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Sample records for compartment model pharmacokinetics

  1. Four open mammillary and catenary compartment models for pharmacokinetics studies.

    PubMed

    de Biasi, J

    1989-11-01

    A mathematical method is proposed to solve a fourth degree equation which gives the eigenvalues of the matrix connected with a four open compartment model used in pharmacokinetic studies. As examples, the method is applied to mammillary and catenary models.

  2. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  3. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  4. 3-compartment dynamic model of talaporfin sodium pharmacokinetics in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Uno, Yuko; Ohtani, Keishi; Maehara, Sachio; Imai, Kentaro; Ono, Shotaro; Usuda, Jitsuo; Arai, Tsunenori

    2017-02-01

    We studied a 3-compartment dynamic model of talaporfin sodium pharmacokinetics in silico. Drug distribution might change after intravenous injection from plasma to interstitial space and then into myocardial cells. We have developed a new cardiac ablation using photosensitization reaction with laser irradiation shortly after talaporfin sodium injection. We think that the major cell-killing factor in our cardiac ablation would be an oxidation by singlet oxygen produced in the interstitial space in myocardium with laser irradiation shortly after the photosensitizer administration. So that the talaporfin sodium concentration change in time in the interstitial space should be investigated. We constructed the pharmacokinetics dynamic model composed by 3-compartments, that is, plasma, interstitial space, and cell. We measured talaporfin sodium fluorescence time change in human skin by our developed fluorescence measurement system in vivo. Using the measured concentration data in plasma and skin in human, we verified the calculation accuracy of our in silico model. We compared the simulated transition tendency of talaporfin sodium concentration from interstitial space to cells in our in silico model with the reported uptake tendency using cultured myocardial cell. We identified the transition coefficients between plasma, interstitial space, and cell compartment, and metabolization coefficient from plasma by the fitting with measured data.

  5. Probabilistic pharmacokinetic models of decompression sickness in humans, part 1: Coupled perfusion-limited compartments.

    PubMed

    Murphy, F Gregory; Hada, Ethan A; Doolette, David J; Howle, Laurens E

    2017-07-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease caused by gas bubbles forming in body tissues following a reduction in ambient pressure, such as occurs in scuba diving. Probabilistic models for quantifying the risk of DCS are typically composed of a collection of independent, perfusion-limited theoretical tissue compartments which describe gas content or bubble volume within these compartments. It has been previously shown that 'pharmacokinetic' gas content models, with compartments coupled in series, show promise as predictors of the incidence of DCS. The mechanism of coupling can be through perfusion or diffusion. This work examines the application of five novel pharmacokinetic structures with compartments coupled by perfusion to the prediction of the probability and time of onset of DCS in humans. We optimize these models against a training set of human dive trial data consisting of 4335 exposures with 223 DCS cases. Further, we examine the extrapolation quality of the models on an additional set of human dive trial data consisting of 3140 exposures with 147 DCS cases. We find that pharmacokinetic models describe the incidence of DCS for single air bounce dives better than a single-compartment, perfusion-limited model. We further find the U.S. Navy LEM-NMRI98 is a better predictor of DCS risk for the entire training set than any of our pharmacokinetic models. However, one of the pharmacokinetic models we consider, the CS2T3 model, is a better predictor of DCS risk for single air bounce dives and oxygen decompression dives. Additionally, we find that LEM-NMRI98 outperforms CS2T3 on the extrapolation data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Local identifiability for two and three-compartment pharmacokinetic models with time-lags.

    PubMed

    Merino, J A; De Biasi, J; Plusquellec, Y; Houin, G

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, we show that time-lags between compartments in a 2 and 3 compartment pharmacokinetic model may be taken into account but that separate identification for model parameters and for time-lags would not be suitable. Furthermore, it may happen that a time-lag model is locally identifiable while the corresponding model without delay is not. For two-compartment delayed models, with only one observation, it is not necessary to have two different inputs contrary to the case without time-lag. Both the Laplace transformation and a Jacobian matrix are used in an identifiability study. For all two-compartment models we have investigated which kind of parameters or lags are identifiable from amount (Q) or concentration (C) measures.

  7. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic tissue compartment model selection in drug development and risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew D.; Beard, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The well-stirred tank (WST) has been the predominant flow-limited tissue compartment model in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Recently, we developed a two-region asymptotically reduced (TAR) PBPK tissue compartment model through an asymptotic approximation to a two-region vascular-extravascular system to incorporate more biophysical detail than the WST model. To determine the relevance of the novel flow-limited approach (F-TAR), 75 structurally diverse drugs are evaluated herein using a priori predicted tissue:plasma partition coefficients along with hybrid and whole-body PBPK of eight rat tissues to determine the impact of model selection on simulation and optimization. Simulations show the F-TAR model significantly improves the ability to predict drug exposure, with hybrid and whole-body WST model error approaching 50% for tissues with larger vascular volumes. When optimization is used to fit F-TAR and WST models to pseudo data, WST-optimized drug partition coefficients more appropriately represent curve-fitting parameters rather than biophysically meaningful partition coefficients. Median F-TAR-optimized error ranged from -0.4 to 0.3%, while WST-optimized median error ranged from -22.2 to 1.8%. These studies demonstrate the use of F-TAR represents a more accurate, biophysically realistic PBPK tissue model for predicting tissue exposure to drug and should be considered for use in drug development and regulatory review. PMID:21968734

  8. Coupled solutions of one- and two-compartment pharmacokinetic models with first-order absorption.

    PubMed

    Asmanova, N; Koloskov, G; Ilin, A I

    2013-04-01

    This work emphasizes the importance of the fact, that plasma concentration profiles of one- and two-compartment linear pharmacokinetic (PK) models with first-order absorption introduce an uncertainty in data interpretation. PK-curve fitting results in a pair of valid solutions (coupled solutions), for which the derived PK parameters (such as AUC, MRT, Cmax, tmax, initial and terminal slope) are identical. Therefore, to make a proper choice of PK parameters of the drug in question, more information has to be considered, for example, which one of the solutions is more correlated with corresponding data, observed after iv administration. Comparison of different types of PK models and discussion on the transitions between the coupled solutions was carried out using a novel symbolic notation to provide more clarity and to simplify parameter indexing. Presented results were obtained by combined means of the method of statistic moments, Laplace transform and illustrated by the numerical experiment.

  9. A NOVEL PNYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A NOVEL PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT. Evans, M.V., Hughes, M.F., and Kenyon, E.M. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    DMA is the major methylated metabolite of inorganic arsenic, a kno...

  10. A NOVEL PNYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A NOVEL PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT. Evans, M.V., Hughes, M.F., and Kenyon, E.M. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    DMA is the major methylated metabolite of inorganic arsenic, a kno...

  11. A two-compartment population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of digoxin in adults, with implications for dosage.

    PubMed

    Jelliffe, Roger W; Milman, Mark; Schumitzky, Alan; Bayard, David; Van Guilder, Michael

    2014-06-01

    A population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of digoxin in adult subjects was originally developed by Reuning et al in 1973. They clearly described the 2-compartment behavior of digoxin, the lack of correlation of effect with serum concentrations, and the close correlation of the observed inotropic effect of digoxin with the calculated amount of drug present in the peripheral nonserum compartment. Their model seemed most attractive for clinical use. However, to make it more applicable for maximally precise dosage, its model parameter values (means and SD's) were converted into discrete model parameter distributions using a computer program developed especially for this purpose using the method of maximum entropy. In this way, the parameter distributions became discrete rather than continuous, suitable for use in developing maximally precise digoxin dosage regimens, individualized to an adult patient's age, gender, body weight, and renal function, to achieve desired specific target goals either in the central (serum) compartment or in the peripheral (effect) compartment using the method of multiple model dosage design. Some illustrative clinical applications of this model are presented and discussed. This model with a peripheral compartment reflecting clinical effect has contributed significantly to an improved understanding of the clinical behavior of digoxin in patients than is possible with models having only a single compartment, and to the improved management of digoxin therapy for more than 20 years.

  12. Dual-input two-compartment pharmacokinetic model of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Li; Yang, Li-Ming; Zhang, Min-Ming; Wang, Bo-Yin; Wang, Ting; Lu, Bao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of a dual-input two-compartment tracer kinetic model for evaluating tumorous microvascular properties in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: From January 2014 to April 2015, we prospectively measured and analyzed pharmacokinetic parameters [transfer constant (Ktrans), plasma flow (Fp), permeability surface area product (PS), efflux rate constant (kep), extravascular extracellular space volume ratio (ve), blood plasma volume ratio (vp), and hepatic perfusion index (HPI)] using dual-input two-compartment tracer kinetic models [a dual-input extended Tofts model and a dual-input 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM)] in 28 consecutive HCC patients. A well-known consensus that HCC is a hypervascular tumor supplied by the hepatic artery and the portal vein was used as a reference standard. A paired Student’s t-test and a nonparametric paired Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare the equivalent pharmacokinetic parameters derived from the two models, and Pearson correlation analysis was also applied to observe the correlations among all equivalent parameters. The tumor size and pharmacokinetic parameters were tested by Pearson correlation analysis, while correlations among stage, tumor size and all pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. RESULTS: The Fp value was greater than the PS value (FP = 1.07 mL/mL per minute, PS = 0.19 mL/mL per minute) in the dual-input 2CXM; HPI was 0.66 and 0.63 in the dual-input extended Tofts model and the dual-input 2CXM, respectively. There were no significant differences in the kep, vp, or HPI between the dual-input extended Tofts model and the dual-input 2CXM (P = 0.524, 0.569, and 0.622, respectively). All equivalent pharmacokinetic parameters, except for ve, were correlated in the two dual-input two-compartment pharmacokinetic models; both Fp and PS in the dual-input 2CXM were correlated with Ktrans derived from the dual-input extended Tofts model

  13. A three-compartment open pharmacokinetic model can explain variable toxicities of cobra venoms and their alpha toxins.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M; Aly, M H; Abd-Elsalam, M A; Morad, A M

    1996-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic profiles of labelled Naja melanoleuca, Naja nivea, Naja nigricollis and Naja haje venoms and their alpha neurotoxins were determined following rapid i.v. injection into rabbits. The data obtained fitted a triexponential equation characteristic of a three-compartment open pharmacokinetic model comprising a central compartment 'blood', a rapidly equilibrating 'shallow' tissue compartment and a slowly equilibrating 'deep' tissue compartment. The distribution half-lives for the shallow compartment ranged from 3.2 to 5 min, reflecting the rapid uptake of venoms and toxins compared with 22-47 min for the deep tissue compartment denoting much slower uptake. The overall elimination half-lives, t1/2 beta, ranged from 15 to 29 hr, indicating a slow body elimination. Peak tissue concentration was reached within 15-20 min in the shallow tissue compartment. The corresponding values for the deep tissue compartment were 120 min for N. melanoleuca and N. nigricollis venoms and their toxins and 240 min for N. nivea and N. haje venoms and their toxins. Steady-state distribution between the shallow tissue compartment and the blood gave values of 0.50 and 0.92 (N. melanoleuca), 1.64 and 1.05 (N. nivea), 0.78 and 0.92 (N. nigricollis) and 1.70 and 1.03 (N. haje) for the venoms and their toxins, respectively. The corresponding values for the deep tissue compartment gave ratios of 3.31 and 3.44 (N. melanoleuca), 2.99 and 1.68 (N. nivea), 3.74 and 3.79 (N. nigricollis) and 1.39 and 2.46 (N. haje) for the venoms and their toxins, respectively. Ratios lower than unity indicate lower venom and toxin concentrations in the tissues than in the blood, while larger ratios denote higher tissue concentrations. The values thus reflect a higher affinity of the venoms and their toxins for the central than the shallow tissue compartment and for the deep tissue than the central compartment. The sites of action of the venoms seem to be located in the deep tissue compartment since most

  14. Explicit reformulations of the Lambert W-omega function for calculations of the solutions to one-compartment pharmacokinetic models with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics.

    PubMed

    Goličnik, Marko

    2011-09-01

    The exact closed-form solutions to the integrated rate equations for one-compartment pharmacokinetic models that obey Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics were derived recently (Tang and Xiao in J Pharmacokin Pharmacodyn 34:807-827, 2007). These solutions are expressed in terms of the Lambert W(x)-omega function; however, unfortunately, most of the available computer programs are not set up to handle equations that involve the W(x) function. Therefore, in this article, I provide alternative explicit analytical equations expressed in terms of elementary mathematical functions that accurately approximate exact solutions and can be simply calculated using any optional standard software.

  15. Ceftaroline plus avibactam demonstrates bactericidal activity against pathogenic anaerobic bacteria in a one-compartment in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Werth, Brian J; Rybak, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic pathogens are often associated with polymicrobial infections, such as diabetic foot infections. Patients with these infections are often treated with broad-spectrum, multidrug therapies targeting resistant Gram-positive bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as well as Gram-negative bacteria and anaerobes. The broad-spectrum, non-beta-lactam, beta-lactamase inhibitor avibactam has been combined with ceftaroline and may provide a single-product alternative for complicated polymicrobial infections. We compared the activity of ceftaroline-avibactam (CPA) to that of ertapenem (ERT) against common anaerobic pathogens in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model. Simulations of doses of ceftaroline-fosamil at 600 mg every 8 h (q8h) (maximum free drug concentration [fCmax], 17.04 mg/liter, and half-life [t1/2], 2.66 h) plus avibactam at 600 mg q8h (fCmax, 11.72 mg/liter, and t1/2, 1.8 h) and of ertapenem at 1 g q24h (fCmax, 13 mg/liter, and t1/2, 4 h) were evaluated against two strains of Bacteroides fragilis, one strain of Prevotella bivia, and one strain of Finegoldia magna in an anaerobic one-compartment in vitro PK/PD model over 72 h with a starting inoculum of ∼8 log10 CFU/ml. Bactericidal activity was defined as a reduction of ≥3 log10 CFU/ml from the starting inoculum. Both CPA and ERT were bactericidal against all four strains. CPA demonstrated improved activity against Bacteroides strains compared to that of ERT but had similar activity against Finegoldia magna and P. bivia, although modest regrowth was observed with CPA against P. bivia. No resistance emerged from any of the models. The pharmacokinetics achieved were 92 to 105% of the targets. CPA has potent in vitro activity against common anaerobic pathogens at clinically relevant drug exposures and may be a suitable single product for the management of complicated polymicrobial infections.

  16. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  17. Individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis: a graphic procedure for quantification of predictive performance.

    PubMed

    Eksborg, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies are important for optimizing of drug dosing, but requires proper validation of the used pharmacokinetic procedures. However, simple and reliable statistical methods suitable for evaluation of the predictive performance of pharmacokinetic analysis are essentially lacking. The aim of the present study was to construct and evaluate a graphic procedure for quantification of predictive performance of individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis. Original data from previously published pharmacokinetic compartment analyses after intravenous, oral, and epidural administration, and digitized data, obtained from published scatter plots of observed vs predicted drug concentrations from population pharmacokinetic studies using the NPEM algorithm and NONMEM computer program and Bayesian forecasting procedures, were used for estimating the predictive performance according to the proposed graphical method and by the method of Sheiner and Beal. The graphical plot proposed in the present paper proved to be a useful tool for evaluation of predictive performance of both individual and population compartment pharmacokinetic analysis. The proposed method is simple to use and gives valuable information concerning time- and concentration-dependent inaccuracies that might occur in individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis. Predictive performance can be quantified by the fraction of concentration ratios within arbitrarily specified ranges, e.g. within the range 0.8-1.2.

  18. A new stochastic approach to multi-compartment pharmacokinetic models: probability of traveling route and distribution of residence time in linear and nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Li, Na; Yang, Harry

    2011-02-01

    Drug kinetics in human has been studied from both deterministic and stochastic perspectives. However, little research has been done to systematically determine the probability for a drug molecule to follow a specific traveling route. Recently a method was developed to estimate this probability and the probability density function of residence time in linear systems. In this paper, we provide a rigorous proof of the main results of the previous paper and extend the method to nonlinear multi-compartment systems. A novel concept of compartment expansion is introduced to facilitate the development of our method. This formulation resolves computational difficulties associated with nonlinear systems, allowing for direct estimation of the probability intensity coefficients, and subsequently the transition probability and probability density function of the residence time. With such expansion of the methodology, it becomes both practical and feasible to apply it in the real-world drug development where drug disposition patterns are often nonlinear. The method can be used to estimate drug exposure at any site of interest, thus may help us to gain better understanding about the impact of drug exposure on efficacy and safety.

  19. Nitro-fatty acid pharmacokinetics in the adipose tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Fazzari, Marco; Khoo, Nicholas K H; Woodcock, Steven R; Jorkasky, Diane K; Li, Lihua; Schopfer, Francisco J; Freeman, Bruce A

    2017-02-01

    Electrophilic nitro-FAs (NO2-FAs) promote adaptive and anti-inflammatory cell signaling responses as a result of an electrophilic character that supports posttranslational protein modifications. A unique pharmacokinetic profile is expected for NO2-FAs because of an ability to undergo reversible reactions including Michael addition with cysteine-containing proteins and esterification into complex lipids. Herein, we report via quantitative whole-body autoradiography analysis of rats gavaged with radiolabeled 10-nitro-[(14)C]oleic acid, preferential accumulation in adipose tissue over 2 weeks. To better define the metabolism and incorporation of NO2-FAs and their metabolites in adipose tissue lipids, adipocyte cultures were supplemented with 10-nitro-oleic acid (10-NO2-OA), nitro-stearic acid, nitro-conjugated linoleic acid, and nitro-linolenic acid. Then, quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis was performed on adipocyte neutral and polar lipid fractions, both before and after acid hydrolysis of esterified FAs. NO2-FAs preferentially incorporated in monoacyl- and diacylglycerides, while reduced metabolites were highly enriched in triacylglycerides. This differential distribution profile was confirmed in vivo in the adipose tissue of NO2-OA-treated mice. This pattern of NO2-FA deposition lends new insight into the unique pharmacokinetics and pharmacologic actions that could be expected for this chemically-reactive class of endogenous signaling mediators and synthetic drug candidates.

  20. Some statistical issues in modelling pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J K; Jones, B; Jarvis, P

    A fundamental assumption underlying pharmacokinetic compartment modelling is that each subject has a different individual curve. To some extent this runs counter to the statistical principle that similar individuals will have similar curves, thus making inferences to a wider population possible. In population pharmacokinetics, the compromise is to use random effects. We recommend that such models also be used in data rich situations instead of independently fitting individual curves. However, the additional information available in such studies shows that random effects are often not sufficient; generally, an autoregressive process is also required. This has the added advantage that it provides a means of tracking each individual, yielding predictions for the next observation. The compartment model curve being fitted may also be distorted in other ways. A widely held assumption is that most, if not all, pharmacokinetic concentration data follow a log-normal distribution. By examples, we show that this is not generally true, with the gamma distribution often being more suitable. When extreme individuals are present, a heavy-tailed distribution, such as the log Cauchy, can often provide more robust results. Finally, other assumptions that can distort the results include a direct dependence of the variance, or other dispersion parameter, on the mean and setting non-detectable values to some arbitrarily small value instead of treating them as censored. By pointing out these problems with standard methods of statistical modelling of pharmacokinetic data, we hope that commercial software will soon make more flexible and suitable models available.

  1. A Review on Pharmacokinetic Modeling and the Effects of Environmental Stressors on Pharmacokinetics for Operational Medicine: Operational Pharmacokinetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    catenary compartment model; (b) the mammillary compartment model....................................................................... 5 Figure 4...and catenary compartment model (Figure 3). A mammillary model consists of a central compartment interacting with a number of peripheral compartments...

  2. Post-dialysis urea concentration: comparison between one- compartment model and two-compartment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrin, N. S. Ahmad; Ibrahim, N.

    2014-11-01

    The reduction of the urea concentration in blood can be numerically projected by using one-compartment model and two-compartment model with no variation in body fluid. This study aims to compare the simulated values of post-dialysis urea concentration for both models with the clinical data obtained from the hospital. The clinical assessment of adequacy of a treatment is based on the value of Kt/V. Further, direct calculation using clinical data and one-compartment model are presented in the form of ratio. It is found that the ratios of postdialysis urea concentration simulated using two-compartment model are higher compared to the ratios of post-dialysis urea concentration using one-compartment model. In addition, most values of post-dialysis urea concentration simulated using two-compartment model are much closer to the clinical data compared to values simulated using one-compartment model. Kt/V values calculated directly using clinical data are found to be higher than Kt/V values derived from one-compartment model.

  3. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskel...

  4. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskel...

  5. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology.

  6. A PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ESTIMATING ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Empirical evidence suggests that exposure of Americans to dioxin-like compounds was low during the early decades of the 20th century, then increased during the 1940s and 1950s reaching a peak in the 1960s and 1970s, and progressively decreased to lower levels in the 1980s and 1990s. Such evidence includes dioxin analysis of carbon-dated sediment cores of lakes and rivers, preserved meat samples from different decades of the 20th century, and limited body burden measurements of dioxin-like compounds. Pinsky and Lorber (1998) summarized studies measuring 2,3,7,8-TCDD in blood and adipose tissue finding a range of 10-20 pg/g (ppt) lipid during the 1970s, and 2-10 ppt lipid during the 1980s. This study reviews body burdens of dioxin toxic equivalents, TEQs, to find a range from about 50-80 ppt lipid during the 1970s, 30-50 ppt lipid during the 1980s, and 10-20 ppt lipid during the 1990s (TEQs comprised of the 17 dioxin and furan congeners only). Pinsky and Lorber (1998) investigated historical exposure trends for 2,3,7,8-TCDD by using a single-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model. The current study extends this prior effort by modeling dioxin TEQs instead of the single compound, 2,3,7,8-TCDD. TEQs are modeled as though they are a single compound, in contrast to an approach where the individual dioxin and furan congeners are modeled separately. It was found that body burdens of TEQs during the 1970s, 80s, and 90s could be modeled by assuming a histor

  7. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Methods Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation–based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Results Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0

  8. Adjustment of endogenous concentrations in pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Wolfsegger, Martin J

    2014-12-01

    Estimating pharmacokinetic parameters in the presence of an endogenous concentration is not straightforward as cross-reactivity in the analytical methodology prevents differentiation between endogenous and dose-related exogenous concentrations. This article proposes a novel intuitive modeling approach which adequately adjusts for the endogenous concentration. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out based on a two-compartment population pharmacokinetic (PK) model fitted to real data following intravenous administration. A constant and a proportional error model were assumed. The performance of the novel model and the method of straightforward subtraction of the observed baseline concentration from post-dose concentrations were compared in terms of terminal half-life, area under the curve from 0 to infinity, and mean residence time. Mean bias in PK parameters was up to 4.5 times better with the novel model assuming a constant error model and up to 6.5 times better assuming a proportional error model. The simulation study indicates that this novel modeling approach results in less biased and more accurate PK estimates than straightforward subtraction of the observed baseline concentration and overcomes the limitations of previously published approaches.

  9. Modeling the Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) During Gestation and Lactation in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the pharmacokinetics of PFOA during gestation and lactation, a biologically supported dynamic model was developed. A two compartment system linked via placental blood flow described gestation, while milk production linked the dam to a pup litter compartment during lact...

  10. Modeling the Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) During Gestation and Lactation in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the pharmacokinetics of PFOA during gestation and lactation, a biologically supported dynamic model was developed. A two compartment system linked via placental blood flow described gestation, while milk production linked the dam to a pup litter compartment during lact...

  11. Applications of physiologic pharmacokinetic modeling in carcinogenic risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Krewski, D; Withey, J R; Ku, L F; Andersen, M E

    1994-01-01

    The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models has been proposed as a means of estimating the dose of the reactive metabolites of carcinogenic xenobiotics reaching target tissues, thereby affording an opportunity to base estimates of potential cancer risk on tissue dose rather than external levels of exposure. In this article, we demonstrate how a PBPK model can be constructed by specifying mass-balance equations for each physiological compartment included in the model. In general, this leads to a system of nonlinear partial differential equations with which to characterize the compartment system. These equations then can be solved numerically to determine the concentration of metabolites in each compartment as functions of time. In the special case of a linear pharmacokinetic system, we present simple closed-form expressions for the area under the concentration-time curves (AUC) in individual tissue compartments. A general relationship between the AUC in blood and other tissue compartments is also established. These results are of use in identifying those parameters in the models that characterize the integrated tissue dose, and which should therefore be the primary focus of sensitivity analyses. Applications of PBPK modeling for purposes of tissue dosimetry are reviewed, including models developed for methylene chloride, ethylene oxide, 1,4-dioxane, 1-nitropyrene, as well as polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and furans. Special considerations in PBPK modeling related to aging, topical absorption, pregnancy, and mixed exposures are discussed. The linkage between pharmacokinetic models used for tissue dosimetry and pharmacodynamic models for neoplastic transformation of stem cells in the target tissue is explored. PMID:7737040

  12. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, inter-individual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cases, are based on human toxicokinetic data.Objectives: To evaluate the utility of genetically diverse mouse strains for estimating toxicokinetic population variability for risk assessment, using trichloroethylene (TCE) metabolism as a case study. Methods: We used data on oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolism of TCE in 16 inbred and one hybrid mouse strains to calibrate and extend existing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. We added one-compartment models for glutathione metabolites and a two-compartment model for dichloroacetic acid (DCA). A Bayesian population analysis of inter-strain variability was used to quantify variability in TCE metabolism. Results: Concentration-time profiles for TCE metabolism to oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolites varied across strains. Median predictions for the metabolic flux through oxidation was less variable (5-fold range) than that through glutathione conjugation (10-fold range). For oxidative metabolites, median predictions of trichloroacetic acid production was less variable (2-fold range) than DCA production (5-fold range), although uncertainty bounds for DCA exceeded the predicted variability. Conclusions:

  13. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, inter-individual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cases, are based on human toxicokinetic data.Objectives: To evaluate the utility of genetically diverse mouse strains for estimating toxicokinetic population variability for risk assessment, using trichloroethylene (TCE) metabolism as a case study. Methods: We used data on oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolism of TCE in 16 inbred and one hybrid mouse strains to calibrate and extend existing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. We added one-compartment models for glutathione metabolites and a two-compartment model for dichloroacetic acid (DCA). A Bayesian population analysis of inter-strain variability was used to quantify variability in TCE metabolism. Results: Concentration-time profiles for TCE metabolism to oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolites varied across strains. Median predictions for the metabolic flux through oxidation was less variable (5-fold range) than that through glutathione conjugation (10-fold range). For oxidative metabolites, median predictions of trichloroacetic acid production was less variable (2-fold range) than DCA production (5-fold range), although uncertainty bounds for DCA exceeded the predicted variability. Conclusions:

  14. Fundamentals of population pharmacokinetic modelling: validation methods.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Kiang, Tony K L; Spigarelli, Michael G; Ensom, Mary H H

    2012-09-01

    Population pharmacokinetic modelling is widely used within the field of clinical pharmacology as it helps to define the sources and correlates of pharmacokinetic variability in target patient populations and their impact upon drug disposition; and population pharmacokinetic modelling provides an estimation of drug pharmacokinetic parameters. This method's defined outcome aims to understand how participants in population pharmacokinetic studies are representative of the population as opposed to the healthy volunteers or highly selected patients in traditional pharmacokinetic studies. This review focuses on the fundamentals of population pharmacokinetic modelling and how the results are evaluated and validated. This review defines the common aspects of population pharmacokinetic modelling through a discussion of the literature describing the techniques and placing them in the appropriate context. The concept of validation, as applied to population pharmacokinetic models, is explored focusing on the lack of consensus regarding both terminology and the concept of validation itself. Population pharmacokinetic modelling is a powerful approach where pharmacokinetic variability can be identified in a target patient population receiving a pharmacological agent. Given the lack of consensus on the best approaches in model building and validation, sound fundamentals are required to ensure the selected methodology is suitable for the particular data type and/or patient population. There is a need to further standardize and establish the best approaches in modelling so that any model created can be systematically evaluated and the results relied upon.

  15. Simulation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics in humans using a minimal physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Li, Linzhong; Gardner, Iain; Dostalek, Miroslav; Jamei, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    Compared to small chemical molecules, monoclonal antibodies and Fc-containing derivatives (mAbs) have unique pharmacokinetic behaviour characterised by relatively poor cellular permeability, minimal renal filtration, binding to FcRn, target-mediated drug disposition, and disposition via lymph. A minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the pharmacokinetics of mAbs in humans was developed. Within the model, the body is divided into three physiological compartments; plasma, a single tissue compartment and lymph. The tissue compartment is further sub-divided into vascular, endothelial and interstitial spaces. The model simultaneously describes the levels of endogenous IgG and exogenous mAbs in each compartment and sub-compartment and, in particular, considers the competition of these two species for FcRn binding in the endothelial space. A Monte-Carlo sampling approach is used to simulate the concentrations of endogenous IgG and mAb in a human population. Existing targeted-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models are coupled with the minimal PBPK model to provide a general platform for simulating the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies using primarily pre-clinical data inputs. The feasibility of utilising pre-clinical data to parameterise the model and to simulate the pharmacokinetics of adalimumab and an anti-ALK1 antibody (PF-03446962) in a population of individuals was investigated and results were compared to published clinical data.

  16. Clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in new drug development: the capecitabine experience.

    PubMed

    Blesch, Karen S; Gieschke, Ronald; Tsukamoto, Yuko; Reigner, Bruno G; Burger, Hans U; Steimer, Jean-Louis

    2003-05-01

    Preclinical studies, along with Phase I, II, and III clinical trials demonstrate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and efficacy of a new drug under well controlled circumstances in relatively homogeneous populations. However, these types of studies generally do not answer important questions about variability in specific factors that predict pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PKPD) activity, in turn affecting safety and efficacy. Semi-physiological and clinical PKPD modeling and simulation offer the possibility of utilizing data obtained in the laboratory and the clinic to make accurate characterizations and predictions of PKPD activity in the target population, based on variability in predictive factors. Capecitabine is an orally administered pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), designed to exploit tissue-specific differences in metabolic enzyme activities in order to enhance efficacy and safety. It undergoes extensive metabolism in multiple physiologic compartments, and presents particular challenges for predicting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic activity in humans. Clinical and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and pharmacodynamic models were developed to characterize the activity of capecitabine and its metabolites, and the clinical consequences under varying physiological conditions such as creatinine clearance or activity of key metabolic enzymes. The results of the modeling investigations were consistent with capecitabine's rational design as a triple pro-drug of 5-FU. This paper reviews and discusses the PKPD and PBPK modeling approaches used in capecitabine development to provide a more thorough understanding of what the key predictors of its PBPK activity are, and how variability in these predictors may affect its PKPD, and ultimately, clinical outcomes.

  17. Telavancin Demonstrates Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Vancomycin, Daptomycin, and Linezolid in Broth Microdilution MIC and One-Compartment Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jordan R.; Barber, Katie E.; Hallesy, Jessica; Raut, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates have arisen with reduced susceptibility to several anti-MRSA agents. Telavancin (TLV), a novel anti-MRSA agent, retains low MICs against these organisms. Our objective was to determine the MICs for TLV, daptomycin (DAP), vancomycin (VAN), and linezolid (LZD) against daptomycin-nonsusceptible (DNS) S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heteroresistant VISA (hVISA), and linezolid-resistant (LZDr) S. aureus. We also evaluated these agents against each phenotype in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Seventy DNS, 100 VISA, 180 hVISA, and 25 LZDr MRSA isolates were randomly selected from our library and tested to determine their MICs against TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD via broth microdilution and a Trek panel. Four isolates were randomly selected for 168-h in vitro models to evaluate treatment with TLV at 10 mg/kg of body weight/day, DAP at 10 mg/kg/day, VAN at 1 g every 12 h (q12h), and LZD at 600 mg q12h. The MIC50/90 for TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD against 70 DNS S. aureus isolates were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 2/4 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 2/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 100 VISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 4/8 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 170 hVISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 0.5/1 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 25 LZDr isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.03/0.06 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 2/2 μg/ml, and 8/8 μg/ml, respectively. The TLV MIC was >0.125 μg/ml for 10/365 (2.7%) isolates. In PK/PD models, TLV was universally bactericidal at 168 h and statistically superior to all antibiotics against DNS S. aureus strain R2334. These data further establish the potency of TLV against resistant MRSA. The model data demonstrate in vitro bactericidal activity of TLV against hVISA, VISA, DNS S. aureus, and LZDr S. aureus strains. Further clinical research is warranted. PMID:26124162

  18. Comparison of oral absorption models for pregabalin: usefulness of transit compartment model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Taegon; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jongtae; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and partial seizure in adults. The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model to describe the absorption characteristics of pregabalin given fasted or after meals. Data from five healthy subject PK studies (n=88) of single- or multiple-dose pregabalin (150 mg) were used. Pregabalin was administered twice daily, without meals or 30 min after a meal (regular or high-fat diet) in the morning and 30 min or 4 h after a meal (regular diet) in the evening. Serial plasma samples were collected up to 24 h after the last dose for PK analysis. Because the peak concentrations were not properly modeled by a conventional first-order absorption model, Erlang frequency distribution, Weibull-type absorption, and transit compartment models were tested on a two-compartment linear PK model using a nonlinear mixed-effects method (NONMEM; version 7.3). The transit compartment model best described the absorption characteristics of pregabalin regardless of meal status. We conclude that the absorption model should be carefully chosen based on the principle of model development and validation and not by following a conventional first-order absorption model for its popularity and simplicity, especially when the PK dataset includes densely sampled absorption-phase data.

  19. Comparison of oral absorption models for pregabalin: usefulness of transit compartment model

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Taegon; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jongtae; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and partial seizure in adults. The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model to describe the absorption characteristics of pregabalin given fasted or after meals. Data from five healthy subject PK studies (n=88) of single- or multiple-dose pregabalin (150 mg) were used. Pregabalin was administered twice daily, without meals or 30 min after a meal (regular or high-fat diet) in the morning and 30 min or 4 h after a meal (regular diet) in the evening. Serial plasma samples were collected up to 24 h after the last dose for PK analysis. Because the peak concentrations were not properly modeled by a conventional first-order absorption model, Erlang frequency distribution, Weibull-type absorption, and transit compartment models were tested on a two-compartment linear PK model using a nonlinear mixed-effects method (NONMEM; version 7.3). The transit compartment model best described the absorption characteristics of pregabalin regardless of meal status. We conclude that the absorption model should be carefully chosen based on the principle of model development and validation and not by following a conventional first-order absorption model for its popularity and simplicity, especially when the PK dataset includes densely sampled absorption-phase data. PMID:27994441

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone.

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, S; Matsunaga, I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--This study aimed to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone and to predict the kinetic behaviour of acetone in the human body with that model. METHODS--The model consists of eight tissue groups in which acetone can be distributed: the mucous layer of the inhaled air tract, the mucous layer of the exhaled air tract, a compartment for gas exchange (alveolus of the lung), a group of blood vessel rich tissues including the brain and heart, a group of tissues including muscles and skin that have low perfusion rates, a group of fatty tissues, an organ for metabolism (liver), and a compartment for urinary excretion (kidney). A mucous layer in the model is only the outermost layer of the mucus lining the wall of the air tract during inhalation and exhalation. To check the relevance of the model, the simulated results were compared with the experimental data. Next, simulation was conducted by changing the volume of the mucous layer and the respiratory rate to clarify the effect of these variables. Finally, simulation of an occupational situation was performed. RESULTS--With an appropriate value for the volume of mucous layer, the simulated acetone concentrations in arterial blood, end exhaled air, urine, and fatty tissue were found to agree well with the experimental data. The volume of mucous layer and rate of respiration were critical for the appropriate simulation. The simulated occupational situation fitted the observed regression line in field studies quite well. The simulation also enabled predictions to be made about the characteristic kinetics for water soluble solvents. CONCLUSION--The model is useful for understanding and explaining the kinetics of acetone. PMID:7795758

  1. A theoretical compartment model for antigen kinetics in the skin.

    PubMed

    Römgens, Anne M; Bader, Dan L; Bouwstra, Joke A; Oomens, Cees W J

    2016-03-10

    The skin is a promising location for vaccination with its abundant population of antigen capturing and presenting cells. The development of new techniques, such as the use of microneedles, can facilitate the delivery of vaccines into the skin. In recent years, many different types of microneedle arrays have been designed. However, their geometry and arrangement within an array may be optimized to trigger sufficient antigen presenting cells. A computational model can support the rational design of microneedle arrays. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to describe the distribution and kinetics of a delivered antigen within the skin using a theoretical compartment model, which included binding of antigens to receptors and their uptake by cells, and to determine which parameters should be measured to validate the model for a specific application. Multiple simulations were performed using a high and low antigen delivery dose and a range of values for the rate constants. The results indicated that the cells were highly saturated when a high dose was applied, while for a low dose saturation was only reached in 5% of the simulations. This was caused by the difference in the ratio between the administered dose and the available binding sites and suggests the dose should be adapted to the number of cells and receptors for a specific compound. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters confirmed that the initial dose and receptor concentrations were indeed the two parameters that had the largest influence on the variance in antigen concentrations within the cells and circulation at equilibrium. Hence, these parameters are important to be measured in vivo. The presented pharmacokinetics model can be used in future computational models to predict the influence of microneedle array geometry to optimize their design.

  2. Telavancin demonstrates activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid in broth microdilution MIC and one-compartment pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan R; Barber, Katie E; Hallesy, Jessica; Raut, Animesh; Rybak, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates have arisen with reduced susceptibility to several anti-MRSA agents. Telavancin (TLV), a novel anti-MRSA agent, retains low MICs against these organisms. Our objective was to determine the MICs for TLV, daptomycin (DAP), vancomycin (VAN), and linezolid (LZD) against daptomycin-nonsusceptible (DNS) S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heteroresistant VISA (hVISA), and linezolid-resistant (LZD(r)) S. aureus. We also evaluated these agents against each phenotype in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Seventy DNS, 100 VISA, 180 hVISA, and 25 LZD(r) MRSA isolates were randomly selected from our library and tested to determine their MICs against TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD via broth microdilution and a Trek panel. Four isolates were randomly selected for 168-h in vitro models to evaluate treatment with TLV at 10 mg/kg of body weight/day, DAP at 10 mg/kg/day, VAN at 1 g every 12 h (q12h), and LZD at 600 mg q12h. The MIC50/90 for TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD against 70 DNS S. aureus isolates were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 2/4 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 2/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 100 VISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 4/8 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 170 hVISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 0.5/1 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 25 LZD(r) isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.03/0.06 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 2/2 μg/ml, and 8/8 μg/ml, respectively. The TLV MIC was >0.125 μg/ml for 10/365 (2.7%) isolates. In PK/PD models, TLV was universally bactericidal at 168 h and statistically superior to all antibiotics against DNS S. aureus strain R2334. These data further establish the potency of TLV against resistant MRSA. The model data demonstrate in vitro bactericidal activity of TLV against hVISA, VISA, DNS S. aureus, and LZD(r) S. aureus strains. Further clinical research is warranted. Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  3. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  4. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  5. A human cadaver fascial compartment pressure measurement model.

    PubMed

    Messina, Frank C; Cooper, Dylan; Huffman, Gretchen; Bartkus, Edward; Wilbur, Lee

    2013-10-01

    Fresh human cadavers provide an effective model for procedural training. Currently, there are no realistic models to teach fascial compartment pressure measurement. We created a human cadaver fascial compartment pressure measurement model and studied its feasibility with a pre-post design. Three faculty members, following instructions from a common procedure textbook, used a standard handheld intra-compartment pressure monitor (Stryker(®), Kalamazoo, MI) to measure baseline pressures ("unembalmed") in the anterior, lateral, deep posterior, and superficial posterior compartments of the lower legs of a fresh human cadaver. The right femoral artery was then identified by superficial dissection, cannulated distally towards the lower leg, and connected to a standard embalming machine. After a 5-min infusion, the same three faculty members re-measured pressures ("embalmed") of the same compartments on the cannulated right leg. Unembalmed and embalmed readings for each compartment, and baseline readings for each leg, were compared using a two-sided paired t-test. The mean baseline compartment pressures did not differ between the right and left legs. Using the embalming machine, compartment pressure readings increased significantly over baseline for three of four fascial compartments; all in mm Hg (±SD): anterior from 40 (±9) to 143 (±44) (p = 0.08); lateral from 22 (±2.5) to 160 (±4.3) (p < 0.01); deep posterior from 34 (±7.9) to 161 (±15) (p < 0.01); superficial posterior from 33 (±0) to 140 (±13) (p < 0.01). We created a novel and measurable fascial compartment pressure measurement model in a fresh human cadaver using a standard embalming machine. Set-up is minimal and the model can be incorporated into teaching curricula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Population pharmacokinetic model of human insulin following different routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Potocka, Elizabeth; Baughman, Robert A; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2011-07-01

    Multiple-compartment disposition of insulin has been demonstrated following intravenous administration; however, because of slow absorption and flip-flop kinetics, meal-time insulin pharmacokinetics have been described by a 1-compartment model. Technosphere insulin (TI) is an inhaled human insulin with rapid absorption and a distinct second compartment in its pharmacokinetics. The aim of this analysis was to develop a pharmacokinetic model for insulin administered via the intravenous, subcutaneous, and inhalation routes. A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model with 1 (inhaled) or 2 sequential (subcutaneous) first-order absorption processes and first-order elimination was developed using data from 2 studies with a total of 651 concentrations from 16 healthy volunteers. Insulin was administered intravenously (5 U), subcutaneously (10 U), and via inhalation (25, 50, and 100 U). The data were modeled simultaneously with NONMEM VI, using ADVAN6 subroutine with FO. Typical values were clearance, 43.4 L/h; volume of distribution in the central compartment, 5.0 L; intercompartmental clearance, 23.9 L/h; volume of distribution in the peripheral compartment 30.7 L; TI first-order absorption rate constant, 2.35 h⁻¹; and first-order absorption rate constants associated with subcutaneously administered insulin, 0.63 and 1.04 h⁻¹, respectively. Absorption rate after subcutaneous dosing was found to decrease with increasing body mass index. Insulin pharmacokinetics were found to be consistent with 2-compartment disposition, regardless of route of administration, with insulin curve differences attributable to absorption differences.

  7. Optimal design of perturbations for individual two-compartment pharmacokinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shotwell, Matthew S; Zhou, Minchun; Fissell, William H

    2016-01-01

    We consider the optimal design of pharmacokinetic studies in patients that receive intermittent hemodialysis and intravenous antibiotic. Hemodialysis perturbs the pharmacokinetic system, providing additional opportunity for study. Designs that allocate measurements to occur exclusively during hemodialysis are shown to be viable alternatives to conventional designs, where all measurements occur outside of hemodialysis. Furthermore, hybrid designs with both conventional and intradialytic measurements have nearly double the efficiency of conventional designs. Convex optimal design and Monte Carlo techniques were used to simultaneously optimize hemodialysis event characteristics and sampling times, accounting for population pharmacokinetic heterogeneity. We also present several related methodological innovations.

  8. Use of a Simple Pharmacokinetic Model to Characterize Exposure to Perchlorate [ Journal Article

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article is about how a simple two-compartment first-order pharmacokinetic model that predicts concentrations of perchlorate in blood and urine was constructed and validated. The model was validated using data from a high-dose experiment in humans where doses and resulting co...

  9. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huixin; van Erp, Nielka; Bins, Sander; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Steeghs, Neeltje; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2017-03-01

    Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96 patients from three clinical studies. A multi-compartment model including (i) a complex absorption profile, (ii) the potential non-linear dose-concentration relationship and (iii) the potential long-term decrease in exposure was developed. A two-compartment model best described pazopanib pharmacokinetics. The absorption phase was modelled by two first-order processes: 36 % (relative standard error [RSE] 34 %) of the administered dose was absorbed with a relatively fast rate (0.4 h(-1) [RSE 31 %]); after a lag time of 1.0 h (RSE 6 %), the remaining dose was absorbed at a slower rate (0.1 h(-1) [RSE 28 %]). The relative bioavailability (rF) at a dose of 200 mg was fixed to 1. With an increasing dose, the rF was strongly reduced, which was modelled with an E max (maximum effect) model (E max was fixed to 1, the dose at half of maximum effect was estimated as 480 mg [RSE 23 %]). Interestingly, the plasma exposure to pazopanib also decreased over time, modelled on rF with a maximum magnitude of 50 % (RSE 27 %) and a first-order decay constant of 0.15 day(-1) (RSE 43 %). The inter-patient and intra-patient variability on rF were estimated as 36 % (RSE 16 %) and 75 % (RSE 22 %), respectively. A popPK model for pazopanib was developed that illustrated the complex absorption process, the non-linear dose-concentration relationship, the high inter-patient and intra-patient variability, and the first-order decay of pazopanib concentration over time. The developed popPK model can be used in clinical practice to screen covariates and guide therapeutic drug monitoring.

  10. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling.

    PubMed

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property-distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. POPULATION PHARMACOKINETIC/DYNAMIC MODEL OF LYMPHOSUPPRESSION AFTER FLUDARABINE ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Vicini, Paolo; Salinger, David H.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Anasetti, Claudio; Mager, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative relationships between 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-2-fluoroadenine (F-ara-A) concentrations and lymphosuppression have not been reported, but would be useful for regimen design. A population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was constructed in this study using data from 41 hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients conditioned with busulfan in combination with fludarabine (total dose 120 mg/m2, Protocol 1519) or with fludarabine (total dose 250 mg/m2) with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG, Protocol 2041). Methods Individual pharmacokinetic parameters were fixed to post-hoc Bayesian estimates, and circulating absolute lymphocyte counts (ALC) were obtained during the three weeks prior to graft infusion. A semi-physiological cell kill model with three lymphocyte transit compartments was applied and aptly characterized the time-course of suppression of circulating ALC by fludarabine administration. Drug and system-specific parameters were estimated using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm, and the final model was qualified using an internal visual predictive check. Results The final model successfully characterized the time-course and variability in ALC. Pharmacodynamic parameters exhibited considerable between subject variability (38.9-211%). The HCT protocol was the only covariate associated with the pharmacodynamic parameters, specifically the lymphocyte kill rate, the transit rate between lymphocyte compartments, and the baseline ALC. Conclusions This model can be used to simulate the degree of lymphosuppression for design of future fludarabine-based conditioning regimens. PMID:25374408

  12. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials for an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP. METHODS: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model discrimination was performed, by minimizing the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), maximizing the coefficient of determination (r²) and by comparison of the quality of fit plots. RESULTS: The best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition after INSCOP administration (minimal AIC =907.2) consisted of one compartment for plasma, saliva and urine respectively that were inter-connected with different rate constants. The estimated values of PK parameters were compiled in Table 1. The model fitting exercises revealed a nonlinear PK for scopolamine between plasma and saliva compartments for K21, Vmax and Km. CONCLUSION: PK model for INSCOP was developed and for the first time it satisfactorily predicted the PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after INSCOP administration. Using non-linear PK yielded the best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition between plasma and saliva compartments, and inclusion of non-linear PK resulted in a significant improved model fitting. The model can be utilized to predict scopolamine plasma concentration using saliva and/or urine data that

  13. Innovations and Improvements in Pharmacokinetic Models Based on Physiology.

    PubMed

    Abbiati, Roberto Andrea; Manca, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Accompanied by significant improvements of modeling techniques and computational methods in medical sciences, the last thirty years saw the flourishing of pharmacokinetic models for applications in the pharmacometric field. In particular, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, grounded on a mechanistic foundation, have been applied to explore a multiplicity of aspects with possible applications in patient care and new drugs development, as in the case of siRNA therapies. This article summarizes the features we recently introduced in PBPK modeling within a threeyear research project funded by Italian Research Ministry. Four major points are detailed: (i) the mathematical formulation of the model, which allows modulating its complexity as a function of the administration route and active principle; (ii) a dedicated parameter of the PBPK model quantifies the drugprotein binding, which affects the active principle distribution; (iii) the gall bladder compartment and the bile enterohepatic circulation process; (iv) the coupling of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models to produce an overall understanding of the drug effects on mammalian body. The proposed model is applied to two separate endovenous (remifentanil) and oral (sorafenib) drug administrations. The resulting PBPK simulations are consistent with the literature experimental data. Blood concentration predictability is confirmed in multiple reference subjects. Furthermore, in case of sorafenib administration in mice, it is possible to evaluate the drug concentration in the liver and reproduce the effects of the enterohepatic circulation. Finally, a preliminary application of the coupling of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models is presented and discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  15. Population Pharmacokinetic Model of Sublingual Buprenorphine in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee M.; Dombrowsky, Erin; Lin, Hopi; Erlich, Michelle E.; Moody, David E.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Kraft, Walter K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS)—a clinical entity of infants from in utero exposure to psychoactive xenobiotic and buprenorphine—has been successfully used to treat NAS. However, nothing is known about the pharmacokinetics (PK) of buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the population pharmacokinetic of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. Design A retrospective population PK analysis of: (1) neonates with NAS treated with sublingual buprenorphine in randomized, double blinded clinical study and (2) data from healthy adults from a previously published pharmacokinetic study. Setting Neonatal intensive care unit and general clinical research unit. Patients Twenty-four neonates with NAS and five healthy adults. Interventions All participants received sublingual buprenorphine per study protocol. Measurements and Main Results A total of 303 PK data from 29 neonates and adults were used for model development. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a first order conditional estimation with interaction in the NONMEM software program. A two-compartment linear PK model with first-order absorption process best described the pharmacokinetics of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates. The apparent clearance (CL) of buprenorphine was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age via two distinct saturated pathways. A typical neonate with NAS (body weight, 2.9 kg; postnatal age; 5.4 days) had a CL of 3.5 L/kg/hour and elimination half-life of 11 hours. Phenobarbital did not affect the clearance of buprenorphine compared to neonates of similar age and weight. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate the population PK of sublingual buprenorphine in neonatal NAS. To our knowledge, this is also the first report to describe the age-dependent changes of buprenorphine PK in this patient population. No buprenorphine dose adjustment is needed for neonates with NAS

  16. Population Pharmacokinetic Model of Sublingual Buprenorphine in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee M; Dombrowsky, Erin; Lin, Hopi; Erlich, Michelle E; Moody, David E; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Kraft, Walter K

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS)--a clinical entity of infants from in utero exposure to psychoactive xenobiotic and buprenorphine--has been successfully used to treat NAS. However, nothing is known about the pharmacokinetics (PK) of buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the population pharmacokinetic of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. A retrospective population PK analysis of: (1) neonates with NAS treated with sublingual buprenorphine in randomized, double blinded clinical study and (2) data from healthy adults from a previously published pharmacokinetic study. Neonatal intensive care unit and general clinical research unit. Twenty-four neonates with NAS and five healthy adults. All participants received sublingual buprenorphine per study protocol. A total of 303 PK data from 29 neonates and adults were used for model development. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a first order conditional estimation with interaction in the NONMEM software program. A two-compartment linear PK model with first-order absorption process best described the pharmacokinetics of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates. The apparent clearance (CL) of buprenorphine was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age via two distinct saturated pathways. A typical neonate with NAS (body weight, 2.9 kg; postnatal age; 5.4 days) had a CL of 3.5 L/kg/hour and elimination half-life of 11 hours. Phenobarbital did not affect the clearance of buprenorphine compared to neonates of similar age and weight. This is the first study to investigate the population PK of sublingual buprenorphine in neonatal NAS. To our knowledge, this is also the first report to describe the age-dependent changes of buprenorphine PK in this patient population. No buprenorphine dose adjustment is needed for neonates with NAS treated with buprenorphine and concurrent phenobarbital. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications

  17. Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Cancer Chemoprevention With Sulindac in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Alexander K.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Ziegler, Katie L. Allen; Carlson, Elsa C.; Szabo, Eva; Ames, Mathew M.; Boring, Daniel; Limburg, Paul J.; Reid, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    Sulindac is a prescription-based non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that continues to be actively investigated as a candidate cancer chemoprevention agent. To further current understanding of sulindac bioavailability, metabolism, and disposition, we developed a population pharmacokinetic model for the parent compound and its active metabolites, sulindac sulfide, and exisulind. This analysis was based on data from 24 healthy subjects who participated in a bioequivalence study comparing two formulations of sulindac. The complex disposition of sulindac and its metabolites was described by a seven-compartment model featuring enterohepatic recirculation and is the first reported population pharmacokinetic model for sulindac. The derived model was used to explore effects of clinical variables on sulindac pharmacokinetics and revealed that body weight, creatinine clearance, and gender were significantly correlated with pharmacokinetic parameters. Moreover, the model quantifies the relative bioavailability of the sulindac formulations and illustrates the utility of population pharmacokinetics in bioequivalence assessment. This novel population pharmacokinetic model provides new insights regarding the factors that may affect the pharmacokinetics of sulindac and the exisulind and sulindac sulfide metabolites in generally healthy subjects, which have implications for future chemoprevention trial design for this widely available agent. PMID:23436338

  18. Population pharmacokinetic model for cancer chemoprevention with sulindac in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Berg, Alexander K; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Carlson, Elsa C; Szabo, Eva; Ames, Mathew M; Boring, Daniel; Limburg, Paul J; Reid, Joel M

    2013-04-01

    Sulindac is a prescription-based non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that continues to be actively investigated as a candidate cancer chemoprevention agent. To further current understanding of sulindac bioavailability, metabolism, and disposition, we developed a population pharmacokinetic model for the parent compound and its active metabolites, sulindac sulfide, and exisulind. This analysis was based on data from 24 healthy subjects who participated in a bioequivalence study comparing two formulations of sulindac. The complex disposition of sulindac and its metabolites was described by a seven-compartment model featuring enterohepatic recirculation and is the first reported population pharmacokinetic model for sulindac. The derived model was used to explore effects of clinical variables on sulindac pharmacokinetics and revealed that body weight, creatinine clearance, and gender were significantly correlated with pharmacokinetic parameters. Moreover, the model quantifies the relative bioavailability of the sulindac formulations and illustrates the utility of population pharmacokinetics in bioequivalence assessment. This novel population pharmacokinetic model provides new insights regarding the factors that may affect the pharmacokinetics of sulindac and the exisulind and sulindac sulfide metabolites in generally healthy subjects, which have implications for future chemoprevention trial design for this widely available agent. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. The influence of distributional kinetics into a peripheral compartment on the pharmacokinetics of substrate partitioning between blood and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Padowski, Jeannie M; Pollack, Gary M

    2011-12-01

    Development of CNS-targeted agents often focuses on identifying compounds with "good" CNS exposure (brain-to-blood partitioning >1). Some compounds undergoing enterohepatic recycling (ER) evidence a partition coefficient, K (p,brain) (expressed as C (brain) /C (plasma)), that exceeds and then decreases to (i.e., overshoots) a plateau (distribution equilibrium) value, rather than increasing monotonically to this value. This study tested the hypothesis that overshoot in K (p,brain) is due to substrate residence in a peripheral compartment. Simulations were based on a 3-compartment model with distributional clearances between central and brain (CL (br)) and central and peripheral (CL (d)) compartments and irreversible clearance from the central compartment (CL). Parameters were varied to investigate the relationship between overshoot and peripheral compartment volume (V (p)), and how this relationship was modulated by other model parameters. Overshoot magnitude and duration were characterized as peak C (brain)/C (plasma) relative to the plateau value (%OS) and time to reach plateau (TRP). Except for systems with high CL (d), increasing V (p) increased TRP and %OS. Increasing brain (V (br)) or central (V (c)) distribution volumes eliminated V (p)-related OS. Parallel increases in all clearances shortened TRP, but did not alter %OS. Increasing either CL or CL (d) individually increased %OS related to V (p), while increasing CL (br) decreased %OS. Under realistic peripheral distribution scenarios, C (brain)/C (plasma) may overshoot substantially K (p,brain) at distribution equilibrium. This observation suggests potential for erroneous assessment of brain disposition, particularly for compounds which exhibit a large apparent V (p), and emphasizes the need for complete understanding of distributional kinetics when evaluating brain uptake.

