Science.gov

Sample records for compartment model pharmacokinetics

  1. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  2. Topical oral cavity pharmacokinetic modeling of a stannous fluoride dentifrice: an unusual two compartment model.

    PubMed

    Scott, Douglas C; Coggan, John W; Cruze, Charles A; He, Tao; Johnson, Robert D

    2009-10-01

    A pharmacokinetic model was developed describing the pharmacokinetics of stannous fluoride in human subjects after oral topical application of a stannous fluoride dentifrice. Twenty subjects participated in an investigation of an experimental dentifrice. Subjects rinsed their mouths with the experimental dentifrice slurry. Saliva and plaque samples were obtained from the subjects at various times up to 6 h after administration. Samples were analyzed for total tin content, used as an analytical marker for the active stannous fluoride ingredient, using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. The modeling indicates that there is an obvious kinetic relationship between saliva and plaque compartments and that stannous fluoride is very well retained in and slowly released from plaque (and oral surfaces) into saliva. Additionally, both compartments are simultaneously loaded during administration unlike typical systemic drug behavior, and the elimination rate "constant" from the central compartment (saliva) changes due to changes in salivary flow. Stannous fluoride is cleared from saliva rapidly but very well retained in gingival plaque. The model with simultaneous loading of plaque and saliva describes these observations and may account for the prolonged antiplaque and antigingivitis benefits of stannous fluoride.

  3. Identification of pharmacokinetic parameters of two compartment open model with first order absorption.

    PubMed

    Cherruault, Y; Sarin, V B

    1985-03-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters of a two-compartment open model with first order absorption from plasma level data. The eigen-values of the characteristic matrix of the given system are obtained by transforming them into a single variable and the global minimum of the deviation (for plasma concentrations) from the observed values is obtained through the solution of linear relations involving the eigen-values. The distribution volume and the lag time are also identified. Finally, the uniqueness of the absorption rate constant is obtained by the minimum energy principle. The model is tested for different sets of data for the drug Guanfacine, an antihypertensive drug. The results are compared to those obtained by the SAMM program.

  4. Theoretical study of haemoperfusion: drugs obeying a one-compartment pharmacokinetics model.

    PubMed

    Guenzet, J; Bourin, M; Laurent, D; Aminou, T

    1985-05-01

    A general theory of haemoperfusion for drugs obeying the one-compartment pharmacokinetics model is proposed. The following theoretical cases are investigated: First case Adsorption and desorption are first-order reactions without biotransformation, and elimination rate is first-order. Two particular cases are examined: no desorption and alpha = beta. Second case: Adsorption and desorption rates are first-order, without biotransformation, and elimination rate is zero-order. Third case: Adsorption rate is first-order and desorption rate is zero-order, without biotransformation, and elimination is either first-order or zero-order. Fourth case Adsorption rate is zero-order and desorption rate is first-order, without biotransformation, and elimination is either first-order or zero-order. Fifth case: Adsorption and desorption rates are first-order, with biotransformation. In all these pharmacokinetics models for haemoperfusion, theoretical computations lead to the values of adsorbed amount and plasma level, in relation to time. Clearances are also computed. In most cases, haemoperfusion must be performed quickly because of the desorption phenomenon. Parameters modulating the adsorption process are: surface area, blood flow, drug concentration in blood, adsorbent nature and adsorbent quantity.

  5. A NOVEL PNYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A NOVEL PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT. Evans, M.V., Hughes, M.F., and Kenyon, E.M. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    DMA is the major methylated metabolite of inorganic arsenic, a kno...

  6. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  7. Use of three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict hepatic blood levels of fluvoxamine relevant for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Iga, Katsumi

    2015-04-01

    Using a three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and a tube model for hepatic extraction kinetics, equations for calculating blood drug levels (Cb s) and hepatic blood drug levels (Chb s, proportional to actual hepatic drug levels), were derived mathematically. Assuming the actual values for total body clearance (CLtot ), oral bioavailability (F), and steady-state distribution volume (Vdss ), Cb s, and Chb s after intravenous and oral administration of fluvoxamine (strong perpetrator in drug-drug interactions, DDIs), propranolol, imipramine, and tacrine were simulated. Values for Cb s corresponded to the actual values for all tested drugs, and mean Chb and maximal Chb -to-maximal Cb ratio predicted for oral fluvoxamine administration (50 mg twice-a-day administration) were nearly 100 nM and 2.3, respectively, which would be useful for the predictions of the DDIs caused by fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine and tacrine are known to exhibit relatively large F values despite having CLtot similar to or larger than hepatic blood flow, which may be because of the high liver uptake (almost 0.6) upon intravenous administration. The present method is thus considered to be more predictive of the Chb for perpetrators of DDIs than other methods. PMID:25558834

  8. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Eigenvector decomposition. Two-compartment open system after rapid intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Lewi, P J

    1975-06-01

    The theroetical background of linear pharmacokinetics is presented in terms of elementary mathematical operations while preserving the important aspects of eigenvector decomposition. The discussion is limited to two-compartment open models with rapid intravenous administration. Eigenvector decomposition allows to extend the theory in a straightforward manner to models of higher order and to other ways of administration. A computational scheme is included that can be carried out on a desk-calculator in a small number of steps. PMID:1164093

  10. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskel...

  11. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Methods Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation–based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Results Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0

  12. Post-dialysis urea concentration: comparison between one- compartment model and two-compartment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrin, N. S. Ahmad; Ibrahim, N.

    2014-11-01

    The reduction of the urea concentration in blood can be numerically projected by using one-compartment model and two-compartment model with no variation in body fluid. This study aims to compare the simulated values of post-dialysis urea concentration for both models with the clinical data obtained from the hospital. The clinical assessment of adequacy of a treatment is based on the value of Kt/V. Further, direct calculation using clinical data and one-compartment model are presented in the form of ratio. It is found that the ratios of postdialysis urea concentration simulated using two-compartment model are higher compared to the ratios of post-dialysis urea concentration using one-compartment model. In addition, most values of post-dialysis urea concentration simulated using two-compartment model are much closer to the clinical data compared to values simulated using one-compartment model. Kt/V values calculated directly using clinical data are found to be higher than Kt/V values derived from one-compartment model.

  13. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology. PMID:26337290

  14. A four compartment open model with first-order absorption.

    PubMed

    Cherruault, Y; Sarin, V B

    1993-03-01

    This paper is related to the identification of pharmacokinetic parameters of a four-compartment open model with first order absorption from plasma level data. The eigenvalues of the characteristic matrix of the given system are obtained by transforming them into a single variable and the solution involves the minimization of the sum of squares of deviation of the model-predicted values of the state variables from an experimentally obtained values. The distribution volume and the lag time are also identified. Finally, the unicity of the absorption rate constant is obtained by the minimum energy principle. The results obtained with present method are compared with those obtained by the generalized least squares method.

  15. Modeling the Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) During Gestation and Lactation in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the pharmacokinetics of PFOA during gestation and lactation, a biologically supported dynamic model was developed. A two compartment system linked via placental blood flow described gestation, while milk production linked the dam to a pup litter compartment during lact...

  16. Applications of physiologic pharmacokinetic modeling in carcinogenic risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Krewski, D; Withey, J R; Ku, L F; Andersen, M E

    1994-01-01

    The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models has been proposed as a means of estimating the dose of the reactive metabolites of carcinogenic xenobiotics reaching target tissues, thereby affording an opportunity to base estimates of potential cancer risk on tissue dose rather than external levels of exposure. In this article, we demonstrate how a PBPK model can be constructed by specifying mass-balance equations for each physiological compartment included in the model. In general, this leads to a system of nonlinear partial differential equations with which to characterize the compartment system. These equations then can be solved numerically to determine the concentration of metabolites in each compartment as functions of time. In the special case of a linear pharmacokinetic system, we present simple closed-form expressions for the area under the concentration-time curves (AUC) in individual tissue compartments. A general relationship between the AUC in blood and other tissue compartments is also established. These results are of use in identifying those parameters in the models that characterize the integrated tissue dose, and which should therefore be the primary focus of sensitivity analyses. Applications of PBPK modeling for purposes of tissue dosimetry are reviewed, including models developed for methylene chloride, ethylene oxide, 1,4-dioxane, 1-nitropyrene, as well as polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and furans. Special considerations in PBPK modeling related to aging, topical absorption, pregnancy, and mixed exposures are discussed. The linkage between pharmacokinetic models used for tissue dosimetry and pharmacodynamic models for neoplastic transformation of stem cells in the target tissue is explored. PMID:7737040

  17. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  18. Telavancin demonstrates activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid in broth microdilution MIC and one-compartment pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan R; Barber, Katie E; Hallesy, Jessica; Raut, Animesh; Rybak, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates have arisen with reduced susceptibility to several anti-MRSA agents. Telavancin (TLV), a novel anti-MRSA agent, retains low MICs against these organisms. Our objective was to determine the MICs for TLV, daptomycin (DAP), vancomycin (VAN), and linezolid (LZD) against daptomycin-nonsusceptible (DNS) S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heteroresistant VISA (hVISA), and linezolid-resistant (LZD(r)) S. aureus. We also evaluated these agents against each phenotype in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Seventy DNS, 100 VISA, 180 hVISA, and 25 LZD(r) MRSA isolates were randomly selected from our library and tested to determine their MICs against TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD via broth microdilution and a Trek panel. Four isolates were randomly selected for 168-h in vitro models to evaluate treatment with TLV at 10 mg/kg of body weight/day, DAP at 10 mg/kg/day, VAN at 1 g every 12 h (q12h), and LZD at 600 mg q12h. The MIC50/90 for TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD against 70 DNS S. aureus isolates were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 2/4 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 2/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 100 VISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 4/8 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 170 hVISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 0.5/1 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 25 LZD(r) isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.03/0.06 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 2/2 μg/ml, and 8/8 μg/ml, respectively. The TLV MIC was >0.125 μg/ml for 10/365 (2.7%) isolates. In PK/PD models, TLV was universally bactericidal at 168 h and statistically superior to all antibiotics against DNS S. aureus strain R2334. These data further establish the potency of TLV against resistant MRSA. The model data demonstrate in vitro bactericidal activity of TLV against hVISA, VISA, DNS S. aureus, and LZD(r) S. aureus strains. Further clinical research is warranted.

  19. A pharmacokinetic model of cadmium in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, R.V.; Shkreli, F.; Harrison, S.

    1997-11-01

    It has been previously observed that exposure of rainbow trout to Cd from water or food did not result in a steady state for key compartments such as the gill, liver, and kidney. Further, during depuration, the mass of Cd in the kidney continued to increase. A seven-compartment pharmacokinetic model of the disposition of cadmium in the rainbow trout was constructed to obtain insight into these observations. The model considers exchange across the gill from exposure to dissolved (available) Cd in the water and exchange of Cd across the gut wall due to exposure to Cd in the food source. Internal distribution of Cd is via Cd in blood exchanging with aqueous phase Cd in kidney, liver, and a storage compartment. Equilibrium partitioning is assumed between the aqueous phase Cd and bound tissue Cd in each compartment. The model is applied to a data set where trout were exposed under two conditions: Cd primarily in water and primarily in food. The model parameters were obtained from other published exposure experiments as well as calibration to the data. The parameters were /not altered between the two exposure pathways. High surface gill sorption and gut biliary transfer were necessary in order to obtain reasonable model calibration. Reproduction of the observed increase in kidney Cd during depuration is obtained with a relatively high partitioning, and model flux calculations indicate a net flux into the kidney during the depuration phase. Model simulations for both water and food exposure routes indicated that the whole body Cd concentration was calculated to reach equilibrium in about 50 d. However, Cd did not achieve a steady state in the kidney where it reached a maximum concentration at seven times whole body. For assessment of Cd risk to trout target tissues, it is concluded that a pharmacokinetic model may be necessary.

  20. Predicting neonatal pharmacokinetics from prior data using population pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Edginton, Andrea N; Avant, Debbie; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2015-10-01

    Selection of the first dose for neonates in clinical trials is very challenging. The objective of this analysis was to assess if a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model developed with data from infants to adults is predictive of neonatal clearance and to evaluate what age range of prior PK data is needed for informative modeling to predict neonate exposure. Two sources of pharmacokinetic data from 8 drugs were used to develop population models: (1) data from all patients > 2 years of age, and (2) data from all nonneonatal patients aged > 28 days. The prediction error based on the models using data from subjects > 2 years of age showed bias toward overprediction, with median average fold error (AFE) for CL predicted/CLobserved greater than 1.5. The bias for predicting neonatal PK was improved when using all prior PK data including infants as opposed to an assessment without infant PK data, with the median AFE 0.91. As an increased number of pediatric trials are conducted in neonates under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, dose selection should be based on the best estimates of neonatal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics prior to conducting efficacy and safety studies in neonates. PMID:25907280

  1. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials for an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP. METHODS: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model discrimination was performed, by minimizing the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), maximizing the coefficient of determination (r²) and by comparison of the quality of fit plots. RESULTS: The best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition after INSCOP administration (minimal AIC =907.2) consisted of one compartment for plasma, saliva and urine respectively that were inter-connected with different rate constants. The estimated values of PK parameters were compiled in Table 1. The model fitting exercises revealed a nonlinear PK for scopolamine between plasma and saliva compartments for K21, Vmax and Km. CONCLUSION: PK model for INSCOP was developed and for the first time it satisfactorily predicted the PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after INSCOP administration. Using non-linear PK yielded the best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition between plasma and saliva compartments, and inclusion of non-linear PK resulted in a significant improved model fitting. The model can be utilized to predict scopolamine plasma concentration using saliva and/or urine data that

  2. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  3. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon.

  4. Modeling the pharmacokinetics of extended release pharmaceutical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muria, Michela; Lamberti, Gaetano; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2009-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) models predict the hematic concentration of drugs after the administration. In compartment modeling, the body is described by a set of interconnected “vessels” or “compartments”; the modeling consisting of transient mass balances. Usually the orally administered drugs were considered as immediately available: this cannot describe the administration of extended-release systems. In this work we added to the traditional compartment models the ability to account for a delay in administration, relating this delay to in vitro data. Firstly, the method was validated, applying the model to the dosage of nicotine by chewing-gum; the model was tuned by in vitro/in vivo data of drugs (divalproex-sodium and diltiazem) with medium-rate release kinetics, then it was applied in describing in vivo evolutions due to the assumption of fast- and slow-release systems. The model reveals itself predictive, the same of a Level A in vitro/in vivo correlation, but being physically based, it is preferable to a purely statistical method.

  5. Bioelectrical impedance modelling of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Zarowitz, B J; Pilla, A M; Peterson, E L

    1989-10-01

    1. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to develop descriptive models of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters in 30 adult in-patients receiving therapy with gentamicin. 2. Serial blood samples obtained from each subject at steady state were analyzed and used to derive gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters. 3. Multiple regression equations were developed for clearance, elimination rate constant and volume of distribution at steady state and were all statistically significant at P less than 0.05. 4. Clinical validation of this innovative technique is warranted before clinical use is recommended.

  6. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, J N; Healy, J R; Thoma, B N; Peahota, M M; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, N C; Kraft, W K

    2016-09-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration-time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log-likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two-compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non-ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher-weight patients. PMID:27639260

  7. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Healy, JR; Thoma, BN; Peahota, MM; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, NC; Kraft, WK

    2016-01-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration–time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log‐likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two‐compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non‐ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher‐weight patients. PMID:27639260

  8. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis.

