.1. The mean mRNA level of GLI1 in RMS was 6.61-fold higher than that in controls (p = 0.0477) by QRT-PCR. Meanwhile, the mean mRNA level of GEFT in RMS samples was 3.92-fold higher than that in controls (p = 0.0354). Bioinformatic analysis showed that genes were enriched in functions such as immunoglobulin domain, induction of apoptosis, and defensin. Proto-oncogene functions were involved in alveolar RMS. miRNAs that located in the amplified regions in RMS tend to be enriched in oncogenic activity (miR-24 and miR-27a). In conclusion, this study identified a number of CNVs in RMS and functional analyses showed enrichment for genes and miRNAs located in these CNVs regions. These findings may potentially help the identification of novel biomarkers and/or drug targets implicated in diagnosis of

  14. Application of array-comparative genomic hybridization in tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Hong-Dan; Cui, Cun-Ying; Wu, Dong; Li, Tao; Fan, Tai-Bing; Peng, Bang-Tian; Zhang, Lian-Zhong; Wang, Cheng-Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To explore the underlying pathogenesis and provide references for genetic counseling and prenatal gene diagnosis, we analyzed the chromosome karyotypes and genome-wide copy number variations (CNVs) in 86 patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) by G-banding karyotype analysis and array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), respectively. And then quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate these candidate CNVs. Based on their different properties, CNVs were categorized into benign CNVs, suspiciously pathogenic CNVs, and indefinite CNVs. Data analysis was based on public databases such as UCSC, DECIPHER, DGV, ISCA, and OMIM. The karyotype was normal in all the 86 patients with TOF. CNVs were detected in 11 patients by aCGH and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patient no. 0001, 0010, and 0029 had 2.52-Mb deletion in the chromosome 22q11.21 region; patient no. 0008 had both 595- and 428-kb duplications, respectively, in 12p12.3p12.2 and 14q23.2q23.3 regions; patient no. 0009 had 1.46-Mb duplication in the 1q21.1q21.2 region; patient no. 0016 had 513-kb duplication in the 1q42.13 region; patient no. 0024 had 292-kb duplication in the 16q11.2 region; patient no. 0026 had 270-kb duplication in the 16q24.1 region; patient no. 0028 had 222-kb deletion in the 7q31.1 region; patient no. 0033 had 1.73-Mb duplication in the 17q12 region; and patient no. 0061 had 5.79-Mb deletion in the 1p36.33p36.31 region. aCGH can accurately detect CNVs in the patients with TOF. This is conducive to genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for TOF and provides a new clue and theoretical basis for exploring the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease. PMID:27930557

  15. Comparative evaluation of different DNA extraction methods for HPV genotyping by linear array and INNO-LiPA.

    PubMed

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Benevolo, Maria; Pimpinelli, Fulvia; Battista, Mara; Rollo, Francesca; Stivali, Francesca; Moscarelli, Antonella; Giuliani, Massimo; Di Carlo, Aldo; Vocaturo, Amina

    2011-06-01

    In order to investigate the influence of DNA extraction on two PCR-based HPV genotyping tests (Linear Array, Roche and INNO-LiPA Extra, Innogenetics), three different procedures were used to purify DNA from 28 cervico-vaginal samples tested previously by the Hybrid Capture 2: the AmpliLute Liquid Media Extraction kit (Roche), the QIAamp DNA Blood mini kit (QIAGEN), and the NucliSENS EasyMAG automated platform (bioMérieux). All HC2-positive samples were found positive by both assays, independently of the extract used. Type-specific concordance (i.e., identical HPV type-specific profile in all the extracts of the same sample) was observed in 55% and 75% of the cases testing samples by the Linear Array and the INNO-LiPA, respectively. Using the DNA extracted with the two manual methods the results were concordant in 75% of the cases both for the Linear Array and the INNO-LiPA. When comparing the Linear Array results obtained on either of the two manual extracts with those obtained following automated extraction, 65% of the samples showed type-specific concordance in both cases. The INNO-LiPA results were concordant in 80% of the cases comparing the AmpliLute versus the automated extract, while concordant results were observed in 90% of the cases when comparing the QIAGEN versus the automated extract. In conclusion, the Linear Array and INNO-LiPA results are affected by the method of DNA extraction. Consequently, different HPV type-specific profiles may be observed using different extracts of the same sample. The use of consistent protocols for DNA purification is a priority to guarantee intra-assay reproducibility over time.

  16. Array comparative hybridisation reveals a high degree of similarity between UK and European clinical isolates of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is responsible for C. difficile associated disease in humans and is currently the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the western world. This current status has been linked to the emergence of a highly virulent PCR-ribotype 027 strain. The aim of this work was to identify regions of sequence divergence that may be used as genetic markers of hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 027 strains and markers of the sequenced strain, CD630 by array comparative hybridisation. Results In this study, we examined 94 clinical strains of the most common PCR-ribotypes isolated in mainland Europe and the UK by array comparative genomic hybridisation. Our array was comprehensive with 40,097 oligonucleotides covering the C. difficile 630 genome and revealed a core genome for all the strains of 32%. The array also covered genes unique to two PCR-ribotype 027 strains, relative to C. difficile 630 which were represented by 681 probes. All of these genes were also found in the commonly occuring PCR-ribotypes 001 and 106, and the emerging hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 078 strains, indicating that these are markers for all highly virulent strains. Conclusions We have fulfilled the aims of this study by identifying markers for CD630 and markers associated with hypervirulence, albeit genes that are not just indicative of PCR-ribotype 027 strains. We have also extended this study and have defined a more stringent core gene set compared to those previously published due to the comprehensive array coverage. Further to this we have defined a list of genes absent from non-toxinogenic strains and defined the nature of the specific toxin deletion in the strain CD37. PMID:20565959

  17. Solar-energy treatment of ceramic tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. N.; Clayton, M. E.

    1981-12-01

    The 400 kW Advanced Components Test Facility was used to provide a concentrated source of solar energy for firing ceramic wall tile. A domed top cylindrical cavity with a white refractory fiber lining provided diffuse reflection of the concentrated solar beam directly onto the upper surface of the unfired wall tile. The tile were placed directly on the cavity floor in a circular pattern, centered at 450 intervals so that eight tile could be fired at one time. The tile and cavity walls were instrumented with thermocouples, and pyrometric cones were used to determine temperature distribution within the cavity. The glazed and unglazed solar fired titles were tested for flatness, modulus of rupture, water absorption, porosity, bulk density, apparent specific gravity, percent linear thermal expansion and crystalline phases present in the fired bodies. The major problems encountered are: cracking by thermal shock, and uneven shrinkage and glaze maturity across individual tile. The cavity failed to provide even heating at all eight tile positions.

  18. Increasing live birth rate by preimplantation genetic screening of pooled polar bodies using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Michael; Stopp, Tina; Göbl, Christian; Feichtinger, Elisabeth; Vaccari, Enrico; Mädel, Ulrike; Laccone, Franco; Stroh-Weigert, Monika; Hengstschläger, Markus; Feichtinger, Wilfried; Neesen, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic errors during oocyte maturation are considered the major contributors to embryonic aneuploidy and failures in human IVF treatment. Various technologies have been developed to screen polar bodies, blastomeres and trophectoderm cells for chromosomal aberrations. Array-CGH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays is widely applied for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) using single cells. Recently, an increase in the pregnancy rate has been demonstrated using array-CGH to evaluate trophectoderm cells. However, in some countries, the analysis of embryonic cells is restricted by law. Therefore, we used BAC array-CGH to assess the impact of polar body analysis on the live birth rate. A disadvantage of polar body aneuploidy screening is the necessity of the analysis of both the first and second polar bodies, resulting in increases in costs for the patient and complex data interpretation. Aneuploidy screening results may sometimes be ambiguous if the first and second polar bodies show reciprocal chromosomal aberrations. To overcome this disadvantage, we tested a strategy involving the pooling of DNA from both polar bodies before DNA amplification. We retrospectively studied 351 patients, of whom 111 underwent polar body array-CGH before embryo transfer. In the group receiving pooled polar body array-CGH (aCGH) analysis, 110 embryos were transferred, and 29 babies were born, corresponding to live birth rates of 26.4% per embryo and 35.7% per patient. In contrast, in the control group, the IVF treatment was performed without preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). For this group, 403 embryos were transferred, and 60 babies were born, resulting in live birth rates of 14.9% per embryo and 22.7% per patient. In conclusion, our data show that in the aCGH group, the use of aneuploidy screening resulted in a significantly higher live birth rate compared with the control group, supporting the benefit of PGS for IVF couples in addition to the

  19. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  20. The TileCal Laser Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangiobbe, Vincent; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Group

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector operating at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter whose active material is made of scintillating plastic tiles. Scintillation light is read by photomultipliers. A Laser system is used to monitor their gain stability. During dedicated calibration runs the Laser system sends via long optical fibers, a monitored amount of light simultaneously to all the ≈10000 photomultipliers of TileCal. This note describes two complementary methods to measure the stability of the photomultipliers gain using the Laser calibration runs. The results of validation tests are presented for both methods and theirrespective performances and limitations are discussed.

  1. Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles

    DOEpatents

    Gallix, R.

    1987-12-09

    U-shaped tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners have two rods which engage L-shaped slots. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the wall. Resilient contact strips under the parallel sides of the U-shaped tile assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall. 6 figs.

  2. Measuring phased-array antenna beampatterns with high dynamic range for the Murchison Widefield Array using 137 MHz ORBCOMM satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neben, A. R.; Bradley, R. F.; Hewitt, J. N.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-07-01

    Detection of the fluctuations in a 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch of Reionization in thousand hour integrations poses stringent requirements on calibration and image quality, both of which necessitate accurate primary beam models. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) uses phased-array antenna elements which maximize collecting area at the cost of complexity. To quantify their performance, we have developed a novel beam measurement system using the 137 MHz ORBCOMM satellite constellation and a reference dipole antenna. Using power ratio measurements, we measure the in situ beampattern of the MWA antenna tile relative to that of the reference antenna, canceling the variation of satellite flux or polarization with time. We employ angular averaging to mitigate multipath effects (ground scattering) and assess environmental systematics with a null experiment in which the MWA tile is replaced with a second-reference dipole. We achieve beam measurements over 30 dB dynamic range in beam sensitivity over a large field of view (65% of the visible sky), far wider and deeper than drift scans through astronomical sources allow. We verify an analytic model of the MWA tile at this frequency within a few percent statistical scatter within the full width at half maximum. Toward the edges of the main lobe and in the sidelobes, we measure tens of percent systematic deviations. We compare these errors with those expected from known beamforming errors.

  3. The challenging scales of the bird: Shuttle tile structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, W. C.; Miller, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The principal design issues, tests, and analyses required to solve the tile integrity problem on the space shuttle orbiters are addressed. Proof testing of installed tiles is discussed along with an airflow test of special tiles. Orbiter windshield tiles are considered in terms of changes necessary to ensure acceptable margins of safety for flight.

  4. Association between chromosomal aberration of COX8C and tethered spinal cord syndrome: array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiu-jiong; Bai, Shao-cong; Cheng, Cheng; Tao, Ben-zhang; Wang, Le-kai; Liang, Shuang; Yin, Ling; Hang, Xing-yi; Shang, Ai-jia

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations have been found in patients with neural tube abnormalities. In this study, we performed genome-wide screening using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization in three children with tethered spinal cord syndrome and two healthy parents. Of eight copy number variations, four were non-polymorphic. These non-polymorphic copy number variations were associated with Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes, and microcephaly. Gene function enrichment analysis revealed that COX8C, a gene associated with metabolic disorders of the nervous system, was located in the copy number variation region of Patient 1. Our results indicate that array-based comparative genomic hybridization can be used to diagnose tethered spinal cord syndrome. Our results may help determine the pathogenesis of tethered spinal cord syndrome and prevent occurrence of this disease. PMID:27651783

  5. High-Strength, Low-Shrinkage Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of refractory fibers and whiskers to insulating tiles composed primarily of fibrous silica, such as those used on the skin of Space Shuttle orbiter, greatly improves properties. New composition suitable for lightweight, thermally-stable mirror blanks and as furnace and kiln insulation. Improved tiles made with current tile-fabrication processes. For given density, tiles containing silicon carbide and boron additives stronger in flexure than tiles made from silica alone. In addition, tiles with additives nearly immune to heat distortion, whereas pure-silica tiles shrink and become severely distorted.

  6. Heat Transfer Measurement and Modeling in Rigid High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Knutson, Jeffrey R.; Cunnington, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transfer in rigid reusable surface insulations was investigated. Steady-state thermal conductivity measurements in a vacuum were used to determine the combined contribution of radiation and solid conduction components of heat transfer. Thermal conductivity measurements at higher pressures were then used to estimate the effective insulation characteristic length for gas conduction modeling. The thermal conductivity of the insulation can then be estimated at any temperature and pressure in any gaseous media. The methodology was validated by comparing estimated thermal conductivities with published data on a rigid high-temperature silica reusable surface insulation tile. The methodology was also applied to the alumina enhanced thermal barrier tiles. Thermal contact resistance for thermal conductivity measurements on rigid tiles was also investigated. A technique was developed to effectively eliminate thermal contact resistance on the rigid tile s cold-side surface for the thermal conductivity measurements.

  7. Notch sensitivity of space shuttle tile materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the notch sensitivity of the thermal protection tile for the space shuttle. Two types of RSI tile were studied: LI-900 and LI-2200. Three point bend specimens were cut from discarded tiles in the in-plane (ip) and through-the-thickness (ttt) directions. They were tested with or without a sharp notch. The LI-900 (ip and ttt) specimens were not very notch sensitive, but the LI-2200 (ip and ttt) specimens were. The LI-2200 material showed about a 35 percent reduction in strength due to the presence of the notch. This reduction in strength should be considered in the design of mechanically fastened tile concepts.

  8. VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. (the Company) is located in Bristow, Virginia. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Washington, DC.

  9. Radioactivity in zircon and building tiles.

    PubMed

    Deng, W; Tian, K; Zhang, Y; Chen, D

    1997-08-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is commonly used in the manufacture of glazed tiles. In this study we found high concentrations of the radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th, 40K in zircon sand. The average radium equivalent (A(Ra) + 1.26 A(Th) + 0.086 A(k)) in zircon sand is 17,500 Bq kg(-1), which is 106 times as much as that in ordinary building materials. The external radiation (gamma + beta) dose rates in air at 5 cm from the surface of piles of zircon sand sacks range from 1.1 to 4.9 x 10(-2) mGy h(-1) with an average of 2.1 x 10(-2) mGy h(-1). Although no elevated gamma-ray radiation or radon exhalation rate was detected in rooms decorated with glazed tiles, which is characteristic of combined alpha, beta and gamma emitting thin materials, the average gamma-ray radiation dose rate at the surface of the tile stacks in shops is 1.5 times as much as the indoor background level. The average area density of total beta emitting radionuclides in glazed floor tiles and glazed wall tiles is 0.30 Bq cm(-2) and 0.28 Bq cm(-2), respectively. It was estimated that the average beta dose rates in tissue at a depth 7 mg cm(-2) with a distance 20-100 cm from the floor tiles were 3.2 to 0.9 x 10(-7) Gy h(-1). The study indicates that the beta-rays from glazed tiles might be one of the main factors leading to an increase in ionizing radiation received by the general public. Workers in glazed tile manufacturing factories and in tile shops or stores may be exposed to elevated levels of both beta-rays and gamma-rays from zircon sand or glazed tile stacks. No elevated radiation from unglazed tiles was detected.

  10. Cutting Symmetrical Recesses In Soft Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesotas, Tony C.; Tyler, Brent

    1989-01-01

    Simple tool cuts hemispherical recesses in soft ceramic tiles. Designed to expose wires of thermocouples embedded in tiles without damaging leads. Creates neat, precise holes around wires. End mill includes axial hole to accommodate thermocouple wires embedded in material to be cut. Wires pass into hole without being bent or broken. Dimensions in inches. Used in place of such tools as dental picks, tweezers, spatulas, and putty knives.

  11. Laser Scanner for Tile-Cavity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, Stanley Y.; Wykes, Donald H.; Hagen, George R.; Lotgering, Gene E.; Gaynor, Michael B.; Westerlund, Paul G.; Baal, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    Irregular surfaces mapped and digitized for numerical-control machinery. Fast, accurate laser scanning system measures size and shape of cavity without making any physical contact with cavity and walls. Measurements processed into control signals for numerically controlled machining of tile or block to fit cavity. System generates map of grid points representing cavity and portion of outer surface surrounding cavity. Map data used to control milling machine, which cuts tile or block to fit in cavity.

  12. Slipping properties of ceramic tiles / Quantification of slip resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terjek, Anita

    2013-12-01

    Regarding the research and application of ceramic tiles there is a great importance of defining precisely the interaction and friction between surfaces. Measuring slip resistance of floor coverings is a complex problem; slipperiness is always interpreted relatively. In the lack of a consistent and clear EU standard, it is practical to use more method in combination. It is necessary to examine the structure of materials in order to get adequate correlation. That is why measuring techniques of surface roughness, an important contributor to slip resistance and cleaning, is fundamental in the research. By comparing the obtained test results, relationship between individual methods of analysis and values may be determined and based on these information recommendations shall be prepared concerning the selection and application of tiles.

  13. DNA-Tile Structures Induce Ionic Currents through Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Zettl, Thomas; Meijering, Anna E C; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Kocabey, Samet; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-05-13

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures have been used to create man-made transmembrane channels in lipid bilayers. Here, we present a DNA-tile structure with a nominal subnanometer channel and cholesterol-tags for membrane anchoring. With an outer diameter of 5 nm and a molecular weight of 45 kDa, the dimensions of our synthetic nanostructure are comparable to biological ion channels. Because of its simple design, the structure self-assembles within a minute, making its creation scalable for applications in biology. Ionic current recordings demonstrate that the tile structures enable ion conduction through lipid bilayers and show gating and voltage-switching behavior. By demonstrating the design of DNA-based membrane channels with openings much smaller than that of the archetypical six-helix bundle, our work showcases their versatility inspired by the rich diversity of natural membrane components.

  14. Performance of the TFTR moveable limiter tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrickson, M.; Cecchi, J. L.; Doyle, B. L.; Dylla, H. F.; Medley, S. S.; Owens, D. K.; Trester, P.

    1985-08-01

    The movable limiter for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is composed of an Inconel X-750 backing plate covered with titanium carbide coated graphite tiles. It has been used for ohmic heating discharges at input powers up to about 2 MW for durations up to 3 s. Even though these levels were well within the design requirements, discharges showed high levels (up to 1%) of titanium contamination. It was observed that certain tiles were showing substantial coating removal which became progressively worse as more discharges were made. After about 800 discharges the tiles were removed. A few of the tiles were examined in the Sandia external beam facility. This analysis showed that the TiC coating was completely removed over large areas. There was also evidence of plasma deposited material on the tiles. The thickness of the remaining coating from this beam analysis agreed with the thickness determined from sectioning control coupons from the production runs. There was a weak correlation between damage and coating thickness. The correlation was such that there was a higher probability of coating failure as the coating thickness increased from 15 μm to 40 μm. Test were done using the ASTM-C-633 procedure for measuring coating bond strength. The adhesion strength agreed well with the behavior observed in TFTR. The coating has been removed, and the tiles reinstalled.

  15. Quasicrystalline tilings with nematic colloidal platelets

    PubMed Central

    Dontabhaktuni, Jayasri; Ravnik, Miha; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Complex nematic fluids have the remarkable capability for self-assembling regular colloidal structures of various symmetries and dimensionality according to their micromolecular orientational order. Colloidal chains, clusters, and crystals were demonstrated recently, exhibiting soft-matter functionalities of robust binding, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, entanglement, shape-driven and topological driven assembly, and even memory imprinting. However, no quasicrystalline structures were found. Here, we show with numerical modeling that quasicrystalline colloidal lattices can be achieved in the form of original Penrose P1 tiling by using pentagonal colloidal platelets in layers of nematic liquid crystals. The tilings are energetically stabilized with binding energies up to 2500 kBT for micrometer-sized platelets and further allow for hierarchical substitution tiling, i.e., hierarchical pentagulation. Quasicrystalline structures are constructed bottom-up by assembling the boat, rhombus, and star maximum density clusters, thus avoiding other (nonquasicrystalline) stable or metastable configurations of platelets. Central to our design of the quasicrystalline tilings is the symmetry breaking imposed by the platelet shape and the surface anchoring conditions at the colloidal platelets, which are misaligning and asymmetric over two perpendicular mirror planes. Finally, the design of the quasicrystalline tilings as platelets in nematic liquid crystals is inherently capable of a continuous variety of length scales of the tiling, ranging over three orders of magnitude in the typical length (from to ), which could allow for the design of quasicrystalline photonics at multiple frequency ranges. PMID:24550269

  16. Effect of tillage on macropore flow and phosphorus transport to tile drains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark R.; King, Kevin W.; Ford, William; Buda, Anthony R.; Kennedy, Casey D.

    2016-04-01

    Elevated phosphorus (P) concentrations in subsurface drainage water are thought to be the result of P bypassing the soil matrix via macropore flow. The objectives of this study were to quantify event water delivery to tile drains via macropore flow paths during storm events and to determine the effect of tillage practices on event water and P delivery to tiles. Tile discharge, total dissolved P (DP) and total P (TP) concentrations, and stable oxygen and deuterium isotopic signatures were measured from two adjacent tile-drained fields in Ohio, USA during seven spring storms. Fertilizer was surface-applied to both fields and disk tillage was used to incorporate the fertilizer on one field while the other remained in no-till. Median DP concentration in tile discharge prior to fertilizer application was 0.08 mg L-1 in both fields. Following fertilizer application, median DP concentration was significantly greater in the no-tilled field (1.19 mg L-1) compared to the tilled field (0.66 mg L-1), with concentrations remaining significantly greater in the no-till field for the remainder of the monitored storms. Both DP and TP concentrations in the no-till field were significantly related to event water contributions to tile discharge, while only TP concentration was significantly related to event water in the tilled field. Event water accounted for between 26 and 69% of total tile discharge from both fields, but tillage substantially reduced maximum contributions of event water. Collectively, these results suggest that incorporating surface-applied fertilizers has the potential to substantially reduce the risk of P transport from tile-drained fields.

  17. Tile-Based Two-Dimensional Phase Unwrapping for Digital Holography Using a Modular Framework

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, Georgios C.; Steltner, Benjamin; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    A variety of physical and biomedical imaging techniques, such as digital holography, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enable measurement of the phase of a physical quantity additionally to its amplitude. However, the phase can commonly only be measured modulo 2π, as a so called wrapped phase map. Phase unwrapping is the process of obtaining the underlying physical phase map from the wrapped phase. Tile-based phase unwrapping algorithms operate by first tessellating the phase map, then unwrapping individual tiles, and finally merging them to a continuous phase map. They can be implemented computationally efficiently and are robust to noise. However, they are prone to failure in the presence of phase residues or erroneous unwraps of single tiles. We tried to overcome these shortcomings by creating novel tile unwrapping and merging algorithms as well as creating a framework that allows to combine them in modular fashion. To increase the robustness of the tile unwrapping step, we implemented a model-based algorithm that makes efficient use of linear algebra to unwrap individual tiles. Furthermore, we adapted an established pixel-based unwrapping algorithm to create a quality guided tile merger. These original algorithms as well as previously existing ones were implemented in a modular phase unwrapping C++ framework. By examining different combinations of unwrapping and merging algorithms we compared our method to existing approaches. We could show that the appropriate choice of unwrapping and merging algorithms can significantly improve the unwrapped result in the presence of phase residues and noise. Beyond that, our modular framework allows for efficient design and test of new tile-based phase unwrapping algorithms. The software developed in this study is freely available. PMID:26599984

  18. Managing tile drainage, subirrigation, and nitrogen fertilization to enhance crop yields and reduce nitrate loss.

    PubMed

    Drury, C F; Tan, C S; Reynolds, W D; Welacky, T W; Oloya, T O; Gaynor, J D

    2009-01-01

    Improving field-crop use of fertilizer nitrogen is essential for protecting water quality and increasing crop yields. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of controlled tile drainage (CD) and controlled tile drainage with subsurface irrigation (CDS) for mitigating off-field nitrate losses and enhancing crop yields. The CD and CDS systems were compared on a clay loam soil to traditional unrestricted tile drainage (UTD) under a corn (Zea Mays L.)-soybean (Glycine Max. (L.) Merr.) rotation at two nitrogen (N) fertilization rates (N1: 150 kg N ha(-1) applied to corn, no N applied to soybean; N2: 200 kg N ha(-1) applied to corn, 50 kg N ha(-1) applied to soybean). The N concentrations in tile flow events with the UTD treatment exceeded the provisional long-term aquatic life limit (LT-ALL) for freshwater (4.7 mg N L(-1)) 72% of the time at the N1 rate and 78% at the N2 rate, whereas only 24% of tile flow events at N1 and 40% at N2 exceeded the LT-ALL for the CDS treatment. Exceedances in N concentration for surface runoff and tile drainage were greater during the growing season than the non-growing season. At the N1 rate, CD and CDS reduced average annual N losses via tile drainage by 44 and 66%, respectively, relative to UTD. At the N2 rate, the average annual decreases in N loss were 31 and 68%, respectively. Crop yields from CDS were increased by an average of 2.8% relative to UTD at the N2 rate but were reduced by an average of 6.5% at the N1 rate. Hence, CD and CDS were effective for reducing average nitrate losses in tile drainage, but CDS increased average crop yields only when additional N fertilizer was applied.

  19. Tiling patterns from ABC star molecules: 3-colored foams?

    PubMed

    Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Pedersen, Martin C; Hyde, Stephen T

    2014-10-07

    We present coarse-grained simulations of the self-assembly of 3-armed ABC star polyphiles. In systems of star polyphiles with two arms of equal length the simulations corroborate and expand previous findings from related miktoarm star terpolymer systems on the formation of patterns containing columnar domains whose sections are 2D planar tilings. However, the systematic variation of face topologies as the length of the third (unequal) arm is varied differs from earlier findings regarding the compositional dependence. We explore 2D 3-colored foams to establish the optimal patterns based on interfacial energy alone. A generic construction algorithm is described that accounts for all observed 2D tiling patterns and suggests other patterns likely to be found beyond the range of the simulations reported here. Patterns resulting from this algorithm are relaxed using Surface Evolver calculations to form 2D foams with minimal interfacial length as a function of composition. This allows us to estimate the interfacial enthalpic contributions to the free energy of related star molecular assemblies assuming strong segregation. We compare the resulting phase sequence with a number of theoretical results from particle-based simulations and field theory, allowing us to tease out relative enthalpic and entropic contributions as a function of the chain lengths making up the star molecules. Our results indicate that a richer polymorphism is to be expected in systems not dominated by chain entropy. Further, analysis of corresponding planar tiling patterns suggests that related two-periodic columnar structures are unlikely hypothetical phases in 4-arm star polyphile melts in the absence of sufficient arm configurational freedom for minor domains to form lens-shaped di-gons, which require higher molecular weight polymeric arms. Finally, we discuss the possibility of forming a complex tiling pattern that is a quasi-crystalline approximant for 3-arm star polyphiles with unequal arm

  20. Defect detection for end surface of ferrite magnetic tile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiayuan; Wang, Yuwei; Wang, Keyi

    2016-09-01

    A visual automatic detection method is proposed for defect detection on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile to tackle the disadvantages generated by human work which has low efficiency and unstable accuracy. Because the defects on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile with dark colors and low contrasts are negative for defect detection, uniform illumination is provided by LED light source and a dedicated optical system is designed to extract defects conveniently. The approach uses comparison of the fitting and actual edge curves to detect defects mainly with most defects located on the edge. Firstly improved adaptive median filter is used as the image preprocessing. Subsequently the appropriate threshold is calculated by Otsu algorithm based on the extreme points in the gray-level histogram to segment the preprocessing image. Then the Sobel operator can be used to extract the edge of end surface precisely. Finally through comparing the ideal fitting and actual edge curves of end surface, to detect the defects with some relevant features. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme could detect defects on the end surface of ferrite magnetic tile efficiency and accurately with 93.33% accuracy rate, 2.30% false acceptance rate and 8.45% correct rejection rate.

  1. Characterization of Genomic Alterations in Radiation-Associated Breast Cancer among Childhood Cancer Survivors, Using Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Killian, J. Keith; Hammond, Sue; Burke, Laura S.; Bennett, Hunter; Wang, Yonghong; Davis, Sean R.; Strong, Louise C.; Neglia, Joseph; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Robison, Leslie L.; Bhatia, Smita; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Inskip, Peter D.; Meltzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29), had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26), estrogen receptor (ER)-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28), and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22). Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12). Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an “amplifier” genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25764003

  2. Identification of DNA copy-number aberrations by array-comparative genomic hybridization in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho Jin; Yim, Sung-Vin; Lee, Woon Kyu; Jeon, Yang-Whan; Kim, Young Hoon; Ko, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Kweon-Haeng; Han, Sang-Ick; Rha, Hyoung Kyun

    2006-06-02

    Chromosomal abnormalities are implicated as important markers for the pathogenesis in patients with schizophrenia. In this study, with using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), we analyzed DNA copy-number changes among 30 patients with schizophrenia. The most frequent changes were partial gain of Xq23 (52%) and loss of 3q13.12 (32%). Other frequent gains were found in: 1p, 6q, 10p, 11p, 11q, 14p, and 15q regions, and frequent losses were found in: 2p, 9q, 10q, 14q, 20q, and 22q regions. The set of abnormal regions was confirmed by real-time PCR (9q12, 9q34.2, 11p15.4, 14q32.33, 15q15.1, 22q11.21, and Xq23). All real-time PCR results were consistent with the array-CGH results. Therefore, it is suggested that array-CGH and real-time PCR analysis could be used as powerful tools in screening for schizophrenia-related genes. Our results might be useful for further exploration of candidate genomic regions in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  3. A customized high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization to explore copy number variations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    La Cognata, Valentina; Morello, Giovanna; Gentile, Giulia; D'Agata, Velia; Criscuolo, Chiara; Cavalcanti, Francesca; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder, was long believed to be a non-genetic sporadic syndrome. Today, only a small percentage of PD cases with genetic inheritance patterns are known, often complicated by reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. The few well-characterized Mendelian genes, together with a number of risk factors, contribute to the major sporadic forms of the disease, thus delineating an intricate genetic profile at the basis of this debilitating and incurable condition. Along with single nucleotide changes, gene-dosage abnormalities and copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant disease-causing mutations in PD. However, due to their size variability and to the quantitative nature of the assay, CNV genotyping is particularly challenging. For this reason, innovative high-throughput platforms and bioinformatics algorithms are increasingly replacing classical CNV detection methods. Here, we report the design strategy, development, validation and implementation of NeuroArray, a customized exon-centric high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) tailored to detect single/multi-exon deletions and duplications in a large panel of PD-related genes. This targeted design allows for a focused evaluation of structural imbalances in clinically relevant PD genes, combining exon-level resolution with genome-wide coverage. The NeuroArray platform may offer new insights in elucidating inherited potential or de novo structural alterations in PD patients and investigating new candidate genes.

  4. Improved blood culture identification by FilmArray in cultures from regional hospitals compared with teaching hospital cultures.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Bzdyl, Nicole; Chua, I-Ly Joanna; Urosevic, Nadezda M; Leung, Michael J; Geelhoed, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Rapid identification of bacteria isolated from blood cultures by direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is now in wide spread use in major centres but is not yet feasible in smaller hospital laboratories. A FilmArray multiplex PCR panel for blood culture isolate identification (BCID) provides an alternative approach to near point-of-care microbial identification in regional hospitals. We assessed the accuracy and time to identification of the BCID FilmArray in a consecutive series of 149 blood cultures from 143 patients in a teaching hospital and smaller regional hospitals, currently identified by direct MALDI-TOF and proprietary molecular methods. The BCID FilmArray contained 18 of 34 species and 20 of 23 species isolated from teaching and regional hospital, respectively. Overall, 85 % of the teaching hospital and 100 % of the regional hospital monomicrobial blood cultures were identified, compared with 60 and 68 %, respectively, for direct MALDI-TOF on the same cultures. There were no incorrect results from blood cultures containing Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterobacteriaceae. The three discrepant results were all in mixed cultures. The mean reduction in time to identification of blood culture isolates was 53 h, which did not include the time required to transport cultures from regional centres to a central laboratory. The overall performance of the BCID FilmArray is stronger in blood cultures from smaller regional hospitals that encounter a narrower range of bacterial species dominated by the commonest species. This approach is more suited to smaller clinical laboratories than the MALDI-TOF direct method.

  5. Tile drainage as karst: Conduit flow and diffuse flow in a tile-drained watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Helmers, M.

    2008-01-01

    The similarity of tiled-drained watersheds to karst drainage basins can be used to improve understanding of watershed-scale nutrient losses from subsurface tile drainage networks. In this study, short-term variations in discharge and chemistry were examined from a tile outlet collecting subsurface tile flow from a 963 ha agricultural watershed. Study objectives were to apply analytical techniques from karst springs to tile discharge to evaluate water sources and estimate the loads of agricultural pollutants discharged from the tile with conduit, intermediate and diffuse flow regimes. A two-member mixing model using nitrate, chloride and specific conductance was used to distinguish rainwater versus groundwater inputs. Results indicated that groundwater comprised 75% of the discharge for a three-day storm period and rainwater was primarily concentrated during the hydrograph peak. A contrasting pattern of solute concentrations and export loads was observed in tile flow. During base flow periods, tile flow consisted of diffuse flow from groundwater sources and contained elevated levels of nitrate, chloride and specific conductance. During storm events, suspended solids and pollutants adhered to soil surfaces (phosphorus, ammonium and organic nitrogen) were concentrated and discharged during the rapid, conduit flow portion of the hydrograph. During a three-day period, conduit flow occurred for 5.6% of the time but accounted for 16.5% of the total flow. Nitrate and chloride were delivered primarily with diffuse flow (more than 70%), whereas 80-94% of total suspended sediment, phosphorus and ammonium were exported with conduit and intermediate flow regimes. Understanding the water sources contributing to tile drainage and the manner by which pollutant discharge occurs from these systems (conduit, intermediate or diffuse flow) may be useful for designing, implementing and evaluating non-point source reduction strategies in tile-drained landscapes. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR-based aneuploidy screening of blastocyst biopsies.

    PubMed

    Capalbo, Antonio; Treff, Nathan R; Cimadomo, Danilo; Tao, Xin; Upham, Kathleen; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Rienzi, Laura; Scott, Richard T

    2015-07-01

    Comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) methods are being extensively used to select chromosomally normal embryos in human assisted reproduction. Some concerns related to the stage of analysis and which aneuploidy screening method to use still remain. In this study, the reliability of blastocyst-stage aneuploidy screening and the diagnostic performance of the two mostly used CCS methods (quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH)) has been assessed. aCGH aneuploid blastocysts were rebiopsied, blinded, and evaluated by qPCR. Discordant cases were subsequently rebiopsied, blinded, and evaluated by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array-based CCS. Although 81.7% of embryos showed the same diagnosis when comparing aCGH and qPCR-based CCS, 18.3% (22/120) of embryos gave a discordant result for at least one chromosome. SNP array reanalysis showed that a discordance was reported in ten blastocysts for aCGH, mostly due to false positives, and in four cases for qPCR. The discordant aneuploidy call rate per chromosome was significantly higher for aCGH (5.7%) compared with qPCR (0.6%; P<0.01). To corroborate these findings, 39 embryos were simultaneously biopsied for aCGH and qPCR during blastocyst-stage aneuploidy screening cycles. 35 matched including all 21 euploid embryos. Blinded SNP analysis on rebiopsies of the four embryos matched qPCR. These findings demonstrate the high reliability of diagnosis performed at the blastocyst stage with the use of different CCS methods. However, the application of aCGH can be expected to result in a higher aneuploidy rate than other contemporary methods of CCS.

  7. Dynamic Moire methods for detection of loosened space shuttle tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, W. L.; Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    1981-09-01

    Moire fringe methods for detecting loose space shuttle tiles were investigated with a test panel consisting of a loose tile surrounded by four securely bonded tiles. The test panel was excited from 20 to 150 Hz with in-plane sinusoidal acceleration of 2 g (peak). If the shuttle orbiter can be subjected to periodic excitation of 1 to 2 g (peak) and rigid-body periodic displacements do not mask the change in the Moire pattern due to tile looseness, then the use of projected Moire fringes to detect out-of-plane rockin appears to be the most viable indicator of tile looseness since no modifications to the tiles are required.

  8. Symmetry groups associated with tilings on a flat torus.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Mark L; De Las Peñas, Ma Louise Antonette N; Estrada, Grace M; Santoso, Eko Budi

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates symmetry and color symmetry properties of Kepler, Heesch and Laves tilings embedded on a flat torus and their geometric realizations as tilings on a round torus in Euclidean 3-space. The symmetry group of the tiling on the round torus is determined by analyzing relevant symmetries of the planar tiling that are transformed to axial symmetries of the three-dimensional tiling. The focus on studying tilings on a round torus is motivated by applications in the geometric modeling of nanotori and the determination of their symmetry groups.

  9. Development of Microplasma Arrays for High Efficiency Lighting Tiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    other three lamps. At this moment, the bill of materials ( BOM ) for the microplasma lamp is expected to be in the middle of LED fixtures and mercury...incorporates an internal spacer structure fabricated from various materials (currently from glass). Areal capacitance is the primary drawback of such...Mason ( Material Scientist), Youngwha Kim (Intern), Kyle Moon (Intern) B. University of Illinois (Subcontract) Prof. J. Gary Eden (Co-PI), Dr. Jin

  10. A Comparative Analysis for Verification of IMRT and VMAT Treatment Plans using a 2-D and 3-D Diode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, Michael J.

    With the added complexity of current radiation treatment dose delivery modalities such as IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) and VMAT (Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy), quality assurance (QA) of these plans become multifaceted and labor intensive. To simplify the patient specific quality assurance process, 2D or 3D diode arrays are used to measure the radiation fluence for IMRT and VMAT treatments which can then be quickly and easily compared against the planned dose distribution. Because the arrays that can be used for IMRT and VMAT patient-specific quality assurance are of different geometry (planar vs. cylindrical), the same IMRT or VMAT treatment plan measured by two different arrays could lead to different measured radiation fluences, regardless of the output and performance of linear accelerator. Thus, the purpose of this study is to compare patient specific QA results as measured by the MapCHECK 2 and ArcCHECK diode arrays for the same IMRT and VMAT treatment plans to see if one diode array consistently provides a closer comparison to reference data. Six prostate and three thoracic spine IMRT treatment plans as well as three prostate and three thoracic spine VMAT treatment plans were produced. Radiotherapy plans for this study were generated using the Pinnacle TPS v9.6 (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) using 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV x-ray beams from a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with a 120-millenium multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Each IMRT and VMAT therapy plan was measured on Sun Nuclear's MapCHECK 2 and ArcCHECK diode arrays. IMRT measured data was compared with planned dose distribution using Sun Nuclear's 3DVH quality assurance software program using gamma analysis and dose-volume histograms for target volumes and critical structures comparison. VMAT arc plans measured on the MapCHECK 2 and ArcCHECK were compared using beam-by-beam analysis with the gamma evaluation method with

  11. Male with mosaicism for supernumerary ring X chromosome: analysis of phenotype and characterization of genotype using array comparative genome hybridization.

    PubMed

    Baker, Peter R; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; Springer, Michelle; Swisshelm, Karen; March, Jennifer; Brown, Kathleen; Bellus, Gary

    2010-09-01

    Supernumerary, derivative, and ring X chromosomes are relatively common in Turner syndrome females but have been reported rarely in males. To date, less than 10 cases have been published, of which only 2 have been partially characterized in defining the breakpoints and genetic content of the derivative X chromosome. We describe a male with mosaicism for a supernumerary X chromosome (46,XY/47,XY, r(X)) who has multiple congenital anomalies, including features of craniofrontonasal dysplasia (Mendelian Inheritance in Man 304110) and the presence of ectopic female reproductive organs. Using comparative genomic hybridization array mapping, we determined that the derivative X is composed of a 24-Mb fragment that contains the regions Xp11.3 through Xq13.1 and lacks the XIST gene. This is the first report to describe a detailed molecular characterization of a ring X chromosome in a male by comparative genomic hybridization array analysis. We compare the clinical and molecular findings in this patient to other 46,XY, r(X) patients reported in the literature and discuss the potential role of disomy for known genes contained on the ring X chromosome.

  12. Clinical utility of array comparative genomic hybridization: uncovering tumor susceptibility in individuals with developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Adam, Margaret P; Justice, April N; Schelley, Susan; Kwan, Andrea; Hudgins, Louanne; Martin, Christa L

    2009-01-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization can determine genome-wide copy number alterations at the kilobase level. We highlight the clinical utility of microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization in determining tumor susceptibility in 3 patients with dysmorphic features and developmental delay, likely decreasing both morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  13. Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Simon , Langford, Alison A.

    1989-01-01

    U-shaped limiter tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners secured to a wall have two rods which engage L-shaped slots in the runners. The short receiving legs of the L-shaped slots are perpendicular to the wall and open away from the wall, while long retaining legs are parallel to and adjacent the wall. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the runners. Resilient contact strips between the parallel arms of the U-shaped tiles and the wall assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall.

  14. Crosslinking in viral capsids via tiling theory.

    PubMed

    Twarock, R; Hendrix, R W

    2006-06-07

    A vital part of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence protects the viral genome. It has been shown in Twarock [2004. A tiling approach to vius capsids assembly explaining a structural puzzle in virology. J. Theor. Biol. 226, 477-482] that the surface structures of viruses with icosahedrally symmetric capsids can be modelled in terms of tilings that encode the locations of the protein subunits. This theory is extended here to multi-level tilings in order to model crosslinking structures. The new framework is demonstrated for the case of bacteriophage HK97, and it is shown, how the theory can be used in general to decide if crosslinking, and what type of crosslinking, is compatible from a mathematical point of view with the geometrical surface structure of a virus.

  15. Improvement of PVC floor tiles by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, T. A.; Badenhorst, F.

    Gamma radiation presents a unique method of transforming highly plasticized PVC floor tiles, manufactured at high speed through injection moulding, into a high quality floor covering at a cost at least 30% less than similarly rated rubber tiles. A specially formulated PVC compound was developed in collaboration with a leading manufacturer of floor tiles. These tiles are gamma crosslinked in its shipping cartons to form a dimensionally stable product which is highly fire resistant and inert to most chemicals and solvents. The crosslinked tiles are more flexible than the highly filled conventional PVC floor tiles, scratch resistant and have a longer lifespan and increased colour fastness. These tiles are also less expensive to install than conventional rubber tiles.