  20. Modeling the pharmacokinetics of extended release pharmaceutical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muria, Michela; Lamberti, Gaetano; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2009-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) models predict the hematic concentration of drugs after the administration. In compartment modeling, the body is described by a set of interconnected “vessels” or “compartments”; the modeling consisting of transient mass balances. Usually the orally administered drugs were considered as immediately available: this cannot describe the administration of extended-release systems. In this work we added to the traditional compartment models the ability to account for a delay in administration, relating this delay to in vitro data. Firstly, the method was validated, applying the model to the dosage of nicotine by chewing-gum; the model was tuned by in vitro/in vivo data of drugs (divalproex-sodium and diltiazem) with medium-rate release kinetics, then it was applied in describing in vivo evolutions due to the assumption of fast- and slow-release systems. The model reveals itself predictive, the same of a Level A in vitro/in vivo correlation, but being physically based, it is preferable to a purely statistical method.

  1. Coastal Ecosystem Integrated Compartment Model (ICM): Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meselhe, E. A.; White, E. D.; Reed, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Compartment Model (ICM) was developed as part of the 2017 Coastal Master Plan modeling effort. It is a comprehensive and numerical hydrodynamic model coupled to various geophysical process models. Simplifying assumptions related to some of the flow dynamics are applied to increase the computational efficiency of the model. The model can be used to provide insights about coastal ecosystems and evaluate restoration strategies. It builds on existing tools where possible and incorporates newly developed tools where necessary. It can perform decadal simulations (~ 50 years) across the entire Louisiana coast. It includes several improvements over the approach used to support the 2012 Master Plan, such as: additional processes in the hydrology, vegetation, wetland and barrier island morphology subroutines, increased spatial resolution, and integration of previously disparate models into a single modeling framework. The ICM includes habitat suitability indices (HSIs) to predict broad spatial patterns of habitat change, and it provides an additional integration to a dynamic fish and shellfish community model which quantitatively predicts potential changes in important fishery resources. It can be used to estimate the individual and cumulative effects of restoration and protection projects on the landscape, including a general estimate of water levels associated with flooding. The ICM is also used to examine possible impacts of climate change and future environmental scenarios (e.g. precipitation, Eustatic sea level rise, subsidence, tropical storms, etc.) on the landscape and on the effectiveness of restoration projects. The ICM code is publically accessible, and coastal restoration and protection groups interested in planning-level modeling are encouraged to explore its utility as a computationally efficient tool to examine ecosystem response to future physical or ecological changes, including the implementation of restoration and protection strategies.

  2. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Healy, JR; Thoma, BN; Peahota, MM; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, NC; Kraft, WK

    2016-01-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration–time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log‐likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two‐compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non‐ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher‐weight patients. PMID:27639260

  3. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E.; Unwin, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from −0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. PMID:27001806

  4. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E; Unwin, Sean; Hennig, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from -0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Pharmacokinetic modeling of carisoprodol and meprobamate disposition in adults.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, T A

    2017-08-01

    Carisoprodol is a widely prescribed muscle relaxant and is also a drug known to be a subject to abuse. Despite the fact that carisoprodol has been available for prescription since 1959, a number of gaps in our knowledge of the toxicokinetics of this common drug exist. For example, the volume of distribution (Vd) for carisoprodol in humans has not been reported. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model describing carisoprodol metabolism and that of the primary metabolite, meprobamate, was developed to better understand the pharmacokinetics of this drug. The model accounts for first pass metabolism of carisoprodol and was able to replicate the data from several previously reported data sets. Based on an analysis of four different data sets, the Vd for carisoprodol ranged from 0.93 to 1.3 L/kg, while that for meprobamate ranged from 1.4 to 1.6 L/kg. The model was also used to estimate the probable dose of this drug in an individual where questions concerning the drug's role in her death had been posed. The model may, therefore, have significant utility for estimating doses of carisoprodol in medicolegal cases.

  6. Two-compartment modeling of tissue microcirculation revisited.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Salehi Ravesh, Mona; Griebel, Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    Conventional two-compartment modeling of tissue microcirculation is used for tracer kinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies although it is well-known that the underlying assumption of an instantaneous mixing of the administered contrast agent (CA) in capillaries is far from being realistic. It was thus the aim of the present study to provide theoretical and computational evidence in favor of a conceptually alternative modeling approach that makes it possible to characterize the bias inherent to compartment modeling and, moreover, to approximately correct for it. Starting from a two-region distributed-parameter model that accounts for spatial gradients in CA concentrations within blood-tissue exchange units, a modified lumped two-compartment exchange model was derived. It has the same analytical structure as the conventional two-compartment model, but indicates that the apparent blood flow identifiable from measured DCE data is substantially overestimated, whereas the three other model parameters (i.e., the permeability-surface area product as well as the volume fractions of the plasma and interstitial distribution space) are unbiased. Furthermore, a simple formula was derived to approximately compute a bias-corrected flow from the estimates of the apparent flow and permeability-surface area product obtained by model fitting. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed modeling and bias correction method, representative noise-free DCE curves were analyzed. They were simulated for 36 microcirculation and four input scenarios by an axially distributed reference model. As analytically proven, the considered two-compartment exchange model is structurally identifiable from tissue residue data. The apparent flow values estimated for the 144 simulated tissue/input scenarios were considerably biased. After bias-correction, the deviations between estimated and actual parameter values were (11.2 ± 6

  7. A two-compartment model for zinc in humans.

    PubMed

    Watson, W S; Mitchell, K G; Lyon, T D; Kerr, N

    1999-11-01

    The oral absorption of zinc, from a test meal of minced beef, mashed potatoes and peas, have been measured in 19 healthy adults using the radiotracer 65Zn. The oral absorption, expressed as a percentage of the administered dose, was 20 +/- 5% (mean +/- 1 SD) in good agreement with previous results. In a subset of 9 subjects, tracer retention in whole body and whole blood was followed out to one year. The data were fitted to a simple two compartment model yielding total body zinc (TBZn), the zinc content in each of the 2 compartments and zinc turnover. The TBZn values ranged from 15.5 to 35.9 mmol while zinc turnover ranged from 0.043 to 0.073 mmol/d in keeping with results reported for significantly more complicated compartmental models applied to more comprehensive 65Zn tracer data sets. Additionally, TBZn correlated well with total body potassium, a measure of lean body mass, measured by whole body counting of the naturally-occurring potassium radioisotope, 40K. The zinc content of the more rapidly turning over compartment ranged from 3.2 to 5.6 mmol in reasonable agreement with exchangeable zinc pool estimations reported for short term studies using stable zinc isotopes. Therefore, the simple dataset and model employed in the present study yielded information on the short- and long-term behaviour of zinc compatible with both more complex radiotracer studies and analytically more demanding stable isotope studies.

  8. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models for Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Plawecki, Martin H.; Han, Jae-Joon; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.; O'Connor, Sean J.

    2012-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models have been used to describe the distribution and elimination of ethanol after intravenous administration. These models have been used to estimate the ethanol infusion profile that is sufficient for achieving a prescribed breath ethanol concentration time course in individuals, providing a useful platform for several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic investigations. Mathematical foundations of these models are examined, including the derivation of an explicit set of governing equations in the form of a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These equations can then be used to formulate and refine parameter identification and control strategies. Finally, a framework in which models related to this model can be constructed and analyzed is described. PMID:19126448

  9. Fundamentals of population pharmacokinetic modelling: modelling and software.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Tony K L; Sherwin, Catherine M T; Spigarelli, Michael G; Ensom, Mary H H

    2012-08-01

    Population pharmacokinetic modelling is widely used within the field of clinical pharmacology as it helps to define the sources and correlates of pharmacokinetic variability in target patient populations and their impact upon drug disposition. This review focuses on the fundamentals of population pharmacokinetic modelling and provides an overview of the commonly available software programs that perform these functions. This review attempts to define the common, fundamental aspects of population pharmacokinetic modelling through a discussion of the literature describing the techniques and placing them in the appropriate context. An overview of the most commonly available software programs is also provided. Population pharmacokinetic modelling is a powerful approach where sources and correlates of pharmacokinetic variability can be identified in a target patient population receiving a pharmacological agent. There is a need to further standardize and establish the best approaches in modelling so that any model created can be systematically evaluated and the results relied upon. Various nonlinear mixed-effects modelling methods, packaged in a variety of software programs, are available today. When selecting population pharmacokinetic software programs, the consumer needs to consider several factors, including usability (e.g. user interface, native platform, price, input and output specificity, as well as intuitiveness), content (e.g. algorithms and data output) and support (e.g. technical and clinical).

  10. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Capreomycin

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, C. P.; Lyons, M. A.; Mayeno, A. N.; Brooks, E. J.; DeGroote, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has led to a renewed interest in the use of second-line antibiotic agents. Unfortunately, there are currently dearths of information, data, and computational models that can be used to help design rational regimens for administration of these drugs. To help fill this knowledge gap, an exploratory physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, supported by targeted experimental data, was developed to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of the second-line agent capreomycin, a cyclic peptide antibiotic often grouped with the aminoglycoside antibiotics. To account for interindividual variability, Bayesian inference and Monte Carlo methods were used for model calibration, validation, and testing. Along with the predictive PBPK model, the first for an antituberculosis agent, this study provides estimates of various key pharmacokinetic parameter distributions and supports a hypothesized mechanism for capreomycin transport into the kidney. PMID:22143528

  11. Mixed-effects modelling of the interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling of pegylated human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Jolling, Koen; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Hemeryck, Alex; Vermeulen, An; Greway, Tony

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for interspecies allometric scaling of pegylated r-HuEPO (PEG-EPO) pharmacokinetics to man. A total of 927 serum concentrations from 193 rats, 6 rabbits, 34 monkeys, and 9 dogs obtained after a single dose of PEG-EPO, administered by the i.v. (dose range: 12.5-550 microg/kg) and s.c. (dose range: 12.5-500 microg/kg) routes, were pooled in this analysis. An open two-compartment model with first-order absorption and lag time (Tlag) and linear elimination from the central compartment was fitted to the data using the NONMEM V software. Body weight (WT) was used as a scaling factor and the effect of brain weight (BW), sex, and pregnancy status on the pharmacokinetic parameters was investigated. The final model was evaluated by means of a non-parametric bootstrap analysis and used to predict the PEG-EPO pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects. The systemic clearance (CL) in males was estimated to be 4.08WT1.030xBW-0.345 ml/h. In females, the CL was 90.7% of the CL in males. The volumes of the central (Vc) and the peripheral (Vp) compartment were characterized as 57.8WT0.959 ml, and 48.1WT1.150 ml, respectively. Intercompartmental flow was estimated at 2.32WT0.930 ml/h. Absorption rate constant (Ka) was estimated at 0.0538WT-0.149. The absolute s.c. bioavailability F was calculated at 52.5, 80.2, and 49.4% in rat, monkey, and dog, respectively. The interindividual variability in the population pharmacokinetic parameters was fairly low (<35%). Non-parametric bootstrap confirmed the accuracy of the NONMEM estimates. The mean model predicted pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects of 70 kg were estimated at: CL: 26.2 ml/h; Vc: 3.6l; Q: 286 l/h; Vp: 6.9l, and Ka: 0.031 h-1. The population pharmacokinetic model developed was appropriate to describe the time course of PEG-EPO serum concentrations and their variability in different species. The model predicted pharmacokinetics of PEG

  12. Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yassen, Ashraf; Olofsen, Erik; Romberg, Raymonda; Sarton, Elise; Danhof, Meindert; Dahan, Albert

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to characterize the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relation of buprenorphine's antinociceptive effect in healthy volunteers. Data on the time course of the antinociceptive effect after intravenous administration of 0.05-0.6 mg/70 kg buprenorphine in healthy volunteers was analyzed in conjunction with plasma concentrations by nonlinear mixed-effects analysis. A three-compartment pharmacokinetic model best described the concentration time course. Four structurally different pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models were evaluated for their appropriateness to describe the time course of buprenorphine's antinociceptive effect: (1) E(max) model with an effect compartment model, (2) "power" model with an effect compartment model, (3) receptor association-dissociation model with a linear transduction function, and (4) combined biophase equilibration/receptor association-dissociation model with a linear transduction function. The latter pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model described the time course of effect best and was used to explain time dependencies in buprenorphine's pharmacodynamics. The model converged, yielding precise estimation of the parameters characterizing hysteresis and the relation between relative receptor occupancy and antinociceptive effect. The rate constant describing biophase equilibration (k(eo)) was 0.00447 min(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.00299-0.00595 min(-1)). The receptor dissociation rate constant (k(off)) was 0.0785 min(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.0352-0.122 min(-1)), and k(on) was 0.0631 ml . ng(-1) . min(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.0390-0.0872 ml . ng(-1) . min(-1)). This is consistent with observations in rats, suggesting that the rate-limiting step in the onset and offset of the antinociceptive effect is biophase distribution rather than slow receptor association-dissociation. In the dose range studied, no saturation of receptor occupancy occurred explaining the lack of a ceiling effect

  13. Population pharmacokinetics of modafinil in Chinese Han, Mongolian, Korean, Uygur, and Hui healthy subjects determined by nonlinear mixed-effects modeling.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo; Longshan, Zhao; Kehua, Wu; Dongya, Xia; Wei, Lu; Zheng, Guan; Chenhui, Deng

    2010-04-01

    Modafinil is being used as a novel wake-promoting psychostimulant. To develop rational dosing schemes, given that China has 56 ethnicities that may have various response to modafinil, it is essential to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of modafinil in some selected ethnicities. One- and two-compartment models were used to fit the plasma concentration time data of 49 Chinese healthy volunteers, including the ethnicities of Han, Mongolian, Korean, Uygur, and Hui, using the nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approach. The data were best described using a two-compartment model with linear elimination. The influences of ethnicity, sex, height, body weight, and body mass index on modafinil pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated. The estimated population parameters of modafinil were as follows: clearance of central compartment was 3.51 L/h and clearance of intercompartment was 7.41 L/h; the volume of the central compartment was 3.85 L and the volume of the peripheral compartment was 45.8 L. The interindividual variability in clearance of central compartment and clearance of intercompartment were 23.2% and 22.1%, and in volume of the central compartment and volume of the peripheral compartment were 90.9% and 16.6%, respectively. A population pharmacokinetic model was established and validated, which adequately described the population pharmacokinetics of modafinil in Chinese healthy volunteers. The results indicated that sex has a significant effect on the metabolism of modafinil, whereas ethnicity has a significant effect on the volume of the central compartment. A good fit was achieved from the population pharmacokinetic analysis that could assist in establishing appropriate modafinil dose regimens.

  14. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics model for melatonin--effects of light and routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Bouak, Fethi; Vartanian, Oshin; Cheung, Bob

    2013-12-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed using MATLAB Simulink(®) to predict diurnal variations of endogenous melatonin with light as well as pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin via different routes of administration. The model was structured using whole body, including pineal and saliva compartments, and parameterized based on the literature values for endogenous melatonin. It was then optimized by including various intensities of light and various dosage and formulation of melatonin. The model predictions generally have a good fit with available experimental data as evaluated by mean squared errors and ratios between model-predicted and observed values considering large variations in melatonin secretion and pharmacokinetics as reported in the literature. It also demonstrates the capability and usefulness in simulating plasma and salivary concentrations of melatonin under different light conditions and the interaction of endogenous melatonin with the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin. Given the mechanistic approach and programming flexibility of MATLAB Simulink(®), the PBPK model could provide predictions of endogenous melatonin rhythms and pharmacokinetic changes in response to environmental (light) and experimental (dosage and route of administration) conditions. Furthermore, the model may be used to optimize the combined treatment using light exposure and exogenous melatonin for maximal phase advances or delays. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrated Two‐Analyte Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Antibody–Drug Conjugates in Patients: Implications for Reducing Pharmacokinetic Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Gibiansky, L; Agarwal, P; Dere, RC; Li, C; Chu, Y‐W; Hirata, J; Joshi, A; Jin, JY; Girish, S

    2016-01-01

    An integrated pharmacokinetics (PK) model that simultaneously describes concentrations of total antibody (Tab) and antibody‐conjugated monomethyl auristatin E (acMMAE) following administration of monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE)‐containing antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) was developed based on phase I PK data with extensive sampling for two ADCs. Two linear two‐compartment models that shared all parameters were used to describe the PK of Tab and acMMAE, except that the deconjugation rate was an additional clearance pathway included in the acMMAE PK model compared to Tab. Further, the model demonstrated its ability to predict Tab concentrations and PK parameters based on observed acMMAE PK and various reduced or eliminated Tab PK sampling schemes of phase II data. Thus, this integrated model allows for the reduction of Tab PK sampling in late‐phase clinical development without compromising Tab PK characterization. PMID:27863168

  16. MEGen: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model Generator

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George; Hogg, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are being used in an increasing number of different areas. However, they are perceived as complex, data hungry, resource intensive, and time consuming. In addition, model validation and verification are hindered by the relative complexity of the equations. To begin to address these issues a web application called MEGen for the rapid construction and documentation of bespoke deterministic PBPK model code is under development. MEGen comprises a parameter database and a model code generator that produces code for use in several commercial software packages and one that is freely available. Here we present an overview of the current capabilities of MEGen, and discuss future developments. PMID:22084631

  17. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Lei; Qu, Yi; Yan, Jing; Liu, Gang-yi; Wang, Wei-liang; Wang, Yi-jun; Wang, Hong-yi; Zhang, Meng-qi; Lu, Chuan; Liu, Yun; Jia, Jing-yin; Hu, Chao-ying; Li, Xue-ning; Yu, Chen; Xu, Hong-rong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our preliminary results show that huperzine A, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in China, exhibits different pharmacokinetic features in elderly and young healthy subjects. However, its pharmacokinetic data in elderly subjects remains unavailable to date. Thus, we developed a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese people, and identified the covariate affecting its pharmacokinetics for optimal individual administration. Methods: A total of 341 serum huperzine A concentration records was obtained from 2 completed clinical trials (14 elderly healthy subjects in a phase I pharmacokinetic study; 35 elderly AD patients in a phase II study). Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the non-linear mixed-effect modeling software Phoenix NLME1.1.1. The effects of age, gender, body weight, height, creatinine, endogenous creatinine clearance rate as well as drugs administered concomitantly were analyzed. Bootstrap and visual predictive checks were used simultaneously to validate the final population pharmacokinetics models. Results: The plasma concentration-time profile of huperzine A was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Age was identified as the covariate having significant influence on huperzine A clearance. The final PPK model of huperzine A was: CL (L/h)=2.4649*(age/86)(−3.3856), Ka=0.6750 h−1, V (L)=104.216. The final PPK model was demonstrated to be suitable and effective by the bootstrap and visual predictive checks. Conclusion: A PPK model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects is established, which can be used to predict PPK parameters of huperzine A in the treatment of elderly AD patients. PMID:27180987

  18. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Olmesartan, the Active Metabolite of Olmesartan Medoxomil, in Patients with Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kodati, Devender; Kotakonda, Harish Kaushik; Yellu, Narsimhareddy

    2017-08-01

    Olmesartan medoxomil is an orally given angiotensin II receptor antagonist indicated for the treatment of hypertension. The aim of the study was to establish a population pharmacokinetic model for olmesartan, the active metabolite of olmesartan medoxomil, in Indian hypertensive patients, and to evaluate effects of covariates on the volume of distribution (V/F) and oral clearance (CL/F) of olmesartan. The population pharmacokinetic model for olmesartan was developed using Phoenix NLME 1.3 with a non-linear mixed-effect model. Bootstrap and visual predictive check were used simultaneously to validate the final population pharmacokinetic models. The covariates included age, sex, body surface area (BSA), bodyweight, height, creatinine clearance (CLCR) as an index of renal function and liver parameters as indices of hepatic function. A total of 205 olmesartan plasma sample concentrations from 69 patients with hypertension were collected in this study. The pharmacokinetic data of olmesartan was well described by a two-compartment linear pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and an absorption lag-time. The mean values of CL/F and V/F of olmesartan in the patients were 0.31565 L/h and 44.5162 L, respectively. Analysis of covariates showed that age and CLCR were factors influencing the clearance of olmesartan and the volume of distribution of olmesartan was dependent on age and BSA. The final population pharmacokinetic model was demonstrated to be appropriate and effective and it can be used to assess the pharmacokinetic parameters of olmesartan in Indian patients with hypertension.

  19. Interspecies mixed-effect pharmacokinetic modeling of penicillin G in cattle and swine.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa; Baynes, Ronald; Huang, Qingbiao; Riviere, Jim E

    2014-08-01

    Extralabel drug use of penicillin G in food-producing animals may cause an excess of residues in tissue which will have the potential to damage human health. Of all the antibiotics, penicillin G may have the greatest potential for producing allergic responses to the consumer of food animal products. There are, however, no population pharmacokinetic studies of penicillin G for food animals. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the time-concentration data profile of penicillin G across two species. Data were collected from previously published pharmacokinetic studies in which several formulations of penicillin G were administered to diverse populations of cattle and swine. Liver, kidney, and muscle residue data were also used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fit to plasma and tissue concentrations using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach. A 3-compartment model with extra tissue compartments was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G. Typical population parameter estimates (interindividual variability) were central volumes of distribution of 3.45 liters (12%) and 3.05 liters (8.8%) and central clearance of 105 liters/h (32%) and 16.9 liters/h (14%) for cattle and swine, respectively, with peripheral clearance of 24.8 liters/h (13%) and 9.65 liters/h (23%) for cattle and 13.7 liters/h (85%) and 0.52 liters/h (40%) for swine. Body weight and age were the covariates in the final pharmacokinetic models. This study established a robust model of penicillin for a large and diverse population of food-producing animals which could be applied to other antibiotics and species in future analyses.

  20. Interspecies Mixed-Effect Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Penicillin G in Cattle and Swine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa; Baynes, Ronald; Huang, Qingbiao

    2014-01-01

    Extralabel drug use of penicillin G in food-producing animals may cause an excess of residues in tissue which will have the potential to damage human health. Of all the antibiotics, penicillin G may have the greatest potential for producing allergic responses to the consumer of food animal products. There are, however, no population pharmacokinetic studies of penicillin G for food animals. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the time-concentration data profile of penicillin G across two species. Data were collected from previously published pharmacokinetic studies in which several formulations of penicillin G were administered to diverse populations of cattle and swine. Liver, kidney, and muscle residue data were also used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fit to plasma and tissue concentrations using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach. A 3-compartment model with extra tissue compartments was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G. Typical population parameter estimates (interindividual variability) were central volumes of distribution of 3.45 liters (12%) and 3.05 liters (8.8%) and central clearance of 105 liters/h (32%) and 16.9 liters/h (14%) for cattle and swine, respectively, with peripheral clearance of 24.8 liters/h (13%) and 9.65 liters/h (23%) for cattle and 13.7 liters/h (85%) and 0.52 liters/h (40%) for swine. Body weight and age were the covariates in the final pharmacokinetic models. This study established a robust model of penicillin for a large and diverse population of food-producing animals which could be applied to other antibiotics and species in future analyses. PMID:24867969

  1. The pseudo-compartment method for coupling partial differential equation and compartment-based models of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christian A; Flegg, Mark B

    2015-05-06

    Spatial reaction-diffusion models have been employed to describe many emergent phenomena in biological systems. The modelling technique most commonly adopted in the literature implements systems of partial differential equations (PDEs), which assumes there are sufficient densities of particles that a continuum approximation is valid. However, owing to recent advances in computational power, the simulation and therefore postulation, of computationally intensive individual-based models has become a popular way to investigate the effects of noise in reaction-diffusion systems in which regions of low copy numbers exist. The specific stochastic models with which we shall be concerned in this manuscript are referred to as 'compartment-based' or 'on-lattice'. These models are characterized by a discretization of the computational domain into a grid/lattice of 'compartments'. Within each compartment, particles are assumed to be well mixed and are permitted to react with other particles within their compartment or to transfer between neighbouring compartments. Stochastic models provide accuracy, but at the cost of significant computational resources. For models that have regions of both low and high concentrations, it is often desirable, for reasons of efficiency, to employ coupled multi-scale modelling paradigms. In this work, we develop two hybrid algorithms in which a PDE in one region of the domain is coupled to a compartment-based model in the other. Rather than attempting to balance average fluxes, our algorithms answer a more fundamental question: 'how are individual particles transported between the vastly different model descriptions?' First, we present an algorithm derived by carefully redefining the continuous PDE concentration as a probability distribution. While this first algorithm shows very strong convergence to analytical solutions of test problems, it can be cumbersome to simulate. Our second algorithm is a simplified and more efficient implementation of

  2. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of diclofenac in normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Pei; Guo, Hai-fang; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To characterize pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of diclofenac in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritic rats using prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a biomarker. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was investigated using 20-day-old arthritic rats. PGE2 level in the rats was measured using an enzyme immunoassay. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model was developed to illustrate the relationship between the plasma concentration of diclofenac and the inhibition of PGE2 production. The inhibition of diclofenac on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PGE2 production in blood cells was investigated in vitro. Results: Similar pharmacokinetic behavior of diclofenac was found both in normal and FCA-induced arthritic rats. Diclofenac significantly decreased the plasma levels of PGE2 in both normal and arthritic rats. The inhibitory effect on PGE2 levels in the plasma was in proportion to the plasma concentration of diclofenac. No delay in the onset of inhibition was observed, suggesting that the effect compartment was located in the central compartment. An inhibitory effect sigmoid Imax model was selected to characterize the relationship between the plasma concentration of diclofenac and the inhibition of PGE2 production in vivo. The Imax model was also used to illustrate the inhibition of diclofenac on LPS-induced PGE2 production in blood cells in vitro. Conclusion: Arthritis induced by FCA does not alter the pharmacokinetic behaviors of diclofenac in rats, but the pharmacodynamics of diclofenac is slightly affected. A PK-PD model characterizing an inhibitory effect sigmoid Imax can be used to fit the relationship between the plasma PGE2 and diclofenac levels in both normal rats and FCA-induced arthritic rats. PMID:22842736

  3. Fractional dynamics pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Verotta, Davide

    2010-06-01

    While an increasing number of fractional order integrals and differential equations applications have been reported in the physics, signal processing, engineering and bioengineering literatures, little attention has been paid to this class of models in the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) literature. One of the reasons is computational: while the analytical solution of fractional differential equations is available in special cases, it this turns out that even the simplest PKPD models that can be constructed using fractional calculus do not allow an analytical solution. In this paper, we first introduce new families of PKPD models incorporating fractional order integrals and differential equations, and, second, exemplify and investigate their qualitative behavior. The families represent extensions of frequently used PK link and PD direct and indirect action models, using the tools of fractional calculus. In addition the PD models can be a function of a variable, the active drug, which can smoothly transition from concentration to exposure, to hyper-exposure, according to a fractional integral transformation. To investigate the behavior of the models we propose, we implement numerical algorithms for fractional integration and for the numerical solution of a system of fractional differential equations. For simplicity, in our investigation we concentrate on the pharmacodynamic side of the models, assuming standard (integer order) pharmacokinetics.

  4. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND (Investigational New Drug) guidelines. The aim of the project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationships among plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial protocol with INSCOP. Twelve healthy human subjects were administered at three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. PK compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling time, were established using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL (i.e. log-likelihood ratio test)) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. The results: Predictable correlations among scopolamine concentrations in compartments of plasma, saliva and urine were established, and for the first time the model satisfactorily predicted the population and individual PK of INSCOP in plasma, saliva and urine. The model can be utilized to predict the INSCOP plasma concentration by saliva and urine data, and it will be useful for monitoring the PK of scopolamine in space and other remote environments using non-invasive sampling of saliva and/or urine.

  5. Finite dose skin mass balance including the lateral part: comparison between experiment, pharmacokinetic modeling and diffusion models.

    PubMed

    Selzer, D; Hahn, T; Naegel, A; Heisig, M; Kostka, K H; Lehr, C M; Neumann, D; Schaefer, U F; Wittum, G

    2013-01-28

    This work investigates in vitro finite dose skin absorption of the model compounds flufenamic acid and caffeine experimentally and mathematically. The mass balance in different skin compartments (donor, stratum corneum (SC), deeper skin layers (DSL), lateral skin parts and acceptor) is analyzed as a function of time. For both substances high amounts were found in the lateral skin compartment after 6h of incubation, which emphasizes not to elide these parts in the modeling. Here, three different mathematical models were investigated and tested with the experimental data: a pharmacokinetic model (PK), a detailed microscopic two-dimensional diffusion model (MICRO) and a macroscopic homogenized diffusion model (MACRO). While the PK model was fitted to the experimental data, the MICRO and the MACRO models employed input parameters derived from infinite dose studies to predict the underlying diffusion process. All models could satisfyingly predict or describe the experimental data. The PK model and MACRO model also feature the lateral parts.

  6. Two-compartment model for competitive hybridization on molecular biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.

    2007-01-01

    During competitive hybridization the specific and non-specific fractions of tested biomolecules in solution bind jointly with the specific probes immobilized in a separate cell of a microchip. The application of two-compartment model to the two-component hybridization allows analytically investigating the underlying kinetics. It is shown that the behaviour with the non-monotonous growth of complexes formed by the non-specific fraction on a probe cell is a typical feature of competitive hybridization for both diffusion-limited and reaction-limited kinetics. The physical reason behind such an evolution consists in the fact that the characteristic hybridization time for the perfect complexes turns out longer with respect to that for the mismatch complexes. This behaviour should be taken into account for the choice of optimum hybridization and washing conditions for the analysis of specific fraction.

  7. Assessment of hemoglobin responsiveness to epoetin alfa in patients on hemodialysis using a population pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liviawati; Mould, Diane R; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Doshi, Sameer

    2015-10-01

    A population pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model describing the effect of epoetin alfa on hemoglobin (Hb) response in hemodialysis patients was developed. Epoetin alfa pharmacokinetics was described using a linear 2-compartment model. PK parameter estimates were similar to previously reported values. A maturation-structured cytokinetic model consisting of 5 compartments linked in a catenary fashion by first-order cell transfer rates following a zero-order input process described the Hb time course. The PD model described 2 subpopulations, one whose Hb response reflected epoetin alfa dosing and a second whose response was unrelated to epoetin alfa dosing. Parameter estimates from the PK/PD model were physiologically reasonable and consistent with published reports. Numerical and visual predictive checks using data from 2 studies were performed. The PK and PD of epoetin alfa were well described by the model. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  8. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for developmental exposure to BDE-47 in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Emond, Claude; Raymer, James H.; Studabaker, William B.; Garner, C. Edwin; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2010-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used commercially as additive flame retardants and have been shown to transfer into environmental compartments, where they have the potential to bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans. Of the 209 possible PBDEs, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is usually the dominant congener found in human blood and milk samples. BDE-47 has been shown to have endocrine activity and produce developmental, reproductive, and neurotoxic effects. The objective of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BDE-47 in male and female (pregnant and non-pregnant) adult rats to facilitate investigations of developmental exposure. This model consists of eight compartments: liver, brain, adipose tissue, kidney, placenta, fetus, blood, and the rest of the body. Concentrations of BDE-47 from the literature and from maternal-fetal pharmacokinetic studies conducted at RTI International were used to parameterize and evaluate the model. The results showed that the model simulated BDE-47 tissue concentrations in adult male, maternal, and fetal compartments within the standard deviations of the experimental data. The model's ability to estimate BDE-47 concentrations in the fetus after maternal exposure will be useful to design in utero exposure/effect studies. This PBPK model is the first one designed for any PBDE pharmaco/toxicokinetic description. The next steps will be to expand this model to simulate BDE-47 pharmacokinetics and distributions across species (mice), and then extrapolate it to humans. After mouse and human model development, additional PBDE congeners will be incorporated into the model and simulated as a mixture.

  9. Limited sampling model for vinblastine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ratain, M J; Vogelzang, N J

    1987-10-01

    A limited sampling model was developed for vinblastine to estimate the total area under the concentration time curve (AUC) using only two timepoints. Detailed pharmacokinetic analysis (16 timepoints) was performed in 30 patients treated with a small bolus dose (3 mg/m2) of vinblastine. A model for the total AUC was developed by multiple linear regression, using the first 15 patients as the training data set: AUC = 38.0 C10 + 73.8 C36 - 12.9, where C10 and C36 represent the serum vinblastine concentration at 10 hours and 36 hours, respectively (r = 0.99, P less than 0.0001). The model was validated on the other 15 patients, the test data set (r = 0.94, P less than 0.0001), with a mean predictive error of 13%. Limited sampling models may facilitate large-scale pharmacodynamic studies of new anticancer drugs, in order to relate the estimated AUC to toxicity and/or response without the need for detailed pharmacokinetic analysis.

  10. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of hydromorphone in cardiac surgery patients during postoperative pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeleazcov, Christian; Saari, Teijo I; Ihmsen, Harald; Mell, Jan; Fröhlich, Katharina; Krajinovic, Ljubica; Fechner, Jörg; Schüttler, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    Hydromorphone is a µ-selective opioid agonist used in postoperative pain therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of hydromorphone in cardiac surgery patients during postoperative analgesia with target-controlled infusion and patient-controlled analgesia. In this study, 50 adult patients were enrolled to receive intravenous hydromorphone during postoperative pain therapy. Arterial plasma samples were collected for measurements of drug concentration. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Results were validated and simulations were carried out to evaluate results. Data from 49 patients (age range, 40-81 yr) were analyzed. The pharmacokinetics of hydromorphone were best described by a three-compartment model. Age was incorporated as a significant covariate for elimination clearance and central volume of distribution. Scaling all parameters with body weight improved the model significantly. The final estimates of the model parameters for the typical adult patient (67 yr old, weighing 70 kg) undergoing cardiac surgery were as follows: CL1 = 1.01 l/min, V1 = 3.35 l, CL2 = 1.47 l/min, V2 = 13.9 l, CL3 = 1.41 l/min, and V3 = 145 l. The elimination clearance decreased by 43% between the age of 40 and 80 yr, and simulations demonstrated that context-sensitive half-time increased from 26 to 84 min in 40- and 80-yr-old subjects, respectively. The final pharmacokinetic model gave a robust representation of hydromorphone pharmacokinetics. Inclusion of age and body weight to the model demonstrated a significant influence of these covariates on hydromorphone pharmacokinetics. The application of this patient-derived population model in individualized pain therapy should improve the dosing of hydromorphone in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  11. Population Pharmacokinetic Model and Pharmacokinetic Target Attainment of Micafungin in Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Martial, Lisa C; Ter Heine, Rob; Schouten, Jeroen A; Hunfeld, Nicole G; van Leeuwen, Henk J; Verweij, Paul E; de Lange, Dylan W; Pickkers, Peter; Brüggemann, Roger J

    2017-01-31

    To study the pharmacokinetics of micafungin in intensive care patients and assess pharmacokinetic (PK) target attainment for various dosing strategies. Micafungin PK data from 20 intensive care unit patients were available. A population-PK model was developed. Various dosing regimens were simulated: licensed regimens (I) 100 mg daily; (II) 100 mg daily with 200 mg from day 5; and adapted regimens 200 mg on day 1 followed by (III) 100 mg daily; (IV) 150 mg daily; and (V) 200 mg daily. Target attainment based on a clinical PK target for Candida as well as non-Candida parapsilosis infections was assessed for relevant minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute). Parameter uncertainty was taken into account in simulations. A two-compartment model best fitted the data. Clearance was 1.10 (root square error 8%) L/h and V 1 and V 2 were 17.6 (root square error 14%) and 3.63 (root square error 8%) L, respectively. Median area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h (interquartile range) on day 14 for regimens I-V were 91 (67-122), 183 (135-244), 91 (67-122), 137 (101-183) and 183 (135-244) mg h/L, respectively, for a typical patient of 70 kg. For the MIC/area under the concentration-time curve >3000 target (all Candida spp.), PK target attainment was >91% on day 14 (MIC 0.016 mg/L epidemiological cut-off) for all of the dosing regimens but decreased to (I) 44%, (II) 91%, (III) 44%, (IV) 78% and (V) 91% for MIC 0.032 mg/L. For the MIC/area under the concentration-time curve >5000 target (non-C. parapsilosis spp.), PK target attainment varied between 62 and 96% on day 14 for MIC 0.016. The licensed micafungin maintenance dose results in adequate exposure based on our simulations with a clinical PK target for Candida infections but only 62% of patients reach the target for non-C. parapsilosis. In the case of pathogens with an attenuated micafungin MIC, patients may benefit from dose escalation to 200 mg daily. This

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital by mixed effect modelling using routine clinical pharmacokinetic data in Japanese neonates and infants: an update.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, M; Yukawa, E; Suematsu, F; Takiguchi, T; Ikeda, H; Aki, H; Mimemoto, M

    2011-12-01

    Optimal use of phenobarbital in the neonatal population requires information regarding the drug's pharmacokinetics and the influence of various factors, such as different routes of administration, on the drug's disposition. However, because of sampling restrictions, it is often difficult to perform traditional pharmacokinetic studies in neonates and infants. This study was conducted to establish the role of patient characteristics in estimating doses of phenobarbital for neonates and infants using routine therapeutic drug monitoring data. The population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital was evaluated using 109 serum concentration measurements obtained from routine phenobarbital monitoring of 70 neonates and infants. The data were analysed using the non-linear mixed effects model. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination was used. Covariates screened were current total bodyweight (TBW), gestational age, postnatal age (PNA), post-conceptional age, gender and neonates-infants clearance factor (serum concentration of phenobarbital; Conc). The final pharmacokinetic parameters were CL/F (mL/h) = (5.95.TBW (kg) +1.41.PNA (weeks)) Conc (serum phenobarbital concentration >50 μg/mL)(-0.221),Vd/F(L) =1.01.TBW (kg), and F = 0.483 for oral administration and F = 1 was assumed for suppository. Conc(-0.221) is 1 for phenobarbital concentration <50 μg/mL. The important variables for predicting phenobarbital clearance in this study were TBW, PNA and Conc. Phenobarbital clearance increases proportionately with increasing TBW, and an older newborn was expected to have a higher rate of clearance than a younger newborn of equal bodyweight. Moreover, the clearance of phenobarbital decreased nonlinearly with increasing serum concentration of phenobarbital >50 μg/mL (Conc(-0.221) ). We developed a new model for neonate and infant dosing of phenobarbital with good predictive performance. Clinical application of our model should permit more accurate

  13. Lumping in pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Brochot, Céline; Tóth, János; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2005-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models simplify biological complexity by dividing the body into interconnected compartments. The time course of the chemical's amount (or concentration) in each compartment is then expressed as a system of ordinary differential equations. The complexity of the resulting system of equations can rapidly increase if a precise description of the organism is needed. However, difficulties arise when the PK model contains more variables and parameters than comfortable for mathematical and computational treatment. To overcome such difficulties, mathematical lumping methods are new and powerful tools. Such methods aim at reducing a differential system by aggregating several variables into one. Typically, the lumped model is still a differential equation system, whose variables are interpretable in terms of variables of the original system. In practice, the reduced model is usually required to satisfy some constraints. For example, it may be necessary to keep state variables of interest for prediction unlumped. To accommodate such constraints, constrained lumping methods have are also available. After presenting the theory, we study, here, through practical examples, the potential of such methods in toxico/pharmacokinetics. As a tutorial, we first simplify a 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model by symbolic lumping. We then explore the reduction of a 6-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for 1,3-butadiene with numerical constrained lumping. The lumping methods presented here can be easily automated, and are applicable to first-order ordinary differential equation systems.

  14. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-10-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels <0.05 IUmL(-1)) undergoing elective, minor or major surgery. Retrospective data were collected on FVIII treatment, including timing and dosing, time point of FVIII sampling and all FVIII plasma concentrations achieved (trough, peak and steady state), brand of concentrate, as well as patients' and surgical characteristics. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (P<0.01) and increased in cases with blood group O (26%; P<0.01). In addition, a minor decrease in clearance was observed when a major surgical procedure was performed (7%; P<0.01). The developed population model describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  15. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    PubMed Central

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels <0.05 IUmL−1) undergoing elective, minor or major surgery. Retrospective data were collected on FVIII treatment, including timing and dosing, time point of FVIII sampling and all FVIII plasma concentrations achieved (trough, peak and steady state), brand of concentrate, as well as patients’ and surgical characteristics. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (P<0.01) and increased in cases with blood group O (26%; P<0.01). In addition, a minor decrease in clearance was observed when a major surgical procedure was performed (7%; P<0.01). The developed population model describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. PMID:27390359

  16. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Non-Linear Brain Distribution of Fluvoxamine in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Geldof, Marian; Freijer, Jan; van Beijsterveldt, Ludy

    2007-01-01

    Introduction A pharmacokinetic (PK) model is proposed for estimation of total and free brain concentrations of fluvoxamine. Materials and methods Rats with arterial and venous cannulas and a microdialysis probe in the frontal cortex received intravenous infusions of 1, 3.7 or 7.3 mg.kg−1 of fluvoxamine. Analysis With increasing dose a disproportional increase in brain concentrations was observed. The kinetics of brain distribution was estimated by simultaneous analysis of plasma, free brain ECF and total brain tissue concentrations. The PK model consists of three compartments for fluvoxamine concentrations in plasma in combination with a catenary two compartment model for distribution into the brain. In this catenary model, the mass exchange between a shallow perfusion-limited and a deep brain compartment is described by a passive diffusion term and a saturable active efflux term. Results The model resulted in precise estimates of the parameters describing passive influx into (kin) of 0.16 min−1 and efflux from the shallow brain compartment (kout) of 0.019 min−1 and the fluvoxamine concentration at which 50% of the maximum active efflux (C50) is reached of 710 ng.ml−1. The proposed brain distribution model constitutes a basis for precise characterization of the PK–PD correlation of fluvoxamine by taking into account the non-linearity in brain distribution. PMID:17710515

  17. Pharmacokinetic modeling of non-linear brain distribution of fluvoxamine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Geldof, Marian; Freijer, Jan; van Beijsterveldt, Ludy; Danhof, Meindert

    2008-04-01

    A pharmacokinetic (PK) model is proposed for estimation of total and free brain concentrations of fluvoxamine. Rats with arterial and venous cannulas and a microdialysis probe in the frontal cortex received intravenous infusions of 1, 3.7 or 7.3 mg.kg(-1) of fluvoxamine. With increasing dose a disproportional increase in brain concentrations was observed. The kinetics of brain distribution was estimated by simultaneous analysis of plasma, free brain ECF and total brain tissue concentrations. The PK model consists of three compartments for fluvoxamine concentrations in plasma in combination with a catenary two compartment model for distribution into the brain. In this catenary model, the mass exchange between a shallow perfusion-limited and a deep brain compartment is described by a passive diffusion term and a saturable active efflux term. The model resulted in precise estimates of the parameters describing passive influx into (k in) of 0.16 min(-1) and efflux from the shallow brain compartment (k out) of 0.019 min(-1) and the fluvoxamine concentration at which 50% of the maximum active efflux (C 50) is reached of 710 ng.ml(-1). The proposed brain distribution model constitutes a basis for precise characterization of the PK-PD correlation of fluvoxamine by taking into account the non-linearity in brain distribution.

  18. Mechanistic pharmacokinetic modelling of ephedrine, norephedrine and caffeine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Csajka, C; Haller, C A; Benowitz, N L; Verotta, D

    2005-01-01

    Aim The combination of ephedrine and caffeine has been used in herbal products for weight loss and athletic performance-enhancement, but the pharmacokinetic profiles of these compounds have not been well characterized. This study aimed to develop a mechanistic model describing ephedrine, norephedrine, and caffeine pharmacokinetics and their interactions in healthy subjects. Methods The pharmacokinetic model was developed based on the simultaneous modelling using plasma samples gathered from two clinical trials. The treatments consisted of single-doses of pharmaceutical caffeine and ephedrine, given alone or together, and an herbal formulation containing both caffeine and ephedrine. We used a mixed-effect statistical model and the program NONMEM to take account of intersubject variability. Results Three hundred and seventy-nine ephedrine, 352 norephedrine, 417 caffeine plasma concentrations and 40 ephedrine urine concentrations were obtained from 24 subjects. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption described the caffeine data. Caffeine clearance was 0.083 l min−1 (CV 38%) and decreased to 0.038 l min−1 in presence of oral contraceptive therapy, its volume of distribution was 38.6 l (CV 20%) and its absorption rate constant was 0.064 l min−1 (CV 50%). A four-compartment model described the pharmocokinetics of ephedrine and norephedrine. Ephedrine was eliminated mostly renally, with a clearance of 0.34 l min−1 (CV 11%), and a volume of distribution of 181 l (CV 19%). Nonlinearity in the conversion of ephedrine to norephedrine was observed. Different models showed that the simultaneous administration of caffeine, or the amount of caffeine in the absorption compartment, was associated with a slower rate of absorption of ephedrine. A 32% greater relative bioavailability of herbal compared with pharmaceutical ephedrine administration was observed. Conclusions We describe a mechanistic model for ephedrine, norephedrine and caffeine pharmacokinetics and

  19. A calibrated human PBPK model for benzene inhalation with urinary bladder and bone marrow compartments.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Kerger, Brent D; Finley, Brent; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of benzene inhalation based on a recent mouse model was adapted to include bone marrow (target organ) and urinary bladder compartments. Empirical data on human liver microsomal protein levels and linked CYP2E1 activities were incorporated into the model, and metabolite-specific conversion rate parameters were estimated by fitting to human biomonitoring data and adjusting for background levels of urinary metabolites. Human studies of benzene levels in blood and breath, and phenol levels in urine were used to validate the rate of human conversion of benzene to benzene oxide, and urinary benzene metabolites from Chinese benzene worker populations provided model validation for rates of human conversion of benzene to muconic acid (MA) and phenylmercapturic acid (PMA), phenol (PH), catechol (CA), hydroquinone (HQ), and benzenetriol (BT). The calibrated human model reveals that while liver microsomal protein and CYP2E1 activities are lower on average in humans compared to mice, the mouse also shows far lower rates of benzene conversion to MA and PMA, and far higher conversion of benzene to BO/PH, and of BO/PH to CA, HQ, and BT. The model also differed substantially from existing human PBPK models with respect to several metabolic rate parameters of importance to interpreting benzene metabolism and health risks in human populations associated with bone marrow doses. The model provides a new methodological paradigm focused on integrating linked human liver metabolism data and calibration using biomonitoring data, thus allowing for model uncertainty analysis and more rigorous validation. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of progesterone in lactating dairy cows: gaining some insights into the metabolism from kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Turino, L N; Mariano, R N; Cabrera, M I; Scándolo, D E; Maciel, M G; Grau, R J A

    2010-03-01

    Progesterone pharmacokinetics were analyzed for plasma hormone concentrations ranging from linear to saturated metabolism in lactating Holstein cows with differing daily milk yields. The adequacy of 2-coupled first-order (bi-exponential equation), hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten equation), and sigmoidal (Hill equation) kinetic models to describe the experimental progesterone pharmacokinetic profiles was examined on a statistical basis. After nonlinear regression and statistical analysis of the data-fitting capability, a simple one-compartment model based on Hill equation proved to be most adequate. This model indicates an enzyme-catalyzed metabolism of progesterone involving cooperative substrate-binding sites, resulting from allosteric effects that yield a sigmoidal saturation rate curve. Kinetic parameters were estimated for 2 groups of lactating Holstein cows with different daily milk yields. We found, for the first time, a remarkable quantitative agreement of the Hill coefficient value with that reported in pharmacokinetic studies involving cytochrome P450, family 3, subfamily A (CYP3A)-mediated reactions in other mammals, humans included. It seems that positive cooperativity makes enzymes much more sensitive to plasma progesterone concentration, and their activities can undergo significant changes in a narrow range of concentration as characteristic of sigmoidal behavior. Therefore, the values of classical pharmacokinetic parameters, such as the elimination constant, half-life, and clearance rate, were found to be highly dependent on the plasma progesterone concentration.

  1. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  2. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  3. Efficacy of intermittent versus continuous administration of netilmicin in a two-compartment in vitro model.

    PubMed Central

    Blaser, J; Stone, B B; Zinner, S H

    1985-01-01

    Several aminoglycoside dosage regimens were studied in a kinetic in vitro model. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus were exposed in serially placed artificial capillary units to netilmicin concentrations that changed based on human two-compartment pharmacokinetics. The same total dose per 24 h was administered as a continuous infusion (3.7 micrograms/ml) or in 1-h infusions given every 24 (24 micrograms/ml) or 8 h (8 micrograms/ml). The once daily administration showed the best response in terms of either faster killing of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and S. aureus or greater reduction of the inocula of P. aeruginosa. After 28 h of treatment, however, all regimens reduced the nonpseudomonads by more than 99.99%, whereas all three P. aeruginosa strains regrew to greater than 10(8) CFU/ml due to selection of resistant subpopulations. In contrast to the bactericidal effect of the first dose, no killing occurred after subsequent doses if the ratio of peak drug concentration to MIC was low (less than or equal to 6). These results support the concept of administering high doses of aminoglycosides once every 24 h. PMID:3922294

  4. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; Liu, Dongyang; Jusko, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is an array of immune responses to infection and injury. It results from a complex immune cascade and is the basis of many chronic diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. Numerous mathematical models have been developed to describe the disease progression and effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. This review illustrates the state of the art in modeling the effects of diverse drugs for treating inflammation, describes relevant biomarkers amenable to modeling, and summarizes major advantages and limitations of the published pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Simple direct inhibitory models are often used to describe in vitro effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. Indirect response models are more mechanism based and have been widely applied to the turnover of symptoms and biomarkers. These, along with target-mediated and transduction models, have been successfully applied to capture the PK/PD of many anti-inflammatory drugs and describe disease progression of inflammation. Biologics have offered opportunities to address specific mechanisms of action, and evolve small systems models to quantitatively capture the underlying physiological processes. More advanced mechanistic models should allow evaluation of the roles of some key mediators in disease progression, assess drug interactions, and better translate drug properties from in vitro and animal data to patients. PMID:23140121

  5. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Pregnant Women to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Drugs Metabolized Via Several Enzymatic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dallmann, André; Ince, Ibrahim; Coboeken, Katrin; Eissing, Thomas; Hempel, Georg

    2017-09-18

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling is considered a valuable tool for predicting pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy to subsequently guide in-vivo pharmacokinetic trials in pregnant women. The objective of this study was to extend and verify a previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for pregnant women for the prediction of pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized via several cytochrome P450 enzymes. Quantitative information on gestation-specific changes in enzyme activity available in the literature was incorporated in a pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the pharmacokinetics of eight drugs metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes was predicted. The tested drugs were caffeine, midazolam, nifedipine, metoprolol, ondansetron, granisetron, diazepam, and metronidazole. Pharmacokinetic predictions were evaluated by comparison with in-vivo pharmacokinetic data obtained from the literature. The pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model successfully predicted the pharmacokinetics of all tested drugs. The observed pregnancy-induced pharmacokinetic changes were qualitatively and quantitatively reasonably well predicted for all drugs. Ninety-seven percent of the mean plasma concentrations predicted in pregnant women fell within a twofold error range and 63% within a 1.25-fold error range. For all drugs, the predicted area under the concentration-time curve was within a 1.25-fold error range. The presented pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model can quantitatively predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes by integrating prior knowledge of the pregnancy-related effect on these enzymes. This pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model may thus be used to identify potential exposure changes in pregnant women a priori and to eventually support informed decision making when clinical trials are designed in this

  6. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) in patients with haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Diao, Lei; Li, Shuanglian; Ludden, Thomas; Gobburu, Jogarao; Nestorov, Ivan; Jiang, Haiyan

    2014-05-01

    Recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) is a clotting factor developed using monomeric Fc fusion technology to prolong the circulating half-life of factor IX. The objective of this analysis was to elucidate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rFIXFc in patients with haemophilia B and identify covariates that affect rFIXFc disposition. Population pharmacokinetic analysis using NONMEM(®) was performed with clinical data from two completed trials in previously treated patients with severe to moderate haemophilia B. Twelve patients from a phase 1/2a study and 123 patients from a registrational phase 3 study were included in this population analysis. A three-compartment model was found to best describe the pharmacokinetics of rFIXFc. For a typical 73 kg patient, the clearance (CL), volume of the central compartment (V 1) and volume of distribution at steady state (V ss) were 2.39 dL/h, 71.4 dL and 198 dL, respectively. Because of repeat pharmacokinetic profiles at week 26 for patients in a subgroup, inclusion of inter-occasion variability (IOV) on CL and V 1 were evaluated and significantly improved the model. The magnitude of IOV on CL and V 1 were both low to moderate (<20 %) and less than the corresponding inter-individual variability. Body weight (BW) was found to be the only significant covariate for rFIXFc disposition. However, the impact of BW was limited, as the BW power exponents on CL and V 1 were 0.436 and 0.396, respectively. This is the first population pharmacokinetic analysis that systematically characterized the pharmacokinetics of long-lasting rFIXFc in patients with haemophilia B. The population pharmacokinetic model for rFIXFc can be utilized to evaluate and optimize dosing regimens for the treatment of patients with haemophilia B.

  7. Numerical modelling of crural fascia mechanical interaction with muscular compartments.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Pachera, Paola; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-05-01

    The interaction of the crural fascia with muscular compartments and surrounding tissues can be at the origin of different pathologies, such as compartment syndrome. This pathology consists in the onset of excessive intracompartmental pressure, which can have serious consequences for the patient, compromising blood circulation. The investigation of compartment syndrome etiology also takes into account the alteration of crural fascia mechanical properties as a cause of the syndrome, where the fascial stiffening would result in the rise of intracompartmental pressure. This work presents a computational approach toward evaluating some biomechanical aspects of the problem, within the context of a more global viewpoint. Finite element analyses of the interaction phenomena of the crural fascia with adjacent regions are reported here. This study includes the effects of a fascial stiffness increase along the proximal-distal direction and their possible clinical implications. Furthermore, the relationship between different pre-strain levels of the crural fascia in the proximal-distal direction and the rise of internal pressure in muscular compartments are considered. The numerical analyses can clarify which aspects could be directly implied in the rise of compartment syndrome, leading to greater insight into muscle-fascia mechanical phenomena, as well as promoting experimental investigation and clinical analysis of the syndrome.