    PubMed

    Wambaugh, John F; Barton, Hugh A; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2008-12-01

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskell Laboratories, USEPA Administrative Record AR-226.1499 (2003)] that administered single oral or iv doses of PFOA to adult male and female rats. PFOA concentration was observed over time; in plasma for some animals and in fecal and urinary excretion for others. There were four rats per dose group, for a total of 36 males and 36 females. Assuming that the PK parameters for each individual within a gender were drawn from the same, biologically varying population, plasma and excretion data were jointly analyzed using a hierarchical framework to separate uncertainty due to measurement error from actual biological variability. Bayesian analysis using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) provides tools to perform such an analysis as well as quantitative diagnostics to evaluate and discriminate between models. Starting from a one-compartment PK model with separate clearances to urine and feces, the model was incrementally expanded using Bayesian measures to assess if the expansion was supported by the data. PFOA excretion is sexually dimorphic in rats; male rats have bi-phasic elimination that is roughly 40 times slower than that of the females, which appear to have a single elimination phase. The male and female data were analyzed separately, keeping only the parameters describing the measurement process in common. For male rats, including excretion data initially decreased certainty in the one-compartment parameter estimates compared to an analysis using plasma data only. Allowing a third, unspecified clearance improved agreement and increased certainty when all the data was used, however a significant amount of eliminated PFOA was estimated to be missing from the excretion data. Adding an additional

  9. Mixed-effects modelling of the interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling of pegylated human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Jolling, Koen; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Hemeryck, Alex; Vermeulen, An; Greway, Tony

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for interspecies allometric scaling of pegylated r-HuEPO (PEG-EPO) pharmacokinetics to man. A total of 927 serum concentrations from 193 rats, 6 rabbits, 34 monkeys, and 9 dogs obtained after a single dose of PEG-EPO, administered by the i.v. (dose range: 12.5-550 microg/kg) and s.c. (dose range: 12.5-500 microg/kg) routes, were pooled in this analysis. An open two-compartment model with first-order absorption and lag time (Tlag) and linear elimination from the central compartment was fitted to the data using the NONMEM V software. Body weight (WT) was used as a scaling factor and the effect of brain weight (BW), sex, and pregnancy status on the pharmacokinetic parameters was investigated. The final model was evaluated by means of a non-parametric bootstrap analysis and used to predict the PEG-EPO pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects. The systemic clearance (CL) in males was estimated to be 4.08WT1.030xBW-0.345 ml/h. In females, the CL was 90.7% of the CL in males. The volumes of the central (Vc) and the peripheral (Vp) compartment were characterized as 57.8WT0.959 ml, and 48.1WT1.150 ml, respectively. Intercompartmental flow was estimated at 2.32WT0.930 ml/h. Absorption rate constant (Ka) was estimated at 0.0538WT-0.149. The absolute s.c. bioavailability F was calculated at 52.5, 80.2, and 49.4% in rat, monkey, and dog, respectively. The interindividual variability in the population pharmacokinetic parameters was fairly low (<35%). Non-parametric bootstrap confirmed the accuracy of the NONMEM estimates. The mean model predicted pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects of 70 kg were estimated at: CL: 26.2 ml/h; Vc: 3.6l; Q: 286 l/h; Vp: 6.9l, and Ka: 0.031 h-1. The population pharmacokinetic model developed was appropriate to describe the time course of PEG-EPO serum concentrations and their variability in different species. The model predicted pharmacokinetics of PEG

  10. Applications of minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang

    2012-01-01

    Conventional mammillary models are frequently used for pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis when only blood or plasma data are available. Such models depend on the quality of the drug disposition data and have vague biological features. An alternative minimal-physiologically-based PK (minimal-PBPK) modeling approach is proposed which inherits and lumps major physiologic attributes from whole-body PBPK models. The body and model are represented as actual blood and tissue usually total body weight) volumes, fractions (fd) of cardiac output with Fick’s Law of Perfusion, tissue/blood partitioning (Kp), and systemic or intrinsic clearance. Analyzing only blood or plasma concentrations versus time, the minimal-PBPK models parsimoniously generate physiologically-relevant PK parameters which are more easily interpreted than those from mam-millary models. The minimal-PBPK models were applied to four types of therapeutic agents and conditions. The models well captured the human PK profiles of 22 selected beta-lactam antibiotics allowing comparison of fitted and calculated Kp values. Adding a classical hepatic compartment with hepatic blood flow allowed joint fitting of oral and intravenous (IV) data for four hepatic elimination drugs (dihydrocodeine, verapamil, repaglinide, midazolam) providing separate estimates of hepatic intrinsic clearance, non-hepatic clearance, and pre-hepatic bioavailability. The basic model was integrated with allometric scaling principles to simultaneously describe moxifloxacin PK in five species with common Kp and fd values. A basic model assigning clearance to the tissue compartment well characterized plasma concentrations of six monoclonal antibodies in human subjects, providing good concordance of predictions with expected tissue kinetics. The proposed minimal-PBPK modeling approach offers an alternative and more rational basis for assessing PK than compartmental models. PMID:23179857

  11. MEGen: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model Generator

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George; Hogg, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are being used in an increasing number of different areas. However, they are perceived as complex, data hungry, resource intensive, and time consuming. In addition, model validation and verification are hindered by the relative complexity of the equations. To begin to address these issues a web application called MEGen for the rapid construction and documentation of bespoke deterministic PBPK model code is under development. MEGen comprises a parameter database and a model code generator that produces code for use in several commercial software packages and one that is freely available. Here we present an overview of the current capabilities of MEGen, and discuss future developments. PMID:22084631

  12. Coastal Ecosystem Integrated Compartment Model (ICM): Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meselhe, E. A.; White, E. D.; Reed, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Compartment Model (ICM) was developed as part of the 2017 Coastal Master Plan modeling effort. It is a comprehensive and numerical hydrodynamic model coupled to various geophysical process models. Simplifying assumptions related to some of the flow dynamics are applied to increase the computational efficiency of the model. The model can be used to provide insights about coastal ecosystems and evaluate restoration strategies. It builds on existing tools where possible and incorporates newly developed tools where necessary. It can perform decadal simulations (~ 50 years) across the entire Louisiana coast. It includes several improvements over the approach used to support the 2012 Master Plan, such as: additional processes in the hydrology, vegetation, wetland and barrier island morphology subroutines, increased spatial resolution, and integration of previously disparate models into a single modeling framework. The ICM includes habitat suitability indices (HSIs) to predict broad spatial patterns of habitat change, and it provides an additional integration to a dynamic fish and shellfish community model which quantitatively predicts potential changes in important fishery resources. It can be used to estimate the individual and cumulative effects of restoration and protection projects on the landscape, including a general estimate of water levels associated with flooding. The ICM is also used to examine possible impacts of climate change and future environmental scenarios (e.g. precipitation, Eustatic sea level rise, subsidence, tropical storms, etc.) on the landscape and on the effectiveness of restoration projects. The ICM code is publically accessible, and coastal restoration and protection groups interested in planning-level modeling are encouraged to explore its utility as a computationally efficient tool to examine ecosystem response to future physical or ecological changes, including the implementation of restoration and protection strategies.

  13. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Lei; Qu, Yi; Yan, Jing; Liu, Gang-yi; Wang, Wei-liang; Wang, Yi-jun; Wang, Hong-yi; Zhang, Meng-qi; Lu, Chuan; Liu, Yun; Jia, Jing-yin; Hu, Chao-ying; Li, Xue-ning; Yu, Chen; Xu, Hong-rong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our preliminary results show that huperzine A, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in China, exhibits different pharmacokinetic features in elderly and young healthy subjects. However, its pharmacokinetic data in elderly subjects remains unavailable to date. Thus, we developed a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese people, and identified the covariate affecting its pharmacokinetics for optimal individual administration. Methods: A total of 341 serum huperzine A concentration records was obtained from 2 completed clinical trials (14 elderly healthy subjects in a phase I pharmacokinetic study; 35 elderly AD patients in a phase II study). Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the non-linear mixed-effect modeling software Phoenix NLME1.1.1. The effects of age, gender, body weight, height, creatinine, endogenous creatinine clearance rate as well as drugs administered concomitantly were analyzed. Bootstrap and visual predictive checks were used simultaneously to validate the final population pharmacokinetics models. Results: The plasma concentration-time profile of huperzine A was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Age was identified as the covariate having significant influence on huperzine A clearance. The final PPK model of huperzine A was: CL (L/h)=2.4649*(age/86)(−3.3856), Ka=0.6750 h−1, V (L)=104.216. The final PPK model was demonstrated to be suitable and effective by the bootstrap and visual predictive checks. Conclusion: A PPK model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects is established, which can be used to predict PPK parameters of huperzine A in the treatment of elderly AD patients. PMID:27180987

  14. Parabolic quantitative structure-activity relationships and photodynamic therapy: application of a three-compartment model with clearance to the in vivo quantitative structure-activity relationships of a congeneric series of pyropheophorbide derivatives used as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Potter, W R; Henderson, B W; Bellnier, D A; Pandey, R K; Vaughan, L A; Weishaupt, K R; Dougherty, T J

    1999-11-01

    An open three-compartment pharmacokinetic model was applied to the in vivo quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) data of a homologous series of pyropheophorbide photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The physical model was a lipid compartment sandwiched between two identical aqueous compartments. The first compartment was assumed to clear irreversibly at a rate K0. The measured octanol-water partition coefficients, P(i) (where i is the number of carbons in the alkyl chain) and the clearance rate K0 determined the clearance kinetics of the drugs. Solving the coupled differential equations of the three-compartment model produced clearance kinetics for each of the sensitizers in each of the compartments. The third compartment was found to contain the target of PDT. This series of compounds is quite lipophilic. Therefore these drugs are found mainly in the second compartment. The drug level in the third compartment represents a small fraction of the tissue level and is thus not accessible to direct measurement by extraction. The second compartment of the model accurately predicted the clearance from the serum of mice of the hexyl ether of pyropheophorbide a, one member of this series of compounds. The diffusion and clearance rate constants were those found by fitting the pharmacokinetics of the third compartment to the QSAR data. This result validated the magnitude and mechanistic significance of the rate constants used to model the QSAR data. The PDT response to dose theory was applied to the kinetic behavior of the target compartment drug concentration. This produced a pharmacokinetic-based function connecting PDT response to dose as a function of time postinjection. This mechanistic dose-response function was fitted to published, single time point QSAR data for the pheophorbides. As a result, the PDT target threshold dose together with the predicted QSAR as a function of time postinjection was found.

  15. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid in rats, extrapolation to pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhou, Y-F; Yu, Y; Zhao, D-H; Shi, W; Fang, B-H; Liu, Y-H

    2015-02-01

    A multi-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the disposition of cyadox (CYX) and its metabolite quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (QCA) after a single oral administration was developed in rats (200 mg/kg b.w. of CYX). Considering interspecies differences in physiology and physiochemistry, the model efficiency was validated by pharmacokinetic data set in swine. The model included six compartments that were blood, muscle, liver, kidney, adipose, and a combined compartment for the rest of tissues. The model was parameterized using rat plasma and tissue concentration data that were generated from this study. Model simulations were achieved using a commercially available software program (ACSLXL ibero version 3.0.2.1). Results supported the validity of the model with simulated tissue concentrations within the range of the observations. The correlation coefficients of the predicted and experimentally determined values for plasma, liver, kidney, adipose, and muscles in rats were 0.98, 0.98, 0.98, 0.99, and 0.95, respectively. The rat model parameters were then extrapolated to pigs to estimate QCA disposition in tissues and validated by tissue concentration of QCA in swine. The correlation coefficients between the predicted and observed values were over 0.90. This model could provide a foundation for developing more reliable pig models once more data are available.

  16. Virtual modelling of compartmental pharmacokinetic systems.

    PubMed

    Prado, Manuel; Roa, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of different methodologies for modelling pharmacokinetic systems under the context of a telemedicine system oriented to the on-line and personalized knowledge generation. We use a simplified 3-pool kinetic system for a better clarification of several relevant modelling formalisms. A more complete 3-pool urea kinetic model is built simply connecting EL components pertaining to a pharmacokinetic library previously developed. The evolution of the urea concentration during the dialysis of a patient provided by this model was compared successfully to the evolution computed by a 2-pool model experimentally validated. The 3-pool model provides more information regarding the interstice and a high capacity to be modified for attending to the knowledge needs of physicians, as well as biomedicine advances. As a major conclusion, our outcomes suggest that virtual modelling is an excellent methodology in biomedical engineering to support the on-line generation of personalized health knowledge for telemedicine systems. This is due to its capacity for reusing components at horizontal and vertical level, and for implementing multiformalism and multidomain models, what simplifies the task to represent complex physiological and artificial systems. PMID:17282097

  17. Interspecies Mixed-Effect Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Penicillin G in Cattle and Swine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa; Baynes, Ronald; Huang, Qingbiao

    2014-01-01

    Extralabel drug use of penicillin G in food-producing animals may cause an excess of residues in tissue which will have the potential to damage human health. Of all the antibiotics, penicillin G may have the greatest potential for producing allergic responses to the consumer of food animal products. There are, however, no population pharmacokinetic studies of penicillin G for food animals. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the time-concentration data profile of penicillin G across two species. Data were collected from previously published pharmacokinetic studies in which several formulations of penicillin G were administered to diverse populations of cattle and swine. Liver, kidney, and muscle residue data were also used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fit to plasma and tissue concentrations using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach. A 3-compartment model with extra tissue compartments was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G. Typical population parameter estimates (interindividual variability) were central volumes of distribution of 3.45 liters (12%) and 3.05 liters (8.8%) and central clearance of 105 liters/h (32%) and 16.9 liters/h (14%) for cattle and swine, respectively, with peripheral clearance of 24.8 liters/h (13%) and 9.65 liters/h (23%) for cattle and 13.7 liters/h (85%) and 0.52 liters/h (40%) for swine. Body weight and age were the covariates in the final pharmacokinetic models. This study established a robust model of penicillin for a large and diverse population of food-producing animals which could be applied to other antibiotics and species in future analyses. PMID:24867969

  18. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of GLP-1 in Healthy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang; Gao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To provide a mechanism-based model to quantitatively describe GLP-1 pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) in rats. Methods Intravenous (IV), infusion (IF), subcutaneous (SC), and intraperitoneal (IP) doses of GLP-1 were administered after glucose challenge in healthy Sprague–Dawley rats. Blood was analyzed for GLP-1, glucose, and insulin. The PK-PD modeling was performed with ADAPT 5. The concentration-response curve was generated and analyzed in comparison with other incretin-related therapeutics. Results The PK of GLP-1 was described using a two-compartment model with a zero-order input accounting for endogenous GLP-1 synthesis. For SC and IP dosing, sequential zero-order and first-order absorption models reasonably described the rapid absorption process and flip-flop kinetics. In dynamics, GLP-1 showed insulinotropic effects (3-fold increase) after IV glucose challenge in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration-response curve was bell-shaped, which was captured using a biphasic two-binding site Adair model. Receptor binding of GLP-1 exhibited high capacity and low affinity kinetics for both binding sites (KD=09.94×103 pM, K2=1.56×10−4 pM−1). Conclusions The PK of GLP-1 was linear and bi-exponential and its PD showed glucose-dependent insulinotropic effects. All profiles were captured by the present mechanistic model and the dynamic analysis yields several implications for incretin-related therapies. PMID:22179928

  19. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND (Investigational New Drug) guidelines. The aim of the project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationships among plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial protocol with INSCOP. Twelve healthy human subjects were administered at three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. PK compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling time, were established using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL (i.e. log-likelihood ratio test)) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. The results: Predictable correlations among scopolamine concentrations in compartments of plasma, saliva and urine were established, and for the first time the model satisfactorily predicted the population and individual PK of INSCOP in plasma, saliva and urine. The model can be utilized to predict the INSCOP plasma concentration by saliva and urine data, and it will be useful for monitoring the PK of scopolamine in space and other remote environments using non-invasive sampling of saliva and/or urine.

  20. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for developmental exposure to BDE-47 in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Emond, Claude; Raymer, James H.; Studabaker, William B.; Garner, C. Edwin; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2010-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used commercially as additive flame retardants and have been shown to transfer into environmental compartments, where they have the potential to bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans. Of the 209 possible PBDEs, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is usually the dominant congener found in human blood and milk samples. BDE-47 has been shown to have endocrine activity and produce developmental, reproductive, and neurotoxic effects. The objective of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BDE-47 in male and female (pregnant and non-pregnant) adult rats to facilitate investigations of developmental exposure. This model consists of eight compartments: liver, brain, adipose tissue, kidney, placenta, fetus, blood, and the rest of the body. Concentrations of BDE-47 from the literature and from maternal-fetal pharmacokinetic studies conducted at RTI International were used to parameterize and evaluate the model. The results showed that the model simulated BDE-47 tissue concentrations in adult male, maternal, and fetal compartments within the standard deviations of the experimental data. The model's ability to estimate BDE-47 concentrations in the fetus after maternal exposure will be useful to design in utero exposure/effect studies. This PBPK model is the first one designed for any PBDE pharmaco/toxicokinetic description. The next steps will be to expand this model to simulate BDE-47 pharmacokinetics and distributions across species (mice), and then extrapolate it to humans. After mouse and human model development, additional PBDE congeners will be incorporated into the model and simulated as a mixture.

  1. Development of a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for dermal permeability for lindane.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Megan E; Evans, Marina V; Wilson, Charles A; Beesley, Lauren J; Leon, Lider S; Eklund, Chris R; Croom, Edward L; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-03-14

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficients using human kinetic data obtained from in vitro and in vivo experimentation as well as a default compound-specific calculation based on physicochemical characteristics used in the absence of kinetic data. A dermal model was developed to describe lindane diffusion into the skin, where the skin compartment consisted of homogeneous dermal tissue. This study utilized Fick's law of diffusion along with chemical binding to protein and lipids to determine appropriate dermal absorption parameters which were then incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe in vivo kinetics. The estimation of permeability coefficients using chemical binding in combination with in vivo data demonstrates the advantages of combining physiochemical properties with a PBPK model to predict dermal absorption.

  2. Pharmacometric Models for Characterizing the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Inhaled Drugs.

    PubMed

    Borghardt, Jens Markus; Weber, Benjamin; Staab, Alexander; Kloft, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    During the last decades, the importance of modeling and simulation in clinical drug development, with the goal to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and understand mechanisms of pharmacokinetic processes, has strongly increased. However, this increase could not equally be observed for orally inhaled drugs. The objectives of this review are to understand the reasons for this gap and to demonstrate the opportunities that mathematical modeling of pharmacokinetics of orally inhaled drugs offers. To achieve these objectives, this review (i) discusses pulmonary physiological processes and their impact on the pharmacokinetics after drug inhalation, (ii) provides a comprehensive overview of published pharmacokinetic models, (iii) categorizes these models into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and (clinical data-derived) empirical models, (iv) explores both their (mechanistic) plausibility, and (v) addresses critical aspects of different pharmacometric approaches pertinent for drug inhalation. In summary, pulmonary deposition, dissolution, and absorption are highly complex processes and may represent the major challenge for modeling and simulation of PK after oral drug inhalation. Challenges in relating systemic pharmacokinetics with pulmonary efficacy may be another factor contributing to the limited number of existing pharmacokinetic models for orally inhaled drugs. Investigations comprising in vitro experiments, clinical studies, and more sophisticated mathematical approaches are considered to be necessary for elucidating these highly complex pulmonary processes. With this additional knowledge, the PBPK approach might gain additional attractiveness. Currently, (semi-)mechanistic modeling offers an alternative to generate and investigate hypotheses and to more mechanistically understand the pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics after oral drug inhalation including the impact of pulmonary diseases.

  3. PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORINATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORONATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS
    Leona H. Clark and Hugh A. Barton
    US Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC

    The physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to be presente...