  16. Recycling of Malaysia's electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste into heavy-duty green ceramic tile.

    PubMed

    Teo, Pao-Ter; Anasyida, Abu Seman; Basu, Projjal; Nurulakmal, Mohd Sharif

    2014-12-01

    flexural strength, lowest apparent porosity and water absorption of EAF slag based tile was attained at the composition of 40 wt.% EAF slag--30 wt.% ball clay--10 wt.% feldspar--20 wt.% silica. The properties of ceramic tile made with EAF slag waste (up to 40 wt.%), especially flexural strength are comparable to those of commercial ceramic tile and are, therefore, suitable as high flexural strength and heavy-duty green ceramic floor tile. Continuous development is currently underway to improve the properties of tile so that this recycling approach could be one of the potential effective, efficient and sustainable solutions in sustaining our nature.

  17. Comparative evaluation of the FilmArray meningitis/encephalitis molecular panel in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Graf, Erin H; Farquharson, Maria Victoria; Cárdenas, Ana María

    2017-01-01

    We compared an FDA cleared molecular meningitis/encephalitis panel to lab developed viral PCRs and bacterial culture. Of the 67 viral PCR or bacterial culture-positive samples, 92.5% were positive for the same target by the panel. Of the 66 negative samples tested, no targets were detected by the panel, for an agreement of 96.2%.

  18. Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

  19. 21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  20. 90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-21. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  1. Production and characterization of glazed tiles containing incinerated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Lin, D F; Chang, W C; Yuan, C; Luo, H L

    2008-01-01

    In this article, glaze with different colorants was applied to tile specimens manufactured by incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and clay. Improvements using different amounts of colorants, and glaze components and concentrations on tile bodies were investigated. Four different proportions of clay (by weight ratio) were replaced by ISSA. Tiles of size 12 cm x 6 cm x 1 cm were made and left in an electric furnace to make biscuit tiles at 800 degrees C. Afterwards, four colorants, Fe2O3 (red), V2O5 (yellow), CoCO3 (blue), and MnO2 (purple), and four different glaze concentrations were applied on biscuit tile specimens. These specimens were later sintered into glazed tiles at 1050 degrees C. The study shows that replacement of clay by sludge ash had adverse effects on properties of tiles. Water absorption increased and bending strength reduced with increased amounts of ash. However, both water absorption and bending strength improved for glazed ash tiles. Abrasion of grazed tiles reduced noticeably from 0.001 to 0.002 g. This implies glaze can enhance abrasion resistance of tiles. Effects like lightfastness and acid-alkali resistance improved as different glazes were applied on tiles. In general, red glazed tiles showed the most stable performance, followed by blue, yellow, and purple.

  2. Modeling of the Thermal Footprint at the Strike Point and Fast Thermocouples in Carbon Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygren, R. E.; Watkins, J. G.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Makowski, M. A.; Leonard, A. W.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal broadening can complicate interpretation of IR images at the strike point because the peaked profile of surface temperature widens as the tile heats due to lateral conduction away from the peak, so the instantaneous values of λq extracted from IR images increases during the shot. Detailed 3D thermal analyses of divertor tiles complement data from edge probes, fast thermocouples (FTCs) and IR thermography and aids interpretation. But the surface temperature reflects the integrated heat load over time, so changes in power or movement of the plasma complicates this interpretation. The array of 16 embedded FTCs in DIII-D divertor tiles are 8 mm below the surface.The poster focuses on the degree to which the FTCs can help resolve the absolute value of the surface temperature and the extracted profile of surface temperature and related peaked heat load.We include a series of detailed 3D thermal analyses of one DIII-D tile exposed to a (theoretical) peaked heat load characterized by the commonly-used two-parameter fit. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC04-94AL85000, DE-AC52-07N27344 & DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. Thermal-Structural Analysis of PICA Tiles for Solar Tower Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Empey, Daniel M.; Squire, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal protection materials used in spacecraft heatshields are subjected to severe thermal and mechanical loading environments during re-entry into earth atmosphere. In order to investigate the reliability of PICA tiles in the presence of high thermal gradients as well as mechanical loads, the authors designed and conducted solar-tower tests. This paper presents the design and analysis work for this tests series. Coupled non-linear thermal-mechanical finite element analyses was conducted to estimate in-depth temperature distribution and stress contours for various cases. The first set of analyses performed on isolated PICA tile showed that stresses generated during the tests were below the PICA allowable limit and should not lead to any catastrophic failure during the test. The tests results were consistent with analytical predictions. The temperature distribution and magnitude of the measured strains were also consistent with predicted values. The second test series is designed to test the arrayed PICA tiles with various gap-filler materials. A nonlinear contact method is used to model the complex geometry with various tiles. The analyses for these coupons predict the stress contours in PICA and inside gap fillers. Suitable mechanical loads for this architecture will be predicted, which can be applied during the test to exceed the allowable limits and demonstrate failure modes. Thermocouple and strain-gauge data obtained from the solar tower tests will be used for subsequent analyses and validation of FEM models.

  4. Development of a nondestructive vibration technique for bond assessment of Space Shuttle tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moslehy, Faissal A.

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes the achievements of the above titled project. The project is funded by NASA-KSC (Grant No. NAG 10-0117) for the period of 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1993. The purpose of this project was to develop a nondestructive, noncontact technique based on 'vibration signature' of tile systems to quantify the bond conditions of the thermal protection system) tiles of Space Shuttle orbiters. The technique uses a laser rapid scan system, modal measurements, and finite element modeling. Finite element models were developed for tiles bonded to both clamped and deformable integrated skin-stringer orbiter mid-fuselage. Results showed that the size and location of a disbonded tile can be determined from frequency and mode shape information. Moreover, a frequency response survey was used to quickly identify the disbonded tiles. The finite element results were compared with experimentally determined frequency responses of a 17-tile test panel, where a rapidscan laser system was employed. An excellent degree of correlation between the mathematical simulation and experimental results was realized. An inverse solution for single-tile assemblies was also derived and is being implemented into a computer program that can interact with the modal testing software. The output of the program displays the size and location of disbond. This program has been tested with simulated input (i.e., finite element data), and excellent agreement between predicted and simulated disbonds was shown. Finally, laser vibration imaging and acoustic emission techniques were shown to be well suited for detecting and monitoring the progressive damage in Graphite/Epoxy composite materials.

  5. Frequent deletion of the CDKN2A locus in chordoma: analysis of chromosomal imbalances using array comparative genomic hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Hallor, K H; Staaf, J; Jönsson, G; Heidenblad, M; Vult von Steyern, F; Bauer, H C F; IJszenga, M; Hogendoorn, P C W; Mandahl, N; Szuhai, K; Mertens, F

    2007-01-01

    The initiating somatic genetic events in chordoma development have not yet been identified. Most cytogenetically investigated chordomas have displayed near-diploid or moderately hypodiploid karyotypes, with several numerical and structural rearrangements. However, no consistent structural chromosome aberration has been reported. This is the first array-based study characterising DNA copy number changes in chordoma. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) identified copy number alterations in all samples and imbalances affecting 5 or more out of the 21 investigated tumours were seen on all chromosomes. In general, deletions were more common than gains and no high-level amplification was found, supporting previous findings of primarily losses of large chromosomal regions as an important mechanism in chordoma development. Although small imbalances were commonly found, the vast majority of these were detected in single cases; no small deletion affecting all tumours could be discerned. However, the CDKN2A and CDKN2B loci in 9p21 were homo- or heterozygously lost in 70% of the tumours, a finding corroborated by fluorescence in situ hybridisation, suggesting that inactivation of these genes constitute an important step in chordoma development. PMID:18071362

  6. Effects of chromosomal variations on pharmacokinetic activity of zolpidem in healthy volunteers: an array-based comparative genomic hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jin Soo; Park, E-Jin; Kang, Chin-Yang; Jeon, Yang-Whan; Lee, Kweon-Haeng; Rha, Hyoung Kyun; Han, Sang-Ick

    2007-05-18

    Zolpidem has been known as a very safe and effective hypnotic drug used to treat a variety of patients with insomnia. Even though the same dose of the medicine is administered to each patient, the blood level of zolpidem and the time required to obtain peak concentration are not consistent among different people. We evaluated the relationship between the peak concentrations of zolpidem and chromosomal imbalances using a high-resolution genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in 16 healthy volunteers in order to detect the genetic factors underlying the variations. The present study showed that chromosomal losses were detected in the 4q35.2, 9p13.1 and 9p12 regions, and those gains were indicated in the 2p14, 11q13.4 and 15q11.2 regions. The abnormal regions were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time PCR. It is suggested that array-CGH analysis may be used as a measure for pharmacogenomic applications in the patients with insomnia and for further exploration of candidate genomic regions implicated in sleep disturbances.

  7. Zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to detect germline rearrangements in cancer susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Johan; Borg, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Disease predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements, including deletions or duplications that are challenging, to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Such rearrangements range from single exons up to hundreds of kilobases of sequence in size. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has evolved as a powerful technique to detect copy number alterations on a genome-wide scale. However, the conventional genome-wide approach of aCGH still provides only limited information about copy number status for individual exons. Custom-designed aCGH arrays focused on only a few target regions (zoom-in aCGH) may circumvent this drawback. Benefits of zoom-in aCGH include the possibility to target almost any region in the genome, and an unbiased coverage of exonic and intronic sequence facilitating convenient design of primers for sequence determination of the breakpoints. Furthermore, zoom-in aCGH can be streamlined for a particular application, for example, focusing on breast cancer susceptibility genes, with increased capacity using multiformat design.

  8. Comparative Analysis on the Performance of a Short String of Series-Connected and Parallel-Connected Photovoltaic Array Under Partial Shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalekshmy, S.; Rama Iyer, S.; Beevi, Bisharathu

    2015-09-01

    The output power from the photovoltaic (PV) array decreases and the array exhibit multiple peaks when it is subjected to partial shading (PS). The power loss in the PV array varies with the array configuration, physical location and the shading pattern. This paper compares the relative performance of a PV array consisting of a short string of three PV modules for two different configurations. The mismatch loss, shading loss, fill factor and the power loss due to the failure in tracking of the global maximum power point, of a series string with bypass diodes and short parallel string are analysed using MATLAB/Simulink model. The performance of the system is investigated for three different conditions of solar insolation for the same shading pattern. Results indicate that there is considerable power loss due to shading in a series string during PS than in a parallel string with same number of modules.

  9. CFD-Predicted Tile Heating Bump Factors Due to Tile Overlay Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    2006-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics investigation of the Orbiter's Tile Overlay Repair (TOR) is performed to assess the aeroheating Damage Assessment Team's (DAT) existing heating correlation method for protuberance interference heating on the surrounding thermal protection system. Aerothermodynamic heating analyses are performed for TORs at the design reference damage locations body points 1800 and 1075 for a Mach 17.9 and a=39deg STS-107 flight trajectory point with laminar flow. Six different cases are considered. The computed peak heating bump factor on the surrounding tiles are below the DAT's heating bump factor values for smooth tile cases. However, for the uneven tiles cases the peak interference heating is shown to be considerably higher than the existing correlation prediction.

  10. Jagged Tiling for Intra-tile Parallelism and Fine-Grain Multithreading

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Sunil; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Marquez, Andres; Feo, John T.; Gao, Guang R.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we have developed a novel methodology that takes into consideration multithreaded many-core designs to better utilize memory/processing resources and improve memory residence on tileable applications. It takes advantage of polyhedral analysis and transformation in the form of PLUTO, combined with a highly optimized finegrain tile runtime to exploit parallelism at all levels. The main contributions of this paper include the introduction of multi-hierarchical tiling techniques that increases intra tile parallelism; and a data-flow inspired runtime library that allows the expression of parallel tiles with an efficient synchronization registry. Our current implementation shows performance improvements on an Intel Xeon Phi board up to 32.25% against instances produced by state-of-the-art compiler frameworks for selected stencil applications.

  11. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  12. TILE at Iowa: Adoption and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florman, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces a University of Iowa effort to enhance and support active learning pedagogies in technology-enhanced (TILE) classrooms and three elements that proved essential to the campus-wide adoption of those pedagogies. It then describes the impact of those professional development efforts on the curricula and cultures of three…

  13. L-Tromino Tiling of Multilated Chessboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An "n" x "n" chessboard is called deficient if one square is missing from any spot on the board. Can all deficient boards with a number of cells divisible by 3 be tiled by bent (or L-shaped) trominoes? The answer is yes, with exception of the order-5 board. This paper deals with the general problem plus numerous related puzzles and proofs…

  14. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D.

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  15. LSAMP, a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in human osteosarcomas, identified by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kresse, Stine H; Ohnstad, Hege O; Paulsen, Erik B; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Szuhai, Karoly; Serra, Massimo; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Myklebost, Ola; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A

    2009-08-01

    Osteosarcomas are the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, and almost all conventional osteosarcomas are high-grade tumors with complex karyotypes. We have examined DNA copy number changes in 36 osteosarcoma tumors and 20 cell lines using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. The most frequent minimal recurrent regions of gain identified in the tumor samples were in 1q21.2-q21.3 (78% of the samples), 1q21.3-q22 (78%), and 8q22.1 (72%). Minimal recurrent regions in 10q22.1-q22.2 (81%), 6q16.1 (67%), 13q14.2 (67%), and 13q21.1 (67%) were most frequently lost. A small region in 3q13.31 (2.1 Mb) containing the gene limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP) was frequently deleted (56%). LSAMP has previously been reported to be a candidate tumor suppressor gene in other cancer types. The deletion was validated using fluorescence in situ hybridization, and the expression level and promoter methylation status of LSAMP were investigated using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and methylation-specific PCR, respectively. LSAMP showed low expression compared to two normal bone samples in 6/15 tumors and 5/9 cell lines with deletion of 3q13.31, and also in 5/14 tumors and 3/11 cell lines with normal copy number or gain. Partial or full methylation of the investigated CpG island was identified in 3/30 tumors and 7/20 cell lines. Statistical analyses revealed that loss of 11p15.4-p15.3 and low expression of LSAMP (both P = 0.011) were significantly associated with poor survival. Our results show that LSAMP is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in osteosarcomas.

  16. Tile-based Level of Detail for the Parallel Age

    SciTech Connect

    Niski, K; Cohen, J D

    2007-08-15

    Today's PCs incorporate multiple CPUs and GPUs and are easily arranged in clusters for high-performance, interactive graphics. We present an approach based on hierarchical, screen-space tiles to parallelizing rendering with level of detail. Adapt tiles, render tiles, and machine tiles are associated with CPUs, GPUs, and PCs, respectively, to efficiently parallelize the workload with good resource utilization. Adaptive tile sizes provide load balancing while our level of detail system allows total and independent management of the load on CPUs and GPUs. We demonstrate our approach on parallel configurations consisting of both single PCs and a cluster of PCs.

  17. Salmonella and fecal indicator bacteria in tile waters draining poultry litter application fields in central Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, C.; Soupir, M.

    2012-12-01

    E. coli and enterococci are commonly used as pathogen indicators in surface waters. Along with these indicators, pathogenic Salmonella are prevalent in poultry litter, and have the potential to be transported from land-application areas to tile waters and ultimately to impact waters that are used for drinking-water and recreation. The fate and transport of these bacteria to drainage tiles from application fields, and the correlation of fecal indicator bacteria to pathogens in this setting, is poorly understood. In this field study, samples were obtained from poultry litter, soil, and drainage tile waters below chisel-plowed and no-till cornfields in central Iowa where poultry litter was applied each year in late spring prior to planting. Litter was applied at three different rates; commercial fertilizer with no litter, a low application rate based on the nitrogen requirements of the corn (PL1), and double the low rate (PL2). This site is characterized by low sloping (0-9%) Clarion and Nicollet soils, which are derived from glacial till. Samples were collected from April to September for three years (2010-12) when tiles were flowing. Record high precipitation fell during the sampling period in 2010, while 2011 and 2012 were exceptionally dry years at this location. Grab samples were taken directly from flowing tiles after every rainfall event (>2 cm in less than 24 hours) and samples were collected hourly throughout selected events using an automatic sampling device. Concentrations of E. coli, enterococci and Salmonella spp. were quantified by membrane filtration and growth on selective agars. Peak bacteria concentrations following rainfall events were often one order of magnitude higher in tile waters discharging from no-till plots, despite the smaller size and lower tile flow rates at these plots compared to the chisel-plowed plots. Bacteria concentrations regularly varied by two orders of magnitude in response to rainfall events. Bacteria transport via macropores

  18. A landsat data tiling and compositing approach optimized for change detection in the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Kurtis; Steinwand, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Annual disturbance maps are produced by the LANDFIRE program across the conterminous United States (CONUS). Existing LANDFIRE disturbance data from 1999 to 2010 are available and current efforts will produce disturbance data through 2012. A tiling and compositing approach was developed to produce bi-annual images optimized for change detection. A tiled grid of 10,000 × 10,000 30 m pixels was defined for CONUS and adjusted to consolidate smaller tiles along national borders, resulting in 98 non-overlapping tiles. Data from Landsat-5,-7, and -8 were re-projected to the tile extents, masked to remove clouds, shadows, water, and snow/ice, then composited using a cosine similarity approach. The resultant images were used in a change detection algorithm to determine areas of vegetation change. This approach enabled more efficient processing compared to using single Landsat scenes, by taking advantage of overlap between adjacent paths, and allowed an automated system to be developed for the entire process.

  19. A semi-analytical model for transient flow to a subsurface tile drain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, Jennifer S.; Haws, Nathan W.; Govindaraju, R. S.; Rao, P. Suresh C.

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to develop and test a semi-analytical model for event-based transient flow to a subsurface tile drain. A sharp-front theory was used to describe redistribution of infiltrated water in the vadose zone. New approximate analytical solutions in terms of Fourier series were sought for the Boussinesq equation describing subsurface saturated flow subject to time-dependent recharge. Both one and two-term solutions of the series approximation were compared with observed tile hydrograph data from the Purdue Water Quality Field Station (WQFS) in West Lafayette, Indiana. In general, the models were able to capture the peaks of the tile-drain hydrographs, as well as the times-to-peak and the times-of-initial-response to rainfall events. The models performed particularly well for rainfall events with single-burst hyetographs, and in the prediction of the first hydrograph peak from multiple-burst hyetographs, though subsequent peaks could not be captured as well. A further comparison of results from the one-term model with those from HYDRUS 2D suggested that the one-term model is adequate for estimating transient flow to a tile drain. The solution developed here holds promise for extension to larger watersheds where the hydrology is governed by tile drains.

  20. Bacillus subtilis RNase Y Activity In Vivo Analysed by Tiling Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Anna; Zig, Léna; Nicolas, Pierre; Putzer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    RNase Y is a key endoribonuclease affecting global mRNA stability in Bacillus subtilis. Its characterization provided the first evidence that endonucleolytic cleavage plays a major role in the mRNA metabolism of this organism. RNase Y shares important functional features with the RNA decay initiating RNase E from Escherichia coli, notably a similar cleavage specificity and a preference for 5′ monophosphorylated substrates. We used high-resolution tiling arrays to analyze the effect of RNase Y depletion on RNA abundance covering the entire genome. The data confirm that this endoribonuclease plays a key role in initiating the decay of a large number of mRNAs as well as non coding RNAs. The downstream cleavage products are likely to be degraded by the 5′ exonucleolytic activity of RNases J1/J2 as we show for a specific case. Comparison of the data with that of two other recent studies revealed very significant differences. About two thirds of the mRNAs upregulated following RNase Y depletion were different when compared to either one of these studies and only about 10% were in common in all three studies. This highlights that experimental conditions and data analysis play an important role in identifying RNase Y substrates by global transcriptional profiling. Our data confirmed already known RNase Y substrates and due to the precision and reproducibility of the profiles allow an exceptionally detailed view of the turnover of hundreds of new RNA substrates. PMID:23326572

  1. Comparing passive source localization and tracking approaches with a towed horizontal receiver array in an ocean waveguide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tran, Duong D; Ratilal, Purnima

    2013-11-01

    Approaches for instantaneous passive source localization using a towed horizontal receiver array in a random range-dependent ocean waveguide are examined. They include: (1) Moving array triangulation, (2) array invariant, (3) bearings-only target motion analysis in modified polar coordinates via the extended Kalman filter, and (4) bearings-migration minimum mean-square error. These methods are applied to localize and track a vertical source array deployed in the far-field of a towed horizontal receiver array during the Gulf of Maine 2006 Experiment. The source transmitted intermittent broadband pulses in the 300 to 1200 Hz frequency range. A nonlinear matched-filter kernel designed to replicate the acoustic signal measured by the receiver array is applied to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The source localization accuracy is found to be highly dependent on source-receiver geometry and the localization approach. For a relatively stationary source drifting at speeds much slower than the receiver array tow-speed, the mean source position can be estimated by moving array triangulation with less than 3% error near broadside direction. For a moving source, the Kalman filter method gives the best performance with 5.5% error. The array invariant is the best approach for localizing sources within the endfire beam of the receiver array with 7% error.

  2. Beautiful Math, Part 5: Colorful Archimedean Tilings from Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Peichang; Zhao, Weiguo; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    The art of tiling originated very early in the history of civilization. Almost every known human society has made use of tilings in some form or another. In particular, tilings using only regular polygons have great visual appeal. Decorated regular tilings with continuous and symmetrical patterns were widely used in decoration field, such as mosaics, pavements, and brick walls. In science, these tilings provide inspiration for synthetic organic chemistry. Building on previous CG&A “Beautiful Math” articles, the authors propose an invariant mapping method to create colorful patterns on Archimedean tilings (1-uniform tilings). The resulting patterns simultaneously have global crystallographic symmetry and local cyclic or dihedral symmetry.

  3. Degenerate polygonal tilings in simple animal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hočevar, A.; Ziherl, P.

    2009-07-01

    The salient feature of one-cell-thick epithelia is their en face view, which reveals the polygonal cross section of the close-packed prismatic cells. The physical mechanisms that shape these tissues were hitherto explored using theories based on cell proliferation, which were either entirely topological or included certain morphogenetic forces. But mitosis itself may not be instrumental in molding the tissue. We show that the structure of simple epithelia can be explained by an equilibrium model where energy-degenerate polygons in an entropy-maximizing tiling are described by a single geometric parameter encoding their inflatedness. The two types of tilings found numerically—ordered and disordered—closely reproduce the patterns observed in Drosophila, Hydra, and Xenopus and they generalize earlier theoretical results. Free of a specific cell self-energy, cell-cell interaction, and cell division kinetics, our model provides an insight into the universality of living and inanimate two-dimensional cellular structures.

  4. Mapping Signal Processing Kernels to Tiled Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    attractive alternatives to monolithic computer architecture designs because they allow a larger design to be built from smaller modules and limit the...Computer Architectures. ACM Transactions on Computer Systems, 2(4):289–308, November 1984. [12] Steven Swanson, Ken Michelson , Andrew Schwerin, and...Program MIT Lincoln LaboratoryHPEC 2004-3 JML 28 Sep 2004 Tiled Architectures • Monolithic single-chip architectures are becoming rare in the industry

  5. High-density tiling microarray analysis of the full transcriptional activity of yeast.

    PubMed

    David, Lior; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between DNA sequence variation and phenotypic variation in complex or quantitative traits is one of the major challenges in modern biology. We are witnessing a deluge of DNA sequence information and association studies of genetic polymorphisms with phenotypes of interest in families and populations. In addition, it has become clear that large portions of eukaryotic genomes beyond protein-coding genes are transcribed, generating numerous noncoding RNA (ncRNA) molecules whose functions remain mostly unknown.DNA oligonucleotide microarrays constitute a powerful technology for studying the expression of genes in different organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae tiling array presents a significant advance over previous array-based platforms. It has a high density of overlapping probes that start on average every 8 bp along each strand of the genome, enabling precise definition of transcript structure. Furthermore, the array includes probes specific for the polymorphic positions of another, distantly related yeast strain, allowing accurate measurement of allele-specific expression in a hybrid of the two strains. This technology thus allows high-resolution, quantitative, strand- and allele-specific measurements of transcription from a full eukaryotic genome. In this chapter, we describe the methods for extracting RNA, synthesizing first-strand cDNA, fragmenting, and labeling of samples for hybridization to the tiling array. Combining genome-wide information on variation in DNA sequence with variation in transcript structure and levels promises to increase our understanding of the genotype-to-phenotype relationship.

  6. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  7. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  8. Low Noise Performance Perspectives Of Wideband Aperture Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestenburg, E. E. M.; Kuenen, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    A general analysis of phased array noise properties and measurements, applied to one square meter tiles of the Thousand Element Array (THEA), has resulted in a procedure to define the noise budget for a THEA-tile (Woestenburg and Dijkstra, 2003). The THEA system temperature includes LNA and receiver noise, antenna connecting loss, noise coupling between antenna elements and other possible contributions. This paper discusses the various noise contributions to the THEA system temperature and identifies the areas where improvement can be realized. We will present better understanding of the individual noise contributions using measurements and analysis of single antenna/receiver elements. An improved design for a 1-m2 Low Noise Tile (LNT) will be discussed and optimized low noise performance for the LNT is presented. We will also give future perspectives of the noise performance for such tiles, in relation to the requirements for SKA in the 1 GHz frequency range.

  9. Genetic characterization of dogs via chromosomal analysis and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

    PubMed

    Müller, M H; Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H

    2012-01-01

    The results of cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic investigations revealed similarities in genetic background and biological behaviour between tumours and genetic diseases of humans and dogs. These findings classify the dog a good and accepted model for human cancers such as osteosarcomas, mammary carcinomas, oral melanomas and others. With the appearance of new studies and advances in canine genome sequencing, the number of known homologies in diseases between these species raised and still is expected to increase. In this context, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) provides a novel tool to rapidly characterize numerical aberrations in canine tumours or to detect copy number aberrations between different breeds. As it is possible to spot probes covering the whole genome on each chip to discover copy number aberrations of all chromosomes simultaneously, this method is time-saving and cost-effective - considering the relation of costs and the amount of data obtained. Complemented with traditional methods like karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, the aCGH is able to provide new insights into the underlying causes of canine carcinogenesis.

  10. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000–10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia. PMID:28018437

  11. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim; Yu, Jeesuk

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000-10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Human and Rodent Brain Primary Neuronal Culture Spontaneous Activity Using Micro-Electrode Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Obeid, Iyad

    2016-03-01

    Electrical activity in embryonic brain tissue has typically been studied using Micro Electrode Array (MEA) technology to make dozens of simultaneous recordings from dissociated neuronal cultures, brain stem cell progenitors, or brain slices from fetal rodents. Although these rodent neuronal primary culture electrical properties are mostly investigated, it has not been yet established to what extent the electrical characteristics of rodent brain neuronal cultures can be generalized to those of humans. A direct comparison of spontaneous spiking activity between rodent and human primary neurons grown under the same in vitro conditions using MEA technology has never been carried out before and will be described in the present study. Human and rodent dissociated fetal brain neuronal cultures were established in-vitro by culturing on a glass grid of 60 planar microelectrodes neurons under identical conditions. Three different cultures of human neurons were produced from tissue sourced from a single aborted fetus (at 16-18 gestational weeks) and these were compared with seven different cultures of embryonic rat neurons (at 18 gestational days) originally isolated from a single rat. The results show that the human and rodent cultures behaved significantly differently. Whereas the rodent cultures demonstrated robust spontaneous activation and network activity after only 10 days, the human cultures required nearly 40 days to achieve a substantially weaker level of electrical function. These results suggest that rat neuron preparations may yield inferences that do not necessarily transfer to humans.

  13. Comprehensive genome characterization of solitary fibrous tumors using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Finetti, Pascal; Adélaïde, José; Metellus, Philippe; Mokhtari, Karima; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Miquel, Catherine; Jouvet, Anne; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Pedeutour, Florence; Chaffanet, Max; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell tumors with limited therapeutic options. Their molecular basis is poorly known. No consistent cytogenetic abnormality has been reported. We used high-resolution whole-genome array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Agilent 244K oligonucleotide chips) to profile 47 samples, meningeal in >75% of cases. Few copy number aberrations (CNAs) were observed. Sixty-eight percent of samples did not show any gene CNA after exclusion of probes located in regions with referenced copy number variation (CNV). Only low-level CNAs were observed. The genomic profiles were very homogeneous among samples. No molecular class was revealed by clustering of DNA copy numbers. All cases displayed a "simplex" profile. No recurrent CNA was identified. Imbalances occurring in >20%, such as the gain of 8p11.23-11.22 region, contained known CNVs. The 13q14.11-13q31.1 region (lost in 4% of cases) was the largest altered region and contained the lowest percentage of genes with referenced CNVs. A total of 425 genes without CNV showed copy number transition in at least one sample, but only but only 1 in at least 10% of samples. The genomic profiles of meningeal and extra-meningeal cases did not show any differences.

  14. Using multivariate analyses to compare subsets of electrodes and potentials within an electrode array for predicting sugar concentrations in mixed solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, Christopher Lyle; Steen, William Arthur

    2008-04-01

    A non-selective electrode array is presented for the quantification of fructose, galactose, and glucose in mixed solutions. A unique feature of this electrode array relative to other published work is the wide diversity of electrode materials incorporated within the array, being constructed of 41 different metals and metal alloys. Cyclic voltammograms were acquired for solutions containing a single sugar at varying concentrations, and the correlation between current and sugar concentration was calculated as a function of potential and electrode array element. The correlation plots identified potential regions and electrodes that scaled most linearly with sugar concentration, and the number of electrodes used in building predictive models was reduced to 15. Partial least squares regression models relating electrochemical response to sugar concentration were constructed using data from single electrodes and multiple electrodes within the array, and the predictive abilities of these models were rigorously compared using a non-parametric Wilcoxon test. Models using single electrodes (Pt:Rh (90:10) for fructose, Au:Ni (82:18) for galactose, and Au for glucose) were judged to be statistically superior or indistinguishable from those built with multiple electrodes. Additionally, for each sugar, interval partial least squares regression successfully identified a subset of potentials within a given electrode that generated a model of statistically equivalent predictive ability relative to the full potential model. While including data from multiple electrodes offered no benefit in predicting sugar concentration, use of the array afforded the versatility and flexibility of selecting the best single electrode for each sugar.

  15. Array-comparative genomic hybridization profiling of immunohistochemical subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma shows distinct genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ying; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Miyata, Tomoko; Ohshima, Koichi; Seto, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) displays striking heterogeneity at the clinical, genetic and molecular levels. Subtypes include germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL and activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, according to microarray analysis, and germinal center type or non-germinal center type by immunohistochemistry. Although some reports have described genomic aberrations based upon microarray classification system, genomic aberrations based upon immunohistochemical classifications have rarely been reported. The present study aimed to ascertain the relationship between genomic aberrations and subtypes identified by immunohistochemistry, and to study the pathogenetic character of Chinese DLBCL. We conducted immunohistochemistry using antibodies against CD10, BCL6 and MUM1 in 59 samples of DLBCL from Chinese patients, and then performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization for each case. Characteristic genomic differences were found between GCB and non-GCB DLBCL from the array data. The GCB type was characterized by more gains at 7q (7q22.1, P < 0.05) and losses at 16q (P ≤ 0.05), while the non-GCB type was characterized by gains at 11q24.3 and 3q13.2 (P < 0.05). We found completely different mutations in BCL6+ and BCL6− non-GCB type DLBCL, whereby the BCL6− group had a higher number of gains at 1q and a loss at 14q32.13 (P ≤ 0.005), while the BCL6+ group showed a higher number of gains at 14q23.1 (P = 0.15) and losses at 6q (P = 0.07). The BCL6− group had a higher frequency of genomic imbalances compared to the BCL6+ group. In conclusion, the BCL6+ and BCL6− non-GCB type of DLBCL appear to have different mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:24843885

  16. 55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED THE CUTTERS INTO SLABS OF CLAY, LIFTED THEM ONTO DRYING BOARDS AND PRESSED THE PLUNGERS TO RELEASE THE CUT TILES. REPRODUCTIONS CUTTERS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. WOODEN FORMS FOR PRODUCING CLAY SLABS WITH ROLLING PINS REST AGAINST THE WALL. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  17. NASA TileWorld manual (system version 2.2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philips, Andrew B.; Bresina, John L.

    1991-01-01

    The commands are documented of the NASA TileWorld simulator, as well as providing information about how to run it and extend it. The simulator, implemented in Common Lisp with Common Windows, encodes a particular range in a spectrum of domains, for controllable research experiments. TileWorld consists of a two dimensional grid of cells, a set of polygonal tiles, and a single agent which can grasp and move tiles. In addition to agent executable actions, there is an external event over which the agent has not control; this event correspond to a 'gust of wind'.

  18. Aneuploidy screening by array comparative genomic hybridization improves success rates of in vitro fertilization: A multicenter Indian study

    PubMed Central

    Kotdawala, Aditi; Patel, Deven; Herrero, Javier; Khajuria, Rajni; Mahajan, Nalini; Banker, Manish

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in the Indian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective, multicenter study including 235 PGS cycles following intracytoplasmic sperm injection performed at six different infertility centers from September 2013 to June 2015. Patients were divided as per maternal age in several groups (<35, 35–36, 37–38, 39–40, and >40 years) and as per indication for undergoing PGS. Indications for performing PGS were recurrent miscarriage, repetitive implantation failure, severe male factor, previous trisomic pregnancy, and advanced maternal age (≥35). Day 3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day 5 embryo transfer in the same cycle or the following cycle. Outcomes such as pregnancy rates (PRs)/transfer, implantation rates, miscarriage rates, percentage of abnormal embryos, and number of embryos with more than one aneuploidy and chaotic patterns were recorded for all the treated subjects based on different age and indication groups. RESULTS: aCGH helped in identifying aneuploid embryos, thus leading to consistent implantation (range: 33.3%–42.9%) and PRs per transfer (range: 31.8%–54.9%) that were obtained for all the indications in all the age groups, after performing PGS. CONCLUSION: Aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation. aCGH can be successfully employed for screening of aneuploid embryos. When euploid embryos are transferred, an increase in PRs can be achieved irrespective of the age or the indication. PMID:28216909

  19. Spectrum of Cytogenomic Abnormalities Revealed by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization on Products of Conception Culture Failure and Normal Karyotype Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Wu, Shen-Yin; Amato, Katherine; DiAdamo, Autumn; Li, Peining

    2016-03-20

    Approximately 30% of pregnancies after implantation end up in spontaneous abortions, and 50% of them are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. However, the spectrum of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in products of conception (POC) and the underlying gene-dosage-sensitive mechanisms causing spontaneous abortions remain largely unknown. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was performed as a salvage procedure for 128 POC culture failure (POC-CF) samples and as a supplemental procedure for 106 POC normal karyotype (POC-NK) samples. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 10% of POC-CF and pathogenic CNVs were detected in 3.9% of POC-CF and 5.7% of POC-NK samples. Compiled results from this study and relevant case series through a literature review demonstrated an abnormality detection rate (ADR) of 35% for chromosomal abnormalities in POC-CF samples, 3.7% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-CF samples, and 4.6% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-NK samples. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed on the genes from pathogenic CNVs found in POC samples. The denoted primary gene networks suggested that apoptosis and cell proliferation pathways are involved in miscarriage. In summary, a similar spectrum of cytogenomic abnormalities was observed in POC culture success and POC-CF samples. A threshold effect correlating the number of dosage-sensitive genes in a chromosome with the observed frequency of autosomal trisomy is proposed. A rationalized approach using firstly fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing with probes of chromosomes X/Y/18, 13/21, and 15/16/22 for common aneuploidies and polyploidies and secondly aCGH for other cytogenomic abnormalities is recommended for POC-CF samples.

  20. Model-based analysis of two-color arrays (MA2C)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun S; Johnson, W Evan; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Wei; Manrai, Arjun K; Liu, Jun S; Chen, Runsheng; Liu, X Shirley

    2007-01-01

    A novel normalization method based on the GC content of probes is developed for two-color tiling arrays. The proposed method, together with robust estimates of the model parameters, is shown to perform superbly on published data sets. A robust algorithm for detecting peak regions is also formulated and shown to perform well compared to other approaches. The tools have been implemented as a stand-alone Java program called MA2C, which can display various plots of statistical analysis for quality control. PMID:17727723

  1. Comparative study of multimode CYTOP graded index and single-mode silica fibre Bragg grating array for the mode shape capturing of a free-free metal beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodosiou, A.; Polis, M.; Lacraz, A.; Kalli, K.; Komodromos, M.; Stassis, A.

    2016-04-01

    The work described in this paper involved two different material fibre Bragg grating (FBG) arrays, investigating their performance as quasi-distributed sensors by capturing the vibrating response of a free-free metal beam close to its resonance frequencies. A six meter length of low-loss, gradient-index, multimode CYTOP fibre and of SMF-28 were used for the inscription of multiple FBG sensors using a femtosecond laser inscription method. The FBG arrays were multiplexed in the wavelength domain using a high-speed commercial demodulator, from which we recovered wavelengthand time-dependent displacement information. We compared the vibration response of the two arrays and using a novel computation algorithm we extract the first mode shape of the free-free metal beam that was exited at its first resonance frequency using a vibrating force.

  2. Event Processing for Modular Gamma Cameras with Tiled Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Salçın, Esen; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are good candidates as light sensors for a new generation of modular scintillation cameras for Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Positron emission tomography (PET) applications. MAPMTs can provide improved intrinsic spatial resolution (<1mm) compared to arrays of larger individual PMTs due to their small anode sizes, and the increased number of channels also allows accurate estimation of depth-of-interaction (DOI). However, the area of a single MAPMT module is small for a modular gamma camera, so we are designing read-out electronics that will allow multiple individual MAPMT modules to be optically coupled to a single monolithic scintillator crystal. In order to allow such flexibility, the read-out electronics, which we refer to as the event processor, must be compact and adaptable. In combining arrays of MAPMTs, which may each have 64 to 1024 anodes per unit, issues need to be overcome with amplifying, digitizing, and recording potentially very large numbers of channels per gamma-ray event. In this study, we have investigated different event-processor strategies for gamma cameras with multiple MAPMTs that will employ maximum-likelihood (ML) methods for estimation of 3D spatial location, deposited energy and time of occurrence of events. We simulated anode signals for hypothetical gamma–camera geometries based on models of the stochastic processes inherent in scintillation cameras. The comparison between different triggering and read-out schemes was carried out by quantifying the information content in the anode signals via the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM). We observed that a decline in spatial resolution at the edges of the individual MAPMTs could be improved by the inclusion of neighboring MAPMT anode signals for events near the tiling boundaries. Thus in order to maintain spatial resolution uniformity throughout the modular camera face, we propose dividing an MAPMT’s array of anode signals

  3. Large field-of-view tiled grating structures for X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Tobias J.; Koch, Frieder J.; Meyer, Pascal; Kunka, Danays; Meiser, Jan; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; De Marco, Fabio; Herzen, Julia; Noel, Peter; Yaroshenko, Andre; Hofmann, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Mohr, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    X-ray grating-based interferometry promises unique new diagnostic possibilities in medical imaging and materials analysis. To transfer this method from scientific laboratories or small-animal applications to clinical radiography applications, compact setups with a large field of view (FoV) are required. Currently the FoV is limited by the grating area, which is restricted due to the complex manufacturing process. One possibility to increase the FoV is tiling individual grating tiles to create one large area grating mounted on a carrier substrate. We investigate theoretically the accuracy needed for a tiling process in all degrees of freedom by applying a simulation approach. We show how the resulting precision requirements can be met using a custom-built frame for exact positioning. Precise alignment is achieved by comparing the fringe patterns of two neighboring grating tiles in a grating interferometer. With this method, the FoV can be extended to practically any desired length in one dimension. First results of a phase-contrast scanning setup with a full FoV of 384 mm × 24 mm show the suitability of this method.

  4. Photographing Shuttle Thermal Tiles in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. The mission's third and final Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) included taking a close-up look and the repair of the damaged heat shield. Gap fillers were removed from between the orbiter's heat-shielding tiles located on the craft's underbelly. Never before had any repairs been done to an orbiter while still in space. This particular photo was taken by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, whose shadow is visible on the thermal protection tiles.

  5. Computerized Machine for Cutting Space Shuttle Thermal Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Luis E.; Reuter, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    A report presents the concept of a machine aboard the space shuttle that would cut oversized thermal-tile blanks to precise sizes and shapes needed to replace tiles that were damaged or lost during ascent to orbit. The machine would include a computer-controlled jigsaw enclosed in a clear acrylic shell that would prevent escape of cutting debris. A vacuum motor would collect the debris into a reservoir and would hold a tile blank securely in place. A database stored in the computer would contain the unique shape and dimensions of every tile. Once a broken or missing tile was identified, its identification number would be entered into the computer, wherein the cutting pattern associated with that number would be retrieved from the database. A tile blank would be locked into a crib in the machine, the shell would be closed (proximity sensors would prevent activation of the machine while the shell was open), and a "cut" command would be sent from the computer. A blade would be moved around the crib like a plotter, cutting the tile to the required size and shape. Once the tile was cut, an astronaut would take a space walk for installation.

  6. Low-Density, Aerogel-Filled Thermal-Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Maryann; Heng, Vann; Barney, Andrea; Oka, Kris; Droege, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel fillings have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop low-density thermal-insulation tiles that, relative to prior such tiles, have greater dimensional stability (especially less shrinkage), equal or lower thermal conductivity, and greater strength and durability. In preparation for laboratory tests of dimensional and thermal stability, prototypes of aerogel-filled versions of recently developed low-density tiles have been fabricated by impregnating such tiles to various depths with aerogel formations ranging in density from 1.5 to 5.6 lb/ft3 (about 53 to 200 kg/cu m). Results available at the time of reporting the information for this article showed that the thermal-insulation properties of the partially or fully aerogel- impregnated tiles were equivalent or superior to those of the corresponding non-impregnated tiles and that the partially impregnated tiles exhibited minimal (<1.5 percent) shrinkage after multiple exposures at a temperature of 2,300 F (1,260 C). Latest developments have shown that tiles containing aerogels at the higher end of the density range are stable after multiple exposures at the said temperature.

  7. Drainage water management effects on tile discharge and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) fluxes from tile drained watersheds have been implicated in water quality studies of the Mississippi River Basin, but the contribution of tile drains to N export in headwater watersheds is not well understood. The objective of this study was to ascertain seasonal and annual contribution...