  8. Oseltamivir Population Pharmacokinetics in the Ferret: Model Application for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study Design.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Micaela B; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Rao, Gauri; Rayner, Craig R; Nie, Jing; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Forrest, Alan; Govorkova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The ferret is a suitable small animal model for preclinical evaluation of efficacy of antiviral drugs against various influenza strains, including highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Rigorous pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) assessment of ferret data has not been conducted, perhaps due to insufficient information on oseltamivir PK. Here, based on PK data from several studies on both uninfected and influenza-infected groups (i.e., with influenza A viruses of H5N1 and H3N2 subtypes and an influenza B virus) and several types of anesthesia we developed a population PK model for the active compound oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) in the ferret. The ferret OC population PK model incorporated delayed first-order input, two-compartment distribution, and first-order elimination to successfully describe OC PK. Influenza infection did not affect model parameters, but anesthesia did. The conclusion that OC PK was not influenced by influenza infection must be viewed with caution because the influenza infections in the studies included here resulted in mild clinical symptoms in terms of temperature, body weight, and activity scores. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine that administration of a 5.08 mg/kg dose of oseltamivir phosphate to ferret every 12 h for 5 days results in the same median OC area under the plasma concentration-time curve 0-12 h (i.e., 3220 mg h/mL) as that observed in humans during steady state at the approved dose of 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. Modeling indicated that PK variability for OC in the ferret model is high, and can be affected by anesthesia. Therefore, for proper interpretation of PK/PD data, sparse PK sampling to allow the OC PK determination in individual animals is important. Another consideration in appropriate design of PK/PD studies is achieving an influenza infection with pronounced clinical symptoms and efficient virus replication, which will allow adequate evaluation of drug effects.

  9. Oseltamivir Population Pharmacokinetics in the Ferret: Model Application for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Micaela B.; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Rao, Gauri; Rayner, Craig R.; Nie, Jing; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Forrest, Alan; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    The ferret is a suitable small animal model for preclinical evaluation of efficacy of antiviral drugs against various influenza strains, including highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Rigorous pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) assessment of ferret data has not been conducted, perhaps due to insufficient information on oseltamivir PK. Here, based on PK data from several studies on both uninfected and influenza-infected groups (i.e., with influenza A viruses of H5N1 and H3N2 subtypes and an influenza B virus) and several types of anesthesia we developed a population PK model for the active compound oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) in the ferret. The ferret OC population PK model incorporated delayed first-order input, two-compartment distribution, and first-order elimination to successfully describe OC PK. Influenza infection did not affect model parameters, but anesthesia did. The conclusion that OC PK was not influenced by influenza infection must be viewed with caution because the influenza infections in the studies included here resulted in mild clinical symptoms in terms of temperature, body weight, and activity scores. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine that administration of a 5.08 mg/kg dose of oseltamivir phosphate to ferret every 12 h for 5 days results in the same median OC area under the plasma concentration-time curve 0–12 h (i.e., 3220 mg h/mL) as that observed in humans during steady state at the approved dose of 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. Modeling indicated that PK variability for OC in the ferret model is high, and can be affected by anesthesia. Therefore, for proper interpretation of PK/PD data, sparse PK sampling to allow the OC PK determination in individual animals is important. Another consideration in appropriate design of PK/PD studies is achieving an influenza infection with pronounced clinical symptoms and efficient virus replication, which will allow adequate evaluation of drug effects. PMID:26460484

  10. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-v...

  11. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-v...

  12. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  13. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  14. Population pharmacokinetic model of lithium and drug compliance assessment.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castelló, Isabel; Mangas-Sanjuan, Víctor; González-García, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Bermejo, Marival; Marco-Garbayo, Jose Luis; Trocóniz, Iñaki F

    2016-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetic analysis of lithium during therapeutic drug monitoring and drug compliance assessment was performed in 54 patients and 246 plasma concentrations levels were included in this study. Patients received several treatment cycles (1-9) and one plasma concentration measurement for each patient was obtained always before starting next cycle (pre-dose) at steady state. Data were analysed using the population approach with NONMEM version 7.2. Lithium measurements were described using a two-compartment model (CL/F=0.41Lh(-1), V1/F=15.3L, Q/F=0.61Lh(-1), and V2/F = 15.8L) and the most significant covariate on lithium CL was found to be creatinine clearance (reference model). Lithium compliance was analysed using inter-occasion variability or Markovian features (previous lithium measurement as ordered categorical covariate) on bioavailability parameter. Markov-type model predicted the lithium compliance in the next cycle with higher success rate (79.8%) compared to IOV model (65.2%) and reference model (43.2%). This model becomes an efficient tool, not only being able to adequately describe the observed outcome, but also to predict the individual drug compliance in the next cycle. Therefore, Bipolar disorder patients can be classified regarding their probability to become extensive or poor compliers in the next cycle and then, individual probabilities lower than 0.5 highlight the need of intensive monitoring, as well as other pharmaceutical care measurements that might be applied to enhance drug compliance for a better and safer lithium treatment.

  15. [Application of three compartment model and response surface model to clinical anesthesia using Microsoft Excel].

    PubMed

    Abe, Eiji; Abe, Mari

    2011-08-01

    With the spread of total intravenous anesthesia, clinical pharmacology has become more important. We report Microsoft Excel file applying three compartment model and response surface model to clinical anesthesia. On the Microsoft Excel sheet, propofol, remifentanil and fentanyl effect-site concentrations are predicted (three compartment model), and probabilities of no response to prodding, shaking, surrogates of painful stimuli and laryngoscopy are calculated using predicted effect-site drug concentration. Time-dependent changes in these calculated values are shown graphically. Recent development in anesthetic drug interaction studies are remarkable, and its application to clinical anesthesia with this Excel file is simple and helpful for clinical anesthesia.

  16. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems.

  17. Exploring Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling with Resampling Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Fenghua

    2014-01-01

    Background. In the last decade, population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling has spread its influence in the whole process of drug research and development. While targeting the construction of the dose-concentration of a drug based on a population of patients, it shows great flexibility in dealing with sparse samplings and unbalanced designs. The resampling approach has been considered an important statistical tool to assist in PopPK model validation by measuring the uncertainty of parameter estimates and evaluating the influence of individuals. Methods. The current work describes a graphical diagnostic approach for PopPK models by visualizing resampling statistics, such as case deletion and bootstrap. To examine resampling statistics, we adapted visual methods from multivariate analysis, parallel coordinate plots, and multidimensional scaling. Results. Multiple models were fitted, the information of parameter estimates and diagnostics were extracted, and the results were visualized. With careful scaling, the dependencies between different statistics are revealed. Using typical examples, the approach proved to have great capacity to identify influential outliers from the statistical perspective, which deserves special attention in a dosing regimen. Discussion. By combining static graphics with interactive graphics, we are able to explore the multidimensional data from an integrated and systematic perspective. Complementary to current approaches, our proposed method provides a new way for PopPK modeling analysis. PMID:24877118

  18. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of a copper-selective chelator (TETA) in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hea-Young; Blum, Robert A; Sunderland, Tracey; Cooper, Garth J S; Jusko, William J

    2009-08-01

    The population pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of triethylenetetramine (TETA) dihydrochloride (trientine, GC811007) administered orally as 100-, 300-, 600-, or 1800-mg twice-daily doses were assessed in healthy adult male and female volunteers. This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, group-sequential, dose-escalating design. Forty participants, 10 per dose level (8 receiving TETA, 2 receiving placebo), received twice-daily doses for 14 consecutive days. A 2-compartment model for the PK and a linear direct effect model for drug-induced copper excretion (PD) were employed. The population PK/PD model was applied using the NONMEM software. Covariates tested were glomerular filtration rate (GFR), body weight, and gender. Multiple daily doses of TETA were safe and generally well tolerated. The linear 2-compartment model with first-order absorption well characterized the serum concentration data. Although its role was small, GFR had a statistically significant (P < .05) influence on systemic clearance (CL/F). The augmentation of copper excretion was well described by a direct linear model in which the slope was related to GFR and gender (P < .001). The intersubject coefficient of variation was 22.2% for slope (SL) and 82.5% for intercept (ER0). TETA has consistent single/multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and dose-proportional and serum concentration-proportional effects on enhancing copper excretion.

  19. Predictive Performance of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Renally Cleared Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Johnson, TN; Xu, H; Cheung, SYA; Bui, KH; Li, J; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Predictive performance of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models of drugs predominantly eliminated through kidney in the pediatric population was evaluated. After optimization using adult clinical data, the verified PBPK models can predict 33 of 34 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children 1 month and older. More specifically, 10 of 11 of predicted clearance values were within 1.5‐fold of those observed in children between 1 month and 2 years old. The PopPK approach also predicted 19 of 21 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children. In summary, our analysis demonstrated both PBPK and PopPK adult models, after verification with additional adult pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and incorporation of known ontogeny of renal filtration, could be applied for dosing regimen recommendation in children 1 month and older for renally eliminated drugs in a first‐in‐pediatric study. PMID:27566992

  20. Physiologically based modeling of the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its major metabolites in humans using a Bayesian population approach.

    PubMed

    Zurlinden, Todd J; Reisfeld, Brad

    2016-06-01

    The principal aim of this study was to develop, validate, and demonstrate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict and characterize the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of acetaminophen (APAP) in humans. A PBPK model was created that included pharmacologically and toxicologically relevant tissue compartments and incorporated mechanistic descriptions of the absorption and metabolism of APAP, such as gastric emptying time, cofactor kinetics, and transporter-mediated movement of conjugated metabolites in the liver. Through the use of a hierarchical Bayesian framework, unknown model parameters were estimated using a large training set of data from human pharmacokinetic studies, resulting in parameter distributions that account for data uncertainty and inter-study variability. Predictions from the model showed good agreement to a diverse test set of data across several measures, including plasma concentrations over time, renal clearance, APAP absorption, and pharmacokinetic and exposure metrics. The utility of the model was then demonstrated through predictions of cofactor depletion, dose response of several pharmacokinetic endpoints, and the relationship between APAP biomarker levels in the plasma and those in the liver. The model addressed several limitations in previous PBPK models for APAP, and it is anticipated that it will be useful in predicting the pharmacokinetics of APAP in a number of contexts, such as extrapolating across doses, estimating internal concentrations, quantifying population variability, assessing possible impacts of drug coadministration, and, when coupled with a suitable pharmacodynamic model, predicting toxicity.

  1. Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Quantify the Impact of Human Age and Interindividual Differences in Physiology and Biochemistry Pertinent to Risk Final Report for Cooperative Agreement. This report describes and demonstrates techniques necessary to extrapolate and incorporate in vitro derived metabolic rate constants in PBPK models. It also includes two case study examples designed to demonstrate the applicability of such data for health risk assessment and addresses the quantification, extrapolation and interpretation of advanced biochemical information on human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism for risk assessment application. It comprises five chapters; topics and results covered in the first four chapters have been published in the peer reviewed scientific literature. Topics covered include: Data Quality ObjectivesExperimental FrameworkRequired DataTwo example case studies that develop and incorporate in vitro metabolic rate constants in PBPK models designed to quantify human interindividual variability to better direct the choice of uncertainty factors for health risk assessment. This report is intended to serve as a reference document for risk assors to use when quantifying, extrapolating, and interpretating advanced biochemical information about human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism.

  2. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  3. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone to estimate CYP2D6 subpopulations in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, Catherine M. T.; Saldaña, Shannon N.; Bies, Robert R.; Aman, Michael G.; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    AIM The study aims were to characterize risperidone and (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone pharmacokinetic variability in children and adolescents and to evaluate covariate effects on pharmacokinetic parameters. METHODS Steady-state samples were drawn at pre-dose, 1, 2, 4, and 7 hours post-dose; CYP2D6 genotypes were available for 28 subjects. A non-linear mixed-effects model (NONMEM®) modeled the pharmacokinetics of risperidone and (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone; covariates included age, weight, sex, and CYP2D6 phenotype. The model included 497 observations [risperidone (n=163), (+) and (−) 9-hydroxyrisperidone (n=334)] from 45 subjects aged 3–18.3 (mean 9.6±3.7) years, weighing 16.8–110 (43±20.2) kg. RESULTS A one-compartment mixture model described risperidone and (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone clearances for three CYP2D6 metabolizer subpopulations: extensive (EM), intermediate (IM), and poor (PM). Weight significantly affected (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone clearance. Clearance estimates in the mixture model were PM 9.38 L/h, IM 29.2 L/h, and EM 37.4 L/h. CONCLUSION Active moiety [risperidone plus (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone] pharmacokinetic variability and the covariate effects were better explained with addition of metabolite pharmacokinetic parameters. This model may aid development of individualized risperidone dosing regimens in children and adolescents. PMID:22929407

  4. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of the Rat Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Badhan, Raj K. Singh; Chenel, Marylore; Penny, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug disposition is dictated by a drug’s physicochemical properties and its ability to permeate physiological barriers. The blood–brain barrier (BBB), blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and centrally located drug transporter proteins influence drug disposition within the central nervous system. Attainment of adequate brain-to-plasma and cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma partitioning is important in determining the efficacy of centrally acting therapeutics. We have developed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of the rat CNS which incorporates brain interstitial fluid (ISF), choroidal epithelial and total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments and accurately predicts CNS pharmacokinetics. The model yielded reasonable predictions of unbound brain-to-plasma partition ratio (Kpuu,brain) and CSF:plasma ratio (CSF:Plasmau) using a series of in vitro permeability and unbound fraction parameters. When using in vitro permeability data obtained from L-mdr1a cells to estimate rat in vivo permeability, the model successfully predicted, to within 4-fold, Kpuu,brain and CSF:Plasmau for 81.5% of compounds simulated. The model presented allows for simultaneous simulation and analysis of both brain biophase and CSF to accurately predict CNS pharmacokinetics from preclinical drug parameters routinely available during discovery and development pathways. PMID:24647103

  5. An approach to the residence time distribution for stochastic multi-compartment models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jihnhee; Wehrly, Thomas E

    2004-10-01

    Stochastic compartmental models are widely used in modeling processes such as drug kinetics in biological systems. This paper considers the distribution of the residence times for stochastic multi-compartment models, especially systems with non-exponential lifetime distributions. The paper first derives the moment generating function of the bivariate residence time distribution for the two-compartment model with general lifetimes and approximates the density of the residence time using the saddlepoint approximation. Then, it extends the distributional approach to the residence time for multi-compartment semi-Markov models combining the cofactor rule for a single destination and the analytic approach to the two-compartment model. This approach provides a complete specification of the residence time distribution based on the moment generating function and thus facilitates an easier calculation of high-order moments than the approach using the coefficient matrix. Applications to drug kinetics demonstrate the simplicity and usefulness of this approach.

  6. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for methyl mercury (MeHg) in monkey and human

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, J.M.; Clewall, H.J. III; Shipp, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A PBPK model for MeHg was developed which coherently describes MeHg pharmacokinetics in the adult rat, monkey and man, and predicts fetal levels of MeHg from in utero exposure. The model includes a description of enterohepatic recirculation of MeHg, conversion to inorganic mercury in tissues and intestinal flora, slowly reversible incorporation of mercury in tissues, and excretion of both organic and inorganic mercury into urine, feces, and hair. The adult submodel includes compartments representing the red blood tells (RBC), plasma, brain, liver, kidney, gut intestinal lumen, gut tissue, hair, richly and slowly perfused tissues, and placenta. The fetal submodel includes compartments representing RBC`s, plasma, brain, and remaining body mass. Two features of the model structure which are critical to prediction of the kinetics of MeHg in different species is the use of separate RBC and plasma compartments, allowing the use of species specific RBC/plasma ratios, and biliary excretion with enterohepatic recirculation. Published tissue and blood MeHg concentrations were used to derive the partition coefficients and RBC/plasma ratios to adjust for species differences in MeHg distribution. Validation involved comparing the model simulations with data from repeated dosing studies in animals and humans, and from accidental human exposures. The model will be used to investigate maternal MeHg intake as it relates to measured blood and hair MeHg concentrations, and to fetal exposure.

  7. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Tribendimidine Metabolites in Opisthorchis viverrini-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Melissa A.; Duthaler, Urs; Odermatt, Peter; Sayasone, Somphou; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need for alternative treatments against the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini. Oral tribendimidine is a promising candidate, but its population pharmacokinetic properties are unknown. Two phase IIa trials were conducted in Laos in O. viverrini-infected adults receiving single oral doses of 25 to 600 mg tribendimidine administered as different formulations in each study (study 1 used 200-mg tablets, and study 2 used 50-mg tablets). Venous whole blood, plasma, and capillary dried blood spots were sampled frequently from 68 adults, and concentrations of the tribendimidine metabolites dADT (deacetylated amidantel) and adADT (acetylated dADT) were measured. Population pharmacokinetics were assessed by using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The relationship between drug exposure and cure (assessed at 21 days posttreatment) was evaluated by using univariable logistic regression. A six-transit compartment absorption model with a one-disposition compartment for each metabolite described the data well. Compared to the 50-mg formulation (study 2), the 200-mg formulation (study 1) had a 40.1% higher mean transit absorption time, a 113% higher dADT volume of distribution, and a 364% higher adADT volume of distribution. Each 10-year increase in age was associated with a 12.7% lower dADT clearance and a 21.2% lower adADT clearance. The highest cure rates (≥55%) were observed with doses of ≥100 mg. Higher dADT, but not adADT, peak concentrations and exposures were associated with cure (P = 0.004 and 0.003, respectively). For the first time, population pharmacokinetics of tribendimidine have been described. Known differences in the 200-mg versus 50-mg formulations were captured by covariate modeling. Further studies are needed to validate the structural model and confirm covariate relationships. (This study has been registered with the ISRCTN Registry under no. ISRCTN96948551.) PMID:27431233

  8. Model-Based Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Nivolumab in Patients With Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, G; Wang, X; Agrawal, S; Gupta, M; Roy, A; Feng, Y

    2017-01-01

    Nivolumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits programmed death-1 activation. The clinical pharmacology profile of nivolumab was analyzed by a population pharmacokinetics model that assessed covariate effects on nivolumab concentrations in 1,895 patients who received 0.3-10.0 mg/kg nivolumab in 11 clinical trials. Nivolumab pharmacokinetics is linear with a time-varying clearance. A full covariate model was developed to assess covariate effects on pharmacokinetic parameters. Nivolumab clearance and volume of distribution increase with body weight. The final model included the effects of baseline performance status (PS), baseline body weight, and baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), sex, and race on clearance, and effects of baseline body weight and sex on volume of distribution in the central compartment. Sex, PS, baseline eGFR, age, race, baseline lactate dehydrogenase, mild hepatic impairment, tumor type, tumor burden, and programmed death ligand-1 expression had a significant but not clinically relevant (<20%) effect on nivolumab clearance.

  9. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation packages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on tile US Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama.

  10. Application of separable parameter space techniques to multi-tracer PET compartment modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L; Morey, A Michael; Kadrmas, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Multi-tracer positron emission tomography (PET) can image two or more tracers in a single scan, characterizing multiple aspects of biological functions to provide new insights into many diseases. The technique uses dynamic imaging, resulting in time-activity curves that contain contributions from each tracer present. The process of separating and recovering separate images and/or imaging measures for each tracer requires the application of kinetic constraints, which are most commonly applied by fitting parallel compartment models for all tracers. Such multi-tracer compartment modeling presents challenging nonlinear fits in multiple dimensions. This work extends separable parameter space kinetic modeling techniques, previously developed for fitting single-tracer compartment models, to fitting multi-tracer compartment models. The multi-tracer compartment model solution equations were reformulated to maximally separate the linear and nonlinear aspects of the fitting problem, and separable least-squares techniques were applied to effectively reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear fit. The benefits of the approach are then explored through a number of illustrative examples, including characterization of separable parameter space multi-tracer objective functions and demonstration of exhaustive search fits which guarantee the true global minimum to within arbitrary search precision. Iterative gradient-descent algorithms using Levenberg–Marquardt were also tested, demonstrating improved fitting speed and robustness as compared to corresponding fits using conventional model formulations. The proposed technique overcomes many of the challenges in fitting simultaneous multi-tracer PET compartment models. PMID:26788888

  11. Population pharmacokinetics model of THC used by pulmonary route in occasional cannabis smokers.

    PubMed

    Marsot, A; Audebert, C; Attolini, L; Lacarelle, B; Micallef, J; Blin, O

    2017-02-04

    Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the world. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effect. Some studies have been carried out and showed significant variability in the described models as the values of the estimated pharmacokinetic parameters. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for THC in occasional cannabis smokers. Twelve male volunteers (age: 20-28years, body weight: 62.5-91.0kg), tobacco (3-8 cigarette per day) and cannabis occasional smokers were recruited from the local community. After ad libitum smoking cannabis cigarette according a standardized procedure, 16 blood samples up to 72h were collected. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed effects model, with NONMEM software. Demographic and biological data were investigated as covariates. A three-compartment model with first-order elimination fitted the data. The model was parameterized in terms of micro constants and central volume of distribution (V1). Normal ALT concentration (6.0 to 45.0IU/l) demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with k10. The mean values (%Relative Standard Error (RSE)) for k10, k12, k21, k23, k32 and V1 were 0.408h(-1) (48.8%), 4.070h(-1) (21.4%), 0.022h(-1) (27.0%), 1.070h(-1) (14.3%), 1.060h(-1) (16.7%) and 19.10L (39.7%), respectively. We have developed a population pharmacokinetic model able to describe the quantitative relationship between administration of inhaled doses of THC and the observed plasma concentrations after smoking cannabis. In addition, a linear relationship between ALT concentration and value of k10 has been described and request further investigation.

  12. Desipramine, substrate for CYP2D6 activity: population pharmacokinetic model and design elements of drug–drug interaction trials

    PubMed Central

    Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Jackson, Kimberley; Wrighton, Steven A; Sinha, Vikram P; Chien, Jenny Y

    2010-01-01

    AIMS To develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the pharmacokinetics of desipramine in healthy subjects, after oral administration of a 50 mg dose. Additional objectives were to develop a semi-mechanistic population pharmacokinetic model for desipramine, which allowed simulation of CYP2D6-mediated inhibition, when using desipramine as a probe substrate, and to evaluate certain study design elements, such as duration of desipramine pharmacokinetic sampling, required sample size and optimal pharmacokinetic sampling schedule for intermediate, extensive and ultrarapid metabolizers of CYP2D6 substrates. RESULTS The mean population estimates of the first order absorption rate constant (ka), apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution at steady state (Vss/F) were 0.15 h−1, 111 l h−1 and 2950 l, respectively. Further, using the proposed semi-mechanistic hepatic intrinsic clearance model with Bayesian inference, mean population desipramine hepatic intrinsic clearance was estimated to be 262 l h−1 with between-subject variability of 84%. d-optimal PK sampling times for intermediate metabolizers were calculated to be approximately 0.25, 24, 75 and 200 h. Similar sampling times were found for ultrarapid and extensive metabolizers except that the second d-optimal sample was earlier at 14 and 19 h, respectively, compared with 24 h for intermediate metabolizers. This difference in sampling times between the three genotypes can be attributed to the different intrinsic clearances and elimination rates. CONCLUSIONS A two compartment population pharmacokinetic model best described desipramine disposition. The semi-mechanistic population model developed is suitable to describe the pharmacokinetic behaviour of desipramine for the dose routinely used in drug–drug interaction (DDI) studies. Based on this meta-analysis of seven trials, a sample size of 21 subjects in cross-over design is appropriate for assessing CYP2D6 interaction with novel

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Anti-VEGF Agent Aflibercept in Cancer Predicted by Data-Driven, Molecular-Detailed Model.

    PubMed

    Finley, S D; Angelikopoulos, P; Koumoutsakos, P; Popel, A S

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical models can support the drug development process by predicting the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of the drug and optimal dosing regimens. We have developed a pharmacokinetic model that includes a biochemical molecular interaction network linked to a whole-body compartment model. We applied the model to study the PK of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) cancer therapeutic agent, aflibercept. Clinical data is used to infer model parameters using a Bayesian approach, enabling a quantitative estimation of the contributions of specific transport processes and molecular interactions of the drug that cannot be examined in other PK modeling, and insight into the mechanisms of aflibercept's antiangiogenic action. Additionally, we predict the plasma and tissue concentrations of unbound and VEGF-bound aflibercept. Thus, we present a computational framework that can serve as a valuable tool for drug development efforts.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a population pharmacokinetic modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Marsot, Amélie; Brevaut-Malaty, Véronique; Vialet, Renaud; Boulamery, Audrey; Bruguerolle, Bernard; Simon, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Phenobarbital is widely used for treatment of neonatal seizures. Its optimal use in neonates and young infants requires information regarding pharmacokinetics. The objective of this study is to characterize the absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a pharmacokinetic parameter which has not yet been investigated. Routine clinical pharmacokinetic data were retrospectively collected from 48 neonates and infants (weight: 0.7-10 kg; patient's postnatal age: 0-206 days; GA: 27-42 weeks) treated with phenobarbital, who were administered as intravenous or suspension by oral routes and hospitalized in a paediatric intensive care unit. Total mean dose of 4.6 mg/kg (3.1-10.6 mg/kg) per day was administered by 30-min infusion or by oral route. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a nonlinear mixed-effect population model software). Data were modelled with an allometric pharmacokinetic model, using three-fourths scaling exponent for clearance (CL). The population typical mean [per cent relative standard error (%RSE)] values for CL, apparent volume of distribution (Vd ) and bioavailability (F) were 0.0054 L/H/kg (7%), 0.64 L/kg (15%) and 48.9% (22%), respectively. The interindividual variability of CL, Vd , F (%RSE) and residual variability (%RSE) was 17% (31%), 50% (27%), 39% (27%) and 7.2 mg/L (29%), respectively. The absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and infants was estimated. The dose should be increased when switching from intravenous to oral administration. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A pharmacokinetic analysis of posaconazole oral suspension in the serum and alveolar compartment of lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Thakuria, L; Packwood, K; Firouzi, A; Rogers, P; Soresi, S; Habibi-Parker, K; Lyster, H; Zych, B; Garcia-Saez, D; Mohite, P; Patil, N; Sabashnikov, A; Capoccia, M; Chibvuri, M; Lamba, H; Tate, H; Carby, M; Simon, A; Leaver, N; Reed, A

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections cause significant morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Fungal prophylaxis following lung transplantation is not standardised, with transplant centres utilising a variety of regimens. Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal triazole that requires further investigation within the setting of lung transplantation. This prospective, single-centre, observational study explored the pharmacokinetics of posaconazole oral suspension (POS) in the early perioperative period following lung transplantation in 26 patients. Organ recipients were scheduled to receive 400mg POS twice daily for 6 weeks as primary antifungal prophylaxis. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of serum posaconazole levels was performed in accordance with local clinical protocols. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was sampled during routine bronchoscopies. Posaconazole levels were measured both in serum and BALF using mass spectrometry. Posaconazole levels were highly variable within lung transplant recipients during the perioperative period and did not achieve 'steady-state'. Serum posaconazole concentrations positively correlated with levels within the BALF (r=0.5527; P=0.0105). Of the 26 patients, 10 failed to complete the study for multiple reasons and so the trial was terminated early. Unlike study findings in stable recipients, serum posaconazole levels rarely achieved steady-state in the perioperative period; however, they do reflect the concentrations within the airways of newly transplanted lungs. The role of POS as primary prophylaxis in the perioperative period is uncertain, but if used TDM may be helpful for determining attainment of therapeutic levels.

  16. Propofol dosing regimens for ICU sedation based upon an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Barr, J; Egan, T D; Sandoval, N F; Zomorodi, K; Cohane, C; Gambus, P L; Shafer, S L

    2001-08-01

    The pharmacology of propofol infusions administered for long-term sedation of intensive care unit (ICU) patients has not been fully characterized. The aim of the study was to develop propofol dosing guidelines for ICU sedation based on an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of propofol infusions in ICU patients. With Institutional Review Board approval, 30 adult male medical and surgical ICU patients were given target-controlled infusions of propofol for sedation, adjusted to maintain a Ramsay sedation scale score of 2-5. Propofol administration in the first 20 subjects was based on a previously derived pharmacokinetic model for propofol. The last 10 subjects were given propofol based on a pharmacokinetic model derived from the first 20 subjects. Plasma propofol concentrations were measured, together with sedation score. Population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters were estimated by means of nonlinear regression analysis in the first 20 subjects, then prospectively tested in the last 10 subjects. An integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was used to construct dosing regimens for light and deep sedation with propofol in ICU patients. The pharmacokinetics of propofol were described by a three-compartment model with lean body mass and fat body mass as covariates. The pharmacodynamics of propofol were described by a sigmoid model, relating the probability of sedation to plasma propofol concentration. The pharmacodynamic model for propofol predicted light and deep levels of sedation with 73% accuracy. Plasma propofol concentrations corresponding to the probability modes for sedation scores of 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 0.25, 0.6, 1.0, and 2.0 microg/ml. Predicted emergence times in a typical subject after 24 h, 72 h, 7 days, and 14 days of light sedation (sedation score = 3 --> 2) with propofol were 13, 34, 198, and 203 min, respectively. Corresponding emergence times from deep sedation (sedation score = 5 --> 2) with propofol were 25, 59

  17. Pharmacokinetic modeling and prediction of plasma pyrrole-imidazole polyamide concentration in rats using simultaneous urinary and biliary excretion data.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takashi; Aoyama, Takahiko; Yokoe, Tsubasa; Fukasawa, Akiko; Fukuda, Noboru; Ueno, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki

    2009-05-01

    The use of urinary and/or biliary excretion data was considered as an alternative approach if the bioanalytical method lacked the appropriate sensitivity to adequately characterize the serum or plasma concentration-time profile. This approach is used for the analysis of plasma concentration-time profile under the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of various analytical instruments. The objective of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the plasma concentration-time profiles under LLOQ of HPLC using urinary and biliary excretion data. As model compounds, pyrrole (Py)-imidazole (Im) polyamides 1035 (MW, 1035.12) and 1666 (MW, 1665.78) were used. The cumulative urinary excretions of Py-Im polyamides 1035 and 1666 were 72.4+/-11.6 and 4.8+/-0.5% of the administered dose, respectively. The cumulative biliary excretion of Py-Im polyamide 1035 was 4.3+/-0.4% of the administered dose, and Py-Im polyamide 1666 was not detected. The plasma concentration-time profiles of Py-Im polyamide 1035 were adequately described using linear and non-linear output compartments. The developed PK model could be used to describe the plasma concentration profiles using the linear output compartment interpreted as the urine compartment and the non-linear output compartment interpreted as the bile compartment. This PK model will be able to provide a more accurate prediction of the plasma concentration profiles under LLOQ.

  18. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Rodents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has pharmacokinetic properties that appear consistent with a number of processes that are currently not well understood. Studies in mice exposed orally at lower doses (1 and 10 mg/kg) demonstrated blood, liver, and kidney concentration time courses ...

  19. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Individual Starting Dose of Tacrolimus Following Pediatric Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Louise M; Hesselink, Dennis A; van Gelder, Teun; Koch, Birgit C P; Cornelissen, Elisabeth A M; Brüggemann, Roger J M; van Schaik, Ron H N; de Wildt, Saskia N; Cransberg, Karlien; de Winter, Brenda C M

    2017-07-05

    Multiple clinical, demographic, and genetic factors affect the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus in children, yet in daily practice, a uniform body-weight based starting dose is used. It can take weeks to reach the target tacrolimus pre-dose concentration. The objectives of this study were to determine the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus immediately after kidney transplantation and to find relevant parameters for dose individualization using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. A total of 722 blood samples were collected from 46 children treated with tacrolimus over the first 6 weeks after renal transplantation. Non-linear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM(®)) was used to develop a population pharmacokinetic model and perform a covariate analysis. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal starting dose and to develop dosing guidelines. The data were accurately described by a two-compartment model with allometric scaling for bodyweight. Mean tacrolimus apparent clearance was 50.5 L/h, with an inter-patient variability of 25%. Higher bodyweight, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, and higher hematocrit levels resulted in lower total tacrolimus clearance. Cytochrome P450 3A5 expressers and recipients who received a kidney from a deceased donor had a significantly higher tacrolimus clearance. The model was successfully externally validated. In total, these covariates explained 41% of the variability in clearance. From the significant covariates, the cytochrome P450 3A5 genotype, bodyweight, and donor type were useful to adjust the starting dose to reach the target pre-dose concentration. Dosing guidelines range from 0.27 to 1.33 mg/kg/day. During the first 6 weeks after transplantation, the tacrolimus weight-normalized starting dose should be higher in pediatric kidney transplant recipients with a lower bodyweight, those who express the cytochrome P450 3A5 genotype, and those who receive a kidney from a deceased donor.

  20. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of valproic acid and its selected metabolites in acute VPA poisoning.

    PubMed

    Jawień, Wojciech; Wilimowska, Jolanta; Kłys, Małgorzata; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a first-line antiepileptic drug. It is used in the treatment of many different types of partial and generalized epileptic seizures. Though the clinical pharmacokinetics of VPA has been well defined, information about pharmacokinetics after overdoses is rare. The aim of this study was to try to build a population pharmacokinetic model that would describe the time course of VPA and its selected metabolites when the drug is ingested in an overdose situation. Blood samples were collected during admission to the hospital and several times during treatment for poisoning (10 men and 10 women). The concentration of VPA and its metabolites were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. For population pharmacokinetic evaluation of VPA and its metabolites, the two-compartment-model was applied. The estimated doses of VPA taken ranged from 6 to 65g, while the time after ingestion ranged from 1 to 30h. Results showed that the β-oxidation process exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics becoming saturated during acute intoxication. The same could not be said for the desaturation route. VPA therapy increased the Vmax for β-oxidation by 59% while decontamination appeared to be of moderate efficacy lowering the F value by 34% on the average. None of the models perfectly described the experimental data. Important factors like the variable degree of protein binding by VPA could not be included in the models. The small number of subjects used in the study made the analysis of more covariates impossible. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. The biomechanics of erections: two- versus one-compartment pressurized vessel modeling of the penis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed M; Erdman, Arthur G; Timm, Gerald W

    2010-12-01

    Previous biomechanical models of the penis simulated penile erections utilizing 2D geometry, simplified 3D geometry or made inaccurate assumptions altogether. These models designed the shaft of the penis as a one-compartment pressurized vessel fixed at one end when in reality it is a two-compartment pressurized vessel in which the compartments diverge as they enter the body and are fixed at two separate anatomic sites. This study utilizes the more anatomically correct two-compartment penile model to investigate erectile function. Simplified 2D and 3D models of the erect penis were developed using the finite element method with varying anatomical considerations for analyzing structural stresses, axial buckling, and lateral deformation. This study then validated the results by building and testing corresponding physical models. Finally, a more complex and anatomically accurate model of the penis was designed and analyzed. When subject to a lateral force of 0.5 N, the peak equivalent von Mises (EVM) stress in the two-compartment model increased by about 31.62%, while in the one-compartment model, the peak EVM stress increased by as high as 70.11%. The peak EVM stress was 149 kPa in the more complex and anatomically accurate penile model. When the perforated septum was removed, the peak EVM stress increased to 455 kPa. This study verified that there is significant difference between modeling the penis as a two- versus a one-compartment pressurized vessel. When subjected to external forces, a significant advantage was exhibited by two corporal based cavernosal bodies separated by a perforated septum as opposed to one corporal body. This is due to better structural integrity of the tunica albuginea when subjected to external forces.

  2. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling to Study the Antipyretic Effect of Qingkailing Injection on Pyrexia Model Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhixin; Qin, Lingling; Peng, Long; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Qing; Lu, Zhiwei; Song, Yuelin; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2016-03-07

    Qingkailing injection (QKLI) is a modern Chinese medicine preparation derived from a well-known classical formulation, An-Gong-Niu-Huang Wan. Although the clinical efficacy of QKLI has been well defined, its severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were extensively increased. Through thorough attempts to reduce ADR rates, it was realized that the effect-based rational use plays the key role in clinical practices. Hence, the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model was introduced in the present study, aiming to link the pharmacokinetic profiles with the therapeutic outcomes of QKLI, and subsequently to provide valuable guidelines for the rational use of QKLI in clinical settings. The PK properties of the six dominant ingredients in QKLI were compared between the normal treated group (NTG) and the pyrexia model group (MTG). Rectal temperatures were measured in parallel with blood sampling for NTG, MTG, model control group (MCG), and normal control group (NCG). Baicalin and geniposide exhibited appropriate PK parameters, and were selected as the PK markers to map the antipyretic effect of QKLI. Then, a PK-PD model was constructed upon the bacalin and geniposide plasma concentrations vs. the rectal temperature variation values, by a two-compartment PK model with a Sigmoid Emax PD model to explain the time delay between the drug plasma concentration of PK markers and the antipyretic effect after a single dose administration of QKLI. The findings obtained would provide fundamental information to propose a more reasonable dosage regimen and improve the level of individualized drug therapy in clinical settings.

  3. A ranking of diffusion MRI compartment models with in vivo human brain data

    PubMed Central

    Ferizi, Uran; Schneider, Torben; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria; Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma; Zhang, Hui; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Alexander, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microstructure imaging provides a unique noninvasive probe into tissue microstructure. The technique relies on biophysically motivated mathematical models, relating microscopic tissue features to the magnetic resonance (MR) signal. This work aims to determine which compartment models of diffusion MRI are best at describing measurements from in vivo human brain white matter. Methods Recent work shows that three compartment models, designed to capture intra-axonal, extracellular, and isotropically restricted diffusion, best explain multi-b-value data sets from fixed rat corpus callosum. We extend this investigation to in vivo by using a live human subject on a clinical scanner. The analysis compares models of one, two, and three compartments and ranks their ability to explain the measured data. We enhance the original methodology to further evaluate the stability of the ranking. Results As with fixed tissue, three compartment models explain the data best. However, a clearer hierarchical structure and simpler models emerge. We also find that splitting the scanning into shorter sessions has little effect on the ranking of models, and that the results are broadly reproducible across sessions. Conclusion Three compartments are required to explain diffusion MR measurements from in vivo corpus callosum, which informs the choice of model for microstructure imaging applications in the brain. Magn Reson Med 72:1785–1792, 2014. © 2013 The authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:24347370

  4. Homeostatic regulation of copper in a marine fish simulated by a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-11-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential yet potentially toxic metal, thus delicate homeostatic controls are developed in the fish. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to simulate the homeostatic regulation of Cu in a marine fish (Terapon jarbua) under dietary and waterborne exposures. In this model, fish were schematized as a six-compartment model, with the intestine being divided into two sub-compartments (chyme and gut wall). The blood was assumed to be the "carrier" distributing Cu into different compartments. The transfer rates between different compartments were determined in fish during Cu exposure (20 d) and depuration (20 d). The differences in Cu transfer from chyme to gut wall between dietary and waterborne treatments suggested that the intestine regulated the dietary uptake and re-absorption of Cu from the chyme. The extremely low uptake rate constant (0.0013 d(-1)) for gills under waterborne exposure indicated that gills strongly restricted Cu uptake from the ambient water. For both treatments, the liver had considerable input rate through the enterohepatic circulation and comparably high exchange rate with the blood, suggesting that the liver can efficiently accumulate newly absorbed Cu. The differences in Cu output from the liver between dietary and waterborne treatments suggested that it can effectively regulate the redistribution of Cu. All of these observations demonstrated that the liver played the central role in Cu homeostasis by serving as the main depository and distributing center. Modeling results also indicated that renal and branchial excretion was of minor importance, whereas biliary excretion combined with defecation played the most important role in whole-body Cu elimination in marine fish. The effective regulation by the "Blood-Liver-Intestine" cycle could be the main reason for the relatively low levels of Cu in fish.

  5. Dosing and Switching Strategies for Paliperidone Palmitate 3-Month Formulation in Patients with Schizophrenia Based on Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulation, and Clinical Trial Data.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Mats O; Samtani, Mahesh N; Plan, Elodie L; Jonsson, E Niclas; Rossenu, Stefaan; Vermeulen, An; Russu, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Paliperidone palmitate 3-month formulation (PP3M), a long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotic, was recently approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of schizophrenia in adult patients who have already been treated with paliperidone palmitate 1-month formulation (PP1M) for ≥4 months. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic rationale for the approved dosing regimens for PP3M, dosing windows, management of missed doses and treatment discontinuation, switching to other formulations, and dosing in special populations. Approved PP3M dosing regimens are based on the comparisons of simulations with predefined dosing regimens using paliperidone palmitate and oral paliperidone extended release (ER) population pharmacokinetic models (one-compartment model with two saturable absorption processes for PP3M; one-compartment model with parallel zero- and first-order absorption for PP1M; two-compartment model with sequential zero- and first-order absorption for ER) versus clinical trial data. Covariates were obtained by resampling subject covariates from the pharmacokinetics database for PP1M and PP3M. Simulation scenarios with varying doses and covariate values were generated. The population median and 90% prediction interval of the simulated concentration-time profiles were plotted for simulation outcomes evaluation. Simulations described in this paper provide (a) simulated plasma exposures for switching from PP1M to PP3M, (b) support for a once-every-3-months injection cycle, (c) information on dosing windows and managing missed doses of PP3M, (d) important guidance on PP3M dosing in special patient populations, and (e) key PP3M pharmacokinetic exposure metrics based on the population pharmacokinetic PP3M model. Population pharmacokinetics provided practical guidance to establish dosing regimens for PP3M.

  6. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationship of Gabapentin in a CFA-induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Keizer, Ron; Munro, Gordon; Mørk, Arne; Holm, René; Savic, Rada; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2016-05-01

    Gabapentin displays non-linear drug disposition, which complicates dosing for optimal therapeutic effect. Thus, the current study was performed to elucidate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) relationship of gabapentin's effect on mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. A semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling, based on gabapentin plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) time-concentration data and measurements of CFA-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia following administration of a range of gabapentin doses (oral and intravenous). The plasma/brain ECF concentration-time profiles of gabapentin were adequately described with a two-compartment plasma model with saturable intestinal absorption rate (K m  = 44.1 mg/kg, V max  = 41.9 mg/h∙kg) and dose-dependent oral bioavailability linked to brain ECF concentration through a transit compartment. Brain ECF concentration was directly linked to a sigmoid E max function describing reversal of hyperalgesia (EC 50, plasma  = 16.7 μg/mL, EC 50, brain  = 3.3 μg/mL). The proposed semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model provides further knowledge into the understanding of gabapentin's non-linear pharmacokinetics and the link between plasma/brain disposition and anti-hyperalgesic effects. The model suggests that intestinal absorption is the primary source of non-linearity and that the investigated rat model provides reasonable predictions of clinically effective plasma concentrations for gabapentin.

  7. Assessment of optimal initial dosing regimen with vancomycin pharmacokinetics model in very low birth weight neonates.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideo; Hagihara, Mao; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Yamagishi, Yuka

    2017-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic of vancomycin in very low birth weight neonates showed big variety, and limited data were available due to very minor population. These facts make it difficult to adjust its optimal initial dosage. Therefore, this study was to develop optimal dosing regimen of vancomycin in very low birth weight neonates. Between 2010 and 2015, low birth weight neonates (≤1500 g) were included in a population pharmacokinetics analysis. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters we estimated, we simulated individual blood concentrations of vancomycin and evaluated the probability of its pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) target attainment, such as 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24)/MIC (≥400) and blood trough concentration (10-20 μg/mL), as primary measure for several dosing regimens by Monte Carlo simulation method. Ten patients were prescribed vancomycin and detected its blood concentrations as routine pharmacy practice to adjust the dosage. A one-compartment model was used and clearance significantly correlated with serum creatinine and the volume of infusion. In this model, vancomycin dose at 10 mg/kg three times a day (TID) was predicted to result 86.7% of neonates for an MIC of 1 μg/mL achieving AUC/MIC of ≥400 and 30.6% of the neonates for an MIC of 2 μg/mL. Moreover, the probability of reaching the target trough concentration was 70.5% for patients treated with vancomycin 10 mg/kg TID. We recommended vancomycin 10 mg/kg TID as initial dosage regimens for low birth weight neonates infected with the pathogens showed MIC of ≤1 μg/mL. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of an integrated population pharmacokinetic model for oral levetiracetam in populations of various ages and ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Toublanc, Nathalie; Lacroix, Brigitte D; Yamamoto, Junichi

    2014-01-01

      Levetiracetam [E Keppra(®)] is a second generation antiepileptic drug for different types of epilepsy in adults and children ≥1 month. The objective is to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam in Japanese children and adults as well as North American children, the purpose being to explore potential dosing recommendations in Japanese children. Levetiracetam plasma concentration-time data were obtained from Japanese adult and pediatric clinical studies. The data were analyzed through non-linear mixed effects modelling. The model was used to perform simulations and compare the exposure in Japanese children and adults. It was subsequently extended to North American children through an external validation. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and first-order elimination adequately described the data. The exposure parameters determined based on the simulations in children were well within the adult range. The external validation against historical data from North American children was successful. The integrated population pharmacokinetic model provided a good description of the data, confirming the similarity of levetiracetam pharmacokinetics in these various populations. In Japanese children, a target dose of 10 to 30 mg/kg twice daily ensures the same exposure as the recommended dose in Japanese adults of 500 to 1,500 mg twice daily.

  9. Nephrectomized and hepatectomized animal models as tools in preclinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Bill; Agersø, Henrik; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2013-08-01

    Early understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolic patterns of new drug candidates is essential for selection of optimal candidates to move further in to the drug development process. In vitro methodologies can be used to investigate metabolic patterns, but in general, they lack several aspects of the whole-body physiology. In contrast, the complexity of intact animals does not necessarily allow individual processes to be identified. Animal models lacking a major excretion organ can be used to investigate these individual metabolic processes. Animal models of nephrectomy and hepatectomy have considerable potential as tools in preclinical pharmacokinetics to assess organs of importance for drug clearance and thereby knowledge of potential metabolic processes to manipulate to improve pharmacokinetic properties of the molecules. Detailed knowledge of anatomy and surgical techniques is crucial to successfully establish the models, and a well-balanced anaesthesia and adequate monitoring of the animals are also of major importance. An obvious drawback of animal models lacking an organ is the disruption of normal homoeostasis and the induction of dramatic and ultimately mortal systemic changes in the animals. Refining of the surgical techniques and the post-operative supportive care of the animals can increase the value of these models by minimizing the systemic changes induced, and thorough validation of nephrectomy and hepatectomy models is needed before use of such models as a tool in preclinical pharmacokinetics. The present MiniReview discusses pros and cons of the available techniques associated with establishing nephrectomy and hepatectomy models.

  10. Simulation of differential drug pharmacokinetics under heat and exercise stress using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Peng, Henry T; Cheung, Bob; Edginton, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Under extreme conditions of heat exposure and exercise stress, the human body undergoes major physiological changes. Perturbations in organ blood flows, gastrointestinal properties, and vascular physiology may impact the body's ability to absorb, distribute, and eliminate drugs. Clinical studies on the effect of these stressors on drug pharmacokinetics demonstrate that the likelihood of pharmacokinetic alteration is dependent on drug properties and the intensity of the stressor. The objectives of this study were to use literature data to quantify the correlation between exercise and heat exposure intensity to changing physiological parameters and further, to use this information for the parameterization of a whole-body, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the purposes of determining those drug properties most likely to demonstrate altered drug pharmacokinetics under stress. Cardiac output and most organ blood flows were correlated with heart rate using regression analysis. Other altered parameters included hematocrit and intravascular albumin concentration. Pharmacokinetic simulations of intravenous and oral administration of hypothetical drugs with either a low or high value of lipophilicity, unbound fraction in plasma, and unbound intrinsic hepatic clearance demonstrated that the area under the curve of those drugs with a high unbound intrinsic clearance was most affected (up to a 130% increase) following intravenous administration, whereas following oral administration, pharmacokinetic changes were smaller (<40% increase in area under the curve) for all hypothetical compounds. A midazolam physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was also used to demonstrate that simulated changes in pharmacokinetic parameters under exercise and heat stress were generally consistent with those reported in the literature.

  11. Contribution of inflammation to cellular injury in compartment syndrome in an experimental rodent model.

    PubMed

    Lawendy, A-R; Bihari, A; Sanders, D W; McGarr, G; Badhwar, A; Cepinskas, G

    2015-04-01

    Compartment syndrome, a devastating consequence of limb trauma, is characterised by severe tissue injury and microvascular perfusion deficits. We hypothesised that leucopenia might provide significant protection against microvascular dysfunction and preserve tissue viability. Using our clinically relevant rat model of compartment syndrome, microvascular perfusion and tissue injury were directly visualised by intravital video microscopy in leucopenic animals. We found that while the tissue perfusion was similar in both groups (38.8% (standard error of the mean (sem) 7.1), 36.4% (sem 5.7), 32.0% (sem 1.7), and 30.5% (sem 5.35) continuously-perfused capillaries at 45, 90, 120 and 180 minutes compartment syndrome, respectively versus 39.2% (sem 8.6), 43.5% (sem 8.5), 36.6% (sem 1.4) and 50.8% (sem 4.8) at 45, 90, 120 and 180 minutes compartment syndrome, respectively in leucopenia), compartment syndrome-associated muscle injury was significantly decreased in leucopenic animals (7.0% (sem 2.0), 7.0%, (sem 1.0), 9.0% (sem 1.0) and 5.0% (sem 2.0) at 45, 90, 120 and 180 minutes of compartment syndrome, respectively in leucopenia group versus 18.0% (sem 4.0), 23.0% (sem 4.0), 32.0% (sem 7.0), and 20.0% (sem 5.0) at 45, 90, 120 and 180 minutes of compartment syndrome in control, p = 0.0005). This study demonstrates that the inflammatory process should be considered central to the understanding of the pathogenesis of cellular injury in compartment syndrome. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. A comprehensive insight on ocular pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mandal, Abhirup; Agrahari, Vivek; Trinh, Hoang M; Joseph, Mary; Ray, Animikh; Hadji, Hicheme; Mitra, Ranjana; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2016-12-01

    The eye is a distinctive organ with protective anatomy and physiology. Several pharmacokinetics compartment models of ocular drug delivery have been developed for describing the absorption, distribution, and elimination of ocular drugs in the eye. Determining pharmacokinetics parameters in ocular tissues is a major challenge because of the complex anatomy and dynamic physiological barrier of the eye. In this review, pharmacokinetics of these compartments exploring different drugs, delivery systems, and routes of administration is discussed including factors affecting intraocular bioavailability. Factors such as precorneal fluid drainage, drug binding to tear proteins, systemic drug absorption, corneal factors, melanin binding, and drug metabolism render ocular delivery challenging and are elaborated in this manuscript. Several compartment models are discussed; these are developed in ocular drug delivery to study the pharmacokinetics parameters. There are several transporters present in both anterior and posterior segments of the eye which play a significant role in ocular pharmacokinetics and are summarized briefly. Moreover, several ocular pharmacokinetics animal models and relevant studies are reviewed and discussed in addition to the pharmacokinetics of various ocular formulations.

  13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for lactational transfer of Na-131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Anita Loretta

    The excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after administration of radiopharmaceuticals is a concern as a radiation risk to nursing infants. It is not uncommon to administer radiopharmaceuticals to lactating patients due to emergency nuclear medicine investigations such as thyroid complications, kidney failure, and pulmonary embolism. There is a need to quantify the amount of radioactivity translocated into breast milk in cases of ingestion by a breast-fed infant. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) and a modified International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model have been developed to predict iodine concentrations in breast milk after ingestion of radioiodine by the mother. In the PBPK model, all compartments are interconnected by blood flow and represent real anatomic tissue regions in the body. All parameters involved are measurable values with physiological or physiochemical meaning such as tissue masses, blood flow rates, partition coefficients and cardiac output. However, some of the parameters such as the partition coefficients and metabolic constants are not available for iodine and had to be inferred from other information. The structure of the PBPK model for the mother consists of the following tissue compartments: gastrointestinal tract, blood, kidney, thyroid, milk, and other tissues. With the exception of the milk compartment, the model for the nursing infant is structured similarly to the mother. The ICRP model describing iodine metabolism in a standard 70-kg man was modified to represent iodine metabolism in a lactating woman and nursing infant. The parameters involved in this model are transfer rates and biological half-lives which are based on experimental observations. The results of the PBPK model and the modified ICRP model describing the lactational transfer of iodine were compared. When administering 1 mCi of Na131I to the lactating mother, the concentration reaches a maximum of 0.1 mCi/liter in 24

  14. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of ibuprofen in pediatric patients and antipyretic effect: Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Har-Even, Ronly; Stepensky, David; Britzi, Malka; Soback, Stefan; Chaim, Adina Bar; Brandriss, Norit; Goldman, Michael; Berkovitch, Matitiahu; Kozer, Eran

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to determine the relationship between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of ibuprofen and the antipyretic effect in pediatric patients. A prospective cohort of infants and children aged 3 months to 15 years and treated with ibuprofen was studied. The patients received ibuprofen (via oral route, median dose of 10.0 mg/kg; 3.4-11.4 mg/kg range), samples of blood and CSF were collected, and body temperature was measured. Sequential analysis of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from 28 patients was performed using a population modeling approach. The observed concentration versus time data indicated substantial pharmacokinetic variability in absorption and distribution of ibuprofen between the patients. The pharmacokinetic modeling outcomes indicate that following a ∼25-minute lag time, ibuprofen is rapidly absorbed to the central compartment and rapidly equilibrates with the CSF, resulting in the total ibuprofen concentration in the CSF versus plasma (CCSF /Cplasma ) of 0.011 ± 0.007. The antipyretic effect of ibuprofen was best described by an indirect response PK-PD model incorporating patient baseline body temperature and ibuprofen concentration in the CSF. We conclude that the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling can be used to predict the time course of ibuprofen plasma and CSF concentrations and of the antipyretic effects in individual pediatric patients.