  4. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    PubMed Central

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels <0.05 IUmL−1) undergoing elective, minor or major surgery. Retrospective data were collected on FVIII treatment, including timing and dosing, time point of FVIII sampling and all FVIII plasma concentrations achieved (trough, peak and steady state), brand of concentrate, as well as patients’ and surgical characteristics. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (P<0.01) and increased in cases with blood group O (26%; P<0.01). In addition, a minor decrease in clearance was observed when a major surgical procedure was performed (7%; P<0.01). The developed population model describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. PMID:27390359

  5. Semiphysiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Leflunomide Disposition in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, A M; Wiese, M D; Proudman, S M; O'Doherty, C E; Foster, Djr; Upton, R N

    2015-06-01

    A semiphysiologically based pharmacokinetic (semi-PBPK) population model was used to evaluate the influence of enterohepatic recycling and protein binding, as well as the effect of genetic variability in CYP1A2, CYP2C19, and ABCG2, on the large interindividual variability of teriflunomide (active metabolite) concentrations following leflunomide administration in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The model was developed with total and free teriflunomide concentrations determined in RA patients taking leflunomide, as well as mean teriflunomide concentrations following the administration of leflunomide or teriflunomide extracted from the literature. Once developed, the 15-compartment model was able to predict total and free teriflunomide concentrations and was used to screen demographic and genotypic covariates, of which only fat-free mass and liver function (ALT) improved prediction. This approach effectively evaluated the effects of multiple covariates on both total and free teriflunomide concentrations, which have only been explored previously through simplistic one-compartment models for total teriflunomide. PMID:26225264

  6. Characterization of a Compartment Syndrome-like Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Oyster, Nick; Witt, Michelle; Gharaibeh, Burhan; Poddar, Minakshi; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute compartment syndrome (CS) is caused by an elevation of pressure within a muscular compartment which can be caused by numerous factors, including blunt trauma. In this study, we characterized a rodent model of CS-like injury. METHODS Forty male athymic rats received a standardized injury of ischemia and compression to their hindlimbs, while the intracompartmental pressure (ICP) was measured using an implantable transmitter. Tetanic muscle function was evaluated, and histology was performed on the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. RESULTS ICPs were held at 260.70±2.70mmHg during injury. Injured muscles recovered 59% of their total function 4 weeks after injury, and histology showed high levels of edema, inflammation (CD68+), angiogenesis (CD31+), and fibrosis within 72 hours following injury. DISCUSSION We describe a novel CS-like injury model and a novel method to measure ICP which could potentially be used to develop innovative therapies to manage CS injury in humans. PMID:25242666

  7. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  8. The pseudo-compartment method for coupling partial differential equation and compartment-based models of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christian A; Flegg, Mark B

    2015-05-01

    Spatial reaction-diffusion models have been employed to describe many emergent phenomena in biological systems. The modelling technique most commonly adopted in the literature implements systems of partial differential equations (PDEs), which assumes there are sufficient densities of particles that a continuum approximation is valid. However, owing to recent advances in computational power, the simulation and therefore postulation, of computationally intensive individual-based models has become a popular way to investigate the effects of noise in reaction-diffusion systems in which regions of low copy numbers exist. The specific stochastic models with which we shall be concerned in this manuscript are referred to as 'compartment-based' or 'on-lattice'. These models are characterized by a discretization of the computational domain into a grid/lattice of 'compartments'. Within each compartment, particles are assumed to be well mixed and are permitted to react with other particles within their compartment or to transfer between neighbouring compartments. Stochastic models provide accuracy, but at the cost of significant computational resources. For models that have regions of both low and high concentrations, it is often desirable, for reasons of efficiency, to employ coupled multi-scale modelling paradigms. In this work, we develop two hybrid algorithms in which a PDE in one region of the domain is coupled to a compartment-based model in the other. Rather than attempting to balance average fluxes, our algorithms answer a more fundamental question: 'how are individual particles transported between the vastly different model descriptions?' First, we present an algorithm derived by carefully redefining the continuous PDE concentration as a probability distribution. While this first algorithm shows very strong convergence to analytical solutions of test problems, it can be cumbersome to simulate. Our second algorithm is a simplified and more efficient implementation of

  9. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  10. Oseltamivir Population Pharmacokinetics in the Ferret: Model Application for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Micaela B.; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Rao, Gauri; Rayner, Craig R.; Nie, Jing; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Forrest, Alan; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    The ferret is a suitable small animal model for preclinical evaluation of efficacy of antiviral drugs against various influenza strains, including highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Rigorous pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) assessment of ferret data has not been conducted, perhaps due to insufficient information on oseltamivir PK. Here, based on PK data from several studies on both uninfected and influenza-infected groups (i.e., with influenza A viruses of H5N1 and H3N2 subtypes and an influenza B virus) and several types of anesthesia we developed a population PK model for the active compound oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) in the ferret. The ferret OC population PK model incorporated delayed first-order input, two-compartment distribution, and first-order elimination to successfully describe OC PK. Influenza infection did not affect model parameters, but anesthesia did. The conclusion that OC PK was not influenced by influenza infection must be viewed with caution because the influenza infections in the studies included here resulted in mild clinical symptoms in terms of temperature, body weight, and activity scores. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine that administration of a 5.08 mg/kg dose of oseltamivir phosphate to ferret every 12 h for 5 days results in the same median OC area under the plasma concentration-time curve 0–12 h (i.e., 3220 mg h/mL) as that observed in humans during steady state at the approved dose of 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. Modeling indicated that PK variability for OC in the ferret model is high, and can be affected by anesthesia. Therefore, for proper interpretation of PK/PD data, sparse PK sampling to allow the OC PK determination in individual animals is important. Another consideration in appropriate design of PK/PD studies is achieving an influenza infection with pronounced clinical symptoms and efficient virus replication, which will allow adequate evaluation of drug effects. PMID:26460484

  11. Oseltamivir Population Pharmacokinetics in the Ferret: Model Application for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study Design.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Micaela B; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Rao, Gauri; Rayner, Craig R; Nie, Jing; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Forrest, Alan; Govorkova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The ferret is a suitable small animal model for preclinical evaluation of efficacy of antiviral drugs against various influenza strains, including highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Rigorous pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) assessment of ferret data has not been conducted, perhaps due to insufficient information on oseltamivir PK. Here, based on PK data from several studies on both uninfected and influenza-infected groups (i.e., with influenza A viruses of H5N1 and H3N2 subtypes and an influenza B virus) and several types of anesthesia we developed a population PK model for the active compound oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) in the ferret. The ferret OC population PK model incorporated delayed first-order input, two-compartment distribution, and first-order elimination to successfully describe OC PK. Influenza infection did not affect model parameters, but anesthesia did. The conclusion that OC PK was not influenced by influenza infection must be viewed with caution because the influenza infections in the studies included here resulted in mild clinical symptoms in terms of temperature, body weight, and activity scores. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine that administration of a 5.08 mg/kg dose of oseltamivir phosphate to ferret every 12 h for 5 days results in the same median OC area under the plasma concentration-time curve 0-12 h (i.e., 3220 mg h/mL) as that observed in humans during steady state at the approved dose of 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. Modeling indicated that PK variability for OC in the ferret model is high, and can be affected by anesthesia. Therefore, for proper interpretation of PK/PD data, sparse PK sampling to allow the OC PK determination in individual animals is important. Another consideration in appropriate design of PK/PD studies is achieving an influenza infection with pronounced clinical symptoms and efficient virus replication, which will allow adequate evaluation of drug effects. PMID:26460484

  12. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-v...

  13. Predictive Performance of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Renally Cleared Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Johnson, TN; Xu, H; Cheung, SYA; Bui, KH; Li, J; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Predictive performance of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models of drugs predominantly eliminated through kidney in the pediatric population was evaluated. After optimization using adult clinical data, the verified PBPK models can predict 33 of 34 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children 1 month and older. More specifically, 10 of 11 of predicted clearance values were within 1.5‐fold of those observed in children between 1 month and 2 years old. The PopPK approach also predicted 19 of 21 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children. In summary, our analysis demonstrated both PBPK and PopPK adult models, after verification with additional adult pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and incorporation of known ontogeny of renal filtration, could be applied for dosing regimen recommendation in children 1 month and older for renally eliminated drugs in a first‐in‐pediatric study. PMID:27566992

  14. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems.

  15. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems. PMID:24721554

  16. The pseudo-compartment method for coupling partial differential equation and compartment-based models of diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Christian A.; Flegg, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial reaction–diffusion models have been employed to describe many emergent phenomena in biological systems. The modelling technique most commonly adopted in the literature implements systems of partial differential equations (PDEs), which assumes there are sufficient densities of particles that a continuum approximation is valid. However, owing to recent advances in computational power, the simulation and therefore postulation, of computationally intensive individual-based models has become a popular way to investigate the effects of noise in reaction–diffusion systems in which regions of low copy numbers exist. The specific stochastic models with which we shall be concerned in this manuscript are referred to as ‘compartment-based’ or ‘on-lattice’. These models are characterized by a discretization of the computational domain into a grid/lattice of ‘compartments’. Within each compartment, particles are assumed to be well mixed and are permitted to react with other particles within their compartment or to transfer between neighbouring compartments. Stochastic models provide accuracy, but at the cost of significant computational resources. For models that have regions of both low and high concentrations, it is often desirable, for reasons of efficiency, to employ coupled multi-scale modelling paradigms. In this work, we develop two hybrid algorithms in which a PDE in one region of the domain is coupled to a compartment-based model in the other. Rather than attempting to balance average fluxes, our algorithms answer a more fundamental question: ‘how are individual particles transported between the vastly different model descriptions?’ First, we present an algorithm derived by carefully redefining the continuous PDE concentration as a probability distribution. While this first algorithm shows very strong convergence to analytical solutions of test problems, it can be cumbersome to simulate. Our second algorithm is a simplified and more efficient

  17. Modeling of pharmacokinetic systems using stochastic deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Kakhi, Maziar; Chittenden, Jason

    2013-12-01

    In environments where complete mechanistic knowledge of the system dynamics is not available, a synergy of first-principle concepts, stochastic methods and statistical approaches can provide an efficient, accurate, and insightful strategy for model development. In this work, a system of ordinary differential equations describing system pharmacokinetics (PK) was coupled to a Wiener process for tracking the absorption rate coefficient, and was embedded in a nonlinear mixed effects population PK formalism. The procedure is referred to as "stochastic deconvolution" and it is proposed as a diagnostic tool to inform on a mapping function between the fraction of the drug absorbed and the fraction of the drug dissolved when applying one-stage methods to in vitro-in vivo correlation modeling. The goal of this work was to show that stochastic deconvolution can infer an a priori specified absorption profile given dense observational (simulated) data. The results demonstrate that the mathematical model is able to accurately reproduce the simulated data in scenarios where solution strategies for linear, time-invariant systems would assuredly fail. To this end, PK systems that are representative of Michaelis-Menten kinetics and enterohepatic circulation were investigated. Furthermore, the solution times are manageable using a modest computer hardware platform.

  18. A new physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the prediction of gastrointestinal drug absorption: translocation model.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hirotaka; Hisaka, Akihiro; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to construct a new local pharmacokinetic model of gastrointestinal absorption, the translocation model (TLM), using an anatomically relevant, minimally segmented structure to explain linear and nonlinear intestinal absorption, metabolism, and transport. The TLM was based on the concept of a single absorption site that flexibly moves, expands, and shrinks along with the length of the gastrointestinal tract after the intake of an oral dose. The structure of the small intestine is continuous, and various time- and location-dependent issues are freely incorporated in the analysis. Since the model has only one absorption site, understanding and modification of factors affecting absorption are simple. The absorption site is composed of four compartments: solid drug in the lumen, solution drug in the lumen, concentration in the enterocytes, and concentration in the lamina propria. The lamina propria includes the blood capillaries. Blood flow in the absorption site of the lamina propria appropriately accounts for the absorption. In the TLM, the permeability of the apical membrane and that of the basolateral membrane are distinct. By considering plicate, villi, and microvilli expansions of the surface area, the apparent permeability measured in Caco-2 experiments was converted to the effective permeability in vivo. The intestinal availability, bioavailability, and dose product of intestinal availability and absorption rate relationship of the model drugs were well explained using the TLM. The TLM would be a useful tool for the consideration of local pharmacokinetics in the gastrointestinal tract in various situations.

  19. A calibrated human PBPK model for benzene inhalation with urinary bladder and bone marrow compartments.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Kerger, Brent D; Finley, Brent; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of benzene inhalation based on a recent mouse model was adapted to include bone marrow (target organ) and urinary bladder compartments. Empirical data on human liver microsomal protein levels and linked CYP2E1 activities were incorporated into the model, and metabolite-specific conversion rate parameters were estimated by fitting to human biomonitoring data and adjusting for background levels of urinary metabolites. Human studies of benzene levels in blood and breath, and phenol levels in urine were used to validate the rate of human conversion of benzene to benzene oxide, and urinary benzene metabolites from Chinese benzene worker populations provided model validation for rates of human conversion of benzene to muconic acid (MA) and phenylmercapturic acid (PMA), phenol (PH), catechol (CA), hydroquinone (HQ), and benzenetriol (BT). The calibrated human model reveals that while liver microsomal protein and CYP2E1 activities are lower on average in humans compared to mice, the mouse also shows far lower rates of benzene conversion to MA and PMA, and far higher conversion of benzene to BO/PH, and of BO/PH to CA, HQ, and BT. The model also differed substantially from existing human PBPK models with respect to several metabolic rate parameters of importance to interpreting benzene metabolism and health risks in human populations associated with bone marrow doses. The model provides a new methodological paradigm focused on integrating linked human liver metabolism data and calibration using biomonitoring data, thus allowing for model uncertainty analysis and more rigorous validation.

  20. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  1. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of NS2330 (tesofensine) and its major metabolite in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Thorsten; Staab, Alexander; Tillmann, Christiane; Trommeshauser, Dirk; Raschig, Andreas; Schaefer, Hans Guenter; Kloft, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Several studies in predominantly healthy subjects have investigated the pharmacokinetics of NS2330 and its major metabolite M1. However, its pharmacokinetics have not been characterized in Alzheimer's disease patients, the target population for NS2330. In addition, no covariates have previously been found to influence the plasma concentration-time profiles of NS2330 and/or M1. What this study adds A descriptive and predictive population pharmacokinetic model for NS2330 and its metabolite was successfully developed in a population of patients with Alzheimer's disease. A covariate analysis elucidated sex and creatinine clearance as having an influence on the plasma concentration-time profiles of NS2330 after long-term treatment. Aims To develop a population pharmacokinetic model for NS2330 and its major metabolite M1 based on data from a 14 week proof of concept study in patients with Alzheimer's disease, and to identify covariates that might influence the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drug and/or its metabolite. Methods Plasma data from 320 subjects undergoing multiple oral dosing, and consisting of 1969 NS2330 and 1714 metabolite concentrations were fitted simultaneously using NONMEM. Results Plasma concentration-time profiles of NS2330 and M1 were best described by one-compartment models with first-order elimination for both compounds. Absorption of NS2330 was best modelled by a first-order process. Low apparent clearances together with large apparent volumes of distribution resulted in long half-lives of 234 h (NS2330) and 374 h (M1). The covariate analysis identified weight, sex, CLCR, BMI and age as influencing the pharmacokinetics of NS2330 and/or M1. However, simulations performed revealed that only CLCR and sex had a significant effect on the steady-state plasma concentration-time profiles. Females with a creatinine clearance of 35.6 ml min−1 showed a 62% increased exposure compared with males without renal

  2. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of the Rat Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Badhan, Raj K. Singh; Chenel, Marylore; Penny, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug disposition is dictated by a drug’s physicochemical properties and its ability to permeate physiological barriers. The blood–brain barrier (BBB), blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and centrally located drug transporter proteins influence drug disposition within the central nervous system. Attainment of adequate brain-to-plasma and cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma partitioning is important in determining the efficacy of centrally acting therapeutics. We have developed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of the rat CNS which incorporates brain interstitial fluid (ISF), choroidal epithelial and total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments and accurately predicts CNS pharmacokinetics. The model yielded reasonable predictions of unbound brain-to-plasma partition ratio (Kpuu,brain) and CSF:plasma ratio (CSF:Plasmau) using a series of in vitro permeability and unbound fraction parameters. When using in vitro permeability data obtained from L-mdr1a cells to estimate rat in vivo permeability, the model successfully predicted, to within 4-fold, Kpuu,brain and CSF:Plasmau for 81.5% of compounds simulated. The model presented allows for simultaneous simulation and analysis of both brain biophase and CSF to accurately predict CNS pharmacokinetics from preclinical drug parameters routinely available during discovery and development pathways. PMID:24647103

  3. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Tribendimidine Metabolites in Opisthorchis viverrini-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Melissa A.; Duthaler, Urs; Odermatt, Peter; Sayasone, Somphou; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need for alternative treatments against the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini. Oral tribendimidine is a promising candidate, but its population pharmacokinetic properties are unknown. Two phase IIa trials were conducted in Laos in O. viverrini-infected adults receiving single oral doses of 25 to 600 mg tribendimidine administered as different formulations in each study (study 1 used 200-mg tablets, and study 2 used 50-mg tablets). Venous whole blood, plasma, and capillary dried blood spots were sampled frequently from 68 adults, and concentrations of the tribendimidine metabolites dADT (deacetylated amidantel) and adADT (acetylated dADT) were measured. Population pharmacokinetics were assessed by using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The relationship between drug exposure and cure (assessed at 21 days posttreatment) was evaluated by using univariable logistic regression. A six-transit compartment absorption model with a one-disposition compartment for each metabolite described the data well. Compared to the 50-mg formulation (study 2), the 200-mg formulation (study 1) had a 40.1% higher mean transit absorption time, a 113% higher dADT volume of distribution, and a 364% higher adADT volume of distribution. Each 10-year increase in age was associated with a 12.7% lower dADT clearance and a 21.2% lower adADT clearance. The highest cure rates (≥55%) were observed with doses of ≥100 mg. Higher dADT, but not adADT, peak concentrations and exposures were associated with cure (P = 0.004 and 0.003, respectively). For the first time, population pharmacokinetics of tribendimidine have been described. Known differences in the 200-mg versus 50-mg formulations were captured by covariate modeling. Further studies are needed to validate the structural model and confirm covariate relationships. (This study has been registered with the ISRCTN Registry under no. ISRCTN96948551.) PMID:27431233

  4. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for methyl mercury (MeHg) in monkey and human

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, J.M.; Clewall, H.J. III; Shipp, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A PBPK model for MeHg was developed which coherently describes MeHg pharmacokinetics in the adult rat, monkey and man, and predicts fetal levels of MeHg from in utero exposure. The model includes a description of enterohepatic recirculation of MeHg, conversion to inorganic mercury in tissues and intestinal flora, slowly reversible incorporation of mercury in tissues, and excretion of both organic and inorganic mercury into urine, feces, and hair. The adult submodel includes compartments representing the red blood tells (RBC), plasma, brain, liver, kidney, gut intestinal lumen, gut tissue, hair, richly and slowly perfused tissues, and placenta. The fetal submodel includes compartments representing RBC`s, plasma, brain, and remaining body mass. Two features of the model structure which are critical to prediction of the kinetics of MeHg in different species is the use of separate RBC and plasma compartments, allowing the use of species specific RBC/plasma ratios, and biliary excretion with enterohepatic recirculation. Published tissue and blood MeHg concentrations were used to derive the partition coefficients and RBC/plasma ratios to adjust for species differences in MeHg distribution. Validation involved comparing the model simulations with data from repeated dosing studies in animals and humans, and from accidental human exposures. The model will be used to investigate maternal MeHg intake as it relates to measured blood and hair MeHg concentrations, and to fetal exposure.