  8. Creative Tiling: A Story of 1000-and-1 Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Darwish, Nasir

    2012-01-01

    We describe a procedure that utilizes symmetric curves for building artistic tiles. One particular curve was found to mesh nicely with hundreds other curves, resulting in eye-catching tiling designs. The results of our work serve as a good example of using ideas from 2-D graphics and algorithms in a practical web-based application.

  9. Future Armor Tiles MIL-STD-166O Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC), Validation Engineering Division, was tasked by DAC to conduct MIL- STD -1660 tests on armor tile...containers on a wooden pallet. This report contains test results with the armor tile containers on a wooden pallet meeting MIL- STD -1660, Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads, requirements.

  10. Highly Symmetric and Congruently Tiled Meshes for Shells and Domes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Muhibur; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2016-01-01

    We describe the generation of all possible shell and dome shapes that can be uniquely meshed (tiled) using a single type of mesh face (tile), and following a single meshing (tiling) rule that governs the mesh (tile) arrangement with maximal vertex, edge and face symmetries. Such tiling arrangements or congruently tiled meshed shapes, are frequently found in chemical forms (fullerenes or Bucky balls, crystals, quasi-crystals, virus nano shells or capsids), and synthetic shapes (cages, sports domes, modern architectural facades). Congruently tiled meshes are both aesthetic and complete, as they support maximal mesh symmetries with minimal complexity and possess simple generation rules. Here, we generate congruent tilings and meshed shape layouts that satisfy these optimality conditions. Further, the congruent meshes are uniquely mappable to an almost regular 3D polyhedron (or its dual polyhedron) and which exhibits face-transitive (and edge-transitive) congruency with at most two types of vertices (each type transitive to the other). The family of all such congruently meshed polyhedra create a new class of meshed shapes, beyond the well-studied regular, semi-regular and quasi-regular classes, and their duals (platonic, Catalan and Johnson). While our new mesh class is infinite, we prove that there exists a unique mesh parametrization, where each member of the class can be represented by two integer lattice variables, and moreover efficiently constructable. PMID:27563368

  11. High-resolution mapping of genotype-phenotype relationships in cri du chat syndrome using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Snijders, Antoine; Segraves, Richard; Zhang, Xiuqing; Niebuhr, Anita; Albertson, Donna; Yang, Huanming; Gray, Joe; Niebuhr, Erik; Bolund, Lars; Pinkel, Dan

    2005-02-01

    We have used array comparative genomic hybridization to map DNA copy-number changes in 94 patients with cri du chat syndrome who had been carefully evaluated for the presence of the characteristic cry, speech delay, facial dysmorphology, and level of mental retardation (MR). Most subjects had simple deletions involving 5p (67 terminal and 12 interstitial). Genotype-phenotype correlations localized the region associated with the cry to 1.5 Mb in distal 5p15.31, between bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing markers D5S2054 and D5S676; speech delay to 3.2 Mb in 5p15.32-15.33, between BACs containing D5S417 and D5S635; and the region associated with facial dysmorphology to 2.4 Mb in 5p15.2-15.31, between BACs containing D5S208 and D5S2887. These results overlap and refine those reported in previous publications. MR depended approximately on the 5p deletion size and location, but there were many cases in which the retardation was disproportionately severe, given the 5p deletion. All 15 of these cases, approximately two-thirds of the severely retarded patients, were found to have copy-number aberrations in addition to the 5p deletion. Restriction of consideration to patients with only 5p deletions clarified the effect of such deletions and suggested the presence of three regions, MRI-III, with differing effect on retardation. Deletions including MRI, a 1.2-Mb region overlapping the previously defined cri du chat critical region but not including MRII and MRIII, produced a moderate level of retardation. Deletions restricted to MRII, located just proximal to MRI, produced a milder level of retardation, whereas deletions restricted to the still-more proximal MRIII produced no discernible phenotype. However, MR increased as deletions that included MRI extended progressively into MRII and MRIII, and MR became profound when all three regions were deleted.

  12. High-resolution mapping of genotype-phenotype relationships in cridu chat syndrome using array comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Snijders, Antoine; Segraves, Richard; Zhang,Xiuqing; Niebuhr, Anita; Albertson, Donna; Yang, Huanming; Gray, Joe; Niebuhr, Erik; Bolund, Lars; Pinkel, Dan

    2007-07-03

    We have used array comparative genomic hybridization to map DNA copy-number changes in 94 patients with cri du chat syndrome who had been carefully evaluated for the presence of the characteristic cry, speech delay, facial dysmorphology, and level of mental retardation (MR). Most subjects had simple deletions involving 5p (67 terminal and 12 interstitial). Genotype-phenotype correlations localized the region associated with the cry to 1.5 Mb in distal 5p15.31, between bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing markers D5S2054 and D5S676; speech delay to 3.2 Mb in 5p15.32-15.33, between BACs containing D5S417 and D5S635; and the region associated with facial dysmorphology to 2.4 Mb in 5p15.2-15.31, between BACs containing D5S208 and D5S2887. These results overlap and refine those reported in previous publications. MR depended approximately on the 5p deletion size and location, but there were many cases in which the retardation was disproportionately severe, given the 5p deletion. All 15 of these cases, approximately two-thirds of the severely retarded patients, were found to have copy-number aberrations in addition to the 5p deletion. Restriction of consideration to patients with only 5p deletions clarified the effect of such deletions and suggested the presence of three regions, MRI-III, with differing effect on retardation. Deletions including MRI, a 1.2-Mb region overlapping the previously defined cri du chat critical region but not including MRII and MRIII, produced a moderate level of retardation. Deletions restricted to MRII, located just proximal to MRI, produced a milder level of retardation, whereas deletions restricted to the still-more proximal MRIII produced no discernible phenotype. However, MR increased as deletions that included MRI extended progressively into MRII and MRIII, and MR became profound when all three regions were deleted.

  13. [Respiratory viral diagnosis by using an automated system of multiplex PCR (FilmArray) compared to conventional methods].

    PubMed

    Marcone, Débora N; Carballal, Guadalupe; Ricarte, Carmen; Echavarria, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, which are commonly caused by viruses, are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In Argentina, national surveillance programs for the detection of respiratory viruses are usually performed by using immunofluorescence (IF) assays, although it is well known that molecular methods are more sensitive. An automated multiplex PCR device, the FilmArray-Respiratory Panel (FilmArray-RP), can detect 17 viral and 3 bacterial pathogens in a closed system that requires only 5 min of hands-on time and 1h of instrumentation time. A total of 315 respiratory samples from children under 6 years of age suffering from acute respiratory infections, were studied by IF for 8 respiratory viruses and by RT-PCR for rhinoviruses. Later, these samples were tested by the FilmArray-RP. The positivity frequency obtained for the 9 viruses tested was 75% by IF/RT-PCR and 92% by the FilmArray-RP. The positive and negative percent agreement between both methods was 70.5% whereas the negative percent agreement was 99.6% (95% confidence interval:65.5-75.1 and 99.2-99.8 respectively). The FilmArray-RP allowed a higher positive diagnosis (97%) and detected other viruses such as coronavirus NL63, 229E, OC43, HKU1 (10%) and bocavirus (18%). In addition, this method identified multiple coinfections (39%) with 2, 3, 4 and up to 5 different viruses. At present, IF is still the most frequently used method in most Latin American countries for respiratory viruses diagnosis due to its low cost, its capability to process a high number of samples simultaneously and the fast determination of results for the most frequent viruses, which are available within 5h. However, the coming incorporation of molecular methods in routine procedures will significantly increase the diagnostic yield of these infections.

  14. Enthalpy arrays

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Francisco E.; Kuhn, Peter; De Bruyker, Dirk; Bell, Alan G.; Wolkin, Michal V.; Peeters, Eric; Williamson, James R.; Anderson, Gregory B.; Schmitz, Gregory P.; Recht, Michael I.; Schweizer, Sandra; Scott, Lincoln G.; Ho, Jackson H.; Elrod, Scott A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Lerner, Richard A.; Bruce, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    We report the fabrication of enthalpy arrays and their use to detect molecular interactions, including protein–ligand binding, enzymatic turnover, and mitochondrial respiration. Enthalpy arrays provide a universal assay methodology with no need for specific assay development such as fluorescent labeling or immobilization of reagents, which can adversely affect the interaction. Microscale technology enables the fabrication of 96-detector enthalpy arrays on large substrates. The reduction in scale results in large decreases in both the sample quantity and the measurement time compared with conventional microcalorimetry. We demonstrate the utility of the enthalpy arrays by showing measurements for two protein–ligand binding interactions (RNase A + cytidine 2′-monophosphate and streptavidin + biotin), phosphorylation of glucose by hexokinase, and respiration of mitochondria in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupler. PMID:15210951

  15. Array comparative genomic hybridisation analysis of boys with X linked hypopituitarism identifies a 3.9 Mb duplicated critical region at Xq27 containing SOX3

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, N; Ross, S; Morgan, T; Belsky, J; Hol, F; Karnes, P; Hopwood, N; Myers, S; Tan, A; Warne, G; Forrest, S; Thomas, P

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) is a powerful method that detects alteration of gene copy number with greater resolution and efficiency than traditional methods. However, its ability to detect disease causing duplications in constitutional genomic DNA has not been shown. We developed an array CGH assay for X linked hypopituitarism, which is associated with duplication of Xq26–q27. Methods: We generated custom BAC/PAC arrays that spanned the 7.3 Mb critical region at Xq26.1–q27.3, and used them to search for duplications in three previously uncharacterised families with X linked hypopituitarism. Results: Validation experiments clearly identified Xq26–q27 duplications that we had previously mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Array CGH analysis of novel XH families identified three different Xq26–q27 duplications, which together refine the critical region to a 3.9 Mb interval at Xq27.2–q27.3. Expression analysis of six orthologous mouse genes from this region revealed that the transcription factor Sox3 is expressed at 11.5 and 12.5 days after conception in the infundibulum of the developing pituitary and the presumptive hypothalamus. Discussion: Array CGH is a robust and sensitive method for identifying X chromosome duplications. The existence of different, overlapping Xq duplications in five kindreds indicates that X linked hypopituitarism is caused by increased gene dosage. Interestingly, all X linked hypopituitarism duplications contain SOX3. As mutation of this gene in human beings and mice results in hypopituitarism, we hypothesise that increased dosage of Sox3 causes perturbation of pituitary and hypothalamic development and may be the causative mechanism for X linked hypopituitarism. PMID:15342697

  16. Initial Results from the BRAHMS Multiplicity Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, H.

    2000-10-01

    The BRAHMS Multiplicity Array is one of three systems used to characterize the centrality of RHIC collisions at the BRAHMS experiment. Together, these systems, which also include the Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) and Beam-Beam Counter arrays, provide a global characterization of particle multiplicities, with the Multiplicity Array (-2.2<η<2.2) and Beam-Beam Arrays (3.2 <= |η|<= 4.3 ) sensitive to charged-particle multiplicity distributions over a large range of pseudorapidity η, and the ZDC measuring neutron distributions along the beam axis. The Multiplicity Array consists of an inner barrel of 24 modestly segmented Si Strip detectors and an outer barrel of 38 plastic scintillator tiles in a collinear arrangement about the beam axis. This talk will discuss some of the physics to be explored with the Multiplicity Array and present initial results obtained with the array during the first RHIC running period.

  17. Tile-in-ONE: A web platform which integrates Tile Calorimeter data quality and calibration assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivolella, A.; Ferreira, F.; Maidantchik, C.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Burghgrave, B.; Smirnov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter collaboration assesses the quality of calibration data in order to ensure its proper operation. A number of tasks is then performed by executing several tools and accessing web systems, which were independently developed to meet distinct collaboration's requirements and do not necessarily are connected with each other. Thus, to attend the collaboration needs, several programs are usually implemented without a global perspective of the detector, requiring basic software features. In addition, functionalities may overlap in their objectives and frequently replicate resources retrieval mechanisms. Tile-in-ONE is a designed and implemented platform that assembles various web systems used by the calorimeter community through a single framework and a standard technology. It provides an infrastructure to support the code implementation, avoiding duplication of work while integrating with an overall view of the detector status. Database connectors smooth the process of information access since developers do not need to be aware of where records are placed and how to extract them. Within the environment, a dashboard stands for a particular Tile operation aspect and gets together plug-ins, i.e. software components that add specific features to an existing application. A server contains the platform core, which represents the basic environment to deal with the configuration, manage user settings and load plug-ins at runtime. A web middleware assists users to develop their own plug-ins, perform tests and integrate them into the platform as a whole. Backends are employed to allow that any type of application is interpreted and displayed in a uniform way. This paper describes Tile-in-ONE web platform.

  18. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Xu; Pan, Hong; Li, Lin; Wu, Hai-Rong; Wang, Song-Tao; Bao, Xin-Hua; Jiang, Yu-Wu; Qi, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene syndrome that is typically caused by a deletion of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 4. However, there are few reports about the features of Chinese WHS patients. This study aimed to characterize the clinical and molecular cytogenetic features of Chinese WHS patients using the combination of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Methods: Clinical information was collected from ten patients with WHS. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the patients. The deletions were analyzed by MLPA and array CGH. Results: All patients exhibited the core clinical symptoms of WHS, including severe growth delay, a Greek warrior helmet facial appearance, differing degrees of intellectual disability, and epilepsy or electroencephalogram anomalies. The 4p deletions ranged from 2.62 Mb to 17.25 Mb in size and included LETM1, WHSC1, and FGFR3. Conclusions: The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype. PMID:26960370

  19. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a patient with partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young Bae; Yun, Jun No; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Moon Sung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Partial trisomy 8q is rare and has distinctive clinical features, including severe mental retardation, growth impairment, dysmorphic facial appearances, cleft palate, congenital heart disease, and urogenital anomalies. Partial monosomy 13q is a rare genetic disorder displaying a variety of phenotypic characteristics including mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and congenital anomalies. Here, we describe for the first time clinical observations and cytogenetic analysis of a patient with a concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy of 8q (8q21.3→qter) and partial monosomy 13q(13q34→qter). The patient was a female neonate with facial dysmorphia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cleft palate, and congenital heart disease. G-band standard karyotype was 46,XX,add(13)(q34). To determine the origin of additional genomic gain in chromosome 13, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed. Array CGH showed a 56.8 Mb sized gain on chromosome 8q and a 0.28 Mb sized loss on chromosome 13q. Therefore, the final karyotype of the patient was defined as 46,XX, der(13)t(8;13)(q21.3;q34). In conclusion, we described the clinical and cytogenetic analysis of the patient with concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array CGH. This report suggests that the array CGH would be a valuable diagnostic tool for identifying the origin of small additional genetic materials.

  20. Floor tile and mastic removal project report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    A test program was developed and coordinated with State and Federal Regulators and carried out at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. This program was carefully designed to create the worst conditions in order to evaluate whether asbestos fibers are released when asbestos containing floor tile and mastic are removed. There were over 1,000 samples taken and analyzed during the execution of the program. The conclusions reached were based upon analysis of the critical samples using the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) technology. Additionally, the TEM procedures were used to evaluate personnel samples to determine whether those fibers found were asbestos or other materials. Most of the (TEM) samples were analyzed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio.

  1. Tile-Compressed FITS Kernel for IRAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.

    2011-07-01

    The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is a ubiquitously supported standard of the astronomical community. Similarly, the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF), developed by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, is a widely used astronomical data reduction package. IRAF supplies compatibility with FITS format data through numerous tools and interfaces. The most integrated of these is IRAF's FITS image kernel that provides access to FITS from any IRAF task that uses the basic IMIO interface. The original FITS kernel is a complex interface of purpose-built procedures that presents growing maintenance issues and lacks recent FITS innovations. A new FITS kernel is being developed at NOAO that is layered on the CFITSIO library from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The simplified interface will minimize maintenance headaches as well as add important new features such as support for the FITS tile-compressed (fpack) format.

  2. Exclusion of APC and VHL gene deletions by array-based comparative hybridization in two patients with microscopically visible chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert J; Brooks, Susan Sklower; Streck, Deanna L; Kurvathi, Rohini; Toruner, Gokce A

    2007-10-15

    Karyotyping is a major component of the genetic work-up of patients with dysmorphism. Cytogenetic aberrations close to a known tumor suppressor gene raise important clinical issues because deletion of that tumor suppressor gene can cause genetic predisposition to cancer. We present two cancer-free dysmorphic patients with karyotypes of 46,XX,del(5)(q15q22.3) and 46,XX,del(3)(p25.2~pter). These deletions are close to the APC and VHL genes that confer susceptibility to familial Adenomatous polyposis (OMIM #17510) and von-Hippel-Lindau syndrome (OMIM #193300), respectively. The array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis using a custom Agilent 44K oligonucleotide array demonstrated an interstitial 20.7-megabase (Mb) deletion on 5q (chr5: 89,725,638-110,491,345) and a terminal 9.45-Mb deletion on 3p (chr3:pter-9,450,984). According to the March 2006 human reference sequence, the APC gene is located at chr5: 112,101,483-112,209,835 and the VHL gene is located at chr3: 10,158,319-10,168,746. These results indicate that the APC gene is 2,300 kilobases (kb) and the VHL gene is 700 kb away from deleted regions. Southern blot analysis for APC and VHL genes were negative, consistent with array-CGH findings. These results demonstrate the power of array-CCH to assess potential tumor suppressor gene involvement and cancer risk in patients with microscopically visible deletions in areas near tumor suppressors.

  3. Energy-efficient specialization of functional units in a Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Array

    SciTech Connect

    Van Essen, B; Panda, R; Wood, A; Ebeling, C; Hauck, S

    2010-12-01

    Functional units provide the backbone of any spatial accelerator by providing the computing resources. The desire for having rich and expensive functional units is in tension with producing a regular and energy-efficient computing fabric. This paper explores the design trade-off between complex, universal functional units and simpler, limited functional units. We show that a modest amount of specialization reduces the area-delay-energy product of an optimized architecture to 0.86x a baseline architecture. Furthermore, we provide a design guideline that allows an architect to customize the contents of the computing fabric just by examining the profile of benchmarks within the application domains. Functional units are the core of compute-intensive spatial accelerators. They perform the computation of interest with support from local storage and communication structures. Ideally, the functional units will provide rich functionality, supporting operations ranging from simple addition, to fused multiply-adds, to advanced transcendental functions and domain specific operations like add-compare-select. However, the total opportunity cost to support the more complex operations is a function of the cost of the hardware, the rate of occurrence of the operation in the application domain, and the inefficiency of emulating the operation with simpler operators. Examples of operations that are typically emulated in spatial accelerators are division and trigonometric functions, which can be solved using table-lookup based algorithms and the CORDIC algorithm. One reason to avoid having direct hardware support for complex operations in a tiled architecture like a Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Array (CGRA) is that the expensive hardware will typically need to be replicated in some or all of the architecture's tiles. Tiled architecture are designed such that their tiles are either homogeneous or heterogeneous. Homogeneous architectures are simpler to design but heterogeneous

  4. DNA tile based self-assembly: building complex nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chenxiang; Liu, Yan; Rinker, Sherri; Yan, Hao

    2006-08-11

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides an attractive route to create nanoarchitectures of programmable patterns. It also offers excellent scaffolds for directed self-assembly of nanometer-scale materials, ranging from nanoparticles to proteins, with potential applications in constructing nanoelectronic/nanophotonic devices and protein/ligand nanoarrays. This Review first summarizes the currently available DNA tile toolboxes and further emphasizes recent developments toward self-assembling DNA nanostructures with increasing complexity. Exciting progress using DNA tiles for directed self-assembly of other nanometer scale components is also discussed.

  5. Affine reflection groups for tiling applications: Knot theory and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, M.; Patera, J.; Peterson, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper some non-conventional applications of affine Weyl groups Waff of rank 2, the symmetry group of the tiling/lattice. We first develop and present the tools for applications requiring tilings of a real Euclidean plane {R}^2. We then elucidate the equivalence of these tilings with 2D projections of knots. The resulting mathematical structure provides a framework within which is encompassed recent work utilizing knot theory for modeling the structure and function of genetic molecules, specifically the action of particular enzymes in altering the topology of DNA in site-specific recombination.

  6. 57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING, HENRY MERCER USED THE KILN FOR HIS EARLIEST GLAZE TESTS. THE PRESS WAS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH METAL CASED MOLDS. SINCE ONLY THE EARLIEST TILE DESIGNS ARE IN METAL CASES. THIS TECHNIQUE WAS PROBABLY DISCONTINUED. THIS PRESS WAS, THEREFORE, PROBABLY NOT USED EXTENSIVELY AT THIS SITE. THE UPPER PART OF GLAZE KILN No. 2 IS AT THE LEFT REAR. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  7. Surface runoff and subsurface tile drain losses of neonicotinoids and companion herbicides at edge-of-field.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, François; Giroux, Isabelle; Thériault, Georges; Gagnon, Patrick; Corriveau, Julie

    2017-05-01

    With their application as seed coatings, the use of neonicotinoid insecticides increased dramatically during the last decade. They are now frequently detected in aquatic ecosystems at concentrations susceptible to harm aquatic invertebrates at individual and population levels. This study intent was to document surface runoff and subsurface tile drain losses of two common neonicotinoids (thiamethoxam and clothianidin) compared to those of companion herbicides (atrazine, glyphosate, S-metolachlor and mesotrione) at the edge of a 22.5-ha field under a corn-soybean rotation. A total of 14 surface runoff and tile drain discharge events were sampled over two years. Events and annual unit mass losses were computed using flow-weighted concentrations and total surface runoff and tile drain flow volumes. Detection frequencies close to 100% in edge-of-field surface runoff and tile drain water samples were observed for thiamethoxam and clothianidin even though only thiamethoxam had been applied in the first year. In 2014, thiamethoxam median concentrations in surface runoff and tile drain samples were respectively 0.46 and 0.16 μg/L, while respective maximum concentrations of 2.20 and 0.44 μg/L were measured in surface runoff and tile drain samples during the first post-seeding storm event. For clothianidin, median concentrations in surface runoff and tile drain samples were 0.02 and 0.01, μg/L, and respective maximum concentrations were 0.07 μg/L and 0.05 μg/L. Surface runoff and tile drain discharge were key transport mechanisms with similar contributions of 53 and 47% of measured mass losses, respectively. Even if thiamethoxam was applied at a relatively low rate and had a low mass exportation value (0.3%), the relative toxicity was one to two orders of magnitude higher than those of the other chemicals applied in 2014 and 2015. Companion herbicides, except glyphosate in tile drains, exceeded their water quality guideline during one sampling campaign after

  8. Modeling water flow in a tile drainage network in glacial clayey tills in an agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Schepper, G.; Therrien, R.; Refsgaard, J.

    2013-12-01

    required grid discretization for accurate simulate of flow in the drain, as well as provide reference results for additional scenarios. For example, because representing drains as discrete features in the model requires a very fine mesh discretization, the size of the domain that can be simulated can be limited. We are therefore testing an alternate approach where the tile drainage network and surrounding porous medium are represented by a dual-continuum formulation and compared to the reference model. Comparisons are made for a series of simulations with different initial conditions and boundary conditions, such as different precipitation events. The required discretization for the dual continuum model is also assessed. Obtaining a valid representation of the drain network with a dual continuum model will reduce the computational requirements compared to discrete drain models. Simulation results should lead us to the definition and validation of satisfactory simplifications and required aspects for future models at larger scale (catchment scale) containing complex and dense tile drainage networks.

  9. Thermal modeling of a metallic thermal protection tile for entry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal Energy Flow Simulation (TEFS) computer program was developed to simulate transient heat transfer through composite solids and predict interfacial temperatures. The program and its usage are described. A simulation of the thermal response of a new thermal protection tile design for the Space Shuttle Orbiter is presented and graphically compared with actual data. An example is also provided which shows the program's usage as a design tool for theoretical models.

  10. Improved Titanium Billet Inspection Sensitivity through Optimized Phased Array Design, Part II: Experimental Validation and Comparative Study with Multizone

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, W.; Vensel, F.; Knowles, B.

    2006-03-06

    The inspection of critical rotating components of aircraft engines has made important advances over the last decade. The development of Phased Array (PA) inspection capability for billet and forging materials used in the manufacturing of critical engine rotating components has been a priority for Honeywell Aerospace. The demonstration of improved PA inspection system sensitivity over what is currently used at the inspection houses is a critical step in the development of this technology and its introduction to the supply base as a production inspection. As described in Part I (in these proceedings), a new phased array transducer was designed and manufactured for optimal inspection of eight inch diameter Ti-6Al-4V billets. After confirming that the transducer was manufactured in accordance with the design specifications a validation study was conducted to assess the sensitivity improvement of the PAI over the current capability of Multi-zone (MZ) inspection. The results of this study confirm the significant ({approx_equal} 6 dB in FBH number sign sensitivity) improvement of the PAI sensitivity over that of MZI.

  11. Array tomography: semiautomated image alignment.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. Successful array tomography requires that the captured images be properly stacked and aligned, and the software to achieve these ends is freely available. This protocol describes the construction of volumetric image stacks from images of fluorescently labeled arrays for three-dimensional image visualization, analysis, and archiving.

  12. Measurement of Tritium Surface Distribution on TFTR Bumper Limiter Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    K. Sugiyama; T. Tanabe; C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile

    2004-06-28

    The tritium surface distribution on graphite tiles used in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) bumper limiter and exposed to TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) discharges from 1993 to 1997 was measured by the Tritium Imaging Plate Technique (TIPT). The TFTR bumper limiter shows both re-/co-deposition and erosion. The tritium images for all tiles measured are strongly correlated with erosion and deposition patterns, and long-term tritium retention was found in the re-/co-depositions and flakes. The CFC tiles located at erosion dominated areas clearly showed their woven structure in their tritium images owing to different erosion yields between fibers and matrix. Significantly high tritium retention was observed on all sides of the erosion tiles, indicating carbon transport via repetition of local erosion/deposition cycles.

  13. 45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION HALL LOOKING EAST ACROSS ARRIVAL LOBBY FLOOR - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 44. Everett Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN, FROM LOGGIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Everett Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN, FROM LOGGIA LOOKING EAST ACROSS RECEPTION HALL - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. South front, west part, showing wrought iron gates and tiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South front, west part, showing wrought iron gates and tiling at the former main entrance. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food cooked on the stove was served to workers in the eating area to the left of the counter (off picture). - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  17. 24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE STEEL WALL ARMOR EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26, Alton, Madison County, IL

  18. Interference Heating to Cavities Between Simulated RSI Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Test results for full scale simulated surface insulation tiles on both the tunnel wall and in the free stream, for in-line and staggered tile orientations, are summarized as follows: (1) The staggered tile orientation has heating on the forward face which is a factor of 4.5 times higher than the heating to the forward face of the in-line tile orientation; (2) the longitudinal gap heating was the highest for the 0.3175 cm gap and the lowest for the 0.1587 cm gap; and (3) there was an order of magnitude decrease in the heating on the forward face of a spanwise gap when the gap size was decreased from 0.3175 cm to 0.1587 cm.

  19. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance with Run 1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá Alberich, L.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the central hadronic calorimeter, TileCal, in the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is studied using cosmic-ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the Run 1 of LHC (2010-2012). Results are presented for the precision of the absolute energy scale and timing, noise characterization, and time-stability of the detector. The results show that the Tile Calorimeter performance is within the design requirements of the detector.

  20. 56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS APPROXIMATELY 6,000 PLASTER MOLDS OF VARIOUS TYPES, INCLUDING THE DEEP CAVITY MOLDS IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THESE MOLDS PRODUCED ALLEGORICAL FIGURES TO BE INSTALLED AROUND THE CORNICES OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  1. No inherent glassiness in a Penrose tiling quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Strandburg, K.J.; Dressel, P.R.

    1988-11-01

    Consideration of the structure of the Penrose pattern has led to speculation that a system with a Penrose tiling ground state might be subject to inherent glassy behavior. Monte Carol simulations show, using a simple model of the energetics, that there is no inherent glassiness in the Penrose tiling. Thermodynamic quantities measured are completely reversible, displaying no observable hysterisis, and the system may be easily cooled from a highly disordered configuration into its lowest energy state. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  2. On the Minimum Weight Steiner Triangular Tiling problem

    SciTech Connect

    Doddi, S.; Zhu, B.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Minimum Weight Steiner Triangular Tiling problem, which is a generalization of the Minimum Weight Steiner Triangulation. Contrary to the conjecture of Eppstein that the Minimum Weight Steiner Triangulation of a convex polygon has the property that the Steiner points all lie on the boundary of the polygon [Epp94], we show that the Steiner points of a Minimum Weight Steiner Triangular Tiling could lie in the interior of a convex polygon.

  3. Next-Generation Microshutter Arrays for Large-Format Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Samuel; Kutyrev, Alexander; Brown, Ari; Li, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A next-generation microshutter array, LArge Microshutter Array (LAMA), was developed as a multi-object field selector. LAMA consists of small-scaled microshutter arrays that can be combined to form large-scale microshutter array mosaics. Microshutter actuation is accomplished via electrostatic attraction between the shutter and a counter electrode, and 2D addressing can be accomplished by applying an electrostatic potential between a row of shutters and a column, orthogonal to the row, of counter electrodes. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology is used to fabricate the microshutter arrays. The main feature of the microshutter device is to use a set of standard surface micromachining processes for device fabrication. Electrostatic actuation is used to eliminate the need for macromechanical magnet actuating components. A simplified electrostatic actuation with no macro components (e.g. moving magnets) required for actuation and latching of the shutters will make the microshutter arrays robust and less prone to mechanical failure. Smaller-size individual arrays will help to increase the yield and thus reduce the cost and improve robustness of the fabrication process. Reducing the size of the individual shutter array to about one square inch and building the large-scale mosaics by tiling these smaller-size arrays would further help to reduce the cost of the device due to the higher yield of smaller devices. The LAMA development is based on prior experience acquired while developing microshutter arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), but it will have different features. The LAMA modular design permits large-format mosaicking to cover a field of view at least 50 times larger than JWST MSA. The LAMA electrostatic, instead of magnetic, actuation enables operation cycles at least 100 times faster and a mass significantly smaller compared to JWST MSA. Also, standard surface micromachining technology will simplify the fabrication process, increasing

  4. Diatoms as an indicator for tile drainage flow in a German lowland catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Naicheng; Faber, Claas; Ulrich, Uta; Schmalz, Britta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    The separation of flow components within a model simulation is of great importance for a successful implementation of management measures. Tracers are commonly used to identify and assess runoff-generating processes and to detect sources of stream flow components within a target catchment. Diatoms could be an ideal tracer due to their diverse preferences to different aquatic habitats (van Dam et al. 1994, Pfister et al. 2009). As a part of a DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) project, we collected diatom samples of 9 sites (4 tile drainage, and 5 river sites) weekly or biweekly from March to July 2013 in a German lowland catchment (the Kielstau catchment). First results showed that diatom species Achnanthes lanceolata, Fragilaria biceps and Navicula ingapirca dominated in tile drainage flow with relative abundances of 22.2%, 21.5% and 10.9%, respectively. For river sites, the most abundant species was Navicula cryptocephala (20.5%), followed by Fragilaria biceps (12.9%), Cyclotella meneghiniana (9.5%) and Achnanthes lanceolata (9.3%). Compared with river sites, tile drainage flow had lower diatom density, biomass, species richness and percentage of Aquatic/Riparian diatoms (AqRi%). However, the proportion of Riparian diatoms (RiZo%) increased at tile drainage flow. Indicator value method (IndVal) revealed that the two water types were characterized by different indicator species. Fifteen taxa (e.g. Cocconeis placentula, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Navicula cryptocephala and Fragilaria biceps) were significant indicators for river sites. Achnanthes lanceolata, Achnanthes minutissima and Navicula ingapirca were significant indicators for tile drainage flow. These results highlight the suitability of diatoms as an indicator for tile drainage flow. Spatial and temporal variations of diatom community should be considered in future surveys. Keywords: Diatoms, Flow components, Indicator value method, Tracer References: Pfister, L., J. J. McDonnell, S. Wrede, D. Hl

  5. DNAzyme-Controlled Cleavage of Dimer and Trimer Origami Tiles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Na; Willner, Itamar

    2016-04-13

    Dimers of origami tiles are bridged by the Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme sequence and its substrate or by the histidine-dependent DNAzyme sequence and its substrate to yield the dimers T1-T2 and T3-T4, respectively. The dimers are cleaved to monomer tiles in the presence of Pb(2+)-ions or histidine as triggers. Similarly, trimers of origami tiles are constructed by bridging the tiles with the Pb(2+)-ion-dependent DNAzyme sequence and the histidine-dependent DNAzyme sequence and their substrates yielding the trimer T1-T5-T4. In the presence of Pb(2+)-ions and/or histidine as triggers, the programmed cleavage of trimer proceeds. Using Pb(2+) or histidine as trigger cleaves the trimer to yield T5-T4 and T1 or the dimer T1-T5 and T4, respectively. In the presence of Pb(2+)-ions and histidine as triggers, the cleavage products are the monomer tiles T1, T5, and T4. The different cleavage products are identified by labeling the tiles with 0, 1, or 2 streptavidin labels and AFM imaging.

  6. Tiling solutions for optimal biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems, from cells to organisms, must respond to the ever-changing environment in order to survive and function. This is not a simple task given the often random nature of the signals they receive, as well as the intrinsically stochastic, many-body and often self-organized nature of the processes that control their sensing and response and limited resources. Despite a wide range of scales and functions that can be observed in the living world, some common principles that govern the behavior of biological systems emerge. Here I review two examples of very different biological problems: information transmission in gene regulatory networks and diversity of adaptive immune receptor repertoires that protect us from pathogens. I discuss the trade-offs that physical laws impose on these systems and show that the optimal designs of both immune repertoires and gene regulatory networks display similar discrete tiling structures. These solutions rely on locally non-overlapping placements of the responding elements (genes and receptors) that, overall, cover space nearly uniformly.

  7. Orbiter thermal pressure drop characteristics for shuttle orbiter thermal protection system components: High density tile, low density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Nystrom, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure drop tests were conducted on available samples of low and high density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pads. The results are presented in terms of pressure drop, material thickness and volume flow rate. Although the test apparatus was only capable of a small part of the range of conditions to be encountered in a Shuttle Orbiter flight, the data serve to determine the type of flow characteristics to be expected for each material type tested; the measured quantities also should serve as input for initial venting and flow through analysis.

  8. Performance of a 64-channel, 3.2×3.2 cm2 SiPM tile for TOF-PET application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Alessandro; Acerbi, Fabio; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio; Paternoster, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a new 3.2×3.2 cm2 detector tile, composed of 8×8 single SiPMs, having a regular 4 mm pitch in both the X and Y directions. The tile fill factor is 85%. We produced two versions of the tile with different SiPM technologies: RGB-HD and NUV. The first one features square micro-cells with 25 μm pitch, a PDE peaked at 550 nm and a DCR of 300 kHz/mm2, at 20 °C and at maximum detection efficiency. The second one features micro-cells with 40 μm pitch and a PDE peaked in the blue part of the spectrum. The dark count rate at 20 °C and at maximum PDE is 100 kHz/mm2. In this work, we show the energy and timing resolution measurements at 511 keV obtained coupling the two tiles to an 8×8 LYSO array with a pixel size of 4×4×22 mm3, perfectly matching the photo-detector array.

  9. Comparative study of fourteen alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves using HPLC-diode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/MS method.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jialin; Gong, Tianxing; Ma, Bin; Zhang, Lin; Kano, Yoshihiro; Yuan, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare alkaloid profile of Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves. Ten oxindole alkaloids and four glycosidic indole alkaloids were identified using HPLC-diode array detection (DAD) or LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-MS method, and a HPLC-UV method for simultaneous quantification of major alkaloids was validated. The hooks are characterized by high levels of four oxindole alkaloids rhynchophylline (R), isorhynchophylline (IR), corynoxeine (C) and isocorynoxeine (IC), while the leaves contained high level of two glycosidic indole alkaloids vincoside lactam (VL) and strictosidine (S). The presented methods have proven its usefulness in chemical characterization of U. rhynchophylla hooks and leaves.

  10. Phase change material in floor tiles for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy Sarah

    Traditional passive solar systems have relied on sensible heat storage for energy savings. Recent research has investigated taking advantage of latent heat storage for additional energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change material into building materials used in traditional passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. This research introduces a new flooring material that incorporates a phase change material ready for commercial manufacture. An agglomerate floor tile containing 20% by mass of encapsulated octadecane has been manufactured. Flexural and compressive strength of 7.4 MPa and 24.5 MPa respectively, were measured for the tile. Peak melting transition temperature was determined to be 27.2°C with a latent heat of 33.9 J/g of tile. Structural and thermal performance of the tile surpassed that of a typical ceramic tile. Each tile was composed of quartz, resin and phase change material. Statistical modeling was performed to analyze the response of flexural and compressive strength on varying amounts of quartz, resin and phase change material. Resulting polynomials described the effect of adding phase change material into the tile. With as little as 10% by mass of phase change material, the strength was reduced to less than 50% of tile without phase change material. It was determined that the maximum phase change material content to attain structural integrity greater than ceramic tile was 20% by mass. The statistical analysis used for this research was based on mixture experiments. A procedure was developed to simplify the selection of data points used in the fit of the polynomials to describe the response of flexural and compressive strengths. Analysis of energy savings using this floor tile containing 20% by mass of phase change material was performed as an addendum to this research. A known static simulation method, SLR (solar load ratio), was adapted to include

  11. Comprehensive meiotic segregation analysis of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) complex chromosome rearrangement using single sperm array comparative genomic hybridization and FISH.

    PubMed

    Hornak, Miroslav; Vozdova, Miluse; Musilova, Petra; Prinosilova, Petra; Oracova, Eva; Linkova, Vlasta; Vesela, Katerina; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-10-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) represent rare structural chromosome abnormalities frequently associated with infertility. In this study, meiotic segregation in spermatozoa of an infertile normospermic carrier of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) CCR was analysed. A newly developed array comparative genomic hybridization protocol was used, and all chromosomes in 50 single sperm cells were simultaneously examined. Three-colour FISH was used to analyse chromosome segregation in 1557 other single sperm cells. It was also used to measure an interchromosomal effect; sperm chromatin structure assay was used to measure chromatin integrity. A high-frequency of unbalanced spermatozoa (84%) was observed, mostly arising from the 3:3 symmetrical segregation mode. Array comparative genomic hybridization was used to detect additional aneuploidies in two out of 50 spermatozoa (4%) in chromosomes not involved in the complex chromosome rearrangement. Significantly increased rates of diploidy and XY disomy were found in the CCR carrier compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Defective condensation of sperm chromatin was also found in 22.7% of spermatozoa by sperm chromatin structure assay. The results indicate that the infertility in the man with CCR and normal spermatozoa was caused by a production of chromosomally unbalanced, XY disomic and diploid spermatozoa and spermatozoa with defective chromatin condensation.

  12. Torsional Buckling Tests of a Simulated Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    Spacecraft solar arrays are typically large structures supported by long, thin deployable booms. As such, they may be particularly susceptible to abnormal structural behavior induced by mechanical and thermal loading. One example is the Hubble Space Telescope solar arrays which consist of two split tubes fit one inside the other called BiSTEMs. The original solar arrays on the Hubble Space Telescope were found to be severely twisted following deployment and later telemetry data showed the arrays were vibrating during daylight to night and night to daylight transition. The solar array twist however can force the BiSTEM booms to change in cross-section and cause tile solar arrays to react unpredictably to future loading. The solar arrays were redesigned to correct for tile vibration, however, upon redeployment they again twisted. To assess the influence of boom cross-sectional configuration, experiments were conducted on two types of booms, (1)booms with closed cross-sections, and (2) booms with open cross-sections. Both models were subjected to compressive loading and imposed tip deflections. An existing analytical model by Chung and Thornton was used to define the individual load ranges for each model solar array configuration. The load range for the model solar array using closed cross-section booms was 0-120 Newtons and 0-160 Newtons for the model solar array using open cross-section booms. The results indicate the model solar array with closed cross-section booms buckled only in flexure. However, the results of the experiment with open cross-section booms indicate the model solar array buckled only in torsion and with imposed tip deflections the cross section can degrade by rotation of the inner relative to the outer STEM. For tile Hubble Space Telescope solar arrays the results of these experiments indicate the twisting resulted from the initial mechanical loading of the open cross-section booms.

  13. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter at LHC in Run 1 and planned upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyanov, O.

    2014-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider, a key detector for the measurements of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. The data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking and the evolution of the detector status are explained in the presentation. The energy and the time reconstruction performance of the digitized signals is presented and the noise behaviour and its improvement during the detector consolidation in maintenance periods are shown. A set of calibration systems allow monitoring and equalization of the calorimeter channels responses via signal sources that act at every stage of the signal path, from scintillation light to digitized signal. These partially overlapping systems are described in detail, their individual performance is discussed as well as the comparative results from measurements of the evolution of the calorimeter response with time during the full LHC data-taking period. The TileCal upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off-detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals will be directly digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. For the off-detector electronics a special pre-processor board is being developed, which will take care of the initial trigger processing, while the main data are temporarily stored in the pipeline and de-randomiser memories.

  14. Elastic-plastic-creep analysis of brazed carbon-carbon/OFHC divertor tile concepts for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, E.; Reis, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The 7.5 MW/m{sup 2} heat flux requirements for the TPX divertor necessitate the use of high conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) tiles that are brazed to annealed copper (OFHC) coolant tubes. Significant residual stresses are developed in the C-C tiles during the braze process due to large differences in the thermal expansion coefficients between these materials. Analyses which account for only the elastic-plastic strains developed in the OFHC tube may not accurately characterize the behavior of the tube during brazing. The elevated temperature creep behavior of the copper coolant tubes intuitively should reduce the calculated residual stresses in the C-C tiles. Two divertor tile concepts, the monoblock and the archblock, were analyzed for residual stress using 2-D finite element analysis for elastic-plastic-creep behavior of the OFHC tube during an assumed braze cooldown cycle. The results show that the inclusion of elevated temperature creep effects decrease the calculated residual stresses by only about 10% when compared to those analyses in which only elastic-plastic behavior of the OFHC is accounted for. The primary reason that creep effects at higher temperatures are not more significant is due to the low yield stress and nearly flat-top stress-strain curve of annealed OFHC. Since high temperature creep plays less of a role in the residual stress levels than previously thought, future scoping studies can be done in an elastic-plastic analysis with confidence that the stresses will be within approximately 10% of an elastic-plastic-creep analysis.