  15. Population pharmacokinetic model of free and total ropivacaine after transversus abdominis plane nerve block in patients undergoing liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, Edouard; Heritier, Fabrice; Bonnet, Caroline; Hodin, Sophie; Beauchesne, Brigitte; Molliex, Serge; Delavenne, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic model in order to characterize the free and total ropivacaine concentrations after transversus abdominis plane block in a population of patients undergoing liver resection surgery. In particular, we evaluated the impact of the size of liver resection on ropivacaine pharmacokinetics. Methods This work is based on a single-centre, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Among the 39 patients included, 19 patients were randomized to the ropivacaine group. The free and total ropivacaine concentrations were measured in nine or 10 blood samples per patient. A pharmacokinetic model was built using a nonlinear mixed-effect modelling approach. Results The free ropivacaine concentrations remained under the previously published toxic threshold. A one-compartment model, including protein binding site with a first-order absorption, best described the data. The protein binding site concentration was considered as a latent variable. Bodyweight, the number of resected liver segments and postoperative fibrinogen evolution were, respectively, included in the calculation of the volume of distribution, clearance and binding site production rate. The resection of three or more liver segments was associated with a 53% decrease in the free ropivacaine clearance. Conclusions Although large liver resections were associated with lower free ropivacaine clearance, the ropivacaine pharmacokinetic profile remained within the safe range after this type of surgery. PMID:25557141

  16. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for Valproic acid in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2014-10-15

    Valproic acid is an anti-convulscant drug that is widely used in the treatment of different types of epilepsy and since its introduction the clinical use has increased rapidly both as a sole agent and in combination therapies. The mechanism of action has been linked to blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels and potentiation of GABAergic transmission. The most widely used route of administration of Valproic acid is oral, although it can also be given intravenously and rectally and its pharmacokinetics has been studied extensively. The aim of this work was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for plasma and tissue/organ prediction in children and adults following intravenous and oral dosing of Valproic acid. The plasma/tissue concentration profile will be used for clinical trial simulation in Dravet syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy in children where the combination of Valproic acid, stiripentol and clobazam has shown remarkable results. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed with compartments for gut lumen, enterocyte, gut tissue, systemic blood, kidney, liver, brain, spleen, muscle and rest of body. System and drug specific parameters for the model were obtained from the literature from in vitro and in vivo experiments. The model was initially developed for adults and scaled to children using age-dependent changes in anatomical and physiological parameters and ontogeny functions for enzyme maturation assuming the same elimination pathways in adults and children. The results from the model validation showed satisfactory prediction of plasma concentration both in terms of mean prediction and variability in children and adults following intravenous and oral dosing especially after single doses. The model also adequately predicts clearance in children. Due to limited distribution of Valproic acid into tissues, the concentration in plasma is about 8-9 times higher than tissues/organs. The model could help to improve

  17. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of Interstrain Variability in Trichloroethylene Metabolism in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jerry L.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Wright, Fred A.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, interindividual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cases, are based on human toxicokinetic data. Objectives: We evaluated the utility of genetically diverse mouse strains for estimating toxicokinetic population variability for risk assessment, using trichloroethylene (TCE) metabolism as a case study. Methods: We used data on oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolism of TCE in 16 inbred and 1 hybrid mouse strains to calibrate and extend existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. We added one-compartment models for glutathione metabolites and a two-compartment model for dichloroacetic acid (DCA). We used a Bayesian population analysis of interstrain variability to quantify variability in TCE metabolism. Results: Concentration–time profiles for TCE metabolism to oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolites varied across strains. Median predictions for the metabolic flux through oxidation were less variable (5-fold range) than that through glutathione conjugation (10-fold range). For oxidative metabolites, median predictions of trichloroacetic acid production were less variable (2-fold range) than DCA production (5-fold range), although the uncertainty bounds for DCA exceeded the predicted variability. Conclusions: Population PBPK modeling of genetically diverse mouse strains can provide useful quantitative estimates of toxicokinetic population variability. When extrapolated to lower doses more relevant to environmental exposures, mouse population-derived variability estimates for TCE metabolism closely matched population variability estimates previously derived from human toxicokinetic studies with TCE, highlighting the utility of mouse interstrain metabolism studies for addressing toxicokinetic variability

  18. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Fluorescently Labeled Block Copolymer Nanoparticles for Controlled Drug Delivery in Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gilkey, MJ; Krishnan, V; Scheetz, L; Jia, X; Rajasekaran, AK; Dhurjati, PS

    2015-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed that describes the concentration and biodistribution of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles in mice used for the controlled delivery of dexamethasone in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy. The simulated data showed initial spikes in nanoparticle concentration in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, whereas concentration in plasma decreased rapidly. These simulation results were consistent with previously published in vivo data. At shorter time scales, the simulated data predicted decrease of nanoparticles from plasma with concomitant increase in the liver, spleen, and kidneys before decaying at longer timepoints. Interestingly, the simulated data predicted an unaccounted accumulation of about 50% of the injected dose of nanoparticles. Incorporation of an additional compartment into the model justified the presence of unaccounted nanoparticles in this compartment. Our results suggest that the proposed PBPK model can be an excellent tool for prediction of optimal dose of nanoparticle-encapsulated drugs for cancer treatment. PMID:26225236

  19. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of oxcarbazepine active metabolite in Chinese patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Zhang, Quanying; Xu, Wenjun; Lv, Chengzhe; Hao, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of oxcarbazepine and optimize the treatment of oxcarbazepine in Chinese patients with epilepsy. A total of 108 oxcarbazepine therapeutic drug monitoring samples from 78 patients with epilepsy were collected in this study. The pharmacologically active metabolite 10,11-dihydro-10-hydrocarbamazepine (MHD) was used as the analytical target for monitoring therapy of oxcarbazepine. Patients' clinical data were retrospectively collected. The PPK model for MHD was developed using Phoenix NLME 1.2 with a non-linear mixed-effect model. MHD pharmacokinetics obeys a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The effect of age, gender, red blood cell count, red blood cell specific volume, hemoglobin (HGB), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatine were analyzed. Bootstrap and data splitting were used simultaneously to validate the final PPK models. The mean values of volume of distribution and clearance of MHD in the patients were 14.2 L and 2.38 L h(-1), respectively. BUN and HGB influenced the MHD volume of distribution according to the following equation: V = tvV × (BUN/4.76)(-0.007) × (HGB/140)(-0.001) × e (ηV) . The MHD clearance was dependent on ALT and gender as follows: CL = tvCL × (ALT/30)(0.181) × (gender) × 1.083 × e (ηCL). The final PPK model was demonstrated to be suitable and effective and it can be used to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of MHD in Chinese patients with epilepsy and to choose an optimal dosage regimen of oxcarbazepine on the basis of these parameters.

  20. Saturable human neopterin response to interferon-α assessed by a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study, we developed a pharmacokinetic (PK)- pharmacodynamic (PD) model of a new sustained release formulation of interferon-α-2a (SR-IFN-α) using the blood concentration of IFN-α and neopterin in order to quantify the magnitude and saturation of neopterin production over time in healthy volunteers. The SR-IFN-α in this study is a solid microparticular formulation manufactured by spray drying of a feeding solution containing IFN-α, a biocompatible polymer (polyethylene glycol) and sodium hyaluronate. Methods The full PK and PD (neopterin concentration) datasets from 24 healthy subjects obtained after single doses of 9, 18, 27 and 36 MIU of subcutaneous SR-IFN-α were used to build the mixed-effect model using NONMEM (version 7.2) with the GFORTRAN compiler. Results A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and a mixture of zero- and first-order absorption was chosen to describe the PK of SR-IFN-α. The time-concentration profile of neopterin, the PD marker, was described by a turnover model combined with a single transit compartment. The saturable pattern of the neopterin response blurring the dose–response relationship of SR-IFN-α was addressed by introducing the concept of the EC50 increasing over time. Conclusions The PK-PD model of SR-IFN-α developed in this study has presented a quantitative tool to assess the time-course of a saturable neopterin response in humans. PMID:24088361

  1. Saturable human neopterin response to interferon-α assessed by a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sangil; Juhn, Jae-Hyeon; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jongtae; Hong, Taegon; Paek, Jeongki; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2013-10-02

    In this study, we developed a pharmacokinetic (PK)- pharmacodynamic (PD) model of a new sustained release formulation of interferon-α-2a (SR-IFN-α) using the blood concentration of IFN-α and neopterin in order to quantify the magnitude and saturation of neopterin production over time in healthy volunteers. The SR-IFN-α in this study is a solid microparticular formulation manufactured by spray drying of a feeding solution containing IFN-α, a biocompatible polymer (polyethylene glycol) and sodium hyaluronate. The full PK and PD (neopterin concentration) datasets from 24 healthy subjects obtained after single doses of 9, 18, 27 and 36 MIU of subcutaneous SR-IFN-α were used to build the mixed-effect model using NONMEM (version 7.2) with the GFORTRAN compiler. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and a mixture of zero- and first-order absorption was chosen to describe the PK of SR-IFN-α. The time-concentration profile of neopterin, the PD marker, was described by a turnover model combined with a single transit compartment. The saturable pattern of the neopterin response blurring the dose-response relationship of SR-IFN-α was addressed by introducing the concept of the EC50 increasing over time. The PK-PD model of SR-IFN-α developed in this study has presented a quantitative tool to assess the time-course of a saturable neopterin response in humans.

  2. Pharmacokinetic similarity of biologics: analysis using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Anne; Gsteiger, Sandro; Balser, Sigrid; Pigeolet, Etienne; Steimer, Jean-Louis; Pillai, Goonaseelan; Mentré, France

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to show with two examples that a pharmacokinetic (PK) similarity analysis can be performed with nonlinear mixed effects models (NLMEM). We used two studies comparing different biosimilars: a three-way crossover trial on somatropin and a parallel group trial on epoetin alpha. For both datasets, NLMEM-based analysis was compared to non-compartmental analysis (NCA). As for NCA, we performed NLMEM-based equivalence Wald test on secondary parameters of the model: the area under the curve and the maximal concentration. Somatropin PK was described by a one-compartment model, epoetin alpha PK by a two-compartment model with linear and Michaelis-Menten elimination. For both studies, PK similarity was demonstrated by NCA and NLMEM. Both approaches led to similar results. Therefore, PK similarity data can be analyzed by both methods. NCA is an easier approach as it does not require data modelling but NLMEM leads to a better understanding of the underlying biological system. PMID:22205196

  3. Closed-Form Formulas for Estimation of Kinetic Parameters in One- and Two-Compartment Models

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gengsheng; Kadrmas, Dan; Gullberg, Grant

    2011-05-24

    .Nowadays the most reliable approach to estimate the kinetic parameters is to minimize an objective function which is essentially the distance between the measured data and the model generated pseudo data. Due to the highly non-linear nature of the model, common optimization algorithms usually fail to find the true minimum. A brute-force search method sometimes must be used to find the true minimum. This paper attempts to use the Laplace transform and Z-transform methods to derive closed-form formulas for kinetic parameter estimation problems, which assume one- or two-compartment models. The proposed method is computationally efficient and its solution is unique. When data sampling interval is small, the proposed method is able to accurately estimate the kinetic parameter; when the interval is larger, the proposed method fails to give a meaningful estimate. The one-compartment method is more robust than the two-compartment method.

  4. Selection between Michaelis-Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2010-02-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis-Menten (M-M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these two approaches. Theoretical derivations were used to determine conditions under which M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models are equivalent. Computer simulations and model fitting were conducted to demonstrate these conditions. Typical M-M and TMDD profiles were simulated based on literature data for an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (TRX1) and phenytoin administered intravenously. Both models were fitted to data and goodness of fit criteria were evaluated for model selection. A case study of recombinant human erythropoietin was conducted to qualify results. A rapid binding TMDD model is equivalent to the M-M model if total target density R ( tot ) is constant, and R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 where K ( D ) represents the dissociation constant and C is the free drug concentration. Under these conditions, M-M parameters are defined as: V ( max ) = k ( int ) R ( tot ) V ( c ) and K ( m ) = K ( D ) where k ( int ) represents an internalization rate constant, and V ( c ) is the volume of the central compartment. R ( tot ) is constant if and only if k ( int ) = k ( deg,) where k ( deg ) is a degradation rate constant. If the TMDD model predictions are not sensitive to k ( int ) or k ( deg ) parameters, the condition of R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 alone can preserve the equivalence between rapid binding TMDD and M-M models. The model selection process for drugs that exhibit TMDD should involve a full mechanistic model as well as reduced models. The best model

  5. Bioconcentration of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl and pentachlorophenol in the midge, Chironomus riparius, as measured by a pharmacokinetic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Hayton, W.L.; Staubus, A.E.; Fisher, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    A two compartment pharmacokinetic model was developed which describes the uptake and elimination of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl (TCB) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the midge, Chironomus riparius. C. riparius were exposed to nominal TCB (2 ??g L-1) and PCP (9 ??g L-1) concentrations during a 16 h static uptake phase. Depuration was determined over approximately 45 h using a flowthrough system without feeding. The uptake clearance (P) was 330 ?? 61 ml g-1 midge h-1 for TCB and 55 ?? 4 ml g-1 midge h-1 for PCP, while measured bioconcentration factors (BCF) were 35,900 and 458 for TCB and PCP, respectively. Overall, the clearance-volume- based pharmacokinetic model predicted BCF values that were consistent with published values as well as with BCF values obtained from the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)).

  6. Semimechanistic model to characterize nonlinear pharmacokinetics of nimotuzumab in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vera, Leyanis; Ramos-Suzarte, Mayra; Fernández-Sánchez, Eduardo; Soriano, Jorge Luis; Guitart, Concepción Peraire; Hernández, Gilberto Castañeda; Jacobo-Cabral, Carlos O; de Castro Suárez, Niurys; Codina, Helena Colom

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed (1) to develop a semimechanistic pharmacokinetic (PK) model for nimotuzumab in patients with advanced breast cancer and (2) to identify demographic, biochemical, and clinical predictive factors of the PK variability. Data from a phase 1 study were analyzed using the nonlinear mixed-effects approach (NONMEM). A target-mediated disposition model that included 2 open PK compartments, the monoclonal antibody (mAb)-target binding, and target and mAb-target complex turnovers best described the linear and nonlinear PK. Covariates had no influence on the PK parameters. The final parameter estimates were 19.93 L (steady-state volume), 0.0045-0.0172 L/h (range of total clearance values), 6.96 μg/mL (steady-state binding constant), 5.50 h(-1) (target degradation rate constant), 1.43 (μg/mL) · h(-1) (complex formation rate), and 0.148 h(-1) (complex internalization rate constant). The model described the effect of the mAb-target binding, and target and mAb-target complex turnovers on nimotuzumab PK. Simulations showed that doses above 200 mg maintained the 50% target occupancy during all of the treatment. This model can be very useful for knowing the dosing schedules required for efficacy and supports further investigation of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships of nimotuzumab to improve its therapeutic use. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. Semi-Mechanism-Based Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of the Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor Vismodegib.

    PubMed

    Lu, T; Wang, B; Gao, Y; Dresser, M; Graham, R A; Jin, J Y

    2015-11-01

    Vismodegib, approved for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma, has shown unique pharmacokinetic (PK) nonlinearity and binding to α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) in humans. A semi-mechanism-based population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model was developed from a meta-dataset of 225 subjects enrolled in five clinical studies to quantitatively describe the clinical PK of vismodegib and identify sources of interindividual variability. Total and unbound vismodegib were analyzed simultaneously, together with time-varying AAG data. The PK of vismodegib was adequately described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption, first-order elimination of unbound drug, and saturable binding to AAG with fast-equilibrium. The variability of total vismodegib concentration at steady-state was predominantly explained by the range of AAG level. The impact of AAG on unbound concentration was clinically insignificant. Various approaches were evaluated for model validation. The semi-mechanism-based PopPK model described herein provided insightful information on the nonlinear PK and has been utilized for various clinical applications.

  8. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of squalene-containing adjuvant in human vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Squalene is used in the oil phase of certain emulsion vaccine adjuvants, but its fate as a vaccine component following intramuscular (IM) injection in humans is unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for intramuscularly injected squalene-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion, in order to make a quantitative estimation of the tissue distribution of squalene following a single IM injection in humans. The PBPK model incorporates relevant physicochemical properties of squalene; estimates of the time course of cracking of a SQ/W emulsion; anatomical and physiological parameters at the injection site and beyond; and local, preferential lymphatic transport. The model predicts that a single dose of SQ/W emulsion will be removed from human deltoid muscle within six days following IM injection. The major proportion of the injected squalene will be distributed to draining lymph nodes and adipose tissues. The model indicates slow decay from the latter compartment most likely due to partitioning into neutral lipids and a low rate of squalene biotransformation there. Parallel pharmacokinetic modeling for mouse muscle suggests that the kinetics of SQ/W emulsion correspond to the immunodynamic time course of a commercial squalene-containing adjuvant reported in that species. In conclusion, this study makes important pharmacokinetic predictions of the fate of a squalene-containing emulsion in humans. The results of this study may be relevant for understanding the immunodynamics of this new class of vaccine adjuvants and may be useful in future quantitative risk analyses that incorporate mode-of-action data.

  9. A four-compartment PBPK heart model accounting for cardiac metabolism - model development and application.

    PubMed

    Tylutki, Zofia; Polak, Sebastian

    2017-01-04

    In the field of cardiac drug efficacy and safety assessment, information on drug concentration in heart tissue is desirable. Because measuring drug concentrations in human cardiac tissue is challenging in healthy volunteers, mathematical models are used to cope with such limitations. With a goal of predicting drug concentration in cardiac tissue, we have developed a whole-body PBPK model consisting of seventeen perfusion-limited compartments. The proposed PBPK heart model consisted of four compartments: the epicardium, midmyocardium, endocardium, and pericardial fluid, and accounted for cardiac metabolism using CYP450. The model was written in R. The plasma:tissues partition coefficients (Kp) were calculated in Simcyp Simulator. The model was fitted to the concentrations of amitriptyline in plasma and the heart. The estimated parameters were as follows: 0.80 for the absorption rate [h(-1)], 52.6 for Kprest, 0.01 for the blood flow through the pericardial fluid [L/h], and 0.78 for the P-parameter describing the diffusion between the pericardial fluid and epicardium [L/h]. The total cardiac clearance of amitriptyline was calculated as 0.316 L/h. Although the model needs further improvement, the results support its feasibility, and it is a first attempt to provide an active drug concentration in various locations within heart tissue using a PBPK approach.

  10. A four-compartment PBPK heart model accounting for cardiac metabolism - model development and application

    PubMed Central

    Tylutki, Zofia; Polak, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    In the field of cardiac drug efficacy and safety assessment, information on drug concentration in heart tissue is desirable. Because measuring drug concentrations in human cardiac tissue is challenging in healthy volunteers, mathematical models are used to cope with such limitations. With a goal of predicting drug concentration in cardiac tissue, we have developed a whole-body PBPK model consisting of seventeen perfusion-limited compartments. The proposed PBPK heart model consisted of four compartments: the epicardium, midmyocardium, endocardium, and pericardial fluid, and accounted for cardiac metabolism using CYP450. The model was written in R. The plasma:tissues partition coefficients (Kp) were calculated in Simcyp Simulator. The model was fitted to the concentrations of amitriptyline in plasma and the heart. The estimated parameters were as follows: 0.80 for the absorption rate [h−1], 52.6 for Kprest, 0.01 for the blood flow through the pericardial fluid [L/h], and 0.78 for the P-parameter describing the diffusion between the pericardial fluid and epicardium [L/h]. The total cardiac clearance of amitriptyline was calculated as 0.316 L/h. Although the model needs further improvement, the results support its feasibility, and it is a first attempt to provide an active drug concentration in various locations within heart tissue using a PBPK approach. PMID:28051093

  11. Development and validation of skinfold-thickness prediction equations with a 4-compartment model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Siervogel, Roger M

    2003-05-01

    Skinfold-thickness measurements are commonly obtained for the indirect assessment of body composition. We developed new skinfold-thickness equations by using a 4-compartment model as the reference. Additionally, we compared our new equations with the Durnin and Womersley and Jackson and Pollock skinfold-thickness equations to evaluate each equation's validity and precision. Data from 681 healthy, white adults were used. Percentage body fat (%BF) values were calculated by using the 4-compartment model. The cohort was then divided into validation and cross-validation groups. Equations were developed by using regression analyses and the 4-compartment model. All equations were then tested by using the cross-validation group. Tests for accuracy included mean differences, R(2), and Bland-Altman plots. Precision was evaluated by comparing root mean squared errors. Our new equations' estimated means for %BF in men and women (22.7% and 32.6%, respectively) were closest to the corresponding 4-compartment values (22.8% and 32.8%). The Durnin and Womersley equation means in men and women (20.0% and 31.0%, respectively) and the Jackson and Pollock mean in women (26.2%) underestimated %BF. All equations showed a tendency toward underestimation in subjects with higher %BF. Bland-Altman plots showed limited agreement between Durnin and Wormersley, Jackson and Pollock, and the 4-compartment model. Precision was similar among all the equations. We developed accurate and precise skinfold-thickness equations by using a 4-compartment model as the method of reference. Additionally, we found that the skinfold-thickness equations frequently used by clinicians and practitioners underestimate %BF.

  12. Pharmacokinetic modeling of perfluorooctanoic acid during gestation and lactation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Chester E; Setzer, R Woodrow; Barton, Hugh A

    2009-06-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a processing aid for the polymerization of commercially valuable fluoropolymers. Its widespread environmental distribution, presence in human blood, and adverse effects in animal toxicity studies have triggered attention to its potential adverse effects to humans. PFOA is not metabolized and exhibits dramatically different serum/plasma half-lives across species. Estimated half-lives for humans, monkeys, mice, and female rats are 3-5 years, 20-30 days, 12-20 days, and 2-4h, respectively. Developmental toxicity is one of the most sensitive adverse effects associated with PFOA exposure in rodents, but its interpretation for risk assessment is currently hampered by the lack of understanding of the inter-species pharmacokinetics of PFOA. To address this uncertainty, a biologically supported dynamic model was developed whereby a two-compartment system linked via placental blood flow described gestation and milk production linked a lactating dam to a growing pup litter compartment. Postnatal serum levels of PFOA for 129S1/SvImJ mice at doses of 1mg/kg or less were reasonably simulated while prenatal and postnatal measurements for CD-1 mice at doses of 1mg/kg or greater were simulated via the addition of a biologically based saturable renal resorption description. Our results suggest that at low doses a linear model may suffice for describing the pharmacokinetics of PFOA while a more complex model may be needed at higher doses. Although mice may appear more sensitive based on administered dose of PFOA, the internal dose metrics estimated in this analysis indicate that they may be equal or less sensitive than rats.

  13. PREDICTING AGE-DEPENDENT PHARMACOKINETICS OF SIX VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS UTILIZING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING OF RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters were incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different lifestages of the rat and ...

  14. Predicting Age-Appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models to incorporate age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages of rats.

  15. Predicting Age-appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Modeling (T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to incorporate ageappropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized in this study to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages o...

  16. Predicting Age-appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Modeling (T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to incorporate ageappropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized in this study to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages o...

  17. PREDICTING AGE-DEPENDENT PHARMACOKINETICS OF SIX VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS UTILIZING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING OF RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters were incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different lifestages of the rat and ...

  18. Predicting Age-Appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models to incorporate age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages of rats.

  19. Reduction of a Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Stabilise the Bayesian Analysis of Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Thierry; Tsamandouras, Nikolaos; Dumitras, Swati; Pigeolet, Etienne; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly used in drug development for their ability to predict drug concentrations in clinically relevant tissues and to extrapolate across species, experimental conditions and sub-populations. A whole-body PBPK model can be fitted to clinical data using a Bayesian population approach. However, the analysis might be time consuming and numerically unstable if prior information on the model parameters is too vague given the complexity of the system. We suggest an approach where (i) a whole-body PBPK model is formally reduced using a Bayesian proper lumping method to retain the mechanistic interpretation of the system and account for parameter uncertainty, (ii) the simplified model is fitted to clinical data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques and (iii) the optimised reduced PBPK model is used for extrapolation. A previously developed 16-compartment whole-body PBPK model for mavoglurant was reduced to 7 compartments while preserving plasma concentration-time profiles (median and variance) and giving emphasis to the brain (target site) and the liver (elimination site). The reduced model was numerically more stable than the whole-body model for the Bayesian analysis of mavoglurant pharmacokinetic data in healthy adult volunteers. Finally, the reduced yet mechanistic model could easily be scaled from adults to children and predict mavoglurant pharmacokinetics in children aged from 3 to 11 years with similar performance compared with the whole-body model. This study is a first example of the practicality of formal reduction of complex mechanistic models for Bayesian inference in drug development.

  20. A physiologically based model for tramadol pharmacokinetics in horses.

    PubMed

    Abbiati, Roberto Andrea; Cagnardi, Petra; Ravasio, Giuliano; Villa, Roberto; Manca, Davide

    2017-09-21

    This work proposes an application of a minimal complexity physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict tramadol concentration vs time profiles in horses. Tramadol is an opioid analgesic also used for veterinary treatments. Researchers and medical doctors can profit from the application of mathematical models as supporting tools to optimize the pharmacological treatment of animal species. The proposed model is based on physiology but adopts the minimal compartmental architecture necessary to describe the experimental data. The model features a system of ordinary differential equations, where most of the model parameters are either assigned or individualized for a given horse, using literature data and correlations. Conversely, residual parameters, whose value is unknown, are regressed exploiting experimental data. The model proved capable of simulating pharmacokinetic profiles with accuracy. In addition, it provides further insights on un-observable tramadol data, as for instance tramadol concentration in the liver or hepatic metabolism and renal excretion extent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacokinetic and -dynamic modelling of G-CSF derivatives in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is routinely applied to support recovery of granulopoiesis during the course of cytotoxic chemotherapies. However, optimal use of the drug is largely unknown. We showed in the past that a biomathematical compartment model of human granulopoiesis can be used to make clinically relevant predictions regarding new, yet untested chemotherapy regimen. In the present paper, we aim to extend this model by a detailed pharmacokinetic and -dynamic modelling of two commonly used G-CSF derivatives Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim. Results Model equations are based on our physiological understanding of the drugs which are delayed absorption of G-CSF when applied to the subcutaneous tissue, dose-dependent bioavailability, unspecific first order elimination, specific elimination in dependence on granulocyte counts and reversible protein binding. Pharmacokinetic differences between Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim were modelled as different parameter sets. Our former cell-kinetic model of granulopoiesis was essentially preserved, except for a few additional assumptions and simplifications. We assumed a delayed action of G-CSF on the bone marrow, a delayed action of chemotherapy and differences between Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim with respect to stimulation potency of the bone marrow. Additionally, we incorporated a model of combined action of Pegfilgrastim and Filgrastim or endogenous G-CSF which interact via concurrent receptor binding. Unknown pharmacokinetic or cell-kinetic parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to available datasets of G-CSF applications, chemotherapy applications or combinations of it. Data were either extracted from the literature or were received from cooperating clinical study groups. Model predictions fitted well to both, datasets used for parameter estimation and validation scenarios as well. A unique set of parameters was identified which is valid for all scenarios

  2. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction - poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models requires a lot data, such as the chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data. Previously-developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be great resource for supporting the constr...

  3. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction - poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models requires a lot data, such as the chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data. Previously-developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be great resource for supporting the constr...

  4. Prediction of Nanoparticle Prodrug Metabolism by Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Biliary Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Stephan T.; Zou, Peng; Skoczen, Sarah; Xie, Sherwin; Liboiron, Barry; Harasym, Troy; Tardi, Paul; Mayer, LawrenceD.; McNeil, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation is a powerful tool for the prediction of drug concentrations in the absence of analytical techniques that allow for direct quantification. The present study applied this modeling approach to determine active drug release from a nanoparticle prodrug formulation. A comparative pharmacokinetic study of a nanoscale micellar docetaxel (DTX) prodrug, Procet 8, and commercial DTX formulation, Taxotere, was conducted in bile duct cannulated rats. The nanoscale (~40 nm) size of the Procet 8 formulation resulted in confinement within the plasma space and high prodrug plasma concentrations. Ex vivo prodrug hydrolysis during plasma sample preparation resulted in unacceptable error that precluded direct measurement of DTX concentrations. Pharmacokinetic modeling of Taxotere and Procet 8 plasma concentrations, and their associated biliary metabolites, allowed for prediction of the DTX concentration profile and DTX bioavailability, and thereby evaluation of Procet 8 metabolism. Procet 8 plasma decay and in vitro plasma hydrolytic rates were identical, suggesting systemic clearance of the prodrug was primarily metabolic. The Procet 8 and Taxotere plasma profiles, and associated docetaxel hydroxy-tert-butyl carbamate (HDTX) metabolite biliary excretion, were best fit by a two compartment model, with both linear and non-linear DTX clearance, and first order Procet 8 hydrolysis. The model estimated HDTX clearance rate agreed with in vitro literature values, supporting the predictability of the proposed model. Model simulation at the 10 mg DTX equivalent/kg dose level predicted DTX formation rate-limited kinetics and a peak plasma DTX concentration of 39 ng/mL at 4h for Procet 8, in comparison to 2826 ng/mL for Taxotere. As a result of nonlinear DTX clearance, the DTX AUCinf for the Procet 8 formulation was predicted to be 2.6 times lower than Taxotere (775 vs. 2017 h x ng/mL, respectively), resulting in an absolute bioavailability estimate of

  5. What Is the Most Realistic Single-Compartment Model of Spike Initiation?

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    A large variety of neuron models are used in theoretical and computational neuroscience, and among these, single-compartment models are a popular kind. These models do not explicitly include the dendrites or the axon, and range from the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model to various flavors of integrate-and-fire (IF) models. The main classes of models differ in the way spikes are initiated. Which one is the most realistic? Starting with some general epistemological considerations, I show that the notion of realism comes in two dimensions: empirical content (the sort of predictions that a model can produce) and empirical accuracy (whether these predictions are correct). I then examine the realism of the main classes of single-compartment models along these two dimensions, in light of recent experimental evidence. PMID:25856629

  6. Entropy of biogeochemical compartment models: complexity and information content as a tool for model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Holger; Sierra, Carlos A.

    2017-04-01

    Most soil organic matter decomposition models consist of a number of compartments describing the dynamics of substrate and microbial biomass pools. The fluxes of mass between the compartments are usually described by a system of ordinary differential equations, in which the number of compartments and the connections among them define the complexity of the model and the number of biological processes that need to be described. With this approach, it is difficult to determine the level of detail that is required to describe a given system, and it is also difficult to compare models against each other due to large differences in their level of complexity. Here, we propose entropy as a tool to determine the level of complexity required to describe a biogeochemical system and to compare the information content of different models. Instead of entire masses on bulk soil level, we look at such models from the point of view of a single particle on the molecular level. This particle enters the system, cycles through it, and leaves it at some point later in time, thereby following a path through the system. We think of this path as a particular stochastic process, a Markov renewal process. If we consider this path as a random variable in a path space, its Shannon information entropy describes its information content, i.e. how much we learn when we observe the entire path of a particle traveling through the system. In other words, it tells us how hard it is to predict this path and thus how much we do not know about what is going to happen to one single particle. The entropy as a measure of model complexity can help us to decide whether a model is not complex enough to represent the information that we have about a system or whether it is too complex. The concept of maximum entropy provides a powerful tool to develop unbiased models, i.e. models that contain the exact amount of information that we have about the system. In addition, differences between a soil organic matter

  7. Pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of ondansetron following oral administration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Baek, I-H; Lee, B-Y; Kang, J; Kwon, K-I

    2015-04-01

    Ondansetron is a potent antiemetic drug that has been commonly used to treat acute and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in dogs. The aim of this study was to perform a pharmacokinetic analysis of ondansetron in dogs following oral administration of a single dose. A single 8-mg oral dose of ondansetron (Zofran(®) ) was administered to beagles (n = 18), and the plasma concentrations of ondansetron were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The data were analyzed by modeling approaches using ADAPT5, and model discrimination was determined by the likelihood-ratio test. The peak plasma concentration (Cmax ) was 11.5 ± 10.0 ng/mL at 1.1 ± 0.8 h. The area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve from time zero to the last measurable concentration was 15.9 ± 14.7 ng·h/mL, and the half-life calculated from the terminal phase was 1.3 ± 0.7 h. The interindividual variability of the pharmacokinetic parameters was high (coefficient of variation > 44.1%), and the one-compartment model described the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron well. The estimated plasma concentration range of the usual empirical dose from the Monte Carlo simulation was 0.1-13.2 ng/mL. These findings will facilitate determination of the optimal dose regimen for dogs with CINV.

  8. Predicting Cortisol Exposure from Paediatric Hydrocortisone Formulation Using a Semi-Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic Model Established in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Melin, Johanna; Parra-Guillen, Zinnia P; Hartung, Niklas; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Ross, Richard J; Whitaker, Martin J; Kloft, Charlotte

    2017-07-31

    Optimisation of hydrocortisone replacement therapy in children is challenging as there is currently no licensed formulation and dose in Europe for children under 6 years of age. In addition, hydrocortisone has non-linear pharmacokinetics caused by saturable plasma protein binding. A paediatric hydrocortisone formulation, Infacort(®) oral hydrocortisone granules with taste masking, has therefore been developed. The objective of this study was to establish a population pharmacokinetic model based on studies in healthy adult volunteers to predict hydrocortisone exposure in paediatric patients with adrenal insufficiency. Cortisol and binding protein concentrations were evaluated in the absence and presence of dexamethasone in healthy volunteers (n = 30). Dexamethasone was used to suppress endogenous cortisol concentrations prior to and after single doses of 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 mg of Infacort(®) or 20 mg of Infacort(®)/hydrocortisone tablet/hydrocortisone intravenously. A plasma protein binding model was established using unbound and total cortisol concentrations, and sequentially integrated into the pharmacokinetic model. Both specific (non-linear) and non-specific (linear) protein binding were included in the cortisol binding model. A two-compartment disposition model with saturable absorption and constant endogenous cortisol baseline (Baseline cort,15.5 nmol/L) described the data accurately. The predicted cortisol exposure for a given dose varied considerably within a small body weight range in individuals weighing <20 kg. Our semi-mechanistic population pharmacokinetic model for hydrocortisone captures the complex pharmacokinetics of hydrocortisone in a simplified but comprehensive framework. The predicted cortisol exposure indicated the importance of defining an accurate hydrocortisone dose to mimic physiological concentrations for neonates and infants weighing <20 kg. EudraCT number: 2013-000260-28, 2013-000259-42.

  9. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of the antihistaminic (H1) effect of bilastine.

    PubMed

    Jauregizar, Nerea; de la Fuente, Leire; Lucero, Maria Luisa; Sologuren, Ander; Leal, Nerea; Rodríguez, Mónica

    2009-01-01

    To model the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of bilastine, a new histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, from single- and multiple-dose studies in healthy adult subjects. The pharmacokinetic model was developed from different single-dose and multiple-dose studies. In the single-dose studies, a total of 183 subjects received oral doses of bilastine 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 120, 160, 200 and 220 mg. In the multiple-dose studies, 127 healthy subjects received bilastine 10, 20, 40, 50, 80, 100, 140 or 200 mg/day as multiple doses during a 4-, 7- or 14-day period. The pharmacokinetic profile of bilastine was investigated using a simultaneous analysis of all concentration-time data by means of nonlinear mixed-effects modelling population pharmacokinetic software NONMEM version 6.1. Plasma concentrations were modelled according to a two-compartment open model with first-order absorption and elimination. For the pharmacodynamic analysis, the inhibitory effect of bilastine (inhibition of histamine-induced wheal and flare) was assessed on a preselected time schedule, and the predicted typical pharmacokinetic profile (based on the pharmacokinetic model previously developed) was used. An indirect response model was developed to describe the pharmacodynamic relationships between flare or wheal areas and bilastine plasma concentrations. Finally, once values of the concentration that produced 50% inhibition (IC(50)) had been estimated for wheal and flare effects, simulations were carried out to predict plasma concentrations for the doses of bilastine 5, 10 and 20 mg at steady state (72-96 hours). A non-compartmental analysis resulted in linear kinetics of bilastine in the dose range studied. Bilastine was characterized by two-compartmental kinetics with a rapid-absorption phase (first-order absorption rate constant = 1.50 h(-1)), plasma peak concentrations were observed at 1 hour following administration and the maximal response was observed at approximately 4 hours

  10. Role of delay in plant growth dynamics: A two compartment mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Preety; Kumar, Pankaj

    2017-07-01

    A mathematical model consisting of two compartments-shoot and root is used in this paper for the study of growth of an individual plant. The dynamics of plant growth is studied by division of plant in these two compartments where the associated state variables are structural dry weight and concentration of nutrients. The assumption is that the nutrient is taken up from the root compartment and the exogenic activities hinder the up taking of nutrients that are essential for the plants and adversely affect the nutrient use efficiency (utilization coefficients) resulting into root structural damage. This effect is studied by introducing the delay (time-lag) in utilization parameter. The inclusion of delay disturbed the Stability of the system and Hopf bifurcation occurred. Analytic results have been supported by numerical simulation using MATLAB.

  11. Pharmacokinetic models for the saturable absorption of cefuroxime axetil and saturable elimination of cefuroxime.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Carretero, P; Merino-Sanjuán, M; Nácher, A; Casabó, V G

    2004-02-01

    Since oligopeptidic drugs such as beta-lactam antibiotics share the same carriers in humans and animals, the absorption and elimination kinetics of cefuroxime (C) were investigated in rats. Plasma C concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of C in the rat were examined after intravenous (i.v.) administration at three doses (1.78, 8.9 and 17.8mg) of cefuroxime sodium and oral administration at two doses (2.02 and 8.9mg) of cefuroxime axetil (CA). Preliminary fits using data from intravenous administration of C showed that the drug disposition kinetics were clearly nonlinear, with an increase in plasma clearance as the intravenous dose increased. After oral administration of CA, normalized C(max) was higher for smaller dose than for the largest dose. The population pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by means of nonlinear mixed effect modelling approach according to a nonlinear elimination and nonlinear absorption two-compartment model. The nonlinear elimination could be attributed to a saturable renal tubular reabsorption of the antibiotic and nonlinear intestinal absorption of CA mediated by carrier system. The oral bioavailability of C, calculated by numeric integration of an amount of CA drug absorbed was 22 and 17% for 2.02 and 8.9mg of prodrug administered orally.

  12. Application of a single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approach to pharmacokinetic model building.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Eric A; Sale, Mark E; Pollock, Bruce G; Belani, Chandra P; Egorin, Merrill J; Ivy, Percy S; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Manuck, Stephen B; Marder, Stephen R; Muldoon, Matthew F; Scher, Howard I; Solit, David B; Bies, Robert R

    2012-08-01

    A limitation in traditional stepwise population pharmacokinetic model building is the difficulty in handling interactions between model components. To address this issue, a method was previously introduced which couples NONMEM parameter estimation and model fitness evaluation to a single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm for global optimization of the model structure. In this study, the generalizability of this approach for pharmacokinetic model building is evaluated by comparing (1) correct and spurious covariate relationships in a simulated dataset resulting from automated stepwise covariate modeling, Lasso methods, and single-objective hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to covariate identification and (2) information criteria values, model structures, convergence, and model parameter values resulting from manual stepwise versus single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to model building for seven compounds. Both manual stepwise and single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to model building were applied, blinded to the results of the other approach, for selection of the compartment structure as well as inclusion and model form of inter-individual and inter-occasion variability, residual error, and covariates from a common set of model options. For the simulated dataset, stepwise covariate modeling identified three of four true covariates and two spurious covariates; Lasso identified two of four true and 0 spurious covariates; and the single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm identified three of four true covariates and one spurious covariate. For the clinical datasets, the Akaike information criterion was a median of 22.3 points lower (range of 470.5 point decrease to 0.1 point decrease) for the best single-objective hybrid genetic-algorithm candidate model versus the final manual stepwise model: the Akaike information criterion was lower by greater than 10 points for four compounds and differed by less than 10 points for three

  13. Compartment model for long-term contamination prediction in deciduous fruit trees after a nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Clouvas, A.; Gagianas, A. )

    1990-06-01

    Radiocesium contamination from the Chernobyl accident of different parts (fruits, leaves, and shoots) of selected apricot trees in North Greece was systematically measured in 1987 and 1988. The results are presented and discussed in the framework of a simple compartment model describing the long-term contamination uptake mechanism of deciduous fruit trees after a nuclear accident.

  14. Estimation of the duration after methamphetamine injection using a pharmacokinetic model in suspects who caused fatal traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kazuo; Asari, Masaru; Suno, Manabu; Awaya, Toshio; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Omura, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Joe; Maseda, Chikatoshi; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Shiono, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Keiko

    2012-07-01

    When the population parameters of drug pharmacokinetics in the human body system are known, the time-course of a certain drug in an individual can generally be estimated by pharmacokinetics. In the present two cases where methamphetamine abusers were suspected to have inflicted mortalities in traffic accidents, the time-elapse or duration immediately after methamphetamine injection to the time when the accidents occurred became points of contention. In each case, we estimated the time-course of blood methamphetamine after the self-administration in the suspects using a 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model with known pharmacokinetic parameters from the literatures. If the injected amount can be determined to a certain extent, it is easy to calculate the average time-elapse after injection by referring to reference values. However, there is considerable individual variability in the elimination rate based on genetic polymorphism and a considerably large error range in the estimated time-elapse results. To minimize estimation errors in such cases, we also analyzed genotype of CYP2D6, which influenced methamphetamine metabolism. Estimation based on two time-point blood samples would usefully benefit legal authorities in passing ruling sentences in cases involving similar personalities and circumstances as those involved in the present study.

  15. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics.

  16. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Long-Circulating Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Grice, Jeffrey E; Li, Li; Liu, Xin; Xu, Zhi Ping; Roberts, Michael S

    2016-02-10

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed for accurately characterizing and predicting the in vivo fate of long-circulating inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). This model is built based on direct visualization of NP disposition details at the organ and cellular level. It was validated with multiple data sets, indicating robust inter-route and interspecies predictive capability. We suggest that the biodistribution of long-circulating inorganic NPs is determined by the uptake and release of NPs by phagocytic cells in target organs.

  17. Validation and Application of Pharmacokinetic Models for Interspecies Extrapolations in Toxicity Risk Assessments of Volatile Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-21

    GROUP SUB-GROUP Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model Saturable metab- olism, Respiratory eliminationi Ialocarbon Inhalation expo- sure, H...nlocarbon oral exposure, Interspecles extrapolations, Pharmacokinetics , l,l,]-trichloroethane, 1,l-dichloroethylene, 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if...necessary and identify by block number) In pursuit of the goal of establishing a scientific basis for the interspecies extrapo- lation of pharmacokinetic

  18. Intra-oral compartment pressures: a biofunctional model and experimental measurements under different conditions of posture.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Wilfried; Jung, Klaus; Knösel, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Oral posture is considered to have a major influence on the development and reoccurrence of malocclusion. A biofunctional model was tested with the null hypotheses that (1) there are no significant differences between pressures during different oral functions and (2) between pressure measurements in different oral compartments in order to substantiate various postural conditions at rest by intra-oral pressure dynamics. Atmospheric pressure monitoring was simultaneously carried out with a digital manometer in the vestibular inter-occlusal space (IOS) and at the palatal vault (sub-palatal space, SPS). Twenty subjects with normal occlusion were evaluated during the open-mouth condition (OC), gently closed lips (semi-open compartment condition, SC), with closed compartments after the generation of a negative pressure (CCN) and swallowing (SW). Pressure curve characteristics were compared between the different measurement phases (OC, SC, CCN, SW) as well as between the two compartments (IOS, SPS) using analysis of variance and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests adopting a significance level of α = 0.05. Both null hypotheses were rejected. Average pressures (IOS, SPS) in the experimental phases were 0.0, -0.08 (OC); -0.16, -1.0 (SC); -48.79, -81.86 (CCN); and -29.25, -62.51 (SW) mbar. CCN plateau and peak characteristics significantly differed between the two compartments SPS and IOS. These results indicate the formation of two different intra-oral functional anatomical compartments which provide a deeper understanding of orofacial biofunctions and explain previous observations of negative intra-oral pressures at rest.

  19. Microminipigs as a new experimental animal model for toxicological studies: comparative pharmacokinetics of perfluoroalkyl acids.

    PubMed

    Guruge, Keerthi S; Noguchi, Michiko; Yoshioka, Koji; Yamazaki, Eriko; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko; Ikezawa, Mitsutaka; Tanimura, Nobuhiko; Sato, Masumi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel minipig strain, the Microminipig (MMPig), as an animal model for studying the pharmacokinetics of a mixture of 10 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). After a single oral dose was given, we found that the blood depuration of PFAAs (blood t1/2), which we calculated using first-order elimination curves, ranged from 1.6 to 86.6 days. Among the five body compartments analyzed, the liver was the greatest site of accumulation of perfluorooctanesulfonate and longer chain perfluorinated carboxylates such as perfluorodecanoic acid, perfluoroundecanoic acid and perfluorododecanoic acid. We observed an increasing accumulation trend of perfluorinated carboxylates in the organs associated with the fluorinated carbon chain length. The perfluorononanoic acid burden was the highest among the treated compounds 21 days after a single exposure, as 29% of the given perfluorononanoic acid dose was accumulated in the tissues. The persistence of PFAAs in edible pig tissues even after 21 days post-exposure raises concerns about the safety of swine products. This was the first study to use MMPigs to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of a group of environmental pollutants. We found that MMPigs could be excellent experimental animals for toxicological studies due to their easy handling, cost efficacy for target compounds and ease of waste treatment.

  20. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Disposition in Plasma, Saliva and Urine of Scopolamine after Intranasal Administration to Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND) protocol. The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trials with INSCOP. Methods: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min and 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on the likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. Results: The best structural model for INSCOP (minimal -2LL= 502.8) was established. It consisted of one compartment each for plasma, saliva and urine, respectively, which were connected with linear transport processes except the nonlinear PK process from plasma to saliva compartment. The best-fit estimates of PK parameters from individual PK compartmental analysis and Population PK model analysis were shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: A population PK model that could predict population and individual PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after dosing was developed and validated. Incorporating a non-linear transfer from plasma to saliva compartments resulted in a significantly improved model fitting. The model could be used to predict scopolamine plasma concentrations from salivary and urinary drug levels, allowing non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of scopolamine in space and other remote environments.

  1. Simple intake and pharmacokinetic modeling to characterize exposure of Americans to perfluoroctanoic acid, PFOA.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Matthew; Egeghy, Peter P

    2011-10-01

    Models for assessing intakes of perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA, are described and applied. One model is based on exposure media concentrations and contact rates. This model is applied to general population exposures for adults and 2-year old children. The other model is a simple one-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic (PK) model. Parameters for this model include a rate of elimination of PFOA and a blood volume of distribution. The model was applied to data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, NHANES, to backcalculate intakes. The central tendency intake estimate for adults and children based on exposure media concentrations and contact rates were 70 and 26 ng/day, respectively. The central tendency adult intake derived from NHANES data was 56 and 37 ng/day for males and females, respectively. Variability and uncertainty discussions regarding the intake modeling focus on lack of data on direct exposure to PFOA used in consumer products, precursor compounds, and food. Discussions regarding PK modeling focus on the range of blood measurements in NHANES, the appropriateness of the simple PK model, and the uncertainties associated with model parameters. Using the PK model, the 10th and 95th percentile long-term average adult intakes of PFOA are 15 and 130 ng/day.

  2. Comparison of the use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and a classical pharmacokinetic model for dioxin exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Emond, Claude; Michalek, Joel E; Birnbaum, Linda S; DeVito, Michael J

    2005-12-01

    In epidemiologic studies, exposure assessments of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) assume a fixed elimination rate. Recent data suggest a dose-dependent elimination rate for TCDD. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, which uses a body-burden-dependent elimination rate, was developed previously in rodents to describe the pharmacokinetics of TCDD and has been extrapolated to human exposure for this study. Optimizations were performed using data from a random selection of veterans from the Ranch Hand cohort and data from a human volunteer who was exposed to TCDD. Assessment of this PBPK model used additional data from the Ranch Hand cohort and a clinical report of two women exposed to TCDD. This PBPK model suggests that previous exposure assessments may have significantly underestimated peak blood concentrations, resulting in potential exposure misclassifications. Application of a PBPK model that incorporates an inducible elimination of TCDD may improve the exposure assessments in epidemiologic studies of TCDD.

  3. Generalized separable parameter space techniques for fitting 1K-5K serial compartment models

    PubMed Central

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Oktay, M. Bugrahan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Kinetic modeling is widely used to analyze dynamic imaging data, estimating kinetic parameters that quantify functional or physiologic processes in vivo. Typical kinetic models give rise to nonlinear solution equations in multiple dimensions, presenting a complex fitting environment. This work generalizes previously described separable nonlinear least-squares techniques for fitting serial compartment models with up to three tissue compartments and five rate parameters. Methods: The approach maximally separates the linear and nonlinear aspects of the modeling equations, using a formulation modified from previous basis function methods to avoid a potential mathematical degeneracy. A fast and robust algorithm for solving the linear subproblem with full user-defined constraints is also presented. The generalized separable parameter space technique effectively reduces the dimensionality of the nonlinear fitting problem to one dimension for 2K-3K compartment models, and to two dimensions for 4K-5K models. Results: Exhaustive search fits, which guarantee identification of the true global minimum fit, required approximately 10 ms for 2K-3K and 1.1 s for 4K-5K models, respectively. The technique is also amenable to fast gradient-descent iterative fitting algorithms, where the reduced dimensionality offers improved convergence properties. The objective function for the separable parameter space nonlinear subproblem was characterized and found to be generally well-behaved with a well-defined global minimum. Separable parameter space fits with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm required fewer iterations than comparable fits for conventional model formulations, averaging 1 and 7 ms for 2K-3K and 4K-5K models, respectively. Sensitivity to initial conditions was likewise reduced. Conclusions: The separable parameter space techniques described herein generalize previously described techniques to encompass 1K-5K compartment models, enable robust solution of the linear

  4. Generalized separable parameter space techniques for fitting 1K-5K serial compartment models.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, Dan J; Oktay, M Bugrahan

    2013-07-01

    Kinetic modeling is widely used to analyze dynamic imaging data, estimating kinetic parameters that quantify functional or physiologic processes in vivo. Typical kinetic models give rise to nonlinear solution equations in multiple dimensions, presenting a complex fitting environment. This work generalizes previously described separable nonlinear least-squares techniques for fitting serial compartment models with up to three tissue compartments and five rate parameters. The approach maximally separates the linear and nonlinear aspects of the modeling equations, using a formulation modified from previous basis function methods to avoid a potential mathematical degeneracy. A fast and robust algorithm for solving the linear subproblem with full user-defined constraints is also presented. The generalized separable parameter space technique effectively reduces the dimensionality of the nonlinear fitting problem to one dimension for 2K-3K compartment models, and to two dimensions for 4K-5K models. Exhaustive search fits, which guarantee identification of the true global minimum fit, required approximately 10 ms for 2K-3K and 1.1 s for 4K-5K models, respectively. The technique is also amenable to fast gradient-descent iterative fitting algorithms, where the reduced dimensionality offers improved convergence properties. The objective function for the separable parameter space nonlinear subproblem was characterized and found to be generally well-behaved with a well-defined global minimum. Separable parameter space fits with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm required fewer iterations than comparable fits for conventional model formulations, averaging 1 and 7 ms for 2K-3K and 4K-5K models, respectively. Sensitivity to initial conditions was likewise reduced. The separable parameter space techniques described herein generalize previously described techniques to encompass 1K-5K compartment models, enable robust solution of the linear subproblem with full user-defined constraints

  5. The use of clinical irrelevance criteria in covariate model building with application to dofetilide pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Tunblad, Karin; Lindbom, Lars; McFadyen, Lynn; Jonsson, E Niclas; Marshall, Scott; Karlsson, Mats O

    2008-10-01

    To characterise the pharmacokinetics of dofetilide in patients and to identify clinically relevant parameter-covariate relationships. To investigate three different modelling strategies in covariate model building using dofetilide as an example: (1) using statistical criteria only or in combination with clinical irrelevance criteria for covariate selection, (2) applying covariate effects on total clearance or separately on non-renal and renal clearances and (3) using separate data sets for covariate selection and parameter estimation. Pooled concentration-time data (1,445 patients, 10,133 observations) from phase III clinical trials was used. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed using NONMEM. Stepwise covariate model building was applied to identify important covariates using the strategies described above. Inclusion and exclusion of covariates using clinical irrelevance was based on reduction in interindividual variability and changes in parameters at the extremes of the covariate distribution. Parametric separation of the elimination pathways was accomplished using creatinine clearance as an indicator of renal function. The pooled data was split in three parts which were used for covariate selection, parameter estimation and evaluation of predictive performance. Parameter estimations were done using the first-order (FO) and the first-order conditional estimation (FOCE) methods. A one-compartment model with first order absorption adequately described the data. Using clinical irrelevance criteria resulted in models containing less parameter-covariate relationships with a minor loss in predictive power. A larger number of covariates were found significant when the elimination was divided into a renal part and a non-renal part, but no gain in predictive power could be seen with this data set. The FO and FOCE estimation methods gave almost identical final covariate model structures with similar predictive performance. Clinical irrelevance criteria may be

  6. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling of methotrexate and 6-mercaptopurine in adults and children. Part 1: methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2014-04-01

    Methotrexate is an antimetabolite and antifolate drug that is widely used in the treatment of malignancies and auto-immune disorders. In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, methotrexate is often combined with 6-mercaptopurine and both of them have been shown to be very effective for maintenance of remission. Large variability in the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate has led to increasing use of therapeutic drug monitoring in its clinical use to identify patients with high risk of toxicity and optimise clinical outcome. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed for methotrexate for oral and intravenous dosing and adults and paediatric use. The model has compartments for stomach, gut lumen, enterocyte, gut tissue, spleen, liver vascular, liver tissue, gall bladder, systemic plasma, red blood cells, kidney vascular, kidney tissue, skin, bone marrow, thymus, muscle and rest of body. A mechanistic model was also developed for the kidney to account for renal clearance of methotrexate via filtration and secretion. Variability on system and drug specific parameters was incorporated in the model to reflect observed clinical data and assuming the same pathways in adults and children, age-dependent changes in body size, organ volumes and plasma flows, the model was scaled to children. The model was developed successfully for adults and parameters such as net secretion clearance, biliary transit time and red blood cell distribution and binding parameters were estimated from published adult profiles. A relationship between fraction absorbed and dose using reported mean bioavailability data in the literature was also established. The model also incorporates non-linear binding in some tissues that has been described in the literature. Predictions using this model provide adequate description of observed plasma concentration data in adults and children. The model can be used to predict plasma and tissue concentrations of methotrexate following intravenous and

  7. An earthquake instability model based on faults containing high fluid-pressure compartments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas contain water in seal-bounded compartments. Arguments based on heat flow and stress orientation suggest that in most of the compartments, the water pressure is so high that the average shear strength of the fault is less than 20 MPa. We propose a variation of this basic model in which most of the shear stress on the fault is supported by a small number of compartments where the pore pressure is relatively low. As a result, the fault gouge in these compartments is compacted and lithified and has a high undisturbed strength. When one of these locked regions fails, the system made up of the neighboring high and low pressure compartments can become unstable. Material in the high fluid pressure compartments is initially underconsolidated since the low effective confining pressure has retarded compaction. As these compartments are deformed, fluid pressure remains nearly unchanged so that they offer little resistance to shear. The low pore pressure compartments, however, are overconsolidated and dilate as they are sheared. Decompression of the pore fluid in these compartments lowers fluid pressure, increasing effective normal stress and shear strength. While this effect tends to stabilize the fault, it can be shown that this dilatancy hardening can be more than offset by displacement weakening of the fault (i.e., the drop from peak to residual strength). If the surrounding rock mass is sufficiently compliant to produce an instability, slip will propagate along the fault until the shear fracture runs into a low-stress region. Frictional heating and the accompanying increase in fluid pressure that are suggested to occur during shearing of the fault zone will act as additional destabilizers. However, significant heating occurs only after a finite amount of slip and therefore is more likely to contribute to the energetics of rupture propagation than to the initiation of the instability. We present

  8. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raswan, T. R.; Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  9. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Raswan, T. R. Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-30

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  10. Comparative population pharmacokinetics of fentanyl using non-linear mixed effect modeling: burns vs. non-burns.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Kotaro; Han, Tae-Hyung

    2009-09-01

    Fentanyl is a commonly used analgesic and sedative for the burned in the operating theater as well as the burn care units. The aim of this study was to characterize fentanyl population pharmacokinetics in burns and to identify clinically significant covariates. Twenty adults, aged 37+/-3 years, with 49+/-4% (mean+/-S.E.) total body surface area burn, were enrolled at 17+/-3 days after the injury. Twenty non-burn adults served as controls. After an intravenous bolus of 200 mcg fentanyl, the plasma concentrations were sequentially determined up to 4.5 h. Concentration-time profiles were subjected to non-linear mixed effect modeling. Cardiac indices were estimated with esophageal Doppler monitor. Burned patients have higher cardiac index than the non-burned. Three-compartment model was the best fit. The volumes of distribution were considerably expanded in all three compartments (27.9 L vs. 63.4 L, 64.7 L vs. 92.9 L, 153 L vs. 301 L, respectively) compared to the non-burned. BURN was the single most important covariate significantly improving the model. The primary effect of burn trauma on fentanyl pharmacokinetics is substantially expanded volumes of distribution, i.e., dilutional. Difference in simulation, however, was insufficient to explain the augmented resistance to fentanyl, implying the importance of titrating analgesics to the clinical effect.