  5. Numerical modelling of crural fascia mechanical interaction with muscular compartments.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Pachera, Paola; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-05-01

    The interaction of the crural fascia with muscular compartments and surrounding tissues can be at the origin of different pathologies, such as compartment syndrome. This pathology consists in the onset of excessive intracompartmental pressure, which can have serious consequences for the patient, compromising blood circulation. The investigation of compartment syndrome etiology also takes into account the alteration of crural fascia mechanical properties as a cause of the syndrome, where the fascial stiffening would result in the rise of intracompartmental pressure. This work presents a computational approach toward evaluating some biomechanical aspects of the problem, within the context of a more global viewpoint. Finite element analyses of the interaction phenomena of the crural fascia with adjacent regions are reported here. This study includes the effects of a fascial stiffness increase along the proximal-distal direction and their possible clinical implications. Furthermore, the relationship between different pre-strain levels of the crural fascia in the proximal-distal direction and the rise of internal pressure in muscular compartments are considered. The numerical analyses can clarify which aspects could be directly implied in the rise of compartment syndrome, leading to greater insight into muscle-fascia mechanical phenomena, as well as promoting experimental investigation and clinical analysis of the syndrome.

  6. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Patrick M; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the clinical pharmacokinetics of new therapeutic entities facilitates decision making during drug discovery, and increases the probability of success for early clinical trials. Standard strategies employed for predicting the pharmacokinetics of small-molecule drugs (e.g., allometric scaling) are often not useful for predicting the disposition monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), as mAbs frequently demonstrate species-specific non-linear pharmacokinetics that is related to mAb-target binding (i.e., target-mediated drug disposition, TMDD). The saturable kinetics of TMDD are known to be influenced by a variety of factors, including the sites of target expression (which determines the accessibility of target to mAb), the extent of target expression, the rate of target turnover, and the fate of mAb-target complexes. In most cases, quantitative information on the determinants of TMDD is not available during early phases of drug discovery, and this has complicated attempts to employ mechanistic mathematical models to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of mAbs. In this report, we introduce a simple strategy, employing physiologically-based modeling, to predict mAb disposition in humans. The approach employs estimates of inter-antibody variability in rate processes of extravasation in tissues and fluid-phase endocytosis, estimates for target concentrations in tissues derived through use of categorical immunohistochemical scores, and in vitro measures of the turnover of target and target-mAb complexes. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for four mAbs (cetuximab, figitumumab, dalotuzumab, trastuzumab) directed against three targets (epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor receptor 1, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2). The proposed modeling strategy was able to predict well the pharmacokinetics of cetuximab, dalotuzumab, and trastuzumab at a range of doses, but trended towards underprediction of figitumumab concentrations

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Anti-VEGF Agent Aflibercept in Cancer Predicted by Data-Driven, Molecular-Detailed Model.

    PubMed

    Finley, S D; Angelikopoulos, P; Koumoutsakos, P; Popel, A S

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical models can support the drug development process by predicting the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of the drug and optimal dosing regimens. We have developed a pharmacokinetic model that includes a biochemical molecular interaction network linked to a whole-body compartment model. We applied the model to study the PK of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) cancer therapeutic agent, aflibercept. Clinical data is used to infer model parameters using a Bayesian approach, enabling a quantitative estimation of the contributions of specific transport processes and molecular interactions of the drug that cannot be examined in other PK modeling, and insight into the mechanisms of aflibercept's antiangiogenic action. Additionally, we predict the plasma and tissue concentrations of unbound and VEGF-bound aflibercept. Thus, we present a computational framework that can serve as a valuable tool for drug development efforts. PMID:26783500

  8. [Application of three compartment model and response surface model to clinical anesthesia using Microsoft Excel].

    PubMed

    Abe, Eiji; Abe, Mari

    2011-08-01

    With the spread of total intravenous anesthesia, clinical pharmacology has become more important. We report Microsoft Excel file applying three compartment model and response surface model to clinical anesthesia. On the Microsoft Excel sheet, propofol, remifentanil and fentanyl effect-site concentrations are predicted (three compartment model), and probabilities of no response to prodding, shaking, surrogates of painful stimuli and laryngoscopy are calculated using predicted effect-site drug concentration. Time-dependent changes in these calculated values are shown graphically. Recent development in anesthetic drug interaction studies are remarkable, and its application to clinical anesthesia with this Excel file is simple and helpful for clinical anesthesia.

  9. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for theophylline disposition in the pregnant and nonpregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, J L; Paalzow, L K; Nordström, L

    1984-04-01

    There are numerous studies which examine the disposition of theophylline from a traditional point of view. Information about the behaviour of drugs, including theophylline, is, however, very scarce when investigating the kinetics by means of a physiological flow model. This study is concerned with the development of a predictive analytical model for the pharmacokinetics of theophylline in nonpregnant and pregnant rats. This model postulates that specific organ or tissue masses may be simulated by compartments whose elements have physiological properties, e.g., tissue volumes, blood flow, and metabolic activity. A model has been developed that has blood, brain, hepatic, muscular, pulmonary, renal, and fetal tissues. With few exceptions, the agreement was good between predicted and calculated tissue data in the pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Finally, model simulations were performed to investigate the impact of different pulmonary extraction ratios on the concentration-time profile of theophylline in a "hypothetical" human patient.

  10. Determination of phenazopyridine in human plasma via LC-MS and subsequent development of a pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Erxin; Xiang, Bingren; Liu, Guangyu; Xie, Shaofei; Wei, Wenyan; Lu, Jun

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a new LC-MS method for the determination of phenazopyridine and the subsequent development of a pharmacokinetic model for phenazopyridine in vivo. Phenazopyridine hydrochloride is a strong analgesic used in the treatment of urinary tract infections. Although it has been used as a clinical treatment for a very long time, pharmacokinetic data and suitable methods for its determination in plasma are currently lacking. The study described in this paper used high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, HPLC-MS, to determine the plasma concentrations of phenazopyridine in human subjects after oral administration. After liquid-liquid extraction, the phenazopyridine in the plasma was analyzed on a C18 column under SIM mode. A double-peak phenomenon was observed in most of the concentration-time profiles of the subjects. Although some drugs are known to cause this phenomenon, phenazopyridine has not been reported to do so. Several possible causes were analyzed in order to obtain an explanation. We proposed a two-site absorption compartment model to fit the concentration data in vivo, which has one more absorption site than the classical one-compartment model. The model describes the concentration profiles in different dose groups well and could provide an explanation for the double-peak phenomenon. The three dose groups exhibited similar model parameters and a linear pharmacokinetic process over the dose range used.

  11. 76 FR 30294 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G250 Airplane Pilot Compartment View...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... G250 Airplane Pilot Compartment View--Hydrophobic Coatings in Lieu of Windshield Wipers AGENCY: Federal... have a novel or unusual design feature associated with the pilot-compartment view through a hydrophobic... Fusion. The Model G250 airplane incorporates novel or unusual design ] features involving...

  12. Gender based Dosing of Metoprolol in the Elderly using Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This article seeks to clarify if gender-based differences occur in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol in the elderly patients. There are a series of physiologic changes that occur in the elderly ranging from decreased hepatic blood flow to increased adiposity causing higher plasma concentrations at therapeutic doses as compared to the healthy young population. Methods Population pharmacokinetic modeling were performed using MONOLIX and Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted using MATLAB. The data was based from a previously published dataset where elderly patients, having multiple comorbidities, were administered a 50mg dose of metoprolol. Results Metoprolol was modeled using a one-compartment model and resulted in the following population pharmacokinetic parameters: volume of distribution, V=38L (CV=155%), clearance rates, CL-Men=105L/hour and CL-Women=59.1L/hour (38%), time lag, Tlag=0.469 hour (CV=17%), and the absorption rate constant, Ka=0.235 hr-1 (CV=23%). Conclusion Gender stratified doses resulting in an equivalent systemic metoprolol exposure in geriatric patients have been identified. Metoprolol doses resulting a similar AUC in a healthy young male administered 50mg tablet were 15mg for geriatric women and 25mg for geriatric men. Further, Metoprolol doses of 25mg for geriatric women and 50mg for geriatric men resulted in an equivalent AUC to a healthy young males dosed with a 100mg tablet. A 15mg Metoprolol tablet may need to be compounded to account for the gender differences in Metoprolol pharmacokinetics. PMID:27468378

  13. Moment method for the estimation of mass transfer coefficients for physiological pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Gallo, J M; Lam, F C; Perrier, D G

    1991-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo techniques have been utilized to estimate mass transfer coefficients for physiological pharmacokinetic models. No single method has been adopted for estimating this parameter, in part, due to the different model structures with which this parameter may be associated. A specific method has been derived to calculate mass transfer coefficients for non-eliminating membrane-limited tissue compartments. The present method is based on observed concentration-time data, and requires the calculation of the areas under the zero and first moment curves for plasma, and the first moment curve for the tissue. A Monte Carlo simulation technique was used to determine the percentage biases of the method based on a published model for streptozoticin and adriamycin. For the latter model, the method was compared to a non-linear regression parameter estimation technique. PMID:2031994

  14. Simulation of differential drug pharmacokinetics under heat and exercise stress using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Peng, Henry T; Cheung, Bob; Edginton, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Under extreme conditions of heat exposure and exercise stress, the human body undergoes major physiological changes. Perturbations in organ blood flows, gastrointestinal properties, and vascular physiology may impact the body's ability to absorb, distribute, and eliminate drugs. Clinical studies on the effect of these stressors on drug pharmacokinetics demonstrate that the likelihood of pharmacokinetic alteration is dependent on drug properties and the intensity of the stressor. The objectives of this study were to use literature data to quantify the correlation between exercise and heat exposure intensity to changing physiological parameters and further, to use this information for the parameterization of a whole-body, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the purposes of determining those drug properties most likely to demonstrate altered drug pharmacokinetics under stress. Cardiac output and most organ blood flows were correlated with heart rate using regression analysis. Other altered parameters included hematocrit and intravascular albumin concentration. Pharmacokinetic simulations of intravenous and oral administration of hypothetical drugs with either a low or high value of lipophilicity, unbound fraction in plasma, and unbound intrinsic hepatic clearance demonstrated that the area under the curve of those drugs with a high unbound intrinsic clearance was most affected (up to a 130% increase) following intravenous administration, whereas following oral administration, pharmacokinetic changes were smaller (<40% increase in area under the curve) for all hypothetical compounds. A midazolam physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was also used to demonstrate that simulated changes in pharmacokinetic parameters under exercise and heat stress were generally consistent with those reported in the literature.

  15. The Effect of Azithromycin on Ivermectin Pharmacokinetics—A Population Pharmacokinetic Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El-Tahtawy, Ahmed; Glue, Paul; Andrews, Emma N.; Mardekian, Jack; Amsden, Guy W.; Knirsch, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    Background A recent drug interaction study reported that when azithromycin was administered with the combination of ivermectin and albendazole, there were modest increases in ivermectin pharmacokinetic parameters. Data from this study were reanalyzed to further explore this observation. A compartmental model was developed and 1,000 interaction studies were simulated to explore extreme high ivermectin values that might occur. Methods and Findings A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination and absorption was developed. The chosen final model had 7 fixed-effect parameters and 8 random-effect parameters. Because some of the modeling parameters and their variances were not distributed normally, a second mixture model was developed to further explore these data. The mixture model had two additional fixed parameters and identified two populations, A (55% of subjects), where there was no change in bioavailability, and B (45% of subjects), where ivermectin bioavailability was increased 37%. Simulations of the data using both models were similar, and showed that the highest ivermectin concentrations fell in the range of 115–201 ng/mL. Conclusions This is the first pharmacokinetic model of ivermectin. It demonstrates the utility of two modeling approaches to explore drug interactions, especially where there may be population heterogeneity. The mechanism for the interaction was identified (an increase in bioavailability in one subpopulation). Simulations show that the maximum ivermectin exposures that might be observed during co-administration with azithromycin are below those previously shown to be safe and well tolerated. These analyses support further study of co-administration of azithromycin with the widely used agents ivermectin and albendazole, under field conditions in disease control programs. PMID:18478051

  16. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models: approaches for enabling personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Hartmanshenn, Clara; Scherholz, Megerle; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2016-10-01

    Personalized medicine strives to deliver the 'right drug at the right dose' by considering inter-person variability, one of the causes for therapeutic failure in specialized populations of patients. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a key tool in the advancement of personalized medicine to evaluate complex clinical scenarios, making use of physiological information as well as physicochemical data to simulate various physiological states to predict the distribution of pharmacokinetic responses. The increased dependency on PBPK models to address regulatory questions is aligned with the ability of PBPK models to minimize ethical and technical difficulties associated with pharmacokinetic and toxicology experiments for special patient populations. Subpopulation modeling can be achieved through an iterative and integrative approach using an adopt, adapt, develop, assess, amend, and deliver methodology. PBPK modeling has two valuable applications in personalized medicine: (1) determining the importance of certain subpopulations within a distribution of pharmacokinetic responses for a given drug formulation and (2) establishing the formulation design space needed to attain a targeted drug plasma concentration profile. This review article focuses on model development for physiological differences associated with sex (male vs. female), age (pediatric vs. young adults vs. elderly), disease state (healthy vs. unhealthy), and temporal variation (influence of biological rhythms), connecting them to drug product formulation development within the quality by design framework. Although PBPK modeling has come a long way, there is still a lengthy road before it can be fully accepted by pharmacologists, clinicians, and the broader industry. PMID:27647273

  17. An interface model for dosage adjustment connects hematotoxicity to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Meille, C; Iliadis, A; Barbolosi, D; Frances, N; Freyer, G

    2008-12-01

    When modeling is required to describe pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics simultaneously, it is difficult to link time-concentration profiles and drug effects. When patients are under chemotherapy, despite the huge amount of blood monitoring numerations, there is a lack of exposure variables to describe hematotoxicity linked with the circulating drug blood levels. We developed an interface model that transforms circulating pharmacokinetic concentrations to adequate exposures, destined to be inputs of the pharmacodynamic process. The model is materialized by a nonlinear differential equation involving three parameters. The relevance of the interface model for dosage adjustment is illustrated by numerous simulations. In particular, the interface model is incorporated into a complex system including pharmacokinetics and neutropenia induced by docetaxel and by cisplatin. Emphasis is placed on the sensitivity of neutropenia with respect to the variations of the drug amount. This complex system including pharmacokinetic, interface, and pharmacodynamic hematotoxicity models is an interesting tool for analysis of hematotoxicity induced by anticancer agents. The model could be a new basis for further improvements aimed at incorporating new experimental features. PMID:19107581

  18. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of ibuprofen in pediatric patients and antipyretic effect: Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Har-Even, Ronly; Stepensky, David; Britzi, Malka; Soback, Stefan; Chaim, Adina Bar; Brandriss, Norit; Goldman, Michael; Berkovitch, Matitiahu; Kozer, Eran

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to determine the relationship between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of ibuprofen and the antipyretic effect in pediatric patients. A prospective cohort of infants and children aged 3 months to 15 years and treated with ibuprofen was studied. The patients received ibuprofen (via oral route, median dose of 10.0 mg/kg; 3.4-11.4 mg/kg range), samples of blood and CSF were collected, and body temperature was measured. Sequential analysis of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from 28 patients was performed using a population modeling approach. The observed concentration versus time data indicated substantial pharmacokinetic variability in absorption and distribution of ibuprofen between the patients. The pharmacokinetic modeling outcomes indicate that following a ∼25-minute lag time, ibuprofen is rapidly absorbed to the central compartment and rapidly equilibrates with the CSF, resulting in the total ibuprofen concentration in the CSF versus plasma (CCSF /Cplasma ) of 0.011 ± 0.007. The antipyretic effect of ibuprofen was best described by an indirect response PK-PD model incorporating patient baseline body temperature and ibuprofen concentration in the CSF. We conclude that the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling can be used to predict the time course of ibuprofen plasma and CSF concentrations and of the antipyretic effects in individual pediatric patients.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of a Pharmacokinetic Model of Vaginal Anti-HIV Microbicide Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Angela M; Gao, Yajing; Hussaini, M Yousuff; Cogan, Nicholas G; Katz, David F