  15. Characterizing phosphorus dynamics in tile-drained agricultural fieldsof eastern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madison, Allison; Ruark, Matthew; Stuntebeck, Todd D.; Komiskey, Matthew J.; Good, Laura W; Drummy, Nancy; Cooley, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Artificial subsurface drainage provides an avenue for the rapid transfer of phosphorus (P) from agricultural fields to surface waters. This is of particular interest in eastern Wisconsin, where there is a concentrated population of dairy farms and high clay content soils prone to macropore development. Through collaboration with private landowners, surface and tile drainage was measured and analyzed for dissolved reactive P (DRP) and total P (TP) losses at four field sites in eastern Wisconsin between 2005 and 2009. These sites, which received frequent manure applications, represent a range of crop management practices which include: two chisel plowed corn fields (CP1, CP2), a no-till corn–soybean field (NT), and a grazed pasture (GP). Subsurface drainage was the dominant pathway of water loss at each site accounting for 66–96% of total water discharge. Average annual flow-weighted (FW) TP concentrations were 0.88, 0.57, 0.21, and 1.32 mg L−1 for sites CP1, CP2, NT, and GP, respectively. Low TP concentrations at the NT site were due to tile drain interception of groundwater flow where large volumes of tile drainage water diluted the FW-TP concentrations. Subsurface pathways contributed between 17% and 41% of the TP loss across sites. On a drainage event basis, total drainage explained between 36% and 72% of the event DRP loads across CP1, CP2, and GP; there was no relationship between event drainflow and event DRP load at the NT site. Manure applications did not consistently increase P concentrations in drainflow, but annual FW-P concentrations were greater in years receiving manure applications compared to years without manure application. Based on these field measures, P losses from tile drainage must be integrated into field level P budgets and P loss calculations on heavily manured soils, while also acknowledging the unique drainage patterns observed in eastern Wisconsin.

  16. Characterizing phosphorus dynamics in tile-drained agricultural fields of eastern Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Allison M.; Ruark, Matthew D.; Stuntebeck, Todd D.; Komiskey, Matthew J.; Good, Lara W.; Drummy, Nancy; Cooley, Eric T.

    2014-11-01

    Artificial subsurface drainage provides an avenue for the rapid transfer of phosphorus (P) from agricultural fields to surface waters. This is of particular interest in eastern Wisconsin, where there is a concentrated population of dairy farms and high clay content soils prone to macropore development. Through collaboration with private landowners, surface and tile drainage was measured and analyzed for dissolved reactive P (DRP) and total P (TP) losses at four field sites in eastern Wisconsin between 2005 and 2009. These sites, which received frequent manure applications, represent a range of crop management practices which include: two chisel plowed corn fields (CP1, CP2), a no-till corn-soybean field (NT), and a grazed pasture (GP). Subsurface drainage was the dominant pathway of water loss at each site accounting for 66-96% of total water discharge. Average annual flow-weighted (FW) TP concentrations were 0.88, 0.57, 0.21, and 1.32 mg L-1 for sites CP1, CP2, NT, and GP, respectively. Low TP concentrations at the NT site were due to tile drain interception of groundwater flow where large volumes of tile drainage water diluted the FW-TP concentrations. Subsurface pathways contributed between 17% and 41% of the TP loss across sites. On a drainage event basis, total drainage explained between 36% and 72% of the event DRP loads across CP1, CP2, and GP; there was no relationship between event drainflow and event DRP load at the NT site. Manure applications did not consistently increase P concentrations in drainflow, but annual FW-P concentrations were greater in years receiving manure applications compared to years without manure application. Based on these field measures, P losses from tile drainage must be integrated into field level P budgets and P loss calculations on heavily manured soils, while also acknowledging the unique drainage patterns observed in eastern Wisconsin.

  17. Application of Hilbert-Huang Transform for Improved Defect Detection in Terahertz NDE of Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    Terahertz NDE is being examined as a method to inspect the adhesive bond-line of Space Shuttle tiles for defects. Terahertz signals are generated and detected, using optical excitation of biased semiconductors with femtosecond laser pulses. Shuttle tile samples were manufactured with defects that included repair regions unbond regions, and other conditions that occur in Shuttle structures. These samples were inspected with a commercial terahertz NDE system that scanned a tile and generated a data set of RF signals. The signals were post processed to generate C-scan type images that are typically seen in ultrasonic NDE. To improve defect visualization the Hilbert-Huang Transform, a transform that decomposes a signal into oscillating components called intrinsic mode functions, was applied to test signals identified as being in and out of the defect regions and then on a complete data set. As expected with this transform, the results showed that the decomposed low-order modes correspond to signal noise while the high-order modes correspond to low frequency oscillations in the signal and mid-order modes correspond to local signal oscillations. The local oscillations compare well with various reflection interfaces and the defect locations in the original signal.

  18. Dominant controls on pesticide transport from tile to catchment scale: Lessons from a minimalist model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, S.; Basu, N. B.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.; Rao, P. S. C.

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes a minimalist modeling approach for characterizing pesticide concentrations in runoff from agricultural catchments across spatial scales. The model proposed is of an intermediate level of complexity between traditional chromatographic separation models and the more complex dual-domain models. Parsimony in the model is achieved by assuming stationarity of catchment travel time distributions and by coupling a dual-domain source zone model that describes near-surface pesticide dynamics with the mass response function (MRF) approach, which describes catchment-scale solute transport. The model is evaluated by comparing predicted atrazine concentrations with measured values over a 5 yr period at two spatial scales (tile drain: 3-5 ha; river station: 69 km2) within an intensively managed agricultural catchment in Illinois, United States. Pesticide dynamics within the source zone provided the strongest control on leaching. Two parameters were calibrated at the tile scale, Γ, which describes partitioning in the dual-domain surficial source zone, and ke, which describes the mass transfer rate constant between the two domains. The initial peak of concentration was found to be sensitive to Γ, while the later peaks were sensitive to ke. The calibrated parameters at the tile stations were used to predict atrazine dynamics at the river station. Prediction errors are examined and related to the lack of detailed information about anthropogenic forcings across scales (e.g., land-use or soil/crop management practices).

  19. Numerical simulation of armor capability of AI2O3 and SiC armor tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, T.; Aleem, M. A.; Akbar, S.; Rauf, A.; Shuaib, M.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina and Silicon Carbide armor plates have been tested numerically against 7.62x51 (mm x mm) armor piercing (AP) projectiles. A 2-D problem with axial symmetry has been designedand the simulations were carried out using commercial software ANSYS AUTODYN. Experiments were modeled for Alumina (99.5%), Alumina (99.7%) and SiC with a range of tile thicknesses (5, 10, 15 and 20 mm). The projectile was chosen as 7.62 x 51AP bullet (initial velocity 810 m/sec)with two different core materials Steel 4340 and WC, however, casing material was copper for both cores. SiC showed better defense against AP bullet as compared to Al2O3. The residual velocity and momentum of the bullet were found to decrease with increasing tile thickness. SiC tiles with thickness 15mm and 20 mm successfully sustained penetration against steel 4340 and WC core bullets, respectively. However none of the Alumina targets succeeded in stopping the bullet.

  20. Parametric Weight Comparison of Advanced Metallic, Ceramic Tile, and Ceramic Blanket Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Martin, Carl J.; Blosser, Max L.

    2000-01-01

    A parametric weight assessment of advanced metallic panel, ceramic blanket, and ceramic tile thermal protection systems (TPS) was conducted using an implicit, one-dimensional (I-D) finite element sizing code. This sizing code contained models to account for coatings fasteners, adhesives, and strain isolation pads. Atmospheric entry heating profiles for two vehicles, the Access to Space (ATS) vehicle and a proposed Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), were used to ensure that the trends were not unique to a certain trajectory. Ten TPS concepts were compared for a range of applied heat loads and substructural heat capacities to identify general trends. This study found the blanket TPS concepts have the lightest weights over the majority of their applicable ranges, and current technology ceramic tiles and metallic TPS concepts have similar weights. A proposed, state-of-the-art metallic system which uses a higher temperature alloy and efficient multilayer insulation was predicted to be significantly lighter than the ceramic tile stems and approaches blanket TPS weights for higher integrated heat loads.

  1. Towards Optimal Filtering on ARM for ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Front-End Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Mitchell A.

    2015-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN generates enormous amounts of raw data which presents a serious computing challenge. After planned upgrades in 2022, the data output from the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter will increase by 200 times to over 40 Tb/s. Advanced and characteristically expensive Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are currently used to process this quantity of data. It is proposed that a cost- effective, high data throughput Processing Unit (PU) can be developed by using several ARM System on Chips in a cluster configuration to allow aggregated processing performance and data throughput while maintaining minimal software design difficulty for the end-user. ARM is a cost effective and energy efficient alternative CPU architecture to the long established x86 architecture. This PU could be used for a variety of high-level algorithms on the high data throughput raw data. An Optimal Filtering algorithm has been implemented in C++ and several ARM platforms have been tested. Optimal Filtering is currently used in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end for basic energy reconstruction and is currently implemented on DSPs.

  2. Effect of acid vapor etching on morphological and opto-electric properties of flat silicon and silicon nanowire arrays: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, Chohdi; Ouertani, Rachid; Hamdi, Abderrahmen; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a comparative study between porous silicon (pSi) and porous silicon nanowires (pSiNWs). Acid Vapor Etching (AVE) treatment has been used to perform porous structure on flat Si and SiNWs array substrates respectively. SiNW structure is prepared by the widely used Silver catalyzed etching method. SEM and TEM images show that AVE treatment induces porous structure in the whole Si wafer and the SiNW sidewall. Comparatively to pSi, pSiNWs exhibit a low reflectivity in the whole spectral range which decreases with etching duration. However, the reflectivity of pSi changes with porous layer thickness. Both pSi and pSiNWs exhibit a significant PL peak situated at 2 eV. PL peaks are attributed to the quantum confinement effect in the silicon nanocrystallites (SiNCs). We discussed the significant enhancement in the peak intensities and a shift toward lower energy displayed in Raman spectra for both pSi and pSiNWs. We reported a correlative study of the AVE treatment effect on the minority carrier life time of flat silicon and SiNW arrays with the passivation effect of chemical induced silicon oxides highlighted by FTIR spectra.

  3. Construction of 2D quasi-periodic Rauzy tiling by similarity transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, V. G.; Maleev, A. V.

    2009-05-15

    A new approach to constructing self-similar fractal tilings is proposed based on the construction of semigroups generated by a finite set of similarity transformations. The Rauzy tiling-a 2D analog of 1D Fibonacci tiling generated by the golden mean-is used as an example to illustrate this approach. It is shown that the Rauzy torus development and the elementary fractal boundary of Rauzy tiling can be constructed in the form of a set of centers of similarity semigroups generated by two and three similarity transformations, respectively. A centrosymmetric tiling, locally dual to the Rauzy tiling, is constructed for the first time and its parameterization is developed.

  4. Microwave versus conventional sintering of silicon carbide tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.D.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Forrester, S.C.; Akerman, A.

    1997-05-07

    Silicon carbide is being evaluated as an armor material because of its lightweight, high-hardness, and excellent armor efficiency. However, one of the problems associated with silicon carbide is the high cost associated with achieving fully dense tiles. Full density requires either hot pressing and sintering or reaction bonding. Past efforts have shown that hot pressed tiles have a higher armor efficiency than those produced by reaction bonded sintering. An earlier stuy showed that the acoustic properties of fully-dense silicon carbide tiles were enhanced through the use of post-sintered microwave heat treatments. One of the least expensive forming techniques is to isostatically press-and-sinter. In this study, the authors have used microwave energy to densify silicon carbide green bodies. Microwave sintering has been demonstrated to be a very quick way to sinter ceramics such as alumina to exceptionally high densities. Previous work has shown that microwave post treatment of fully-dense reaction bonded silicon carbide tiles significantly improves the acoustic properties of the tiles. These properties include Poisson`s ratio, Young`s modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus.

  5. Investigation of registration algorithms for the automatic tile processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamir, Dan E.

    1995-01-01

    The Robotic Tile Inspection System (RTPS), under development in NASA-KSC, is expected to automate the processes of post-flight re-water-proofing and the process of inspection of the Shuttle heat absorbing tiles. An important task of the robot vision sub-system is to register the 'real-world' coordinates with the coordinates of the robot model of the Shuttle tiles. The model coordinates relate to a tile data-base and pre-flight tile-images. In the registration process, current (post-flight) images are aligned with pre-flight images to detect the rotation and translation displacement required for the coordinate systems rectification. The research activities performed this summer included study and evaluation of the registration algorithm that is currently implemented by the RTPS, as well as, investigation of the utility of other registration algorithms. It has been found that the current algorithm is not robust enough. This algorithm has a success rate of less than 80% and is, therefore, not suitable for complying with the requirements of the RTPS. Modifications to the current algorithm has been developed and tested. These modifications can improve the performance of the registration algorithm in a significant way. However, this improvement is not sufficient to satisfy system requirements. A new algorithm for registration has been developed and tested. This algorithm presented very high degree of robustness with success rate of 96%.

  6. Interlaced Particle Systems and Tilings of the Aztec Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Benjamin J.; Forrester, Peter J.

    2011-02-01

    Motivated by the problem of domino tilings of the Aztec diamond, a weighted particle system is defined on N lines, with line j containing j particles. The particles are restricted to lattice points from 0 to N, and particles on successive lines are subject to an interlacing constraint. It is shown that this particle system is exactly solvable, to the extent that not only can the partition function be computed exactly, but so too can the marginal distributions. These results in turn are used to give new derivations within the particle picture of a number of known fundamental properties of the tiling problem, for example that the number of distinct configurations is 2 N( N+1)/2, and that there is a limit to the GUE minor process, which we show at the level of the joint PDFs. It is shown too that the study of tilings of the half Aztec diamond—not known from earlier literature—also leads to an interlaced particle system, now with successive lines 2 n-1 and 2 n ( n=1,…, N/2-1) having n particles. Its exact solution allows for an analysis of the half Aztec diamond tilings analogous to that given for the Aztec diamond tilings.

  7. Analysis of Thick Sandwich Shells with Embedded Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Smith, C.; Lumban-Tobing, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Composite Armored Vehicle (CAV) is an advanced technology demonstrator of an all-composite ground combat vehicle. The CAV upper hull is made of a tough light-weight S2-glass/epoxy laminate with embedded ceramic tiles that serve as armor. The tiles are bonded to a rubber mat with a carefully selected, highly viscoelastic adhesive. The integration of armor and structure offers an efficient combination of ballistic protection and structural performance. The analysis of this anisotropic construction, with its inherent discontinuous and periodic nature, however, poses several challenges. The present paper describes a shell-based 'element-layering' technique that properly accounts for these effects and for the concentrated transverse shear flexibility in the rubber mat. One of the most important advantages of the element-layering technique over advanced higher-order elements is that it is based on conventional elements. This advantage allows the models to be portable to other structural analysis codes, a prerequisite in a program that involves the computational facilities of several manufacturers and government laboratories. The element-layering technique was implemented into an auto-layering program that automatically transforms a conventional shell model into a multi-layered model. The effects of tile layer homogenization, tile placement patterns, and tile gap size on the analysis results are described.

  8. Proximal 10q duplication in a child with severe central hypotonia characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MANOLAKOS, EMMANOUIL; VETRO, ANNALISA; GARAS, ANTONIOS; THOMAIDIS, LORETTA; KEFALAS, KONSTANTINOS; KITSOS, GEORGE; ZIEGLER, MONIKA; LIEHR, THOMAS; ZUFFARDI, ORSETTA; PAPOULIDIS, IOANNIS

    2014-01-01

    Proximal 10q duplication is a well-defined but rare genetic syndrome. Duplication of proximal segments of the long arm of chromosome 10 results in a pattern of malformations, which are distinct from those of the more common distal 10q trisomy syndrome. The present study describes the case of a boy with phenotypic abnormalities (severe central hypotonia, mild ataxia, moderate developmental delay and mild dysmorphic features), due to duplication of chromosome region, 10q11.21→q11.22, which was characterized by the array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique. The phenotypic findings were compared with those in eight additional similar published cases. Major similarities have emerged, suggesting a likely minimal critical region. However, only detailed characterization of additional cases may provide firm conclusions. PMID:24669257

  9. Genomic Alteration in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) Cell Lines Inferred from Karyotyping, Molecular Cytogenetics, and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Rerkarmnuaychoke, Budsaba; Suntronpong, Aorarat; Fu, Beiyuan; Bodhisuwan, Winai; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Yang, Fengtang; Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2016-01-01

    Genomic alteration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) was studied in two cell line pairs (HN30-HN31 and HN4-HN12) using conventional C-banding, multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). HN30 and HN4 were derived from primary lesions in the pharynx and base of tongue, respectively, and HN31 and HN12 were derived from lymph-node metastatic lesions belonging to the same patients. Gain of chromosome 1, 7, and 11 were shared in almost all cell lines. Hierarchical clustering revealed that HN31 was closely related to HN4, which shared eight chromosome alteration cases. Large C-positive heterochromatins were found in the centromeric region of chromosome 9 in HN31 and HN4, which suggests complex structural amplification of the repetitive sequence. Array CGH revealed amplification of 7p22.3p11.2, 8q11.23q12.1, and 14q32.33 in all cell lines involved with tumorigenesis and inflammation genes. The amplification of 2p21 (SIX3), 11p15.5 (H19), and 11q21q22.3 (MAML2, PGR, TRPC6, and MMP family) regions, and deletion of 9p23 (PTPRD) and 16q23.1 (WWOX) regions were identified in HN31 and HN12. Interestingly, partial loss of PTPRD (9p23) and WWOX (16q23.1) genes was identified in HN31 and HN12, and the level of gene expression tended to be the down-regulation of PTPRD, with no detectable expression of the WWOX gene. This suggests that the scarcity of PTPRD and WWOX genes might have played an important role in progression of HNSCC, and could be considered as a target for cancer therapy or a biomarker in molecular pathology. PMID:27501229

  10. Cross-Correlation for Automated Stitching of Two-Dimensional Multi-Tile Electron Backscatter Diffraction Data (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    270 350x 650 (25, 26) 2 20 Ni-15Al- 5Cr+C,B,Zr 187 x 187 500x 44 ( 4 , 11) 0.5 40 A. Coarse grain, single phase α- titanium The coarse grained... titanium alloy serves as an instructive example because, as evident in Figure 4 (a), only one triple point and one grain boundary appear in the search...wpafb.af.mil Figure 4 . Crystal orientation maps for the first (left) and second (current) tiles of (a) coarse grained α- Titanium , (b) a 2x2 array of a

  11. Identification of genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer by the combined use of tissue microdissection and array-based comparative genomic hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, T; Baril, P; Gangeswaran, R; Kelly, G; Chelala, C; Bhakta, V; Caulee, K; Mahon, P C; Lemoine, N R

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterised pathologically by a marked desmoplastic stromal reaction that significantly reduces the sensitivity and specificity of cytogenetic analysis. To identify genetic alterations that reflect the characteristics of the tumour in vivo, we screened a total of 23 microdissected PDAC tissue samples using array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) with 1 Mb resolution. Highly stringent statistical analysis enabled us to define the regions of nonrandom genomic changes. We detected a total of 41 contiguous regions (>3.0 Mb) of copy number changes, such as a genetic gain at 7p22.2–p15.1 (26.0 Mb) and losses at 17p13.3–p11.2 (13.6 Mb), 18q21.2–q22.1 (12.0 Mb), 18q22.3–q23 (7.1 Mb) and 18q12.3–q21.2 (6.9 Mb). To validate our array CGH results, fluorescence in situ hybridisation was performed using four probes from those regions, showing that these genetic alterations were observed in 37–68% of a separate sample set of 19 PDAC cases. In particular, deletion of the SEC11L3 gene (18q21.32) was detected at a very high frequency (13 out of 19 cases; 68%) and in situ RNA hybridisation for this gene demonstrated a significant correlation between deletion and expression levels. It was further confirmed by reverse transcription–PCR that SEC11L3 mRNA was downregulated in 16 out of 16 PDAC tissues (100%). In conclusion, the combination of tissue microdissection and array CGH provided a valid data set that represents in vivo genetic changes in PDAC. Our results raise the possibility that the SEC11L3 gene may play a role as a tumour suppressor in this disease. PMID:17242705

  12. Flutter Analysis of the Shuttle Tile Overlay Repair Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Kim S.; Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Waters, William A.; Chen, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle tile overlay repair concept, developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is designed for on-orbit installation over an area of damaged tile to permit safe re-entry. The thin flexible plate is placed over the damaged area and secured to tile at discreet points around its perimeter. A series of flutter analyses were performed to determine if the onset of flutter met the required safety margins. Normal vibration modes of the panel, obtained from a simplified structural analysis of the installed concept, were combined with a series of aerodynamic analyses of increasing levels of fidelity in terms of modeling the flow physics to determine the onset of flutter. Results from these analyses indicate that it is unlikely that the overlay installed at body point 1800 will flutter during re-entry.

  13. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Real, Markus

    1999-11-16

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  14. Monte Carlo estimation of the number of tatami tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Kenji; Higuchi, Saburo

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the way Japanese tatami mats are placed on the floor, we consider domino tilings with a constraint and estimate the number of such tilings of plane regions. We map the system onto a monomer-dimer model with a novel local interaction on the dual lattice. We make use of a variant of the Hamiltonian replica exchange Monte Carlo method where data for ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic models are combined to make a single family of histograms. The properties of the density of states is studied beyond exact enumeration and combinatorial methods. The logarithm of the number of the tilings is linear in the boundary length of the region for all the regions studied.

  15. Using a Multijunction Microfluidic Device to Inject Substrate inot an Array of Preformed Plugs Without Cross-Contamination: Comparing Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, L.; Boedicker, J; Ismagilov, R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe a multijunction microfluidic device for the injection of a substrate into an array of preformed plugs carried by an immiscible fluid in a microchannel. The device uses multiple junctions to inject substrate into preformed plugs without synchronization of the flow of substrate and the array of preformed plugs of reagent, which reduces cross-contamination of the plugs, eliminates formation of small droplets of substrate, and allows a greater range of injection ratios compared to that of a single T-junction. The device was based on a previously developed physical model for transport that was here adapted to describe injection and experimentally verified. After characterization, the device was applied to two biochemical assays, including evaluation of the enzymatic activity of thrombin and determination of the coagulation time of human blood plasma, which both provided reliable results. The reduction of cross-contamination and greater range of injection ratios achieved by this device may improve the processes that involve addition and titration of reagents into plugs, such as high-throughput screening of protein crystallization conditions.

  16. Implications of tiling for performance and design flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircan, Ertugrul; Tian, Ruiqi; Grobman, Warren D.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss rule-based and model-based tiling methodologies for interconnect layers and their implications for design flows and performance. The addition of these 'dummy' tiling metal features modifies the final physical design and reduces the variation of back-end process parameters. This is a newly developing area of design flow and its importance is increasing with each succeeding semiconductor generation. Along with this development new methodologies and tools need to be introduced to handle time placement post-physical design, as well as efficient methods for representing the resulting large amount of dat. Additionally, the inclusion of tiles may introduce performance-degrading parasitic effects. The situation is complicated by the order of the elements of the design flow: parasitics characterization requires knowledge about the placement of dummy metal times, which takes place after physical design. In this study, we co pare the advantages of having uniform interconnect characteristics to the performance degradation caused by the additional layout parasitics. We also discuss several possible scenarios for the modification of design flows to account for these effects the thereby recover timing and power targets closure. These scenarios depend for their success on the very different length scales of polish and electromagnetic effects. Finally, an analysis of correlations in the parameters that define design corners leads to the new conclusion that the negative effect of increased parasitic loading due to tiling is not as sever as a simple analysis would suggest. This result is due to the fact that the tiling parasitic loading is somewhat compensated for by the improved planarity resulting from tiling, which tightens the process variation-induced spread of metal electrical parameters.

  17. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  18. Genome-Wide Survey of Cold Stress Regulated Alternative Splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression. PMID:23776682

  19. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  20. High-Performance Tiled WMS and KML Web Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2007-01-01

    This software is an Apache 2.0 module implementing a high-performance map server to support interactive map viewers and virtual planet client software. It can be used in applications that require access to very-high-resolution geolocated images, such as GIS, virtual planet applications, and flight simulators. It serves Web Map Service (WMS) requests that comply with a given request grid from an existing tile dataset. It also generates the KML super-overlay configuration files required to access the WMS image tiles.

  1. Automated Absorber Attachment for X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Allen, Christine; Kilbourne, Caroline; Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Schulte, Eric; Moseley, Samuel J.

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a method for the automated attachment of large numbers of absorber tiles to large format detector arrays. This development includes the fabrication of high quality, closely spaced HgTe absorber tiles that are properly positioned for pick-and-place by our FC150 flip chip bonder. The FC150 also transfers the appropriate minute amount of epoxy to the detectors for permanent attachment of the absorbers. The success of this development will replace an arduous, risky and highly manual task with a reliable, high-precision automated process.

  2. Tony Rollins fashions a new tile for the Space Shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance, holds down a curtain while making a test sample of tile on a block 5-axis computerized numerical control milling machine. About 70 percent of a Space Shuttle orbiter's external surface is shielded from heat by a network of more than 24,000 tiles formed from a silica fiber compound. They are known as High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tiles and Low-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (LRSI) tiles. Most HRSI tiles are 6 inches square, but may be as large as 12 inches in some areas, and 1 to 5 inches thick. LRSI tiles are generally 8 inches square, ranging from 0.2- to 1-inch thick. More advanced materials such as Flexible Insulation Blankets have replaced tiles on some upper surfaces of the orbiter.

  3. Chromosome deletion of 14q32.33 detected by array comparative genomic hybridization in a patient with features of dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Diana C; Rosenthal, Scott; Wallerstein, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    We report a 4-year-old girl of Mexican origins with a clinical diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome who carries a de novo terminal deletion at the 14q32.33 locus identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Dubowitz syndrome is a rare condition characterized by a constellation of features including growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, micrognathia, eczema, telecanthus, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, round-tipped nose, mild to moderate developmental delay, and high-pitched hoarse voice. This syndrome is thought to be autosomal recessive; however, the etiology has not been determined. This is the first report of this deletion in association with this phenotype; it is possible that this deletion may be causal for a Dubowitz phenocopy.

  4. Genome‐scale diversity and niche adaptation analysis of Lactococcus lactis by comparative genome hybridization using multi‐strain arrays

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, Roland J.; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.; Felis, Giovanna E.; van der Sijde, Marijke R.; Starrenburg, Marjo; Molenaar, Douwe; Wels, Michiel; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lactococcus lactis produces lactic acid and is widely used in the manufacturing of various fermented dairy products. However, the species is also frequently isolated from non‐dairy niches, such as fermented plant material. Recently, these non‐dairy strains have gained increasing interest, as they have been described to possess flavour‐forming activities that are rarely found in dairy isolates and have diverse metabolic properties. We performed an extensive whole‐genome diversity analysis on 39 L. lactis strains, isolated from dairy and plant sources. Comparative genome hybridization analysis with multi‐strain microarrays was used to assess presence or absence of genes and gene clusters in these strains, relative to all L. lactis sequences in public databases, whereby chromosomal and plasmid‐encoded genes were computationally analysed separately. Nearly 3900 chromosomal orthologous groups (chrOGs) were defined on basis of four sequenced chromosomes of L. lactis strains (IL1403, KF147, SK11, MG1363). Of these, 1268 chrOGs are present in at least 35 strains and represent the presently known core genome of L. lactis, and 72 chrOGs appear to be unique for L. lactis. Nearly 600 and 400 chrOGs were found to be specific for either the subspecies lactis or subspecies cremoris respectively. Strain variability was found in presence or absence of gene clusters related to growth on plant substrates, such as genes involved in the consumption of arabinose, xylan, α‐galactosides and galacturonate. Further niche‐specific differences were found in gene clusters for exopolysaccharides biosynthesis, stress response (iron transport, osmotolerance) and bacterial defence mechanisms (nisin biosynthesis). Strain variability of functions encoded on known plasmids included proteolysis, lactose fermentation, citrate uptake, metal ion resistance and exopolysaccharides biosynthesis. The present study supports the view of L. lactis as a species with a very flexible

  5. 40 CFR 427.70 - Applicability; description of the asbestos floor tile subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... asbestos floor tile subcategory. 427.70 Section 427.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Floor Tile Subcategory § 427.70 Applicability; description of the asbestos floor tile...

  6. 40 CFR 427.70 - Applicability; description of the asbestos floor tile subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asbestos floor tile subcategory. 427.70 Section 427.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Floor Tile Subcategory § 427.70 Applicability; description of the asbestos floor tile...

  7. GROWTH EVALUATION OF FUNGI (PENICILLIUM AND ASPERGILLUS SPP.) ON CEILING TILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of the potential for fungal growth on four different ceiling tiles in static chambers. It was found that even new ceiling tiles supported fungal growth under favorable conditions. Used ceiling tiles appeared to be more susceptible to funga...

  8. Divertor sheath power studies in DIII-D using fixed Langmuir probes and three-dimensional modeling of tile heat flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D.; Nygren, R.; Buchenauer, D.; Watkins, J.; Rudakov, D.; Leonard, A.; Wong, C. P. C.; Makowski, M.

    2014-04-01

    Experimental results are presented from the three-Langmuir probe (LP) diagnostic head of the divertor material evaluation system (DiMES) on DIII-D that confirm the size of the projected current collection area of the LPs, which is essential for properly measuring ion saturation current density (Jsat) and the sheath power transmission factor (SPTF). Also using the 3-LP DiMES head, the hypothesis that collisional effects on plasma density occurring in the magnetic sheath of the tile are responsible for a lower than expected SPTF is tested and deemed not to have a significant impact on the SPTF. Three-dimensional thermal modeling of wall tiles is presented that accounts for lateral heat conduction, temperature dependence of tile material properties and radiative heat loss from the tile surface. This modeling was developed to be used in the analysis of temperature profiles of the divertor embedded thermocouple (TC) array to obtain more accurate interpretations of TC temperature profiles to infer divertor surface heat flux than have previously been accomplished using more basic one-dimensional methods.

  9. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 1: Detailed test plan for leading edge tile development. Leading edge material development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Staszak, Paul; Hinkle, Karrie

    1995-01-01

    This task develops two alternative candidate tile materials for leading edge applications: coated alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) tile and silicone impregnated reusable ceramic ablator (SIRCA) tile. Upon reentry of the X-33/RLV space vehicle, the leading edges experience the highest heating rates and temperatures. The wing leading edge and nose cap experience peak temperatures in the range 2000 to 2700 F. Replacing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) with tile-based thermal protection system (TPS) materials is the primary objective. Weight, complexity, coating impact damage, and repairability are among the problems that this tile technology development addresses. The following subtasks will be performed in this development effort: tile coating development; SIRCA tile development; robustness testing of tiles; tile repair development; tile operations/processing; tile leading edge configuration; and life cycle testing.

  10. Drainage water management effects on tile dicharge and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drainage water management (DWM) has received considerable attention as a potential best management practice for improving water quality in tile drained landscapes. However, only a limited number of studies have documented the effectiveness of DWM in mitigating nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loads. ...

  11. Contributions of systematic tile drainage to watershed scale phosphorus transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) transport from agricultural fields continues be a focal point for addressing harmful algal blooms (HABs) and nuisance algae in freshwater systems throughout the world. In humid, poorly drained regions, attention has turned to P delivery through subsurface tile drainage. Research on th...

  12. EVALUATION OF FUNGAL GROWTH (PENICILLIUM GLABRUM) ON A CEILING TILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study employing static chambers to study the impact of different equilibrium relative humidities (RHs) and moisture conditions on the ability of a new ceiling tile to support fungal growth. Amplification of the mold, Penicillium glabrum, occurred at R...

  13. Phosphorus modeling in tile drained agricultural systems using APEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus losses through tile drained systems in agricultural landscapes may be causing the persistent eutrophication problems observed in surface water. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the state of the science in the Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender (APEX) model related to surf...

  14. Tiled architecture of a CNN-mostly IP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaanenburg, Lambert; Malki, Suleyman

    2009-05-01

    Multi-core architectures have been popularized with the advent of the IBM CELL. On a finer grain the problems in scheduling multi-cores have already existed in the tiled architectures, such as the EPIC and Da Vinci. It is not easy to evaluate the performance of a schedule on such architecture as historical data are not available. One solution is to compile algorithms for which an optimal schedule is known by analysis. A typical example is an algorithm that is already defined in terms of many collaborating simple nodes, such as a Cellular Neural Network (CNN). A simple node with a local register stack together with a 'rotating wheel' internal communication mechanism has been proposed. Though the basic CNN allows for a tiled implementation of a tiled algorithm on a tiled structure, a practical CNN system will have to disturb this regularity by the additional need for arithmetical and logical operations. Arithmetic operations are needed for instance to accommodate for low-level image processing, while logical operations are needed to fork and merge different data streams without use of the external memory. It is found that the 'rotating wheel' internal communication mechanism still handles such mechanisms without the need for global control. Overall the CNN system provides for a practical network size as implemented on a FPGA, can be easily used as embedded IP and provides a clear benchmark for a multi-core compiler.

  15. A design rationale for NASA TileWorld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philips, Andrew B.; Swanson, Keith J.; Drummond, Mark E.; Bresina, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Automated systems that can operate in unrestricted real-world domains are still well beyond current computational capabilities. This paper argues that isolating essential problem characteristics found in real-world domains allows for a careful study of how particular control systems operate. By isolating essential problem characteristics and studying their impact on autonomous system performance, we should be able to more quickly deliver systems for practical real-world problems. For our research on planning, scheduling, and control, we have selected three particular domain attributes to study: exogenous events, uncertain action outcome, and metric time. We are not suggesting that studies of these attributes in isolation are sufficient to guarantee the obvious goals of good methodology, brilliant architectures, or first-class results; however, we are suggesting that such isolation facilitates the achievement of these goals. To study these attributes, we have developed the NASA TileWorld. We describe the NASA TileWorld simulator in general terms, present an example NASA TileWorld problem, and discuss some of our motivations and concerns for NASA TileWorld.

  16. Garuda: a scalable tiled display wall using commodity PCs.

    PubMed

    Nirnimesh; Harish, Pawan; Narayanan, P J

    2007-01-01

    Cluster-based tiled display walls can provide cost-effective and scalable displays with high resolution and a large display area. The software to drive them needs to scale too if arbitrarily large displays are to be built. Chromium is a popular software API used to construct such displays. Chromium transparently renders any OpenGL application to a tiled display by partitioning and sending individual OpenGL primitives to each client per frame. Visualization applications often deal with massive geometric data with millions of primitives. Transmitting them every frame results in huge network requirements that adversely affect the scalability of the system. In this paper, we present Garuda, a client-server-based display wall framework that uses off-the-shelf hardware and a standard network. Garuda is scalable to large tile configurations and massive environments. It can transparently render any application built using the Open Scene Graph (OSG) API to a tiled display without any modification by the user. The Garuda server uses an object-based scene structure represented using a scene graph. The server determines the objects visible to each display tile using a novel adaptive algorithm that culls the scene graph to a hierarchy of frustums. Required parts of the scene graph are transmitted to the clients, which cache them to exploit the interframe redundancy. A multicast-based protocol is used to transmit the geometry to exploit the spatial redundancy present in tiled display systems. A geometry push philosophy from the server helps keep the clients in sync with one another. Neither the server nor a client needs to render the entire scene, making the system suitable for interactive rendering of massive models. Transparent rendering is achieved by intercepting the cull, draw, and swap functions of OSG and replacing them with our own. We demonstrate the performance and scalability of the Garuda system for different configurations of display wall. We also show that the

  17. Magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  18. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  19. Breakthrough of two pesticides into tile drain and shallow groundwater: comparison of tile drain reaction and soil profiles within a field scale irrigation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Julian; Zehe, Erwin; Elsner, Martin; Palm, Juliane; Schneider, Dorothee; Schröder, Boris; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; West, Stephanie

    2010-05-01

    Preferential flow in macropores is a key process which strongly affects infiltration and may cause rapid transport of pesticides into depths of 80 to 150 cm. At these depths they experience a much slower degradation, may leach into shallow groundwater or enter a tile-drain and are transported into surface water bodies. Therefore, preferential transport might be an environmental problem, if the topsoil is bypassed, which has been originally thought to act as a filter to protect the subsoil and shallow groundwater. To investigate the behaviour of two pesticides with different chemical characteristics and to compare their transport behaviour in soil and into the tile drain an irrigation experiment was performed on a 400 m² field site. The experimental plot is located in the Weiherbach valley, south-west Germany, which basic geology consists of Loess and Keuper layers, the soil at the test site is a gleyic Colluvisol. The distance of the irrigation site to the Weiherbach brook is approximately 12 m, the field is drained with a tile-drain in about 1.2 m depth and shows discharge over the entire year. Three hours before the irrigation started, the farmer applied a pesticide solution consisting of Isoproturon (80 g) and Flufenacet (20 g) (IPU and FLU) according to conventional agricultural practice on the field plot. The irrigation took place in three time blocks (80 min, 60 min, 80 min) with in total 33.6 mm of precipitation. During the first block 1600 g of Bromide were mixed in the irrigation water. The drainage outlet was instrumented with a pressure probe. About 50 water samples ware taken during the experimental day, and several samples more the days after the experiment. They were analysed for the pesticides, bromide and water isotopes. In the two days after the experiment three soil profiles were excavated and soil samples were taken on a 10x10 cm² scheme. One week after the experiment two additional profiles were excavated. The soil was analysed for IPU, FLU

  20. Evaluation of the Hooghoudt and Kirkham tile drain equations in SWAT to simulate tile flow and nitrate-nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface tile drains in agricultural systems of Midwest U.S. are a major contributor of nitrate-N (NO3-N) loadings to hypoxic conditions in the Gulf of Mexico. Existing soil moisture retention parameter computation algorithm in the widely used Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is known t...

  1. Novel regions of chromosomal amplification at 6p21, 5p13, and 12q14 in gastric cancer identified by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Boussioutas, Alex; Bowtell, David D L

    2005-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) frequently displays changes in DNA copy number, but few studies have precisely correlated specific genetic alterations with changes in gene expression. We undertook both array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and expression analyses of 20 primary GCs using a cDNA microarray with more than 9,300 genes. Diverse clinical and histopathologic tumor subtypes, including signet-ring tumors and tumors at the gastroesophageal junction, were analyzed. All tumors showed changes in gene copy number, with the majority showing multiple changes. Regions of gain and loss were generally consistent with previous cytogenetic reports; however, the use of aCGH greatly increased the resolution of measured genomic change. By comparing gene expression and high-resolution measurement of gene copy number directly, we were able to identify several regions of high-level gain associated with substantially increased gene expression that have not been defined previously in GC. Novel candidate oncogenes included dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) and protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7).

  2. Array comparative genomic hybridization reveals similarities between nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Döring, Claudia; Vucic, Emily; Chan, Fong Chun; Ennishi, Daisuke; Tousseyn, Thomas; de Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Perner, Sven; Wlodarska, Iwona; Steidl, Christian; Gascoyne, Randy D; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2015-05-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) and T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma (THRLBCL) usually affect middle-aged men, show tumour cells with a B cell phenotype and a low tumour cell content. Whereas the clinical behaviour of NLPHL is indolent, THRLBCL presents with advanced stage disease and an aggressive behaviour. In the present study, array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in seven typical NLPHL, four THRLBCL-like NLPHL variants, six THRLBCL and four diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) derived from NLPHL. The number of genomic aberrations was higher in THRLBCL compared with typical and THRLBCL-like variant of NLPHL. Gains of 2p16.1 and losses of 2p11.2 and 9p11.2 were commonly observed in typical and THRLBCL-like variants of NLPHL as well as THRLBCL. Gains of 2p16.1, affecting the REL locus were confirmed in an independent cohort. Expression of the REL protein was observed at similar frequencies in typical and THRLBCL-like variant of NLPHL as well as THRLBCL (33-38%). In conclusion, the present study reveals further similarities between NLPHL and THRLBCL on the genomic level, confirming that these entities are part of a pathobiological spectrum with common molecular features, but varying clinical presentations.

  3. Erosion and deposition on JET divertor and limiter tiles during the experimental campaigns 2005-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krat, S.; Coad, J. P.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Hakola, A.; Likonen, J.; Mayer, M.; Pisarev, A.; Widdowson, A.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2013-07-01

    Erosion from and deposition on JET divertor tiles used during the 2007-2009 campaign and on inner wall guard limiter (IWGL) tiles used during 2005-2009 are studied. The tungsten coating on the divertor tiles was mostly intact with the largest erosion ˜30% in a small local area. Locally high erosion areas were observed on the load bearing divertor tile 5 and on the horizontal surface of the divertor tile 8. The IWGL tiles show a complicated distribution of erosion and deposition areas. The total amount of carbon deposited on the all IWGL tiles during the campaign 2005-2009 is estimated to be 65 g. The density of carbon deposits is estimated to be 0.67-0.83 g/cm3.

  4. Wavelet-based detection of transcriptional activity on a novel Staphylococcus aureus tiling microarray

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-density oligonucleotide microarray is an appropriate technology for genomic analysis, and is particulary useful in the generation of transcriptional maps, ChIP-on-chip studies and re-sequencing of the genome.Transcriptome analysis of tiling microarray data facilitates the discovery of novel transcripts and the assessment of differential expression in diverse experimental conditions. Although new technologies such as next-generation sequencing have appeared, microarrays might still be useful for the study of small genomes or for the analysis of genomic regions with custom microarrays due to their lower price and good accuracy in expression quantification. Results Here, we propose a novel wavelet-based method, named ZCL (zero-crossing lines), for the combined denoising and segmentation of tiling signals. The denoising is performed with the classical SUREshrink method and the detection of transcriptionally active regions is based on the computation of the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). In particular, the detection of the transitions is implemented as the thresholding of the zero-crossing lines. The algorithm described has been applied to the public Saccharomyces cerevisiae dataset and it has been compared with two well-known algorithms: pseudo-median sliding window (PMSW) and the structural change model (SCM). As a proof-of-principle, we applied the ZCL algorithm to the analysis of the custom tiling microarray hybridization results of a S. aureus mutant deficient in the sigma B transcription factor. The challenge was to identify those transcripts whose expression decreases in the absence of sigma B. Conclusions The proposed method archives the best performance in terms of positive predictive value (PPV) while its sensitivity is similar to the other algorithms used for the comparison. The computation time needed to process the transcriptional signals is low as compared with model-based methods and in the same range to those based on the use of

  5. A large maize (Zea Mays L.) SNP genotyping array: development and germplasm genotyping, and genetic mapping to compare with the B73 reference genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SNP genotyping arrays have been useful for many applications that require a large number of molecular markers such as high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection for accelerated breeding. We report the establishment of a large SNP array for maize and i...