  11. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  12. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  13. Elucidating the Plasma and Liver Pharmacokinetics of Simeprevir in Special Populations Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modelling.

    PubMed

    Snoeys, Jan; Beumont, Maria; Monshouwer, Mario; Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, Sivi

    2016-11-29

    The disposition of simeprevir (SMV) in humans is characterised by cytochrome P450 3A4 metabolism and hepatic uptake by organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1/3 (OATP1B1/3). This study was designed to investigate SMV plasma and liver exposure upon oral administration in subjects infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), in subjects of Japanese or Chinese origin, subjects with organ impairment and subjects with OATP genetic polymorphisms, using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling. Simulations showed that compared with healthy Caucasian subjects, SMV plasma exposure was 2.4-, 1.7-, 2.2- and 2.0-fold higher, respectively, in HCV-infected Caucasian subjects, in healthy Japanese, healthy Chinese and subjects with severe renal impairment. Further simulations showed that compared with HCV-infected Caucasian subjects, SMV plasma exposure was 1.6-fold higher in HCV-infected Japanese subjects. In subjects with OATP1B1 genetic polymorphisms, no noteworthy changes in SMV pharmacokinetics were observed. Simulations suggested that liver concentrations in Caucasians with HCV are 18 times higher than plasma concentrations.

  14. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V.; Chow, Diana S. L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP.

  15. Description of glucose transport in isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells by a three-compartment model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Quinton, V Margaret; Cant, John P

    2004-04-01

    Initial rates of glucose entry into isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells display moderate degrees of asymmetry and cooperative interactions between export and import sites. The present study examined the hypothesis that these kinetic features are due to compartmentalization of intracellular glucose. Net uptake of 3-O-methyl-d-[1-(3)H]glucose (3-OMG) by isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells was measured at 37 degrees C. The time course of 3-OMG net uptake was better fitted by a double-exponential equation than by a single- or triple-exponential equation. Compartmental analysis of the time course curve suggested that translocated 3-OMG is distributed into two compartments with fractional volumes of 32.6 +/- 5.7% and 67.4 +/- 5.7%, respectively. The results support the view that glucose transport in bovine mammary epithelial cells is a multistep process consisting of two serial steps: fast, carrier-mediated, symmetric translocation of sugar across the cell plasma membrane into a small compartment and subsequent slow exchange of posttranslocated sugar between two intracellular compartments. A three-compartment model of this system successfully simulated the observed time course of 3-OMG net uptake and the observed dependence of unidirectional entry rates on intra- and extracellular 3-OMG concentrations. Simulations indicated that backflux of radiolabeled sugar from the small compartment to extracellular space during 15 s of incubation gives rise to the apparent asymmetry, trans-stimulation, and cooperativity of mammary glucose transport kinetics. The fixed-site carrier model overestimated the rate of glucose accumulation in cells, and its features can be accounted for by the compartmentalization of intracellular sugar.

  16. Prediction of Deoxypodophyllotoxin Disposition in Mouse, Rat, Monkey, and Dog by Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model and the Extrapolation to Human

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Fei; Xie, Qiushi; Zhong, Zeyu; Miao, Mingxing; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT) is a potential anti-tumor candidate prior to its clinical phase. The aim of the study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model consisting of 13 tissue compartments to predict DPT disposition in mouse, rat, monkey, and dog based on in vitro and in silico inputs. Since large interspecies difference was found in unbound fraction of DPT in plasma, we assumed that Kt:pl,u (unbound tissue-to-plasma concentration ratio) was identical across species. The predictions of our model were then validated by in vivo data of corresponding preclinical species, along with visual predictive checks. Reasonable matches were found between observed and predicted plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in all four animal species. The prediction in the related seven tissues of mouse was also desirable. We also attempted to predict human pharmacokinetic profile by both the developed PBPK model and interspecies allometric scaling across mouse, rat and monkey, while dog was excluded from the scaling. The two approaches reached similar results. We hope the study will help in the efficacy and safety assessment of DPT in future clinical studies and provide a reference to the preclinical screening of similar compounds by PBPK model. PMID:28018224

  17. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of total and unbound cefazolin plasma concentrations as a guide for dosing in preterm and term neonates.

    PubMed

    De Cock, R F W; Smits, A; Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Saegeman, V; Danhof, M; Knibbe, C A J

    2014-05-01

    Cefazolin is frequently administered for antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of infections. In neonates, pharmacokinetic observations are limited and dosing regimens variable. The aim of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in neonates based on total and unbound concentrations to optimize cefazolin dosing. Thirty-six neonates [median birth body weight 2720 (range 540-4200) g, current body weight (cBW) 2755 (830-4200) g and postnatal age (PNA) 9 (1-30) days] receiving intravenous cefazolin (50 mg/kg/8 h) were included. Based on 119 total and unbound plasma concentrations, a population pharmacokinetic analysis with a covariate analysis was performed. Monte Carlo simulations were performed aiming for unbound concentrations above an MIC of 8 mg/L (>60% of the time) in all patients. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model was developed in which total and unbound concentrations were linked by maximum protein binding (Bmax) of 136 mg/L and a dissociation constant (KD) for cefazolin protein binding of 46.5 mg/L. cBW was identified as covariate for volume of distribution (V), bBW and PNA for clearance and albumin plasma concentration for Bmax, explaining 50%, 58% and 41% of inter-individual variability in V, clearance and Bmax, respectively. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, a body weight- and PNA-adapted dosing regimen that resulted in similar exposure across different weight and age groups was proposed. A neonatal pharmacokinetic model taking into account total and unbound cefazolin concentrations with saturable plasma protein binding was identified. As cBW and PNA were the most important covariates, these may be used for individualized dosing in neonates.

  18. Vitamin D3 supplementation scheme in HIV-infected patients based upon pharmacokinetic modelling of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol.

    PubMed

    Foissac, Frantz; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Rostane, Hafeda; Urien, Saïk; Viard, Jean-Paul

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in HIV-infected patients and has been associated with osteopenia and HIV disease progression. Our aims were to investigate the pharmacokinetics of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D], the effect of antiretroviral treatment (ARV) and others factors that may influence the pharmacokinetics, and to determine a vitamin D3 dosing scheme to reach the 30 ng ml(-1) threshold (defined as 25(OH)D sufficiency). This monocentric retrospective study included 422 HIV-infected patients aged 16 to 85 years. A total of 723 25(OH)D concentrations were available for pharmacokinetic evaluation and a population pharmacokinetic model was developed with MONOLIX 3.2. Median 25(OH)D at baseline was 16 ng ml(-1) (interquartile range 11-23 ng ml(-1)) for the total population, 17% of patient had concentrations below 10 ng ml(-1), 68% between 10 and 30 ng ml(-1) and 15% above 30 ng ml(-1). 25(OH)D pharmacokinetics were best described by a one compartment model with an additional endogenous production. The effects of season and skin phototype were significant on production rate. The endogenous production was 20% lower in non-white skin phototype patients and was decreased by 16% during autumn, winter and spring. No significant differences in 25(OH)D concentrations were related to antiretroviral drugs (ARV). To obtain concentrations between 30 and 80 ng ml(-1), the dosing recommendation was 100,000 IU every month. Season and skin phototype had an influence on the endogenous production of 25(OH)D. However no effect of ARV was found. A dosing scheme to reach sufficient 25(OH)D concentrations is proposed. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Relevance of pharmacokinetic parameters in animal models of methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Cho, A K; Melega, W P; Kuczenski, R; Segal, D S

    2001-02-01

    Although the behavioral consequences of methamphetamine (METH) abuse have been extensively documented, a more precise and thorough understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms still requires the use of animal models. To study these biochemical processes in experimental animals requires consideration for the broad range of human METH abuse patterns and the many factors that have been identified to profoundly influence the behavioral and neurochemical effects of exposure to METH-like stimulants. One potentially critical issue relates to pharmacokinetic differences between the species. In this review, METH plasma pharmacokinetic profiles after single and multiple dose intravenous METH administration are compared for the rat and human. Significant differences in elimination half-life between the two species (t1/2: rat-70 min, human-12 h) result in markedly dissimilar profiles of METH exposure. However, the plasma profile of a human METH binge pattern can be approximated in the rat by increasing METH dose frequency. Consideration of METH pharmacokinetics in animal models should permit a closer simulation of the temporal profile of METH exposure in the human CNS and should provide further insight into the mechanisms contributing to the addiciton and psychopathology associated with METH abuse.

  20. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for flunixin in cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Leavens, Teresa L; Tell, Lisa A; Kissell, Lindsey W; Smith, Geoffrey W; Smith, David J; Wagner, Sarah A; Shelver, Weilin L; Wu, Huali; Baynes, Ronald E; Riviere, Jim E

    2014-01-01

    Frequent violation of flunixin residues in tissues from cattle has been attributed to non-compliance with the USFDA-approved route of administration and withdrawal time. However, the effect of administration route and physiological differences among animals on tissue depletion has not been determined. The objective of this work was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict plasma, liver and milk concentrations of flunixin in cattle following intravenous (i.v.), intramuscular (i.m.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) administration for use as a tool to determine factors that may affect the withdrawal time. The PBPK model included blood flow-limited distribution in all tissues and elimination in the liver, kidney and milk. Regeneration of parent flunixin due to enterohepatic recirculation and hydrolysis of conjugated metabolites was incorporated in the liver compartment. Values for physiological parameters were obtained from the literature, and partition coefficients for all tissues but liver and kidney were derived empirically. Liver and kidney partition coefficients and elimination parameters were estimated for 14 pharmacokinetic studies (including five crossover studies) from the literature or government sources in which flunixin was administered i.v., i.m. or s.c. Model simulations compared well with data for the matrices following all routes of administration. Influential model parameters included those that may be age or disease-dependent, such as clearance and rate of milk production. Based on the model, route of administration would not affect the estimated days to reach the tolerance concentration (0.125 mg kg(-1)) in the liver of treated cattle. The majority of USDA-reported violative residues in liver were below the upper uncertainty predictions based on estimated parameters, which suggests the need to consider variability due to disease and age in establishing withdrawal intervals for drugs used in food animals. The model predicted

  1. Characterization of the pharmacokinetics of gasoline using PBPK modeling with a complex mixtures chemical lumping approach.

    PubMed

    Dennison, James E; Andersen, Melvin E; Yang, Raymond S H

    2003-09-01

    Gasoline consists of a few toxicologically significant components and a large number of other hydrocarbons in a complex mixture. By using an integrated, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and lumping approach, we have developed a method for characterizing the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of gasoline in rats. The PBPK model tracks selected target components (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene [BTEX], and n-hexane) and a lumped chemical group representing all nontarget components, with competitive metabolic inhibition between all target compounds and the lumped chemical. PK data was acquired by performing gas uptake PK studies with male F344 rats in a closed chamber. Chamber air samples were analyzed every 10-20 min by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection and all nontarget chemicals were co-integrated. A four-compartment PBPK model with metabolic interactions was constructed using the BTEX, n-hexane, and lumped chemical data. Target chemical kinetic parameters were refined by studies with either the single chemical alone or with all five chemicals together. o-Xylene, at high concentrations, decreased alveolar ventilation, consistent with respiratory irritation. A six-chemical interaction model with the lumped chemical group was used to estimate lumped chemical partitioning and metabolic parameters for a winter blend of gasoline with methyl t-butyl ether and a summer blend without any oxygenate. Computer simulation results from this model matched well with experimental data from single chemical, five-chemical mixture, and the two blends of gasoline. The PBPK model analysis indicated that metabolism of individual components was inhibited up to 27% during the 6-h gas uptake experiments of gasoline exposures.

  2. Propofol target-controlled infusion modeling in rabbits: Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Yan; Yi, Ming; Yao, Shang-Long; Zhang, Xue-Ping

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to establish a new propofol target-controlled infusion (TCI) model in animals so as to study the general anesthetic mechanism at multi-levels in vivo. Twenty Japanese white rabbits were enrolled and propofol (10 mg/kg) was administrated intravenously. Artery blood samples were collected at various time points after injection, and plasma concentrations of propofol were measured. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using WinNonlin software. Propofol TCI within the acquired parameters integrated was conducted to achieve different anesthetic depths in rabbits, monitored by narcotrend. The pharmacodynamics was analyzed using a sigmoidal inhibitory maximal effect model for narcotrend index (NI) versus effect-site concentration. The results showed the pharmacokinetics of propofol in Japanese white rabbits was best described by a two-compartment model. The target plasma concentrations of propofol required at light anesthetic depth was 9.77±0.23 μg/mL, while 12.52±0.69 μg/mL at deep anesthetic depth. NI was 76.17±4.25 at light anesthetic depth, while 27.41±5.77 at deep anesthetic depth. The effect-site elimination rate constant (ke0) was 0.263/min, and the propofol dose required to achieve a 50% decrease in the NI value from baseline was 11.19 μg/mL (95% CI, 10.25-13.67). Our results established a new propofol TCI animal model and proved the model controlled the anesthetic depth accurately and stably in rabbits. The study provides a powerful method for exploring general anesthetic mechanisms at different anesthetic depths in vivo.

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) in Preterm and Term Neonates: Model Development and External Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Sarah F.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; Stockmann, Chris; King, Amber D.; Deutsch, Nina; Williams, Elaine F.; Allegaert, Karel; Sherwin, Catherine M. T.; van den Anker, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for intravenous paracetamol in preterm and term neonates and to assess the generalizability of the model by testing its predictive performance in an external dataset. Methods Nonlinear mixed-effects models were constructed from paracetamol concentration–time data in NONMEM 7.2. Potential covariates included body weight, gestational age, postnatal age, postmenstrual age, sex, race, total bilirubin, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. An external dataset was used to test the predictive performance of the model through calculation of bias, precision, and normalized prediction distribution errors. Results The model-building dataset included 260 observations from 35 neonates with a mean gestational age of 33.6 weeks [standard deviation (SD) 6.6]. Data were well-described by a one-compartment model with first-order elimination. Weight predicted paracetamol clearance and volume of distribution, which were estimated as 0.348 L/h (5.5 % relative standard error; 30.8 % coefficient of variation) and 2.46 L (3.5 % relative standard error; 14.3 % coefficient of variation), respectively, at the mean subject weight of 2.30 kg. An external evaluation was performed on an independent dataset that included 436 observations from 60 neonates with a mean gestational age of 35.6 weeks (SD 4.3). The median prediction error was 10.1 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 6.1–14.3] and the median absolute prediction error was 25.3 % (95 % CI 23.1–28.1). Conclusions Weight predicted intravenous paracetamol pharmacokinetics in neonates ranging from extreme preterm to full-term gestational status. External evaluation suggested that these findings should be generalizable to other similar patient populations. PMID:26201306

  4. SU-C-BRE-03: Dual Compartment Mathematical Modeling of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Kupelian, P; Kaprealian, T; Selch, M; Low, D; Pajonk, F; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the aggressive recurrence and radioresistence of GBM with a dual compartment tumor survival mathematical model based on intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The repopulation and differentiation responses to radiotherapy of a solid tumor were simulated using an Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE). To obtain the tumor radiobiological parameters, we assumed that a tumor consists of two subpopulations, each with its distinctive linear quadratic parameters. The dual compartment cell survival model was constructed as SF(D)=F × exp(-α{sub 1} D-β{sub 1}D{sup 2}) + (1-F) × exp(-α{sub 2}D-β{sub 2}D{sup 2}) for a single fraction of treatment, with F as the fraction of CSC, and α and β describing the radiological properties of each population. Robust least square fitting was performed on clonogenic survival data from one GBM (U373MG) and one NSCLC (H460) cell line. The fit parameters were then used in the ODE model to predict treatment outcome of various treatment schemes. Results: The fit parameters from GBM cell survival data were (F, α{sub 1}, β{sub 1}, α{sub 2}, β{sub 2})=(0.0396, 0.0801, 0.0006, 0.1363, 0.0279), exhibiting two populations with distinctive radiological properties, CSC more radioresistant than DCC. The GBM cell line exhibited significantly poorer tumor control than its single compartment model prediction and NSCLC, which responded well to hypofrationation. The increased radioresistance was due to rapid regrowth of the DCC compartment triggered by its depletion while maintaining a viable CSC population. The rapid regrowth can be reduced by treating dose fractions ≤ 2 Gy with a prolonged treatment period. Conclusion: The interaction between a radioresistant CSC compartment and DCC compartment can explain the poor clinical outcome of GBM after radiotherapy despite dose escalation and hypofractionation attempts. Lower dose fractions result in better treatment

  5. Evaluating a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-yun; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Ji; Shi, Jun; Hu, Pei

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the SimCYP simulator ethnicity-specific population model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a typical CYP3A4/5 substrate, in Chinese after oral administration. The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for midazolam was developed using a SimCYP population-based simulator incorporating Chinese population demographic, physiological and enzyme data. A clinical trial was conducted in 40 Chinese subjects (the half was females) receiving a single oral dose of 15 mg midazolam. The subjects were separated into 4 groups based on age (20-50, 51-65, 66-75, and above 76 years), and the pharmacokinetics profiles of each age- and gender-group were determined, and the results were used to verify the PBPK model. Following oral administration, the simulated profiles of midazolam plasma concentrations over time in virtual Chinese were in good agreement with the observed profiles, as were AUC and Cmax. Moreover, for subjects of varying ages (20-80 years), the ratios of predicted to observed clearances were between 0.86 and 1.12. The SimCYP PBPK model accurately predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese from youth to old age. This study may provide novel insight into the prediction of CYP3A4/5-mediated pharmacokinetics in the Chinese population relative to Caucasians and other ethnic groups, which can support the rational design of bridging clinical trials.

  6. Evaluating a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-yun; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Ji; Shi, Jun; Hu, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the SimCYP simulator ethnicity-specific population model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a typical CYP3A4/5 substrate, in Chinese after oral administration. Methods: The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for midazolam was developed using a SimCYP population-based simulator incorporating Chinese population demographic, physiological and enzyme data. A clinical trial was conducted in 40 Chinese subjects (the half was females) receiving a single oral dose of 15 mg midazolam. The subjects were separated into 4 groups based on age (20–50, 51–65, 66–75, and above 76 years), and the pharmacokinetics profiles of each age- and gender-group were determined, and the results were used to verify the PBPK model. Results: Following oral administration, the simulated profiles of midazolam plasma concentrations over time in virtual Chinese were in good agreement with the observed profiles, as were AUC and Cmax. Moreover, for subjects of varying ages (20–80 years), the ratios of predicted to observed clearances were between 0.86 and 1.12. Conclusion: The SimCYP PBPK model accurately predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese from youth to old age. This study may provide novel insight into the prediction of CYP3A4/5-mediated pharmacokinetics in the Chinese population relative to Caucasians and other ethnic groups, which can support the rational design of bridging clinical trials. PMID:26592516

  7. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Canagliflozin in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Eef; De Winter, Willem; Neyens, Martine; Devineni, Damayanthi; Vermeulen, An; Dunne, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Canagliflozin is an orally active, reversible, selective sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor. A population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model of canagliflozin, including relevant covariates as sources of inter-individual variability, was developed to describe phase I, II, and III data in healthy volunteers and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The final analysis included 9061 pharmacokinetic (PK) samples from 1616 volunteers enrolled in nine phase I, two phase II, and three phase III studies and was performed using NONMEM(®) 7.1. Inter-individual variability was evaluated using an exponential model and the residual error model was additive in the log domain. The first-order conditional estimation method with interaction was applied and the model was parameterized in terms of rate constants. Covariate effects were explored graphically on empirical Bayes estimates of PK parameters, as shrinkage was low. Clinical relevance of statistically significant covariates was evaluated. The predictive properties of the model were illustrated by prediction-corrected visual predictive checks. A two-compartment PK model with lag-time and sequential zero- and first-order absorption and first-order elimination best described the observed data. Sex, age, and weight on apparent volume of distribution of the central compartment, body mass index on first-order absorption rate constant, and body mass index and over-encapsulation on lag-time, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, by MDRD equation), dose, and genetic polymorphism (carriers of UGT1A9*3 allele) on elimination rate constant were identified as statistically significant covariates. The prediction-corrected visual predictive checks revealed acceptable predictive performance of the model. The popPK model adequately described canagliflozin PK in healthy volunteers and in patients with T2DM. Because of the small magnitude of statistically significant covariates, they were not considered clinically

  8. Stability and mixing conditions for HIV/AIDS models with regional compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Richard

    Compartmental models have been adapted to derive temporal epidemic forecasting systems for imitating the transfer of HIV infection between those with different behaviours or rates of risk activity. Alternatively, models with regional compartments, which forecast disease incidence in both space and time, have emerged as a response to the challenge of anticipating the pandemic pathways of this infection. This paper combines these frameworks to obtain properties for a multiregion model that also contains demographic compartments. Section 2 begins by showing how the stability conditions (starting thresholds) for a purely regional model are a special case of the existing conditions that have been derived for the general compartmental framework. Then, these results are extended to encompass a regions with compartments design. Section 3 presents an analysis of the population mixing relationships that are embedded in all these specifications. Here, the topics include the maintenance of contact symmetry, the representation of alternative partner selection behaviours, and the identification of core populations for the diffusion of HIV infection. The discussion considers how these theoretical findings might be applied to disease prevention.

  9. Compartment models of the diffusion MR signal in brain white matter: a taxonomy and comparison.

    PubMed

    Panagiotaki, Eleftheria; Schneider, Torben; Siow, Bernard; Hall, Matt G; Lythgoe, Mark F; Alexander, Daniel C

    2012-02-01

    This paper aims to identify the minimum requirements for an accurate model of the diffusion MR signal in white matter of the brain. We construct a taxonomy of multi-compartment models of white matter from combinations of simple models for the intra- and the extra-axonal spaces. We devise a new diffusion MRI protocol that provides measurements with a wide range of imaging parameters for diffusion sensitization both parallel and perpendicular to white matter fibres. We use the protocol to acquire data from two fixed rat brains, which allows us to fit, study and compare the different models. The study examines a total of 47 analytic models, including several well-used models from the literature, which we place within the taxonomy. The results show that models that incorporate intra-axonal restriction, such as ball and stick or CHARMED, generally explain the data better than those that do not, such as the DT or the biexponential models. However, three-compartment models which account for restriction parallel to the axons and incorporate pore size explain the measurements most accurately. The best fit comes from combining a full diffusion tensor (DT) model of the extra-axonal space with a cylindrical intra-axonal component of single radius and a third spherical compartment of non-zero radius. We also measure the stability of the non-zero radius intra-axonal models and find that single radius intra-axonal models are more stable than gamma distributed radii models with similar fitting performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Toxicokinetics and Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of arsenic toxicokinetics and physiologically-basedpharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with particular emphasis on key 'actors needed fordevelopment of a model useful for dose-response analysis, applications of arsenicmodels, as well research needs.U...

  11. Toxicokinetics and Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of arsenic toxicokinetics and physiologically-basedpharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with particular emphasis on key 'actors needed fordevelopment of a model useful for dose-response analysis, applications of arsenicmodels, as well research needs.U...

  12. Adjusted adaptive Lasso for covariate model-building in nonlinear mixed-effect pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Haem, Elham; Harling, Kajsa; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi; Zare, Najaf; Karlsson, Mats O

    2017-02-01

    One important aim in population pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics is identification and quantification of the relationships between the parameters and covariates. Lasso has been suggested as a technique for simultaneous estimation and covariate selection. In linear regression, it has been shown that Lasso possesses no oracle properties, which means it asymptotically performs as though the true underlying model was given in advance. Adaptive Lasso (ALasso) with appropriate initial weights is claimed to possess oracle properties; however, it can lead to poor predictive performance when there is multicollinearity between covariates. This simulation study implemented a new version of ALasso, called adjusted ALasso (AALasso), to take into account the ratio of the standard error of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator to the ML coefficient as the initial weight in ALasso to deal with multicollinearity in non-linear mixed-effect models. The performance of AALasso was compared with that of ALasso and Lasso. PK data was simulated in four set-ups from a one-compartment bolus input model. Covariates were created by sampling from a multivariate standard normal distribution with no, low (0.2), moderate (0.5) or high (0.7) correlation. The true covariates influenced only clearance at different magnitudes. AALasso, ALasso and Lasso were compared in terms of mean absolute prediction error and error of the estimated covariate coefficient. The results show that AALasso performed better in small data sets, even in those in which a high correlation existed between covariates. This makes AALasso a promising method for covariate selection in nonlinear mixed-effect models.

  13. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients’ compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. Methods The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box–Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Results and Discussion Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box–Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry

  14. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  15. Near-Infrared Monitoring of Model Chronic Compartment Syndrome In Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Breit, G. A.; Gross, J. H.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Chance, B.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic compartment syndrome (CCS) is characterized by muscle ischemia, usually in the anterior oompartment of the leg, caused by high intramuscular pressure during exercise. Dual-wave near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is an optical technique that allows noninvasive tracking of variations in muscle tissue oxygenation (Chance et al., 1988). We hypothesized that with a model CCS, muscle tissue oxygenation will show a greater decline during exercise and a slower recovery post-exercise than under normal conditions.

  16. Incorporation of FcRn-mediated disposition model to describe the population pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal IgG antibody in clinical patients.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee M

    2016-03-01

    The two-compartment linear model used to describe the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TMAbs) offered little biological insight to antibody disposition in humans. The purpose of this study is to develop a semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model to describe the population PK of TMAbs in clinical patients. A standard two-compartment linear PK model from a previously published population PK model of pertuzumab was used to simulate intensive PK data of 100 subjects for model development. Two different semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition models were developed and First Order Conditional Estimation (FOCE) with the interaction method in NONMEM was used to obtain the final model estimates. The performances of these models were then compared with the two-compartment linear PK model used to simulate the data for model development. A semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model consisting of a peripheral tissue compartment and FcRn-containing endosomes in the central compartment best describes the simulated pertuzumab population PK data. This developed semi-mechanistic population PK model had the same number of model parameters, produced very similar concentration-time profiles but provided additional biological insight to the FcRn-mediated IgG disposition in human subjects compared with the standard linear two-compartment linear PK model. This first reported semi-mechanistic model may serve as an important model framework for developing future population PK models of TMAbs in clinical patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants. PMID:27009902

  18. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-03-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants.

  19. Compartment model of aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation in a municipal solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yul; Tojo, Yasumasa; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2007-12-01

    The mathematical formulations in a one-dimensional compartment model of the biodegradation of organic landfill components are described. The model is designed to switch between anaerobic and aerobic conditions, depending on the local oxygen concentration. The model also includes the effect of environmental factors, such as moisture content, pH, and temperature, on reaction rates. The model includes not only biodegradation processes for carbon compounds (acetate, CO2, CH4), but also for nitrogen compounds involved in nitrification and denitrification due to their significance in landfills. Two example runs to simulate anaerobic and aerobic waste were conducted for a single landfill unit cell by changing the organic content and diffusion coefficient.

  20. Correlating pharmacokinetics and teratogenic endpoints.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, C A; Young, J F

    1983-01-01

    The use of pharmacokinetics can improve the extrapolation of animal teratology data for human risk evaluation. Before one can extrapolate between species, however, the pharmacokinetic model must be predictable within the species for which it was developed. This article summarizes an approach being used for correlating pharmacokinetics and teratology endpoints in the same animal and predicting the teratogenic outcome for other animals of the same species. With the aid of micro-sampling procedures, and sensitive and rapid analytical techniques, blood, urine and feces samples are obtained from individual animals following dosing and the data are simulated using a hybrid computer to develop a pharmacokinetic model. The model is validated in other animals by measuring the parent compound and metabolites in various "compartments" predicted by the model. Then the pharmacokinetic model is tested by predicting the teratogenic outcome in single ani-analyses indicated the most predictive pharmacokinetic parameters to be two maternal blood concentration values. Prediction of the teratogenic outcome based on these parameters was accurate for 74% of the litters in the 95% confidence interval. This approach is discussed as it relates to its utility for other exposure routes and for extrapolation to other species.

  1. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    DOE PAGES

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; ...

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VKmore » model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.« less

  2. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  3. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    PubMed Central

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F; Perelson, Alan S

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. The antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). The second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d−1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir. PMID:25321394

  4. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Unboosted Atazanavir in a Cohort of Stable HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baudry, Thomas; Gagnieu, Marie-Claude; Boibieux, André; Livrozet, Jean-Michel; Peyramond, Dominique; Tod, Michel; Ferry, Tristan

    2013-01-01

    Limited data on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) of unboosted atazanavir (uATV) in treatment-experienced patients are available. The aim of this work was to study the PK/PD of unboosted atazanavir in a cohort of HIV-infected patients. Data were available for 58 HIV-infected patients (69 uATV-based regimens). Atazanavir concentrations were analyzed by using a population approach, and the relationship between atazanavir PK and clinical outcome was examined using logistic regression. The final PK model was a linear one-compartment model with a mixture absorption model to account for two subgroups of absorbers. The mean (interindividual variability) of population PK parameters were as follows: clearance, 13.4 liters/h (40.7%), volume of distribution, 71.1 liters (29.7%), and fraction of regular absorbers, 0.49. Seven subjects experienced virological failure after switch to uATV. All of them were identified as low absorbers in the PK modeling. The absorption rate constant (0.38 ± 0.20 versus 0.75 ± 0.28 h−1; P = 0.002) and ATV exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [AUC0–24], 10.3 ± 2.1 versus 22.4 ± 11.2 mg · h · liter−1; P = 0.001) were significantly lower in patients with virological failure than in patients without failure. In the logistic regression analysis, both the absorption rate constant and ATV trough concentration significantly influenced the probability of virological failure. A significant relationship between ATV pharmacokinetics and virological response was observed in a cohort of HIV patients who were administered unboosted atazanavir. This study also suggests that twice-daily administration of uATV may optimize drug therapy. PMID:23147727

  5. Cross-simulation between two pharmacokinetic models for the target-controlled infusion of propofol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Kim, Dae-Hee; Lee, A-Ram; Moon, Bong-Ki

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated how one pharmacokinetic (PK) model differed in prediction of plasma (Cp) and effect-site concentration (Ceff) using a reproducing simulation of target-controlled infusion (TCI) with another PK model of propofol. Methods Sixty female patients were randomly assigned to TCI using Marsh PK (Group M) and TCI using Schnider PK (Group S) targeting 6.0 µg/ml of Cp of propofol for induction of anesthesia, and loss of responsiveness (LOR) was evaluated. Total and separate cross-simulation were investigated using the 2 hr TCI data (Marsh TCI and Schnider TCI), and we investigated the reproduced predicted concentrations (MARSHSCH and SCHNIDERMAR) using the other model. The correlation of the difference with covariates, and the influence of the PK parameters on the difference of prediction were investigated. Results Group M had a shorter time to LOR compared to Group S (P < 0.001), but Ceff at LOR was not different between groups. Reproduced simulations showed different time courses of Cp. MARSHSCH predicted a higher concentration during the early phase, whereas SCHNIDERMAR was maintained at a higher concentration. Volume and clearance of the central compartment were relevant to the difference of prediction, respectively. Body weight correlated well with differences in prediction between models (Rsqr = 0.9821, P < 0.001). Conclusions We compared two PK models to determine the different infusion behaviors during TCI, which resulted from the different parameter sets for each PK model. PMID:22558495

  6. Convulsant activity and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the electroencephalogram effect of gemifloxacin in rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bikash; Bose, Anirbandeep; Bhaumik, Uttam; Das, Ayan; Chatterjee, Nilendra; Ghosh, Animesh; Darbar, Soumendra; Sarkar, Amlan Kanti; Sengupta, Pinaki; Pal, T K

    2010-03-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling approach was used to investigate the epileptogenic activity of gemifloxacin as a representative antibiotic with concentration-dependent antimicrobial activity. Rats received an intravenous infusion of gemifloxacin at a rate of 4 mg kg of body weight(-1) min(-1) over 50 min. Blood samples were collected for drug assay, and an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during infusion and postinfusion. An important delay was observed between concentrations of gemifloxacin in plasma and the EEG effect; this effect was accompanied by tremors and partial seizures. Indirect effect models failed to describe these data, which were successfully fitted by using an effect compartment model with a spline function to describe the relationship between effect and concentration at the effect site. The robustness of the PK-PD model was then assessed by keeping the dose constant but increasing the duration of infusion to 100 and 200 min. Although this was accompanied by PK modifications, PD parameters did not vary significantly, and the PK-PD model still applied. In conclusion, the successful PK-PD modeling of the gemifloxacin EEG effect in rats should be considered to predict and reduce the epileptogenic risk associated with this antibiotic as a representative fluoroquinolone. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  7. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of the Electroencephalogram Effect of Norfloxacin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chenel, Marylore; Barbot, Agnès; Dupuis, Antoine; Mimoz, Olivier; Paquereau, Joël; Bouquet, Serge; Couet, William

    2003-01-01

    A previously developed pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling approach was used to investigate the epileptogenic activity of norfloxacin as a representative antibiotic with concentration-dependent antimicrobial activity. Rats received an intravenous infusion of norfloxacin at a rate of 5 mg kg of body weight−1 min−1 over 30 min. Blood samples were collected for drug assay, and an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during infusion and postinfusion. An important delay was observed between concentrations of norfloxacin in plasma and the EEG effect. Indirect effect models failed to describe these data, which were successfully fitted by using an effect compartment model with a spline function to describe the relationship between effect and concentration at the effect site, as previously observed with imipenem. The robustness of the PK-PD model was then assessed by keeping the dose constant but increasing the duration of infusion to 120 and 240 min. Although this was accompanied by PK modifications, PD parameters did not vary significantly, and the PK-PD model still applied. In conclusion, the successful PK-PD modeling of the norfloxacin EEG effect in rats should be considered to predict and reduce the epileptogenic risk associated with this antibiotic as a representative fluoroquinolone (E. Fuseau and L. B. Sheiner, Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. 35:733-741, 1984). PMID:12760873

  8. A Multi-Compartment Mathematical Model of Cancer Stem Cell Driven Tumor Growth Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Suzanne L.; Barker, Brian; Bober, Sarah; Cisneros, Karina; Cline, Justina; Thompson, Amanda; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Enderling, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are appreciated to be an intrinsically heterogeneous population of cells with varying proliferation capacities and tumorigenic potentials. As a central tenet of the so-called cancer stem cell hypothesis, most cancer cells have only a limited lifespan and thus cannot initiate or re-initiate tumors. Longevity and clonogenicity are properties unique to the subpopulation of cancer stem cells. To understand the implications of the population structure suggested by this hypothesis - a hierarchy consisting of cancer stem cells and progeny non-stem cancer cells which experience a reduction in their remaining proliferation capacity per division - we set out to develop a mathematical model for the development of the aggregate population. We show that overall tumor progression rate during the exponential growth phase is identical to the growth rate of the cancer stem cell compartment. Tumors with identical stem cell proportions, however, can have different growth rates, dependent on the proliferation kinetics of all participating cell populations. Analysis of the model revealed that the proliferation potential of non-stem cancer cells is likely to be small to reproduce biologic observations. Furthermore, a single compartment of non-stem cancer cell population may adequately represent population growth dynamics only when the compartment proliferation rate is scaled with the generational hierarchy depth. PMID:24840956

  9. Body composition by a three compartment model in adult Indian male and female subjects.

    PubMed

    Borgonha, S; Kuriyan, R; Shetty, P; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Kurpad, A V

    1997-07-01

    The body composition of 10 adult Indian male and female subjects was investigated by a three compartment model, using measurements of Total Body Water (TBW) by deuterium dilution, and of body density by hydrodensitometry. The three compartment model yielded significantly different (P < 0.005) estimates of percent body fat of 15.9+/-3.8 and 19.7+/-4.2% and of the Fat Free Mass (FFM) of 41+/-3.3 kg and 33.9+/-4.1 kg in the male and female subjects respectively. The hydration of the FFM was 0.704+/-0.032 in the males and 0.719+/-0.024 in the females; this difference was not signifcant between groups. The density of the FFM, measured from estimates of percent body fat by the 3 compartment approach and of body density by hydrodensitometry, was 1.107+/-0.014 in the males and 1.101+/-0.001 in the females with no significant differences between the groups. This study demonstrates differences in body composition between BMI matched healthy adult male and female subjects. Although there are significant differences for % Fat and FFM between the sexes, there are no significant differences in the hydration fraction and the density of the FFM.

  10. The pharmacokinetics and hepatic disposition of repaglinide in pigs: mechanistic modeling of metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Erik; Bredberg, Ulf; Lennernäs, Hans

    2012-04-02

    The predictive power of using in vitro systems in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to elucidate the relative importance of metabolism and carrier-mediated transport for the pharmacokinetics was evaluated using repaglinide as a model compound and pig as the test system. Repaglinide was chosen as model drug as previous studies in humans have shown that repaglinide is subject to both carrier-mediated influx to the liver cells and extensive hepatic metabolism. A multiple sampling site model in pig was chosen since it provides detailed in vivo information about the liver disposition. The underlying assumption was that both metabolism and carrier-mediated transport are also important for the hepatic disposition of repaglinide in pigs. Microsomes and primary hepatocytes were used for in vitro evaluation of enzyme kinetics and cellular disposition, respectively. In vitro data were generated both with and without metabolism inhibitors (ketoconazole, bezafibrate and trimethoprim) and transport inhibitors (diclofenac and quinine) providing input into a semi-PBPK model. In vivo data were also generated with and without the same enzyme and transporter inhibitors, alone and in combination. The pigs were given repaglinide as intravenous infusions with and without inhibitors in a sequential manner, i.e., a control phase and a test phase. Parameters describing the passive and carrier-mediated flux as well as metabolism were estimated in the control phase. The result from test phase was used to gain further knowledge of the findings from the control phase. The in vivo pig model enabled simultaneous sampling from plasma (pre- and postliver and peripheral) as well as from bile and urine. A semi-PBPK model consisting of 11 compartments (6 tissues + 5 sampling sites) was constructed for the mechanistic elucidation of the liver disposition, in vitro based in vivo predictions, sensitivity analyses and estimations of individual pharmacokinetic

  11. A Stochastic Model for the Ethanol Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    GHADIRINEJAD, Mazyar; ATASOYLU, Emine; İZBIRAK, Gökhan; GHA-SEMI, Matina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to propose a new stochastic model to study the time course of ethanol elimination in human bodies. Methods: The times and amount of alcohol ingested are assumed to be random in controllable intervals. Constant elimination rate follows zero order kinetics and is replaced by first order kinetics when the effects of alcohol increase due to alcohol ingestion. Simulation studies of three different models were made to compare the statistical characteristics of the ethanol effects obtained using analytical expressions. For each model, three cases were considered depending on the drinking pattern and by classifying the drinker as heavy, normal or sparse. Results: From the model formulation, we noted that as the rate of drinking increases for a given elimination rate, the expected time between overflows goes towards zero. Furthermore, as the average amount of alcohol in each drink increases, the corresponding time between overflows decreases. Conclusion: Variations in times of alcohol intakes as well as the amount of alcohol consumption can be accounted through the final created formula. The model proves that overflows occur when alcohol is ingested before the adverse effects of alcohol from the previous drink are completely eliminated. Being the first stochastic model of such a kind, we do hope that it will throw more light on interpreting experimental data of alcohol abuse. PMID:27957462

  12. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of recombinant human erythropoietin after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sukyung; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Jusko, William J

    2006-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) were studied in rats after single i.v. and s.c. administration at three dose levels (450, 1350, and 4050 IU/kg). The plasma concentrations of rHuEPO and its erythropoietic effects including reticulocyte (RET), red blood cell (RBC), and hemoglobin (Hb) levels were determined. A two-compartment model with dual input rate and nonlinear disposition was used to characterize the PK of rHuEPO. The catenary indirect response model with several compartments reflecting the bone marrow and circulating erythropoietic cells was applied. The s.c. doses exhibited slow absorption (T(max) = 12 h) and incomplete bioavailability (F = 0.59). In placebo groups, RBC and Hb values gradually increased over time with growth of the rats, and the changes in the baselines monitored from 8 to 32 weeks of age were described by a nonlinear growth function. All doses resulted in dose-dependent increases in RET counts followed by an immediate decline below the baseline at around 6 days and returned to the predose level in 21-24 days after dosing. A subsequent steady increase of RBC and Hb levels followed and reached peaks at 6 days. A tolerance phenomenon observed at all dose levels was modeled by a negative feedback inhibition with the relative change in Hb level. The PK/PD model well described the erythropoietic effects of rHuEPO as well as tolerance, thereby yielding important PD parameters (S(max) = 1.87 and SC(50) = 65.37 mIU/ml) and mean lifespans of major erythropoietic cell populations in rats.

  13. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for rats and mice orally exposed to chromium.

    PubMed

    Kirman, C R; Hays, S M; Aylward, L L; Suh, M; Harris, M A; Thompson, C M; Haws, L C; Proctor, D M

    2012-10-25

    A multi-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to describe the behavior of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in rats and mice following long-term oral exposure. Model compartments were included for GI lumen, oral mucosa, forestomach/stomach, small intestinal mucosa (duodenum, jejunum, ileum), blood, liver, kidney, bone, and a combined compartment for remaining tissues. Data from ex vivo Cr(VI) reduction studies were used to characterize reduction of Cr(VI) in fed rodent stomach fluid as a second-order, pH-dependent process. For model development, tissue time-course data for total chromium were collected from rats and mice exposed to Cr(VI) in drinking water for 90 days at six concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 180 mg Cr(VI)/L. These data were used to supplement the tissue time-course data collected in other studies with oral administration of Cr(III) and Cr(VI), including that from recent NTP chronic bioassays. Clear species differences were identified for chromium delivery to the target tissue (small intestines), with higher concentrations achieved in mice than in rats, consistent with small intestinal tumor formation, which was observed upon chronic exposures in mice but not in rats. Erythrocyte:plasma chromium ratios suggest that Cr(VI) entered portal circulation at drinking water concentrations equal to and greater than 60 mg/L in rodents. Species differences are described for distribution of chromium to the liver and kidney, with liver:kidney ratios higher in mice than in rats. Overall, the PBPK model provides a good description of chromium toxicokinetics, with model predictions for tissue chromium within a factor of 3 for greater than 80% of measurements evaluated. The tissue data and PBPK model predictions indicate a concentration gradient in the small intestines (duodenum > jejunum > ileum), which will be useful for assessing the tumor response gradient observed in mouse small intestines in terms of target tissue dose. The rodent PBPK

  14. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rambiritch, Virendra; Naidoo, Poobalan; Maharaj, Breminand; Pillai, Goonaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK) of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects using noncompartmental and model-based methods. Methods A total of 24 subjects with type 2 diabetes were administered increasing doses (0 mg/d, 2.5 mg/d, 5 mg/d, 10 mg/d, and 20 mg/d) of glibenclamide daily at 2-week intervals. Plasma glibenclamide, glucose, and insulin determinations were performed. Blood sampling times were 0 minute, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes (post breakfast sampling) and 240 minutes, 270 minutes, 300 minutes, 330 minutes, 360 minutes, and 420 minutes (post lunch sampling) on days 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 for doses of 0 mg, 2.5 mg, 5.0 mg, 10 mg, and 20 mg, respectively. Blood sampling was performed after the steady state was reached. A total of 24 individuals in the data set contributed to a total of 841 observation records. The PK was analyzed using noncompartmental analysis methods, which were implemented in WinNonLin®, and population PK analysis using NONMEM®. Glibenclamide concentration data were log transformed prior to fitting. Results A two-compartmental disposition model was selected after evaluating one-, two-, and three-compartmental models to describe the time course of glibenclamide plasma concentration data. The one-compartment model adequately described the data; however, the two-compartment model provided a better fit. The three-compartment model failed to achieve successful convergence. A more complex model, to account for enterohepatic recirculation that was observed in the data, was unsuccessful. Conclusion In South African diabetic subjects, glibenclamide demonstrates linear PK and was best described by a two-compartmental model. Except for the absorption rate constant, the other PK parameters reported in this study are comparable to those reported in the scientific literature. The study is limited by the small study sample size and inclusion of poorly

  15. Intraocular pharmacokinetics of intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor-Trap in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Park, S J; Oh, J; Kim, Y-K; Park, J H; Park, J Y; Hong, H K; Park, K H; Lee, J-E; Kim, H M; Chung, J Y; Woo, S J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine intraocular pharmacokinetic properties of intravitreally injected vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-Trap in a rabbit model. Methods VEGF-Trap was intravitreally injected in 18 rabbit eyes. Eyes were enucleated 1 h and 1, 2, 5, 14, and 30 days after injections and immediately frozen at −80 °C. Concentration of VEGF-Trap in vitreous, aqueous humor, and retina/choroid was determined using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and analyzed to obtain pharmacokinetic properties. Results Maximum concentration of VEGF-Trap was achieved at 1 h in all three tissues. A one-compartment model of distribution was selected as the final model for all tissues studied. Estimated half-life of VEGF-Trap in vitreous, aqueous humor, and retinal/choroid was 87.1, 36.8, and 35.0 h, respectively, and estimated mean residence time was 125.7, 53.1, and 50.5 h, respectively. Area under the curve from time 0 to the end point was 10009.8, 3945.1, and 1189.3, respectively. Total exposure of the aqueous humor and retina/choroid to VEGF-Trap was 39.4% and 11.9% of vitreous exposure, respectively. Conclusion The vitreous half-life of VEGF-Trap is 3.63 days. This is shorter than that of bevacizumab (6.99 days) and longer than that of ranibizumab (2.51 days), as shown in studies using the same experimental settings. The concentration of VEGF-Trap peaked at 1 h after injections in all eye tissues studied. PMID:25592118

  16. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) oligomer pharmacokinetics in Fischer 344 rats: development of a physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Vinegar, A; Seckel, C S; Pollard, D L; Kinkead, E R; Conolly, R B; Andersen, M E

    1992-05-01

    The hydraulic fluid oil polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) is hepato- and nephrotoxic in the rat. Male Fischer 344 rats were exposed to PCTFE either for a single 6-hr exposure (0.5 or 0.25 mg/liter) or daily 5 days/week, 6 hr/day, for 13 weeks (0.5, 0.25, or 0.01 mg/liter). Blood, tissue, and urinary PCTFE concentrations measured postexposure were used to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model. The PCTFE hydraulic fluid used was a mixture of trimeric and tetrameric oligomers with minor amounts of other chain lengths. The PB-PK model was designed to describe the behavior, not of individual oligomers, but of total mass for the trimer and tetramer in each tissue. Partition coefficients were estimated using the model to optimize tissue/blood concentration ratios measured at the end of the 13-week exposure. First-order metabolic rate constants for both trimeric (2.0 hr-1) and tetrameric (1.0 hr-1) portions were estimated by optimization against urinary fluoride data assuming release of 0.77 mole fluoride per mole trimer and 0.844 mole fluoride per mole tetramer metabolized. To obtain accurate simulation of pharmacokinetic data it was necessary to hypothesize two fat compartments with diffusion-limited exchange of PCTFE oligomer with the blood. Relative concentrations of trimer and tetramer in venous blood, liver, and fat after a single 6-hr exposure were proportional to inhaled concentrations. Tetramer accumulated preferentially with multiple exposure. Components of PCTFE were metabolized to carboxylic acids with release of fluoride. Due to their persistence tetrameric oligomers appear to be more important than trimeric oligomers as causative agents of PCTFE hepato- and nephrotoxicity in the rat.

  17. Fractional model for pharmacokinetics of high dose methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Jovan K.; Spasić, Dragan T.; Tošić, Jela; Kolarović, Jovanka L.; Malti, Rachid; Mitić, Igor M.; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to promote a model based on the fractional differential calculus related to the pharmacokinetic individualization of high dose methotrexate treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, especially in high risk patients. We applied two-compartment fractional model on 8 selected cases with the largest number (4-19) of measured concentrations, among 43 pediatric patients received 24-h methotrexate 2-5 g/m2 infusions. The plasma concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Our mathematical procedure, designed by combining Post's and Newton's method, was coded in Mathematica 8.0 and performed on Fujicu Celsius M470-2 PC. Experimental data show that most of the measured values of methotrexate were in decreasing order. However, in certain treatments local maximums were detected. On the other hand, integer order compartmental models do not give values which fit well with the observed data. By the use of our model, we obtained better results, since it gives more accurate behavior of the transmission, as well as the local maximums which were recognized in methotrexate monitoring. It follows from our method that an additional test with a small methotrexate dose can be suggested for the fractional system parameter identification and the prediction of a possible pattern with a full dose in the case of high risk patients. A special feature of the fractional model is that it can also recognize and better fit an observed non-monotonic behavior. A new parameter determination procedure can be successfully used.

  18. The dynamical analysis of modified two-compartment neuron model and FPGA implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qianjin; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Shuangming; Yi, Guosheng; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Yu, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    The complexity of neural models is increasing with the investigation of larger biological neural network, more various ionic channels and more detailed morphologies, and the implementation of biological neural network is a task with huge computational complexity and power consumption. This paper presents an efficient digital design using piecewise linearization on field programmable gate array (FPGA), to succinctly implement the reduced two-compartment model which retains essential features of more complicated models. The design proposes an approximate neuron model which is composed of a set of piecewise linear equations, and it can reproduce different dynamical behaviors to depict the mechanisms of a single neuron model. The consistency of hardware implementation is verified in terms of dynamical behaviors and bifurcation analysis, and the simulation results including varied ion channel characteristics coincide with the biological neuron model with a high accuracy. Hardware synthesis on FPGA demonstrates that the proposed model has reliable performance and lower hardware resource compared with the original two-compartment model. These investigations are conducive to scalability of biological neural network in reconfigurable large-scale neuromorphic system.

  19. Multi-Compartment T2 Relaxometry Using a Spatially Constrained Multi-Gaussian Model

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Ashish; Pandya, Sneha; Shen, Xiaobo; LoCastro, Eve; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Gauthier, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The brain’s myelin content can be mapped by T2-relaxometry, which resolves multiple differentially relaxing T2 pools from multi-echo MRI. Unfortunately, the conventional fitting procedure is a hard and numerically ill-posed problem. Consequently, the T2 distributions and myelin maps become very sensitive to noise and are frequently difficult to interpret diagnostically. Although regularization can improve stability, it is generally not adequate, particularly at relatively low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of around 100–200. The purpose of this study was to obtain a fitting algorithm which is able to overcome these difficulties and generate usable myelin maps from noisy acquisitions in a realistic scan time. To this end, we restrict the T2 distribution to only 3 distinct resolvable tissue compartments, modeled as Gaussians: myelin water, intra/extra-cellular water and a slow relaxing cerebrospinal fluid compartment. We also impose spatial smoothness expectation that volume fractions and T2 relaxation times of tissue compartments change smoothly within coherent brain regions. The method greatly improves robustness to noise, reduces spatial variations, improves definition of white matter fibers, and enhances detection of demyelinating lesions. Due to efficient design, the additional spatial aspect does not cause an increase in processing time. The proposed method was applied to fast spiral acquisitions on which conventional fitting gives uninterpretable results. While these fast acquisitions suffer from noise and inhomogeneity artifacts, our preliminary results indicate the potential of spatially constrained 3-pool T2 relaxometry. PMID:24896833

  20. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design.

    PubMed

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics.

  1. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PopPK/PD) modeling of risperidone and its active metabolite in Chinese schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shuangmin; Shang, Dewei; Wu, Kehua; Li, Anning; Li, Xiwei; Deng, Chenhui; Li, Liang; Zhou, Tianyan; Wang, Chuanyue; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Risperidone is a second-generation antipsychotic agent commonly used in the treatment of ~ 31.1% of schizophrenia patients in China, it is the most commonly-prescribed antipsychotic agent. Despite the abundant use of risperidone, population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models of risperidone have not been performed in Chinese schizophrenia patients. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PopPK/PD) model to describe the PK behavior and efficacy of risperidone and 9-hydroxy-risperidone (active metabolite) in Chinese patients. Plasma concentration data (702 measurements from 131 patients) and positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) scores (258 observations from 56 patients) were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) approach with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCEI). The influence of potential covariates was evaluated. Model robustness was assessed using external validation, normalized prediction distribution error, nonparametric bootstrap, and visual predictive check approaches. Risperidone concentration data were well described by a one-compartmental model incorporating an additional compartment that refers to the concentration profiles of 9-hydroxy-risperidone. A complex absorption procedure was incorporated into the model to describe the metabolism of risperidone to 9-hydroxy-risperidone in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A binomial distribution in the estimated clearance (CL) of risperidone has been identified in our model. Decrease in PANSS score along with total AUC (AUCtotal) of risperidone and 9-hydroxy-risperidone was best characterized by an Emax model with 3 transit compartments describing the delay of drug effect. Considerable differences in PK behavior and drug effect of risperidone have been identified among Chinese extensive metabolizing (EM) and poor metabolizing (PM) patients. This PopPK/PD model may fulfill individualized treatment in clinical

  2. Systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport pharmacokinetic model for remoxipride after intravenous and intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jasper; Ploeger, Bart A; van der Graaf, Piet H; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2011-12-01

    Intranasal (IN) administration could be an attractive mode of delivery for drugs targeting the central nervous system, potentially providing a high bioavailability because of avoidance of a hepatic first-pass effect and rapid onset of action. However, controversy remains whether a direct transport route from the nasal cavity into the brain exists. Pharmacokinetic modeling is proposed to identify the existence of direct nose-to-brain transport in a quantitative manner. The selective dopamine-D2 receptor antagonist remoxipride was administered at different dosages, in freely moving rats, by the IN and intravenous (IV) route. Plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentration-time profiles were obtained and simultaneously analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Brain ECF/plasma area under the curve ratios were 0.28 and 0.19 after IN and IV administration, respectively. A multicompartment pharmacokinetic model with two absorption compartments (nose-to-systemic and nose-to-brain) was found to best describe the observed pharmacokinetic data. Absorption was described in terms of bioavailability and rate. Total bioavailability after IN administration was 89%, of which 75% was attributed to direct nose-to brain transport. Direct nose-to-brain absorption rate was slow, explaining prolonged brain ECF exposure after IN compared with IV administration. These studies explicitly provide separation and quantitation of systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport after IN administration of remoxipride in the rat. Describing remoxipride pharmacokinetics at the target site (brain ECF) in a semiphysiology-based manner would allow for better prediction of pharmacodynamic effects.

  3. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of psychomotor impairment induced by oral clonazepam in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Fábio Monteiro; Gonçalves, José Carlos Saraiva; Caminha, Ricardo; da Silveira, Gabriel Estolano; Neves, Claúdia Silvana de Miranda; Gram, Karla Regina da Silva; Ferreira, Carla Teixeira; Jacqmin, Philippe; Noël, François

    2009-10-01

    This study was undertaken to model the relationship between clonazepam plasma concentrations and a central nervous system adverse effect (impairment of the psychomotor performance) following the oral administration of immediate-release tablets of clonazepam in healthy volunteers. Such a (P)pharmacokinetic/(P)pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) study is important to interpret properly the consequences of determined levels of plasma concentrations of psychoactive therapeutic drugs reported to be involved in road-traffic accidents. Twenty-three male subjects received a single oral dose of 4 mg clonazepam. Plasma concentration, determined by on-line solid phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and psychomotor performance, quantified through the Digit Symbol Substitution Test, were monitored for 72 hours. A 2-compartment open model with first order absorption and lag-time better fitted the plasma clonazepam concentrations. Clonazepam decreased the psychomotor performance by 72 +/- 3.7% (observed maximum effect), 1.5 to 4 hours (25th-75th percentile) after drug administration. A simultaneous population PK/PD model based on a sigmoid Emax model with time-dependent tolerance described well the time course of effect. Such acute tolerance could minimize the risk of accident as a result of impairment of motor skill after a single dose of clonazepam. However, an individual analysis of the data revealed a great interindividual variation in the relationship between clonazepam effect and plasma concentration, indicating that the phenomenon of acute tolerance can be predicted at a population, but not individual, level.