    2016-05-01

    Uncertainties in parameter values in microbicide pharmacokinetics (PK) models confound the models' use in understanding the determinants of drug delivery and in designing and interpreting dosing and sampling in PK studies. A global sensitivity analysis (Sobol' indices) was performed for a compartmental model of the pharmacokinetics of gel delivery of tenofovir to the vaginal mucosa. The model's parameter space was explored to quantify model output sensitivities to parameters characterizing properties for the gel-drug product (volume, drug transport, initial loading) and host environment (thicknesses of the mucosal epithelium and stroma and the role of ambient vaginal fluid in diluting gel). Greatest sensitivities overall were to the initial drug concentration in gel, gel-epithelium partition coefficient for drug, and rate constant for gel dilution by vaginal fluid. Sensitivities for 3 PK measures of drug concentration values were somewhat different than those for the kinetic PK measure. Sensitivities in the stromal compartment (where tenofovir acts against host cells) and a simulated biopsy also depended on thicknesses of epithelium and stroma. This methodology and results here contribute an approach to help interpret uncertainties in measures of vaginal microbicide gel properties and their host environment. In turn, this will inform rational gel design and optimization. PMID:27012224

  20. Application of separable parameter space techniques to multi-tracer PET compartment modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morey, A. Michael; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2016-02-01

    Multi-tracer positron emission tomography (PET) can image two or more tracers in a single scan, characterizing multiple aspects of biological functions to provide new insights into many diseases. The technique uses dynamic imaging, resulting in time-activity curves that contain contributions from each tracer present. The process of separating and recovering separate images and/or imaging measures for each tracer requires the application of kinetic constraints, which are most commonly applied by fitting parallel compartment models for all tracers. Such multi-tracer compartment modeling presents challenging nonlinear fits in multiple dimensions. This work extends separable parameter space kinetic modeling techniques, previously developed for fitting single-tracer compartment models, to fitting multi-tracer compartment models. The multi-tracer compartment model solution equations were reformulated to maximally separate the linear and nonlinear aspects of the fitting problem, and separable least-squares techniques were applied to effectively reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear fit. The benefits of the approach are then explored through a number of illustrative examples, including characterization of separable parameter space multi-tracer objective functions and demonstration of exhaustive search fits which guarantee the true global minimum to within arbitrary search precision. Iterative gradient-descent algorithms using Levenberg-Marquardt were also tested, demonstrating improved fitting speed and robustness as compared to corresponding fits using conventional model formulations. The proposed technique overcomes many of the challenges in fitting simultaneous multi-tracer PET compartment models.

  1. PKgraph: an R package for graphically diagnosing population pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Wu, Kai; Cook, Dianne

    2011-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling has become increasing important in drug development because it handles unbalanced design, sparse data and the study of individual variation. However, the increased complexity of the model makes it more of a challenge to diagnose the fit. Graphics can play an important and unique role in PopPK model diagnostics. The software described in this paper, PKgraph, provides a graphical user interface for PopPK model diagnosis. It also provides an integrated and comprehensive platform for the analysis of pharmacokinetic data including exploratory data analysis, goodness of model fit, model validation and model comparison. Results from a variety of modeling fitting software, including NONMEM, Monolix, SAS and R, can be used. PKgraph is programmed in R, and uses the R packages lattice, ggplot2 for static graphics, and rggobi for interactive graphics.

  2. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for lactational transfer of Na-131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Anita Loretta

    The excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after administration of radiopharmaceuticals is a concern as a radiation risk to nursing infants. It is not uncommon to administer radiopharmaceuticals to lactating patients due to emergency nuclear medicine investigations such as thyroid complications, kidney failure, and pulmonary embolism. There is a need to quantify the amount of radioactivity translocated into breast milk in cases of ingestion by a breast-fed infant. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) and a modified International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model have been developed to predict iodine concentrations in breast milk after ingestion of radioiodine by the mother. In the PBPK model, all compartments are interconnected by blood flow and represent real anatomic tissue regions in the body. All parameters involved are measurable values with physiological or physiochemical meaning such as tissue masses, blood flow rates, partition coefficients and cardiac output. However, some of the parameters such as the partition coefficients and metabolic constants are not available for iodine and had to be inferred from other information. The structure of the PBPK model for the mother consists of the following tissue compartments: gastrointestinal tract, blood, kidney, thyroid, milk, and other tissues. With the exception of the milk compartment, the model for the nursing infant is structured similarly to the mother. The ICRP model describing iodine metabolism in a standard 70-kg man was modified to represent iodine metabolism in a lactating woman and nursing infant. The parameters involved in this model are transfer rates and biological half-lives which are based on experimental observations. The results of the PBPK model and the modified ICRP model describing the lactational transfer of iodine were compared. When administering 1 mCi of Na131I to the lactating mother, the concentration reaches a maximum of 0.1 mCi/liter in 24

  3. Bioconcentration of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl and pentachlorophenol in the midge, Chironomus riparius, as measured by a pharmacokinetic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Hayton, W.L.; Staubus, A.E.; Fisher, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    A two compartment pharmacokinetic model was developed which describes the uptake and elimination of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl (TCB) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the midge, Chironomus riparius. C. riparius were exposed to nominal TCB (2 ??g L-1) and PCP (9 ??g L-1) concentrations during a 16 h static uptake phase. Depuration was determined over approximately 45 h using a flowthrough system without feeding. The uptake clearance (P) was 330 ?? 61 ml g-1 midge h-1 for TCB and 55 ?? 4 ml g-1 midge h-1 for PCP, while measured bioconcentration factors (BCF) were 35,900 and 458 for TCB and PCP, respectively. Overall, the clearance-volume- based pharmacokinetic model predicted BCF values that were consistent with published values as well as with BCF values obtained from the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)).

  4. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of motesanib and its active metabolite, M4, in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Lu, Jian-Feng; Hsu, Cheng-Pang

    2015-11-01

    Motesanib is a small molecule and potent multikinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antitumor activity. Population pharmacokinetic (POPPK) modeling of motesanib and M4, an active metabolite, was performed to assess sources of variability in cancer patients. The analysis included data collected from 451 patients from 8 clinical trials with oral doses of motesanib ranging from 25 to 175 mg, either once daily or twice daily. The POPPK analyses were performed using nonlinear mixed-effect models with a sequential approach. Covariate effects of demographics and other baseline characteristics were assessed with stepwise covariate modeling. A 2-compartment model with food effect on absorption parameters fitted the PK data of motesanib well. The effects albumin and sex on apparent clearance (CL/F) of motesanib were statistically significant. The albumin effect was more important but remained below a 25% difference. A 1-compartment model fitted PK data of M4 well. Effects of race (Asian vs non-Asian) and dosing frequency were identified as statistically significant covariates on the CL/F of M4. The maximum effect of albumin would result in less than 25% change in motesanib CL/F and as such would not warrant any dosing adjustment. However, faster elimination of M4 in Asian patients requires further investigation. PMID:27137719

  5. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Amodiaquine and Desethylamodiaquine in Women with Plasmodium vivax Malaria during and after Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chotsiri, Palang; Jullien, Vincent; Rijken, Marcus J.; Bergstrand, Martin; Cammas, Mireille; McGready, Rose; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, Francois; Lindegardh, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Amodiaquine is effective for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria, but there is little information on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of amodiaquine in pregnant women with malaria. This study evaluated the population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of amodiaquine and its biologically active metabolite, desethylamodiaquine, in pregnant women with P. vivax infection and again after delivery. Twenty-seven pregnant women infected with P. vivax malaria on the Thai-Myanmar border were treated with amodiaquine monotherapy (10 mg/kg/day) once daily for 3 days. Nineteen women, with and without P. vivax infections, returned to receive the same amodiaquine dose postpartum. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was used to evaluate the population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of amodiaquine and desethylamodiaquine. Amodiaquine plasma concentrations were described accurately by lagged first-order absorption with a two-compartment disposition model followed by a three-compartment disposition of desethylamodiaquine under the assumption of complete in vivo conversion. Body weight was implemented as an allometric function on all clearance and volume parameters. Amodiaquine clearance decreased linearly with age, and absorption lag time was reduced in pregnant patients. Recurrent malaria infections in pregnant women were modeled with a time-to-event model consisting of a constant-hazard function with an inhibitory effect of desethylamodiaquine. Amodiaquine treatment reduced the risk of recurrent infections from 22.2% to 7.4% at day 35. In conclusion, pregnancy did not have a clinically relevant impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of amodiaquine or desethylamodiaquine. No dose adjustments are required in pregnancy. PMID:22926572

  6. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction - poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models requires a lot data, such as the chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data. Previously-developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be great resource for supporting the constr...

  7. Reduction of a Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Stabilise the Bayesian Analysis of Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Thierry; Tsamandouras, Nikolaos; Dumitras, Swati; Pigeolet, Etienne; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly used in drug development for their ability to predict drug concentrations in clinically relevant tissues and to extrapolate across species, experimental conditions and sub-populations. A whole-body PBPK model can be fitted to clinical data using a Bayesian population approach. However, the analysis might be time consuming and numerically unstable if prior information on the model parameters is too vague given the complexity of the system. We suggest an approach where (i) a whole-body PBPK model is formally reduced using a Bayesian proper lumping method to retain the mechanistic interpretation of the system and account for parameter uncertainty, (ii) the simplified model is fitted to clinical data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques and (iii) the optimised reduced PBPK model is used for extrapolation. A previously developed 16-compartment whole-body PBPK model for mavoglurant was reduced to 7 compartments while preserving plasma concentration-time profiles (median and variance) and giving emphasis to the brain (target site) and the liver (elimination site). The reduced model was numerically more stable than the whole-body model for the Bayesian analysis of mavoglurant pharmacokinetic data in healthy adult volunteers. Finally, the reduced yet mechanistic model could easily be scaled from adults to children and predict mavoglurant pharmacokinetics in children aged from 3 to 11 years with similar performance compared with the whole-body model. This study is a first example of the practicality of formal reduction of complex mechanistic models for Bayesian inference in drug development. PMID:26538125

  8. Reduction of a Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Stabilise the Bayesian Analysis of Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Thierry; Tsamandouras, Nikolaos; Dumitras, Swati; Pigeolet, Etienne; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly used in drug development for their ability to predict drug concentrations in clinically relevant tissues and to extrapolate across species, experimental conditions and sub-populations. A whole-body PBPK model can be fitted to clinical data using a Bayesian population approach. However, the analysis might be time consuming and numerically unstable if prior information on the model parameters is too vague given the complexity of the system. We suggest an approach where (i) a whole-body PBPK model is formally reduced using a Bayesian proper lumping method to retain the mechanistic interpretation of the system and account for parameter uncertainty, (ii) the simplified model is fitted to clinical data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques and (iii) the optimised reduced PBPK model is used for extrapolation. A previously developed 16-compartment whole-body PBPK model for mavoglurant was reduced to 7 compartments while preserving plasma concentration-time profiles (median and variance) and giving emphasis to the brain (target site) and the liver (elimination site). The reduced model was numerically more stable than the whole-body model for the Bayesian analysis of mavoglurant pharmacokinetic data in healthy adult volunteers. Finally, the reduced yet mechanistic model could easily be scaled from adults to children and predict mavoglurant pharmacokinetics in children aged from 3 to 11 years with similar performance compared with the whole-body model. This study is a first example of the practicality of formal reduction of complex mechanistic models for Bayesian inference in drug development.

  9. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics. PMID:24733631

  10. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics.

  11. Application of a single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approach to pharmacokinetic model building.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Eric A; Sale, Mark E; Pollock, Bruce G; Belani, Chandra P; Egorin, Merrill J; Ivy, Percy S; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Manuck, Stephen B; Marder, Stephen R; Muldoon, Matthew F; Scher, Howard I; Solit, David B; Bies, Robert R

    2012-08-01

    A limitation in traditional stepwise population pharmacokinetic model building is the difficulty in handling interactions between model components. To address this issue, a method was previously introduced which couples NONMEM parameter estimation and model fitness evaluation to a single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm for global optimization of the model structure. In this study, the generalizability of this approach for pharmacokinetic model building is evaluated by comparing (1) correct and spurious covariate relationships in a simulated dataset resulting from automated stepwise covariate modeling, Lasso methods, and single-objective hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to covariate identification and (2) information criteria values, model structures, convergence, and model parameter values resulting from manual stepwise versus single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to model building for seven compounds. Both manual stepwise and single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to model building were applied, blinded to the results of the other approach, for selection of the compartment structure as well as inclusion and model form of inter-individual and inter-occasion variability, residual error, and covariates from a common set of model options. For the simulated dataset, stepwise covariate modeling identified three of four true covariates and two spurious covariates; Lasso identified two of four true and 0 spurious covariates; and the single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm identified three of four true covariates and one spurious covariate. For the clinical datasets, the Akaike information criterion was a median of 22.3 points lower (range of 470.5 point decrease to 0.1 point decrease) for the best single-objective hybrid genetic-algorithm candidate model versus the final manual stepwise model: the Akaike information criterion was lower by greater than 10 points for four compounds and differed by less than 10 points for three

  12. Pharmacokinetic model-predicted anticancer drug concentrations in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallo, James M; Vicini, Paolo; Orlansky, Amy; Li, Shaolan; Zhou, Feng; Ma, Jianguo; Pulfer, Sharon; Bookman, Michel A; Guo, Ping

    2004-12-01

    In an era when molecular and targeted anticancer therapeutics is a major focus and when understanding drug dynamics in tumor is critical, it seems advantageous to be able to relate drug concentrations in tumors to corresponding biological end points. To that end, a novel method, based on physiologically based hybrid pharmacokinetic models, is presented to predict human tumor drug concentrations. Such models consist of a forcing function, describing the plasma drug concentration-time profile, which is linked to a model describing drug disposition in tumors. The hybrid models are originally derived from preclinical data and then scaled to humans. Integral to the scale-up procedure is the ability to derive human forcing functions directly from clinical pharmacokinetic data. Three examples of this approach are presented based on preclinical investigations with carboplatin, topotecan, and temozolomide. Translation of these preclinical hybrid models to humans used a Monte Carlo simulation technique that accounted for intrasubject and intersubject variability. Different pharmacokinetic end points, such as the AUC tumor, were extracted from the simulated human tumor drug concentrations to show how the predicted drug concentrations might be used to select drug-dosing regimens. It is believed that this modeling strategy can be used as an aid in the drug development process by providing key insights into drug disposition in tumors and by offering a foundation to optimize drug regimen design. PMID:15585640

  13. Pharmacokinetic analysis of tissue microcirculation using nested models: multimodel inference and parameter identifiability.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Zwick, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian; Griebel, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the identifiability of physiological tissue parameters by pharmacokinetic modeling of concentration-time curves derived under conditions that are realistic for dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging and to assess the information-theoretic approach of multimodel inference using nested models. Tissue curves with a realistic noise level were simulated by means of an axially distributed multipath reference model using typical values reported in literature on plasma flow, permeability-surface area product, and volume fractions of the intravascular and interstitial space. The simulated curves were subsequently analyzed by a two-compartment model containing these physiological quantities as fit parameters as well as by two reduced models with only three and two parameters formulated for the case of a permeability-limited and a flow-limited scenario, respectively. The competing models were ranked according to Akaike's information criterion (AIC), balancing the bias versus variance trade-off. To utilize the information available from all three models, model-averaged parameters were estimated using Akaike weights that quantify the relative strength of evidence in favor of each model. As compared to the full model, the reduced models yielded equivalent or even superior AIC values for scenarios where the structural information in the tissue curves on either the plasma flow or the capillary permeability was limited. Multimodel inference took effect to a considerable extent in half of the curves and improved the precision of the estimated tissue parameters. As theoretically expected, the plasma flow was subject to a systematic (but largely correctable) overestimation, whereas the other three physiological tissue parameters could be determined in a numerically robust and almost unbiased manner. The presented concept of pharmacokinetic analysis of noisy DCE data using three nested models under an information-theoretic paradigm offers

  14. Characterization and validation of a pharmacokinetic model for controlled-release oxycodone.

    PubMed

    Mandema, J W; Kaiko, R F; Oshlack, B; Reder, R F; Stanski, D R

    1996-12-01

    1. Oxycodone is a strong opioid agonist that is currently available in immediate-release (IR) formulations for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Recently, controlled-release (CR) oxycodone tablets were developed to provide the benefits of twice-a-day dosing to patients treated with oxycodone. The purpose of this investigation was to develop and validate a pharmacokinetic model for CR oxycodone tablets in comparison with IR oxycodone solution. 2. Twenty-four normal male volunteers were enrolled in a single-dose, randomized, analytically blinded, two-way crossover study designed to compare the pharmacokinetics of two 10 mg CR oxycodone tablets with 20 mg IR oxycodone oral solution. Pharmacokinetic models describing the oxycodone plasma concentration vs time profiles of CR tablets and IR solution were derived using NONMEM version IV. The predictive performance of the models was assessed by comparison of predicted oxycodone plasma concentrations with actual oxycodone plasma concentrations observed in a separate group of 21 volunteers who received repeated doses of IR and CR oxycodone for 4 days. 3. The unit impulse disposition function of oxycodone was best described by a one-compartment model. Absorption rate of the IR solution was best described by a mono-exponential model with a lag time, whereas absorption rate of the CR tablet was best described using a bi-exponential model. The absorption profile of the CR tablets was characterized by a rapid absorption component (t1/2abs = 37 min) accounting for 38% of the available dose and a slow absorption phase (t1/2abs = 6.2 h) accounting for 62% of the available dose. Two 10 mg tablets of oral CR oxycodone hydrochloride were 102.7% bioavailable relative to 20 mg of IR oxycodone hydrochloride oral solution. The population model derived after administration of a single dose accurately predicted both the mean and range of oxycodone concentrations observed during 4 days of repeated dosing. The mean prediction error was

  15. Pharmacokinetic modeling of a gel-delivered dapivirine microbicide in humans.

    PubMed

    Halwes, Michael E; Steinbach-Rankins, Jill M; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2016-10-10

    Although a number of drugs have been developed for the treatment and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, it has proven difficult to optimize the drug and dosage parameters. The vaginal tissue, comprised of epithelial, stromal and blood compartments presents a complex system which challenges evaluation of drug kinetics solely through empirical effort. To provide insight into the underlying processes, mathematical modeling and computational simulation have been applied to the study of retroviral microbicide pharmacokinetics. Building upon previous pioneering work that modeled the delivery of Tenofovir (TFV) via topical delivery to the vaginal environment, here we computationally evaluate the performance of the retroviral inhibitor dapivirine released from a microbicide gel. We adapt the TFV model to simulate the multicompartmental diffusion and uptake of dapivirine into the blood plasma and vaginal compartments. The results show that dapivirine is expected to accumulate at the interface between the gel and epithelium compartments due to its hydrophobic characteristics. Hydrophobicity also results in decreased diffusivity, which may impact distribution by up to 2 orders of magnitude compared to TFV. Maximum concentrations of dapivirine in the epithelium, stroma, and blood were 9.9e7, 2.45e6, and 119pg/mL, respectively. This suggests that greater initial doses or longer time frames are required to obtain higher drug concentrations in the epithelium. These observations may have important ramifications if a specific time frame is required for efficacy, or if a minimum/maximum concentration is needed in the mucus, epithelium, or stroma based on combined efficacy and safety data. PMID:27559026

  16. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V.; Chow, Diana S. L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP.