  6. Water and Nutrient Balances in a Large Tile-Drained Agricultural Catchment: A Distributed Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongyi; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Tian, Fuqiang; Liu, Dengfeng

    2010-11-16

    This paper presents the development and implementation of a distributed model of coupled water nutrient processes, based on the representative elementary watershed (REW) approach, to the Upper Sangamon River Basin, a large, tile-drained agricultural basin located in central Illinois, mid-west of USA. Comparison of model predictions with the observed hydrological and biogeochemical data, as well as regional estimates from literature studies, shows that the model is capable of capturing the dynamics of water, sediment and nutrient cycles reasonably well. The model is then used as a tool to gain insights into the physical and chemical processes underlying the inter- and intra-annual variability of water and nutrient balances. Model predictions show that about 80% of annual runoff is contributed by tile drainage, while the remainder comes from surface runoff (mainly saturation excess flow) and subsurface runoff. It is also found that, at the annual scale nitrogen storage in the soil is depleted during wet years, and is supplemented during dry years. This carryover of nitrogen storage from dry year to wet year is mainly caused by the lateral loading of nitrate. Phosphorus storage, on the other hand, is not affected much by wet/dry conditions simply because the leaching of it is very minor compared to the other mechanisms taking phosphorous out of the basin, such as crop harvest. The analysis then turned to the movement of nitrate with runoff. Model results suggested that nitrate loading from hillslope into the channel is preferentially carried by tile drainage. Once in the stream it is then subject to in-stream denitrification, the significant spatio-temporal variability of which can be related to the variation of the hydrologic and hydraulic conditions across the river network.

  7. Optimal Non-Invasive Fault Classification Model for Packaged Ceramic Tile Quality Monitoring Using MMW Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Smriti; Singh, Dharmendra

    2016-04-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) frequency has emerged as an efficient tool for different stand-off imaging applications. In this paper, we have dealt with a novel MMW imaging application, i.e., non-invasive packaged goods quality estimation for industrial quality monitoring applications. An active MMW imaging radar operating at 60 GHz has been ingeniously designed for concealed fault estimation. Ceramic tiles covered with commonly used packaging cardboard were used as concealed targets for undercover fault classification. A comparison of computer vision-based state-of-the-art feature extraction techniques, viz, discrete Fourier transform (DFT), wavelet transform (WT), principal component analysis (PCA), gray level co-occurrence texture (GLCM), and histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) has been done with respect to their efficient and differentiable feature vector generation capability for undercover target fault classification. An extensive number of experiments were performed with different ceramic tile fault configurations, viz., vertical crack, horizontal crack, random crack, diagonal crack along with the non-faulty tiles. Further, an independent algorithm validation was done demonstrating classification accuracy: 80, 86.67, 73.33, and 93.33 % for DFT, WT, PCA, GLCM, and HOG feature-based artificial neural network (ANN) classifier models, respectively. Classification results show good capability for HOG feature extraction technique towards non-destructive quality inspection with appreciably low false alarm as compared to other techniques. Thereby, a robust and optimal image feature-based neural network classification model has been proposed for non-invasive, automatic fault monitoring for a financially and commercially competent industrial growth.

  8. Real-time optimal adaptation for planetary geometry and texture: 4-8 tile hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Lok M; Duchaineau, Mark A; Joy, Kenneth I

    2005-01-01

    The real-time display of huge geometry and imagery databases involves view-dependent approximations, typically through the use of precomputed hierarchies that are selectively refined at runtime. A classic motivating problem is terrain visualization in which planetary databases involving billions of elevation and color values are displayed on PC graphics hardware at high frame rates. This paper introduces a new diamond data structure for the basic selective-refinement processing, which is a streamlined method of representing the well-known hierarchies of right triangles that have enjoyed much success in real-time, view-dependent terrain display. Regular-grid tiles are proposed as the payload data per diamond for both geometry and texture. The use of 4-8 grid refinement and coarsening schemes allows level-of-detail transitions that are twice as gradual as traditional quadtree-based hierarchies, as well as very high-quality low-pass filtering compared to subsampling-based hierarchies. An out-of-core storage organization is introduced based on Sierpinski indices per diamond, along with a tile preprocessing framework based on fine-to-coarse, same-level, and coarse-to-fine gathering operations. To attain optimal frame-to-frame coherence and processing-order priorities, dual split and merge queues are developed similar to the Realtime Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) Algorithm, as well as an adaptation of the ROAM frustum culling technique. Example applications of lake-detection and procedural terrain generation demonstrate the flexibility of the tile processing framework.

  9. Denitrification in the shallow ground water of a tile-drained, agricultural watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, E.; Hwang, H.-H.; Johnson, T.M.; Sanford, R.A.; Beaumont, W.C.; Holm, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonpoint-source pollution of surface water by N is considered a major cause of hypoxia. Because Corn Belt watersheds have been identified as major sources of N in the Mississippi River basin, the fate and transport of N from midwestern agricultural watersheds have received considerable interest. The fate and transport of N in the shallow ground water of these watersheds still needs additional research. Our purpose was to estimate denitrification in the shallow ground water of a tile-drained, Corn Belt watershed with fine-grained soils. Over a 3-yr period, N was monitored in the surface and ground water of an agricultural watershed in central Illinois. A significant amount of N was transported past the tile drains and into shallow ground water. The ground water nitrate was isotopically heavier than tile drain nitrate, which can be explained by denitrification in the subsurface. Denitrifying bacteria were found at depths to 10 m throughout the watershed. Laboratory and push-pull tests showed that a significant fraction of nitrate could be denitrified rapidly. We estimated that the N denitrified in shallow ground water was equivalent to 0.3 to 6.4% of the applied N or 9 to 27% of N exported via surface water. These estimates varied by water year and peaked in a year of normal precipitation after 2 yr of below average precipitation. Three years of monitoring data indicate that shallow ground water in watersheds with fine-grained soils may be a significant N sink compared with N exported via surface water. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  10. Direct measurements of the tile drain and groundwater contributions to surface water contamination: from field-scale concentration patterns in groundwater to catchment-scale dynamics in stream water nutrient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Geer, F.; Rozemeijer, J.; Van der Velde, Y.; Broers, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    Enhanced knowledge of water and nutrient pathways in catchments improves the understanding of dynamics in water quality and supports the selection of appropriate water pollution mitigation options. For this study, we physically separated tile drain effluent and groundwater discharge from an agricultural field before it entered a 43.5 meter ditch transect. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling, we directly quantified the flow route contributions to surface water discharge and solute loading. Our multi-scale experimental approach allowed us to relate these measurements to field-scale NO3 concentration patterns in shallow groundwater and to continuous NO3 records at the catchment outlet. Our mapping of nutrient concentrations in shallow groundwater at the experimental field revealed a highly variable spatial pattern, with NO3 concentrations ranging from 0 to 219 mg/l. Our measurement setup allowed us to compare NO3 concentrations of the individual tile drains to the spatial NO3 concentration pattern in shallow groundwater. These results show that tile drain effluent sampling is an efficient way to obtain information on shallow groundwater composition. The catchment-scale monitoring revealed a large spatial heterogeneity in tile drain effluent NO3 concentrations, which ranged from 0 mg/l up to 390 mg/l. A distinct similarity was found between the temporal patterns in NO3 concentrations in tile drain effluent at the field-scale, in tile drain effluent throughout the catchment, and in stream water at the catchment outlet. They all showed a seasonal pattern with higher concentrations in winter, which is related to the increased contribution of near-surface flow routes to the tile drain and stream discharge in winter. Our measurements indicated that tile drains play a major role in lateral water and solute transport from the agricultural field towards the surface water system. On average, the tile drains contributed 80% of the

  11. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893-972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts.

  12. Cell-cycle and suppressor proteins expression in uterine cervix in HIV/HPV co-infection: comparative study by tissue micro-array (TMA)

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Alcina F; Pires, Andréa Rodrigues Cordovil; de Souza, Simone R; Nuovo, Gerard J; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Tristão, Aparecida; Russomano, Fabio B; Velasque, Luciane; e Silva, José R Lapa; Pirmez, Claude

    2008-01-01

    Background The oncoproteins of human papillomavirus (HPVs) directly effect cell-cycle control. We hypothesize that regulatory and cell cycle protein expression might be additionally modified in the cervix of HIV/HPV co-infected women. Methods We analyzed the expression of Rb, p27, VEGF and Elf-1 transcriptor factor by immunohistochemistry in 163 paraffin-embeded cervical samples using Tissue Micro-Array (TMA) and correlated this to HIV-1 and HPV infection. Results HIV/HPV co-infection was associated with a significant increase in expression (p < 0.001) of VEGF and p27 in both low and high grade CIN when compared to the cervices of women infected by HPV alone. Decreased Rb expression was evident with increased CIN grade in the cervices of women infected with HPV alone (p = 0.003 average of cells/mm2 in CIN I: 17.9, CIN II/III: 4.8, and tumor 3.9). Rb expression increased 3-fold for both low and high grade CIN with HPV/HIV-1 co-infection compared to HPV infection alone but did not reach statistical significance. There was a significant increase in Elf-1 expression in HPV+/HIV- women with CIN II/III and tumor (average of cells/mm2 in CIN I: 63.8; CIN II/III: 115.7 and tumor: 112.0, p = 0.005), in comparison to controls. Conclusion Co-infection of HPV and HIV leads to significant increase in the VEGF and p27 expression when compared to HPV+/HIV-negative infection that could facilitate viral persistence and invasive tumor development. PMID:18840277

  13. An Analysis of the Selected Materials Used in Step Measurements During Pre-Fits of Thermal Protection System Tiles and the Accuracy of Measurements Made Using These Selected Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, David William

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this research project was be to compare and contrast the selected materials used in step measurements during pre-fits of thermal protection system tiles and to compare and contrast the accuracy of measurements made using these selected materials. The reasoning for conducting this test was to obtain a clearer understanding to which of these materials may yield the highest accuracy rate of exacting measurements in comparison to the completed tile bond. These results in turn will be presented to United Space Alliance and Boeing North America for their own analysis and determination. Aerospace structures operate under extreme thermal environments. Hot external aerothermal environments in high Mach number flights lead to high structural temperatures. The differences between tile heights from one to another are very critical during these high Mach reentries. The Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System is a very delicate and highly calculated system. The thermal tiles on the ship are measured to within an accuracy of .001 of an inch. The accuracy of these tile measurements is critical to a successful reentry of an orbiter. This is why it is necessary to find the most accurate method for measuring the height of each tile in comparison to each of the other tiles. The test results indicated that there were indeed differences in the selected materials used in step measurements during prefits of Thermal Protection System Tiles and that Bees' Wax yielded a higher rate of accuracy when compared to the baseline test. In addition, testing for experience level in accuracy yielded no evidence of difference to be found. Lastly the use of the Trammel tool over the Shim Pack yielded variable difference for those tests.

  14. Interferometric array generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. S.; Khare, Alika

    2006-02-01

    We report the formation of square, rectangular as well as hexagonal arrays of small light spots in one single setup using Michelson and Mach-Zehnder interferometers in tandem. The geometry of arrays can be altered easily online, by changing the relative orientations of the mirrors. The arrays could be scanned over large longitudinal distances and could be compressed to give large spot density. The expression for the resultant intensity distribution for the arrays has been worked out and the computed pattern is compared with the experimental data.

  15. The sROD module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A.; Fiorini, L.; Hernández, Y.; Higón, E.; Mellado, B.; March, L.; Moreno, P.; Reed, R.; Solans, C.; Valero, A.; Valls, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will also provide digital calibrated information with enhanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD module is designed on a double mid-size AMC format and will operate under an AdvancedTCA framework. The module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing, as well as the implementation of embedded systems. Related to optical connectors, the sROD uses 4 QSFPs to receive and transmit data from the front-end electronics and 1 Avago MiniPOD to send preprocessed data to the first level trigger system. An SFP module maintains the compatibility with the existing hardware. A complete description of the sROD module for the demonstrator including the main functionalities, circuit design and the control software and firmware will be presented.

  16. Firmware development for the ATLAS TileCal sROD

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. A main upgrade of the LHC (also called Phase-II) is planned in order to increase the instantaneous luminosity in 2022. At the TileCal level, the upgrade involves the redesign of the complete read-out architecture, affecting both the front-end and the back-end electronics. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics will transmit digitized information of the full detector to the back-end system every single bunch crossing. Thus, the back-end system must provide digital calibrated information to the first level of trigger. Having all detector data per bunch crossing in the back-end will increase the precision and granularity of the trigger information, improving this way the trigger efficiencies. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions in the so-called 'demonstrator project'. The upgraded version of the Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD demonstrator is a prototype that is being developed to validate in the demonstrator project the future sROD for Phase-II. This module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing and will be installed and working in an ATCA framework. A complete description of the sROD functionality in terms of firmware will be introduced. In addition, the status of the firmware development and a summary of the main milestones achieved and the future plans will be presented. (authors)

  17. A digital-receiver for the MurchisonWidefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, Thiagaraj; Srivani, K. S.; Roshi, D. Anish; Kamini, P. A.; Madhavi, S.; Emrich, David; Crosse, Brian; Williams, Andrew J.; Waterson, Mark; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Briggs, Frank H.; Goeke, Robert F.; Tingay, Steven J.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; R, Gopalakrishna M.; Morgan, Edward H.; Pathikulangara, Joseph; Bunton, John D.; Hampson, Grant; Williams, Christopher; Ord, Stephen M.; Wayth, Randall B.; Kumar, Deepak; Morales, Miguel F.; deSouza, Ludi; Kratzenberg, Eric; Pallot, D.; McWhirter, Russell; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Arcus, Wayne; Barnes, David G.; Bernardi, Gianni; Booler, T.; Bowman, Judd D.; Cappallo, Roger J.; Corey, Brian E.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Herne, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Kaplan, David L.; Kasper, Justin C.; Kincaid, Barton B.; Koenig, Ronald; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Lynch, Mervyn J.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Oberoi, Divya; Remillard, Ronald A.; Rogers, Alan E.; Salah, Joseph E.; Sault, Robert J.; Stevens, Jamie B.; Tremblay, S.; Webster, Rachel L.; Whitney, Alan R.; Wyithe, Stuart B.

    2015-03-01

    An FPGA-based digital-receiver has been developed for a low-frequency imaging radio interferometer, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The MWA, located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia, consists of 128 dual-polarized aperture-array elements (tiles) operating between 80 and 300 MHz, with a total processed bandwidth of 30.72 MHz for each polarization. Radio-frequency signals from the tiles are amplified and band limited using analog signal conditioning units; sampled and channelized by digital-receivers. The signals from eight tiles are processed by a single digital-receiver, thus requiring 16 digital-receivers for the MWA. The main function of the digital-receivers is to digitize the broad-band signals from each tile, channelize them to form the sky-band, and transport it through optical fibers to a centrally located correlator for further processing. The digital-receiver firmware also implements functions to measure the signal power, perform power equalization across the band, detect interference-like events, and invoke diagnostic modes. The digital-receiver is controlled by high-level programs running on a single-board-computer. This paper presents the digital-receiver design, implementation, current status, and plans for future enhancements.

  18. Predictions of the Hunt-Lu array model compared with measurements for the growth undercooling of Al{sub 3}Fe dendrites in Al-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, D.; Jones, H.

    1997-10-01

    Earlier contributions by the authors reported the first measurements of growth temperature as a function of growth velocity V and alloy concentration C{sub 0} for a dendritic intermetallic phase (Al{sub 3}Fe, in Al-rich Al-Fe alloys). Comparison with predictions of the model of Kurz, Giovanola and Trivedi (KGT model) of dendrite growth of a needle gave predicted {Delta}T a factor between 1.1 and 2.5 above the measured values. A subsequent paper presented evidence that the Al{sub 3}Fe dendrite tips were indeed needle-like under the conditions studied, as distinct from the plate-like morphology that develops behind the dendrite tips. The KGT model predicts T{sub G} and {Delta}T on the basis that marginal stability determines the operating condition at the dendrite tip. The present purpose is to compare the measurements with predictions of the more recently developed array model of Hunt and Lu.

  19. Transatlantic secondary contact in Atlantic Salmon, comparing microsatellites, a single nucleotide polymorphism array and restriction-site associated DNA sequencing for the resolution of complex spatial structure.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Ian R; Hamilton, Lorraine C; Dempson, Brian; Robertson, Martha J; Bourret, Vincent; Bernatchez, Louis; Verspoor, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Identification of discrete and unique assemblages of individuals or populations is central to the management of exploited species. Advances in population genomics provide new opportunities for re-evaluating existing conservation units but comparisons among approaches remain rare. We compare the utility of RAD-seq, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and a microsatellite panel to resolve spatial structuring under a scenario of possible trans-Atlantic secondary contact in a threatened Atlantic Salmon, Salmo salar, population in southern Newfoundland. Bayesian clustering indentified two large groups subdividing the existing conservation unit and multivariate analyses indicated significant similarity in spatial structuring among the three data sets. mtDNA alleles diagnostic for European ancestry displayed increased frequency in southeastern Newfoundland and were correlated with spatial structure in all marker types. Evidence consistent with introgression among these two groups was present in both SNP data sets but not the microsatellite data. Asymmetry in the degree of introgression was also apparent in SNP data sets with evidence of gene flow towards the east or European type. This work highlights the utility of RAD-seq based approaches for the resolution of complex spatial patterns, resolves a region of trans-Atlantic secondary contact in Atlantic Salmon in Newfoundland and demonstrates the utility of multiple marker comparisons in identifying dynamics of introgression.

  20. An Xq22.3 duplication detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH) defines a new locus (FGS5) for FG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Rosenberg, Carla; Krepischi-Santos, Ana Cristina; Kok, Fernando; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; Froyen, Guy; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Opitz, John M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2005-12-15

    FG syndrome is an X-linked multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) syndrome. It has been mapped to four distinct loci FGS1-4, through linkage analysis (Xq13, Xp22.3, and Xp11.4-p11.3) and based on the breakpoints of an X chromosome inversion (Xq11:Xq28), but so far no gene has been identified. We describe a boy with FG syndrome who has an inherited duplication at band Xq22.3 detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH). These duplication maps outside all four loci described so far for FG syndrome, representing therefore a new locus, which we propose to be called FGS5. MID2, a gene closely related to MID1, which is known to be mutated in Opitz G/BBB syndrome, maps within the duplicated segment of our patient. Since FG and Opitz G/BBB syndromes share many manifestations we considered MID2 a candidate gene for FG syndrome. We also discuss the involvement of other potential genes within the duplicated segment and its relationship with clinical symptoms of our patient, as well as the laboratory abnormalities found in his mother, a carrier of the duplication.

  1. DNA profiling by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and tumor tissue cell in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Baik, Seung-Ho; Jee, Bo-Keun; Choi, Jin-Soo; Yoon, Hyoung-Kyu; Lee, Kweon-Haeng; Kim, Yeul-Hong; Lim, Young

    2009-09-01

    Lung tumor cell DNA copy number alteration (CNA) was expected to display specific patterns such as a large-scale amplification or deletion of chromosomal arms, as previously published data have reported. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) CNA however, was expected to show normal variations in cancer patients as well as healthy individuals, and has thus been used as normal control DNA samples in various published studies. We performed array CGH to measure and compare genetic changes in terms of the CNA of PBMC samples as well as DNA isolated from tumor tissue samples, obtained from 24 non-small cell lung cancer patients. Contradictory to expectations, our studies showed that the PBMC CNA also showed chromosomal variant regions. The list included well-known tumor-associated NTRK1, FGF8, TP53, and TGFbeta1 genes and potentially novel oncogenes such as THPO (3q27.1), JMJD1B, and EGR1 (5q31.2), which was investigated in this study. The results of this study highlighted the connection between PBMC and tumor cell genomic DNA in lung cancer patients. However, the application of these studies to cancer prognosis may pose a challenge due to the large amount of information contained in genetic predisposition and family history that has to be processed for useful downstream clinical applications.

  2. Comparative Correlation Structure of Colon Cancer Locus Specific Methylation: Characterisation of Patient Profiles and Potential Markers across 3 Array-Based Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Barat, Ana; Ruskin, Heather J.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal DNA-methylation is well known to play an important role in cancer onset and development, and colon cancer is no exception to this rule. Recent years have seen the increased use of large-scale technologies, (such as methylation microarray assays or specific sequencing of methylated DNA), to determine whole genome profiles of CpG island methylation in tissue samples. Comprehensive study of methylation array data from transcriptome high-throughput platforms permits determination of gene methylation markers, important for cancer profiling. Here, three large-scale methylation datasets for colon cancer have been compared to determine locus-specific methylation agreement. These data are from the GEO database, where colon cancer and apparently healthy adjacent tissues are represented by sample sizes 125 and 29 respectively in the first dataset, 24 of each in the second and 118 of each in the third. Several data analysis techniques have been employed, including Clustering, Discriminant Principal Component Analysis, Discriminant Analysis and ROC curves, in order (i) to obtain a better insight on the locus-specific concomitant methylation structures for these diverse data and (ii) to determine a robust potential marker set for indicative screening, drawn from all data taken together. The extent of the agreement between the analysed datasets is reported. Further, potential screening methylation markers, for which methylation profiles are consistent across tissue samples and several datasets, are highlighted and discussed. PMID:26185542

  3. Kokkos Array

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards Daniel Sunderland, Harold Carter

    2012-09-12

    The Kokkos Array library implements shared-memory array data structures and parallel task dispatch interfaces for data-parallel computational kernels that are performance-portable to multicore-CPU and manycore-accelerator (e.g., GPGPU) devices.

  4. Receiver architecture of the thousand-element array (THEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, G. W.; Kokkeler, A. B.; Smolders, A. B.; Gunst, A. W.

    2000-07-01

    As part of the development of a new international radio- telescope SKA (Square Kilometer Array), an outdoor phased- array prototype, the THousand Element Array (THEA), is being developed at NFRA. THEA is a phased array with 1024 active elements distributed on a regular grid over a surface of approximately 16 m2. The array is organized into 16 units denoted as tiles. THEA operates in the frequency band from 750 to 1500 MHz. On a tile the signals from 64 antenna elements are converted into two independent RF beams. Two times 16 beams can be made simultaneously with full sensitivity by the real-time digital beam former of the THEA system. At the output of each tile the analog RF signal from a beam is converted into a 2 X 12-bit digital quadrature representation by a receiver system. A double super-heterodyne architecture is used to mix the signal band of interest to an intermediate frequency of 210 MHz. The IF-signal is shifted to baseband by means of a partly digitally implemented I/Q mixer scheme. After a quadrature mixer stage, the I and Q signals are digitized by means of 12 bit A/D converters at 40 MS/s. Implementing a part of the mixing scheme digitally offers the flexibility to use different I/Q architectures, e.g. Hartley and Weaver mixer setups. This way the effect of RFI in different mixing architectures can be analyzed. After the digital processing, the samples are multiplexed, serialized and transported over fibers to the central adaptive digital beam former unit where the signals from all tiles are combined giving 32 beams. This paper focuses on the design choices and the final implementation of the THEA system. In particular, the receiver architecture is addressed. A digital solution is presented, which enables switching between Hartley and a Weaver based mixer scheme.

  5. Mortar characterization study of unreinforced hollow clay tile masonry

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, M.B.

    1992-09-14

    This report presents the results of an investigation of mortar removed from existing hollow clay tile masonry walls in buildings located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Primary purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the properties of existing mortar and provide a similar specification for the mortar to be used in construction of test specimens and test walls for the Hollow Clay Tile Wall Test Program. A mortar characterization study of mortar samples removed from walls in four buildings, 9207, 9206, 9204-2 and 9212 was performed by Testwell Craig Materials Consultants (TCMC) under subcontract to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc (MMES). The mortar samples were collected by MMES and analyzed by TCMC in accordance with applicable ASTM standards. Petrographical and chemical analyses were performed. From the results of this investigation a mortar mix was prepared to resemble the properties of existing mortar.

  6. Calibration and monitoring systems of the ATLAS tile hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumediene, D.

    2013-08-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10,000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems are presented.

  7. Large-scale testing of structural clay tile infilled frames

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.D.; Bennett, R.M.

    1993-03-18

    A summary of large-scale cyclic static tests of structural clay tile infilled frames is given. In-plane racking tests examined the effects of varying frame stiffness, varying infill size, infill offset from frame centerline, and single and double wythe infill construction. Out-of-plane tests examined infilled frame response to inertial loadings and inter-story drift loadings. Sequential in-plane and out-of-plane loadings were performed to determine the effects of orthogonal damage and degradation on both strength and stiffness. A combined out-of-plane inertial and in-plane racking test was conducted to investigate the interaction of multi-directional loading. To determine constitutive properties of the infills, prism compression, mortar compression and various unit tile tests were performed.

  8. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2007-03-13

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  9. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2009-08-11

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  10. Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Analysis of Late Relapse Using Comparative Karyotype and Chromosome Genome Array Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Min; Scott, Bart L.; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Gooley, Ted; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is a major cause of failure after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We analyzed the relapse pattern in 1007 patients who underwent transplantation for MDS to identify factors that may determine the timing of relapse. Overall, 254 patients relapsed: 213 before 18 months and 41 later than 18 months after HCT, a time point frequently used in clinical trials. The hazard of relapse declined progressively with time since transplantation. A higher proportion of patients with early relapse had high-risk cytogenetics compared with patients with late relapse (P =.009). Patients with late relapse had suggestively longer postrelapse survival than patients who relapsed early, although the difference was not statistically significant (P =.07). Among 41 late relapsing patients, sequential cytogenetic data were available in 36. In 41% of these, new clonal abnormalities in addition to pre-HCT findings were identified at relapse; in 30% pre-HCT abnormalities were replaced by new clones, in 17.3% the same clone was present before HCT and at relapse, and in 9.7%, no abnormalities were present either before HCT or at relapse. Comparative chromosomal genomic array testing in 3 patients with late relapse showed molecular differences not detectable by cytogenetics between the pre-HCT clones and the clones at relapse. These data show that late relapses are not infrequent in patients who undergo transplantation for MDS. The pattern of new cytogenetic alterations at late relapse is similar to that observed in patients with early relapse and supports the concept that MDS relapse early and late after HCT is frequently due to the emergence of clones not detectable before HCT. PMID:25953732

  11. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis Reveals Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Associated with Clinical Outcome in Canine Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bresolin, Silvia; Marconato, Laura; Comazzi, Stefano; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Aresu, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Canine Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (cDLBCL) is an aggressive cancer with variable clinical response. Despite recent attempts by gene expression profiling to identify the dog as a potential animal model for human DLBCL, this tumor remains biologically heterogeneous with no prognostic biomarkers to predict prognosis. The aim of this work was to identify copy number aberrations (CNAs) by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in 12 dogs with newly diagnosed DLBCL. In a subset of these dogs, the genetic profiles at the end of therapy and at relapse were also assessed. In primary DLBCLs, 90 different genomic imbalances were counted, consisting of 46 gains and 44 losses. Two gains in chr13 were significantly correlated with clinical stage. In addition, specific regions of gains and losses were significantly associated to duration of remission. In primary DLBCLs, individual variability was found, however 14 recurrent CNAs (>30%) were identified. Losses involving IGK, IGL and IGH were always found, and gains along the length of chr13 and chr31 were often observed (>41%). In these segments, MYC, LDHB, HSF1, KIT and PDGFRα are annotated. At the end of therapy, dogs in remission showed four new CNAs, whereas three new CNAs were observed in dogs at relapse compared with the previous profiles. One ex novo CNA, involving TCR, was present in dogs in remission after therapy, possibly induced by the autologous vaccine. Overall, aCGH identified small CNAs associated with outcome, which, along with future expression studies, may reveal target genes relevant to cDLBCL. PMID:25372838

  12. Response and Uniformity Studies of Directly Coupled Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Zutshi, Vishnu

    2010-04-02

    A finely-segmented scintillator-based calorimeter which capitalizes on the marriage of proven detection techniques with novel solid-state photo-detector devices such as Multi-pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) is an interesting calorimetric system from the point of view of future detector design. A calorimeter system consisting of millions of channels will require a high degree of integration. The first steps towards this integration have already been facilitated by the small size and magnetic field immunity of the MPPCs. The photo-conversion occurs right at the tile, thus obviating the need for routing of long clear fibers. Similar considerations apply to the presence of wave-length shifting (WLS) fibers inside the tiles which couple it to the photo-detectors. Significant simplification in construction and assembly ensue if the MPPCs can be coupled directly to the scintillator tiles. Equally importantly, the total absence of fibers would offer greater flexibility in the choice of the transverse segmentation while enhancing the electro-mechanical integrability of the design. The NIU high-energy physics group has been studying the fiberless or direct-coupling option for some time now. Encouraging results on response and response uniformity have been obtained using radioactive sources. This MOU seeks to set up a framework to extend these tests using beams at the MTBF. The results will be relevant to high granularity scintillator/crystal electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. The tests involve a set of small directly-coupled tile counters fabricated at NIU which will be placed in the beam to study their response and response uniformity as a function of the incident position of the particles passing through them.

  13. Natural radioactivity content of granite tiles used in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papaefthymiou, H

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in commercial granite tiles imported in Greece were performed using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranged from 1 to 434, 2 to 239 and 71 to 1576 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The calculated activity concentration index (I) values for all granite samples examined were found to be within the EC limit values for superficial and other materials with restricted use.

  14. Cellular Uptake of Tile-Assembled DNA Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kocabey, Samet; Meinl, Hanna; MacPherson, Iain S.; Cassinelli, Valentina; Manetto, Antonio; Rothenfusser, Simon; Liedl, Tim; Lichtenegger, Felix S.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-based nanostructures have received great attention as molecular vehicles for cellular delivery of biomolecules and cancer drugs. Here, we report on the cellular uptake of tubule-like DNA tile-assembled nanostructures 27 nm in length and 8 nm in diameter that carry siRNA molecules, folic acid and fluorescent dyes. In our observations, the DNA structures are delivered to the endosome and do not reach the cytosol of the GFP-expressing HeLa cells that were used in the experiments. Consistent with this observation, no elevated silencing of the GFP gene could be detected. Furthermore, the presence of up to six molecules of folic acid on the carrier surface did not alter the uptake behavior and gene silencing. We further observed several challenges that have to be considered when performing in vitro and in vivo experiments with DNA structures: (i) DNA tile tubes consisting of 42 nt-long oligonucleotides and carrying single- or double-stranded extensions degrade within one hour in cell medium at 37 °C, while the same tubes without extensions are stable for up to eight hours. The degradation is caused mainly by the low concentration of divalent ions in the media. The lifetime in cell medium can be increased drastically by employing DNA tiles that are 84 nt long. (ii) Dyes may get cleaved from the oligonucleotides and then accumulate inside the cell close to the mitochondria, which can lead to misinterpretation of data generated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. (iii) Single-stranded DNA carrying fluorescent dyes are internalized at similar levels as the DNA tile-assembled tubes used here.

  15. Poster: Building a Large Tiled-Display Cluster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    constructed a tiled-display matrix which makes the most use of the available space. However, this has made maintenance incon- 1Axel Mellinger’s Milky Way ...image of the milky way . Pub- lications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 2009. [5] T. Ni, G. S. Schmidt, O. G. Staadt, M. A. Livingston, R...theoretically mul- tiply computational throughput. In the same way , individual dis- plays or projectors can be combined to expand the visual real

  16. A hollow clay tile wall seismic performance program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Jones, W.D.; Stoddart, W.C.T.

    1992-02-25

    An overview of a multiyear hollow clay tile wall (HCTW) program being conducted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, for the US Department of Energy is presented. The purpose of the HCTW program is to determine the load capacity of unreinforced infilled HCTW buildings when subjected to earthquakes. Progress to date tends to indicate that extensive retrofit of such structures may not be warranted in low-to-moderate seismic zones.

  17. The geometry of the 37-tile microwave antenna support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    The geometry of the support structure for a proposed parabolic shaped microwave antenna is examined. The surface of the antenna is comprised of 37 hexagonal shaped tiles, each connected to a truss module. The units are joined together to form a rigidized, faceted, concave parabolic surface. The geometry specifications are described through an explanation of the structural components which make up the antenna, a description of the coordinate system devised to identify the structure, and a presentation of the nondimensional results.

  18. The effect of manufacturing variables on radiation doses from porcelain tiles.

    PubMed

    Selby, J H; Strydom, R

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies have focused on the radiological properties of glazed ceramic tiles. This study was conducted to describe the radiological properties of porcelain tiles and how they were affected by variations in the manufacturing parameters. The data showed that the majority of the uranium in the tiles was attributable to the addition of zircon while less than half of the thorium in the tile was attributable to the added zircon, and the remainder came from other minerals in the formulation. The effects of firing temperatures and compressive strengths of the tiles are presented and show that higher firing temperatures increase radon emanation, while higher compressive strengths reduce radon emanation. The study also described how the addition of zircon to the tile formulation affected the radiological exposures that could be received by a member of the public from the use of such porcelain tiles. A dose assessment was conducted based on 23 different types of tile formulation. Screening procedures for building materials have been described in European Commission documents, and these limit the addition of zircon in a porcelain tile to approximately 9% by mass. The dose assessment reported in this study showed that 20% zircon could be added to a porcelain tile without exceeding the prescribed dose limits.

  19. Buffing, burnishing, and stripping of vinyl asbestos floor tile

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, B.A.; Edwards, A.; Clark, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate airborne asbestos concentrations during the three principal types of preventative maintenance (low-speed spray-buffing, ultra high-speed burnishing, and wet-stripping) used on asbestos-containing floor tiles. These were done under pre-existing and prepared levels of floor care maintenance. Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured before and during each floor care procedure to determine the magnitude of the increase in airborne asbestos levels during each procedure. Airborne total fiber concentrations were also measured for comparison with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration`s (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 0.1 f/cm{sup 3}. Low-speed spray-buffing and wet-stripping were evaluated on pre-existing floor conditions and three levels of prepared floor care conditions (poor, medium, and good). Ultra high-speed burnishing and wet-stripping were evaluated on two levels of prepared floor care conditions (poor and good). Floor care conditions were defined in consultation with the Chemical Specialty Manufacturers Association and other representatives of floor-care chemical manufacturers. Controlled studies were conducted in an unoccupied building at the decommissioned Chanute Air Force Base in Rantoul, Illinois, with the cooperation of the U.S. Air Force. The building offered approximately 8600 ft{sup 2} of open floor space tiled with 9-inch by 9-inch resilient floor tile containing approximately 5% chrysotile asbestos.

  20. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  1. Tiling of the Drosophila epidermis by multidendritic sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Grueber, Wesley B; Jan, Lily Y; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2002-06-01

    Insect dendritic arborization (da) neurons provide an opportunity to examine how diverse dendrite morphologies and dendritic territories are established during development. We have examined the morphologies of Drosophila da neurons by using the MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker) system. We show that each of the 15 neurons per abdominal hemisegment spread dendrites to characteristic regions of the epidermis. We place these neurons into four distinct morphological classes distinguished primarily by their dendrite branching complexities. Some class assignments correlate with known proneural gene requirements as well as with central axonal projections. Our data indicate that cells within two morphological classes partition the body wall into distinct, non-overlapping territorial domains and thus are organized as separate tiled sensory systems. The dendritic domains of cells in different classes, by contrast, can overlap extensively. We have examined the cell-autonomous roles of starry night (stan) (also known as flamingo (fmi)) and sequoia (seq) in tiling. Neurons with these genes mutated generally terminate their dendritic fields at normal locations at the lateral margin and segment border, where they meet or approach the like dendrites of adjacent neurons. However, stan mutant neurons occasionally send sparsely branched processes beyond these territories that could potentially mix with adjacent like dendrites. Together, our data suggest that widespread tiling of the larval body wall involves interactions between growing dendritic processes and as yet unidentified signals that allow avoidance by like dendrites.

  2. JuxtaView - A tool for interactive visualization of large imagery on scalable tiled displays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krishnaprasad, N.K.; Vishwanath, V.; Venkataraman, S.; Rao, A.G.; Renambot, L.; Leigh, J.; Johnson, A.E.; Davis, B.

    2004-01-01

    JuxtaView is a cluster-based application for viewing ultra-high-resolution images on scalable tiled displays. We present in JuxtaView, a new parallel computing and distributed memory approach for out-of-core montage visualization, using LambdaRAM, a software-based network-level cache system. The ultimate goal of JuxtaView is to enable a user to interactively roam through potentially terabytes of distributed, spatially referenced image data such as those from electron microscopes, satellites and aerial photographs. In working towards this goal, we describe our first prototype implemented over a local area network, where the image is distributed using LambdaRAM, on the memory of all nodes of a PC cluster driving a tiled display wall. Aggressive pre-fetching schemes employed by LambdaRAM help to reduce latency involved in remote memory access. We compare LambdaRAM with a more traditional memory-mapped file approach for out-of-core visualization. ?? 2004 IEEE.

  3. Self-assembly of complex two-dimensional shapes from single-stranded DNA tiles.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bryan; Vhudzijena, Michelle K; Robaszewski, Joanna; Yin, Peng

    2015-05-08

    Current methods in DNA nano-architecture have successfully engineered a variety of 2D and 3D structures using principles of self-assembly. In this article, we describe detailed protocols on how to fabricate sophisticated 2D shapes through the self-assembly of uniquely addressable single-stranded DNA tiles which act as molecular pixels on a molecular canvas. Each single-stranded tile (SST) is a 42-nucleotide DNA strand composed of four concatenated modular domains which bind to four neighbors during self-assembly. The molecular canvas is a rectangle structure self-assembled from SSTs. A prescribed complex 2D shape is formed by selecting the constituent molecular pixels (SSTs) from a 310-pixel molecular canvas and then subjecting the corresponding strands to one-pot annealing. Due to the modular nature of the SST approach we demonstrate the scalability, versatility and robustness of this method. Compared with alternative methods, the SST method enables a wider selection of information polymers and sequences through the use of de novo designed and synthesized short DNA strands.

  4. Surface defect detection in tiling Industries using digital image processing methods: analysis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad H; Asemani, Davud

    2014-05-01

    Ceramic and tile industries should indispensably include a grading stage to quantify the quality of products. Actually, human control systems are often used for grading purposes. An automatic grading system is essential to enhance the quality control and marketing of the products. Since there generally exist six different types of defects originating from various stages of tile manufacturing lines with distinct textures and morphologies, many image processing techniques have been proposed for defect detection. In this paper, a survey has been made on the pattern recognition and image processing algorithms which have been used to detect surface defects. Each method appears to be limited for detecting some subgroup of defects. The detection techniques may be divided into three main groups: statistical pattern recognition, feature vector extraction and texture/image classification. The methods such as wavelet transform, filtering, morphology and contourlet transform are more effective for pre-processing tasks. Others including statistical methods, neural networks and model-based algorithms can be applied to extract the surface defects. Although, statistical methods are often appropriate for identification of large defects such as Spots, but techniques such as wavelet processing provide an acceptable response for detection of small defects such as Pinhole. A thorough survey is made in this paper on the existing algorithms in each subgroup. Also, the evaluation parameters are discussed including supervised and unsupervised parameters. Using various performance parameters, different defect detection algorithms are compared and evaluated.

  5. Analysis of dynamic testing performed on structural clay tile infilled frames

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joele Johnston

    1994-12-18

    The behavior of two structural clay tile infilled frames subjected to dynamic loading is investigated. The testing was performed by USACERL using a biaxial shake table machine on which two framed infills were spaced nine feet apart and connected by steel trusses and an eight inch concrete roof slab. The infills were composed of structural clay tile block which were laid with the cores horizontal. The specimen was loaded in both the out-of-plane and in-plane directions using a site specific time history record. The testing focused on determining frame and panel load-deflection behavior, acceleration amplification, and frequency degradation characteristics. The out-of-plane tests resulted in little degradation of frequency which means there was little loss of stiffness. There was no evidence of the infill {open_quotes}walking-out{close_quotes} of the steel frame; in fact the infill still had substantial stability after completion of the out-of-plane tests. As a result of the gradual increase in ground motion in the in-plane testing, the stiffness of the specimen gradually decreased. Strength and stiffness characteristics obtained from the dynamic testing were comparable to results and behavior seen in static tests. Degradation in the panel was much more rapid under the stronger ground motions which were produced during the sine sweep tests.

  6. Defects detection for rough magnetic tiles surface based on light sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Tao, Jiayuan; Chen, Xiangcheng; Wang, Keyi

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic tile as a kind of product of mass production and wide application in electronic motors, and defects detection is a major issue in its production line. In this paper, a machine vision method based on black-stripe projection is presented to deal with this issue. Because of magnetic tile surface with black colors, rough structure and complex grinding textures, we abandon intensity imaging and resort to light sectioning methods which provides more reliable and abundant surface information. In order to suppress the speckle diffraction effect caused by laser light source, we used the light-emitting diode (LED) with incoherent characteristics. The black-stripe images were captured by a high-speed camera. A fast algorithm was developed to extract and compare both edges of the black-stripe, which could detect defects and eliminate the effects of vibrations. The experimental results show that the simple and fast processing method proposed in this paper can detect the structural defects such as micro pits and micro cracks.

  7. Leaching of the Neonicotinoids Thiamethoxam and Imidacloprid from Sugar Beet Seed Dressings to Subsurface Tile Drains.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Felix E; Kasteel, Roy; Garcia Delgado, Maria F; Hanke, Irene; Huntscha, Sebastian; Balmer, Marianne E; Poiger, Thomas; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2016-08-24

    Pesticide transport from seed dressings toward subsurface tile drains is still poorly understood. We monitored the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and thiamethoxam from sugar beet seed dressings in flow-proportional drainage water samples, together with spray applications of bromide and the herbicide S-metolachlor in spring and the fungicides epoxiconazole and kresoxim-methyl in summer. Event-driven, high first concentration maxima up to 2830 and 1290 ng/L for thiamethoxam and imidacloprid, respectively, were followed by an extended period of tailing and suggested preferential flow. Nevertheless, mass recoveries declined in agreement with the degradation and sorption properties collated in the groundwater ubiquity score, following the order bromide (4.9%), thiamethoxam (1.2%), imidacloprid (0.48%), kresoxim-methyl acid (0.17%), S-metolachlor (0.032%), epoxiconazole (0.013%), and kresoxim-methyl (0.003%), and indicated increased leaching from seed dressings compared to spray applications. Measured concentrations and mass recoveries indicate that subsurface tile drains contribute to surface water contamination with neonicotinoids from seed dressings.