  4. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Itraconazole and Hydroxyitraconazole for Oral SUBA-Itraconazole and Sporanox Capsule Formulations in Healthy Subjects in Fed and Fasted States

    PubMed Central

    Foster, David J. R.; Mudge, Stuart; Hayes, David

    2015-01-01

    Itraconazole is an orally active antifungal agent that has complex and highly variable absorption kinetics that is highly affected by food. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for itraconazole and the active metabolite hydroxyitraconazole, in particular, quantifying the effects of food and formulation on oral absorption. Plasma pharmacokinetic data were collected from seven phase I crossover trials comparing the SUBA-itraconazole and Sporanox formulations of itraconazole. First, a model of single-dose itraconazole data was developed, which was then extended to the multidose data. Covariate effects on itraconazole were then examined before extending the model to describe hydroxyitraconazole. The final itraconazole model was a 2-compartment model with oral absorption described by 4-transit compartments. Multidose kinetics was described by total effective daily dose- and time-dependent changes in clearance and bioavailability. Hydroxyitraconazole was best described by a 1-compartment model with mixed first-order and Michaelis-Menten elimination for the single-dose data and a time-dependent clearance for the multidose data. The relative bioavailability of SUBA-itraconazole compared to that of Sporanox was 173% and was 21% less variable between subjects. Food resulted in a 27% reduction in bioavailability and 58% reduction in the transit absorption rate constant compared to that with the fasted state, irrespective of the formulation. This analysis presents the most extensive population pharmacokinetic model of itraconazole and hydroxyitraconazole in the literature performed in healthy subjects. The presented model can be used for simulating food effects on itraconazole exposure and for performing prestudy power analysis and sample size estimation, which are important aspects of clinical trial design of bioequivalence studies. PMID:26149987

  5. Physiological modeling reveals novel pharmacokinetic behavior for inhaled octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane in rats.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M E; Sarangapani, R; Reitz, R H; Gallavan, R H; Dobrev, I D; Plotzke, K P

    2001-04-01

    Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) is an ingredient in selected consumer and precision cleaning products. Workplace inhalation exposures may occur in some D4 production operations. In this study, we analyzed tissue, plasma, and excreta time-course data following D4 inhalation in Fischer 344 rats (K. Plotzke et al., 2000, Drug Metab. Dispos. 28, 192-204) to assess the degree to which the disposition of D4 is similar to or different from that of volatile hydrocarbons that lack silicone substitution. We first applied a basic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model (J. C. Ramsey and M. E. Andersen, 1984, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 73, 159-175) to characterize the biological determinants of D4 kinetics. Parameter estimation techniques indicated an unusual set of characteristics, i.e., a low blood:air (P(b:a) congruent with 0.9) and a high fat:blood partition coefficient (P(f:b) congruent with 550). These parameters were then determined experimentally by equilibrating tissue or liquid samples with saturated atmospheres of D4. Consistent with the estimates from the time-course data, blood:air partition coefficients were small, ranging from 1.9 to 6.9 in six samples. Perirenal fat:air partition coefficients were large, from 1400 to 2500. The average P(f:b) was determined to be 485. This combination of partitioning characteristics leads to rapid exhalation of free D4 at the cessation of the inhalation exposure followed by a much slower redistribution of D4 from fat and tissue storage compartments. The basic PK model failed to describe D4 tissue kinetics in the postexposure period and had to be expanded by adding deep-tissue compartments in liver and lung, a mobile chylomicron-like lipid transport pool in blood, and a second fat compartment. Model parameters for the refined model were optimized using single-exposure data in male and female rats exposed at three concentrations: 7, 70, and 700 ppm. With inclusion of induction of D4 metabolism at 700 ppm (3-fold in

  6. A hybrid multi-compartment model of granuloma formation and T cell priming in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Simeone; El-Kebir, Mohammed; Kirschner, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a worldwide health problem with 2 billion people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the bacteria causing TB). The hallmark of infection is the emergence of organized structures of immune cells forming primarily in the lung in response to infection. Granulomas physically contain and immunologically restrain bacteria that cannot be cleared. We have developed several models that spatially characterize the dynamics of the host–mycobacterial interaction, and identified mechanisms that control granuloma formation and development. In particular, we published several agent-based models (ABMs) of granuloma formation in TB that include many subtypes of T cell populations, macrophages as well as key cytokine and chemokine effector molecules. These ABM studies emphasize the important role of T-cell related mechanisms in infection progression, such as magnitude and timing of T cell recruitment, and macrophage activation. In these models, the priming and recruitment of T cells from the lung draining lymph node (LN) was captured phenomenologically. In addition to these ABM studies, we have also developed several multi-organ models using ODEs to examine trafficking of cells between, for example, the lung and LN. While we can predict temporal dynamic behaviors, those models are not coupled to the spatial aspects of granuloma. To this end, we have developed a multi-organ model that is hybrid: an ABM for the lung compartment and a non-linear system of ODE representing the lymph node compartment. This hybrid multi-organ approach to study TB granuloma formation in the lung and immune priming in the LN allows us to dissect protective mechanisms that cannot be achieved using the single compartment or multi-compartment ODE system. The main finding of this work is that trafficking of important cells known as antigen presenting cells from the lung to the lymph node is a key control mechanism for protective immunity: the entire spectrum of infection outcomes can

  7. Two compartment model of diazepam biotransformation in an organotypical culture of primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Acikgoez, Ali; Karim, Najibulla; Giri, Shibashish; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-01-15

    Drug biotransformation is one of the most important parameters of preclinical screening tests for the registration of new drug candidates. Conventional existing tests rely on nonhuman models which deliver an incomplete metabolic profile of drugs due to the lack of proper CYP450 expression as seen in human liver in vivo. In order to overcome this limitation, we used an organotypical model of human primary hepatocytes for the biotransformation of the drug diazepam with special reference to metabolites in both the cell matrix phase and supernatant and its interaction of three inducers (phenobarbital, dexamethasone, aroclor 1254) in different time responses (1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h). Phenobarbital showed the strongest inducing effect in generating desmethyldiazepam and induced up to a 150 fold increase in oxazepam-content which correlates with the increased availability of the precursor metabolites (temazepam and desmethyldiazepam). Aroclor 1254 and dexamethasone had the strongest inducing effect on temazepam and the second strongest on oxazepam. The strong and overlapping inductive role of phenobarbital strengthens the participation of CYP2B6 and CYP3A in diazepam N-demethylation and CYP3A in temazepam formation. Aroclor 1254 preferentially generated temazepam due to the interaction with CYP3A and potentially CYP2C19. In parallel we represented these data in the form of a mathematical model with two compartments explaining the dynamics of diazepam metabolism with the effect of these other inducers in human primary hepatocytes. The model consists of ten differential equations, with one for each concentration c{sub i,j} (i = diazepam, temazepam, desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam, other metabolites) and one for each compartment (j = cell matrix phase, supernatant), respectively. The parameters p{sub k} (k = 1, 2, 3, 4, 13) are rate constants describing the biotransformation of diazepam and its metabolites and the other parameters (k = 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15) explain the

  8. A Multi-Compartment 3-D Finite Element Model of Rectocele and Its Interaction with Cystocele

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as POP-Q point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  9. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  10. Body fat measurement among Singaporean Chinese, Malays and Indians: a comparative study using a four-compartment model and different two-compartment models.

    PubMed

    Deurenberg-Yap, M; Schmidt, G; van Staveren, W A; Hautvast, J G; Deurenberg, P

    2001-04-01

    This cross-sectional study compared body fat percentage (BF%) obtained from a four-compartment (4C) model with BF% from hydrometry (using 2H2O), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and densitometry among the three main ethnic groups (Chinese, Malays and Indians) in Singapore, and determined the suitability of two-compartment (2C) models as surrogate methods for assessing BF% among different ethnic groups. A total of 291 subjects (108 Chinese, seventy-six Malays, 107 Indians) were selected to ensure an adequate representation of age range (18-75 years) and BMI range (16-40 kg/m2) of the general adult population, with almost equal numbers from each gender group. Body weight was measured, together with body height, total body water by 2H2O dilution, densitometry with Bodpod and bone mineral content with Hologic QDR-4500. BF% measurements with a 4C model for the subgroups were: Chinese females 33.5 (sd 7.5), Chinese males 24.4 (sd 6.1), Malay females 37.8 (sd 6.3), Malay males 26.0 (sd 7.6), Indian females 38.2 (sd 7.0), Indian males 28.1 (sd 5.5). Differences between BF% measured by the 4C and 2C models (hydrometry, DXA and densitometry) were found, with underestimation of BF% in all the ethnic-gender groups by DXA of 2.1-4.2 BF% and by densitometry of 0.5-3.2 BF%). On a group level, the differences in BF% between the 4C model and 2H2O were the lowest (0.0-1.4 BF% in the different groups), while differences between the 4C model and DXA were the highest. Differences between the 4C model and 2H2O and between the 4C model and DXA were positively correlated with the 4C model, water fraction (f(water)) of fat-free mass (FFM) and the mineral fraction (f(mineral)) of FFM, and negatively correlated with density of the FFM (D(FFM)), while the difference between 4C model and densitometry correlated with these variables negatively and positively respectively (i.e. the correlations were opposite). The largest contributors to the observed differences were f(water) and D

  11. An analytical solution set for a four-compartment mixed mammillary/catenary model.

    PubMed

    Charkes, N D; Siegel, J A

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to extract the intercompartmental rate constants analytically from the coefficients and exponents of the exponential sum fitted to tracer data points for a unique four-compartment mixed mammillary/catenary (extended mammillary, radial) model, with losses solely from the central (blood) compartment. This model is useful in estimating myocardial and skeletal blood flow. Using Laplace transforms, the transfer functions of the exponential sum and the differential equations describing the model were obtained and the corresponding coefficients equated sequentially, which yielded the intercompartmental rate constants. Three solution sets of rate constants were found for the model, each of which satisfies both transfer functions. A program written in BASIC is provided, which requires only the coefficients and exponents of the exponential terms as input; the output is the three sets of rate constants. An example is given as an aid in debugging. Only one solution set of the three was physiologically realizable in the example, but the bounds defining these limits are not known. The advantages and limitations of the method are discussed. The method is suitable for initializing a non-linear least-squares fitting program for the rate constants. The appropriate physiological solution set for this model yields fractional and total myocardial or skeletal blood flow in a subject in the steady state.

  12. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling Analysis of GCC‐4401C, a Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor, in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, HY; Choi, S; Kim, YH

    2016-01-01

    GCC‐4401C, an orally active direct factor Xa inhibitor that is similar to rivaroxaban, is currently under development for venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of GCC‐4401C by population modeling analysis and to predict proper dosage regimens compared to rivaroxaban using data from two phase I clinical studies. Plasma GCC‐4401C concentrations over time were best described by a two‐compartment linear model and body weight was associated with central volume of distribution. Relevant PD markers generally changed in a dose‐dependent manner and were described well with sigmoid, simple maximum effect, or linear models. GCC‐4401C was absorbed more rapidly than rivaroxaban. Comparisons based on simulations of PD marker changes over time suggest that 20 mg and 40 mg of GCC‐4401C administered under fasted status are comparable to 10 mg and 20 mg of rivaroxaban under fed status. PMID:27511836

  13. Bioenergetic and pharmacokinetic model for exposure of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karasov, W.H.; Kenow, K.P.; Meyer, M.W.; Fournier, F.

    2007-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was used to predict food intake of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks as a function of body mass during development, and a pharmacokinetics model, based on first-order kinetics in a single compartment, was used to predict blood Hg level as a function of food intake rate, food Hg content, body mass, and Hg absorption and elimination. Predictions were tested in captive growing chicks fed trout (Salmo gairdneri) with average MeHg concentrations of 0.02 (control), 0.4, and 1.2 ??g/g wet mass (delivered as CH3HgCl). Predicted food intake matched observed intake through 50 d of age but then exceeded observed intake by an amount that grew progressively larger with age, reaching a significant overestimate of 28% by the end of the trial. Respiration in older, nongrowing birds probably was overestimated by using rates measured in younger, growing birds. Close agreement was found between simulations and measured blood Hg, which varied significantly with dietary Hg and age. Although chicks may hatch with different blood Hg levels, their blood level is determined mainly by dietary Hg level beyond approximately two weeks of age. The model also may be useful for predicting Hg levels in adults and in the eggs that they lay, but its accuracy in both chicks and adults needs to be tested in free-living birds. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  14. Use of partition coefficients in flow-limited physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew D; Beard, Daniel A; Wu, Fan

    2012-08-01

    Permeability-limited two-subcompartment and flow-limited, well-stirred tank tissue compartment models are routinely used in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling. Here, the permeability-limited two-subcompartment model is used to derive a general flow-limited case of a two-subcompartment model with the well-stirred tank being a specific case where tissue fractional blood volume approaches zero. The general flow-limited two-subcompartment model provides a clear distinction between two partition coefficients typically used in PBPK: a biophysical partition coefficient and a well-stirred partition coefficient. Case studies using diazepam and cotinine demonstrate that, when the well-stirred tank is used with a priori predicted biophysical partition coefficients, simulations overestimate or underestimate total organ drug concentration relative to flow-limited two-subcompartment model behavior in tissues with higher fractional blood volumes. However, whole-body simulations show predicted drug concentrations in plasma and lower fractional blood volume tissues are relatively unaffected. These findings point to the importance of accurately determining tissue fractional blood volume for flow-limited PBPK modeling. Simulations using biophysical and well-stirred partition coefficients optimized with flow-limited two-subcompartment and well-stirred models, respectively, lead to nearly identical fits to tissue drug distribution data. Therefore, results of whole-body PBPK modeling with diazepam and cotinine indicate both flow-limited models are appropriate PBPK tissue models as long as the correct partition coefficient is used: the biophysical partition coefficient is for use with two-subcompartment models and the well-stirred partition coefficient is for use with the well-stirred tank model.

  15. [Comparison of the brain pharmacokinetics of nasal tetramethylpyrazine phosphate pH-sensitive in situ gel in normal rats and model rats].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Wei; Yan, Yi-Lin; Zhou, Li-Ling

    2012-05-01

    The study is to investigate the brain pharmacokinetics change of nasal tetramethylpyrazine phosphate (TMPP) pH-sensitive in situ gel in normal and model rats. Acute cerebral ischemia rat model was successfully established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method. Both normal and model rats were given nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel (10 mg x kg(-1)). Perfusates of brain striatum area were collected at each time point by microdialysis. The content of TMPP was determined by HPLC. The pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated by Kinetica 4.4 software at each time point of the brain drug concentration. The main pharmacokinetics parameters of TMPP were fitted with compartments 2. After nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel the values of C(max) and AUC of both components in brain showed as follows: the value of model group > that of normal group. Significant difference can be observed in the process of brain pharmacokinetics in normal and model rats after giving nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel.

  16. Population pharmacokinetic modelling and evaluation of different dosage regimens for darunavir and ritonavir in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Arab-Alameddine, M; Lubomirov, R; Fayet-Mello, A; Aouri, M; Rotger, M; Buclin, T; Widmer, N; Gatri, M; Ledergerber, B; Rentsch, K; Cavassini, M; Panchaud, A; Guidi, M; Telenti, A; Décosterd, L A; Csajka, C

    2014-09-01

    Darunavir is a protease inhibitor that is administered with low-dose ritonavir to enhance its bioavailability. It is prescribed at standard dosage regimens of 600/100 mg twice daily in treatment-experienced patients and 800/100 mg once daily in naive patients. A population pharmacokinetic approach was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of both drugs and their interaction in a cohort of unselected patients and to compare darunavir exposure expected under alternative dosage regimens. The study population included 105 HIV-infected individuals who provided darunavir and ritonavir plasma concentrations. Firstly, a population pharmacokinetic analysis for darunavir and ritonavir was conducted, with inclusion of patients' demographic, clinical and genetic characteristics as potential covariates (NONMEM(®)). Then, the interaction between darunavir and ritonavir was studied while incorporating levels of both drugs into different inhibitory models. Finally, model-based simulations were performed to compare trough concentrations (Cmin) between the recommended dosage regimen and alternative combinations of darunavir and ritonavir. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption adequately characterized darunavir and ritonavir pharmacokinetics. The between-subject variability in both compounds was important [coefficient of variation (CV%) 34% and 47% for darunavir and ritonavir clearance, respectively]. Lopinavir and ritonavir exposure (AUC) affected darunavir clearance, while body weight and darunavir AUC influenced ritonavir elimination. None of the tested genetic variants showed any influence on darunavir or ritonavir pharmacokinetics. The simulations predicted darunavir Cmin much higher than the IC50 thresholds for wild-type and protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strains (55 and 550 ng/mL, respectively) under standard dosing in >98% of experienced and naive patients. Alternative regimens of darunavir/ritonavir 1200/100 or 1200/200 mg once daily also had predicted

  17. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in the prediction of pharmacokinetics of bicyclol controlled-release formulation in human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baolian; Liu, Zhihao; Li, Dan; Yang, Shuang; Hu, Jinping; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Li; Li, Yan

    2015-09-18

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can assist in formulation development. Bicyclol is a novel anti-hepatitis drug. A bilayer osmotic pump table of bicyclol is being developed. PBPK models for bicyclol immediate-release (IR) and controlled-release (CR) tablets in beagle dog, as well as PBPK model for IR tablets in human were constructed. These models incorporated physicochemical properties and in vitro preclinical data. Parameter sensitivity analysis was performed for the effects of solubility and dissolution on pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Models were refined by comparing simulated results to experimental measurements. Furthermore, the clinical PK for bicyclol CR tablets was predicted using the in vivo dissolution profile by deconvolution of the mean PK profile of CR tablets in dogs. In summary, the present study described a strategy employing PBPK models to evaluate the effects of formulation factors on PK profiles and predict the performance of bicyclol CR tablets in human. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  19. Pharmacokinetic modeling of ascorbate diffusion through normal and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C M; Hicks, Kevin O

    2014-12-01

    Ascorbate is delivered to cells via the vasculature, but its ability to penetrate into tissues remote from blood vessels is unknown. This is particularly relevant to solid tumors, which often contain regions with dysfunctional vasculature, with impaired oxygen and nutrient delivery, resulting in upregulation of the hypoxic response and also the likely depletion of essential plasma-derived biomolecules, such as ascorbate. In this study, we have utilized a well-established multicell-layered, three-dimensional pharmacokinetic model to measure ascorbate diffusion and transport parameters through dense tissue in vitro. Ascorbate was found to penetrate the tissue at a slightly lower rate than mannitol and to travel via the paracellular route. Uptake parameters into the cells were also determined. These data were fitted to the diffusion model, and simulations of ascorbate pharmacokinetics in normal tissue and in hypoxic tumor tissue were performed with varying input concentrations, ranging from normal dietary plasma levels (10-100 μM) to pharmacological levels (>1 mM) as seen with intravenous infusion. The data and simulations demonstrate heterogeneous distribution of ascorbate in tumor tissue at physiological blood levels and provide insight into the range of plasma ascorbate concentrations and exposure times needed to saturate all regions of a tumor. The predictions suggest that supraphysiological plasma ascorbate concentrations (>100 μM) are required to achieve effective delivery of ascorbate to poorly vascularized tumor tissue.

  20. Translational Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Tumor Growth Inhibition Supports Dose‐Range Selection of the Anti–PD‐1 Antibody Pembrolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Lindauer, A; Valiathan, CR; Mehta, K; Sriram, V; de Greef, R; Elassaiss‐Schaap, J

    2016-01-01

    Pembrolizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against programmed death 1 (PD‐1), has a manageable safety profile and robust clinical activity against advanced malignancies. The lowest effective dose for evaluation in further dose‐ranging studies was identified by developing a translational model from preclinical mouse experiments. A compartmental pharmacokinetic model was combined with a published physiologically based tissue compartment, linked to receptor occupancy as the driver of observed tumor growth inhibition. Human simulations were performed using clinical pharmacokinetic data, literature values, and in vitro parameters for drug distribution and binding. Biological and mathematical uncertainties were included in simulations to generate expectations for dose response. The results demonstrated a minimal increase in efficacy for doses higher than 2 mg/kg. The findings of the translational model were successfully applied to select 2 mg/kg as the lowest dose for dose‐ranging evaluations. PMID:27863176

  1. A Two-Compartment Model of VEGF Distribution in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Engel-Stefanini, Marianne O.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of angiogenesis – the growth of new microvessels from existing microvasculature. Angiogenesis is a complex process involving numerous molecular species, and to better understand it, a systems biology approach is necessary. In vivo preclinical experiments in the area of angiogenesis are typically performed in mouse models; this includes drug development targeting VEGF. Thus, to quantitatively interpret such experimental results, a computational model of VEGF distribution in the mouse can be beneficial. In this paper, we present an in silico model of VEGF distribution in mice, determine model parameters from existing experimental data, conduct sensitivity analysis, and test the validity of the model. The multiscale model is comprised of two compartments: blood and tissue. The model accounts for interactions between two major VEGF isoforms (VEGF120 and VEGF164) and their endothelial cell receptors VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, and co-receptor neuropilin-1. Neuropilin-1 is also expressed on the surface of parenchymal cells. The model includes transcapillary macromolecular permeability, lymphatic transport, and macromolecular plasma clearance. Simulations predict that the concentration of unbound VEGF in the tissue is approximately 50-fold greater than in the blood. These concentrations are highly dependent on the VEGF secretion rate. Parameter estimation was performed to fit the simulation results to available experimental data, and permitted the estimation of VEGF secretion rate in healthy tissue, which is difficult to measure experimentally. The model can provide quantitative interpretation of preclinical animal data and may be used in conjunction with experimental studies in the development of pro- and anti-angiogenic agents. The model approximates the normal tissue as skeletal muscle and includes endothelial cells to represent the vasculature. As the VEGF system becomes better characterized in other tissues and

  2. Pharmacokinetics of ribavirin in patients with hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Janet R; Snoeck, Eric; Duff, Frank; Lamb, Matthew; Jorga, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Aim A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using plasma concentration data (n = 7025) from 380 patients to examine the relationship between ribavirin dose and its pharmacokinetics. Methods Ribavirin pharmacokinetics were described by a three-compartment model with sequential zero-order and a first-order absorption processes. Interoccasion variability and food effects were included. Results Lean body weight (range 41–91 kg) was the only covariate with a clinically significant influence on ribavirin pharmacokinetics, affecting clearance (15.3–23.9 l h−1) and the volume of the larger peripheral compartment. Conclusion The model provided a good description of the available data, confirmed by accurate estimates of parameter values and low residual variability (17%). PMID:17118126

  3. Model-based estimates of the effects of efavirenz on bedaquiline pharmacokinetics and suggested dose adjustments for patients coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elin M; Aweeka, Francesca; Park, Jeong-Gun; Marzan, Florence; Dooley, Kelly E; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-06-01

    Safe, effective concomitant treatment regimens for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV infection are urgently needed. Bedaquiline (BDQ) is a promising new anti-TB drug, and efavirenz (EFV) is a commonly used antiretroviral. Due to EFV's induction of cytochrome P450 3A4, the metabolic enzyme responsible for BDQ biotransformation, the drugs are expected to interact. Based on data from a phase I, single-dose pharmacokinetic study, a nonlinear mixed-effects model characterizing BDQ pharmacokinetics and interaction with multiple-dose EFV was developed. BDQ pharmacokinetics were best described by a 3-compartment disposition model with absorption through a dynamic transit compartment model. Metabolites M2 and M3 were described by 2-compartment models with clearance of BDQ and M2, respectively, as input. Impact of induction was described as an instantaneous change in clearance 1 week after initialization of EFV treatment and estimated for all compounds. The model predicts average steady-state concentrations of BDQ and M2 to be reduced by 52% (relative standard error [RSE], 3.7%) with chronic coadministration. A range of models with alternative structural assumptions regarding onset of induction effect and fraction metabolized resulted in similar estimates of the typical reduction and did not offer a markedly better fit to data. Simulations to investigate alternative regimens mitigating the estimated interaction effect were performed. The results suggest that simple adjustments of the standard regimen during EFV coadministration can prevent reduced exposure to BDQ without increasing exposures to M2. However, exposure to M3 would increase. Evaluation in clinical trials of adjusted regimens is necessary to ensure appropriate dosing for HIV-infected TB patients on an EFV-based regimen.

  4. Ozanezumab Dose Selection for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis by Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Immunohistochemistry Data from Patient Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Alienor; Bullman, Jonathan; Bates, Stewart; Krull, David; Williams, Nicola; Chen, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disease with a high unmet medical need. In this context, a potential therapy should be brought to patients in the most expeditious way and early exploration of pharmacology is highly beneficial. Ozanezumab, a humanised IgG monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A protein which is an inhibitor of neurite outgrowth, is currently under development for the treatment of ALS and has been recently assessed in 76 patients in a first-in-human study. Inadequate target engagement has been recognised as a major contributing reason for drug trial failures. In this work, we describe the development of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model using immunohistochemistry (IHC) data of co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle as a surrogate measure of target engagement. The rich plasma concentration data and the sparse IHC data after one or two intravenous doses of ozanezumab were modelled simultaneously using a non-linear mixed-effect approach. The final PKPD model was a two-compartment PK model combined with an effect compartment PD model that accounted for the delay in ozanezumab concentrations to reach the site of action which is skeletal muscle. Diagnostic plots showed a satisfactory fit of both PK and IHC data. The model was used as a simulation tool to design a dose regimen for sustained drug-target co-localization in a phase II study. PMID:25706882

  5. In Vitro Measurements of Metabolism for Application in Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, John C.; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-04-01

    Abstract Human risk and exposure assessments require dosimetry information. Species-specific tissue dose response will be driven by physiological and biochemical processes. While metabolism and pharmacokinetic data are often not available in humans, they are much more available in laboratory animals; metabolic rate constants can be readily derived in vitro. The physiological differences between laboratory animals and humans are known. Biochemical processes, especially metabolism, can be measured in vitro and extrapolated to account for in vivo metabolism through clearance models or when linked to a physiologically based biological (PBPK) model to describe the physiological processes, such as drug delivery to the metabolic organ. This review focuses on the different organ, cellular, and subcellular systems that can be used to measure in vitro metabolic rate constants and how that data is extrapolated to be used in biokinetic modeling.

  6. Preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Susan Ritger; Amin, Shantu G.; Anderson, Kim A.; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Sharma, Arun K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Williams, David E.; Corley, Richard A.

    2011-12-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants generated as byproducts of natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. Despite significant public health concern, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling efforts for PAHs have so far been limited to naphthalene, plus simpler PK models for pyrene, nitropyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The dearth of published models is due in part to the high lipophilicity, low volatility, and myriad metabolic pathways for PAHs, all of which present analytical and experimental challenges. Our research efforts have focused upon experimental approaches and initial development of PBPK models for the prototypic PAH, B[a]P, and the more potent, albeit less studied transplacental carcinogen, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). For both compounds, model compartments included arterial and venous blood, flow limited lung, liver, richly perfused and poorly perfused tissues, diffusion limited fat, and a two compartment theoretical gut (for oral exposures). Hepatic and pulmonary metabolism was described for both compounds, as were fractional binding in blood and fecal clearance. Partition coefficients for parent PAH along with their diol and tetraol metabolites were estimated using published algorithms and verified experimentally for the hydroxylated metabolites. The preliminary PBPK models were able to describe many, but not all, of the available data sets, comprising multiple routes of exposure (oral, intravenous) and nominal doses spanning several orders of magnitude. Supported by Award Number P42 ES016465 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present PBPK models for benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B[a]P model accurately predicts data from multiple sources over a wide dose range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DBC model was based on the B[a]P model as less chemical specific

  7. Busulfan in infants to adult hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: A population pharmacokinetic model for initial and Bayesian dose personalization

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Baker, K. Scott; Gamis, Alan S.; Holford, Nicholas H.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses to a target plasma concentration at steady state (Css) is an essential component of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We sought to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to predict IV busulfan doses over a wide age spectrum (0.1 – 66 years) that accounts for differences in age and body size. Experimental design A population pharmacokinetic model based on normal fat mass and maturation based on post-menstrual age was built from 12,380 busulfan concentration-time points obtained after IV busulfan administration in 1,610 HCT recipients. Subsequently, simulation results of the initial dose necessary to achieve a target Css with this model were compared with pediatric-only models. Results A two-compartment model with first-order elimination best fit the data. The population busulfan clearance was 12.4 L/h for an adult male with 62kg normal fat mass (equivalent to 70kg total body weight). Busulfan clearance, scaled to body size – specifically normal fat mass, is predicted to be 95% of the adult clearance at 2.5 years post-natal age. With a target Css of 770 ng/mL, a higher proportion of initial doses achieved the therapeutic window with this age- and size-dependent model (72%) compared to dosing recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (57%) or the European Medicines Agency (70%). Conclusion This is the first population pharmacokinetic model developed to predict initial IV busulfan doses and personalize to a target Css over a wide age spectrum, ranging from infants to adults. PMID:24218510

  8. Incorporation of ABCB1-mediated transport into a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of docetaxel in mice.

    PubMed

    Hudachek, Susan F; Gustafson, Daniel L

    2013-08-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most widely used anticancer agents. While this taxane has proven to be an effective chemotherapeutic drug, noteworthy challenges exist in relation to docetaxel administration due to the considerable interindividual variability in efficacy and toxicity associated with the use of this compound, largely attributable to differences between individuals in their ability to metabolize and eliminate docetaxel. Regarding the latter, the ATP-binding cassette transporter B1 (ABCB1, PGP, MDR1) is primarily responsible for docetaxel elimination. To further understand the role of ABCB1 in the biodistribution of docetaxel in mice, we utilized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling that included ABCB1-mediated transport in relevant tissues. Transporter function was evaluated by studying docetaxel pharmacokinetics in wild-type FVB and Mdr1a/b constitutive knockout (KO) mice and incorporating this concentration-time data into a PBPK model comprised of eight tissue compartments (plasma, brain, heart, lung, kidney, intestine, liver and slowly perfused tissues) and, in addition to ABCB1-mediated transport, included intravenous drug administration, specific binding to intracellular tubulin, intestinal and hepatic metabolism, glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. For all tissues in both the FVB and KO cohorts, the PBPK model simulations closely mirrored the observed data. Furthermore, both models predicted AUC values that were with 15 % of the observed AUC values, indicating that our model-simulated drug exposures accurately reflected the observed tissue exposures. Overall, our PBPK model furthers the understanding of the role of ABCB1 in the biodistribution of docetaxel. Additionally, this exemplary model structure can be applied to investigate the pharmacokinetics of other ABCB1 transporter substrates.

  9. Linear pharmacokinetic models for evaluating unusual work schedules, exposure limits and body burdens of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, B.E.

    1988-05-01

    The adverse effects of workplace exposures to pollutants relate more accurately to the concentrations of pollutants in the body than in the environment. In many cases pharmacokinetic models may represent the external to internal concentration relationships with useful accuracy. Simplified equations are presented for stepwise calculations on a series of time-averaged, external concentrations to give a corresponding series of internal concentrations. Accurate results were obtained for averaging times not exceeding one-fourth of the biological half-life of the pollutant. A convenient measure of internal concentration is the external concentration that would be at in vivo equilibrium with it (termed biologically effective concentration). Three measures of damage burden are proposed, each appropriate for different toxic mechanisms. The calculations readily may be carried out on a programmable calculator or microcomputer. Illustrative examples show how unusual work schedules may be compared with an 8 hr/day, 5 days/week schedule and how appropriate short- and long-term exposure limits may be determined. Other examples, illustrated for lead, relate absorbed mass rates to body concentrations and body burdens in a two-compartment kinetic model. These calculations should provide a more accurate evaluation of fluctuating concentrations, which can be handled easily.

  10. Analytical model of ionization and energy deposition by proton beams in subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Surdutovich, Eugene; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytical model to evaluate in a fast, simple and effective manner the energy delivered by proton beams moving through a cell model made of nucleus and cytoplasm, taking into account the energy carried by the secondary electrons generated along the proton tracks. The electronic excitation spectra of these subcellular compartments have been modelled by means of an empirical parameterization of their dielectric properties. The energy loss rate and target ionization probability induced by swift protons are evaluated by means of the dielectric formalism. With the present model we have quantified the energy delivered, the specific energy, and the number of ionizations produced per incoming ion in a typical human cell by a typical hadrontherapy proton beam having energies usually reached around the Bragg peak (below 20 MeV). We find that the specific energy per incoming ion delivered in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm are rather similar for all the proton energy range analyzed.

  11. (Tri)butyltin biotic degradation rates and pathways in different compartments of a freshwater model ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David; Morin, Anne; Christian, Lehnhoff; Thybaud, Eric; Vindimian, Eric; Donard, Olivier F X

    2007-12-15

    Experiments were conducted in controlled temperate freshwater ecosystems (microcosms) to determine the persistence and biogeochemical dynamic of tributyltin (TBT) and its degradation products. TBT and its derivatives were monitored simultaneously for 23 days (552 h) in sediment-water systems, with or without macroorganisms (macrophytes: Elodea canadensis and gastropods: Lymnaea stagnalis). Biphasic TBT removal from the water column was significantly enhanced by the presence of biota. The persistence of TBT in biota was assessed by a kinetic approach of the different bioaccumulation pathways and associated metabolisms adopted by the snails and the macrophytes in response to the TBT contamination. Furthermore, sediment acted for the final sink for butyltins in both types of microcosms, with more than 70% of TBT and its metabolites recovered in this compartment after two weeks of exposure. Degradation pathways in sediments of both biotic and abiotic microcosms appeared to represent a key process in TBT cycle and were characterized by half-lives in the range of one month. Specific transformation and transfer pathways of TBT as reactional mechanisms are discussed and modelled assessing in detail the role of each compartment with regards to the fate of TBT in the model aquatic ecosystems.

  12. One-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics and therapeutic window: an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sanyi; Xiao, Yanni

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide the analytical solutions of one-compartment models with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics for three different inputs (single intravenous dose, multiple-dose bolus injection and constant). All analytical solutions obtained in present paper can be described by the well defined Lambert W function which can be easily implemented in most mathematical softwares such as Matlab and Maple. These results will play an important role in fitting the Michaelis-Menten parameters and in designing a dosing regimen to maintain steady-state plasma concentrations. In particular, the analytical periodic solution for multi-dose inputs is also given, and we note that the maximum and minimum values of the periodic solution depends on the Michaelis-Menten parameters, dose and time interval of drug administration. In practice, it is important to maintain a concentration above the minimum therapeutic level at all times without exceeding the minimum toxic concentration. Therefore, the one-compartment model with therapeutic window is proposed, and further the existence of periodic solution, analytical expression and its period are analyzed. The analytical formula of period plays a key role in designing a dose regimen to maintain the plasma concentration within a specified range over long periods of therapy. Finally, the completely analytical solution for the constant input rate is derived and discussed which depends on the relations between constant input rate and maximum rate of change of concentration.

  13. Two-Compartment Kinetic Modeling of Radiocesium Accumulation in Marine Bivalves under Hypothetical Exposure Regimes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Tan, Qiao-Guo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Interpreting the variable concentrations of (137)Cs in the field biological samples requires mechanistic understanding of both environmental and biological behavior of (137)Cs. In this study, we used a two-compartment model to estimate and compare the (137)Cs biokinetics in three species of subtropical marine bivalves. Significant interspecific difference of (137)Cs biokinetics was observed among oysters, mussels, and scallops. There was considerable (137)Cs assimilation from phytoplankton in the bivalves, but the calculated trophic transfer factors were generally between 0.04 and 0.4. We demonstrated a major efflux of radiocesium in the scallops (with a rate constant of 0.207 d(-1)), whereas the efflux was comparable between oysters and mussels (0.035-0.038 d(-1)). A two-compartment kinetic model was developed to simulate the (137)Cs accumulation in the three bivalves under four hypothetical exposure regimes. We showed that the bivalves respond differently to the exposure regimes in terms of time to reach equilibrium, equilibrium concentration, and maximum concentration. Bivalves suffering more frequent intermittent exposure may have higher maximum concentrations than those receiving less frequent exposure. The interspecific difference of (137)Cs accumulation in bivalves has important implications for biomonitoring and implementing management techniques. This study represents one of the first attempts to combine both dissolved and dietary pathways to give a realistic simulation of (137)Cs accumulation in marine bivalves under dynamic exposure regimes.

  14. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling using microsoft excel and visual basic for applications.

    PubMed

    Marino, Dale J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are mathematical descriptions depicting the relationship between external exposure and internal dose. These models have found great utility for interspecies extrapolation. However, specialized computer software packages, which are not widely distributed, have typically been used for model development and utilization. A few physiological models have been reported using more widely available software packages (e.g., Microsoft Excel), but these tend to include less complex processes and dose metrics. To ascertain the capability of Microsoft Excel and Visual Basis for Applications (VBA) for PBPK modeling, models for styrene, vinyl chloride, and methylene chloride were coded in Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL), Excel, and VBA, and simulation results were compared. For styrene, differences between ACSL and Excel or VBA compartment concentrations and rates of change were less than +/-7.5E-10 using the same numerical integration technique and time step. Differences using VBA fixed step or ACSL Gear's methods were generally <1.00E-03, although larger differences involving very small values were noted after exposure transitions. For vinyl chloride and methylene chloride, Excel and VBA PBPK model dose metrics differed by no more than -0.013% or -0.23%, respectively, from ACSL results. These differences are likely attributable to different step sizes rather than different numerical integration techniques. These results indicate that Microsoft Excel and VBA can be useful tools for utilizing PBPK models, and given the availability of these software programs, it is hoped that this effort will help facilitate the use and investigation of PBPK modeling.

  15. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of amphotericin B disposition in rats following administration of deoxycholate formulation (Fungizone®): pooled analysis of published data.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Leonid; Gershkovich, Pavel; Wasan, Kishor M; Mager, Donald E

    2011-06-01

    The time course of tissue distribution of amphotericin B (AmB) has not been sufficiently characterized despite its therapeutic importance and an apparent disconnect between plasma pharmacokinetics and clinical outcomes. The goals of this work were to develop and evaluate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to characterize the disposition properties of AmB administered as deoxycholate formulation in healthy rats and to examine the utility of the PBPK model for interspecies scaling of AmB pharmacokinetics. AmB plasma and tissue concentration-time data, following single and multiple intravenous administration of Fungizone® to rats, from several publications were combined for construction of the model. Physiological parameters were fixed to literature values. Various structural models for single organs were evaluated, and the whole-body PBPK model included liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract, plasma, and remainder compartments. The final model resulted in a good simultaneous description of both single and multiple dose data sets. Incorporation of three subcompartments for spleen and kidney tissues was required for capturing a prolonged half-life in these organs. The predictive performance of the final PBPK model was assessed by evaluating its utility in predicting pharmacokinetics of AmB in mice and humans. Clearance and permeability-surface area terms were scaled with body weight. The model demonstrated good predictions of plasma AmB concentration-time profiles for both species. This modeling framework represents an important basis that may be further utilized for characterization of formulation- and disease-related factors in AmB pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

  16. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for ionic silver and silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, Gerald; von Goetz, Natalie; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Silver is a strong antibiotic that is increasingly incorporated into consumer products as a bulk, salt, or nanosilver, thus potentially causing side-effects related to human exposure. However, the fate and behavior of (nano)silver in the human body is presently not well understood. In order to aggregate the existing experimental information, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) was developed in this study for ionic silver and nanosilver. The structure of the model was established on the basis of toxicokinetic data from intravenous studies. The number of calibrated parameters was minimized in order to enhance the predictive capability of the model. We validated the model structure for both silver forms by reproducing exposure conditions (dermal, oral, and inhalation) of in vivo experiments and comparing simulated and experimentally assessed organ concentrations. Therefore, the percutaneous, intestinal, or pulmonary absorption fraction was estimated based on the blood silver concentration of the respective experimental data set. In all of the cases examined, the model could successfully predict the biodistribution of ionic silver and 15–150 nm silver nanoparticles, which were not coated with substances designed to prolong the circulatory time (eg, polyethylene glycol). Furthermore, the results of our model indicate that: (1) within the application domain of our model, the particle size and coating had a minor influence on the biodistribution; (2) in vivo, it is more likely that silver nanoparticles are directly stored as insoluble salt particles than dissolve into Ag+; and (3) compartments of the mononuclear phagocytic system play a minor role in exposure levels that are relevant for human consumers. We also give an example of how the model can be used in exposure and risk assessments based on five different exposure scenarios, namely dietary intake, use of three separate consumer products, and occupational exposure. PMID:24039420

  17. Glucosamine sulfate effect on the degenerated patellar cartilage: preliminary findings by pharmacokinetic magnetic resonance modeling.

    PubMed

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Rodrigo, José Luis; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Carot, José Miguel

    2009-06-01

    Normal and degenerated cartilages have different magnetic resonance (MR) capillary permeability (K(trans)) and interstitial interchangeable volume (v(e)). Our hypothesis was that glucosamine sulfate treatment modifies these neovascularity abnormalities in osteoarthritis. Sixteen patients with patella degeneration, randomly distributed into glucosamine or control groups, underwent two 1.5-Tesla dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (treatment initiation and after 6 months). The pain visual analog scale (VAS) and American Knee Society (AKS) score were used. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used. Percentages of variations (postreatment-pretreatment/pretreatment) were compared (t-test for independent data). In the glucosamine group, pain and functional outcomes statistically improved (VAS: 7.3 +/- 1.1 to 3.6 +/- 1.3, p < 0.001; AKS: 18.6 +/- 6.9 to 42.9 +/- 2.7, p < 0.01). Glucosamine significantly increased K(trans) at 6 months (-54.4 +/- 21.2% vs 126.7 +/- 56.9%, p < 0.001, control vs glucosamine). In conclusion, glucosamine sulfate decreases pain while improving functional outcome in patients with cartilage degeneration. Glucosamine sulfate increases K(trans), allowing its proposal as a surrogate imaging biomarker after 6 months of treatment.

  18. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and its Metabolite Triandimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Pharmacokinetic data for par...

  19. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL TO ESTIMATE ABSORBED CARBARYL DOSE IN CHILDREN AFTER TURF APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to investigate exposure scenarios of children to carbaryl following turf application. Physiological, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters describing the fate and effects of carbaryl in rats were scaled ...

  20. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL TO ESTIMATE ABSORBED CARBARYL DOSE IN CHILDREN AFTER TURF APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to investigate exposure scenarios of children to carbaryl following turf application. Physiological, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters describing the fate and effects of carbaryl in rats were scaled ...

  1. Tuneable resolution as a systems biology approach for multi-scale, multi-compartment computational models.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Denise E; Hunt, C Anthony; Marino, Simeone; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2014-01-01

    The use of multi-scale mathematical and computational models to study complex biological processes is becoming increasingly productive. Multi-scale models span a range of spatial and/or temporal scales and can encompass multi-compartment (e.g., multi-organ) models. Modeling advances are enabling virtual experiments to explore and answer questions that are problematic to address in the wet-lab. Wet-lab experimental technologies now allow scientists to observe, measure, record, and analyze experiments focusing on different system aspects at a variety of biological scales. We need the technical ability to mirror that same flexibility in virtual experiments using multi-scale models. Here we present a new approach, tuneable resolution, which can begin providing that flexibility. Tuneable resolution involves fine- or coarse-graining existing multi-scale models at the user's discretion, allowing adjustment of the level of resolution specific to a question, an experiment, or a scale of interest. Tuneable resolution expands options for revising and validating mechanistic multi-scale models, can extend the longevity of multi-scale models, and may increase computational efficiency. The tuneable resolution approach can be applied to many model types, including differential equation, agent-based, and hybrid models. We demonstrate our tuneable resolution ideas with examples relevant to infectious disease modeling, illustrating key principles at work.

  2. Improving the clinical management of traumatic brain injury through the pharmacokinetic modeling of peripheral blood biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Dadas, Aaron; Washington, Jolewis; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir

    2016-11-30

    Blood biomarkers of neurovascular damage are used clinically to diagnose the presence severity or absence of neurological diseases, but data interpretation is confounded by a limited understanding of their dependence on variables other than the disease condition itself. These include half-life in blood, molecular weight, and marker-specific biophysical properties, as well as the effects of glomerular filtration, age, gender, and ethnicity. To study these factors, and to provide a method for markers' analyses, we developed a kinetic model that allows the integrated interpretation of these properties. The pharmacokinetic behaviors of S100B (monomer and homodimer), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 were modeled using relevant chemical and physical properties; modeling results were validated by comparison with data obtained from healthy subjects or individuals affected by neurological diseases. Brain imaging data were used to model passage of biomarkers across the blood-brain barrier. Our results show the following: (1) changes in biomarker serum levels due to age or disease progression are accounted for by differences in kidney filtration; (2) a significant change in the brain-to-blood volumetric ratio, which is characteristic of infant and adult development, contributes to variation in blood concentration of biomarkers; (3) the effects of extracranial contribution at steady-state are predicted in our model to be less important than suspected, while the contribution of blood-brain barrier disruption is confirmed as a significant factor in controlling markers' appearance in blood, where the biomarkers are typically detected; (4) the contribution of skin to the marker S100B blood levels depends on a direct correlation with pigmentation and not ethnicity; the contribution of extracranial sources for other markers requires further investigation. We developed a multi-compartment, pharmacokinetic model that integrates the biophysical

  3. Pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim (TMP) in normal and febrile rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ladefoged, O

    1977-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim (TMP) were investigated in normal and febrile rabbits. The half-life of TMP in rabbits is about 40 minutes and no differences were found between the half-life in normal and febrile rabbits. A significantly greater volume of distribution of TMP, however, was found in the febrile rabbits. Analysis according to the two-compartment model showed that the differences are due to a change in the distribution of TMP towards the peripheral compartments.

  4. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  5. Rabbit as an animal model for intravitreal pharmacokinetics: Clinical predictability and quality of the published data.

    PubMed

    Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2015-08-01

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice in drug delivery to the retina and/or choroid. Rabbit is the most commonly used animal species in intravitreal pharmacokinetics, but it has been criticized as being a poor model of human eye. The critique is based on some anatomical differences, properties of the vitreous humor, and observed differences in drug concentrations in the anterior chamber after intravitreal injections. We have systematically analyzed all published information on intravitreal pharmacokinetics in the rabbit and human eye. The analysis revealed major problems in the design of the pharmacokinetic studies. In this review we provide advice for study design. Overall, the pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution, half-life) in the human and rabbit eye have good correlation and comparable absolute values. Therefore, reliable rabbit-to-man translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics should be feasible. The relevant anatomical and physiological parameters in rabbit and man show only small differences. Furthermore, the claimed discrepancy between drug concentrations in the human and rabbit aqueous humor is not supported by the data analysis. Based on the available and properly conducted pharmacokinetic studies, the differences in the vitreous structure in rabbits and human patients do not lead to significant pharmacokinetic differences. This review is the first step towards inter-species translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics. More information is still needed to dissect the roles of drug delivery systems, disease states, age and ocular manipulation on the intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbit and man. Anyway, the published data and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the rabbit is a useful animal model in intravitreal pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of population pharmacokinetic models and optimal sampling times for ibuprofen tablet and suspension formulations in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Paul; Aminimanizani, Amir; Synold, Timothy; Scott, Christy

    2002-04-01

    High-dose ibuprofen therapy has demonstrated to slow deterioration in pulmonary function in children with cystic fibrosis with mild lung disease. Therapeutic drug monitoring has been recommended to maintain peak concentrations within the range of 50 to 100 mg/L to ensure efficacy. Current methods for dosage individualization are based on dose proportionality using visual inspection of the peak concentration; however, because of interpatient variability in the absorption of the various formulations this method may result in incorrect assessments of the peak concentration achieved. Maximum a posteriori Bayesian analysis (MAP-B) has proven to be a useful and precise method of individualizing the dose of aminoglycosides but requires a description of the structural model. In this study we performed parametric population modeling analysis on plasma concentrations of ibuprofen after single doses of 20 to 30-mg/kg tablet or suspension in children with cystic fibrosis. Patients evaluated in this study were part of a single dose pharmacokinetic study that has been published previously. A one-compartment model with first order absorption and a lag time best described the data. The pharmacokinetic parameters differed significantly depending on the formulation administered. D-optimal sampling times for the suspension and tablet formulations are 0, 0.25 to 0.5, 1, and 3 to 4 hours and 0, 0.25 to 0.5, 1 to 1.5, and 5 hours respectively. Use of MAP-B analysis performed with the 4 d-optimal sampling strategy resulted in accurate and precise estimates of the pharmacokinetic parameters when compared with maximum likelihood analysis using the complete plasma concentrations data set. Further studies are needed to evaluate the performance of these models and the impact on patient outcomes.

  7. Global stability of a multiple infected compartments model for waterborne diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Cao, Jinde

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, mathematical analysis is carried out for a multiple infected compartments model for waterborne diseases, such as cholera, giardia, and rotavirus. The model accounts for both person-to-person and water-to-person transmission routes. Global stability of the equilibria is studied. In terms of the basic reproduction number R0, we prove that, if R0⩽1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and the infection always disappears; whereas if R0>1, there exists a unique endemic equilibrium which is globally asymptotically stable for the corresponding fast-slow system. Numerical simulations verify our theoretical results and present that the decay rate of waterborne pathogens has a significant impact on the epidemic growth rate. Also, we observe numerically that the unique endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable for the whole system. This statement indicates that the present method need to be improved by other techniques.

  8. Cross-species genomics matches driver mutations and cell compartments to model ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert A; Wright, Karen D; Poppleton, Helen; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Finkelstein, David; Pounds, Stanley B; Rand, Vikki; Leary, Sarah E S; White, Elsie; Eden, Christopher; Hogg, Twala; Northcott, Paul; Mack, Stephen; Neale, Geoffrey; Wang, Yong-Dong; Coyle, Beth; Atkinson, Jennifer; DeWire, Mariko; Kranenburg, Tanya A; Gillespie, Yancey; Allen, Jeffrey C; Merchant, Thomas; Boop, Fredrick A; Sanford, Robert A; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W; Taylor, Michael D; Grundy, Richard G; Gilbertson, Richard J

    2010-07-29

    Understanding the biology that underlies histologically similar but molecularly distinct subgroups of cancer has proven difficult because their defining genetic alterations are often numerous, and the cellular origins of most cancers remain unknown. We sought to decipher this heterogeneity by integrating matched genetic alterations and candidate cells of origin to generate accurate disease models. First, we identified subgroups of human ependymoma, a form of neural tumour that arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Subgroup-specific alterations included amplifications and homozygous deletions of genes not yet implicated in ependymoma. To select cellular compartments most likely to give rise to subgroups of ependymoma, we matched the transcriptomes of human tumours to those of mouse neural stem cells (NSCs), isolated from different regions of the CNS at different developmental stages, with an intact or deleted Ink4a/Arf locus (that encodes Cdkn2a and b). The transcriptome of human supratentorial ependymomas with amplified EPHB2 and deleted INK4A/ARF matched only that of embryonic cerebral Ink4a/Arf(-/-) NSCs. Notably, activation of Ephb2 signalling in these, but not other, NSCs generated the first mouse model of ependymoma, which is highly penetrant and accurately models the histology and transcriptome of one subgroup of human supratentorial tumour. Further, comparative analysis of matched mouse and human tumours revealed selective deregulation in the expression and copy number of genes that control synaptogenesis, pinpointing disruption of this pathway as a critical event in the production of this ependymoma subgroup. Our data demonstrate the power of cross-species genomics to meticulously match subgroup-specific driver mutations with cellular compartments to model and interrogate cancer subgroups.

  9. In Vitro Multitissue Interface Model Supports Rapid Vasculogenesis and Mechanistic Study of Vascularization across Tissue Compartments.

    PubMed

    Buno, Kevin P; Chen, Xuemei; Weibel, Justin A; Thiede, Stephanie N; Garimella, Suresh V; Yoder, Mervin C; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L

    2016-08-31

    A significant challenge facing tissue engineers is the design and development of complex multitissue systems, including vascularized tissue-tissue interfaces. While conventional in vitro models focus on either vasculogenesis (de novo formation of blood vessels) or angiogenesis (vessels sprouting from existing vessels or endothelial monolayers), successful therapeutic vascularization strategies will likely rely on coordinated integration of both processes. To address this challenge, we developed a novel in vitro multitissue interface model in which human endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC)-encapsulated tissue spheres are embedded within a surrounding tissue microenvironment. This highly reproducible approach exploits biphilic surfaces (nanostructured surfaces with distinct superhydrophobic and hydrophilic regions) to (i) support tissue compartments with user-specified matrix composition and physical properties as well as cell type and density and (ii) introduce boundary conditions that prevent the cell-mediated tissue contraction routinely observed with conventional three-dimensional monodispersion cultures. This multitissue interface model was applied to test the hypothesis that independent control of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-cell interactions would affect vascularization within the tissue sphere as well as across the tissue-tissue interface. We found that high-cell-density tissue spheres containing 5 × 10(6) ECFCs/mL exhibit rapid and robust vasculogenesis, forming highly interconnected, stable (as indicated by type IV collagen deposition) vessel networks within only 3 days. Addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) in the surrounding tissue further enhanced vasculogenesis within the sphere as well as angiogenic vessel elongation across the tissue-tissue boundary, with both effects being dependent on the ASC density. Overall, results show that the ECFC density and ECFC-ASC crosstalk, in terms of paracrine and mechanophysical signaling

  10. Reconstructing Exposures from Biomarkers using Exposure-Pharmacokinetic Modeling - A Case Study with Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for a short half-life chemical, carbaryl, were characterized using the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), an exposure model, and a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CARES was...

  11. Reconstructing Exposures from Biomarkers using Exposure-Pharmacokinetic Modeling - A Case Study with Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for a short half-life chemical, carbaryl, were characterized using the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), an exposure model, and a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CARES was...

  12. USE OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS TO ASSESS OCCUPATIONAL AND RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urinary biomarker measurements were analyzed using a dynamic pharmacokinetic model. The dynamic model provided the structure to link spot urine samples with corresponding exposure and absorbed dose. Data from both occupational and residential studies were analyzed. In the Agri...

  13. PKreport: report generation for checking population pharmacokinetic model assumptions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Li, Jun

    2011-05-16

    Graphics play an important and unique role in population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model building by exploring hidden structure among data before modeling, evaluating model fit, and validating results after modeling. The work described in this paper is about a new R package called PKreport, which is able to generate a collection of plots and statistics for testing model assumptions, visualizing data and diagnosing models. The metric system is utilized as the currency for communicating between data sets and the package to generate special-purpose plots. It provides ways to match output from diverse software such as NONMEM, Monolix, R nlme package, etc. The package is implemented with S4 class hierarchy, and offers an efficient way to access the output from NONMEM 7. The final reports take advantage of the web browser as user interface to manage and visualize plots. PKreport provides 1) a flexible and efficient R class to store and retrieve NONMEM 7 output, 2) automate plots for users to visualize data and models, 3) automatically generated R scripts that are used to create the plots; 4) an archive-oriented management tool for users to store, retrieve and modify figures, 5) high-quality graphs based on the R packages, lattice and ggplot2. The general architecture, running environment and statistical methods can be readily extended with R class hierarchy. PKreport is free to download at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/PKreport/index.html.