  17. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Disposition in Plasma, Saliva and Urine of Scopolamine after Intranasal Administration to Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND) protocol. The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trials with INSCOP. Methods: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min and 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on the likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. Results: The best structural model for INSCOP (minimal -2LL= 502.8) was established. It consisted of one compartment each for plasma, saliva and urine, respectively, which were connected with linear transport processes except the nonlinear PK process from plasma to saliva compartment. The best-fit estimates of PK parameters from individual PK compartmental analysis and Population PK model analysis were shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: A population PK model that could predict population and individual PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after dosing was developed and validated. Incorporating a non-linear transfer from plasma to saliva compartments resulted in a significantly improved model fitting. The model could be used to predict scopolamine plasma concentrations from salivary and urinary drug levels, allowing non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of scopolamine in space and other remote environments.

  18. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  19. Small animal model of weightlessness for pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, S; Brunner, L J

    1994-06-01

    As the United States seeks a greater presence in space, physiologic changes associated with space flight become of greater concern. Exposure to a weightless environment has been shown to have numerous effects on body composition and organ function. Alterations include decreases in muscle and liver mass, changes in bone structure and integrity, and fluid shifts markedly affecting cardiovascular functioning. Furthermore, metabolic activity of the liver has been found to be altered in rats after extended periods of weightlessness. As the length of space travel increases, the probability for the need to administer pharmacologic agents to crew members during space flight for prophylaxis or treatment becomes greater. Thus, because of the observed physiologic and metabolic changes associated with weightlessness, it is reasonable to assume that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of xenobiotics administered during space flight may be different that those found in 1g environment. To address these possible changes, the development of a model of weightlessness to investigate possible alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics before space flight is of importance. The tail-suspended rat is a well-described model of weightlessness. During the time of the suspension, the pharmacokinetics of marker compounds can be used to evaluate changes in hepatic and renal physiology. Rats suspended for different periods allow for the investigation of the length of weightlessness exposure and drug pharmacology. Results from the use of the suspended rat model provide valuable information regarding possible pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes associated with weightlessness, and therefore, provide space biomedical researchers with a method of investigating drug administration during space flight missions.

  20. MELISSA: Global Control Strategy of the Artificial Ecosystem by Using First Principles Models of the Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulget, N.; Poughon, L.; Richalet, J.; Lasseur, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    MELISSA is a micro-organisms based ecosystem conceived as a tool for understanding the behaviour of artificial ecosystems, and developing the technology for a future biological life support system for long term space mission. The driving element of MELISSA is the recovering of oxygen and edible biomass from waste (faeces, urea). Due to its intrinsic instability and the safety requirements of manned missions, an important control strategy is developed to pilot this system and to optimize its recycling performance. This is a hierarchical control strategy. Each MELISSA compartment has its local control system, and taking into account the states of other compartments and a global desired functioning point, the upper level determines the setpoints for each compartment. The developed approach is based on first principles models of each compartment (physico chemical equations, stoichiometries, kinetic rates, ...). Those models are used to develop a global simulator of the system (in order to study the global functioning). They are also used in the control strategy, which is a non linear predictive model based strategy. This paper presents the general approach of the control strategy of the loop from the compartment level up to the overall loop. At the end, some simulation and experimental results are presented.

  1. A whole-body pharmacokinetic model for the early assessment of targeted radionuclide therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, Joseph J.

    Early assessment of targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) agent effectiveness based on its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties could provide a means to expedite agent development or rejection. A whole-body PK model was developed that not only simplifies the complex radiation dosimetry and physiology of TRT but also provides criteria for normal tissue and tumor PK parameters that achieve effective TRT while limiting toxicity. Because biologically effective dose (BED) may be more of a relevant quantity than absorbed dose for establishing tumor response relationships, the model was expanded to include BED. The model consisted of two coupled normal body compartments and one decoupled tumor compartment. Differential equations were used to develop an equation that predicted TRT efficacy. PK scenarios were created by pairing normal body influx and efflux parameters with a range of tumor influx and efflux parameters. Each PK scenario yielded a maximum delivered tumor absorbed dose that limited the whole body dose to 2 Gy. The dose rate and repair rate were used for BED. The relationships between the tumor influx-to-efflux ratio (k34:k 43), central compartment efflux-to-influx ratio (k12:k 21), central elimination (ke1), and tumor repair rate (mu), and tumor BED were investigated. The model was used to find the PK parameters for NM404 and FLT within a xenograft model. The TCC of both Compartment 1 and tumor were fit to the equations of the model using Levenberg-Marquardt. The parameter errors were propagated into dosimetry uncertainties. Sensitivity functions were derived for each PK parameter that described the change in TCC as a result of a change in the PK parameter value at each time. Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds (CRLB) theory was used to derive optimal sampling schedules based on the sensitivity of the derived PK parameters. The experimental and optimal sampling schedules were compared by running simulations that measured the precision and accuracy of the measured PK parameters

  2. Vitamin D3 supplementation scheme in HIV-infected patients based upon pharmacokinetic modelling of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Frantz; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Rostane, Hafeda; Urien, Saïk; Viard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aims Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in HIV-infected patients and has been associated with osteopenia and HIV disease progression. Our aims were to investigate the pharmacokinetics of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D], the effect of antiretroviral treatment (ARV) and others factors that may influence the pharmacokinetics, and to determine a vitamin D3 dosing scheme to reach the 30 ng ml−1 threshold (defined as 25(OH)D sufficiency). Methods This monocentric retrospective study included 422 HIV-infected patients aged 16 to 85 years. A total of 723 25(OH)D concentrations were available for pharmacokinetic evaluation and a population pharmacokinetic model was developed with MONOLIX 3.2. Results Median 25(OH)D at baseline was 16 ng ml−1 (interquartile range 11–23 ng ml−1) for the total population, 17% of patient had concentrations below 10 ng ml−1, 68% between 10 and 30 ng ml−1 and 15% above 30 ng ml−1. 25(OH)D pharmacokinetics were best described by a one compartment model with an additional endogenous production. The effects of season and skin phototype were significant on production rate. The endogenous production was 20% lower in non-white skin phototype patients and was decreased by 16% during autumn, winter and spring. No significant differences in 25(OH)D concentrations were related to antiretroviral drugs (ARV). To obtain concentrations between 30 and 80 ng ml−1, the dosing recommendation was 100 000 IU every month. Conclusions Season and skin phototype had an influence on the endogenous production of 25(OH)D. However no effect of ARV was found. A dosing scheme to reach sufficient 25(OH)D concentrations is proposed. PMID:23072545

  3. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients’ compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. Methods The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box–Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Results and Discussion Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box–Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry

  4. Development of a complex parent-metabolite joint population pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Julie; Laffont, Céline M; Mentré, France; Chenel, Marylore; Comets, Emmanuelle

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a joint population pharmacokinetic model for an antipsychotic agent in development (S33138) and its active metabolite (S35424) produced by reversible metabolism. Because such a model leads to identifiability problems and numerical difficulties, the model building was performed using the FOCE-I and the Stochastic Approximation Expectation Maximization (SAEM) estimation algorithms in NONMEM and MONOLIX, respectively. Four different structural models were compared based on Bayesian information criteria. Models were first written as ordinary differential equations systems and then in closed form (CF) to facilitate further analyses. The impact of polymorphisms on genes coding for the CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 enzymes, respectively involved in the parent drug and the metabolite elimination were investigated using permutation Wald test. The parent drug and metabolite plasma concentrations of 101 patients were analyzed on two occasions after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h following daily oral administration. All configurations led to a two compartment model with back-transformation of the metabolite into the parent drug and a first-pass effect. The elimination clearance of the metabolite through other processes than back-transformation was decreased by 35% [9-53%] in CYP2D6 poor metabolizer. Permutation tests were performed to ensure the robustness of the analysis, using SAEM and CF. In conclusion, we developed a complex joint pharmacokinetic model adequately predicting the impact of CYP2D6 polymorphisms on the parent drug and its metabolite concentrations through the back-transformation mechanism. PMID:21618059

  5. Toxicokinetics and Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of arsenic toxicokinetics and physiologically-basedpharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with particular emphasis on key 'actors needed fordevelopment of a model useful for dose-response analysis, applications of arsenicmodels, as well research needs.U...

  6. Propofol target-controlled infusion modeling in rabbits: Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Yan; Yi, Ming; Yao, Shang-Long; Zhang, Xue-Ping

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to establish a new propofol target-controlled infusion (TCI) model in animals so as to study the general anesthetic mechanism at multi-levels in vivo. Twenty Japanese white rabbits were enrolled and propofol (10 mg/kg) was administrated intravenously. Artery blood samples were collected at various time points after injection, and plasma concentrations of propofol were measured. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using WinNonlin software. Propofol TCI within the acquired parameters integrated was conducted to achieve different anesthetic depths in rabbits, monitored by narcotrend. The pharmacodynamics was analyzed using a sigmoidal inhibitory maximal effect model for narcotrend index (NI) versus effect-site concentration. The results showed the pharmacokinetics of propofol in Japanese white rabbits was best described by a two-compartment model. The target plasma concentrations of propofol required at light anesthetic depth was 9.77±0.23 μg/mL, while 12.52±0.69 μg/mL at deep anesthetic depth. NI was 76.17±4.25 at light anesthetic depth, while 27.41±5.77 at deep anesthetic depth. The effect-site elimination rate constant (ke0) was 0.263/min, and the propofol dose required to achieve a 50% decrease in the NI value from baseline was 11.19 μg/mL (95% CI, 10.25-13.67). Our results established a new propofol TCI animal model and proved the model controlled the anesthetic depth accurately and stably in rabbits. The study provides a powerful method for exploring general anesthetic mechanisms at different anesthetic depths in vivo.

  7. Population modeling and simulation study of the pharmacokinetics and antituberculosis pharmacodynamics of isoniazid in lungs.

    PubMed

    Lalande, L; Bourguignon, L; Bihari, S; Maire, P; Neely, M; Jelliffe, R; Goutelle, S

    2015-09-01

    Among first-line antituberculosis drugs, isoniazid (INH) displays the greatest early bactericidal activity (EBA) and is key to reducing contagiousness in treated patients. The pulmonary pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of INH have not been fully characterized with modeling and simulation approaches. INH concentrations measured in plasma, epithelial lining fluid, and alveolar cells for 89 patients, including fast acetylators (FAs) and slow acetylators (SAs), were modeled by use of population pharmacokinetic modeling. Then the model was used to simulate the EBA of INH in lungs and to investigate the influences of INH dose, acetylator status, and M. tuberculosis MIC on this effect. A three-compartment model adequately described INH concentrations in plasma and lungs. With an MIC of 0.0625 mg/liter, simulations showed that the mean bactericidal effect of a standard 300-mg daily dose of INH was only 11% lower for FA subjects than for SA subjects and that dose increases had little influence on the effects in either FA or SA subjects. With an MIC value of 1 mg/liter, the mean bactericidal effect associated with a 300-mg daily dose of INH in SA subjects was 41% greater than that in FA subjects. With the same MIC, increasing the daily INH dose from 300 mg to 450 mg resulted in a 22% increase in FA subjects. These results suggest that patients infected with M. tuberculosis with low-level resistance, especially FA patients, may benefit from higher INH doses, while dose adjustment for acetylator status has no significant impact on the EBA in patients with low-MIC strains.

  8. Population modeling and simulation study of the pharmacokinetics and antituberculosis pharmacodynamics of isoniazid in lungs.

    PubMed

    Lalande, L; Bourguignon, L; Bihari, S; Maire, P; Neely, M; Jelliffe, R; Goutelle, S

    2015-09-01

    Among first-line antituberculosis drugs, isoniazid (INH) displays the greatest early bactericidal activity (EBA) and is key to reducing contagiousness in treated patients. The pulmonary pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of INH have not been fully characterized with modeling and simulation approaches. INH concentrations measured in plasma, epithelial lining fluid, and alveolar cells for 89 patients, including fast acetylators (FAs) and slow acetylators (SAs), were modeled by use of population pharmacokinetic modeling. Then the model was used to simulate the EBA of INH in lungs and to investigate the influences of INH dose, acetylator status, and M. tuberculosis MIC on this effect. A three-compartment model adequately described INH concentrations in plasma and lungs. With an MIC of 0.0625 mg/liter, simulations showed that the mean bactericidal effect of a standard 300-mg daily dose of INH was only 11% lower for FA subjects than for SA subjects and that dose increases had little influence on the effects in either FA or SA subjects. With an MIC value of 1 mg/liter, the mean bactericidal effect associated with a 300-mg daily dose of INH in SA subjects was 41% greater than that in FA subjects. With the same MIC, increasing the daily INH dose from 300 mg to 450 mg resulted in a 22% increase in FA subjects. These results suggest that patients infected with M. tuberculosis with low-level resistance, especially FA patients, may benefit from higher INH doses, while dose adjustment for acetylator status has no significant impact on the EBA in patients with low-MIC strains. PMID:26077251

  9. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe Artemether Pharmacokinetics in Adult and Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Heimbach, Tycho; Jain, Jay Prakash; Awasthi, Rakesh; Hamed, Kamal; Sunkara, Gangadhar; He, Handan

    2016-10-01

    Artemether is co-administered with lumefantrine as part of a fixed-dose combination therapy for malaria in both adult and pediatric patients. However, artemether exposure is higher in younger infants (1-3 months) with a lower body weight (<5 kg) as compared to older infants (3-6 months) with a higher body weight (≥5 to <10 kg), children, and adults. In contrast, lumefantrine exposure is similar in all age groups. This article describes the clinically observed artemether exposure data in pediatric populations across various age groups (1 month to 12 years) and body weights (<5 or ≥5 kg) using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) mechanistic models. A PBPK model was developed using artemether physicochemical, biopharmaceutic, and metabolic properties together with known enzyme ontogeny and pediatric physiology. The model was verified using clinical data from adult patients after multiple doses of oral artemether, and was then applied to simulate the exposure in children and infants. The simulated PBPK concentration-time profiles captured observed clinical data. Consistent with the clinical data, the PBPK model simulations indicated a higher artemether exposure for younger infants with lower body weight. A PBPK model developed for artemether reliably described the clinical data from adult and pediatric patients. PMID:27506269

  10. What Is the Most Realistic Single-Compartment Model of Spike Initiation?

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    A large variety of neuron models are used in theoretical and computational neuroscience, and among these, single-compartment models are a popular kind. These models do not explicitly include the dendrites or the axon, and range from the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model to various flavors of integrate-and-fire (IF) models. The main classes of models differ in the way spikes are initiated. Which one is the most realistic? Starting with some general epistemological considerations, I show that the notion of realism comes in two dimensions: empirical content (the sort of predictions that a model can produce) and empirical accuracy (whether these predictions are correct). I then examine the realism of the main classes of single-compartment models along these two dimensions, in light of recent experimental evidence. PMID:25856629

  11. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Predict Acetaminophen Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X-L; Zhao, P; Barrett, J S; Lesko, L J; Schmidt, S

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that undergoes extensive phase I and II metabolism. To better understand the kinetics of this process and to characterize the dynamic changes in metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK) between children and adults, we developed a physiologically based PK (PBPK) model for APAP integrating in silico, in vitro, and in vivo PK data into a single model. The model was developed and qualified for adults and subsequently expanded for application in children by accounting for maturational changes from birth. Once developed and qualified, it was able to predict clinical PK data in neonates (0–28 days), infants (29 days to <2 years), children (2 to <12 years), and adolescents (12–17 years) following intravenous and orally administered APAP. This approach represents a general strategy for projecting drug exposure in children, in the absence of pediatric PK information, using previous drug- and system-specific information of adults and children through PBPK modeling. PMID:24132164

  12. Implementation of dose superimposition to introduce multiple doses for a mathematical absorption model (transit compartment model).