  8. Preferential bromide and pesticide movement to tile drains under different cropping practices.

    PubMed

    Fortin, J; Gagnon-Bertrand, E; Vézina, L; Rompré, M

    2002-01-01

    Subsurface drainage systems are useful tools to study chemical leaching in soils. Our objective was to compare the breakthrough behavior of bromide, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamid] to tile drains under two fall tillage practices (conventional tillage [CT] with a moldboard plow, and reduced tillage [RT] with a chisel plow) in field plots cultivated with corn (Zea mays L.). Leachate volume were greater in RT than in CT, with no statistical differences. Soil analysis showed that bromide migrated deeper in the soil profile than both herbicides, with little tillage effect. All chemicals were detected in drainage water at the same time and followed an event-driven behavior. Tillage had no effect on atrazine and metolachlor found in drainage water, while bromide concentration peaks were higher in RT than in CT in 1999. Concentration peaks were recorded earlier for atrazine and metolachlor than for bromide. Plots of cumulative relative chemical mass (cumulative mass divided by total mass measured in drainage) as a function of cumulative drainage were mostly linear for bromide, while they were S-shaped for both herbicides. Drainage that corresponded to 50% of relative cumulative mass ranged from 40 to 55% for bromide and from 5 to 28% for both herbicides. Rapid chemical movement to tile drains suggested that preferential flow was important in both CT and RT, and that these tillage practices had little influence on this phenomena.

  9. Coverage percentage and raman measurement of cross-tile and scaffold cross-tile based DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Ahn, Sang Jung; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Kim, Jang Ah; Amin, Rashid; Mitta, Sekhar Babu; Vellampatti, Srivithya; Kim, Byeonghoon; Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Taesung; Yun, Kyusik; LaBean, Thomas H; Park, Sung Ha

    2015-11-01

    We present two free-solution annealed DNA nanostructures consisting of either cross-tile CT1 or CT2. The proposed nanostructures exhibit two distinct structural morphologies, with one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes for CT1 and 2D nanolattices for CT2. When we perform mica-assisted growth annealing with CT1, a dramatic dimensional change occurs where the 1D nanotubes transform into 2D nanolattices due to the presence of the substrate. We assessed the coverage percentage of the 2D nanolattices grown on the mica substrate with CT1 and CT2 as a function of the concentration of the DNA monomer. Furthermore, we fabricated a scaffold cross-tile (SCT), which is a new design of a modified cross-tile that consists of four four-arm junctions with a square aspect ratio. For SCT, eight oligonucleotides are designed in such a way that adjacent strands with sticky ends can produce continuous arms in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The SCT was fabricated via free-solution annealing, and self-assembled SCT produces 2D nanolattices with periodic square cavities. All structures were observed via atomic force microscopy. Finally, we fabricated divalent nickel ion (Ni(2+))- and trivalent dysprosium ion (Dy(3+))-modified 2D nanolattices constructed with CT2 on a quartz substrate, and the ion coordinations were examined via Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Comparative transcriptomic profiling of Vitis vinifera under high light using a custom-made array and the Affymetrix GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luísa C; Vilela, Belmiro J; Mullineaux, Phil M; Amâncio, Sara

    2011-11-01

    Understanding abiotic stress responses is one of the most important issues in plant research nowadays. Abiotic stress, including excess light, can promote the onset of oxidative stress through the accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Oxidative stress also arises when in vitro propagated plants are exposed to high light upon transfer to ex vitro. To determine whether the underlying pathways activated at the transfer of in vitro grapevine to ex vitro conditions reflect the processes occurring upon light stress, we used Vitis vinifera Affymetrix GeneChip (VvGA) and a custom array of genes responsive to light stress (LSCA) detected by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). When gene-expression profiles were compared, 'protein metabolism and modification', 'signaling', and 'anti-oxidative' genes were more represented in LSCA, while, in VvGA, 'cell wall metabolism' and 'secondary metabolism' were the categories in which gene expression varied more significantly. The above functional categories confirm previous studies involving other types of abiotic stresses, enhancing the common attributes of abiotic stress defense pathways. The LSCA analysis of our experimental system detected strong response of heat shock genes, particularly the protein rescuing mechanism involving the cooperation of two ATP-dependent chaperone systems, Hsp100 and Hsp70, which showed an unusually late response during the recovery period, of extreme relevance to remove non-functional, potentially harmful polypeptides arising from misfolding, denaturation, or aggregation brought about by stress. The success of LSCA also proves the feasibility of a custom-made qRT-PCR approach, particularly for species for which no GeneChip is available and for researchers dealing with a specific and focused problem.

  11. Dense array expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joseph N.; Chen, LiangMing

    1999-10-01

    Various researchers have realized the value of implementing loop fusion to evaluate dense (pointwise) array expressions. Recently, the method of template metaprogramming in C++ has been used to significantly speed-up the evaluation of array expressions, allowing C++ programs to achieve performance comparable to or better than FORTRAN for numerical analysis applications. Unfortunately, the template metaprogramming technique suffers from several limitations in applicability, portability, and potential performance. We present a framework for evaluating dense array expressions in object-oriented programming languages. We demonstrate how this technique supports both common subexpression elimination and threaded implementation and compare its performance to object-library and hand-generated code.

  12. Filler bar heating due to stepped tiles in the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, D. H.; Smith, D. M.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Patten, A. B.; Hamilton, H. H., II

    1983-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to investigate the excessive heating in the tile to tile gaps of the Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System due to stepped tiles. The excessive heating was evidence by visible discoloration and charring of the filler bar and strain isolation pad that is used in the attachment of tiles to the aluminum substrate. Two tile locations on the Shuttle orbiter were considered, one on the lower surface of the fuselage and one on the lower surface of the wing. The gap heating analysis involved the calculation of external and internal gas pressures and temperatures, internal mass flow rates, and the transient thermal response of the thermal protection system. The results of the analysis are presented for the fuselage and wing location for several step heights. The results of a study to determine the effectiveness of a half height ceramic fiber gap filler in preventing hot gas flow in the tile gaps are also presented.

  13. CAD Tools for Creating Space-filing 3D Escher Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Sequin, Carlo H.

    2009-04-10

    We discuss the design and implementation of CAD tools for creating decorative solids that tile 3-space in a regular, isohedral manner. Starting with the simplest case of extruded 2D tilings, we describe geometric algorithms used for maintaining boundary representations of 3D tiles, including a Java implementation of an interactive constrained Delaunay triangulation library and a mesh-cutting algorithm used in layering extruded tiles to create more intricate designs. Finally, we demonstrate a CAD tool for creating 3D tilings that are derived from cubic lattices. The design process for these 3D tiles is more constrained, and hence more difficult, than in the 2D case, and it raises additional user interface issues.

  14. Retrosynthetic Analysis-Guided Breaking Tile Symmetry for the Assembly of Complex DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Wu, Siyu; Tian, Cheng; Yu, Guimei; Jiang, Wen; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2016-10-11

    Current tile-based DNA self-assembly produces simple repetitive or highly symmetric structures. In the case of 2D lattices, the unit cell often contains only one basic tile because the tiles often are symmetric (in terms of either the backbone or the sequence). In this work, we have applied retrosynthetic analysis to determine the minimal asymmetric units for complex DNA nanostructures. Such analysis guides us to break the intrinsic structural symmetries of the tiles to achieve high structural complexities. This strategy has led to the construction of several DNA nanostructures that are not accessible from conventional symmetric tile designs. Along with previous studies, herein we have established a set of four fundamental rules regarding tile-based assembly. Such rules could serve as guidelines for the design of DNA nanostructures.

  15. Array tomography: immunostaining and antibody elution.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are prepared for imaging by tagging with primary antibodies against specific cellular targets, followed by labeling with fluorescent secondary antibodies. Alternatively, fluorescent proteins that have been introduced into the tissue before dissection can be used.

  16. Array tomography: rodent brain fixation and embedding.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the fixation and processing required to prepare tissues for immunofluorescence array tomography.

  17. Measuring the hydraulic conductivity of soil adjacent to tile drains in a heavy clay soil in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Van Hoorn, J. W.; Stoffelsen, G. H.

    The hydraulic conductivity, Ksat, of soil adjacent to tile drains in heavy clay soils was measured at twelve locations with a new technique. This technique involves excavation of a cube of soil (25 cm × 25 cm × 25 cm) in situ around a tile fragment. Cutting of the tile leaves it protruding from the cube for ˜5 cm on two sides, also when covering five sides of the cube with a layer of gypsum outside the pit. Flow rates from the tile are measured for two conditions: (1) infiltration into the layer which was previously the lower horizontal soil surface of the cube; and (2) infiltration into the upper surface. The cube is turned upside down to allow the first measurement. The open surface is then covered with gypsum. The cube is turned upside down again and gypsum is removed from the upper surface of the cube (which is the original upper surface of the cube in the pit) to allow the second measurement. The first measurement mainly characterizes undisturbed soil below the drain, the second characterizes soil above the drain (fill). Dye is added to the percolating water to trace patterns of water movement, using micromorphometric techniques. Flow rates are transformed to Ksat-values by using an electrolytic analog model. Measured Ksat-values below the drain had median values of 10 m/day and agreed well with those measured in undisturbed soil at comparable depth, indicating that there are no changes due to either system construction or system operation. The median Ksat for fill above the drain was 5 m/day. The conclusions reached pertain to three types of drains, e.g., one fired-clay pipe and two types of plastic pipe. The dye studies showed that water movement occurred almost exclusively along larger planar voids (cracks), and hardly along channels (rootholes). Water-conducting voids were below 2% by volume.

  18. Inferring the interconnections between surface water bodies, tile-drains and an unconfined aquifer-aquitard system: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, N.; Di Giuseppe, D.; Faccini, B.; Ferretti, G.; Mastrocicco, M.; Coltorti, M.

    2016-06-01

    Shallow lenses in reclaimed coastal areas are precious sources of freshwater for crop development, but their seasonal behaviour is seldom known in tile-drained fields. In this study, field monitoring and numerical modelling provide a robust conceptual model of these complex environments. Crop and meteorological data are used to implement an unsaturated flow model to reconstruct daily recharge. Groundwater fluxes and salinity, water table elevation, tile-drains' discharge and salinity are used to calibrate a 2D density-dependent numerical model to quantify non-reactive solute transport within the aquifer-aquitard system. Results suggest that lateral fluxes in low hydraulic conductivity sediments are limited, while water table fluctuation is significant. The use of depth-integrated monitoring to calibrate the model results in poor efficiency, while multi-level soil profiles are crucial to define the mixing zone between fresh and brackish groundwater. Measured fluxes and chloride concentrations from tile-drains not fully compare with calculated ones due to preferential flow through cracks.

  19. Numerical investigation of the spatial scale and time dependency of tile drainage contribution to stream flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nicholas W.; Arenas, Antonio A.; Schilling, Keith E.; Weber, Larry J.

    2016-07-01

    Tile drainage systems are pervasive in the Central U.S., significantly altering the hydrologic system. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of tile drainage systems on streamflow. A physically based coupled hydrologic model was applied to a 45 km2 agricultural Iowa watershed. Tile drainage was incorporated though an equivalent porous medium approach, calibrated though numerical experimentation. Experimental results indicated that a significant increase in hydraulic conductivity of the equivalent medium layer was needed to achieve agreement in total outflow with an explicit numerical representation of a tiled system. Watershed scale analysis derived the tile drainage contribution to stream flow (QT/Q) from a numerical tracer driven analysis of instream surface water. During precipitation events tile drainage represented 30% of stream flow, whereas during intervals between precipitations events, 61% of stream flow originated from the tile system. A division of event and non-event periods produced strong correlations between QT/Q and drainage area, positive for events, and negative for non-events. The addition of precipitation into the system acted to saturate near surface soils, increase lateral soil water movement, and dilute the relatively stable instream tile flow. Increased intensity precipitation translated the QT/Q relationship downward in a consistent manner. In non-event durations, flat upland areas contributed large contributions of tile flow, diluted by larger groundwater (non-tile) contribution to stream flow in the downstream steeper portion of the watershed. Study results provide new insights on the spatiotemporal response of tile drainage to precipitation and contributions of tile drainage to streamflow at a watershed scale, with results having important implications for nitrate transport.

  20. Development and implementation of a highly-multiplexed SNP array for genetic mapping in maritime pine and comparative mapping with loblolly pine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant source of genetic variation among individuals of a species. New genotyping technologies allow examining hundreds to thousands of SNPs in a single reaction for a wide range of applications such as genetic diversity analysis, linkage mapping, fine QTL mapping, association studies, marker-assisted or genome-wide selection. In this paper, we evaluated the potential of highly-multiplexed SNP genotyping for genetic mapping in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), the main conifer used for commercial plantation in southwestern Europe. Results We designed a custom GoldenGate assay for 1,536 SNPs detected through the resequencing of gene fragments (707 in vitro SNPs/Indels) and from Sanger-derived Expressed Sequenced Tags assembled into a unigene set (829 in silico SNPs/Indels). Offspring from three-generation outbred (G2) and inbred (F2) pedigrees were genotyped. The success rate of the assay was 63.6% and 74.8% for in silico and in vitro SNPs, respectively. A genotyping error rate of 0.4% was further estimated from segregating data of SNPs belonging to the same gene. Overall, 394 SNPs were available for mapping. A total of 287 SNPs were integrated with previously mapped markers in the G2 parental maps, while 179 SNPs were localized on the map generated from the analysis of the F2 progeny. Based on 98 markers segregating in both pedigrees, we were able to generate a consensus map comprising 357 SNPs from 292 different loci. Finally, the analysis of sequence homology between mapped markers and their orthologs in a Pinus taeda linkage map, made it possible to align the 12 linkage groups of both species. Conclusions Our results show that the GoldenGate assay can be used successfully for high-throughput SNP genotyping in maritime pine, a conifer species that has a genome seven times the size of the human genome. This SNP-array will be extended thanks to recent sequencing effort using new generation

  1. Suppression of backscattered diffraction from sub-wavelength 'moth-eye' arrays.

    PubMed

    Stavroulakis, Petros I; Boden, Stuart A; Johnson, Thomas; Bagnall, Darren M

    2013-01-14

    The eyes and wings of some species of moth are covered with arrays of nanoscale features that dramatically reduce reflection of light. There have been multiple examples where this approach has been adapted for use in antireflection and antiglare technologies with the fabrication of artificial moth-eye surfaces. In this work, the suppression of iridescence caused by the diffraction of light from such artificial regular moth-eye arrays at high angles of incidence is achieved with the use of a new tiled domain design, inspired by the arrangement of features on natural moth-eye surfaces. This bio-mimetic pillar architecture contains high optical rotational symmetry and can achieve high levels of diffraction order power reduction. For example, a tiled design fabricated in silicon and consisting of domains with 9 different orientations of the traditional hexagonal array exhibited a ~96% reduction in the intensity of the -1 diffraction order. It is suggested natural moth-eye surfaces have evolved a tiled domain structure as it confers efficient antireflection whilst avoiding problems with high angle diffraction. This combination of antireflection and stealth properties increases chances of survival by reducing the risk of the insect being spotted by a predator. Furthermore, the tiled domain design could lead to more effective artificial moth-eye arrays for antiglare and stealth applications.

  2. Micromechanics and advanced designs for curved photodetector arrays in hemispherical electronic-eye cameras.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gunchul; Jung, Inhwa; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Song, Jizhou; Wang, Shuodao; Ko, Heung Cho; Huang, Yonggang; Ha, Jeong Sook; Rogers, John A

    2010-04-09

    The fabrication of a hemispherical electronic-eye camera with optimized designs based upon micromechanical analysis is reported. The photodetector arrays combine layouts with multidevice tiles and extended, non-coplanar interconnects to improve the fill factor and deformability, respectively. Quantitative comparison to micromechanics analysis reveals the key features of these designs. Color images collected with working cameras demonstrate the utility of these approaches.

  3. Aperiodic compression and reconstruction of real-world material systems based on Wang tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doškář, Martin; Novák, Jan; Zeman, Jan

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents a concept to compress and synthesize complex material morphologies that is based on Wang tilings. Specifically, a microstructure is stored in a set of Wang tiles and its reconstruction is performed by means of a stochastic tiling algorithm. A substantial part of the study is devoted to the setup of optimal parameters of the automatic tile design by means of parametric studies with statistical descriptors at heart. The performance of the method is demonstrated on four two-dimensional two-phase target systems, monodisperse media with hard and soft disks, sandstone, and high porosity metallic foam.

  4. Microwave energy versus convected hot air for rapidly drying ceramic tile

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine if microwave energy could provide advantages over the conventional hot air method currently used for rapidly drying ceramic tile. Tiles consisting of a typical fast-fire body formula were dried to 0.5% moisture using a 2.45 GHz, 950W microwave oven and a natural gas-fired roller dryer. Statistical methods were employed to develop equations for predicting microwave energy consumption, tile % moisture and surface temperature given drying time, tile volume and % relative humidity. Microwave drying was found to require 36% less energy than hot air drying. Moisture was removed and surface temperature elevated at faster rates using microwave energy.

  5. High Resolution Modeling of Tile-Drained Controls on Ecohydrologic Dynamics in Intensively Managed Landscapes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.; Woo, D.

    2015-12-01

    Tile drains are widely used in the Midwestern United States to improve the productivity of poorly drained agricultural fields. Since tile drain reduces vadose zone soil moisture by lowering the water table, and its outlets feed directly into streams and ditches, tile flow can affect various hydrologic, biotic and biogeochemical processes in the watershed. However, the effects of tile flow on ecohydrologic and nutrient dynamics at scales dominated by microtopographic variability, such as depression and roadside ditches, remain poorly understood. Here we present an explicit model of tile flow and incorporate into the integrated ecohydrologic-flow model, MLCan-GCSFlow, to investigate the impacts of tile drain on ecohydrologic and nutrient dynamics in intensively managed agricultural fields at lidar-resolution scales. Explicit coupling between subsurface and tile flow is obtained by modifications of variably saturated Richards equation to capture the impacts of tile drain on soil moisture. The coupling between subsurface and overland flow is obtained by prescribing a boundary condition switching approach at the top surface of the computational domain. Model results for study sites in Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes (IMLCZO) show the significance of tile drain flow on the vertical and spatial soil moisture distribution and coupled surface - sub-surface flow dynamics.

  6. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Tether Fragments on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    The SPHC hydrodynamic code was used to simulate impacts of Kevlar and aluminum projectiles on a model of the LI-900 type insulating tiles used on Space Shuffle Orbiters The intent was to examine likely damage that such tiles might experience if impacted by orbital debris consisting of tether fragments. Projectile speeds ranged from 300 meters per second to 10 kilometers per second. Damage is characterized by penetration depth, tile surface-hole diameter, tile body-cavity diameter, coating fracture diameter, tether and cavity wall material phases, and deformation of the aluminum backwall.

  7. Self-assembly of fully addressable DNA nanostructures from double crossover tiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Lin, Tong; Zhang, Suoyu; Bai, Tanxi; Mi, Yongli; Wei, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami and single-stranded tile (SST) are two proven approaches to self-assemble finite-size complex DNA nanostructures. The construction elements appeared in structures from these two methods can also be found in multi-stranded DNA tiles such as double crossover tiles. Here we report the design and observation of four types of finite-size lattices with four different double crossover tiles, respectively, which, we believe, in terms of both complexity and robustness, will be rival to DNA origami and SST structures. PMID:27484479

  8. Hypothetical Reentry Thermostructural Performance of Space Shuttle Orbiter With Missing or Eroded Thermal Protection Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Gong, Leslie; Quinn, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    This report deals with hypothetical reentry thermostructural performance of the Space Shuttle orbiter with missing or eroded thermal protection system (TPS) tiles. The original STS-5 heating (normal transition at 1100 sec) and the modified STS-5 heating (premature transition at 800 sec) were used as reentry heat inputs. The TPS missing or eroded site is assumed to be located at the center or corner (spar-rib juncture) of the lower surface of wing midspan bay 3. For cases of missing TPS tiles, under the original STS-5 heating, the orbiter can afford to lose only one TPS tile at the center or two TPS tiles at the corner (spar-rib juncture) of the lower surface of wing midspan bay 3. Under modified STS-5 heating, the orbiter cannot afford to lose even one TPS tile at the center or at the corner of the lower surface of wing midspan bay 3. For cases of eroded TPS tiles, the aluminum skin temperature rises relatively slowly with the decreasing thickness of the eroded central or corner TPS tile until most of the TPS tile is eroded away, and then increases exponentially toward the missing tile case.

  9. Aperiodic compression and reconstruction of real-world material systems based on Wang tiles.

    PubMed

    Doškář, Martin; Novák, Jan; Zeman, Jan

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents a concept to compress and synthesize complex material morphologies that is based on Wang tilings. Specifically, a microstructure is stored in a set of Wang tiles and its reconstruction is performed by means of a stochastic tiling algorithm. A substantial part of the study is devoted to the setup of optimal parameters of the automatic tile design by means of parametric studies with statistical descriptors at heart. The performance of the method is demonstrated on four two-dimensional two-phase target systems, monodisperse media with hard and soft disks, sandstone, and high porosity metallic foam.

  10. Ceramic-ceramic shell tile thermal protection system and method thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Smith, Marnell (Inventor); Goldstein, Howard E. (Inventor); Zimmerman, Norman B. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A ceramic reusable, externally applied composite thermal protection system (TPS) is proposed. The system functions by utilizing a ceramic/ceramic upper shell structure which effectively separates its primary functions as a thermal insulator and as a load carrier to transmit loads to the cold structure. The composite tile system also prevents impact damage to the atmospheric entry vehicle thermal protection system. The composite tile comprises a structurally strong upper ceramic/ceramic shell manufactured from ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix meeting the thermal and structural requirements of a tile used on a re-entry aerospace vehicle. In addition, a lightweight high temperature ceramic lower temperature base tile is used. The upper shell and lower tile are attached by means effective to withstand the extreme temperatures (3000 to 3200F) and stress conditions. The composite tile may include one or more layers of variable density rigid or flexible thermal insulation. The assembly of the overall tile is facilitated by two or more locking mechanisms on opposing sides of the overall tile assembly. The assembly may occur subsequent to the installation of the lower shell tile on the spacecraft structural skin.

  11. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  12. A male newborn with VACTERL association and Fanconi anemia with a FANCB deletion detected by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

    PubMed

    Umaña, Luis A; Magoulas, Pilar; Bi, Weimin; Bacino, Carlos A

    2011-12-01

    We report on a male newborn with multiple congenital abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis of VACTERL association (vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal, and limb anomalies), who had Fanconi anemia (complementation group B) recognized by the detection of a deletion in chromosome Xp22.2 using an oligonucleotide array. The diagnosis of Fanconi anemia was confirmed by increased chromosomal breakage abnormalities observed in cultured cells that were treated with cross-linking agents. This is the first report in the literature of Fanconi anemia complementation group B detected by oligonucleotide array testing postnatally.

  13. Magnetization Reversal Study of Geometrically Frustrated, Quasiperiodic Antidot Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Justin; Bhat, Vinayak; Farmer, Barry; de Long, Lance; Hastings, Todd; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John

    2013-03-01

    We have used electron beam lithography to pattern quasiperiodic AD arrays in permalloy films of thickness 25 nm. Two five-fold rotationally symmetric Penrose tilings were fabricated with AD kites and darts having long (d1) and short edges (d2) equal to 1620 nm or 810 nm, and 1000 nm or 500 nm, respectively, with fixed Py line width of 100 nm. Two eight-fold Ammann tilings were patterned with square and rhomboid AD of edge lengths of 1000 nm or 2000 nm, resp. Magnetization reversal was studied at various angles between the in-plane, applied DC magnetic field H and the quasiperiodic array. We observed very reproducible hysteresis curves with low-field anomalies not present in our previous studies of periodic, square arrays of square-, circular- and diamond-shaped AD; e.g., for the Penrose tilings, we observed four reproducible knee anomalies (both for 81 H >-71 Oe). Micromagnetic simulations exhibit systematic evolution of domain walls (DW) in the hysteretic regime due to DW pinning by edges of the quasicrystalline pattern, which correlates DW evolution with observed features in magnetic hysteresis. Research at Kentucky is supported by U.S. DoE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45653 and NSF Grant EPS-0814194.

  14. Assembly of a tile-based multilayered DNA nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Junyoung; Lee, Junywe; Tandon, Anshula; Kim, Byeonghoon; Yoo, Sanghyun; Lee, Chang-Won; Park, Sung Ha

    2015-04-01

    The Watson-Crick complementarity of DNA is exploited to construct periodically patterned nanostructures, and we herein demonstrate tile-based three dimensional (3D) multilayered DNA nanostructures that incorporate two design strategies: vertical growth and horizontal layer stacking with substrate-assisted growth. To this end, we have designed a periodically holed double-double crossover (DDX) template that can be used to examine the growth of the multilayer structures in both the vertical and horizontal directions. For vertical growth, the traditional 2D double crossover (DX) DNA lattice is seeded and grown vertically from periodic holes in the DDX template. For horizontal stacking, the DDX layers are stacked by binding the connector tiles between each layer. Although both types of multilayers exhibited successful formation, the observations with an atomic force microscope indicated that the DDX layer growth achieved with the horizontal stacking approach could be considered to be slightly better relative to the vertical growth of the DX layers in terms of uniformity, layer size, and discreteness. In particular, the newly designed DDX template layer provided a parallel arrangement between each domain with substrate-assisted growth. This kind of layer arrangement suggests a possibility of using our design scheme in the construction of other periodic structures.The Watson-Crick complementarity of DNA is exploited to construct periodically patterned nanostructures, and we herein demonstrate tile-based three dimensional (3D) multilayered DNA nanostructures that incorporate two design strategies: vertical growth and horizontal layer stacking with substrate-assisted growth. To this end, we have designed a periodically holed double-double crossover (DDX) template that can be used to examine the growth of the multilayer structures in both the vertical and horizontal directions. For vertical growth, the traditional 2D double crossover (DX) DNA lattice is seeded and grown

  15. Laboratory evaluation to reduce respirable crystalline silica dust when cutting concrete roofing tiles using a masonry saw.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Rebecca V; Sheehy, John; Feng, H Amy; Sieber, William K

    2010-04-01

    Respirable crystalline silica dust exposure in residential roofers is a recognized hazard resulting from cutting concrete roofing tiles. Roofers cutting tiles using masonry saws can be exposed to high concentrations of respirable dust. Silica exposures remain a serious threat for nearly two million U.S. construction workers. Although it is well established that respiratory diseases associated with exposure to silica dust are preventable, they continue to occur and cause disability or death. The effectiveness of both a commercially available local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system and a water suppression system in reducing silica dust was evaluated separately. The LEV system exhausted 0.24, 0.13, or 0.12 m(3)/sec of dust laden air, while the water suppression system supplied 0.13, 0.06, 0.03, or 0.02 L/sec of water to the saw blade. Using a randomized block design, implemented under laboratory conditions, the aforementioned conditions were evaluated independently on two types of concrete roofing tiles (s-shape and flat) using the same saw and blade. Each engineering control (LEV or water suppression) was replicated eight times, or four times for each type of tile. Analysis of variance was performed by comparing the mean airborne respirable dust concentrations generated during each run and engineering control treatment. The use of water controls and ventilation controls compared with the "no control" treatment resulted in a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction of mean respirable dust concentrations generated per tile cut. The percent reduction for respirable dust concentrations was 99% for the water control and 91% for the LEV. Results suggest that water is an effective method for reducing crystalline silica exposures. However, water damage potential, surface discolorations, cleanup, slip hazards, and other requirements may make the use of water problematic in many situations. Concerns with implementing an LEV system to control silica dust exposures include

  16. Scintillating tile/fiber calorimetry development at FNAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. W.; Freeman, J.; Hagstrom, R.

    1991-07-01

    The technique of calorimetry using scintillating tiles with waveshifting fibers imbedded in them for readout has been refined for use in SSC test calorimeters and for the CDF Endplug upgrade. The technique offers high light yield, good spatial uniformity, flexible readout mechanics and a very small "readout crack". Various production techniques have been developed and optimized, including control and correction of scintillator plate uniformity, techniques for splicing plastic fibers with low light losses, and laser-cutting of the groove in which the fiber is placed.

  17. Shake table testing of structural clay tile infilled frames

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.M.; Fowler, J.J.; Flanagan, R.D.

    1996-03-08

    Two steel frames with structural clay tile infills were tested under simulated seismic loads in both the out-of-plane and in-plane direction. Out-of-plane testing showed that infill panels separate from their bounding frame, and respond at their own natural frequency during a seismic excitation. Due to arching, the panels remain stable. In-plane seismic testing showed similar behavior patterns to previous static testing. The natural frequency was adequately predicted using a piecewise linear equivalent strut analytical method. The structure was then subjected to over one thousand cycles of loading using a sine sweep before failure.

  18. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  19. Aerodynamic pressure and heating-rate distributions in tile gaps around chine regions with pressure gradients at a Mach number of 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. Roane; Notestine, Kristopher K.

    1990-01-01

    Surface and gap pressures and heating-rate distributions were obtained for simulated Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile arrays on the curved surface test apparatus of the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel at Mach 6.6. The results indicated that the chine gap pressures varied inversely with gap width because larger gap widths allowed greater venting from the gap to the lower model side pressures. Lower gap pressures caused greater flow ingress from the surface and increased gap heating. Generally, gap heating was greater in the longitudinal gaps than in the circumferential gaps. Gap heating decreased with increasing gap depth. Circumferential gap heating at the mid-depth was generally less than about 10 percent of the external surface value. Gap heating was most severe at local T-gap junctions and tile-to-tile forward-facing steps that caused the greatest heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating in most gaps but increased heating in others. Limited use of flow stoppers or gap filler in longitudinal gaps could reduce gap heating in open circumferential gaps in regions of high surface pressure gradients.

  20. New family of tilings of three-dimensional Euclidean space by tetrahedra and octahedra.

    PubMed

    Conway, John H; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-07-05

    It is well known that two regular tetrahedra can be combined with a single regular octahedron to tile (complete fill) three-dimensional Euclidean space . This structure was called the "octet truss" by Buckminster Fuller. It was believed that such a tiling, which is the Delaunay tessellation of the face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice, and its closely related stacking variants, are the only tessellations of that involve two different regular polyhedra. Here we identify and analyze a unique family comprised of a noncountably infinite number of periodic tilings of whose smallest repeat tiling unit consists of one regular octahedron and six smaller regular tetrahedra. We first derive an extreme member of this unique tiling family by showing that the "holes" in the optimal lattice packing of octahedra, obtained by Minkowski over a century ago, are congruent tetrahedra. This tiling has 694 distinct concave (i.e., nonconvex) repeat units, 24 of which possess central symmetry, and hence is distinctly different and combinatorically richer than the fcc tetrahedra-octahedra tiling, which only has two distinct tiling units. Then we construct a one-parameter family of octahedron packings that continuously spans from the fcc to the optimal lattice packing of octahedra. We show that the "holes" in these packings, except for the two extreme cases, are tetrahedra of two sizes, leading to a family of periodic tilings with units composed four small tetrahedra and two large tetrahedra that contact an octahedron. These tilings generally possess 2,068 distinct concave tiling units, 62 of which are centrally symmetric.

  1. New family of tilings of three-dimensional Euclidean space by tetrahedra and octahedra

    PubMed Central

    Conway, John H.; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that two regular tetrahedra can be combined with a single regular octahedron to tile (complete fill) three-dimensional Euclidean space . This structure was called the “octet truss” by Buckminster Fuller. It was believed that such a tiling, which is the Delaunay tessellation of the face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice, and its closely related stacking variants, are the only tessellations of that involve two different regular polyhedra. Here we identify and analyze a unique family comprised of a noncountably infinite number of periodic tilings of whose smallest repeat tiling unit consists of one regular octahedron and six smaller regular tetrahedra. We first derive an extreme member of this unique tiling family by showing that the “holes” in the optimal lattice packing of octahedra, obtained by Minkowski over a century ago, are congruent tetrahedra. This tiling has 694 distinct concave (i.e., nonconvex) repeat units, 24 of which possess central symmetry, and hence is distinctly different and combinatorically richer than the fcc tetrahedra-octahedra tiling, which only has two distinct tiling units. Then we construct a one-parameter family of octahedron packings that continuously spans from the fcc to the optimal lattice packing of octahedra. We show that the “holes” in these packings, except for the two extreme cases, are tetrahedra of two sizes, leading to a family of periodic tilings with units composed four small tetrahedra and two large tetrahedra that contact an octahedron. These tilings generally possess 2,068 distinct concave tiling units, 62 of which are centrally symmetric. PMID:21690370

  2. Arrays vs. single telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. L.

    The question of the relative efficiencies of telescope arrays versus an equivalent mirror-area very large telescope is re-examined and summarized. Four separate investigations by Bowen, Johnson and Richards, Code, and Disney all came to the same conclusion: that an array of telescopes is superior, both scientifically and economically, to a single very large telescope. The costs of recently completed telescopes are compared. The costs of arrays of telescopes are shown to be significantly lower than that of a single, very large telescope, with the further advantage that because existing, proven, designs can be used, no engineering 'break-throughs' are needed.

  3. Impact: a low cost, reconfigurable, digital beamforming common module building block for next generation phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Lee; Hoffmann, Ted; Fulton, Caleb; Yeary, Mark; Saunders, Austin; Thompson, Dan; Chen, Bill; Guo, Alex; Murmann, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Phased array systems offer numerous advantages to the modern warfighter in multiple application spaces, including Radar, Electronic Warfare, Signals Intelligence, and Communications. However, a lack of commonality in the underlying technology base for DoD Phased Arrays has led to static systems with long development cycles, slow technology refreshes in response to emerging threats, and expensive, application-specific sub-components. The IMPACT module (Integrated Multi-use Phased Array Common Tile) is a multi-channel, reconfigurable, cost-effective beamformer that provides a common building block for multiple, disparate array applications.

  4. K-Band Phased Array Developed for Low- Earth-Orbit Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzic, Godfrey

    1999-01-01

    Future rapid deployment of low- and medium-Earth-orbit satellite constellations that will offer various narrow- to wide-band wireless communications services will require phased-array antennas that feature wide-angle and superagile electronic steering of one or more antenna beams. Antennas, which employ monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), are perfectly suited for this application. Under a cooperative agreement, an MMIC-based, K-band phased-array antenna is being developed with 50/50 cost sharing by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Raytheon Systems Company. The transmitting array, which will operate at 19 gigahertz (GHz), is a state-of-the-art design that features dual, independent, electronically steerable beam operation ( 42 ), a stand-alone thermal management, and a high-density tile architecture. This array can transmit 622 megabits per second (Mbps) in each beam from Earth orbit to small Earth terminals. The weight of the total array package is expected to be less than 8 lb. The tile integration technology (flip chip MMIC tile) chosen for this project represents a major advancement in phased-array engineering and holds much promise for reducing manufacturing costs.

  5. Dynamic microtubule-dependent interactions position homotypic neurones in regular monolayered arrays during retinal development.

    PubMed

    Galli-Resta, Lucia; Novelli, Elena; Viegi, Alessandro

    2002-08-01

    In the vertebrate retina cell layers support serial processing, while monolayered arrays of homotypic neurones tile each layer to allow parallel processing. How neurones form layers and arrays is still largely unknown. We show that monolayered retinal arrays are dynamic structures based on dendritic interactions between the array cells. The analysis of three developing retinal arrays shows that these become regular as a net of dendritic processes links neighbouring array cells. Molecular or pharmacological perturbations of microtubules within dendrites lead to a stereotyped and reversible disruption of array organization: array cells lose their regular spacing and the arrangement in a monolayer. This leads to a micro-mechanical explanation of how monolayers of regularly spaced 'like-cells' are formed.

  6. Close-up of Shuttle Thermal Tiles in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. The mission's third and final Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) included taking a close-up look and the repair of the damaged heat shield. Gap fillers were removed from between the orbiter's heat-shielding tiles located on the craft's underbelly. Never before had any repairs been done to an orbiter while still in space. This particular photo was taken by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, whose shadow is visible on the thermal protection tiles, and a portion of the Canadian built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm and the Nile River is visible at the bottom.

  7. Tiling analysis of melting in strongly-coupled dusty plasma*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suranga Ruhunusiri, W. D.; Feng, Yan; Liu, Bin; Goree, John

    2010-11-01

    A dusty plasma is an ionized gas containing micron-size particles of solid matter, which collect electrons and ions and become negatively charged. Due to large Coulomb interparticle potential energies, the microparticles represent a strongly-coupled plasma. In the absence of an external disturbance, the microparticles self-organize, arranging themselves in a crystalline lattice, due to their Coulomb interaction. If kinetic energy is added, the arrangement of microparticles becomes disordered, like atoms in a liquid. This melting process can be characterized by a proliferation of defects, which previous experimenters measured using Voronoi analysis. Here we use another method, tiling [1] to quantify defects. We demonstrate this method, which until now has been used only in simulations, in a dusty plasma experiment. A single layer of 4.83 μm polymer microparticles was electrically levitated in a glow discharge argon plasma. The lattice was melted by applying random kicks to the micoparticles from rastered laser beams. We imaged the particle positions and computed the corresponding tiling for both the crystalline lattice and liquid states. [1] Matthew A. Glaser, Phys. Rev A 41, 4585 (1990) ^*Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  8. Close-up of Shuttle Thermal Tiles in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26 2005, from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. The mission's third and final Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) included taking a close-up look and the repair of the damaged heat shield. Gap fillers were removed from between the orbiter's heat-shielding tiles located on the craft's underbelly. Never before had any repairs been done to an orbiter while still in space. This close up of the thermal tiles was taken by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist (out of frame). Astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration (JAXA), can be seen in the background perched on a Space Station truss.

  9. Space Shuttle Communications Coverage Analysis for Thermal Tile Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Quin D.; Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Boster, John P.; Chavez, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle ultra-high frequency Space-to-Space Communication System has to provide adequate communication coverage for astronauts who are performing thermal tile inspection and repair on the underside of the space shuttle orbiter (SSO). Careful planning and quantitative assessment are necessary to ensure successful system operations and mission safety in this work environment. This study assesses communication systems performance for astronauts who are working in the underside, non-line-of-sight shadow region on the space shuttle. All of the space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) transmitting antennas are blocked by the SSO structure. To ensure communication coverage at planned inspection worksites, the signal strength and link margin between the SSO/ISS antennas and the extravehicular activity astronauts, whose line-of-sight is blocked by vehicle structure, was analyzed. Investigations were performed using rigorous computational electromagnetic modeling techniques. Signal strength was obtained by computing the reflected and diffracted fields along the signal propagation paths between transmitting and receiving antennas. Radio frequency (RF) coverage was determined for thermal tile inspection and repair missions using the results of this computation. Analysis results from this paper are important in formulating the limits on reliable communication range and RF coverage at planned underside inspection and repair worksites.

  10. Self-Replication of Nanoscale tiles and patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikin, Paul

    2012-02-01

    We want to make a ``non-biological'' system which can self-replicate. The idea is to design particles with specific and reversible and irreversible interactions, introduce seed motifs, and cycle the system in such a way that a copy is made. Repeating the cycle would double the number of offspring in each generation leading to exponential growth. Using the chemistry of DNA either on colloids or on DNA tiles makes the specific recognition part easy. In the case of DNA tiles we have in fact replicated the seed at least to the third generation. The DNA linkers can also be self-protected so that particles don't interact unless they are held together for sufficient time -- a nano-contact glue. Chemical modification of the DNA allows us to permanently crosslink hybridized strands for irreversible bonds and a new type of photolithography. We have also designed and produced colloidal particles that use novel ``lock and key'' geometries to get specific and reversible physical interactions.[4pt] With Tong Wang, Ruojie Sha, Remi Dreyfus, Mirjam E. Leunissen, Corinna Maass, David J. Pine, and Nadrian C. Seeman.

  11. 40 CFR 427.70 - Applicability; description of the asbestos floor tile subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... asbestos floor tile subcategory. 427.70 Section 427.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Floor Tile Subcategory § 427.70 Applicability; description of the asbestos floor...

  12. 40 CFR 427.70 - Applicability; description of the asbestos floor tile subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... asbestos floor tile subcategory. 427.70 Section 427.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Floor Tile Subcategory § 427.70 Applicability; description of the asbestos floor...

  13. 40 CFR 427.70 - Applicability; description of the asbestos floor tile subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asbestos floor tile subcategory. 427.70 Section 427.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Floor Tile Subcategory § 427.70 Applicability; description of the asbestos floor...

  14. Effect of surface inlet type on suspended sediment transported through a subsurface drain tile system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Throughout the Prairie Pothole Region, subsurface tile and surface inlets are used to remove water from low-lying or poorly-drained soils. Open inlets are being increasingly converted to buried inlets in which perforated tile is placed in a trench of rock (i.e., a French drain) and buried below a la...

  15. Preferential flow estimates to an agricultural tile drain with implications for glyphosate transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, W.W.; Wilson, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural subsurface drains, commonly referred to as tile drains, are potentially significant pathways for the movement of fertilizers and pesticides to streams and ditches in much of the Midwest. Preferential flow in the unsaturated zone provides a route for water and solutes to bypass the soil matrix and reach tile drains faster than predicted by traditional displacement theory. This paper uses chloride concentrations to estimate preferential flow contributions to a tile drain during two storms in May 2004. Chloride, a conservative anion, was selected as the tracer because of differences in chloride concentrations between the two sources of water to the tile drain, preferential and matrix flow. A strong correlation between specific conductance and chloride concentration provided a mechanism to estimate chloride concentrations in the tile drain throughout the storm hydrographs. A simple mixing analysis was used to identify the preferential flow component of the storm hydrograph. During two storms, preferential flow contributed 11 and 51% of total storm tile drain flow; the peak contributions, 40 and 81%, coincided with the peak tile drain flow. Positive relations between glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] concentrations and preferential flow for the two storms suggest that preferential flow is an important transport pathway to the tile drain. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  16. A Scintillator tile-fiber preshower detector for the CDF Central Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lami

    2004-08-12

    The front face of the CDF central calorimeter is being equipped with a new Preshower detector, based on scintillator tiles read out by WLS fibers. A light yield of about 40 pe/MIP at the tile exit was obtained, exceeding the design requirements.