  14. A multiobjective modeling approach to locate multi-compartment containers for urban-sorted waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tralhao, Lino; Coutinho-Rodrigues, Joao; Alcada-Almeida, Luis

    2010-12-15

    The location of multi-compartment sorted waste containers for recycling purposes in cities is an important problem in the context of urban waste management. The costs associated with those facilities and the impacts placed on populations are important concerns. This paper introduces a mixed-integer, multiobjective programming approach to identify the locations and capacities of such facilities. The approach incorporates an optimization model in a Geographical Information System (GIS)-based interactive decision support system that includes four objectives. The first objective minimizes the total investment cost; the second one minimizes the average distance from dwellings to the respective multi-compartment container; the last two objectives address the 'pull' and 'push' characteristics of the decision problem, one by minimizing the number of individuals too close to any container, and the other by minimizing the number of dwellings too far from the respective multi-compartment container. The model determines the number of facilities to be opened, the respective container capacities, their locations, their respective shares of the total waste of each type to be collected, and the dwellings assigned to each facility. The approach proposed was tested with a case study for the historical center of Coimbra city, Portugal, where a large urban renovation project, addressing about 800 buildings, is being undertaken. This paper demonstrates that the models and techniques incorporated in the interactive decision support system (IDSS) can be used to assist a decision maker (DM) in analyzing this complex problem in a realistically sized urban application. Ten solutions consisting of different combinations of underground containers for the disposal of four types of sorted waste in 12 candidate sites, were generated. These solutions and tradeoffs among the objectives are presented to the DM via tables, graphs, color-coded maps and other graphics. The DM can then use this

  15. Propofol Pharmacokinetics and Estimation of Fetal Propofol Exposure during Mid-Gestational Fetal Surgery: A Maternal-Fetal Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Ngamprasertwong, Pornswan; Dong, Min; Niu, Jing; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Vinks, Alexander A; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Measuring fetal drug concentrations is extremely difficult in humans. We conducted a study in pregnant sheep to simultaneously describe maternal and fetal concentrations of propofol, a common intravenous anesthetic agent used in humans. Compared to inhalational anesthesia, propofol supplemented anesthesia lowered the dose of desflurane required to provide adequate uterine relaxation during open fetal surgery. This resulted in better intraoperative fetal cardiac outcome. This study describes maternal and fetal propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) using a chronically instrumented maternal-fetal sheep model. Fetal and maternal blood samples were simultaneously collected from eight mid-gestational pregnant ewes during general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and desflurane. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was performed by using NONMEM software. Total body weight, gestational age and hemodynamic parameters were tested in the covariate analysis. The final model was validated by bootstrapping and visual predictive check. A total of 160 propofol samples were collected. A 2-compartment maternal PK model with a third fetal compartment appropriately described the data. Mean population parameter estimates for maternal propofol clearance and central volume of distribution were 4.17 L/min and 37.7 L, respectively, in a typical ewe with a median heart rate of 135 beats/min. Increase in maternal heart rate significantly correlated with increase in propofol clearance. The estimated population maternal-fetal inter-compartment clearance was 0.0138 L/min and the volume of distribution of propofol in the fetus was 0.144 L. Fetal propofol clearance was found to be almost negligible compared to maternal clearance and could not be robustly estimated. For the first time, a maternal-fetal PK model of propofol in pregnant ewes was successfully developed. This study narrows the gap in our knowledge in maternal-fetal PK model in human. Our study confirms that maternal heart rate has an

  16. Propofol Pharmacokinetics and Estimation of Fetal Propofol Exposure during Mid-Gestational Fetal Surgery: A Maternal-Fetal Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Vinks, Alexander A.; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background Measuring fetal drug concentrations is extremely difficult in humans. We conducted a study in pregnant sheep to simultaneously describe maternal and fetal concentrations of propofol, a common intravenous anesthetic agent used in humans. Compared to inhalational anesthesia, propofol supplemented anesthesia lowered the dose of desflurane required to provide adequate uterine relaxation during open fetal surgery. This resulted in better intraoperative fetal cardiac outcome. This study describes maternal and fetal propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) using a chronically instrumented maternal-fetal sheep model. Methods Fetal and maternal blood samples were simultaneously collected from eight mid-gestational pregnant ewes during general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and desflurane. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was performed by using NONMEM software. Total body weight, gestational age and hemodynamic parameters were tested in the covariate analysis. The final model was validated by bootstrapping and visual predictive check. Results A total of 160 propofol samples were collected. A 2-compartment maternal PK model with a third fetal compartment appropriately described the data. Mean population parameter estimates for maternal propofol clearance and central volume of distribution were 4.17 L/min and 37.7 L, respectively, in a typical ewe with a median heart rate of 135 beats/min. Increase in maternal heart rate significantly correlated with increase in propofol clearance. The estimated population maternal-fetal inter-compartment clearance was 0.0138 L/min and the volume of distribution of propofol in the fetus was 0.144 L. Fetal propofol clearance was found to be almost negligible compared to maternal clearance and could not be robustly estimated. Conclusions For the first time, a maternal-fetal PK model of propofol in pregnant ewes was successfully developed. This study narrows the gap in our knowledge in maternal-fetal PK model in human. Our study confirms

  17. Pharmacokinetics and a simulation model of colforsin daropate, new forskolin derivative inotropic vasodilator, in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kikura, Mutsuhito; Morita, Koji; Sato, Shigehito

    2004-03-01

    Colforsin daropate, a water-soluble forskolin derivative, is an adenyl cyclase activator with positive inotropic and vasodilatory effects that are useful in the treatment of ventricular dysfunction. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of colforsin daropate in cardiac surgery patients and performed simulations to determine the dosage necessary to maintain an effective plasma concentration following cardiopulmonary bypass. In six patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft, colforsin daropate (0.01mgkg(-1)) was administered immediately after separation from cardiopulmonary bypass. Arterial blood was sampled over the next 16h and plasma concentrations of colforsin daropate and its initial active metabolite were determined by gas-chromatography. Extended nonlinear least-squares regression was used to fit a three-compartment model to each patient's data. Distribution half-life (t(1/2alpha)) was 3.9+/-1.1min, metabolic half-life (t(1/2beta)) was 1.9+/-0.7h, and elimination half-life (t(1/2gamma)) was 95.3+/-15.2h. Central-compartment volume was 591.0+/-42.8mlkg(-1), volume distribution was 2689.2+/-450.6mlkg(-1), and elimination clearance was 27.7+/-14.7mlkg(-1)min(-1). In the pharmacokinetic simulation model, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0microgkg(-1)min(-1) continuous infusion of colforsin daropate produce effective concentration (5-10ngml(-1)) within 30, 20, and 10min, respectively following administration. An initial active metabolite of decreased rapidly to less than 1.0ngml(-1) within the first 10min.A colforsin daropate infusion of 0.7-1.0microgkg(-1)min(-1) for 10-20min followed by 0.5microgkg(-1)min(-1) continuous infusion is recommended to produce an effective concentration (5-10ngml(-1)) within 10-20min and to maintain a therapeutic concentration throughout the administration period after cardiopulmonary bypass.

  18. Population Pharmacokinetic Modelling and Bayesian Estimation of Tacrolimus Exposure: Is this Clinically Useful for Dosage Prediction Yet?

    PubMed

    Brooks, Emily; Tett, Susan E; Isbel, Nicole M; Staatz, Christine E

    2016-11-01

    This review summarises the available data on the population pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus and use of Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) Bayesian estimation to predict tacrolimus exposure and subsequent drug dosage requirements in solid organ transplant recipients. A literature search was conducted which identified 56 studies that assessed the population pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus based on non-linear mixed effects modelling and 14 studies that assessed the predictive performance of MAP Bayesian estimation of tacrolimus area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time zero to the end of the dosing interval. Studies were most commonly undertaken in adult kidney transplant recipients and investigated the immediate-release formulation. The pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus were described using one- and two-compartment disposition models with first-order elimination in 61 and 39 % of population pharmacokinetic studies, respectively. Variability in tacrolimus whole blood apparent clearance amongst transplant recipients was most commonly related to cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5 genotype (rs776746), patient haematocrit, patient weight, post-operative day and hepatic function (aspartate aminotransferase). Bias, as calculated using estimation of the mean predictive error (MPE) or mean percentage predictive error (MPPE) associated with prediction of the tacrolimus AUC, ranged from -15 to 9.95 %. Imprecision, as calculated through estimation of the root mean squared error (RMSE) or mean absolute prediction error (MAPE), was generally much poorer overall, ranging from 0.81 to 40. r (2) values ranged from 0.27 to 0.99 %. Of the Bayesian forecasting strategies that used two or more tacrolimus concentrations, 71 % showed bias of 10 % or less; however, only 39 % showed imprecision of 10 % or less. The combination of sampling times at 0, 1 and 3 h post-dose consistently showed bias and imprecision values of less than 15 %. No studies to date have examined how closely MAP

  19. Development and Validation of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Chloral Hydrate and Its Main Metabolites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    developed model described successfully the pharmacokinetics of chloral, trichloroethanol and its glucuronide in mice and dogs. It seems that one adequately...OF PAGES Pharmacokinetic model Chloral hydrate Trichloroacetic acid 48 Trichloroacetate glucuronide Computer simulation Mouse 16. PRICE CODE Dog 17...general scheme of the PBPK sub-models for trichloroethylene and its glucuronide ... 13 4 The results of PBPK model computer simulations of historical

  20. Targeting anticancer drugs to the brain: II. Physiological pharmacokinetic model of oxantrazole following intraarterial administration to rat glioma-2 (RG-2) bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Gallo, J M; Varkonyi, P; Hassan, E E; Groothius, D R

    1993-10-01

    The disposition of the anticancer drug oxantrazole (OX) was characterized in rats bearing the rat glioma-2 (RG-2) brain tumor. Following intraarterial administration of 3 mg/kg of OX, serial sacrifices were completed from 5 min to 5 hr after administration. Blood and tissue samples collected at the time of sacrifice were processed and measured for OX concentrations by HPLC. The kidney had the greatest affinity for OX with the Cmax being 40.6 micrograms/ml at 15 min after administration. OX concentrations in brain tumor were higher than in normal right and left brain hemispheres, and consistent with enhanced drug blood-tumor barrier (BTB) permeability seen in experimental models for brain tumors. Observed heart, liver, lung, and spleen OX concentrations were similar, ranging from approximately 2 micrograms/ml to 20 micrograms/ml. A unique technique was used to develop a global physiological pharmacokinetic model for OX. A hybrid or forcing function method was used to estimate individual tissue compartment biochemical parameters (i.e., partition and mass transfer coefficients). A log likelihood optimization scheme was used to determine the best model structure and parameter sets for each tissue. Most tissues required a 3-subcompartment structure to adequately describe the observed data. The global model was then reconstructed with an arterial blood and rest of body compartments that provided predicted OX concentrations in agreement with the data. The model development strategy provides a systematic approach to physiological pharmacokinetic model development.

  1. Semi-mechanistic physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of clinical glibenclamide pharmacokinetics and drug-drug-interactions.

    PubMed

    Greupink, Rick; Schreurs, Marieke; Benne, Marina S; Huisman, Maarten T; Russel, Frans G M

    2013-08-16

    We studied if the clinical pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of the sulfonylurea-derivative glibenclamide can be simulated via a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach. To this end, a glibenclamide PBPK-model was build in Simcyp using in vitro physicochemical and biotransformation data of the drug, and was subsequently optimized using plasma disappearance data observed after i.v. administration. The model was validated against data observed after glibenclamide oral dosing, including DDIs. We found that glibenclamide pharmacokinetics could be adequately modeled if next to CYP metabolism an active hepatic uptake process was assumed. This hepatic uptake process was subsequently included in the model in a non-mechanistic manner. After an oral dose of 0.875 mg predicted Cmax and AUC were 39.7 (95% CI:37.0-42.7)ng/mL and 108 (95% CI: 96.9-120)ng/mLh, respectively, which is in line with observed values of 43.6 (95% CI: 37.7-49.5)ng/mL and 133 (95% CI: 107-159)ng/mLh. For a 1.75 mg oral dose, the predicted and observed values were 82.5 (95% CI:76.6-88.9)ng/mL vs 91.1 (95% CI: 67.9-115.9) for Cmax and 224 (95% CI: 202-248) vs 324 (95% CI: 197-451)ng/mLh for AUC, respectively. The model correctly predicted a decrease in exposure after rifampicin pre-treatment. An increase in glibenclamide exposure after clarithromycin co-treatment was predicted, but the magnitude of the effect was underestimated because part of this DDI is the result of an interaction at the transporter level. Finally, the effects of glibenclamide and fluconazol co-administration were simulated. Our simulations indicated that co-administration of this potent CYP450 inhibitor will profoundly increase glibenclamide exposure, which is in line with clinical observations linking the glibenclamide-fluconazol combination to an increased risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, glibenclamide pharmacokinetics and its CYP-mediated DDIs can be simulated via PBPK-modeling. In addition, our

  2. Simultaneous pharmacokinetic modeling of cocaine and its metabolites, norcocaine and benzoylecgonine, after intravenous and oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Lau, C E

    2001-09-01

    To accurately assess the mechanism of involvement of the active metabolite norcocaine in the effects of oral cocaine, it is essential to determine the rate and extent of the formation of norcocaine. Although this study was designed specifically for this aim, it was also of interest to characterize the metabolite kinetics of benzoylecgonine for comparative purpose. We first characterized the pharmacokinetics of cocaine, norcocaine, and benzoylecgonine by the i.v. route of administration; all three drugs decayed biexponentially. These pharmacokinetic estimates were then used for determination of the formation of norcocaine and benzoylecgonine after i.v. and p.o. (20-40 mg/kg) cocaine administration. Although t(1/2alpha), and t(1/2beta) were similar across the three compounds, the values of volume of distribution in the central compartment and clearance for benzoylecgonine were much smaller than those of cocaine and norcocaine. Norcocaine was not detected following i.v. cocaine; however, serum norcocaine concentrations were as high as those of oral cocaine. Both routes of cocaine administration produced benzoylecgonine. A pharmacokinetic model for the metabolite kinetics was proposed by sequentially adding the models that most adequately described the formation of each metabolite to the model of cocaine. For oral cocaine, the absolute bioavailability was 3.48%, whereas 6.04 and 2.26% of cocaine were converted to benzoylecgonine and norcocaine, respectively, during first-pass absorption regardless of dose. Furthermore, the majority of norcocaine and 92% of benzoylecgonine were formed during the first-pass absorption, leaving 8% of benzoylecgonine produced in systemic circulation. The profile of norcocaine as a metabolite confirmed the involvement of norcocaine in cocaine's behavioral effects.

  3. Differential pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling of robenacoxib and ketoprofen in a feline model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pelligand, L; King, J N; Hormazabal, V; Toutain, P L; Elliott, J; Lees, P

    2014-08-01

    Robenacoxib and ketoprofen are acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Both are licensed for once daily administration in the cat, despite having short blood half-lives. This study reports the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling of each drug in a feline model of inflammation. Eight cats were enrolled in a randomized, controlled, three-period cross-over study. In each period, sterile inflammation was induced by the injection of carrageenan into a subcutaneously implanted tissue cage, immediately before the subcutaneous injection of robenacoxib (2 mg/kg), ketoprofen (2 mg/kg) or placebo. Blood samples were taken for the determination of drug and serum thromboxane (Tx)B2 concentrations (measuring COX-1 activity). Tissue cage exudate samples were obtained for drug and prostaglandin (PG)E2 concentrations (measuring COX-2 activity). Individual animal pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition were generated by PK/PD modelling. S(+) ketoprofen clearance scaled by bioavailability (CL/F) was 0.114 L/kg/h (elimination half-life = 1.62 h). For robenacoxib, blood CL/F was 0.684 L/kg/h (elimination half-life = 1.13 h). Exudate elimination half-lives were 25.9 and 41.5 h for S(+) ketoprofen and robenacoxib, respectively. Both drugs reduced exudate PGE2 concentration significantly between 6 and 36 h. Ketoprofen significantly suppressed (>97%) serum TxB2 between 4 min and 24 h, whereas suppression was mild and transient with robenacoxib. In vivo IC50 COX-1/IC50 COX-2 ratios were 66.9:1 for robenacoxib and 1:107 for S(+) ketoprofen. The carboxylic acid nature of both drugs may contribute to the prolonged COX-2 inhibition in exudate, despite short half-lives in blood.

  4. An Extended Minimal Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model: Evaluation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy on Human IgG Pharmacokinetics in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Gurkishan S; Morris, Marilyn E

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have evaluated the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of low molecular weight molecules, there is limited information regarding effects on monoclonal antibodies. Our previous studies have reported significant increases in total (2-4 fold) and renal (100-300 fold) clearance of human IgG, an antibody isotype, in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Pioglitazone treatment incompletely reversed the disease-related PK changes. The objective of this study was to construct a mechanistic model for simultaneous fitting plasma and urine data, to yield physiologically relevant PK parameters. We propose an extended minimal physiologically based PK (mPBPK) model specifically for IgG by classifying organs as either leaky or tight vascular tissues, and adding a kidney compartment. The model incorporates convection as the primary mechanism of IgG movement from plasma into tissues, interstitial fluid (ISF) in extravascular distribution space, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), sieving coefficient and fraction reabsorbed in the kidney. The model captured the plasma and urine PK profiles well, and simulated concentrations in ISF. The model estimated a 2-4 fold increase in nonrenal clearance from plasma and 30-120 fold increase in renal clearance with T2DM, consistent with the experimental findings, and these differences in renal clearance were related to changes in GFR, sieving coefficient, and proximal tubular reabsorption. In conclusion, the mPBPK model offers a more relevant approach for analyzing plasma and urine IgG concentration-time data than conventional models and provides insight regarding alterations in distributional and elimination parameters occurring with T2DM.

  5. Animal models for exploring the pharmacokinetics of breast cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    Despite massive expenditures in research and development to cure breast cancer, few agents that pass preclinical trials demonstrate efficacy in humans. Although this endeavor relies on murine models to screen for efficacy before progressing to clinical trials, historically there has been little focus on the validation of these models, even in the era of targeted therapy where understanding the genetic signatures of tumors under study is critical. This review includes the transgenic, xenograft, and syngeneic murine breast cancer models, the ectopic, orthotopic and intravenous methods of cell implantation, and the ethics of animal experimentation. It also includes the latest data on tumor gene expression and the issues to consider when exploring the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies. Breast cancer drug development is expensive and inefficient without a consensus preclinical murine model. Investigators must approach the choice of murine model with the same sophistication that is applied to the choice of in vitro assays to improve efficiency. Understanding the limitations of each model available, including the nuances of tumor gene signatures, is critical for investigators exploring the phamacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies, especially in the context of gene profiling and individualized targeted therapy.

  6. Animal models for exploring the pharmacokinetics of breast cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Omar M.; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite massive expenditures in research and development to cure breast cancer, few agents that pass preclinical trials demonstrate efficacy in humans. Although this endeavor relies on murine models to screen for efficacy before progressing to clinical trials, historically there has been little focus on the validation of these models, even in the era of targeted therapy where understanding the genetic signatures of tumors under study is critical. Areas covered This review includes the transgenic, xenograft, and syngeneic murine breast cancer models, the ectopic, orthotopic and intravenous methods of cell implantation, and the ethics of animal experimentation. It also includes the latest data on tumor gene expression and the issues to consider when exploring the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies. Expert opinion Breast cancer drug development is expensive and inefficient without a consensus preclinical murine model. Investigators must approach the choice of murine model with the same sophistication that is applied to the choice of in vitro assays to improve efficiency. Understanding the limitations of each model available, including the nuances of tumor gene signatures, is critical for investigators exploring the phamacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies, especially in the context of gene profiling and individualized targeted therapy. PMID:25416501

  7. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models in chemical risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Moiz; Fisher, Jeffrey; Blount, Benjamin; Ruiz, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting "in silico" tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application-health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The "human PBPK model toolkit" is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures.

  8. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models in Chemical Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Moiz; Fisher, Jeffrey; Blount, Benjamin; Ruiz, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting “in silico” tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application—health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The “human PBPK model toolkit” is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:22523493

  9. In Vitro Dissolution and In Vivo Bioavailability of Six Brands of Ciprofloxacin Tablets Administered in Rabbits and Their Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the in vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of six brands of ciprofloxacin oral tablets available in the UAE market using rabbits. The in vitro dissolution profiles of the six ciprofloxacin products were determined using the USP dissolution paddle method. Pharmacokinetic modeling using compartmental and noncompartmental analysis was done to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of ciprofloxacin after single-dose oral administration. In vitro release study revealed that the amount of ciprofloxacin released in 20 minutes was not less than 80% of the labeled amount which is in accordance with the pharmacopoeial requirements. All tested products are considered to be very rapid dissolving except for formulae A and D. Ciprofloxacin plasma concentration in rabbits was best fitted to a two-compartment open model. The lowest bioavailability was determined to be for product A (93.24%) while the highest bioavailability was determined to be for product E (108.01%). Postmarketing surveillance is very crucial to ensure product quality and eliminating substandard products to be distributed and, consequently, ensure better patient clinical outcome. The tested ciprofloxacin generic products distributed in the UAE market were proven to be of good quality and could be used interchangeably with the branded ciprofloxacin product. PMID:24995312

  10. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets administered in rabbits and their pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Sahar; Abu-Gharbieh, Eman

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the in vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of six brands of ciprofloxacin oral tablets available in the UAE market using rabbits. The in vitro dissolution profiles of the six ciprofloxacin products were determined using the USP dissolution paddle method. Pharmacokinetic modeling using compartmental and noncompartmental analysis was done to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of ciprofloxacin after single-dose oral administration. In vitro release study revealed that the amount of ciprofloxacin released in 20 minutes was not less than 80% of the labeled amount which is in accordance with the pharmacopoeial requirements. All tested products are considered to be very rapid dissolving except for formulae A and D. Ciprofloxacin plasma concentration in rabbits was best fitted to a two-compartment open model. The lowest bioavailability was determined to be for product A (93.24%) while the highest bioavailability was determined to be for product E (108.01%). Postmarketing surveillance is very crucial to ensure product quality and eliminating substandard products to be distributed and, consequently, ensure better patient clinical outcome. The tested ciprofloxacin generic products distributed in the UAE market were proven to be of good quality and could be used interchangeably with the branded ciprofloxacin product.

  11. Development of good modelling practice for phsiologically based pharmacokinetic models for use in risk assessment: The first steps

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing use of tissue dosimetry estimated using pharmacokinetic models in chemical risk assessments in multiple countries necessitates the need to develop internationally recognized good modelling practices. These practices would facilitate sharing of models and model eva...

  12. External Evaluation of Two Fluconazole Infant Population Pharmacokinetic Models.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael F; Beechinor, Ryan J; Wade, Kelly C; Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian; Hornik, Christoph P; Capparelli, Edmund V; Duara, Shahnaz; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Gonzalez, Daniel

    2017-09-11

    Fluconazole is an antifungal agent used for the treatment of invasive candidiasis, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Population pharmacokinetics (PK) models of fluconazole in infants have been previously published by Wade et al. and Momper et al. Here we report the results of the first external evaluation of the predictive performance of both models. We used patient level data from both studies to externally evaluate both PK models. The predictive performance of each model was evaluated using the model prediction error (PE), mean prediction error (MPE), mean absolute prediction error (MAPE), prediction-corrected visual predictive check (pcVPC), and normalized prediction distribution errors (NPDE). The parameters of each model were re-estimated using both the external and merged datasets. When evaluated with an external data set, the model proposed by Wade et al. showed lower median PE, MPE, and MAPE (0.429 μg/mL, 41.9%, and 57.6%, respectively) compared to the model proposed by Momper et al. (2.45 μg/mL, 188%, and 195%, respectively). The majority of re-estimated parameters were within 20% of their respective original parameter values for all model evaluations. Our analysis determined that though both models are robust, the model proposed by Wade et al. had greater accuracy and precision than the model proposed by Momper et al., likely because it was derived from a patient population with a wider age range. This study highlights the importance of external evaluation of infant population PK models. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  14. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  15. [A nonlinear multi-compartment lung model for optimization of breathing airflow pattern].

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongming; Gu, Lingyan; Chen, Fuhua

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult to select the appropriate ventilation mode in clinical mechanical ventilation. This paper presents a nonlinear multi-compartment lung model to solve the difficulty. The purpose is to optimize respiratory airflow patterns and get the minimum of the work of inspiratory phrase and lung volume acceleration, minimum of the elastic potential energy and rapidity of airflow rate changes of expiratory phrase. Sigmoidal function is used to smooth the respiratory function of nonlinear equations. The equations are established to solve nonlinear boundary conditions BVP, and finally the problem was solved with gradient descent method. Experimental results showed that lung volume and the rate of airflow after optimization had good sensitivity and convergence speed. The results provide a theoretical basis for the development of multivariable controller monitoring critically ill mechanically ventilated patients.

  16. Network bursting using experimentally constrained single compartment CA3 hippocampal neuron models with adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dur-e-Ahmad, Muhammad; Nicola, Wilten; Campbell, Sue Ann; Skinner, Frances K

    2012-08-01

    The hippocampus is a brain structure critical for memory functioning. Its network dynamics include several patterns such as sharp waves that are generated in the CA3 region. To understand how population outputs are generated, models need to consider aspects of network size, cellular and synaptic characteristics and context, which are necessarily 'balanced' in appropriate ways to produce particular outputs. Thick slice hippocampal preparations spontaneously produce sharp waves that are initiated in CA3 regions and depend on the right balance of glutamatergic activities. As a step toward developing network models that can explain important balances in the generation of hippocampal output, we develop models of CA3 pyramidal cells. Our models are single compartment in nature, use an Izhikevich-type structure and involve parameter values that are specifically designed to encompass CA3 intrinsic properties. Importantly, they incorporate spike frequency adaptation characteristics that are directly comparable to those measured experimentally. Excitatory networks using these model cells are able to produce bursting suggesting that the amount of spike frequency adaptation expressed in the biological cells is an essential contributor to network bursting, and as such, may be important for sharp wave generation. The network bursting mechanism is numerically dissected showing the critical balance between adaptation and excitatory drive. The compact nature of our models allows large network simulations to be efficiently computed. This, together with the linkage of our models to cellular characteristics, will allow us to develop an understanding of population output of CA3 hippocampus with direct biological comparisons.

  17. Rational Design of Glucose-Responsive Insulin Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bakh, Naveed A; Bisker, Gili; Lee, Michael A; Gong, Xun; Strano, Michael S

    2017-08-25

    A glucose responsive insulin (GRI) is a therapeutic that modulates its potency, concentration, or dosing of insulin in relation to a patient's dynamic glucose concentration, thereby approximating aspects of a normally functioning pancreas. Current GRI design lacks a theoretical basis on which to base fundamental design parameters such as glucose reactivity, dissociation constant or potency, and in vivo efficacy. In this work, an approach to mathematically model the relevant parameter space for effective GRIs is induced, and design rules for linking GRI performance to therapeutic benefit are developed. Well-developed pharmacokinetic models of human glucose and insulin metabolism coupled to a kinetic model representation of a freely circulating GRI are used to determine the desired kinetic parameters and dosing for optimal glycemic control. The model examines a subcutaneous dose of GRI with kinetic parameters in an optimal range that results in successful glycemic control within prescribed constraints over a 24 h period. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the modeling approach can find GRI parameters that enable stable glucose levels that persist through a skipped meal. The results provide a framework for exploring the parameter space of GRIs, potentially without extensive, iterative in vivo animal testing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Investigation of an alternative generic model for predicting pharmacokinetic changes during physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Edginton, Andrea N; Cheung, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed using MATLAB Simulink® and PK-Sim®. We compared the capability and usefulness of these two models by simulating pharmacokinetic changes of midazolam under exercise and heat stress to verify the usefulness of MATLAB Simulink® as a generic PBPK modeling software. Although both models show good agreement with experimental data obtained under resting condition, their predictions of pharmacokinetics changes are less accurate in the stressful conditions. However, MATLAB Simulink® may be more flexible to include physiologically based processes such as oral absorption and simulate various stress parameters such as stress intensity, duration and timing of drug administration to improve model performance. Further work will be conducted to modify algorithms in our generic model developed using MATLAB Simulink® and to investigate pharmacokinetics under other physiological stress such as trauma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. New compartment model analysis of lean-mass and fat-mass growth with overfeeding.

    PubMed

    Shumilov, Dmytro; Heymsfield, Steven B; Redman, Leanne M; Kalluri, Kesava; Dey, Joyoni

    2016-05-01

    Mathematical models of lean- and fat-mass growth with diet are useful to help describe and potentially predict the fat- and lean-mass change with different diets as a function of consumed protein and fat calories. Most of the existing models do not explicitly account for interdependence of fat-mass on the lean-mass and vice versa. The aim of this study was to develop a new compartmental model to describe the growth of lean and fat mass depending on the input of dietary protein and fat, and accounting for the interdependence of adipose tissue and muscle growth. The model was fitted to existing clinical data of an overfeeding trial for 23 participants (with a high-protein diet, a normal-protein diet, and a low-protein diet) and compared with the existing Forbes model. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the compartment model data fit was smoother with less overall error than the Forbes model. The root means square error were 0.39, 0.93 and 0.72 kg for the new model, the Forbes model, and the modified Forbes model, respectively. Additionally, for the present model, the differences between some of the coefficients (on the cross dependence of fat and lean mass as well as on the intake diet dependence) across different diets were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Our new Dey-model showed excellent fit to overfeeding data for 23 normal participants with some significant differences of model coefficients across diets, enabling further studies of the model coefficients for larger groups of participants with obesity or other diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Joint population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for the heart rate effects at rest and at the end of exercise for cilobradine.

    PubMed

    Vélez de Mendizábal, Nieves; Staab, Alexander; Schäfer, Hans Günter; Trommeshauser, Dirk; Döge, Christiane; Klüglich, Matthias; Roberts, Juliet; Trocóniz, Iñaki F

    2013-04-01

    To develop a semi-mechanistic population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model for the selective bradycardic agent cilobradine describing simultaneously the heart rate (HR) measured at rest and just after the end of exercise sharing the same set of PKPD parameters. Healthy subjects received cilobradine orally once daily over 2 weeks at 0.25-5 mg doses or placebo. Plasma drug concentrations and HR were measured at rest and following 3 min of exercise over the entire study period. PK and HR data were analyzed using the population approach with NONMEM VII. Plasma disposition of cilobradine was described with a three compartment model. Cilobradine showed dose proportional and time independent pharmacokinetics. HR response was drug concentration dependent and appeared with a significant delay with respect to PK profiles, a phenomenon modeled using two transit compartments. Perturbation in HR at rest as a consequence of exercise was described assuming that physiological processes controlling cardiac frequency were constantly increased over the period of exercise only. The selected model provides a useful modeling tool for cases where the PD response measured is the result of a temporal experimental induced perturbation.

  1. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in human exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The potential dose received by an individual during defined exposure situations can be determined using personal dosimeters or estimated by combining information on exposure scenarios with the environmental concentration (C.) of chemicals. With the latter approach, not only the potential dose but also the internal dose (i.e., amount of chemical that has been absorbed and available for interaction with receptors) and biologically-effective dose (i.e., amount of chemical that actually reaches the cellular sites where interaction with macromolecules occur) can be estimated if C. is provided as an input to PBPK models. These models are mathematical representations of the interrelationships among the critical determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals in biota. Since the compartments in this model correspond to biologically relevant tissues or tissue groups, the amount of chemical reaching specific target organ(s) can be estimated. Further, the PBPK models permit the use of biological monitoring data such as urinary levels of metabolites, hemoglobin adduct levels, and alveolar air concentrations, to reconstruct the exposure levels and scenarios for specific subgroups of populations. These models are also useful in providing estimates of target tissue dose in humans simultaneously exposed to chemicals in various media (air, water, soil, food) by different routes (oral, dermal, inhalation). Several examples of exposure assessment for volatile organic chemicals using PBPK models for mammals will be presented, and the strategies for development of these models for other classes of chemicals highlighted.

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics and Optimal Sampling Strategy for Model-Based Precision Dosing of Melphalan in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kana; Dong, Min; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Chandra, Sharat; Mehta, Parinda A; McConnell, Scott; Anaissie, Elias J; Vinks, Alexander A

    2017-09-16

    High-dose melphalan is an important component of conditioning regimens for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The current dosing strategy based on body surface area results in a high incidence of oral mucositis and gastrointestinal and liver toxicity. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing will individualize exposure and help minimize overexposure-related toxicity. The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model and optimal sampling strategy. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM using 98 observations collected from 15 adult patients given the standard dose of 140 or 200 mg/m(2) by intravenous infusion. The determinant-optimal sampling strategy was explored with PopED software. Individual area under the curve estimates were generated by Bayesian estimation using full and the proposed sparse sampling data. The predictive performance of the optimal sampling strategy was evaluated based on bias and precision estimates. The feasibility of the optimal sampling strategy was tested using pharmacokinetic data from five pediatric patients. A two-compartment model best described the data. The final model included body weight and creatinine clearance as predictors of clearance. The determinant-optimal sampling strategies (and windows) were identified at 0.08 (0.08-0.19), 0.61 (0.33-0.90), 2.0 (1.3-2.7), and 4.0 (3.6-4.0) h post-infusion. An excellent correlation was observed between area under the curve estimates obtained with the full and the proposed four-sample strategy (R (2) = 0.98; p < 0.01) with a mean bias of -2.2% and precision of 9.4%. A similar relationship was observed in children (R (2) = 0.99; p < 0.01). The developed pharmacokinetic model-based sparse sampling strategy promises to achieve the target area under the curve as part of precision dosing.

  3. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for atrazine and its main metabolites in the adult male C57BL/6 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2011-02-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide that is widely used and relatively persistent in the environment. In laboratory rodents, excessive exposure to ATR is detrimental to the reproductive, immune, and nervous systems. To better understand the toxicokinetics of ATR and to fill the need for a mouse model, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for ATR and its main chlorotriazine metabolites (Cl-TRIs) desethyl atrazine (DE), desisopropyl atrazine (DIP), and didealkyl atrazine (DACT) was developed for the adult male C57BL/6 mouse. Taking advantage of all relevant and recently made available mouse-specific data, a flow-limited PBPK model was constructed. The ATR and DACT sub-models included blood, brain, liver, kidney, richly and slowly perfused tissue compartments, as well as plasma protein binding and red blood cell binding, whereas the DE and DIP sub-models were constructed as simple five-compartment models. The model adequately simulated plasma levels of ATR and Cl-TRIs and urinary dosimetry of Cl-TRIs at four single oral dose levels (250, 125, 25, and 5 mg/kg). Additionally, the model adequately described the dose dependency of brain and liver ATR and DACT concentrations. Cumulative urinary DACT amounts were accurately predicted across a wide dose range, suggesting the model's potential use for extrapolation to human exposures by performing reverse dosimetry. The model was validated using previously reported data for plasma ATR and DACT in mice and rats. Overall, besides being the first mouse PBPK model for ATR and its Cl-TRIs, this model, by analogy, provides insights into tissue dosimetry for rats. The model could be used in tissue dosimetry prediction and as an aid in the exposure assessment to this widely used herbicide.

  4. Description of the time course of the prolactin suppressant effect of the dopamine agonist CQP201-403 by an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Brownell, J; Steimer, J L; Gaillard, R C; Rosenthaler, J

    1986-07-01

    Six male volunteers (mean age 24 years) received a single oral dose of 0.025 mg CQP201-403 and placebo in a randomised double-blind crossover design. Fifteen plasma samples were collected over 48 h and were assayed by radioimmunoassay for drug substance and prolactin (PRL). Three of the samples were drawn during sleep on the first study day. The pharmacological effect (E%) of CQP201-403 was expressed as reduction in plasma PRL levels. The pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) model consisted of two kinetic compartments and an effect compartment linked to the central compartment. A sigmoid Emax model (Hill equation) described the relationship between the drug concentration in the effect compartment and E%. Curve-fitting of PK and PD data provided individual parameter estimates which served to generate computer-simulated PK and PD profiles after single and multiple doses in order to: investigate the in vivo concentration-effect relationship; evaluate the consequence of dosage reduction on the steady-state PD profile; and study the robustness of the response to changes in drug potency and bioavailability.

  5. Description of the time course of the prolactin suppressant effect of the dopamine agonist CQP201-403 by an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed Central

    Grevel, J; Brownell, J; Steimer, J L; Gaillard, R C; Rosenthaler, J

    1986-01-01

    Six male volunteers (mean age 24 years) received a single oral dose of 0.025 mg CQP201-403 and placebo in a randomised double-blind crossover design. Fifteen plasma samples were collected over 48 h and were assayed by radioimmunoassay for drug substance and prolactin (PRL). Three of the samples were drawn during sleep on the first study day. The pharmacological effect (E%) of CQP201-403 was expressed as reduction in plasma PRL levels. The pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) model consisted of two kinetic compartments and an effect compartment linked to the central compartment. A sigmoid Emax model (Hill equation) described the relationship between the drug concentration in the effect compartment and E%. Curve-fitting of PK and PD data provided individual parameter estimates which served to generate computer-simulated PK and PD profiles after single and multiple doses in order to: investigate the in vivo concentration-effect relationship; evaluate the consequence of dosage reduction on the steady-state PD profile; and study the robustness of the response to changes in drug potency and bioavailability. PMID:3755608

  6. Lifetime pharmacokinetic model for hydrophobic contaminants in marine mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; Mackay, D.; Koning, J. de

    1999-11-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model is developed that describes the uptake and release of a hydrophobic organic chemical by a marine mammal over its entire lifetime, i.e., from birth to death. This model is applied to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The processes treated are growth; uptake from food, milk, and air; disposition of the chemical among arterial and venous blood, liver, muscle, blubber, and rapidly perfused tissues; and losses by metabolism, release in exhaled air; and by egestion. A separate model is developed for females, which includes pregnancy, birth, and lactation. Food consumption is deduced from size, growth, and from activity-dependent bioenergetic data. The results obtained by simulating continuous PCB exposure over a 30-year period are in accordance with reported concentrations and show the importance of milk transfer to both mother and progeny and the tendency for continued accumulation over the animal's lifetime. Implications of the results are discussed, especially the need for improved data on diets, gut absorption characteristics, and various physiological parameters used in the model.

  7. An Evolutionary Search Algorithm for Covariate Models in Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Fujita, Atsuto; Sasa, Yukako; Higuchi, Yuriko; Tsuda, Masahiro; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2017-09-01

    Building a covariate model is a crucial task in population pharmacokinetics. This study develops a novel method for automated covariate modeling based on gene expression programming (GEP), which not only enables covariate selection, but also the construction of nonpolynomial relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters and covariates. To apply GEP to the extended nonlinear least squares analysis, the parameter consolidation and initial parameter value estimation algorithms were further developed and implemented. The entire program was coded in Java. The performance of the developed covariate model was evaluated for the population pharmacokinetic data of tobramycin. In comparison with the established covariate model, goodness-of-fit of the measured data was greatly improved by using only 2 additional adjustable parameters. Ten test runs yielded the same solution. In conclusion, the systematic exploration method is a potentially powerful tool for prescreening covariate models in population pharmacokinetic analysis. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A simple pharmacokinetic model linking plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts.

    PubMed

    Mariano, R N; Turino, L N; Cabrera, M I; Scándolo, D E; Maciel, M G; Grau, R J A

    2010-10-01

    On the basis of pharmacokinetic modeling, this study provides some insights into predicting in vivo plasma progesterone concentrations when using bovine intravaginal inserts for systemic progesterone delivery. More significantly, this contribution is the first attempt to build a simple pharmacokinetic model that links plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts. After evaluating three rival pharmacokinetic models and considering some phenomena involved in the intravaginal administration of progesterone, a primary pharmacokinetic model having a good data fitting capability with only two adjustable parameters is proposed to the above mentioned task. Kinetic parameters are given for lactating Holstein dairy cows with two levels of daily milk yields; and non-pregnant, non-lactating Holstein-Friesian cattle. Model predictions indicate the occurrence of a preferential distribution of the intravaginally administered progesterone dose through a first uterine pass effect.

  9. Compartment-based hydrodynamics and water quality modeling of a northern Everglades wetland, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongqing; Meselhe, Ehab A.; Waldon, Michael G.; Harwell, Matthew C.; Chen, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    The last remaining large remnant of softwater wetlands in the US Florida Everglades lies within the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. However, Refuge water quality today is impacted by pumped stormwater inflows to the eutrophic and mineral-enriched 100-km canal, which circumscribes the wetland. Optimal management is a challenge and requires scientifically based predictive tools to assess and forecast the impacts of water management on Refuge water quality. In this research, we developed a compartment-based numerical model of hydrodynamics and water quality for the Refuge. Using the numerical model, we examined the dynamics in stage, water depth, discharge from hydraulic structures along the canal, and exchange flow among canal and marsh compartments. We also investigated the transport of chloride, sulfate and total phosphorus from the canal to the marsh interior driven by hydraulic gradients as well as biological removal of sulfate and total phosphorus. The model was calibrated and validated using long-term stage and water quality data (1995-2007). Statistical analysis indicates that the model is capable of capturing the spatial (from canal to interior marsh) gradients of constituents across the Refuge. Simulations demonstrate that flow from the eutrophic and mineral-enriched canal impacts chloride and sulfate in the interior marsh. In contrast, total phosphorus in the interior marsh shows low sensitivity to intrusion and dispersive transport. We conducted a rainfall-driven scenario test in which the pumped inflow concentrations of chloride, sulfate and total phosphorus were equal to rainfall concentrations (wet deposition). This test shows that pumped inflow is the dominant factor responsible for the substantially increased chloride and sulfate concentrations in the interior marsh. Therefore, the present day Refuge should not be classified as solely a rainfall-driven or ombrotrophic wetland. The model provides an effective screening tool for

  10. Programming of a flexible computer simulation to visualize pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, J; Kobal, G; Geisslinger, G

    2004-01-01

    Teaching pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models can be made more effective using computer simulations. We propose the programming of educational PK or PK/PD computer simulations as an alternative to the use of pre-built simulation software. This approach has the advantage of adaptability to non-standard or complicated PK or PK/PD models. Simplicity of the programming procedure was achieved by selecting the LabVIEW programming environment. An intuitive user interface to visualize the time courses of drug concentrations or effects can be obtained with pre-built elements. The environment uses a wiring analogy that resembles electrical circuit diagrams rather than abstract programming code. The goal of high interactivity of the simulation was attained by allowing the program to run in continuously repeating loops. This makes the program behave flexibly to the user input. The programming is described with the aid of a 2-compartment PK simulation. Examples of more sophisticated simulation programs are also given where the PK/PD simulation shows drug input, concentrations in plasma, and at effect site and the effects themselves as a function of time. A multi-compartmental model of morphine, including metabolite kinetics and effects is also included. The programs are available for download from the World Wide Web at http:// www. klinik.uni-frankfurt.de/zpharm/klin/ PKPDsimulation/content.html. For pharmacokineticists who only program occasionally, there is the possibility of building the computer simulation, together with the flexible interactive simulation algorithm for clinical pharmacological teaching in the field of PK/PD models.

  11. 76 FR 10476 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead Crew-Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Crew- Rest Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special... will have novel or unusual design features associated with installation of an overhead crew-rest (OCR... Sec. 21.101. Novel or Unusual Design Features Crew-rest compartments have been installed...

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of exenatide

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present analysis was to develop a core population pharmacokinetic model for the pharmacokinetic properties of immediate‐release (IR) exenatide, which can be used in subsequent analyses of novel sustained‐release formulations. Methods Data from eight clinical trials, evaluating a wide range of doses and different administration routes, were available for analysis. All modelling and simulations were conducted using the nonlinear mixed‐effect modelling program NONMEM. External model validation was performed using data from the phase III clinical trials programme through standard visual predictive checks. Results The pharmacokinetics of IR exenatide was described by a two‐compartment model, and the absorption of subcutaneous exenatide was described with a sequential zero‐order rate constant followed by a saturable nonlinear absorption process. Drug elimination was characterized by two parallel routes (linear and nonlinear), with significant relationships between renal function and the linear elimination route, and between body weight and volume of distribution. For a subject with normal renal function, the linear clearance was estimated to be 5.06 l hr−1. The nonlinear elimination was quantified with a Michaelis–Menten constant (K m) of 567 pg ml−1 and a maximum rate of metabolism (V max) of 1.6 μg h−1. For subcutaneous administration, 37% of the subcutaneous dose is absorbed via the zero‐order process, and the remaining 63% via the nonlinear pathway. Conclusions The present analysis provides a comprehensive population pharmacokinetic model for exenatide, expanding the elimination process to include both linear and nonlinear components, providing a suitable platform for a broad range of concentrations and patient conditions that can be leveraged in future modelling efforts of sustained‐release exenatide formulations. PMID:27650681

  13. Tuneable resolution as a systems biology approach for multi-scale, multi-compartment computational models

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Denise E; Hunt, C Anthony; Marino, Simeone; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2014-01-01

    The use of multi-scale mathematical and computational models to study complex biological processes is becoming increasingly productive. Multi-scale models span a range of spatial and/or temporal scales and can encompass multi-compartment (e.g., multi-organ) models. Modeling advances are enabling virtual experiments to explore and answer questions that are problematic to address in the wet-lab. Wet-lab experimental technologies now allow scientists to observe, measure, record, and analyze experiments focusing on different system aspects at a variety of biological scales. We need the technical ability to mirror that same flexibility in virtual experiments using multi-scale models. Here we present a new approach, tuneable resolution, which can begin providing that flexibility. Tuneable resolution involves fine- or coarse-graining existing multi-scale models at the user's discretion, allowing adjustment of the level of resolution specific to a question, an experiment, or a scale of interest. Tuneable resolution expands options for revising and validating mechanistic multi-scale models, can extend the longevity of multi-scale models, and may increase computational efficiency. The tuneable resolution approach can be applied to many model types, including differential equation, agent-based, and hybrid models. We demonstrate our tuneable resolution ideas with examples relevant to infectious disease modeling, illustrating key principles at work. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2014, 6:225–245. doi:10.1002/wsbm.1270 How to cite this article: WIREs Syst Biol Med 2014, 6:289–309. doi:10.1002/wsbm.1270 PMID:24810243

  14. A pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic (p-PBPK) model for disposition of drugs metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4

    PubMed Central

    Gaohua, Lu; Abduljalil, Khaled; Jamei, Masoud; Johnson, Trevor N; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Aims Pregnant women are usually not part of the traditional drug development programme. Pregnancy is associated with major biological and physiological changes that alter the pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs. Prediction of the changes to drug exposure in this group of patients may help to prevent under- or overtreatment. We have used a pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic (p-PBPK) model to assess the likely impact of pregnancy on three model compounds, namely caffeine, metoprolol and midazolam, based on the knowledge of their disposition in nonpregnant women and information from in vitro studies. Methods A perfusion-limited form of a 13-compartment full-PBPK model (Simcyp® Simulator) was used for the nonpregnant women, and this was extended to the pregnant state by applying known changes to all model components (including the gestational related activity of specific cytochrome P450 enzymes) and through the addition of an extra compartment to represent the fetoplacental unit. The uterus and the mammary glands were grouped into the muscle compartment. The model was implemented in Matlab Simulink and validated using clinical observations. Results The p-PBPK model predicted the PK changes of three model compounds (namely caffeine, metoprolol and midazolam) for CYP1A2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 during pregnancy within twofold of observed values. The changes during the third trimester were predicted to be a 100% increase, a 30% decrease and a 35% decrease in the exposure of caffeine, metoprolol and midazolam, respectively, compared with the nonpregnant women. Conclusions In the absence of clinical data, the in silico prediction of PK behaviour during pregnancy can provide a valuable aid to dose adjustment in pregnant women. The performance of the model for drugs metabolized by a single enzyme to different degrees (high and low extraction) and for drugs that are eliminated by several different routes warrants further study. PMID:22725721

  15. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of varying doses of intravenous metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Sprandel, Kelly A; Drusano, George L; Hecht, David W; Rotschafer, John C; Danziger, Larry H; Rodvold, Keith A

    2006-08-01

    Population pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) are approaches used to determine probability of target attainment (PTA) of antimicrobial therapy. The objectives of this study were 1) to determine a population pharmacokinetic model (PPM) using metronidazole and hydroxy-metronidazole concentrations from healthy subjects and critically ill patients, and 2) to determine the probability of attaining the pharmacodynamic target area under the plasma concentration (AUC)/MIC ratio >or=70 against 218 clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis using MCS. Eighteen healthy subjects were randomized to 3 dosages of intravenous metronidazole (500 mg every 8 h, 1000 mg day(-1), 1500 mg day(-1)) in an open-label 3-way crossover fashion. Serial blood samples were collected over 25.5 h on the 3rd day of each study period. An additional of 8 critically ill patients received intravenous metronidazole 500 mg every 8 h. Serial blood samples were collected over 8 h after the 2nd day of dosing. Plasma metronidazole and hydroxy-metronidazole concentrations were analyzed using a high-performance liquid chromatographic assay. The 834 plasma concentrations from 62 data sets were simultaneously modeled with Non-Parametric Adaptive Grid population modeling program. A 4-compartment model with a metabolite and zero-order infusion into the central compartment was used. The mean parameter vector and covariance matrix from PPM were inserted into the simulation module of ADAPT II. A 10,000-subject MCS was performed to determine the probability of PTA for a total drug AUC to MIC ratio >or=70 against 218 isolates of B. fragilis (MIC range, 0.125-2.0 mg L(-1)). Mean parameter values were CL(non-OH), 3.08 L h(-1); Vc, 35.4 L; K(OH), 0.04 h(-1); CL(OH), 2.78 L h(-1); and V(OH), 9.66 L. The regression values of the observed versus predicted concentrations (r2) of metronidazole and hydroxy-metronidazole were 0.972 and 0.980, respectively. The PTA for metronidazole 1500 mg day(-1) or 500 mg

  16. Are Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models Reporting the Right C(max)? Central Venous Versus Peripheral Sampling Site.

    PubMed

    Musther, Helen; Gill, Katherine L; Chetty, Manoranjenni; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Rowland, Malcolm; Jamei, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can over-predict maximum plasma concentrations (C(max)) following intravenous administration. A proposed explanation is that invariably PBPK models report the concentration in the central venous compartment, rather than the site where the samples are drawn. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate potential corrective models based on anatomy and physiology governing the blood supply at the site of sampling and incorporate them into a PBPK platform. Four models were developed and scrutinised for their corrective potential. All assumed the peripheral sampling site concentration could be described by contributions from surrounding tissues and utilised tissue-specific concentration-time profiles reported from the full-PBPK model within the Simcyp Simulator. Predicted concentrations for the peripheral site were compared to the observed C(max). The models results were compared to clinical data for 15 studies over seven compounds (alprazolam, imipramine, metoprolol, midazolam, omeprazole, rosiglitazone and theophylline). The final model utilised tissue concentrations from adipose, skin, muscle and a contribution from artery. Predicted C(max) values considering the central venous compartment can over-predict the observed values up to 10-fold whereas the new sampling site predictions were within 2-fold of observed values. The model was particularly relevant for studies where traditional PBPK models over-predict early time point concentrations. A successful corrective model for C(max) prediction has been developed, subject to further validation. These models can be enrolled as built-up modules into PBPK platforms and potentially account for factors that may affect the initial mixing of the blood at the site of sampling.

  17. A Pharmacokinetic Model of a Tissue Implantable Cortisol Sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael A; Bakh, Naveed; Bisker, Gili; Brown, Emery N; Strano, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Cortisol is an important glucocorticoid hormone whose biochemistry influences numerous physiological and pathological processes. Moreover, it is a biomarker of interest for a number of conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder, Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, and others. An implantable biosensor capable of real time monitoring of cortisol concentrations in adipose tissue may revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders, as well as provide an invaluable research tool. Toward this end, a mathematical model, informed by the physiological literature, is developed to predict dynamic cortisol concentrations in adipose, muscle, and brain tissues, where a significant number of important processes with cortisol occur. The pharmacokinetic model is applied to both a prototypical, healthy male patient and a previously studied Cushing's disease patient. The model can also be used to inform the design of an implantable sensor by optimizing the sensor dissociation constant, apparent delay time, and magnitude of the sensor output versus system dynamics. Measurements from such a sensor would help to determine systemic cortisol levels, providing much needed insight for proper medical treatment for various cortisol-related conditions.

  18. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  19. PHYSIOLOCIGALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING AND MODE OF ACTION IN DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING AND MODE OF ACTION IN DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT. Barton HA. Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA
    Dose-response analysis requires quantitatively linking infor...

  20. High Throughput pharmacokinetic modeling using computationally predicted parameter values: dissociation constants (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the ionization association and dissociation constant (pKa) are vital to modeling the pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals in vivo. Methodologies for the prediction of compound sequestration in specific tissues using partition coefficients require a parameter that ch...

  1. High Throughput pharmacokinetic modeling using computationally predicted parameter values: dissociation constants (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the ionization association and dissociation constant (pKa) are vital to modeling the pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals in vivo. Methodologies for the prediction of compound sequestration in specific tissues using partition coefficients require a parameter that ch...

  2. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  3. A CONSISTENT APPROACH FOR THE APPLICATION OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING IN CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling provides important capabilities for improving the reliability of the extrapolations across dose, species, and exposure route that are generally required in chemical risk assessment regardless of the toxic endpoint being consid...

  4. A Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic Model for Liver Transporter Substrates Under Liver Cirrhosis Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, R; Barton, HA; Maurer, TS

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a disease characterized by the loss of functional liver mass. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to interpret and predict how the interplay among physiological changes in cirrhosis affects pharmacokinetics. However, previous PBPK models under cirrhotic conditions were developed for permeable cytochrome P450 substrates and do not directly apply to substrates of liver transporters. This study characterizes a PBPK model for liver transporter substrates in relation to the severity of liver cirrhosis. A published PBPK model structure for liver transporter substrates under healthy conditions and the physiological changes for cirrhosis are combined to simulate pharmacokinetics of liver transporter substrates in patients with mild and moderate cirrhosis. The simulated pharmacokinetics under liver cirrhosis reasonably approximate observations. This analysis includes meta-analysis to obtain system-dependent parameters in cirrhosis patients and a top-down approach to improve understanding of the effect of cirrhosis on transporter-mediated drug disposition under cirrhotic conditions. PMID:26225262

  5. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  6. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  7. Three-compartment model for contaminant accumulation by semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gale, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Passive sampling of dissolved hydrophobic contaminants with lipid (triolein)-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) has been gaining acceptance for environmental monitoring. Understanding of the accumulation process has employed a simple polymer film-control model of uptake by the polymer-enclosed lipid, while aqueous film control has been only briefly discussed. A more complete three-compartment model incorporating both aqueous film (turbulent-diffusive) and polymer film (diffusive) mass transfer is developed here and is fit to data from accumulation studies conducted in constant-concentration, flow-through dilutors. This model predicts aqueous film control of the whole device for moderate to high Kow compounds, rather than polymer film control. Uptake rates for phenanthrene and 2,2‘,5,5‘-tetrachlorobiphenyl were about 4.8 and 4.2 L/day/standard SPMD, respectively. Maximum 28 day SPMD concentration factors of 30 000 are predicted for solutes with log Kow values of >5.5. Effects of varying aqueous and polymer film thicknesses and solute diffusivities in the polymer film are modeled, and overall accumulation by the whole device is predicted to remain under aqueous film control, although accumulation in the triolein may be subject to polymer film control. The predicted half-life and integrative response of SPMDs to pulsed concentration events is proportional to log KSPMD.