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Boeckmann, Alison; Vick, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    A mathematical absorption model (e.g. transit compartment model) is useful to describe complex absorption process. However, in such a model, an assumption has to be made to introduce multiple doses that a prior dose has been absorbed nearly completely when the next dose is administered. This is because the drug input cannot be determined from drug depot compartment through integration of the differential equation system and has to be analytically calculated. We propose a method of dose superimposition to introduce multiple doses; thereby eliminating the assumption. The code for implementing the dose superimposition in WinNonlin and NONMEM was provided. For implementation in NONMEM, we discussed a special case (SC) and a general case (GC). In a SC, dose superimposition was implemented solely using NM-TRAN abbreviated code and the maximum number of the doses that can be administered for any subject must be pre-defined. In a GC, a user-supplied function (FUNCA) in FORTRAN code was defined to perform dose superimposition to remove the restriction that the maximum number of doses must be pre-defined. PMID:22555854

  13. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Unboosted Atazanavir in a Cohort of Stable HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baudry, Thomas; Gagnieu, Marie-Claude; Boibieux, André; Livrozet, Jean-Michel; Peyramond, Dominique; Tod, Michel; Ferry, Tristan

    2013-01-01

    Limited data on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) of unboosted atazanavir (uATV) in treatment-experienced patients are available. The aim of this work was to study the PK/PD of unboosted atazanavir in a cohort of HIV-infected patients. Data were available for 58 HIV-infected patients (69 uATV-based regimens). Atazanavir concentrations were analyzed by using a population approach, and the relationship between atazanavir PK and clinical outcome was examined using logistic regression. The final PK model was a linear one-compartment model with a mixture absorption model to account for two subgroups of absorbers. The mean (interindividual variability) of population PK parameters were as follows: clearance, 13.4 liters/h (40.7%), volume of distribution, 71.1 liters (29.7%), and fraction of regular absorbers, 0.49. Seven subjects experienced virological failure after switch to uATV. All of them were identified as low absorbers in the PK modeling. The absorption rate constant (0.38 ± 0.20 versus 0.75 ± 0.28 h−1; P = 0.002) and ATV exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [AUC0–24], 10.3 ± 2.1 versus 22.4 ± 11.2 mg · h · liter−1; P = 0.001) were significantly lower in patients with virological failure than in patients without failure. In the logistic regression analysis, both the absorption rate constant and ATV trough concentration significantly influenced the probability of virological failure. A significant relationship between ATV pharmacokinetics and virological response was observed in a cohort of HIV patients who were administered unboosted atazanavir. This study also suggests that twice-daily administration of uATV may optimize drug therapy. PMID:23147727

  14. A distributed multi-compartment hydrological model with dynamic vegetation and nutrient turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Gayler, Sebastian; Streck, Thilo; Selle, Benny; Klein, Christian; Priesack, Eckart; Singh, Ashok; Kalbacher, Thomas; Wang, Wenqing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    Agricultural practices impact soils and the wider environment (groundwater, receiving water courses and ponds, etc.) with various feedback loops. For instance, groundwater extraction may increase infiltration rates and nitrate leaching from the plant root zone. To assess such inter-compartment feedbacks with a numerical model, the object-oriented modeling platform OpenGeoSys (OGS), which is designed for Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical processes in porous and fractured media (open to the public via www.opengeosys.org), is coupled with the soil-plant-atmosphere model system Expert-N. Latter consists of interchangeable sub-modules for thermo-hydro-chemical processes at land surfaces subject to agricultural production and forestry. In the resulting model, OGS solves partial differential equations through a Galerkin finite element approach to transfer water, air, heat and nitrogen compounds in the overland, soil and aquifer compartments, while Expert-N provides source / sink terms for evapotranspiration, plant growth, and nutrient turnover (mineralization, denitrification, etc.). General criteria are determined to guarantee stability when coupling hydrological compartments by iterating and to ensure that inter-compartment water and solute fluxes are insensitive to variations in leakage. Test cases include a synthetic surface-subsurface flow benchmark with evapotranspiration (Panday & Huyakorn problem) and a cross section of the Ammer catchment in South-West Germany, where precipitation water flows to groundwater wells, which are used for the supply of potable water.

  15. Compartment model for long-term contamination prediction in deciduous fruit trees after a nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Clouvas, A.; Gagianas, A. )

    1990-06-01

    Radiocesium contamination from the Chernobyl accident of different parts (fruits, leaves, and shoots) of selected apricot trees in North Greece was systematically measured in 1987 and 1988. The results are presented and discussed in the framework of a simple compartment model describing the long-term contamination uptake mechanism of deciduous fruit trees after a nuclear accident.

  16. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VKmore » model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.« less

  17. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  18. Cross-simulation between two pharmacokinetic models for the target-controlled infusion of propofol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Kim, Dae-Hee; Lee, A-Ram; Moon, Bong-Ki

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated how one pharmacokinetic (PK) model differed in prediction of plasma (Cp) and effect-site concentration (Ceff) using a reproducing simulation of target-controlled infusion (TCI) with another PK model of propofol. Methods Sixty female patients were randomly assigned to TCI using Marsh PK (Group M) and TCI using Schnider PK (Group S) targeting 6.0 µg/ml of Cp of propofol for induction of anesthesia, and loss of responsiveness (LOR) was evaluated. Total and separate cross-simulation were investigated using the 2 hr TCI data (Marsh TCI and Schnider TCI), and we investigated the reproduced predicted concentrations (MARSHSCH and SCHNIDERMAR) using the other model. The correlation of the difference with covariates, and the influence of the PK parameters on the difference of prediction were investigated. Results Group M had a shorter time to LOR compared to Group S (P < 0.001), but Ceff at LOR was not different between groups. Reproduced simulations showed different time courses of Cp. MARSHSCH predicted a higher concentration during the early phase, whereas SCHNIDERMAR was maintained at a higher concentration. Volume and clearance of the central compartment were relevant to the difference of prediction, respectively. Body weight correlated well with differences in prediction between models (Rsqr = 0.9821, P < 0.001). Conclusions We compared two PK models to determine the different infusion behaviors during TCI, which resulted from the different parameter sets for each PK model. PMID:22558495

  19. A model for simulation of crowd behaviour in the evacuation from a smoke-filled compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weifeng; Tan, Kang Hai

    2011-11-01

    The modelling of crowd evacuation from a building has been studied over the past decades. In this study, a numerical model based on cellular automaton is proposed to simulate the human behaviour termed “flow with the stream” in emergency evacuation from a large smoke-filled compartment. In the model, the smoke effect in the context of visibility is considered since visibility range can affect the human behaviour significantly. To simulate the reality that the smoke concentration in a fire compartment is not constant, the proposed model is developed to deal with the scenario in which the visibility range varies in the course of time. An empirical formula is incorporated into the proposed model to estimate the visibility range. The results of numerical tests show that the proposed model can also be used to investigate the effect of the number of guiders through case study.

  20. Computer assisted modeling of ethyl sulfate pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Georg; Halter, Claudia C; Aderjan, Rolf; Auwaerter, Volker; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2010-01-30

    For 12 volunteers of a drinking experiment the concentration-time-courses of ethyl sulfate (EtS) and ethanol were simulated and fitted to the experimental data. The concentration-time-courses were described with the same mathematical model as previously used for ethyl glucuronide (EtG). The kinetic model based on the following assumptions and simplifications: a velocity constant k(form) for the first order formation of ethyl sulfate from ethanol and an exponential elimination constant k(el). The mean values (and standard deviations) obtained for k(form) and k(el) were 0.00052 h(-1) (0.00014) and 0.561 h(-1) (0.131), respectively. Using the ranges of these parameters it is possible to calculate minimum and maximum serum concentrations of EtS based on stated ethanol doses and drinking times. The comparison of calculated and measured concentrations can prove the plausibility of alleged ethanol consumption and add evidence to the retrospective calculation of ethanol concentrations based on EtG concentrations. PMID:19913378

  1. The role of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in regulatory review.

    PubMed

    Huang, S-M; Rowland, M

    2012-03-01

    During regulatory review of clinical pharmacology data in new drug applications and biologics license applications, questions are routinely asked about how intrinsic factors (e.g., organ dysfunction, age, and genetics) and extrinsic factors (e.g., drug-drug interactions) might influence dose-response and exposure-response and about the impact of these individual factors on the efficacy and safety of the candidate compound. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation is one of the tools that can be used to address these critical questions. PMID:22318616

  2. Fractional model for pharmacokinetics of high dose methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Jovan K.; Spasić, Dragan T.; Tošić, Jela; Kolarović, Jovanka L.; Malti, Rachid; Mitić, Igor M.; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to promote a model based on the fractional differential calculus related to the pharmacokinetic individualization of high dose methotrexate treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, especially in high risk patients. We applied two-compartment fractional model on 8 selected cases with the largest number (4-19) of measured concentrations, among 43 pediatric patients received 24-h methotrexate 2-5 g/m2 infusions. The plasma concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Our mathematical procedure, designed by combining Post's and Newton's method, was coded in Mathematica 8.0 and performed on Fujicu Celsius M470-2 PC. Experimental data show that most of the measured values of methotrexate were in decreasing order. However, in certain treatments local maximums were detected. On the other hand, integer order compartmental models do not give values which fit well with the observed data. By the use of our model, we obtained better results, since it gives more accurate behavior of the transmission, as well as the local maximums which were recognized in methotrexate monitoring. It follows from our method that an additional test with a small methotrexate dose can be suggested for the fractional system parameter identification and the prediction of a possible pattern with a full dose in the case of high risk patients. A special feature of the fractional model is that it can also recognize and better fit an observed non-monotonic behavior. A new parameter determination procedure can be successfully used.

  3. Implications of pharmacokinetic modeling in risk assessment analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, R J; Dedrick, R L

    1987-01-01

    Physiologic pharmacokinetic models are a useful interface between exposure models and risk assessment models by providing a means to estimate tissue concentrations of reactive chemical species at the site of action. The models utilize numerous parameters that can be characterized as anatomical, such as body size or tissue volume; physiological, such as tissue blood perfusion rates, clearances, and metabolism; thermodynamic, such as partition coefficients; and transport, such as membrane permeabilities. The models provide a format to investigate how these parameters can influence the disposition of chemicals throughout the body, which is an important consideration in interpreting toxicity studies. Physiologic models can take into account nonlinear effects related to clearance, metabolism, or transport. They allow for extrapolation of tissue concentration from high dose to low dose experiments and from species to species and can account for temporal variations in dose. PMID:3447907

  4. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rambiritch, Virendra; Naidoo, Poobalan; Maharaj, Breminand; Pillai, Goonaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK) of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects using noncompartmental and model-based methods. Methods A total of 24 subjects with type 2 diabetes were administered increasing doses (0 mg/d, 2.5 mg/d, 5 mg/d, 10 mg/d, and 20 mg/d) of glibenclamide daily at 2-week intervals. Plasma glibenclamide, glucose, and insulin determinations were performed. Blood sampling times were 0 minute, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes (post breakfast sampling) and 240 minutes, 270 minutes, 300 minutes, 330 minutes, 360 minutes, and 420 minutes (post lunch sampling) on days 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 for doses of 0 mg, 2.5 mg, 5.0 mg, 10 mg, and 20 mg, respectively. Blood sampling was performed after the steady state was reached. A total of 24 individuals in the data set contributed to a total of 841 observation records. The PK was analyzed using noncompartmental analysis methods, which were implemented in WinNonLin®, and population PK analysis using NONMEM®. Glibenclamide concentration data were log transformed prior to fitting. Results A two-compartmental disposition model was selected after evaluating one-, two-, and three-compartmental models to describe the time course of glibenclamide plasma concentration data. The one-compartment model adequately described the data; however, the two-compartment model provided a better fit. The three-compartment model failed to achieve successful convergence. A more complex model, to account for enterohepatic recirculation that was observed in the data, was unsuccessful. Conclusion In South African diabetic subjects, glibenclamide demonstrates linear PK and was best described by a two-compartmental model. Except for the absorption rate constant, the other PK parameters reported in this study are comparable to those reported in the scientific literature. The study is limited by the small study sample size and inclusion of poorly

  5. Population pharmacokinetic model of canrenone after intravenous administration of potassium canrenoate to paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Suyagh, Maysa; Hawwa, Ahmed F; Collier, Paul S; Millership, Jeffrey S; Kole, Prashant; Millar, Muriel; Shields, Mike D; Halliday, Henry L; McElnay, James C

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To characterize the population pharmacokinetics of canrenone following administration of potassium canrenoate to paediatric patients. METHODS Data were collected prospectively from 23 paediatric patients (2 days to 10 years of age; median weight 4 kg, range 2.16–28.0 kg) who received intravenous potassium canrenoate (K-canrenoate) as part of their intensive care therapy for removal of retained fluids, e.g. in pulmonary oedema due to chronic lung disease and for the management of congestive heart failure. Plasma samples were analyzed by HPLC for determination of canrenone (the major metabolite and pharmacologically active moiety) and the data subjected to pharmacokinetic analysis using NONMEM. RESULTS A one compartment model best described the data. The only significant covariate was weight (WT). The final population models for canrenone clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) were CL/F (l h−1) = 11.4 × (WT/70.0)0.75 and V/F (l) = 374.2 × (WT/70) where WT is in kg. The values of CL/F and V/F in a 4 kg child would be 1.33 l h−1 and 21.4 l, respectively, resulting in an elimination half-life of 11.2 h. CONCLUSIONS The range of estimated CL/F in the study population was 0.67–7.38 l h−1. The data suggest that adjustment of K-canrenoate dosage according to body weight is appropriate in paediatric patients. PMID:22376078

  6. An earthquake instability model based on faults containing high fluid-pressure compartments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas contain water in seal-bounded compartments. Arguments based on heat flow and stress orientation suggest that in most of the compartments, the water pressure is so high that the average shear strength of the fault is less than 20 MPa. We propose a variation of this basic model in which most of the shear stress on the fault is supported by a small number of compartments where the pore pressure is relatively low. As a result, the fault gouge in these compartments is compacted and lithified and has a high undisturbed strength. When one of these locked regions fails, the system made up of the neighboring high and low pressure compartments can become unstable. Material in the high fluid pressure compartments is initially underconsolidated since the low effective confining pressure has retarded compaction. As these compartments are deformed, fluid pressure remains nearly unchanged so that they offer little resistance to shear. The low pore pressure compartments, however, are overconsolidated and dilate as they are sheared. Decompression of the pore fluid in these compartments lowers fluid pressure, increasing effective normal stress and shear strength. While this effect tends to stabilize the fault, it can be shown that this dilatancy hardening can be more than offset by displacement weakening of the fault (i.e., the drop from peak to residual strength). If the surrounding rock mass is sufficiently compliant to produce an instability, slip will propagate along the fault until the shear fracture runs into a low-stress region. Frictional heating and the accompanying increase in fluid pressure that are suggested to occur during shearing of the fault zone will act as additional destabilizers. However, significant heating occurs only after a finite amount of slip and therefore is more likely to contribute to the energetics of rupture propagation than to the initiation of the instability. We present

  7. Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of concentration-dependent hysteresis and biphasic electroencephalogram effects of alphaxalone in rats.

    PubMed

    Visser, S A G; Smulders, C J G M; Reijers, B P R; Van der Graaf, P H; Peletier, L A; Danhof, M

    2002-09-01

    The neuroactive steroid alphaxalone reveals a complex biphasic concentration-effect relationship using the 11.5 to 30 Hz frequency band of the electroencephalogram (EEG) as biomarker. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to describe this observation. The proposed model is based on receptor theory and aims to separate the drug-receptor interaction from the transduction of the initial stimulus into the observed biphasic response. Individual concentration-time courses of alphaxalone were obtained in combination with continuous recording of the EEG parameter. Alphaxalone was administered intravenously in various dosages. The pharmacokinetics were described by a two-compartment model, and parameter estimates for clearance, intercompartmental clearance, volume of distribution 1 and 2 were 158 +/- 29 ml. min(-1). kg(-1), 143 +/- 31 ml. min(-1). kg(-1), 122 +/- 20 ml. kg(-1) and 606 +/- 48 ml. kg(-1), respectively. Concentration-effect relationships exhibited a biphasic pattern and delay in onset of effect. The hysteresis was described on the basis of an effect-compartment model with C(max) as covariate. The pharmacodynamic model consisted of a receptor model, featuring a monophasic saturable receptor activation model in combination with a biphasic stimulus-response model. The in vivo affinity (K(PD)) was estimated at 432 +/- 26 ng. ml(-1). Unique parameter estimates were obtained that were independent of the dose and the duration of the infusion. In conclusion, we have shown that this mechanism-based approach, which separates drug- and system-related properties in vivo, was successfully applied for the characterization of the biphasic effect versus time patterns of alphaxalone. The model should be of use in the characterization of other biphasic responses.

  8. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of histamine response measured by histamine iontophoresis laser Doppler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jones, Bridgette L; Roberts, Jessica K; Sherwin, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    The epicutaneous histamine (EH) test is the current gold standard method for the clinical evaluation of allergic conditions. However, the EH method is limited in providing an objective and qualitative assessment of histamine pharmacodynamic response. The histamine iontophoresis with laser Doppler (HILD) monitoring method, an alternative method, allows a fixed dose of histamine to be delivered and provides an objective, continuous, and dynamic measurement of histamine epicutaneous response in children and adults. However, due to the high sampling frequency (up to 40 Hz), the output files are usually too cumbersome to be directly used for further analysis. In this study, we developed an averaging algorithm that efficiently reduces the HILD data in size. The reduced data was further analyzed and a population linked effect pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed to describe the local histamine response. The model consisted of a one-compartment PK model and a direct-response fractional maximum effect (Emax) model. The parameter estimates were obtained as follows: absorption rate constant (ka), 0.094/min; absorption lag time (Tlag), 2.72 min; partitioning clearance from local depot to systemic circulation (CLpar), 0.0006 L/min; baseline effect (E0), 13.1 flux unit; Emax, 13.4; concentration at half maximum effect (EC50) 31.1 mg/L. Covariate analysis indicated that age and race had significant influence on Tlag and EC50, respectively.