  17. Supporting Students' Understanding of Linear Equations with One Variable Using Algebra Tiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saraswati, Sari; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to describe how algebra tiles can support students' understanding of linear equations with one variable. This article is a part of a larger research on learning design of linear equations with one variable using algebra tiles combined with balancing method. Therefore, it will merely discuss one activity focused on how students…

  18. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  19. Effect of strain isolator pad modulus on inplane strain in Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal protection system used on the Space Shuttle orbiter to determine strains in the reusable surface insulation tiles under simulated flight loads was investigated. The effects of changes in the strain isolator pad (SIP) moduli on the strains in the tile were evaluated. To analyze the SIP/tile system, it was necessary to conduct tests to determine inplane tension and compression modulus and inplane failure strain for the densified layer of the tiles. It is shown that densification of the LI-900 tile material increases the modulus by a factor of 6 to 10 and reduces the failure strain by about 50%. It is indicated that the inplane strain levels in the Shuttle tiles in the highly loaded regions are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than the failure strain of the material. It is concluded that most of the LI-900 tiles on the Shuttle could be mounted on a SIP with tensile and shear stiffnesses 10 times those of the present SIP without inplane strain failure in the tile.

  20. A simple model for predicting solute concentration in agricultural tile lines shortly after application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenhuis, T. S.; Bodnar, M.; Geohring, L. D.; Aburime, S.-A.; Wallach, R.

    Agricultural tile drainage lines have been implicated as a source of pesticide contamination of surface waters. Field experiments were conducted and a simple model was developed to examine preferential transport of applied chemicals to agricultural tile lines. The conceptual model consists of two linear reservoirs, one near the soil surface and one near the tile drain. The connection between the two reservoirs is via preferential flow paths with very little interaction with the soil matrix. The model assumes that only part of the field contributes solutes to the tile drain. The model was evaluated with data from the field experiments in which chloride, 2,4-D, and atrazine concentrations were measured on eight tile-drained plots that were irrigated twice. Atrazine was applied two months prior to the experiment, 2,4-D was sprayed just before the first irrigation, and chloride before the second irrigation. All three chemicals were found in the tile effluent shortly after the rainfall began. Generally, the concentration increased with increased flow rates and decreased exponentially after the rainfall ceased. Although the simple model could simulate the observed chloride concentration patterns in the tile outflow for six of the eight plots, strict validation was not possible because of the difficulty with independent measurement of the data needed for a preferential flow model applied to field conditions. The results show that, to simulate pesticide concentration in tile lines, methods that can measure field averaged preferential flow characteristics need to be developed.

  1. SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Louhelainen, Jari

    2016-01-01

    The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays) focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays. PMID:27792140

  2. Terahertz NDE Application for Corrosion Detection and Evaluation under Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Stephen W.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Winfree, William P.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed Terahertz NDE is being examined as a method to inspect for possible corrosion under Space Shuttle Tiles. Other methods such as ultrasonics, infrared, eddy current and microwave technologies have demonstrable shortcomings for tile NDE. This work applies Terahertz NDE, in the frequency range between 50 GHz and 1 THz, for the inspection of manufactured corrosion samples. The samples consist of induced corrosion spots that range in diameter (2.54 to 15.2 mm) and depth (0.036 to 0.787 mm) in an aluminum substrate material covered with tiles. Results of these measurements are presented for known corrosion flaws both covered and uncovered and for blind tests with unknown corrosion flaws covered with attached tiles. The Terahertz NDE system is shown to detect all artificially manufactured corrosion regions under a Shuttle tile with a depth greater than 0.13 mm.

  3. Porosity detection in ceramic armor tiles via ultrasonic time-of-flight

    SciTech Connect

    Margetan, Frank J.; Richter, Nathaniel; Jensen, Terrence

    2011-06-23

    Some multilayer armor panels contain ceramic tiles as one constituent, and porosity in the tiles can affect armor performance. It is well known that porosity in ceramic materials leads to a decrease in ultrasonic velocity. We report on a feasibility study exploring the use of ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) to locate and characterize porous regions in armor tiles. The tiles in question typically have well-controlled thickness, thus simplifying the translation of TOF data into velocity data. By combining UT velocity measurements and X-ray absorption measurements on selected specimens, one can construct a calibration curve relating velocity to porosity. That relationship can then be used to translate typical ultrasonic C-scans of TOF-versus-position into C-scans of porosity-versus-position. This procedure is demonstrated for pulse/echo, focused-transducer inspections of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic tiles.

  4. Advanced Modeling Strategies for the Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    1999-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the deformation mechanisms in tile-reinforced armored components was conducted to develop the most efficient modeling strategies for the structural analysis of large components of the Composite Armored Vehicle. The limitations of conventional finite elements with respect to the analysis of tile-reinforced structures were examined, and two complementary optimal modeling strategies were developed. These strategies are element layering and the use of a tile-adhesive superelement. Element layering is a technique that uses stacks of shear deformable shell elements to obtain the proper transverse shear distributions through the thickness of the laminate. The tile-adhesive superelement consists of a statically condensed substructure model designed to take advantage of periodicity in tile placement patterns to eliminate numerical redundancies in the analysis. Both approaches can be used simultaneously to create unusually efficient models that accurately predict the global response by incorporating the correct local deformation mechanisms.

  5. Fractal spectral triples on Kellendonk's C∗-algebra of a substitution tiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mampusti, Michael; Whittaker, Michael F.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new class of noncommutative spectral triples on Kellendonk's C∗-algebra associated with a nonperiodic substitution tiling. These spectral triples are constructed from fractal trees on tilings, which define a geodesic distance between any two tiles in the tiling. Since fractals typically have infinite Euclidean length, the geodesic distance is defined using Perron-Frobenius theory, and is self-similar with scaling factor given by the Perron-Frobenius eigenvalue. We show that each spectral triple is θ-summable, and respects the hierarchy of the substitution system. To elucidate our results, we construct a fractal tree on the Penrose tiling, and explicitly show how it gives rise to a collection of spectral triples.

  6. A Large Maize (Zea mays L.) SNP Genotyping Array: Development and Germplasm Genotyping, and Genetic Mapping to Compare with the B73 Reference Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ganal, Martin W.; Durstewitz, Gregor; Polley, Andreas; Bérard, Aurélie; Buckler, Edward S.; Charcosset, Alain; Clarke, Joseph D.; Graner, Eva-Maria; Hansen, Mark; Joets, Johann; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; McMullen, Michael D.; Montalent, Pierre; Rose, Mark; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Sun, Qi; Walter, Hildrun; Martin, Olivier C.; Falque, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    SNP genotyping arrays have been useful for many applications that require a large number of molecular markers such as high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection. We report the establishment of a large maize SNP array and its use for diversity analysis and high density linkage mapping. The markers, taken from more than 800,000 SNPs, were selected to be preferentially located in genes and evenly distributed across the genome. The array was tested with a set of maize germplasm including North American and European inbred lines, parent/F1 combinations, and distantly related teosinte material. A total of 49,585 markers, including 33,417 within 17,520 different genes and 16,168 outside genes, were of good quality for genotyping, with an average failure rate of 4% and rates up to 8% in specific germplasm. To demonstrate this array's use in genetic mapping and for the independent validation of the B73 sequence assembly, two intermated maize recombinant inbred line populations – IBM (B73×Mo17) and LHRF (F2×F252) – were genotyped to establish two high density linkage maps with 20,913 and 14,524 markers respectively. 172 mapped markers were absent in the current B73 assembly and their placement can be used for future improvements of the B73 reference sequence. Colinearity of the genetic and physical maps was mostly conserved with some exceptions that suggest errors in the B73 assembly. Five major regions containing non-colinearities were identified on chromosomes 2, 3, 6, 7 and 9, and are supported by both independent genetic maps. Four additional non-colinear regions were found on the LHRF map only; they may be due to a lower density of IBM markers in those regions or to true structural rearrangements between lines. Given the array's high quality, it will be a valuable resource for maize genetics and many aspects of maize breeding. PMID:22174790

  7. A large maize (Zea mays L.) SNP genotyping array: development and germplasm genotyping, and genetic mapping to compare with the B73 reference genome.

    PubMed

    Ganal, Martin W; Durstewitz, Gregor; Polley, Andreas; Bérard, Aurélie; Buckler, Edward S; Charcosset, Alain; Clarke, Joseph D; Graner, Eva-Maria; Hansen, Mark; Joets, Johann; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; McMullen, Michael D; Montalent, Pierre; Rose, Mark; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Sun, Qi; Walter, Hildrun; Martin, Olivier C; Falque, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    SNP genotyping arrays have been useful for many applications that require a large number of molecular markers such as high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection. We report the establishment of a large maize SNP array and its use for diversity analysis and high density linkage mapping. The markers, taken from more than 800,000 SNPs, were selected to be preferentially located in genes and evenly distributed across the genome. The array was tested with a set of maize germplasm including North American and European inbred lines, parent/F1 combinations, and distantly related teosinte material. A total of 49,585 markers, including 33,417 within 17,520 different genes and 16,168 outside genes, were of good quality for genotyping, with an average failure rate of 4% and rates up to 8% in specific germplasm. To demonstrate this array's use in genetic mapping and for the independent validation of the B73 sequence assembly, two intermated maize recombinant inbred line populations - IBM (B73×Mo17) and LHRF (F2×F252) - were genotyped to establish two high density linkage maps with 20,913 and 14,524 markers respectively. 172 mapped markers were absent in the current B73 assembly and their placement can be used for future improvements of the B73 reference sequence. Colinearity of the genetic and physical maps was mostly conserved with some exceptions that suggest errors in the B73 assembly. Five major regions containing non-colinearities were identified on chromosomes 2, 3, 6, 7 and 9, and are supported by both independent genetic maps. Four additional non-colinear regions were found on the LHRF map only; they may be due to a lower density of IBM markers in those regions or to true structural rearrangements between lines. Given the array's high quality, it will be a valuable resource for maize genetics and many aspects of maize breeding.

  8. Nitrate and Pesticide Transport From Tile-Drained Fields in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, K. L.; Rupp, D. E.; Selker, J. S.; Dragila, M. I.; Peachey, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    Tile drainage affects the hydrology and thus the solute transport on agricultural fields by increasing the volume of water that drains from the subsurface. Previous NAWQA studies have shown elevated nitrate levels in wells and high detection frequencies for selected pesticides in Willamette Valley streams. As a substantial area of Willamette Valley agricultural land is tile-drained, it is important to determine the role of tile drains in surface water and ground water pollution. Four fields in the Willamette Valley were instrumented to monitor tile effluent for two winter seasons. On two fields, surface runoff was also monitored for the second season. Field areas ranged from 3 to 30 acres and were cropped in grass, corn, or a grass/corn rotation. Tile effluent nitrate concentrations frequently exceeded 10 ppm on some fields. Flow-weighted averages for each field were 0.87 ppm and 1.36 ppm for two established grass fields, and 8.1 ppm and 14.4 ppm for grass fields that had recently grown corn. Mass losses ranged from 1.15%-6.45% of the applied nitrate through the tile drains. Diuron, Metolachlor, and Chlorpyrifos were tested in selected surface runoff and tile effluent samples. On one field, Metolachlor concentrations were similar in the tile drains and surface runoff. Concentrations in both sources were 10 times lower than the drinking water advisory for Metolachlor. In a second field, Chlorpyrifos concentrations were two orders of magnitude lower than drinking water advisories in both sources. On the same field, Diuron concentrations were significantly higher in the surface runoff than in the tile effluent. Diuron concentrations were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher during the first precipitation events after application in the surface runoff. On a third field, Diuron was at least 10 times lower than drinking water advisories in the tile effluent, with the highest concentrations found in samples collected within 21 days of pesticide application.

  9. An Automated Approach to Agricultural Tile Drain Detection and Extraction Utilizing High Resolution Aerial Imagery and Object-Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Richard A.

    Subsurface drainage from agricultural fields in the Maumee River watershed is suspected to adversely impact the water quality and contribute to the formation of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie. In early August of 2014, a HAB developed in the western Lake Erie Basin that resulted in over 400,000 people being unable to drink their tap water due to the presence of a toxin from the bloom. HAB development in Lake Erie is aided by excess nutrients from agricultural fields, which are transported through subsurface tile and enter the watershed. Compounding the issue within the Maumee watershed, the trend within the watershed has been to increase the installation of tile drains in both total extent and density. Due to the immense area of drained fields, there is a need to establish an accurate and effective technique to monitor subsurface farmland tile installations and their associated impacts. This thesis aimed at developing an automated method in order to identify subsurface tile locations from high resolution aerial imagery by applying an object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach utilizing eCognition. This process was accomplished through a set of algorithms and image filters, which segment and classify image objects by their spectral and geometric characteristics. The algorithms utilized were based on the relative location of image objects and pixels, in order to maximize the robustness and transferability of the final rule-set. These algorithms were coupled with convolution and histogram image filters to generate results for a 10km2 study area located within Clay Township in Ottawa County, Ohio. The eCognition results were compared to previously collected tile locations from an associated project that applied heads-up digitizing of aerial photography to map field tile. The heads-up digitized locations were used as a baseline for the accuracy assessment. The accuracy assessment generated a range of agreement values from 67.20% - 71.20%, and an average

  10. Experimental aerodynamic heating to simulated space shuttle tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers with variable flow angles at a nominal Mach number of 7. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Nov. 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The heat transfer to simulated shuttle thermal protection system tiles was investigated experimentally by using a highly instrumented metallic thin wall tile arranged with other metal tiles in a staggered tile array. Cold wall heating rate data for laminar and turbulent flow were obtained in the Langley 8 foot high Temperature Tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 3300R, a free stream unit Reynolds number from 3.4 x 10 sup 5 to 2.2 10 sup 6 per foot, and a free stream dynamic pressure from 2.1 to 9.0 psia. Experimental data are presented to illustrate the effects of flow angularity and gap width on both local peak heating and overall heating loads. For the conditions of the present study, the results show that localized and total heating are sensitive to changes in flow angle only for the test conditions of turbulent boundary layer flow with high kinetic energy and that a flow angle from 30 deg to 50 deg will minimize the local heating.

  11. Infrared Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, I.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Infrared arrays are small electronic imaging devices subdivided into a grid or `array' of picture elements, or pixels, each of which is made of a material sensitive to photons (ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION) with wavelengths much longer than normal visible light. Typical dimensions of currently available devices are about 27-36 mm square, and formats now range from 2048×2048 pixels for the near-infra...

  12. Field-scale modeling of subsurface tile-drained soils using an equivalent-medium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, Jean Philippe; Kao, Cyril; Ginzburg, Irina

    2007-07-01

    SummaryResearch conducted for the last 35 years has shown that subsurface drainage has a significant impact on hydrology and contaminant transport. This can be observed at the field-scale and also at the watershed scale. Impacts are always associated with modifying otherwise natural flow paths. Most computer model representations of drainage have been drawn at the field-scale. These models require relatively precise data that are usually unavailable when simulating hydrology and water quality in large watersheds. We believe that in this case drainage representation should be simplified and yet closely match observations. As a first step towards incorporating drainage systems into large-scale hydrological models, we propose an equivalent representation of drains buried in a soil profile by using a homogeneous anisotropic porous medium without drains. This representation is based on a "self-consistent" approach and on geometrical considerations. Simplification is such that calculating the equivalent hydraulic conductivity requires only information on the main length and spacing of the tile drains and not on their precise location. This approach also provides a much simpler discretisation of the domain because of the absence of internal boundary conditions on the drainage pipes. Compared to other methods that have simplified drainage representation in existing watershed models, it requires no parameter fitting. Two alternatives to the method are presented: in the first one, the soil profile equipped with the actual drain pipes is represented by an equivalent, horizontally layered system with no pipes; in the second, the layered system has been replaced with an equivalent homogeneous profile. The efficiency of these approaches was tested against a classical representation of tile drains using the SWMS 3D code, which solves the Richards equation for a typical drained plot configuration. The equivalent-medium approach appears to give satisfying results for global water

  13. Bulge RR Lyrae stars in the VVV tile b201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, F.; Minniti, D.; Saito, R. K.; Navarrete, C.; Dékány, I.; McDonald, I.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Catelan, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey is one of the six ESO public surveys currently ongoing at the VISTA telescope on Cerro Paranal, Chile. VVV uses near-IR (ZYJHKs) filters that at present provide photometry to a depth of Ks ~ 17.0 mag in up to 36 epochs spanning over four years, and aim at discovering more than 106 variable sources as well as trace the structure of the Galactic bulge and part of the southern disk. Aims: A variability search was performed to find RR Lyrae variable stars. The low stellar density of the VVV tile b201, which is centered at (ℓ,b) ~ (-9°, -9°), makes it suitable to search for variable stars. Previous studies have identified some RR Lyrae stars using optical bands that served to test our search procedure. The main goal is to measure the reddening, interstellar extinction, and distances of the RR Lyrae stars and to study their distribution on the Milky Way bulge. Methods: For each star in the tile with more than 25 epochs (~90% of the objects down to Ks ~ 17.0 mag), the standard deviation and χ2 test were calculated to identify variable candidates. Periods were determined using the analysis of variance. Objects with periods in the RR Lyrae range of 0.2 ≤ P ≤ 1.2 days were selected as candidate RR Lyrae. They were individually examined to exclude false positives. Results: A total of 1.5 sq deg were analyzed, and we found 39 RR Lyr stars, 27 of which belong to the ab-type and 12 to the c-type. Our analysis recovers all the previously identified RR Lyrae variables in the field and discovers 29 new RR Lyr stars. The reddening and extinction toward all the RRab stars in this tile were derived, and distance estimations were obtained through the period-luminosity relation. Despite the limited amount of RR Lyrae stars studied, our results are consistent with a spheroidal or central distribution around ~8.1 and ~8.5 kpc. for either the Cardelli or Nishiyama extinction law. Our analysis does not reveal a stream

  14. Effective Padding of Multi-Dimensional Arrays to Avoid Cache Conflict Misses

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Changwan; Bao, Wenlei; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Pouchet, Louis-noel; Rastello, Fabrice; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2016-06-02

    Caches are used to significantly improve performance. Even with high degrees of set-associativity, the number of accessed data elements mapping to the same set in a cache can easily exceed the degree of associativity, causing conflict misses and lowered performance, even if the working set is much smaller than cache capacity. Array padding (increasing the size of array dimensions) is a well known optimization technique that can reduce conflict misses. In this paper, we develop the first algorithms for optimal padding of arrays for a set associative cache for arbitrary tile sizes, In addition, we develop the first solution to padding for nested tiles and multi-level caches. The techniques are in implemented in PAdvisor tool. Experimental results with multiple benchmarks demonstrate significant performance improvement from use of PAdvisor for padding.

  15. Microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH) detects submicroscopic chromosomal deletions and duplications in patients with learning disability/mental retardation and dysmorphic features

    PubMed Central

    Shaw-Smith, C; Redon, R; Rickman, L; Rio, M; Willatt, L; Fiegler, H; Firth, H; Sanlaville, D; Winter, R; Colleaux, L; Bobrow, M; Carter, N

    2004-01-01

    The underlying causes of learning disability and dysmorphic features in many patients remain unidentified despite extensive investigation. Routine karyotype analysis is not sensitive enough to detect subtle chromosome rearrangements (less than 5 Mb). The presence of subtle DNA copy number changes was investigated by array-CGH in 50 patients with learning disability and dysmorphism, employing a DNA microarray constructed from large insert clones spaced at approximately 1 Mb intervals across the genome. Twelve copy number abnormalities were identified in 12 patients (24% of the total): seven deletions (six apparently de novo and one inherited from a phenotypically normal parent) and five duplications (one de novo and four inherited from phenotypically normal parents). Altered segments ranged in size from those involving a single clone to regions as large as 14 Mb. No recurrent deletion or duplication was identified within this cohort of patients. On the basis of these results, we anticipate that array-CGH will become a routine method of genome-wide screening for imbalanced rearrangements in children with learning disability. PMID:15060094

  16. A digital gigapixel large-format tile-scan camera.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, M

    2011-01-01

    Although the resolution of single-lens reflex (SLR) and medium-format digital cameras has increased in recent years, applications for cultural-heritage preservation and computational photography require even higher resolutions. Addressing this issue, a large-format cameras' large image planes can achieve very high resolution without compromising pixel size and thus can provide high-quality, high-resolution images.This digital large-format tile scan camera can acquire high-quality, high-resolution images of static scenes. It employs unique calibration techniques and a simple algorithm for focal-stack processing of very large images with significant magnification variations. The camera automatically collects overlapping focal stacks and processes them into a high-resolution, extended-depth-of-field image.

  17. Direct molding of pavement tiles made of ground tire rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Gagliardi, Donatella; Tedde, Giovanni Matteo; Santo, Loredana; Musacchi, Ettore

    2016-10-01

    Large rubber products can be molded by using only ground tire rubber (GTR) without any additive or binder due to a new technology called "direct molding". Rubber granules and powders from tire recycling are compression molded at elevated temperatures and pressures. The feasibility of this process was clearly shown in laboratory but the step to the industrial scale was missing. Thanks to an European Project (SMART "Sustainable Molding of Articles from Recycled Tires") this step has been made and some results are reported in this study. The press used for compression molding is described. Some tests were made to measure the energy consumption so as to evaluate costs for production in comparison with conventional technologies for GTR molding (by using binders). Results show that 1 m2 tiles can be easily molded with several thicknesses in a reasonable low time. Energy consumption is higher than conventional technologies but it is lower than the cost for binders.

  18. Courant-sharp eigenvalues of Neumann 2-rep-tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Ram; Bersudsky, Michael; Fajman, David

    2016-11-01

    We find the Courant-sharp Neumann eigenvalues of the Laplacian on some 2-rep-tile domains. In {R}2 , the domains we consider are the isosceles right triangle and the rectangle with edge ratio √{2} (also known as the A4 paper). In {R}n , the domains are boxes which generalize the mentioned planar rectangle. The symmetries of those domains reveal a special structure of their eigenfunctions, which we call folding/unfolding. This structure affects the nodal set of the eigenfunctions, which, in turn, allows to derive necessary conditions for Courant-sharpness. In addition, the eigenvalues of these domains are arranged as a lattice which allows for a comparison between the nodal count and the spectral position. The Courant-sharpness of most eigenvalues is ruled out using those methods. In addition, this analysis allows to estimate the nodal deficiency—the difference between the spectral position and the nodal count.

  19. Genome-wide transcription analyses in rice using tiling microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Stolc, Viktor; Li, Xueyong; Zhang, Dongfen; Su, Ning; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Li, Songgang; Cheng, Zhukuan; Wang, Jun; Deng, Xing Wang

    2006-01-01

    Sequencing and computational annotation revealed several features, including high gene numbers, unusual composition of the predicted genes and a large number of genes lacking homology to known genes, that distinguish the rice (Oryza sativa) genome from that of other fully sequenced model species. We report here a full-genome transcription analysis of the indica rice subspecies using high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. Our results provided expression data support for the existence of 35,970 (81.9%) annotated gene models and identified 5,464 unique transcribed intergenic regions that share similar compositional properties with the annotated exons and have significant homology to other plant proteins. Elucidating and mapping of all transcribed regions revealed an association between global transcription and cytological chromosome features, and an overall similarity of transcriptional activity between duplicated segments of the genome. Collectively, our results provide the first whole-genome transcription map useful for further understanding the rice genome.

  20. pH-Controlled Assembly of DNA Tiles.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Alessia; Adedeji, Abimbola Feyisara; Castronovo, Matteo; Franco, Elisa; Ricci, Francesco

    2016-10-05

    We demonstrate a strategy to trigger and finely control the assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructures with pH. Control is achieved via a rationally designed strand displacement circuit that responds to pH and activates a downstream DNA tile self-assembly process. We observe that the DNA structures form under neutral/basic conditions, while the self-assembly process is suppressed under acidic conditions. The strategy presented here demonstrates a modular approach toward building systems capable of processing biochemical inputs and finely controlling the assembly of DNA-based nanostructures under isothermal conditions. In particular, the presented architecture is relevant for the development of complex DNA devices able to sense and respond to molecular markers associated with abnormal metabolism.

  1. In-flight investigation of shuttle tile pressure orifice installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    To determine shuttle orbiter wing loads during ascent, wing load instrumentation was added to Columbia (OV-102). This instrumentation included strain gages and pressure orifices on the wing. The loads derived from wing pressure measurements taken during STS 61-C did not agree with those derived from strain gage measurements or with the loads predicted from the aerodynamic database. Anomalies in the surface immediately surrounding the pressure orifices in the thermal protection system (TPS) tiles were one possible cause of errors in the loads derived from wing pressure measurements. These surface anomalies were caused by a ceramic filler material which was installed around the pressure tubing. The filler material allowed slight movement of the TPS tile and pressure tube as the airframe flexed and bent under aerodynamic loads during ascent and descent. Postflight inspection revealed that this filler material had protruded from or receeded beneath the surface, causing the orifice to lose its flushness. Flight tests were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility to determine the effects of any anomaly in surface flushness of the orifice installation on the measured pressures at Mach numbers between 0.6 and 1.4. An F-104 aircraft with a flight test fixture mounted beneath the fuselage was used for these flights. Surface flushness anomalies typical of those on the orbiter after flight (STA 61-C) were tested. Also, cases with excessive protrusion and recession of the filler material were tested. This report shows that the anomalies in STS 61-C orifice installations adversely affected the pressure measurements. But the magnitude of the affect was not great enough to account for the discrepancies with the strain gage measurements and the aerodynamic predictions.

  2. Numerical Investigation of the Spatiotemporal Contribution of Tile Drainage to Stream Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N. W.; Schilling, K. E.; Weber, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    Tile drainage systems are pervasive in the Central U.S., significantly altering the hydrologic system. A physically based coupled hydrologic model was applied to a 45 km2 agricultural Iowa watershed. The tile drainage contribution to stream flow (QT/Q) was derived from a tracer driven analysis of instream surface water. QT/Q varied instantaneously from 6% to 71 % at the basin outlet, with tile flow correlating linearly with total stream flow. In low precipitation periods 62 % of stream flow traveled through the tile system. In heavy precipitation periods a dilution effect shifted QT/Q to 27 %. Precipitation driven events produced a strong positive logarithmic correlation between QT/Q and drainage area. The addition of precipitation into the system saturated near surface soils, increased lateral soil water movement, and diluted the relatively stable instream tile flow. A negative logarithmic trend in QT/Q to drainage area persisted non-event durations. Larger groundwater (non-tile) contribution to stream flow at the outlet diluted instream tile flow at increased drainage areas. Logarithmic regression slopes were consistent for event and non-event periods, respectively. While, the intercept responded in a predicable manner to precipitation intensity. This study, indicates a strong systematic response of QT/Q to meteorological forcing, drainage area over a single year.

  3. Analytical and experimental evaluations of Space Shuttle TPS tile vibration response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical studies and laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the vibration response of the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) tiles due to the intense rocket generated acoustic noise during lift-off. The TPS tiles are mounted over the exterior of the Space Shuttle Orbiter structure through Strain Isolation Pads (SIP) which protect the tiles from thermal induced shear loads at their interface. The analytical predictions indicate that the response of a typical tile is governed by the structural vibration inputs through the SIP under the tile at frequencies below 250 Hz, and by the direct acoustic excitation over the exterior surface of the tile at frequencies above 250 Hz. An evaluation of the laboratory test data for this same tile, in which conditioned (partial) coherent output spectral analysis procedures were used, leads to exactly the same conclusion. The results demonstrate the power of conditioned spectral analysis procedures in identifying vibration response mechanisms when two or more of the inputs are highly correlated.

  4. Nondeterministic self-assembly of two tile types on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoro, S.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Self-assembly is ubiquitous in nature, particularly in biology, where it underlies the formation of protein quaternary structure and protein aggregation. Quaternary structure assembles deterministically and performs a wide range of important functions in the cell, whereas protein aggregation is the hallmark of a number of diseases and represents a nondeterministic self-assembly process. Here we build on previous work on a lattice model of deterministic self-assembly to investigate nondeterministic self-assembly of single lattice tiles and mixtures of two tiles at varying relative concentrations. Despite limiting the simplicity of the model to two interface types, which results in 13 topologically distinct single tiles and 106 topologically distinct sets of two tiles, we observe a wide variety of concentration-dependent behaviors. Several two-tile sets display critical behaviors in the form of a sharp transition from bound to unbound structures as the relative concentration of one tile to another increases. Other sets exhibit gradual monotonic changes in structural density, or nonmonotonic changes, while again others show no concentration dependence at all. We catalog this extensive range of behaviors and present a model that provides a reasonably good estimate of the critical concentrations for a subset of the critical transitions. In addition, we show that the structures resulting from these tile sets are fractal, with one of two different fractal dimensions.

  5. Microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutley, Michael C.; Stevens, Richard F.; Daly, Daniel J.

    1992-04-01

    Microlenses have been with us for a long time as indeed the very word lens reminds us. Many early lenses,including those made by Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in the 17th century were small and resembled lentils. Many languages use the same word for both (French tilentillelt and German "Linse") and the connection is only obscure in English because we use the French word for the vegetable and the German for the optic. Many of the applications for arrays of inicrolenses are also well established. Lippmann's work on integral photography at the turn of the century required lens arrays and stimulated an interest that is very much alive today. At one stage, lens arrays played an important part in high speed photography and various schemes have been put forward to take advantage of the compact imaging properties of combinations of lens arrays. The fact that many of these ingenious schemes have not been developed to their full potential has to a large degree been due to the absence of lens arrays of a suitable quality and cost.

  6. Detecting Subsurface Agricultural Tile Drainage using GIS and Remote Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhathoki, M.; Gokkaya, K.; Tank, J. L.; Christopher, S. F.; Hanrahan, B.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface tile drainage is a common practice in many of the row crop dominated agricultural lands in the Upper Midwest, which increases yield by making the soil more productive. It is reported that nearly half of all cropland in Indiana benefits from some sort of artificial drainage. However, subsurface tile has a significant negative impact on surface water quality by providing a fast means of transport for nutrients from fertilizers. Therefore, generating spatial data of tile drainage in the field is important and useful for agricultural landscape and hydrological studies. Subsurface tile drains in Indiana's croplands are not widely mapped. In this study, we will delineate subsurface tile drainage in agricultural land in Shatto Ditch watershed, located in Kosciusko County, Indiana. We will use geo-spatial methodology, which was purposed by earlier researchers to detect tile drainage. We will use aerial color-infrared and satellite imagery along with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. In order to map tile lines with possible accuracy, we will use GIS-based analysis in combination with remotely sensed data. This research will be comprised of three stages: 1) masking out the potential drainage area using a decision tree rule based on land cover information, soil drainage category, surface slope, and satellite image differencing technique, 2) delineate tile lines using image processing techniques, and 3) check the accuracy of mapped tile lines with ground control points. To our knowledge, this study will be the first to check the accuracy of mapping with ground truth data. Based on the accuracy of results, we will extend the methodology to greater spatial scales. The results are expected to contribute to better characterizing and controlling water pollution sources in Indiana, which is a major environmental problem.

  7. Electrokinetic microactuator arrays for active sublayer control of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez-Garias, Francisco J.

    2002-09-01

    The present study has been the first to examine the electrokinetic principle as the basis for a new class of microscale actuator arrays for active sublayer control on full scale aeronautical and hydronautical vehicles under realistic operating conditions. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski scalings that govern such electrokinetic actuator arrays show significant performance advantages from their miniaturization to the microscale. The electrokinetic microactuator arrays that are the subject of this study seek to interrupt the bursting process associated with naturally-occurring streamwise sublayer vortices in the turbulent boundary layer. Specific performance requirements for microactuator spacing, flow rate, and frequency response for active sublayer control have been determined from fundamental scaling laws for the streamwise vortical structures in the sublayer of turbulent boundary layers. In view of the inherently local nature of the sublayer dynamics, a general system architecture for microactuator arrays appropriate for active sublayer control has been developed based on the concept of relatively small and independent "unit cells", each with their own sensing, processing, and actuation capability, that greatly simplifies the sensing and processing requirements needed to achieve practical sublayer control. A fundamental three-layer design has been developed for such electrokinetic microactuator arrays, in which electrokinetic flow is induced by an impulsively applied electric field across a center layer, with a bottom layer containing an electrolyte reservoir and a common electrode, and a top layer that containing individual electrodes and lead-outs for each microactuator in the unit cell. Microfabrication techniques have been developed that permit mass production of large numbers of individual electrokinetic microactuators in unit cells on comparatively large-area tiles. Several generations of such electrokinetic microactuator arrays have been built leading to the

  8. Gap heating with pressure gradients. [for Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.; Maraia, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The heating rate distribution and temperature response on the gap walls of insulating tiles is analyzed to determine significant phenomena and parameters in flows where there is an external surface pressure gradient. Convective heating due to gap flow, modeled as fully developed pipe flow, is coupled with a two-dimensional thermal model of the tiles that includes conduction and radiative heat transfer. To account for geometry and important environmental parameters, scale factors are obtained by curve-fitting measured temperatures to analytical solutions. These scale factors are then used to predict the time-dependent gap heat flux and temperature response of tile gaps on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry.

  9. Beam test results of a high-granularity tile/fiber electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, H.; Miyata, H.; Iba, S.; Nakajima, N.; Sanchez, A. L. C.; Fujii, Y.; Itoh, S.; Kajino, F.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kim, S.; Kishimoto, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Nagano, A.; Nakamura, R.; Takeshita, T.; Tamura, Y.; Yamauchi, S.

    2009-03-01

    A prototype sampling electromagnetic calorimeter (17.1 radiation lengths) for future linear collider experiments was built, using 4 cm×4 cm×1 mm plastic scintillator tiles and 4 mm-thick lead absorber. Wavelength-shifting fibers were used to guide the scintillation light into multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes. The calorimeter was tested at the beam test facility of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in 2004. In this article we present our beam test results for the tile/fiber calorimeter focusing on the linearity in energy response, the energy resolution, position resolution and uniformity across the tile front face.

  10. Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor. Part 1; Advanced Modeling and Strength Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, C. G.; Chen, Tzi-Kang; Baker, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of the structural response and strength of tile-reinforced components of the Composite Armored Vehicle are presented. The analyses are based on specialized finite element techniques that properly account for the effects of the interaction between the armor tiles, the surrounding elastomers, and the glass-epoxy sublaminates. To validate the analytical predictions, tests were conducted with panels subjected to three-point bending loads. The sequence of progressive failure events for the laminates is described. This paper describes the results of Part 1 of a study of the response and strength of tile-reinforced composite armor.

  11. Self assembly of rectangular shapes on concentration programming and probabilistic tile assembly models.

    PubMed

    Kundeti, Vamsi; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2012-06-01

    Efficient tile sets for self assembling rectilinear shapes is of critical importance in algorithmic self assembly. A lower bound on the tile complexity of any deterministic self assembly system for an n × n square is [Formula: see text] (inferred from the Kolmogrov complexity). Deterministic self assembly systems with an optimal tile complexity have been designed for squares and related shapes in the past. However designing [Formula: see text] unique tiles specific to a shape is still an intensive task in the laboratory. On the other hand copies of a tile can be made rapidly using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) experiments. This led to the study of self assembly on tile concentration programming models. We present two major results in this paper on the concentration programming model. First we show how to self assemble rectangles with a fixed aspect ratio (α:β), with high probability, using Θ(α + β) tiles. This result is much stronger than the existing results by Kao et al. (Randomized self-assembly for approximate shapes, LNCS, vol 5125. Springer, Heidelberg, 2008) and Doty (Randomized self-assembly for exact shapes. In: proceedings of the 50th annual IEEE symposium on foundations of computer science (FOCS), IEEE, Atlanta. pp 85-94, 2009)-which can only self assembly squares and rely on tiles which perform binary arithmetic. On the other hand, our result is based on a technique called staircase sampling. This technique eliminates the need for sub-tiles which perform binary arithmetic, reduces the constant in the asymptotic bound, and eliminates the need for approximate frames (Kao et al. Randomized self-assembly for approximate shapes, LNCS, vol 5125. Springer, Heidelberg, 2008). Our second result applies staircase sampling on the equimolar concentration programming model (The tile complexity of linear assemblies. In: proceedings of the 36th international colloquium automata, languages and programming: Part I on ICALP '09, Springer-Verlag, pp 235-253, 2009

  12. Thermal insulation attaching means. [adhesive bonding of felt vibration insulators under ceramic tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved isolation system is provided for attaching ceramic tiles of insulating material to the surface of a structure to be protected against extreme temperatures of the nature expected to be encountered by the space shuttle orbiter. This system isolates the fragile ceramic tiles from thermally and mechanically induced vehicle structural strains. The insulating tiles are affixed to a felt isolation pad formed of closely arranged and randomly oriented fibers by means of a flexible adhesive and in turn the felt pad is affixed to the metallic vehicle structure by an additional layer of flexible adhesive.

  13. Electrospun SiO2 "necklaces" on unglazed ceramic tiles: a planarizing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, Alessandro; Fragalà, Maria Elena

    2015-05-01

    Silica based nanofibres have been deposited on unglazed ceramic tiles by combining electrospinning and sol-gel processes. Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) alcoholic solutions and commercial spin on glass (Accuglass) mixtures have been used to obtain composite fibrous non-woven mats totally converted, after thermal annealing at 600 °C, to SiO2 microsphere "necklaces". The possibility to get an uniform fibres coverage onto the tile surface confirms the validity of electrospinning (easily scalable to large surface samples) as coating strategy to cover the macroscopic defects typical of the polished unglazed tile surface and improve surface planarization.

  14. A prediction method for flow in the Shuttle tile strain isolation pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1987-01-01

    The Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system uses a Strain Isolation Pad (SIP) between the tile and the Orbiter. This paper presents experimental measurements of the pressure drop and associated flow rate through a sample of the SIP material. Included are data for a range of air densities representative of Shuttle ascent and re-entry trajectories. Also presented are new theoretical and correlative methods which predict the experimental data. These methods will help in predicting venting characteristics of tile assemblies during ascent, and hot gas leak under the tiles during descent. The predictive philosophy developed is useful in the study of fibrous and porous media fluid mechanics.

  15. Molecular Dissection Using Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization and Clinical Evaluation of An Infertile Male Carrier of An Unbalanced Y;21 Translocation: A Case Report and Review of The Literature.

    PubMed

    Orrico, Alfredo; Marseglia, Giuseppina; Pescucci, Chiara; Cortesi, Ambra; Piomboni, Paola; Giansanti, Andrea; Gerundino, Francesca; Ponchietti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal defects are relatively frequent in infertile men however, translocations between the Y chromosome and autosomes are rare and less than 40 cases of Y-autosome translocation have been reported. In particular, only three individuals has been described with a Y;21 translocation, up to now. We report on an additional case of an infertile man in whom a Y;21 translocation was associated with the deletion of a large part of the Y chromosome long arm. Applying various techniques, including conventional cytogenetic procedures, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis and array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) studies, we identified a derivative chromosome originating from a fragment of the short arm of the chromosome Y translocated on the short arm of the 21 chromosome. The Y chromosome structural rearrangement resulted in the intactness of the entire short arm, including the sex-determining region Y (SRY) and the short stature homeobox (SHOX) loci, although translocated on the 21 chromosome, and the loss of a large part of the long arm of the Y chromosome, including azoospermia factor-a (AZFa), AZFb, AZFc and Yq heterochromatin regions. This is the first case in which a (Yp;21p) translocation has been ascertained using an array-CGH approach, thus reporting details of such a rearrangement at higher resolution.

  16. Families of tessellations of space by elementary polyhedra via retessellations of face-centered-cubic and related tilings.

    PubMed

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-10-01

    The problem of tiling or tessellating (i.e., completely filling) three-dimensional Euclidean space R(3) with polyhedra has fascinated people for centuries and continues to intrigue mathematicians and scientists today. Tilings are of fundamental importance to the understanding of the underlying structures for a wide range of systems in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences. In this paper, we enumerate and investigate the most comprehensive set of tilings of R(3) by any two regular polyhedra known to date. We find that among all of the Platonic solids, only the tetrahedron and octahedron can be combined to tile R(3). For tilings composed of only congruent tetrahedra and congruent octahedra, there seem to be only four distinct ratios between the sides of the two polyhedra. These four canonical periodic tilings are, respectively, associated with certain packings of tetrahedra (octahedra) in which the holes are octahedra (tetrahedra). Moreover, we derive two families of an uncountably infinite number of periodic tilings of tetrahedra and octahedra that continuously connect the aforementioned four canonical tilings with one another, containing the previously reported Conway-Jiao-Torquato family of tilings [Conway et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 11009 (2011)] as a special case. For tilings containing infinite planar surfaces, nonperiodic arrangements can be easily generated by arbitrary relative sliding along these surfaces. We also find that there are three distinct canonical periodic tilings of R(3) by congruent regular tetrahedra and congruent regular truncated tetrahedra associated with certain packings of tetrahedra (truncated tetrahedra) in which the holes are truncated tetrahedra (tetrahedra). Remarkably, we discover that most of the aforementioned periodic tilings can be obtained by "retessellating" the well-known tiling associated with the face-centered-cubic lattice, i.e., by combining the associated fundamental tiles (regular tetrahedra and

  17. On analytic design of loudspeaker arrays with uniform radiation characteristics

    PubMed

    Aarts; Janssen

    2000-01-01

    Some notes on analytical derived loudspeaker arrays with uniform radiation characteristics are presented. The array coefficients are derived via analytical means and compared with so-called maximal flat sequences known from telecommunications and information theory. It appears that the newly derived array, i.e., the quadratic phase array, has a higher efficiency than the Bessel array and a flatter response than the Barker array. The method discussed admits generalization to the design of arrays with desired nonuniform radiating characteristics.

  18. Development of Tiled Imaging CZT Detectors for Sensitive Wide-Field Hard X-Ray Surveys to EXIST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 sq cm close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2 x 2 x 0.5 cubic cm. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8 x 8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October. 2009, as the ProtoEX1STl payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtcEXIST2. with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32 x 32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  19. Diffractive-optics-based beam combination of a phase-locked fiber laser array.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eric C; Ho, James G; Goodno, Gregory D; Rice, Robert R; Rothenberg, Josh; Thielen, Peter; Weber, Mark; Wickham, Michael

    2008-02-15

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) is used as a beam combiner for an actively phase-locked array of fiber lasers. Use of a DOE eliminates the far-field sidelobes and the accompanying loss of beam quality typically observed in tiled coherent laser arrays. Using this technique, we demonstrated coherent combination of five fiber lasers with 91% efficiency and M2=1.04. Combination efficiency and phase locking is robust even with large amplitude and phase fluctuations on the input laser array elements. Calculations and power handling measurements suggest that this approach can scale to both high channel counts and high powers.