  8. Description and simulation of a physiological pharmacokinetic model for the metabolism and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids in man. Cholic acid in healthy man.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, A F; Molino, G; Milanese, M; Belforte, G

    1983-01-01

    A multicompartmental pharmacokinetic model based on physiological principles, experimental data, and the standard mathematical principles of compartmental analysis has been constructed that fully describes the metabolism and enterohepatic cycling in man of cholic acid, a major bile acid. The model features compartments and linear transfer coefficients. The compartments are aggregated into nine spaces based on physiological considerations (liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, jejunum, ileum, colon, portal blood sinusoidal blood, and general circulation). The transfer coefficients are also categorized according to function: flow, i.e., emptying of gallbladder or intestinal spaces, and circulation of the blood; biotransformation, i.e., conjugation, deconjugation, or dehydroxylation; and transport, i.e., active or passive transport. The model is made time dependent by introducing meals, which trigger discrete increases in gallbladder emptying and intestinal flow. Each space contains three compartments. For cholic acid, these are unconjugated cholic acid, cholylglycine, and cholyltaurine. The model was then used with all existing experimental data to simulate cholic acid metabolism in healthy man over a 24-h period. Satisfactory agreement was obtained between simulated and experimental results for serum bile acid levels, hepatic bile acid secretion, and bile acid secretion into the intestine. The model was also used to classify 16 clinical instances in which the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids is altered by drugs or disease. The model can be extended to describe completely the metabolism and enterohepatic circulation of any bile acids in man in health and digestive disease. The model should also be broadly applicable to the description of the pharmacokinetics of all other drugs whose metabolism is similar to that of bile acids, i.e., drugs for which there are tissue and bacterial biotransformations, enterohepatic cycling, and appreciable first-pass clearance. Images

  9. Enhancing the Modeling of PFOA Pharmacokinetics with Bayesian Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detail sufficient to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK) for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and the methods necessary to combine information from multiple data sets are both subjects of ongoing investigation. Bayesian analysis provides tools to accommodate these goals. We exa...

  10. Enhancing the Modeling of PFOA Pharmacokinetics with Bayesian Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detail sufficient to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK) for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and the methods necessary to combine information from multiple data sets are both subjects of ongoing investigation. Bayesian analysis provides tools to accommodate these goals. We exa...

  11. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Bortezomib in Pediatric Leukemia Patients: Model-Based Support for Body Surface Area-Based Dosing Over the 2- to 16-Year Age Range.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Michael J; Mould, Diane R; Taylor, Timothy J; Gupta, Neeraj; Suryanarayan, Kaveri; Neuwirth, Rachel; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Horton, Terzah M; Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A; Lu, Xiaomin; Milton, Ashley; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik

    2017-09-01

    This population analysis described the pharmacokinetics of bortezomib after twice-weekly, repeat-dose, intravenous administration in pediatric patients participating in 2 clinical trials: the phase 2 AALL07P1 (NCT00873093) trial in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the phase 3 AAML1031 (NCT01371981) trial in de novo acute myelogenous leukemia. The sources of variability in the pharmacokinetic parameters were characterized and quantified to support dosing recommendations. Patients received intravenous bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) twice-weekly, on days 1, 4, and 8 during specific blocks or cycles of both trials and on day 11 of block 1 of study AALL07P1, in combination with multiagent chemotherapy. Blood samples were obtained and the plasma was harvested on day 8 over 0-72 hours postdose to measure bortezomib concentrations by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Concentration-time data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Covariates were examined using forward addition (P < .01)/backward elimination (P < .001). Data were included from 104 patients (49%/51% acute lymphoblastic leukemia/acute myelogenous leukemia; 60%/40% aged 2-11 years/12-16 years). Bortezomib pharmacokinetics were described by a 3-compartment model with linear elimination. Body surface area adequately accounted for variability in clearance (exponent 0.97), supporting body surface area-based dosing. Stratified visual predictive check simulations verified that neither age group nor patient population represented sources of meaningful pharmacokinetic heterogeneity not accounted for by the final population pharmacokinetic model. Following administration of 1.3 mg/m(2) intravenous bortezomib doses, body surface area-normalized clearance in pediatric patients was similar to that observed in adult patients, thereby indicating that this dose achieves similar systemic exposures in pediatric patients. © 2017, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley

  12. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probe cocktails extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in mice transplanted with human hepatocytes and from pharmacokinetics in common marmosets using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Utoh, Masahiro; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Mitsui, Marina; Kawano, Mirai; Toda, Akiko; Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    1. The pharmacokinetic data of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys, dogs and minipigs using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In this study, the modeling methodology was further adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from mice transplanted with human hepatocytes or based on data from marmosets. 2. Using known species allometric scaling factors, the observed plasma concentrations of caffeine, warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol, and midazolam in chimeric TK-NOG mice with humanized liver were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in marmosets were also scaled to reported equivalents in humans using in vitro metabolic clearance data. 3. Human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by simplified human PBPK models based on the observed pharmacokinetics in mice with humanized liver and on the reported pharmacokinetics in marmosets were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in Caucasians. 4. These results suggest that mice with humanized liver and/or marmosets could be suitable pharmacokinetic models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models.

  13. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, Christopher M.; Chang, Daniel T.; Brooks, Raina D.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Phillips, Martin B.; Hypes, Ethan D.; Fair, Matthew J.; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Johnson, Jeffre; Dary, Curtis C.; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be a great resource for the construction of models pertaining to new chemicals. A PBPK knowledgebase was compiled and developed from existing PBPK-related articles and used to develop new models. From 2,039 PBPK-related articles published between 1977 and 2013, 307 unique chemicals were identified for use as the basis of our knowledgebase. Keywords related to species, gender, developmental stages, and organs were analyzed from the articles within the PBPK knowledgebase. A correlation matrix of the 307 chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase was calculated based on pharmacokinetic-relevant molecular descriptors. Chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase were ranked based on their correlation toward ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Next, multiple chemicals were selected to represent exact matches, close analogues, or non-analogues of the target case study chemicals. Parameters, equations, or experimental data relevant to existing models for these chemicals and their analogues were used to construct new models, and model predictions were compared to observed values. This compiled knowledgebase provides a chemical structure-based approach for identifying PBPK models relevant to other chemical entities. Using suitable correlation metrics, we demonstrated that models of chemical analogues in the PBPK knowledgebase can guide the construction of PBPK models for other chemicals. PMID:26871706

  14. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for lifetime exposure to PCB 153 in male and female harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena): model development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Yang, Raymond S H; Covaci, Adrian; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny

    2010-09-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed for the most persistent polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB 153) in male and female harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) to elucidate processes such as uptake, distribution, and elimination. Due to its limited metabolic capacities, long life span, and top position in marine food chains, this species is highly sensitive to pollution. The models consist of 5 compartments, liver, blubber, kidney, brain, and a compartment which accounts for the rest of the body, all connected through blood. All physiological and biochemical parameters were extracted from the literature, except for the brain/blood partition coefficient and rate of excretion, which were both fitted to data sets used for validation of the models. These data sets were compiled from our own analyses performed with GC-MS on tissue samples of harbor porpoises. The intake of PCB 153 was from milk from birth to 4 months, and after weaning fish was the main food source. Overall, these models reveal that concentrations of PCB 153 in males increase with age but suggest that, as the animals grow older, metabolic transformation can be a possible pathway for elimination as well. In contrast, the model for females confirms that gestation and lactation are key processes for eliminating PCB 153 as body burdens decrease with age. These PBPK models are capable of simulating the bioaccumulation of PCB 153 during the entire life span of approximately 20 years of the harbor porpoises.

  15. Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling for the Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase by Acotiamide, A Novel Gastroprokinetic Agent for the Treatment of Functional Dyspepsia, in Rat Stomach.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Kazuyoshi; Iikura, Minami; Hirayama, Masamichi; Toda, Ryoko; Kawabata, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Acotiamide, a gastroprokinetic agent used to treat functional dyspepsia, is transported to at least two compartments in rat stomach. However, the role of these stomach compartments in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of acotiamide remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship of the blood and stomach concentration of acotiamide with its inhibitory effect on acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Concentration profiles of acotiamide and acetylcholine (ACh) were determined after intravenous administration to rats and analyzed by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model containing vascular space, precursor pool and deep pool of stomach. Acotiamide was eliminated from the blood and stomach in a biexponential manner. Our PBPK/PD model estimated that acotiamide concentration in the precursor pool exceeded 2 μM at approximately 2 h after administration. Acotiamide inhibited AChE activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 1.79 μM. ACh reached the maximum concentration at 2 h after administration. Our PBPK model well described the profile of acotiamide and ACh concentration in the stomach in the assumption that acotiamide was distributed by carrier mediated process and inhibited AChE in the precursor pool of stomach. Thus, Acotiamide in the precursor pool plays an important role for producing the pharmacological action.

  16. Comparison of the BOD POD with the four-compartment model in adult females.

    PubMed

    Fields, D A; Wilson, G D; Gladden, L B; Hunter, G R; Pascoe, D D; Goran, M I

    2001-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the accuracy and bias in estimates of total body density (Db) by hydrostatic weighing (HW) and the BOD POD, and percent body fat (%fat) by the BOD POD with the four-compartment model (4C model) in 42 adult females. Furthermore, the role of the aqueous and mineral fractions in the estimation of body fat by the BOD POD was examined. Total body water was determined by isotope dilution ((2)H(2)0) and bone mineral was determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Db and %fat were determined by the BOD POD and HW. The 4C model of Baumgartner was used as the criterion measure of body fat. HW Db (1.0352 g x cm(-3)) was not statistically different (P = 0.35) from BOD POD Db (1.0349 g x cm(-3)). The regression between Db by HW and the BOD POD significantly deviated from the line of identity (Db by HW = 0.90 x Db by BOD POD + 0.099; R(2) = 0.94). BOD POD %fat (28.8%) was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than %fat by the 4C model (30.6%). The regression between %fat by the 4C model and the BOD POD significantly deviated from the line of identity (%fat by 4C model = 0.88 x %fat by BOD POD + 5.41%; R(2) = 0.92). BOD POD Db and %fat showed no bias across the range of fatness. Only the aqueous fraction of the fat-free mass (FFM) had a significant correlation with the difference in %fat between the 4C model and the BOD POD. These data indicate that the BOD POD underpredicted body fat as compared with the 4C model, and the aqueous fraction of the FFM had a significant effect on estimates of %fat by the BOD POD.

  17. Body composition techniques and the four-compartment model in children.

    PubMed

    Fields, D A; Goran, M I

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy, precision, and bias of fat mass (FM) as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), hydrostatic weighing (HW), air-displacement plethysmography (PM) using the BOD POD body composition system and total body water (TBW) against the four-compartment (4C) model in 25 children (11.4 +/- 1.4 yr). The regression between FM by the 4C model and by DXA deviated significantly from the line of identity (FM by 4C model = 0.84 x FM by DXA + 0.95 kg; R(2) = 0.95), as did the regression between FM by 4C model and by TBW (FM by 4C model = 0. 85 x FM by TBW - 0.89 kg; R(2) = 0.98). The regression between FM by the 4C model and by HW did not significantly deviate from the line of identity (FM by 4C model = 1.09 x FM by HW + 0.94 kg; R(2) = 0. 95) and neither did the regression between FM by 4C (using density assessed by PM) and by PM (FM by 4C model = 1.03 x FM by PM + 0.88; R(2) = 0.97). DXA, HW, and TBW all showed a bias in the estimate of FM, but there was no bias for PM. In conclusion, PM was the only technique that could accurately, precisely, and without bias estimate FM in 9- to 14-yr-old children.

  18. Estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters from non-compartmental variables using Microsoft Excel.

    PubMed

    Dansirikul, Chantaratsamon; Choi, Malcolm; Duffull, Stephen B

    2005-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a method, termed 'back analysis (BA)', for converting non-compartmental variables to compartment model dependent pharmacokinetic parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet was implemented with the use of Solver and visual basic functions. The performance of the BA method in estimating pharmacokinetic parameter values was evaluated by comparing the parameter values obtained to a standard modelling software program, NONMEM, using simulated data. The results show that the BA method was reasonably precise and provided low bias in estimating fixed and random effect parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. The pharmacokinetic parameters estimated from the BA method were similar to those of NONMEM estimation.

  19. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials.

  20. Fitting the two-compartment model in DCE-MRI by linear inversion.

    PubMed

    Flouri, Dimitra; Lesnic, Daniel; Sourbron, Steven P

    2016-09-01

    Model fitting of dynamic contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging-MRI data with nonlinear least squares (NLLS) methods is slow and may be biased by the choice of initial values. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a linear least squares (LLS) method to fit the two-compartment exchange and -filtration models. A second-order linear differential equation for the measured concentrations was derived where model parameters act as coefficients. Simulations of normal and pathological data were performed to determine calculation time, accuracy and precision under different noise levels and temporal resolutions. Performance of the LLS was evaluated by comparison against the NLLS. The LLS method is about 200 times faster, which reduces the calculation times for a 256 × 256 MR slice from 9 min to 3 s. For ideal data with low noise and high temporal resolution the LLS and NLLS were equally accurate and precise. The LLS was more accurate and precise than the NLLS at low temporal resolution, but less accurate at high noise levels. The data show that the LLS leads to a significant reduction in calculation times, and more reliable results at low noise levels. At higher noise levels the LLS becomes exceedingly inaccurate compared to the NLLS, but this may be improved using a suitable weighting strategy. Magn Reson Med 76:998-1006, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A two or three compartments hyperbolic reaction-diffusion model for the aquatic food chain.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Elvira; Consolo, Giancarlo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-06-01

    Two hyperbolic reaction-diffusion models are built up in the framework of Extended Thermodynamics in order to describe the spatio-temporal interactions occurring in a two or three compartments aquatic food chain. The first model focuses on the dynamics between phytoplankton and zooplankton, whereas the second one accounts also for the nutrient. In these models, infections and influence of illumination on photosynthesis are neglected. It is assumed that the zooplankton predation follows a Holling type-III functional response, while the zooplankton mortality is linear. Owing to the hyperbolic structure of our equations, the wave processes occur at finite velocity, so that the paradox of instantaneous diffusion of biological quantities, typical of parabolic systems, is consequently removed. The character of steady states and travelling waves, together with the occurrence of Hopf bifurcations, is then discussed through linear stability analysis. The governing equations are also integrated numerically to validate the analytical results herein obtained and to extract additional information on the population dynamics.

  2. Two-compartment model as a teaching tool for cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wrona, Artur; Balbus, Joanna; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Kubica, Krystian

    2015-12-01

    Cholesterol is a vital structural and functional molecule in the human body that is only slightly soluble in water and therefore does not easily travels by itself in the bloodstream. To enable cholesterol's targeted delivery to cells and tissues, it is encapsulated by different fractions of lipoproteins, complex particles containing both proteins and lipids. Maintaining cholesterol homeostasis is a highly regulated process with multiple factors acting at both molecular and tissue levels. Furthermore, to regulate the circulatory transport of cholesterol in lipoproteins, the amount of cholesterol present depends on and is controlled by cholesterol dietary intake, de novo synthesis, usage, and excretion; abnormal and/or unbalanced cholesterol levels have been shown to lead to severe outcomes, e.g., cardiovascular diseases. To investigate cholesterol transport in the circulatory system, we have previously developed a two-compartment mathematical model. Here, we show how this model can be used as a teaching tool for cholesterol homeostasis. Using the model and a hands-on approach, students can familiarize themselves with the basic components and mechanisms behind balanced cholesterol circulatory transport as well as investigate the consequences of and countermeasures to abnormal cholesterol levels. Among others, various treatments of high blood cholesterol levels can be simulated, e.g., with commonly prescribed de novo cholesterol synthesis inhibitors.

  3. Comparison of non-compartmental and mixed effect modelling methods for establishing bioequivalence for the case of two compartment kinetics and censored concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jim H; Upton, Richard N; Foster, David J R

    2017-06-01

    Non-compartmental analysis (NCA) is regarded as the standard for establishing bioequivalence, despite its limitations and the existence of alternative methods such as non-linear mixed effects modelling (NLMEM). Comparisons of NCA and NLMEM in bioequivalence testing have been limited to drugs with one-compartment kinetics and have included a large number of different approaches. A simulation tool was developed with the ability to rapidly compare NCA and NLMEM methods in determining bioequivalence using both R and NONMEM and applied to a drug with two-compartment pharmacokinetics. Concentration-time profiles were simulated where relative bioavailability, random unexplained variability (RUV) at the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) differed between simulations. NLMEM analyses employed either the M1 or M3 methods for dealing with values below the LLOQ. It was used to elucidate the impact of changes in (i) RUV at the LLOQ, (ii) the extent of censoring data below the LLOQ and (iii) the concentration sampling times. The simulations showed NLMEM having a consistent 20-40% higher accuracy and sensitivity in identifying bioequivalent studies when compared to NCA, while NCA was found to have a 1-10% higher specificity than NLMEM. Increasing data censoring by increasing the LLOQ resulted in decreases of ~10% to the accuracy and sensitivity of NCA, with minimal effects on NLMEM. The tool provides a platform for comparing NCA and NLMEM methods and its use can be extended beyond the scenarios reported here. In the situations examined it is seen that NLMEM is more accurate than NCA and may offer some advantages in the determination of bioequivalence.

  4. PK/DB: database for pharmacokinetic properties and predictive in silico ADME models.

    PubMed

    Moda, Tiago L; Torres, Leonardo G; Carrara, Alexandre E; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-10-01

    The study of pharmacokinetic properties (PK) is of great importance in drug discovery and development. In the present work, PK/DB (a new freely available database for PK) was designed with the aim of creating robust databases for pharmacokinetic studies and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) prediction. Comprehensive, web-based and easy to access, PK/DB manages 1203 compounds which represent 2973 pharmacokinetic measurements, including five models for in silico ADME prediction (human intestinal absorption, human oral bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-brain barrier and water solubility). http://www.pkdb.ifsc.usp.br

  5. Three-compartment model: critical evaluation based on neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Analiza M; Shen, Wei; Wang, ZiMian; Aloia, John F; Nelson, Miriam E; Heymsfield, Steven B; Sardinha, Luis B; Heshka, Stanley

    2004-11-01

    There is renewed interest in Siri's classic three-compartment (3C) body composition model, requiring body volume (BV) and total body water (TBW) estimates, because dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and in vivo neutron activation (IVNA) systems cannot accommodate subjects with severe obesity. However, the 3C model assumption of a constant ratio (alpha) of mineral (M) to total body protein (TBPro) and related residual mass density (D(RES)) based on cadaver analyses might not be valid across groups differing in sex, race, age, and weight. The aim of this study was to derive new 3C model coefficients in vivo and to compare these estimates to those derived by Siri. Healthy adults (n = 323) were evaluated with IVNA and DEXA and the measured components used to derive alpha and D(RES). For all subjects combined, values of alpha and D(RES) (means +/- SD, 0.351 +/- 0.043; 1.565 +/- 0.023 kg/l) were similar to Siri's proposed values of 0.35 and 1.565 kg/l, respectively. However, alpha and D(RES) varied significantly as a function of sex, race, weight, and age. Expected errors in percent body fat arising by application of Siri's model were illustrated in a second group of 264 adults, including some whose size exceeded DEXA limits but whose BV and TBW had been measured by hydrodensitometry and (2)H(2)O dilution, respectively. Extrapolation of predictions by newly developed models to very high weights allows percent fat error estimation when Siri's model is applied in morbidly obese subjects. The present study results provide a critical evaluation of potential errors in the classic 3C model and present new formulas for use in selected populations.

  6. Thiamine whole blood and urinary pharmacokinetics in rats: urethan-induced dose-dependent pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Pipkin, J D; Stella, V J

    1982-02-01

    The whole blood pharmacokinetics of thiamine after intravenous administration of thiamine hydrochloride (4, 12, and 36 mg/kg) to rats anesthetized continuously with ether (inhalation) or urethan (1 g/kg ip) were studied. Urinary excretion of thiamine after intravenous administration of thiamine hydrochloride to rats lightly anesthetized with ether was also investigated. At any particular dose, thiamine displayed apparent classical two-compartment model behavior in the time range studied. Under urethan anesthesia, thiamine displayed apparent dose-dependent kinetics as measured by the changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters, AUC,Vd(area), t0.5 beta, and total body clearance, ClTB, with dose. However, when ether anesthesia was used, thiamine displayed dose-independent pharmacokinetic behavior. These results suggest that care should be taken in the interpretation of pharmacokinetic data obtained in anesthetized animals, particularly when urethan anesthesia is used.

  7. Comparison of different blood compartments for the detection of circulating DNA using a rat model of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fréalle, E; Gantois, N; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Leroy, S; Zawadzki, C; Perkhofer, S; Aliouat, E M; Dei-Cas, E

    2015-09-01

    Pneumocystis is mostly found in the alveolar spaces, but circulation of viable organisms also occurs and suggests that the detection of DNA in blood could be used as a noninvasive procedure to improve the diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP). In order to determine the optimal compartment for Pneumocystis DNA detection, we used a rat model of PcP and tested the presence of Pneumocystis with a quantitative mtLSU targeting real-time PCR in four blood compartments: whole blood, clot, serum and Platelet-Rich-Plasma (PRP). All samples from 4 Pneumocystis-free control rats were negative. Pneumocystis was detected in 79, 64, 57, and 57% of samples from 14 PcP rats, respectively, but DNA release was not related to pulmonary loads. These data confirm the potential usefulness of Pneumocystis DNA detection in the blood for PcP diagnosis and suggest that whole blood could be the most appropriate compartment for Pneumocystis detection.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  9. Percent body fat via DEXA: comparison with a four-compartment model.

    PubMed

    Van Der Ploeg, Grant E; Withers, Robert T; Laforgia, Joe

    2003-02-01

    This study compared body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA; Lunar DPX-L) with that via a four-compartment (4C; water, bone mineral mass, fat, and residual) model. Relative body fat was determined for 152 healthy adults [30.0 +/- 11.1 (SD) yr; 75.10 +/- 14.88 kg; 176.3 +/- 8.7 cm] aged from 18 to 59 yr. The 4C approach [20.7% body fat (%BF)] resulted in a significantly (P < 0.001) higher mean %BF compared with DEXA (18.9% BF), with intraindividual variations ranging from -2.6 to 7.3% BF. Linear regression and a Bland and Altman plot demonstrated the tendency for DEXA to progressively underestimate the %BF of leaner individuals compared with the criterion 4C model (4C %BF = 0.862 x DEXA %BF + 4.417; r(2) = 0.952, standard error of estimate = 1.6% BF). This bias was not attributable to variations in fat-free mass hydration but may have been due to beam-hardening errors that resulted from differences in anterior-posterior tissue thickness.

  10. Modeling the cathode compartment of polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Dead and active reaction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikovsky, A.A.; Divisek, J.; Kornyshev, A.A.

    1999-11-01

    A two-dimensional model of the cathode compartment of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell has been developed. The existence of gas channels in the current collector is taken into account. The model is based on continuity equations for concentrations of the gases and Poisson's equations for potentials of membrane and carbon phase, coupled by Tafel relation for reaction kinetics. Stefan-Maxwell and Knudsen diffusion of gases are taken into account. The simulations were performed for high and low values of carbon phase conductivity. The results revealed (i) for a low value of carbon phase conductivity, a dead zone in the active layer in front of the gas channel is formed, where the reaction rate is small. The catalyst may be removed from this zone without significant loss in cell performance; (ii) For a high carbon phase conductivity value, such a zone is absent, but removal of the catalyst from the same part of the active layer forces the reaction to proceed more rapidly in the remaining parts, with only marginal losses in performance. This conclusion is valid for high diffusivity of oxygen. For low diffusivity, dead zones are formed in front of the current collector, so that catalyst can be removed from these zones. The results, thus, show the possibilities for a considerable reduction of the amount of catalyst.

  11. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes determined in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral or intravenous administrations were extrapolated to give human plasma concentrations. 2. Plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and R-/S-warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole and midazolam previously observed in cynomolgus monkeys were scaled to human oral biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Results of the simplified human PBPK models were consistent with reported experimental PK data in humans or with values simulated by a fully constructed population-based simulator (Simcyp). 3. Oral administrations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan (human P450 2D probes) in monkeys reportedly yielded plasma concentrations similar to their quantitative detection limits. Consequently, ratios of in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearances of metoprolol and dextromethorphan determined in monkeys and humans were used with simplified PBPK models to extrapolate intravenous PK in monkeys to oral PK in humans. 4. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkeys, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 substrates, could be a suitable model for humans, especially when used in conjunction with simple PBPK models.

  12. Compartment modeling of dynamic brain PET—The impact of scatter corrections on parameter errors

    SciTech Connect

    Häggström, Ida Karlsson, Mikael; Larsson, Anne; Schmidtlein, C. Ross

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of scatter and its correction on kinetic parameters in dynamic brain positron emission tomography (PET) tumor imaging. The 2-tissue compartment model was used, and two different reconstruction methods and two scatter correction (SC) schemes were investigated. Methods: The GATE Monte Carlo (MC) software was used to perform 2 × 15 full PET scan simulations of a voxelized head phantom with inserted tumor regions. The two sets of kinetic parameters of all tissues were chosen to represent the 2-tissue compartment model for the tracer 3′-deoxy-3′-({sup 18}F)fluorothymidine (FLT), and were denoted FLT{sub 1} and FLT{sub 2}. PET data were reconstructed with both 3D filtered back-projection with reprojection (3DRP) and 3D ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM). Images including true coincidences with attenuation correction (AC) and true+scattered coincidences with AC and with and without one of two applied SC schemes were reconstructed. Kinetic parameters were estimated by weighted nonlinear least squares fitting of image derived time–activity curves. Calculated parameters were compared to the true input to the MC simulations. Results: The relative parameter biases for scatter-eliminated data were 15%, 16%, 4%, 30%, 9%, and 7% (FLT{sub 1}) and 13%, 6%, 1%, 46%, 12%, and 8% (FLT{sub 2}) for K{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}, k{sub 4}, V{sub a}, and K{sub i}, respectively. As expected, SC was essential for most parameters since omitting it increased biases by 10 percentage points on average. SC was not found necessary for the estimation of K{sub i} and k{sub 3}, however. There was no significant difference in parameter biases between the two investigated SC schemes or from parameter biases from scatter-eliminated PET data. Furthermore, neither 3DRP nor OSEM yielded the smallest parameter biases consistently although there was a slight favor for 3DRP which produced less biased k{sub 3} and K{sub i

  13. Nonlinear Population Pharmacokinetics of Sirolimus in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K; Cohen, E E W; House, L K; Ramírez, J; Zhang, W; Ratain, M J; Bies, R R

    2012-01-01

    Sirolimus, the prototypical inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, has substantial antitumor activity. In this study, sirolimus showed nonlinear pharmacokinetic characteristics over a wide dose range (from 1 to 60 mg/week). The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model to describe the nonlinearity of sirolimus. Whole blood concentration data, obtained from four phase I clinical trials, were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) approach. The influence of potential covariates was evaluated. Model robustness was assessed using nonparametric bootstrap and visual predictive check approaches. The data were well described by a two-compartment model incorporating a saturable Michaelis–Menten kinetic absorption process. A covariate analysis identified hematocrit as influencing the oral clearance of sirolimus. The visual predictive check indicated that the final pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted observed concentrations. The pharmacokinetics of sirolimus, based on whole blood concentrations, appears to be nonlinear due to saturable absorption. PMID:23887441

  14. 78 FR 21037 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A330-200 Airplanes; Bulk Cargo Lower Deck Crew Rest Compartments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ...: Alan Sinclair, Airframe and Cabin Safety Branch, ANM-115, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft...-200 airplane. The Airbus Model A330-200 airplane is a wide-body, twin engine jet airplane. Operating... Aircraft Certification Service. Prior to operational use of a flight (cabin) crew rest compartment, the...

  15. 76 FR 44246 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ...-115, Transport Standards Staff, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 1601... the 747-400. The Model 747-8 is a four-engine jet transport airplane that will have a maximum takeoff... airplanes, crew rest compartments have been installed and certified in the main passenger cabin area,...

  16. Methamphetamine blood concentrations in human abusers: application to pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K; Harvey, Dennis; Laćan, Goran

    2007-04-01

    Characterization of methamphetamine's (METH) dose-dependent effects on brain neurochemistry may represent a critical component for better understanding the range of resultant behavioral pathologies. Most human studies, however, have assessed only the effects of long term, high dose METH abuse (e.g., greater than 1000 mg/day) in individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for METH dependence. Yet, for the majority of METH abusers, their patterns of METH exposure that consist of lower doses remain less well-characterized. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 105 individuals detained by police for possible criminal activity and testing positive for stimulants by EMIT assay. METH blood concentrations were subsequently quantified by GC-MS and were predominantly in the low micromolar range (0.1-11.1 microM), with median and mean values of 1.3 microM (0.19 mg/l) and 2 microM (0.3 mg/l), respectively. Pharmacokinetic calculations based on these measured values were used to estimate initial METH body burdens, the median value being 52 mg. Modeling a 52 mg dose for a 4 day-METH maintenance exposure pattern of 4 doses/day at 4 h intervals showed that blood concentrations remained between 1 and 4 microM during this period. Collectively, these data present evidence for a METH exposure pattern distinct from high dose-METH abuse and provide the rationale for assessing potential brain pathology associated with such lower dose-METH exposure.

  17. Animal model and pharmacokinetic interpretation of nicotine poisoning in man.

    PubMed

    Brady, M E; Ritschel, W A; Saelinger, D A; Cacini, W; Patterson, A J

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find an animal model and possible pharmacolokinetic interpretation of the fact that a patient survived an accidental sc poisoning with a nicotine-containing animal tranquilizing dart. The same dose size of 3.58 mg/kg causing poisoning in man was administered to rabbits iv and sc. Blood samples were obtained for nicotine analysis by cardiac punctures; and blood pressure, respiration rate, and saliva flow were measured. Analysis of the original solution used in the dart excluded the possibility of sub-potency. The extent of unchanged drug reaching systemic circulation (extent of bioavailability) upon sc administration was 83%. Hence, the possibility of survival in man due to rapid tissue metabolism was ruled out. The pharmacokinetic analysis revealed a significant reduction in sc plasma levels during the first half hour which is reported as the most critical period for patients experiencing nicotine intoxication. The disposition of nicotine in the rabbit, i.e. distribution and elimination, are identical upon iv and sc administration. The reduced toxicity, i.e. blood pressure and saliva flow rate, upon sc dosing may be explained by the difference in plasma level peaks between sc and iv administration.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Piperacillin in Critically Ill Australian Indigenous Patients with Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Danny; Stewart, Penelope; Goud, Rajendra; Gourley, Stephen; Hewagama, Saliya; Krishnaswamy, Sushena; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-12-01

    There are no available pharmacokinetic data to guide piperacillin dosing in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients despite numerous reported physiological differences. This study aimed to describe the population pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis. A population pharmacokinetic study of Indigenous patients with severe sepsis was conducted in a remote hospital intensive care unit. Plasma samples were collected over two dosing intervals and assayed by validated chromatography. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using Pmetrics. Nine patients were recruited, and a two-compartment model adequately described the data. The piperacillin clearance (CL), volume of distribution of the central compartment (Vc), and distribution rate constants from the central to the peripheral compartment and from the peripheral to the central compartment were 5.6 ± 3.2 liters/h, 14.5 ± 6.6 liters, 1.5 ± 0.4 h(-1), and 1.8 ± 0.9 h(-1), respectively, where CL and Vc were found to be described by creatinine clearance (CLCR) and total body weight, respectively. In this patient population, piperacillin demonstrated high interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. CLCR was found to be the most important determinant of piperacillin pharmacokinetics.

  19. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  20. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  1. Dynamic (99m)Tc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-21

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for (99m)Tc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  2. Population pharmacokinetic model of the pregabalin-sildenafil interaction in rats: application of simulation to preclinical PK-PD study design.

    PubMed

    Bender, Gregor; Gosset, James; Florian, Jeff; Tan, Keith; Field, Mark; Marshall, Scott; DeJongh, Joost; Bies, Robert; Danhof, Meindert

    2009-10-01

    Preliminary evidence has suggested a synergistic interaction between pregabalin and sildenafil for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The focus of this study was to determine the influence of sildenafil on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of pregabalin with the objective of informing the design of a quantitative pharmacodynamic (PD) study. The pharmacokinetics were determined in rats following 2-hr intravenous infusions of pregabalin at doses of 4 mg/kg/hr and 10 mg/kg/hr with and without a sildenafil bolus (2.2 mg) and steady state infusion (12 mg/kg/hr for 6 h). This PK model was utilized in a preclinical trial simulation with the aim of selecting the optimal sampling strategy to characterize the PK-PD profile in a future study. Eight logistically feasible PK sampling strategies were simulated in NONMEM and examined through trial simulation techniques. A two-compartment population PK model best described pregabalin pharmacokinetics. Significant model covariates included either a binary effect of sildenafil administration (30.2% decrease in clearance) or a concentration-dependent effect due to sildenafil's active metabolite. Analysis of simulations indicated that three post-PD samples had the best cost/benefit ratio by providing a significant increase in the precision (and minor improvement in bias) of both PK and PD parameters compared with no PK sampling.

  3. Assessing pharmacokinetic variability directly induced by drug intake behaviour through development of a feeding behaviour-pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Petit-Jetté, C E; Gohore Bi, D; Fenneteau, F; Del Castillo, J R E; Nekka, F

    2008-04-07

    Variability in drug intake is increasingly recognized as a major source of variability in drug response. The non-uniform access to medicated feed, influenced by swine individual feeding behaviour, is a determinant of antibiotic exposure, recalling the intrinsic similarity with human compliance to drug regimens. In this paper, we developed a feeding behaviour-pharmacokinetic (FBPK) model of in-feed chlortetracycline (CTC) and established, in a definite way, the effect of feeding behaviour and its induced pharmacokinetic (PK) variability. Based on reported animal behaviour, we mathematically formulated swine feeding behaviour by incorporating its main characteristics: intense feeding periods that repeat on a daily basis and random feeding periods of free access to feed, along with growth stage factors. This behaviour model was then integrated into a PK model of CTC. Moreover, we analysed the effect of each feeding behaviour component and assessed the corresponding PK variability. We have been able to delineate the impact of different feeding behaviour components and characterize the induced PK variability. We have compared different therapeutic assumptions to our model and shown that random features underlying the feeding behaviour have dramatic influence on the PK variability. A practical tool to adopt the dosing regimen in terms of dose and age has been proposed. The method developed here can be generalized to other therapeutic contexts and incorporated into medical practice, particularly to make long-term projections of drug-intake behaviour, to explain possible treatment failure and guide practitioners in adjusting the dosing regimen.

  4. Influence of biophase distribution and P-glycoprotein interaction on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of the effects of morphine on the EEG.

    PubMed

    Groenendaal, D; Freijer, J; de Mik, D; Bouw, M R; Danhof, M; de Lange, E C M

    2007-07-01

    The aim was to investigate the influence of biophase distribution including P-glycoprotein (Pgp) function on the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic correlations of morphine's actions in rat brain. Male rats received a 10-min infusion of morphine as 4 mg kg(-1), combined with a continuous infusion of the Pgp inhibitor GF120918 or vehicle, 10 or 40 mg kg(-1). EEG signals were recorded continuously and blood samples were collected. Profound hysteresis was observed between morphine blood concentrations and effects on the EEG. Only the termination of the EEG effect was influenced by GF120918. Biophase distribution was best described with an extended catenary biophase distribution model, with a sequential transfer and effect compartment. The rate constant for transport through the transfer compartment (k(1e)) was 0.038 min(-1), being unaffected by GF120918. In contrast, the rate constant for the loss from the effect compartment (k(eo)) decreased 60% after GF120918. The EEG effect was directly related to concentrations in the effect compartment using the sigmoidal E(max) model. The values of the pharmacodynamic parameters E(0), E(max), EC(50) and Hill factor were 45.0 microV, 44.5 microV, 451 ng ml(-1) and 2.3, respectively. The effects of GF120918 on the distribution kinetics of morphine in the effect compartment were consistent with the distribution in brain extracellular fluid (ECF) as estimated by intracerebral microdialysis. However, the time-course of morphine concentrations at the site of action in the brain, as deduced from the biophase model, is distinctly different from the brain ECF concentrations.

  5. An on-chip small intestine-liver model for pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Takashi; Nakayama, Hidenari; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-06-01

    Testing of drug effects and cytotoxicity by using cultured cells has been widely performed as an alternative to animal testing. However, the estimation of pharmacokinetics by conventional cell-based assay methods is difficult because of the inability to evaluate multiorgan effects. An important challenge in the field is to mimic the organ-to-organ network in the human body by using a microfluidic network connecting small-scale tissues based on recently emerging MicroTAS (Micro Total Analysis Systems) technology for prediction of pharmacokinetics. Here, we describe an on-chip small intestine-liver coupled model for pharmacokinetic studies. To construct an in vitro pharmacokinetic model that appropriately models in vivo conditions, physiological parameters such as the structure of internal circulation, volume ratios of each organ, and blood flow ratio of the portal vein to the hepatic artery were mimicked using microfluidic networks. To demonstrate interactions between organs in vitro in pharmacokinetic studies, Caco-2, HepG2, and A549 cell cultures were used as organ models of the small intestine, liver, and lung, respectively, and connected to each other through a microporous membrane and microchannels to prepare a simple model of a physiological organ-to-organ network. The on-chip organ model assay using three types of substrate-epirubicine (EPI), irinotecan (CPT-11), and cyclophosphamide (CPA)-were conducted to model the effects of orally administered or biologically active anticancer drugs. The result suggested that the device can replicate physiological phenomena such as activity of the anticancer drugs on the target cells. This microfluidic device can thus be used as an in vitro organ model to predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the human body and may thus provide not only an alternative to animal testing but also a method of obtaining parameters for in silico models of physiologically based pharmacokinetics. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and

  6. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling of the analgesic effects of tramadol in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Garrido, María J; Habre, Walid; Rombout, Ferdinand; Trocóniz, Iñaki F

    2006-09-01

    The efficacy of tramadol (T) in children is not clearly understood because it is still unknown the ability of that population to form the active metabolite O-demethyltramadol (M1) and, whether or not the parent compound has a contribution to the efficacy. The aim was to develop a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for T in pediatrics, identifying the main active components. One hundred four children, mean age (4.55 years) received intravenously 1 mg/kg dose of T over 2.5 min at the end of surgery. If pain relief was inadequate, then an additional 0.33 mg/kg dose was given at 15, 30 and/or 45 min. Plasma samples and analgesic responses such as crying and movement were measured during a 6-h period. The estimates of the apparent volumes of distribution of the central compartment and at steady state and total plasma clearance of T were 8 l, 46.2 l, and 15.2 l/h, respectively. M1 formation clearance represented only a minor elimination pathway of T. Effect site concentrations of T and M1 were found to be the best predictors of the movement and crying responses, respectively. Steady-state plasma concentration levels of T and M1 of 100 and 15 ng/ml were associated with a 95% probability of adequate pain relief. Children have the ability to produce enough M1 to achieve proper pain relief. The response variables investigated give further evidence that not only the opioid effects of the metabolite are relevant, also the non-opiod effects of tramadol seem to give a significant contribution in its clinical use.

  7. Exploration of the Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Relationships for Fosfomycin Efficacy Using an In Vitro Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    VanScoy, Brian D.; McCauley, Jennifer; Ellis-Grosse, Evelyn J.; Okusanya, Olanrewaju O.; Bhavnani, Sujata M.; Forrest, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin, a phosphonic class antibiotic with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, has been used outside the United States since the early 1970s for the treatment of a variety of infections. In the United States, an oral (tromethamine salt) formulation is used for uncomplicated urinary tract infections. Recently, there has been interest in the use of an intravenous solution (ZTI-01) for the treatment of a broad range of infections associated with multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this era of multidrug-resistant bacteria with few treatment options, it is critical to understand the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) determinants for fosfomycin efficacy. Since such data are limited, a one-compartment in vitro infection model was used to determine the PK-PD index associated with efficacy and the magnitude of this measure necessary for various levels of effect. One challenge isolate (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, for which the fosfomycin agar MIC is 0.5 mg/liter and the broth microdilution MIC is 1 mg/liter) was evaluated in the dose fractionation studies, and two additional clinical E. coli isolates were evaluated in the dose-ranging studies. Mutation frequency studies indicated the presence of an inherently fosfomycin resistant E. coli subpopulation (agar MIC = 32 to 64 mg/liter) within the standard starting inoculum of a susceptibility test. Due to the presence of this resistant subpopulation, we identified the percentage of the dosing interval that drug concentrations were above the inherent resistance inhibitory concentration found at baseline to be the PK-PD index associated with efficacy (r2 = 0.777). The magnitudes of this PK-PD index associated with net bacterial stasis and 1- and 2-log10 CFU/ml reductions from baseline at 24 h were 11.9, 20.9, and 32.8, respectively. These data provide useful information for modernizing and optimizing ZTI-01 dosing regimens for further study. PMID:26100706

  8. A model for size and age changes in the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol in neonates, infants and children.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Woollard, G A; Holford, N H

    2000-08-01

    The aims of this study were to describe paracetamol pharmacokinetics in neonates and infants. Infants in their first 3 months of life (n = 30) were randomised to sequentially receive one of three paracetamol formulations (dose 30-40 mg kg-1) over a 2 day period. The formulations were (a) elixir, (b) glycogelatin capsule suppository and (c) triglyceride base suppository. Approximately six blood samples were taken after each dose over the subsequent 10-16 h. Data were analysed using a nonlinear mixed effect model. These neonatal and infant data were then included with data from four published studies of paracetamol pharmacokinetics (n = 221) and age-related pharmacokinetic changes investigated. Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates and their coefficients of variation (CV%) for a one compartment model with first order input, lag time and first order elimination were volume of distribution 69.9 (18%) l and clearance 13.0 (41%) l h-1 (standardized to a 70 kg person). The volume of distribution decreased exponentially with a half-life of 1.9 days from 120 l 70 kg-1 at birth to 69.9 l 70 kg-1 by 14 days. Clearance increased from birth (4.9 l h-1 70 kg-1) with a half-life of 3.25 months to reach 12.4 l h-1 70 kg-1 by 12 months. The absorption half-life (tabs) for the oral preparation was 0.13 (154%) h with a lag time (tlag) of 0.39 h (31%). Absorption parameters for the triglyceride base and capsule suppositories were tabs 1.34 (90%) h, tlag 0.14 h (31%) and tabs 0.65 (63%) h, tlag 0.54 h (31%), respectively. The tabs for elixir and capsule suppository in children under 3 months were 3.68 and 1.51 times greater than children over 3 months. The relative bioavailability of rectal formulations compared with elixir were 0.67 (30%) and 0.61 (23%) for the triglyceride base and capsule suppositories, respectively. Total body clearance of paracetamol at birth is 62% and volume of distribution 174% that of older children. A target concentration above 10 mg l-1 in

  9. A model for size and age changes in the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol in neonates, infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian J; Woollard, Gerald A; Holford, Nicholas H G

    2000-01-01

    Aims The aims of this study were to describe paracetamol pharmacokinetics in neonates and infants. Methods Infants in their first 3 months of life (n = 30) were randomised to sequentially receive one of three paracetamol formulations (dose 30–40 mg kg−1) over a 2 day period. The formulations were (a) elixir, (b) glycogelatin capsule suppository and (c) triglyceride base suppository. Approximately six blood samples were taken after each dose over the subsequent 10–16 h. Data were analysed using a nonlinear mixed effect model. These neonatal and infant data were then included with data from four published studies of paracetamol pharmacokinetics (n = 221) and age-related pharmacokinetic changes investigated. Results Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates and their coefficients of variation (CV%) for a one compartment model with first order input, lag time and first order elimination were volume of distribution 69.9 (18%) l and clearance 13.0 (41%) l h−1 (standardized to a 70 kg person). The volume of distribution decreased exponentially with a half-life of 1.9 days from 120 l 70 kg−1 at birth to 69.9 l 70 kg−1 by 14 days. Clearance increased from birth (4.9 l h−1 70 kg−1) with a half-life of 3.25 months to reach 12.4 l h−1 70 kg−1 by 12 months. The absorption half-life (tabs) for the oral preparation was 0.13 (154%) h with a lag time (tlag) of 0.39 h (31%). Absorption parameters for the triglyceride base and capsule suppositories were tabs 1.34 (90%) h, tlag 0.14 h (31%) and tabs 0.65 (63%) h, tlag 0.54 h (31%), respectively. The tabs for elixir and capsule suppository in children under 3 months were 3.68 and 1.51 times greater than children over 3 months. The relative bioavailability of rectal formulations compared with elixir were 0.67 (30%) and 0.61 (23%) for the triglyceride base and capsule suppositories, respectively. Conclusions Total body clearance of paracetamol at birth is 62% and volume of distribution 174% that of older children

  10. Population pharmacokinetics. A regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Fadiran, E O; Jones, C D; Lesko, L; Huang, S M; Higgins, K; Hu, C; Machado, S; Maldonado, S; Williams, R; Hossain, M; Ette, E I

    1999-07-01

    The application of population approaches to drug development is recommended in several US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance documents. Population pharmacokinetic (and pharmacodynamic) techniques enable identification of the sources of inter- and intra-individual variability that impinge upon drug safety and efficacy. This article briefly discusses the 2-stage approach to the estimation of population pharmacokinetic parameters, which requires serial multiple measurements on each participant, and comprehensively reviews the nonlinear mixed-effects modelling approach, which can be applied in situations where extensive sampling is not done on all or any of the participants. Certain preliminary information, such as the compartment model used in describing the pharmacokinetics of the drug, is required for a population pharmacokinetic study. The practical design considerations of the location of sampling times, number of samples/participants and the need to sample an individual more than once should be borne in mind. Simulation may be useful for choosing the study design that will best meet study objectives. The objectives of the population pharmacokinetic study can be secondary to the objectives of the primary clinical study (in which case an add-on population pharmacokinetic protocol may be needed) or primary (when a stand-alone protocol is required). Having protocols for population pharmacokinetic studies is an integral part of 'good pharmacometric practice'. Real-time data assembly and analysis permit an ongoing evaluation of site compliance with the study protocol and provide the opportunity to correct violations of study procedures. Adequate policies and procedures should be in place for study blind maintenance. Real-time data assembly creates the opportunity for detecting and correcting errors in concentration-time data, drug administration history and covariate data. Population pharmacokinetic analyses may be undertaken in 3 interwoven steps: exploratory

  11. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-disease progression model for effects of anakinra in Lewis rats with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyang; Lon, Hoi-Kei; Dubois, Debra C; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J

    2011-12-01

    A population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-disease progression (PK/PD/DIS) model was developed to characterize the effects of anakinra in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) rats and explore the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in rheumatoid arthritis. The CIA rats received either vehicle, or anakinra at 100 mg/kg for about 33 h, 100 mg/kg for about 188 h, or 10 mg/kg for about 188 h by subcutaneous infusion. Plasma concentrations of anakinra were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Swelling of rat hind paws was measured. Population PK/PD/DIS parameters were computed for the various groups using non-linear mixed-effects modeling software (NONMEM® Version VI). The final model was assessed using visual predictive checks and nonparameter stratified bootstrapping. A two-compartment PK model with two sequential absorption processes and linear elimination was used to capture PK profiles of anakinra. A transduction-based feedback model incorporating logistic growth rate captured disease progression and indirect response model I captured drug effects. The PK and paw swelling versus time profiles in CIA rats were fitted well. Anakinra has modest effects (I ( max ) = 0.28) on paw edema in CIA rats. The profiles are well-described by our PK/PD/DIS model which provides a basis for future mechanism-based assessment of anakinra dynamics in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Prediction of Ketoconazole absorption using an updated in vitro transfer model coupled to physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Aaron; Fiolka, Tom; Kostewicz, Edmund S

    2017-03-30

    The aim of this study was to optimize the in vitro transfer model and to increase its biorelevance to more accurately mimic the in vivo supersaturation and precipitation behaviour of weak basic drugs. Therefore, disintegration of the formulation, volumes of the stomach and intestinal compartments, transfer rate, bile salt concentration, pH range and paddle speed were varied over a physiological relevant range. The supersaturation and precipitation data from these experiments for Ketoconazole (KTZ) were coupled to physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model using Stella® software, which also incorporated the disposition kinetics of KTZ taken from the literature, in order to simulate the oral absorption and plasma profile in humans. As expected for a poorly soluble weak base, KTZ demonstrated supersaturation followed by precipitation under various in vitro conditions simulating the proximal small intestine with the results influenced by transfer rate, hydrodynamics, volume, bile salt concentration and pH values. When the in vitro data representing the "average" GI conditions was coupled to the PBPK model, the simulated profiles came closest to the observed mean plasma profiles for KTZ. In line with the high permeability of KTZ, the simulated profiles were highly influenced by supersaturation whilst precipitation was not predicted to occur in vivo. A physiological relevant in vitro "standard" transfer model setup to investigate supersaturation and precipitation was established. For translating the in vitro data to the in vivo setting, it is important that permeability is considered which can be achieved by coupling the in vitro data to PBPK modelling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of bosutinib.

    PubMed

    Hsyu, Poe-Hirr; Mould, Diane R; Abbas, Richat; Amantea, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bosutinib is an orally active, competitive inhibitor of Src/Abl tyrosine kinases. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed using data pooled from 3 studies of patients (n = 870) with solid tumors or Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia. Patients (aged 18-91 y, weighing 35-221 kg) who received bosutinib 50 to 600 mg orally with food each contributed 6-9 pharmacokinetic samples. The final pharmacokinetic model was a linear two-compartment model with first-order absorption, an absorption lag-time, and dose-dependent bioavailability. Oral absorption was relatively slow, with a half-time of 1.14 h and a lag-time of 0.87 h; time to peak concentration was 5-6 h. Apparent clearance was 120 L/h. The apparent volume of the peripheral compartment was large with a slow turnover; alpha and beta half-lives were 19 h and 290 days, respectively. All parameters were estimated with acceptable precision (standard error <30%). No tested covariate (protocol, baseline demographic/clinical characteristics, or laboratory results) explained the high inter-individual variability of bosutinib pharmacokinetics. Therefore, adjusting bosutinib dose for body size (weight, surface area) would not provide benefit over fixed dosing. Using this exposure model in pharmacodynamic assessment of one study, adverse event incidence was shown to be similar in overall and bosutinib-responsive populations.

  14. A population pharmacokinetic model for the complex systemic absorption of ropivacaine after femoral nerve block in patients undergoing knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, François; Drolet, Pierre; Fallaha, Michel; Varin, France

    2012-12-01

    Because of its slow systemic absorption and flip-flop kinetics, ropivacaine's pharmacokinetics after a peripheral nerve block has never been thoroughly characterized. The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for ropivacaine after loco-regional administration and to identify patient characteristics that may influence the drug's absorption and disposition. Frequent plasma samples were taken up to 93 h after a 100 mg dose given as femoral block for postoperative analgesia in 15 orthopedic patients. Ropivacaine plasma concentration-time data were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling method. A one-compartment model with parallel inverse Gaussian and time-dependent inputs best described ropivacaine plasma concentration-time curves. Ropivacaine systemic absorption was characterized by a rapid phase (mean absorption time of 25 ± 4.8 min) followed by a much slower phase (half-life of 3.9 ± 0.65 h). Interindividual variability (IIV) for these parameters, 58 and 9 %, indicated that the initial absorption phase was more variable. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F = 77.2 ± 11.5 L, IIV = 26 %) was influenced by body weight (Δ 1.49 % per kg change) whereas the absorption rate constant (slower phase) of ropivacaine was affected by age (Δ 2.25 % per year change). No covariate effects were identified for the apparent clearance of the drug (CL/F =10.8 ± 1.0 L/h, 34  IIV = 34 %). These findings support our hypothesis that modeling a complex systemic absorption directly from plasma concentration-time curves exhibiting flip-flop kinetics is possible. Only the age-effect was considered as relevant for possible dosing adjustments.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral mecamylamine - development of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist cognitive challenge test using modelling and simulation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Jimenez, Ricardo; Baakman, Anne Catrien; Stevens, Jasper; Goulooze, Sebastiaan C; Hart, Ellen P; Rissmann, Robert; van Gerven, Joop Ma; Groeneveld, Geert Jan

    2017-02-01

    A pharmacologic challenge model with a nicotinic antagonist could be an important tool not only to understand the complex role of the nicotinic cholinergic system in cognition, but also to develop novel compounds acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The objective was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) methods to quantitate the pharmacokinetics of three oral mecamylamine doses (10, 20 and 30 mg) and correlate the plasma concentrations to the pharmacodynamic effects on a cognitive and neurophysiologic battery of tests in healthy subjects. A one-compartment linear kinetic model best described the plasma concentrations of mecamylamine. Mecamylamine's estimated clearance was 0.28 ± 0.015 L min(-1). The peripheral volume of distribution (291 ± 5.15 L) was directly related to total body weight. Mecamylamine impaired the accuracy and increased the reaction time in tests evaluating short term working memory with a steep increase in the concentration-effect relationship at plasma concentrations below 100 μg L(-1). On the other hand, mecamylamine induced a decrease in performance of tests evaluating visual and fine motor coordination at higher plasma concentrations (EC50 97 μg L(-1)). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased exponentially after a plasma mecamylamine concentration of 80 μg L(-1), a known effect previously poorly studied in healthy subjects. The developed mecamylamine PKPD model was used to quantify the effects of nicotinic blockade in a set of neurophysiological tests in humans with the goal to provide insight into the physiology and pharmacology of the nicotinic system in humans and the possibility to optimize future trials that use mecamylamine as a pharmacological challenge.

  16. In Silico Ocular Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Delivery of Topical FK962 to Retina.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ayumi; Yabuta, Chiho; Kishimoto, Yayoi; Kozai, Seiko; Ohtori, Akira; Shearer, Thomas R; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-09-01

    To establish the in silico ocular pharmacokinetic modeling for eye drops, and to simulate the dose regimen for FK962 in human choroid/retinal diseases. Pharmacokinetics for FK962 in vivo was performed by a single instillation of drops containing 0.1% (14)C-FK962 in rabbit eyes. Permeation of FK962 across the cornea, sclera, and choroid/retina was measured in vitro. Neurite elongation by FK962 was measured in cultured rat retinal ganglion cells. Parameters from the experimental data were used in an improved in silico model of ocular pharmacokinetics of FK962 in man. The mean concentration of FK962 in ocular tissues predicted by in silico modeling was consistent with in vivo results, validating the in silico model. FK962 rapidly penetrated into the anterior and posterior segments of the eye and then diffused into the vitreous body. The in silico pharmacokinetic