  20. Pacific Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Takeo, A.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Based on our recent results on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry (e.g., Suetsugu & Shiobara, 2014, Annual Review EPS), together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (both radial and azimuthal), with deployments of ~10-15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) (namely "ocean-bottom broadband dispersion survey"; Takeo et al., 2013, JGR; Kawakatsu et al., 2013, AGU; Takeo, 2014, Ph.D. Thesis; Takeo et al., 2014, JpGU). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations might be sought.

  1. Noise dependence with pile-up in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. Pile-up noise studies in the ATLAS TileCal calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Araque, J.P.

    2015-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter, TileCal, is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, positioned between the electromagnetic calorimeter and the muon chambers. It comprises alternating layers of steel (as absorber material) and plastic (as active material), known as tiles. Between 2009 and 2012, the LHC has performed better than expected producing proton-proton collisions at a very high rate. These conditions are really challenging when dealing with the energy measurements in the calorimeter since not only the energy from an interesting event will be measured but a component coming from other collisions, which are difficult to distinguish from the interesting one, will also be present. This component is referred to as pile-up noise. Studies carried out to better understand how pile-up affects calorimeter noise under different circumstances are described. (author)

  2. Study of outgassing and decomposition of space shuttle heat protection tiles, fillers and adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, B. L.; Hoffman, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the chemicals desorbing from the space shuttle heat protection tiles. The original protocol for this project involved direct insertion probe mass spectrometry (DIPMS) analysis of the outgassing products from the tiles. However, this method proved unsatisfactory due to the large number of compounds desorbing from the tiles. A purge and trap technique was then employed to collect and separate the chemicals desorbing from the tiles. The maximum temperature in this analysis was 180 C which is the gas chromatograph fused silica capillary column's temperature limit. The desorption was also carried out at atmospheric pressure with helium as the purge gas. A description of the modified protocol is given. All compounds are tentatively identified.

  3. Construction of DNA nanotubes with controllable diameters and patterns using hierarchical DNA sub-tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Wu, Xiaoxu; Song, Tao; Li, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The design of DNA nanotubes is a promising and hot research branch in structural DNA nanotechnology, which is rapidly developing as a versatile method for achieving subtle nanometer scale materials and molecular diagnostic/curative devices. Multifarious methods have been proposed to achieve varied DNA nanotubes, such as using square tiles and single-stranded tiles, but it is still a challenge to develop a bottom-up assembly way to build DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns using certain universal DNA nanostructures. This work addresses the challenge by assembling three types of spatial DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns from the so-called ``basic bricks'', i.e., hierarchical DNA sub-tiles. A high processing rate and throughput synthesis of DNA nanotubes are observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Experimental observations and data analysis suggests the stability and controllability of DNA nanotubes assembled by hierarchical DNA sub-tiles.

  4. Catalytic surface effects on contaminated space shuttle tile in a dissociated nitrogen stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, O. L.; Stewart, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Visual inspection revealed contamination on the surface of tiles removed from the lower section of the space shuttle orbiter after the second flight of Columbia (STS-2). Possible sources of this contamination and the effect on surface catalycity are presented.

  5. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, A. S. A.; Sousa, F. J. P.; Hamedon, Z.; Azhari, A.

    2016-02-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed.

  6. Finding minimum spanning trees more efficiently for tile-based phase unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawaf, Firas; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2006-06-01

    The tile-based phase unwrapping method employs an algorithm for finding the minimum spanning tree (MST) in each tile. We first examine the properties of a tile's representation from a graph theory viewpoint, observing that it is possible to make use of a more efficient class of MST algorithms. We then describe a novel linear time algorithm which reduces the size of the MST problem by half at the least, and solves it completely at best. We also show how this algorithm can be applied to a tile using a sliding window technique. Finally, we show how the reduction algorithm can be combined with any other standard MST algorithm to achieve a more efficient hybrid, using Prim's algorithm for empirical comparison and noting that the reduction algorithm takes only 0.1% of the time taken by the overall hybrid.

  7. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Regalia, Giulia; Coelli, Stefania; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms' performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly performed off-line, which is time and memory consuming and prevents researchers from having an immediate glance at ongoing experiments. The aim of this work is to provide a versatile framework to support the evaluation and comparison of different spike classification algorithms suitable for both off-line and on-line analysis. We incorporated different spike sorting "building blocks" into a Matlab-based software, including 4 feature extraction methods, 3 feature clustering methods, and 1 template matching classifier. The framework was validated by applying different algorithms on simulated and real signals from neuronal cultures coupled to MEAs. Moreover, the system has been proven effective in running on-line analysis on a standard desktop computer, after the selection of the most suitable sorting methods. This work provides a useful and versatile instrument for a supported comparison of different options for spike sorting towards more accurate off-line and on-line MEA data analysis.

  8. Optical Demonstration of a Medical Imaging System with an EMCCD-Sensor Array for Use in a High Resolution Dynamic X-ray Imager.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bin; Huang, Ying; Wang, Weiyuan; Sharma, Prateek; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew T; Cartwright, Alexander N; Titus, Albert H; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-10-30

    Use of an extensible array of Electron Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) in medical x-ray imager applications was demonstrated for the first time. The large variable electronic-gain (up to 2000) and small pixel size of EMCCDs provide effective suppression of readout noise compared to signal, as well as high resolution, enabling the development of an x-ray detector with far superior performance compared to conventional x-ray image intensifiers and flat panel detectors. We are developing arrays of EMCCDs to overcome their limited field of view (FOV). In this work we report on an array of two EMCCD sensors running simultaneously at a high frame rate and optically focused on a mammogram film showing calcified ducts. The work was conducted on an optical table with a pulsed LED bar used to provide a uniform diffuse light onto the film to simulate x-ray projection images. The system can be selected to run at up to 17.5 frames per second or even higher frame rate with binning. Integration time for the sensors can be adjusted from 1 ms to 1000 ms. Twelve-bit correlated double sampling AD converters were used to digitize the images, which were acquired by a National Instruments dual-channel Camera Link PC board in real time. A user-friendly interface was programmed using LabVIEW to save and display 2K × 1K pixel matrix digital images. The demonstration tiles a 2 × 1 array to acquire increased-FOV stationary images taken at different gains and fluoroscopic-like videos recorded by scanning the mammogram simultaneously with both sensors. The results show high resolution and high dynamic range images stitched together with minimal adjustments needed. The EMCCD array design allows for expansion to an M×N array for arbitrarily larger FOV, yet with high resolution and large dynamic range maintained.

  9. Air quality comparison between two European ceramic tile clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguillón, M. C.; Monfort, E.; Escrig, A.; Celades, I.; Guerra, L.; Busani, G.; Sterni, A.; Querol, X.

    2013-08-01

    The European ceramic tile industry is mostly concentrated in two clusters, one in Castelló (Spain) and another one in Modena (Italy). Industrial clusters may have problems to accomplish the EU air quality regulations because of the concentration of some specific pollutants and, hence, the feasibility of the industrial clusters can be jeopardised. The present work assesses the air quality in these ceramic clusters in 2008, when the new EU emission regulations where put into force. PM10 samples were collected at two sampling sites in the Modena ceramic cluster and one sampling site in the Castelló ceramic cluster. PM10 annual average concentrations were 12-14 μg m-3 higher in Modena than in Castelló, and were close to or exceeded the European limit. Air quality in Modena was mainly influenced by road traffic and, in a lower degree, the metalmechanical industry, as evidenced by the high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Zn, Sn and Sb registered. The stagnant weather conditions from Modena hindering dispersion of pollutants also contributed to the relatively high pollution levels. In Castelló, the influence of the ceramic industry is evidenced by the high concentrations of Ti, Se, Tl and Pb, whereas this influence is not seen in Modena. The difference in the impact of the ceramic industry on the air quality in the two areas was attributed to: better abatement systems in the spray-drier facilities in Modena, higher coverage of the areas for storage and handling of dusty raw materials in Modena, presence of two open air quarries in the Castelló region, low degree of abatement systems in the ceramic tile kilns in Castelló, and abundance of ceramic frit, glaze and pigment manufacture in Castelló as opposed to scarce manufacture of these products in Modena. The necessity of additional measures to fulfil the EU air quality requirements in the Modena region is evidenced, despite the high degree of environmental measures implemented in the ceramic industry. The Principal

  10. SiC Armor Tiles via Magnetic Compaction and Pressureless Sintering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-27

    Ceramatec, ORNL ,ARMY and UDRI Unclassified 7Cocoa Beach 2008 What is Dynamic Magnetic Compaction? Dynamic Kinetic process High compaction pressure for sub...1Cocoa Beach 2008 SiC Armor Tiles via Magnetic Compaction and Pressureless Sintering B. Chelluri, and E. A. Knoth, IAP Research, Inc. L. P. Franks...TITLE AND SUBTITLE SiC Armor Tiles via Magnetic Compaction and Pressureless Sintering 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  11. Influence of Tile Geometry on the Dynamic Fracture of Silicon Carbide (SiC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Influence of Tile Geometry on the Dynamic Fracture of Silicon Carbide (SiC) by Jacqueline T. Le and Shane D. Bartus ARL-TR-6861 March...Influence of Tile Geometry on the Dynamic Fracture of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Jacqueline T. Le George Washington University Shane D...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911NF-10-2-0076 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jacqueline T. Le * and Shane D. Bartus 5d

  12. Reconnecting tile drainage to riparian buffer hydrology for enhanced nitrate removal.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, D B; Isenhart, T M

    2014-03-01

    Riparian buffers are a proven practice for removing NO from overland flow and shallow groundwater. However, in landscapes with artificial subsurface (tile) drainage, most of the subsurface flow leaving fields is passed through the buffers in drainage pipes, leaving little opportunity for NO removal. We investigated the feasibility of re-routing a fraction of field tile drainage as subsurface flow through a riparian buffer for increasing NO removal. We intercepted an existing field tile outlet draining a 10.1-ha area of a row-cropped field in central Iowa and re-routed a fraction of the discharge as subsurface flow along 335 m of an existing riparian buffer. Tile drainage from the field was infiltrated through a perforated pipe installed 75 cm below the surface by maintaining a constant head in the pipe at a control box installed in-line with the existing field outlet. During 2 yr, >18,000 m (55%) of the total flow from the tile outlet was redirected as infiltration within the riparian buffer. The redirected water seeped through the 60-m-wide buffer, raising the water table approximately 35 cm. The redirected tile flow contained 228 kg of NO. On the basis of the strong decrease in NO concentrations within the shallow groundwater across the buffer, we hypothesize that the NO did not enter the stream but was removed within the buffer by plant uptake, microbial immobilization, or denitrification. Redirecting tile drainage as subsurface flow through a riparian buffer increased its NO removal benefit and is a promising management practice to improve surface water quality within tile-drained landscapes.

  13. Effect of DNA Hairpin Loops on the Twist of Planar DNA Origami Tiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Wang, Lei; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The development of scaffolded DNA origami, a technique in which a long single-stranded viral genome is folded into arbitrary shapes by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides, represents an important milestone in DNA nanotechnology. Recent findings have revealed that two-dimensional (2D)DNA origami structures based on the original design parameters adopt a global twist with respect to the tile plane, which may be because the conformation of the constituent DNA (10.67 bp/turn) deviates from the natural B-type helical twist (10.4 bp/turn). Here we aim to characterize the effects of DNA hairpin loops on the overall curvature of the tile and explore their ability to control, and ultimately eliminate any unwanted curvature. A series of dumbbell-shaped DNA loops were selectively displayed on the surface of DNA origami tiles with the expectation that repulsive interactions among the neighboring dumbbell loops and between the loops and the DNA origami tile would influence the structural features of the underlying tiles. A systematic, atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of how the number and position of the DNA loops influenced the global twist of the structure was performed, and several structural models to explain the results were proposed. The observations unambiguously revealed that the first generation of rectangular shaped origami tiles adopt a conformation in which the upper right (corner 2) and bottom left (corner 4) corners bend upward out of the plane, causing linear superstructures attached by these corners to form twisted ribbons. Our experimental observations are consistent with the twist model predicted by the DNA mechanical property simulation software CanDo. Through the systematic design and organization of various numbers of dumbbell loops on both surfaces of the tile, a nearly planar rectangular origami tile was achieved. PMID:22126326

  14. Acousto-optic signature analysis for inspection of the orbiter thermal protection tile bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Julio G.; Tow, D. M.; Barna, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a viable NDE technique for the inspection of orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) tile bonds. Phase 2, discussed here, concentrated on developing an empirical understanding of the bonded and unbonded vibration signatures of acreage tiles. Controlled experiments in the laboratory have provided useful information on the dynamic response of TPS tiles. It has been shown that several signatures are common to all the pedigree tiles. This degree of consistency in the tile-SIP (strain isolation pad) dynamic response proves that an unbond can be detected for a known tile and establish the basis for extending the analysis capability to arbitrary tiles for which there are no historical data. The field tests of the noncontacting laser acoustic sensor system, conducted at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), investigated the vibrational environment of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) and its effect on the measurement and analysis techniques being developed. The data collected showed that for orbiter locations, such as the body flap and elevon, the data analysis scheme, and/or the sensor, will require modification to accommodate the ambient motion. Several methods were identified for accomplishing this, and a solution is seen as readily achievable. It was established that the tile response was similar to that observed in the laboratory. Of most importance, however, is that the field environment will not affect the physics of the dynamic response that is related to bond condition. All of this information is fundamental to any future design and development of a prototype system.

  15. Modeling Subsurface Storm and Tile Drain Systems in GSSHA with SUPERLINK

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 4- 11 System-Wide Water Resources Program (SWWRP) Modeling Subsurface Storm and Tile Drain Systems in GSSHA with...System-Wide Water Resources Program (SWWRP) ERDC/CHL TR-14-11 September 2014 Modeling Subsurface Storm and Tile Drain Systems in GSSHA with...loadings and pollution abatement. A subsurface storm drain model, called SUPERLINK, has been incorporated into GSSHA to allow the model to

  16. Method and apparatus for an optical function generator for seamless tiled displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael (Inventor); Chen, Chung-Jen (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Producing seamless tiled images from multiple displays includes measuring a luminance profile of each of the displays, computing a desired luminance profile for each of the displays, and determining a spatial gradient profile of each of the displays based on the measured luminance profile and the computed desired luminance profile. The determined spatial gradient profile is applied to a spatial filter to be inserted into each of the displays to produce the seamless tiled display image.

  17. Performance of the FilmArray® blood culture identification panel utilized by non-expert staff compared with conventional microbial identification and antimicrobial resistance gene detection from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Morgan H; Relich, Ryan F; Davis, Thomas E; Schmitt, Bryan H

    2016-07-01

    Utilization of commercially available rapid platforms for microbial identification from positive blood cultures is useful during periods of, or in laboratories with, limited expert staffing. We compared the results of the FilmArray® BCID Panel performed by non-expert technologists to those of conventional methods for organism identification performed by skilled microbiologists. Within 8 h of signalling positive by a continuous monitoring blood culture system, positive bottles were analysed by the FilmArray BCID Panel. Data from these analyses were compared to standard-of-care testing, which included conventional and automated methods. To gauge the ease of use of the BCID Panel by non-expert staff, technologists unfamiliar with diagnostic bacteriology performed the testing without prior knowledge of the Gram stain results, or even whether organisms were detected. Identifications of 172/200 (86 %) positive blood cultures using the BCID Panel were consistent with identifications provided by standard-of-care methods. Standard-of-care testing identified organisms in 20 positive blood cultures, which were not represented on the BCID Panel. Seven (3.5 %) blood cultures demonstrated a discrepancy between the methods, which could not be attributed to either a lack of representation on the panel or unclear separate detection of organisms in a mixed blood culture of a shared genus or grouping of organisms, e.g. Staphylococcus or Enterobacteriaceae . One (0.5 %) blood culture yielded invalid results on two separate panels, so it was eliminated from the study. The easy-to-use FilmArray® technology shows good correlation with blood culture identification and antibiotic resistance detection performed by conventional methods. This technology may be particularly useful in laboratories with limited staffing or limited technical expertise.

  18. Tile Drainage Density Reduces Groundwater Travel Times and Compromises Riparian Buffer Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F; Isenhart, Thomas M; Schultz, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Strategies to reduce nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) pollution delivered to streams often seek to increase groundwater residence time to achieve measureable results, yet the effects of tile drainage on residence time have not been well documented. In this study, we used a geographic information system groundwater travel time model to quantify the effects of artificial subsurface drainage on groundwater travel times in the 7443-ha Bear Creek watershed in north-central Iowa. Our objectives were to evaluate how mean groundwater travel times changed with increasing drainage intensity and to assess how tile drainage density reduces groundwater contributions to riparian buffers. Results indicate that mean groundwater travel times are reduced with increasing degrees of tile drainage. Mean groundwater travel times decreased from 5.6 to 1.1 yr, with drainage densities ranging from 0.005 m (7.6 mi) to 0.04 m (62 mi), respectively. Model simulations indicate that mean travel times with tile drainage are more than 150 times faster than those that existed before settlement. With intensive drainage, less than 2% of the groundwater in the basin appears to flow through a perennial stream buffer, thereby reducing the effectiveness of this practice to reduce stream nitrate loads. Hence, strategies, such as reconnecting tile drainage to buffers, are promising because they increase groundwater residence times in tile-drained watersheds.

  19. Finishing of display glass for mobile electronics using 3M Trizact diamond tile abrasive pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lianbin; Fletcher, Tim; Na, Tee Koon; Sventek, Bruce; Romero, Vince; Lugg, Paul S.; Kim, Don

    2010-10-01

    This paper will describe a new method being used during the finishing of glass displays for mobile electronics including mobile hand held devices and notebook computers. The new method consists of using 3M TrizactTM Diamond Tile Abrasive Pads. TrizactTM Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive grinding technology developed by 3M Company. The TrizactTM Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder) - inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology can be applied in both double and single side grinding applications. A unique advantage of TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology is the combination of high stock removal and low sub-surface damage. Grinding results will be presented for both 9 micron and 20 micron grades of TrizactTM Diamond Tile abrasive pads used to finish several common display glasses including Corning GorillaTM glass and Soda Lime glass.

  20. Describing polyhedral tilings and higher dimensional polytopes by sequence of their two-dimensional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Kengo; Miyazaki, Takehide

    2017-01-01

    Polyhedral tilings are often used to represent structures such as atoms in materials, grains in crystals, foams, galaxies in the universe, etc. In the previous paper, we have developed a theory to convert a way of how polyhedra are arranged to form a polyhedral tiling into a codeword (series of numbers) from which the original structure can be recovered. The previous theory is based on the idea of forming a polyhedral tiling by gluing together polyhedra face to face. In this paper, we show that the codeword contains redundant digits not needed for recovering the original structure, and develop a theory to reduce the redundancy. For this purpose, instead of polyhedra, we regard two-dimensional regions shared by faces of adjacent polyhedra as building blocks of a polyhedral tiling. Using the present method, the same information is represented by a shorter codeword whose length is reduced by up to the half of the original one. Shorter codewords are easier to handle for both humans and computers, and thus more useful to describe polyhedral tilings. By generalizing the idea of assembling two-dimensional components to higher dimensional polytopes, we develop a unified theory to represent polyhedral tilings and polytopes of different dimensions in the same light.

  1. Describing polyhedral tilings and higher dimensional polytopes by sequence of their two-dimensional components

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Kengo; Miyazaki, Takehide

    2017-01-01

    Polyhedral tilings are often used to represent structures such as atoms in materials, grains in crystals, foams, galaxies in the universe, etc. In the previous paper, we have developed a theory to convert a way of how polyhedra are arranged to form a polyhedral tiling into a codeword (series of numbers) from which the original structure can be recovered. The previous theory is based on the idea of forming a polyhedral tiling by gluing together polyhedra face to face. In this paper, we show that the codeword contains redundant digits not needed for recovering the original structure, and develop a theory to reduce the redundancy. For this purpose, instead of polyhedra, we regard two-dimensional regions shared by faces of adjacent polyhedra as building blocks of a polyhedral tiling. Using the present method, the same information is represented by a shorter codeword whose length is reduced by up to the half of the original one. Shorter codewords are easier to handle for both humans and computers, and thus more useful to describe polyhedral tilings. By generalizing the idea of assembling two-dimensional components to higher dimensional polytopes, we develop a unified theory to represent polyhedral tilings and polytopes of different dimensions in the same light. PMID:28094254

  2. Internal defect inspection in magnetic tile by using acoustic resonance technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luofeng; Yin, Ming; Huang, Qinyuan; Zhao, Yue; Deng, Zhenbo; Xiang, Zhaowei; Yin, Guofu

    2016-11-01

    This paper focuses on the validity of a nondestructive methodology for magnetic tile internal defect inspection based on acoustic resonance. The principle of this methodology is to analyze the acoustic signal collected from the collision of magnetic tile with a metal block. To accomplish the detection process, the separating part of the detection system is designed and discussed in detail in this paper. A simplified mathematical model is constructed to analyze the characteristics of the impact of magnetic tile with a metal block. The results demonstrate that calculating the power spectrum density (PSD) can diagnose the internal defect of magnetic tile. Two different data-driven multivariate algorithms are adopted to obtain the feature set, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis (h-NLPCA). Three different classifiers are then performed to deal with magnetic tile classification problem based on features extracted by PCA or h-NLPCA. The classifiers adopted in this paper are fuzzy neural networks (FNN), variable predictive model based class discrimination (VPMCD) method and support vector machine (SVM). Experimental results show that all six methods are successful in identifying the magnetic tile internal defect. In this paper, the effect of environmental noise is also considered, and the classification results show that all the methods have high immunity to background noise, especially PCA-SVM and h-NLPCA-SVM. Considering the accuracy rate, computation cost problem and the ease of implementation, PCA-SVM turns out to be the best method for this purpose.

  3. Quantifying the proportion of tile-drained land in large river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Ulrike; Volk, Martin

    A considerable reduction in the nutrient and pesticide inputs into the rivers and lakes of Germany is required in order to meet the “good ecological status” as demanded by the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). Subsurface tile drainage systems are one of the main pathways for such diffuse nutrient and pesticide inputs. However, the simulation of water and matter fluxes under tile-drained land on the landscape scale is still problematic in many countries, mainly due to a lack of data about the existing drainage systems. The present study examines for the first time whether an existing method to calculate the usually unknown proportions of tile-drained areas could be transferred to a large river basin, for which minimal data about drained areas is available. The study area was the Saale river basin (24,000 km 2) in central Germany, with a broad variety of soils and site characteristics. The share of tile-drained areas in the Saale river basin was calculated to be 11% of the agricultural area. Apart from that, the calculated proportion of tile-drained areas corresponded satisfactory with the statistical data of the meliorated areas of the former German Democratic Republic. The successful application of the promising method is considered as an important step towards the calculation of the proportion of tile-drained areas for the whole Germany and Europe.

  4. Modeling the effects of tile drain placement on the hydrologic function of farmed prairie wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Brett; Tracy, John; Johnson, W. Carter; Voldseth, Richard A.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Millett, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The early 2000s saw large increases in agricultural tile drainage in the eastern Dakotas of North America. Agricultural practices that drain wetlands directly are sometimes limited by wetland protection programs. Little is known about the impacts of tile drainage beyond the delineated boundaries of wetlands in upland catchments that may be in agricultural production. A series of experiments were conducted using the well-published model WETLANDSCAPE that revealed the potential for wetlands to have significantly shortened surface water inundation periods and lower mean depths when tile is placed in certain locations beyond the wetland boundary. Under the soil conditions found in agricultural areas of South Dakota in North America, wetland hydroperiod was found to be more sensitive to the depth that drain tile is installed relative to the bottom of the wetland basin than to distance-based setbacks. Because tile drainage can change the hydrologic conditions of wetlands, even when deployed in upland catchments, tile drainage plans should be evaluated more closely for the potential impacts they might have on the ecological services that these wetlands currently provide. Future research should investigate further how drainage impacts are affected by climate variability and change.

  5. Estimation of Tile Drainage Contribution to Streamflow and Nutrient Export Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, K. E.; Arenas Amado, A.; Jones, C. S.; Weber, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface drainage is a very common practice in the agricultural U.S. Midwest. It is typically installed in poorly drained soils in order to enhance crop yields. The presence of tile drains creates a route for agrichemicals to travel and therefore negatively impacts stream water quality. This study estimated through end-member analyses the contributions of tile drainage, groundwater, and surface runoff to streamflow at the watershed scale based on continuously monitored data. Especial attention was devoted to quantifying tile drainage impact on watershed streamflow and nutrient export loads. Data analyzed includes streamflow, rainfall, soil moisture, shallow groundwater levels, in-stream nitrate+nitrite concentrations and specific conductance. Data were collected at a HUC12 watershed located in Northeast Iowa, USA. Approximately 60% of the total watershed area is devoted to agricultural activities and forest and grassland are the other two predominant land uses. Results show that approximately 20% of total annual streamflow comes from tile drainage and during rainfall events tile drainage contribution can go up to 30%. Furthermore, for most of the analyzed rainfall events groundwater responded faster and in a more dramatic fashion than tile drainage. The State of Iowa is currently carrying out a plan to reduce nutrients in Iowa waters and the Gulf of Mexico (Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy). The outcome of this investigation has the potential to assist in Best Management Practice (BMP) scenario selection and therefore help the state achieve water quality goals.

  6. Transport pathways of nitrogen and phosphorus in tile-drained cranberry farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Alversion, N.; Jeranyama, P.; DeMoranville, C.; Sandler, H.; Caruso, F.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid, controlled drainage of cranberry farms is critical to optimizing production in Massachusetts, where approximately 1/3 of the industry's crop is produced. Relatively new to cranberry farming, tile drainage has been billed as a low-cost drainage management option for reducing crop disease and weed infestations. Despite its well documented agronomic benefits, tile drainage may exacerbate nutrient loss and promote eutrophication in nearby ponds receiving cranberry drainage waters. In this study, a monitoring program was established on a Massachusetts cranberry bed to quantify (1) mass loss of nitrogen and phosphorous via tile drainage to a perimeter ditch surrounding the cranberry bed, (2) the attenuation of N and P in the ditch prior to discharge from the cranberry bed, and (3) and the component contributions of preferential vs. matrix transport of N and P in tile drainage. A combination of compound weirs, acoustic-velocity meters, propeller-driven flow meters, and rain gauges were installed to quantify drainage management characteristics of the cranberry bed. Automatic samplers were also installed to collect water samples at each monitoring site (i.e., four tile drains, an irrigation pond, and a flume used to control ditch height) for analysis of N and P concentrations and hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to estimate nutrient loss and transport pathways. These data will be used to develop a mechanistic synthesis of nutrient cycling in tile-drained cranberry beds.

  7. Solar array flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Emerging satellite designs require increasing amounts of electrical power to operate spacecraft instruments and to provide environments suitable for human habitation. In the past, electrical power was generated by covering rigid honeycomb panels with solar cells. This technology results in unacceptable weight and volume penalties when large amounts of power are required. To fill the need for large-area, lightweight solar arrays, a fabrication technique in which solar cells are attached to a copper printed circuit laminated to a plastic sheet was developed. The result is a flexible solar array with one-tenth the stowed volume and one-third the weight of comparably sized rigid arrays. An automated welding process developed to attack the cells to the printed circuit guarantees repeatable welds that are more tolerant of severe environments than conventional soldered connections. To demonstrate the flight readiness of this technology, the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) was developed and flown on the space shuttle Discovery in September 1984. The tests showed the modes and frequencies of the array to be very close to preflight predictions. Structural damping, however, was higher than anticipated. Electrical performance of the active solar panel was also tested. The flight performance and postflight data evaluation are described.

  8. Lacunae infills for in situ treatment of historic glazed tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Marta T.; Esteves, Lurdes; Ferreira, Teresa A.; Candeias, António; Tennent, Norman H.; Rodrigues, José Delgado; Pereira, Sílvia R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of current conservation materials and methods together with those adopted in the past is essential to aid research and improve or develop better conservation options. The infill and painting of tile lacunae are subjected to special requirements mainly when used in outdoor settings. A selection of the most commonly used materials was undertaken and performed based on inquiries to practitioners working in the field. The infill pastes comprised organic (epoxy, polyester), inorganic (slaked lime, hydraulic lime and zinc hydroxychloride) and mixed organic-inorganic (slaked lime mixed with a vinylic resin) binders. The selected aggregates were those most commonly used or those already present in the commercially formulated products. The infill pastes were characterised by SEM, MIP, open porosity, water absorption by capillarity, water vapour permeability, thermal and hydric expansibilities and adhesion to the ceramic body. Their performance was assessed after curing, artificial ageing (salt ageing and UV-Temp-RH cycles) and natural ageing. The results were interpreted in terms of their significance as indicators of effectiveness, compatibility and durability.

  9. Computational modeling of thin ceramic tiles backed by thin substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Cox, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Building on the work of Wilkins, Eulerian hydrocode calculations were performed with ceramic models to examine the behavior of thin ceramic tiles backed by a thin substrate. In order to match ballistic limit data it was necessary to include a pressure dependent flow stress for failed ceramic. Reasonable agreement is found between the modified model and ballistic limit data for a simulated armor piercing round impacting an AD-85 alumina/6061T6 aluminum laminate. Based upon this success, the modified model was used to examine the performance of a SiC/6061T6 aluminum laminate when impacted by an M80 ball round (7.62 mm) at muzzle velocity. The projectile undergoes large deformation, as does the aluminum backing sheet. The computational results indicate, for the M80 projectile impacting at muzzle velocity, that the ballistic limit thickness for the SiC/aluminum laminate should weigh 10% less than the ballistic limit thickness for steel. The talk will include a video tape of calculations.

  10. Radon exhalation rates and gamma doses from ceramic tiles.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R S; Aral, H; Peggie, J R

    1998-12-01

    This study was carried out to assess the possible radiological hazard resulting from the use of zircon in glaze applied to tiles used in buildings. The 226Ra content of various stains and glazing compounds was measured using gamma spectroscopy and the 222Rn exhalation rates for these materials were measured using adsorption on activated charcoal. The radon exhalation rates were found to be close to or less than the minimum detectable values for the equipment used. This limit was much lower than the estimated exhalation rates, which were calculated assuming that the parameters controlling the emanation and diffusion of 222Rn in the materials studied were similar to those of soil. This implied that the 222Rn emanation coefficients and/or diffusion coefficients for most of the materials studied were very much lower than expected. Measurements on zircon powders showed that the 222Rn emanation coefficient for zircon was much lower than that for soil, indicating that only a small fraction of the 222Rn produced by the decay of 226Ra was able to escape from the zircon grains. The estimated increase in radon concentration in room air and the estimated external gamma radiation dose resulting from the use of zircon glaze are both much lower than the relevant action level and dose limit.

  11. Crystallization and tile separation in the multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, Jacques Henri; Fanchon, Jean

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the self-organization of simple mobile agents confined in a two-dimension rectangular area. Each agent interacts with its neighbors inside an interaction disk and moves following various types of force-driven couplings (e.g. repulsion or attraction). The agents do not know their absolute position, do not exchange messages, have no memory, and no learning capabilities. We first study the self-organization appearing in systems made-up with one sole type of agents, initially generated at random in the terrain. By changing the agent-agent repulsive interaction, we observe five different population reorganizations, namely, grouping, diffusion (that is classical), but especially interesting, crystallization (i.e., the agents group together on the vertices a regular hexagonal lattice), alignment along straight lines, and vortex dynamics. Then, we consider reorganization in systems made-up from two to five types of agents, where each pair of agent types has specific interaction parameters. The main result of this work is to show that, by only changing the agent-agent repulsion rules, one can generate hexagonal or rectangular multi-agent crystals or on the contrary, induce complete separation in regular hexagonal tiles.

  12. Assembly models for Papovaviridae based on tiling theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keef, T.; Taormina, A.; Twarock, R.

    2005-09-01

    A vital constituent of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence provides protection for the viral genome. Assembly models are developed for viral capsids built from protein building blocks that can assume different local bonding structures in the capsid. This situation occurs, for example, for viruses in the family of Papovaviridae, which are linked to cancer and are hence of particular interest for the health sector. More specifically, the viral capsids of the (pseudo-) T = 7 particles in this family consist of pentamers that exhibit two different types of bonding structures. While this scenario cannot be described mathematically in terms of Caspar-Klug theory (Caspar D L D and Klug A 1962 Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 27 1), it can be modelled via tiling theory (Twarock R 2004 J. Theor. Biol. 226 477). The latter is used to encode the local bonding environment of the building blocks in a combinatorial structure, called the assembly tree, which is a basic ingredient in the derivation of assembly models for Papovaviridae along the lines of the equilibrium approach of Zlotnick (Zlotnick A 1994 J. Mol. Biol. 241 59). A phase space formalism is introduced to characterize the changes in the assembly pathways and intermediates triggered by the variations in the association energies characterizing the bonds between the building blocks in the capsid. Furthermore, the assembly pathways and concentrations of the statistically dominant assembly intermediates are determined. The example of Simian virus 40 is discussed in detail.

  13. Superelement Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.

    1998-01-01

    Super-elements can greatly improve the computational efficiency of analyses of tile-reinforced structures such as the hull of the Composite Armored Vehicle. By taking advantage of the periodicity in this type of construction, super-elements can be used to simplify the task of modeling, to virtually eliminate the time required to assemble the stiffness matrices, and to reduce significantly the analysis solution time. Furthermore, super-elements are fully transferable between analyses and analysts, so that they provide a consistent method to share information and reduce duplication. This paper describes a methodology that was developed to model and analyze large upper hull components of the Composite Armored Vehicle. The analyses are based on two types of superelement models. The first type is based on element-layering, which consists of modeling a laminate by using several layers of shell elements constrained together with compatibility equations. Element layering is used to ensure the proper transverse shear deformation in the laminate rubber layer. The second type of model uses three-dimensional elements. Since no graphical pre-processor currently supports super-elements, a special technique based on master-elements was developed. Master-elements are representations of super-elements that are used in conjunction with a custom translator to write the superelement connectivities as input decks for ABAQUS.

  14. Quality and seasonal variation of rainwater harvested from concrete, asphalt, ceramic tile and green roofs in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Xiaoke; Hou, Peiqiang; Wan, Wuxing; Li, Ruida; Ren, Yufen; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement to examine the quality of harvested rainwater for potable and non-potable purposes, based on the type of roofing material. In this study, we examined the effect on the quality of harvested rainwater of conventional roofing materials (concrete, asphalt and ceramic tile roofs) compared with alternative roofing materials (green roof). The results showed that the ceramic tile roof was the most suitable for rainwater-harvesting applications because of the lower concentrations of leachable pollutants. However, in this study, the green roof was not suitable for rainwater harvesting applications. In addition, seasonal trends in water quality parameters showed that pollutants in roof runoff in summer and autumn were lower than those in winter and spring. This study revealed that the quality of harvested rainwater was significantly affected by the roofing material; therefore, local government and urban planners should develop stricter testing programs and produce more weathering resistant roofing materials to allow the harvesting of rainwater for domestic and public uses.

  15. Evaluating the use of sub-tile Bulk Averaged inputs to simulate evapotranspiration within Heterogeneous Land-Atmosphere Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiting; Jia, Li; Hutjes, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Evapotranspiration plays a crucial role in the regional water and energy balance and often takes place within heterogeneous land-atmosphere systems. Heterogeneity usually appears in the resolvable elements in Land Surface Models (LSMs). Typically, Land surface modelling to simulate evapotranspiration tends to oversimplify the sub-Tile heterogeneity of a Land-atmosphere parameter by a single representative value. This paper evaluates the inaccuracy of LSMs resulting from inaccurately representing the heterogeneity within resolvable elements by a bulk average value. In a synthetic experiment, seven Probability Density Functions (PDFs) were used to simulate the different scenarios of heterogeneity of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and top Soil Moisture (SM). Evapotranspiration estimates based on bulk averaged LAI and SM status were compared with the one obtained by the real distributed LAI and SM. Their difference is due to the combined effect of heterogeneities in LAI and SM, and the nonlinear processes in the LSMs. Besides the synthetic numerical experiment, we also tested the reliability of the bulk average scheme in a real world case for the Heihe river basin, northwest of China, to further demonstrate the importance of accounting for sub-Tile heterogeneity in evapotranspiration estimates and its implications for the regional and irrigation water management.

  16. Shearography for Non-destructive Inspection with applications to BAT Mask Tile Adhesive Bonding and Specular Surface Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Daniel B.

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of shearography techniques for non-destructive evaluation in two unique application areas is examined. In the first application, shearography is used to evaluate the quality of adhesive bonds holding lead tiles to the B.4T gamma ray mask for the NASA Swift program. Using a vibration excitation, the more poorly bonded tiles are readily identifiable in the shearography image. A quantitative analysis is presented that compares the shearography results with a destructive pull test measuring the force at bond failure. The second application is to evaluate the bonding between the skin and core of a honeycomb structure with a specular (mirror-like) surface. In standard shearography techniques, the object under test must have a diffuse surface to generate the speckle patterns in laser light, which are then sheared. A novel configuration using the specular surface as a mirror to image speckles from a diffuser is presented, opening up the use of shearography to a new class of objects that could not have been examined with the traditional approach. This new technique readily identifies large scale bond failures in the panel, demonstrating the validity of this approach.

  17. Characterization of plastic scintillators using magnetic resonance techniques for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter in the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelwan, C.; Jivan, H.; Joubert, D.; Keartland, J.; Liao, S.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we look at radiation damage and its adverse effects on plastic scintillators housed within the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS detector. The study focuses on determining how the interaction of ionizing radiation with plastic scintillators effects their efficacy and desired properties such as high light output and fast decay time. Plastic scintillators form an integral part of the ATLAS trigger system and their optimal functionality is paramount to the success of ATLAS. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provides insight into the electronic structure of the plastics and can characterize the damage caused by ionizing radiation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed in order to simulate the EPR signal. Preliminary EPR results investigate four different types of plastic scintillators. These include three polyvinyl-toluene based Eljen technologies: EJ200, EJ208 and EJ260, and one polystyrene based Dubna sample. It has been observed that the Dubna sample, identical on the current scintillator used in the ATLAS detector, undergoes more structural damage when compared to the Eljen samples.

  18. The Diagnostic Yield of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization Is High Regardless of Severity of Intellectual Disability/Developmental Delay in Children.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Stefano; Gavazzi, Francesco; Alfei, Enrico; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Montomoli, Cristina; Corso, Barbara; Buzzi, Erika; Sciacca, Francesca L; Bulgheroni, Sara; Riva, Daria; Pantaleoni, Chiara

    2016-05-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization is a method of molecular analysis that identifies chromosomal anomalies (or copy number variants) that correlate with clinical phenotypes. The aim of the present study was to apply a clinical score previously designated by de Vries to 329 patients with intellectual disability/developmental disorder (intellectual disability/developmental delay) referred to our tertiary center and to see whether the clinical factors are associated with a positive outcome of aCGH analyses. Another goal was to test the association between a positive microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization result and the severity of intellectual disability/developmental delay. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization identified structural chromosomal alterations responsible for the intellectual disability/developmental delay phenotype in 16% of our sample. Our study showed that causative copy number variants are frequently found even in cases of mild intellectual disability (30.77%). We want to emphasize the need to conduct microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization on all individuals with intellectual disability/developmental delay, regardless of the severity, because the degree of intellectual disability/developmental delay does not predict the diagnostic yield of microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization.

  19. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Kevlar Tethers on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper I examined the effects of impacts of polymer tethers on aluminum plates using the SPHC hydrodynamic code. In this paper I apply tether models to a new target - models of Space Shuttle tiles developed during the STS 107 accident investigation. In this three-dimensional simulation, a short tether fragment strikes a single tile supported on an aluminum backing plate. A tile of the LI-900 material is modeled. Penetration and damage to the tile and the backwall are characterized for three normal impact velocities. The tether is modeled as a bundle of eight 1-mm strands, with the bundle having dimensions 2-mm x 4-mm x 20-cm. The bulk material properties used are those of Kevlar(TradeMark) 49, for which a Mie-Gruneisen multiphase equation of state (eos) is used. In addition, the strength model is applied in a linear sense, such that tensile loads along the strand length are supported, but there is no strength in the lateral directions. Tile models include the various layers making up the tile structure. The outermost layer is a relatively dense borosilicate glass, known as RCG, 0.5-mm thick. The RCG layer is present on the top and four sides of the tile. Below this coating is the bulk of the tile, 1.8- in thick, made of LI-900, a product consisting of rigidized fiberous silica with a density of 9 lWft3. Below the main insulating layer is a bottom layer of the same material that has been treated to increase its density by approximately 69% to improve its strength. This densified layer is bonded to a Strain Isolation Pad (SIP), modeled as a refractory felt fabric. The SIP is bonded to an aluminum 2024 wall 0.1-in thick. The tile and backwall materials use a Me-Gruneisen multiphase eos, with the exception of the SIP felt, which uses a fabric equation of state. Fabrics must be crushed to the full bulk material density before bulk material properties and a Mie-Gruneisen eos are applied. Tether fragment impact speeds of 3,7, and 10 km/s are simulated, with

  20. Efficient Metamodel Estimates of Nitrate Flux to Groundwater and Tile Drains (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, B. T.; Malone, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    metamodel and evidently was a surrogate for key aspects of the N cycle, such as organic N pools and mineralization. We evaluated the nitrate metamodel by comparing predictions with sampled nitrate from 38 shallow monitoring wells, which yielded a Pearson's r of 0.466 (p=0.003). Metamodel predictions of shallow subsurface nitrate concentration and flux were mapped in a GIS to show the vulnerability of groundwater and streams (via tile drains) in the Corn Belt. Predicted nitrate concentration was greater in the northern part of the region and corresponded to the spatial distribution of sensitive variables, such as soil organic matter content. Nitrate leaching to groundwater was highest in undrained areas with coarse soils, such as southeastern Nebraska. High predicted nitrate concentration also occurred in extensive tile-drained areas (north-central Iowa and large areas of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio), which generally is consistent with total N concentration in streams predicted by CONDOR, a national-scale regression model. Metamodel predictions of N flux were summed over the Corn Belt to estimate the relative annual impacts to groundwater and streams (up to 4.1 x 106 and 2 x 106 metric tons of N, respectively).