  9. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Raswan, T. R. Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-30

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  10. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design.

    PubMed

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics.

  11. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design

    PubMed Central

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John P

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics. PMID:24837591

  12. EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT. L H Clark1, H A Barton1, and R W Setzer1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly being used in eva...

  13. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  14. Model-based pharmacokinetic analysis of elotuzumab in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Passey, Chaitali; Roy, Amit; Bello, Akintunde; Gupta, Manish

    2016-06-01

    Elotuzumab is a humanized immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody in development for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received one or more prior therapies. In this work, 6958 elotuzumab serum concentrations from 375 patients enrolled in four Phase 1 to 3 clinical trials were used to analyze the pharmacokinetics (PK) of elotuzumab. A population PK model with parallel linear and Michaelis-Menten elimination from the central compartment and limited-capacity target-mediated elimination from the peripheral compartment described the elotuzumab concentration-time course. Clearance of elotuzumab increased with increasing body weight and weight-based dosing generated uniform exposures across a range of body weights. Coadministration of lenalidomide/dexamethasone background therapy decreased elotuzumab nonspecific clearance by 35 %. Target-mediated elimination of elotuzumab increased with increasing baseline serum M-protein, resulting in lower exposure in patients with high baseline serum M-protein concentration. Age, race, sex, renal and hepatic function, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, lactate dehydrogenase, albumin and β2-microglobulin had less than 20 % effect on model parameters and are unlikely to have clinically meaningful effects. Impact of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) on the PK of elotuzumab was assessed as an ad hoc analysis. In the majority of ADA-positive patients, immunogenicity started early, was transient and resolved by 2-4 months. Since the majority of patients had ADAs detected early, this resulted in a corresponding transient increase in nonspecific clearance at these time points. Nonspecific clearance appeared to return to baseline at later time points when ADAs were no longer detected. PMID:26993283

  15. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Itraconazole and Hydroxyitraconazole for Oral SUBA-Itraconazole and Sporanox Capsule Formulations in Healthy Subjects in Fed and Fasted States

    PubMed Central

    Foster, David J. R.; Mudge, Stuart; Hayes, David

    2015-01-01

    Itraconazole is an orally active antifungal agent that has complex and highly variable absorption kinetics that is highly affected by food. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for itraconazole and the active metabolite hydroxyitraconazole, in particular, quantifying the effects of food and formulation on oral absorption. Plasma pharmacokinetic data were collected from seven phase I crossover trials comparing the SUBA-itraconazole and Sporanox formulations of itraconazole. First, a model of single-dose itraconazole data was developed, which was then extended to the multidose data. Covariate effects on itraconazole were then examined before extending the model to describe hydroxyitraconazole. The final itraconazole model was a 2-compartment model with oral absorption described by 4-transit compartments. Multidose kinetics was described by total effective daily dose- and time-dependent changes in clearance and bioavailability. Hydroxyitraconazole was best described by a 1-compartment model with mixed first-order and Michaelis-Menten elimination for the single-dose data and a time-dependent clearance for the multidose data. The relative bioavailability of SUBA-itraconazole compared to that of Sporanox was 173% and was 21% less variable between subjects. Food resulted in a 27% reduction in bioavailability and 58% reduction in the transit absorption rate constant compared to that with the fasted state, irrespective of the formulation. This analysis presents the most extensive population pharmacokinetic model of itraconazole and hydroxyitraconazole in the literature performed in healthy subjects. The presented model can be used for simulating food effects on itraconazole exposure and for performing prestudy power analysis and sample size estimation, which are important aspects of clinical trial design of bioequivalence studies. PMID:26149987

  16. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of itraconazole and hydroxyitraconazole for oral SUBA-itraconazole and sporanox capsule formulations in healthy subjects in fed and fasted states.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Mudge, Stuart; Hayes, David; Upton, Richard N

    2015-09-01

    Itraconazole is an orally active antifungal agent that has complex and highly variable absorption kinetics that is highly affected by food. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for itraconazole and the active metabolite hydroxyitraconazole, in particular, quantifying the effects of food and formulation on oral absorption. Plasma pharmacokinetic data were collected from seven phase I crossover trials comparing the SUBA-itraconazole and Sporanox formulations of itraconazole. First, a model of single-dose itraconazole data was developed, which was then extended to the multidose data. Covariate effects on itraconazole were then examined before extending the model to describe hydroxyitraconazole. The final itraconazole model was a 2-compartment model with oral absorption described by 4-transit compartments. Multidose kinetics was described by total effective daily dose- and time-dependent changes in clearance and bioavailability. Hydroxyitraconazole was best described by a 1-compartment model with mixed first-order and Michaelis-Menten elimination for the single-dose data and a time-dependent clearance for the multidose data. The relative bioavailability of SUBA-itraconazole compared to that of Sporanox was 173% and was 21% less variable between subjects. Food resulted in a 27% reduction in bioavailability and 58% reduction in the transit absorption rate constant compared to that with the fasted state, irrespective of the formulation. This analysis presents the most extensive population pharmacokinetic model of itraconazole and hydroxyitraconazole in the literature performed in healthy subjects. The presented model can be used for simulating food effects on itraconazole exposure and for performing prestudy power analysis and sample size estimation, which are important aspects of clinical trial design of bioequivalence studies. PMID:26149987

  17. A population pharmacokinetic model of piperaquine in pregnant and non-pregnant women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of developing a malaria infection and a higher risk of developing severe malaria. The pharmacokinetic properties of many anti-malarials are also altered during pregnancy, often resulting in a decreased drug exposure. Piperaquine is a promising anti-malarial partner drug used in a fixed-dose combination with dihydroartemisinin. The aim of this study was to investigate the population pharmacokinetics of piperaquine in pregnant and non-pregnant Sudanese women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Method Symptomatic patients received a standard dose regimen of the fixed dose oral piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin combination treatment. Densely sampled plasma aliquots were collected and analysed using a previously described LC-MS/MS method. Data from 12 pregnant and 12 non-pregnant women were analysed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. A Monte Carlo Mapped Power (MCMP) analysis was conducted based on a previously published study to evaluate the power of detecting covariates in this relatively small study. Results A three-compartment disposition model with a transit-absorption model described the observed data well. Body weight was added as an allometric function on all clearance and volume parameters. A statistically significant decrease in estimated terminal piperaquine half-life in pregnant compared with non-pregnant women was found, but there were no differences in post-hoc estimates of total piperaquine exposure. The MCMP analysis indicated a minimum of 13 pregnant and 13 non-pregnant women were required to identify pregnancy as a covariate on relevant pharmacokinetic parameters (80% power and p=0.05). Pregnancy was, therefore, evaluated as a categorical and continuous covariate (i.e. estimate gestational age) in a full covariate approach. Using this approach pregnancy was not associated with any major change in piperaquine elimination clearance. However, a trend of increasing elimination

  18. Bioenergetic and pharmacokinetic model for exposure of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karasov, W.H.; Kenow, K.P.; Meyer, M.W.; Fournier, F.

    2007-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was used to predict food intake of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks as a function of body mass during development, and a pharmacokinetics model, based on first-order kinetics in a single compartment, was used to predict blood Hg level as a function of food intake rate, food Hg content, body mass, and Hg absorption and elimination. Predictions were tested in captive growing chicks fed trout (Salmo gairdneri) with average MeHg concentrations of 0.02 (control), 0.4, and 1.2 ??g/g wet mass (delivered as CH3HgCl). Predicted food intake matched observed intake through 50 d of age but then exceeded observed intake by an amount that grew progressively larger with age, reaching a significant overestimate of 28% by the end of the trial. Respiration in older, nongrowing birds probably was overestimated by using rates measured in younger, growing birds. Close agreement was found between simulations and measured blood Hg, which varied significantly with dietary Hg and age. Although chicks may hatch with different blood Hg levels, their blood level is determined mainly by dietary Hg level beyond approximately two weeks of age. The model also may be useful for predicting Hg levels in adults and in the eggs that they lay, but its accuracy in both chicks and adults needs to be tested in free-living birds. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  19. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling Analysis of GCC‐4401C, a Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor, in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, HY; Choi, S; Kim, YH

    2016-01-01

    GCC‐4401C, an orally active direct factor Xa inhibitor that is similar to rivaroxaban, is currently under development for venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of GCC‐4401C by population modeling analysis and to predict proper dosage regimens compared to rivaroxaban using data from two phase I clinical studies. Plasma GCC‐4401C concentrations over time were best described by a two‐compartment linear model and body weight was associated with central volume of distribution. Relevant PD markers generally changed in a dose‐dependent manner and were described well with sigmoid, simple maximum effect, or linear models. GCC‐4401C was absorbed more rapidly than rivaroxaban. Comparisons based on simulations of PD marker changes over time suggest that 20 mg and 40 mg of GCC‐4401C administered under fasted status are comparable to 10 mg and 20 mg of rivaroxaban under fed status. PMID:27511836

  20. Use of partition coefficients in flow-limited physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew D.; Beard, Daniel A.; Wu, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Permeability-limited two-subcompartment and flow-limited, well-stirred tank tissue compartment models are routinely used in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling. Here, the permeability-limited two-subcompartment model is used to derive a general flow-limited case of a two-subcompartment model with the well-stirred tank being a specific case where tissue fractional blood volume approaches zero. The general flow-limited two-subcompartment model provides a clear distinction between two partition coefficients typically used in PBPK: a biophysical partition coefficient and a well-stirred partition coefficient. Case studies using diazepam and cotinine demonstrate that, when the well-stirred tank is used with a priori predicted biophysical partition coefficients, simulations overestimate or underestimate total organ drug concentration relative to flow-limited two-subcompartment model behavior in tissues with higher fractional blood volumes. However, whole-body simulations show predicted drug concentrations in plasma and lower fractional blood volume tissues are relatively unaffected. These findings point to the importance of accurately determining tissue fractional blood volume for flow-limited PBPK modeling. Simulations using biophysical and well-stirred partition coefficients optimized with flow-limited two-subcompartment and well-stirred models, respectively, lead to nearly identical fits to tissue drug distribution data. Therefore, results of whole-body PBPK modeling with diazepam and cotinine indicate both flow-limited models are appropriate PBPK tissue models as long as the correct partition coefficient is used: the biophysical partition coefficient is for use with two-subcompartment models and the well-stirred partition coefficient is for use with the well-stirred tank model. PMID:22639356

  1. In Vitro Measurements of Metabolism for Application in Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, John C.; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-04-01

    Abstract Human risk and exposure assessments require dosimetry information. Species-specific tissue dose response will be driven by physiological and biochemical processes. While metabolism and pharmacokinetic data are often not available in humans, they are much more available in laboratory animals; metabolic rate constants can be readily derived in vitro. The physiological differences between laboratory animals and humans are known. Biochemical processes, especially metabolism, can be measured in vitro and extrapolated to account for in vivo metabolism through clearance models or when linked to a physiologically based biological (PBPK) model to describe the physiological processes, such as drug delivery to the metabolic organ. This review focuses on the different organ, cellular, and subcellular systems that can be used to measure in vitro metabolic rate constants and how that data is extrapolated to be used in biokinetic modeling.

  2. Survey of monoclonal antibody disposition in man utilizing a minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang; Jusko, William J

    2014-01-01

    Minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic (mPBPK) models provide a simple and sensible approach that incorporates physiological elements into pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis when only plasma data are available. With this modeling concept, a second-generation mPBPK model was further developed with specific accommodations for the unique PK properties of monoclonal antibodies (mAb). This study applied this model to extensively survey mAb PK in man in order to seek general perspectives on mAb distributional and elimination features. Profiles for 72 antibodies were successfully analyzed with this model. The model results provide assessment regarding: 1) predominant clearance site, in plasma or interstitial fluid (ISF); 2) mAb ISF concentrations in two groups of lumped tissues with continuous (Vtight) or fenestrated (Vleaky) vascular endothelium; 3) Transcapillary Escape Rate (TER), an indicator of systemic vascular permeability. For 93% of surveyed mAbs, the model assuming clearance from plasma (CLp) produced better or at least equivalent model performance than the model with clearance from ISF and yielded most consistent values of vascular reflection coefficients (σ1 and σ2) among all antibodies. The average mAb ISF concentration in Vtight and Vleaky at equilibrium was predicted to be about 6.8% and 37.9% of that in plasma. A positive correlation was detected between plasma clearance and TER among most mAbs, which could be interpreted as both parameters having common determinants related to ISF tissue distribution in this model context. The mAbs with relative higher plasma clearance (> 0.035 L/hr/70 kg) did not reveal such positive correlation between clearance and TER, implying that the factors contributing to high clearance may not necessarily increase tissue distribution and penetration. In conclusion, this mPBPK model offers a more mechanistic approach for analyzing plasma mAb PK than compartment models and generates parameters providing useful intrinsic

  3. Stability and mixing conditions for HIV/AIDS models with regional compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Richard

    Compartmental models have been adapted to derive temporal epidemic forecasting systems for imitating the transfer of HIV infection between those with different behaviours or rates of risk activity. Alternatively, models with regional compartments, which forecast disease incidence in both space and time, have emerged as a response to the challenge of anticipating the pandemic pathways of this infection. This paper combines these frameworks to obtain properties for a multiregion model that also contains demographic compartments. Section 2 begins by showing how the stability conditions (starting thresholds) for a purely regional model are a special case of the existing conditions that have been derived for the general compartmental framework. Then, these results are extended to encompass a regions with compartments design. Section 3 presents an analysis of the population mixing relationships that are embedded in all these specifications. Here, the topics include the maintenance of contact symmetry, the representation of alternative partner selection behaviours, and the identification of core populations for the diffusion of HIV infection. The discussion considers how these theoretical findings might be applied to disease prevention.

  4. 76 FR 26949 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ...; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... installation of an overhead flight attendant rest compartment. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not... Electric GEnx-2B67 engines. The Model 747-8 will have two flight crew and the capacity to carry...

  5. Busulfan in infants to adult hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: A population pharmacokinetic model for initial and Bayesian dose personalization

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Baker, K. Scott; Gamis, Alan S.; Holford, Nicholas H.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses to a target plasma concentration at steady state (Css) is an essential component of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We sought to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to predict IV busulfan doses over a wide age spectrum (0.1 – 66 years) that accounts for differences in age and body size. Experimental design A population pharmacokinetic model based on normal fat mass and maturation based on post-menstrual age was built from 12,380 busulfan concentration-time points obtained after IV busulfan administration in 1,610 HCT recipients. Subsequently, simulation results of the initial dose necessary to achieve a target Css with this model were compared with pediatric-only models. Results A two-compartment model with first-order elimination best fit the data. The population busulfan clearance was 12.4 L/h for an adult male with 62kg normal fat mass (equivalent to 70kg total body weight). Busulfan clearance, scaled to body size – specifically normal fat mass, is predicted to be 95% of the adult clearance at 2.5 years post-natal age. With a target Css of 770 ng/mL, a higher proportion of initial doses achieved the therapeutic window with this age- and size-dependent model (72%) compared to dosing recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (57%) or the European Medicines Agency (70%). Conclusion This is the first population pharmacokinetic model developed to predict initial IV busulfan doses and personalize to a target Css over a wide age spectrum, ranging from infants to adults. PMID:24218510

  6. Incorporation of ABCB1-mediated transport into a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of docetaxel in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hudachek, Susan F.

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most widely used anticancer agents. While this taxane has proven to be an effective chemotherapeutic drug, noteworthy challenges exist in relation to docetaxel administration due to the considerable interindividual variability in efficacy and toxicity associated with the use of this compound, largely attributable to differences between individuals in their ability to metabolize and eliminate docetaxel. Regarding the latter, the ATP-binding cassette transporter B1 (ABCB1, PGP, MDR1) is primarily responsible for docetaxel elimination. To further understand the role of ABCB1 in the biodistribution of docetaxel in mice, we utilized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling that included ABCB1-mediated transport in relevant tissues. Transporter function was evaluated by studying docetaxel pharmacokinetics in wild-type FVB and Mdr1a/b constitutive knockout (KO) mice and incorporating this concentration–time data into a PBPK model comprised of eight tissue compartments (plasma, brain, heart, lung, kidney, intestine, liver and slowly perfused tissues) and, in addition to ABCB1-mediated transport, included intravenous drug administration, specific binding to intracellular tubulin, intestinal and hepatic metabolism, glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. For all tissues in both the FVB and KO cohorts, the PBPK model simulations closely mirrored the observed data. Furthermore, both models predicted AUC values that were with 15 % of the observed AUC values, indicating that our model-simulated drug exposures accurately reflected the observed tissue exposures. Overall, our PBPK model furthers the understanding of the role of ABCB1 in the biodistribution of docetaxel. Additionally, this exemplary model structure can be applied to investigate the pharmacokinetics of other ABCB1 transporter substrates. PMID:23616082

  7. Near-Infrared Monitoring of Model Chronic Compartment Syndrome In Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Breit, G. A.; Gross, J. H.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Chance, B.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic compartment syndrome (CCS) is characterized by muscle ischemia, usually in the anterior oompartment of the leg, caused by high intramuscular pressure during exercise. Dual-wave near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is an optical technique that allows noninvasive tracking of variations in muscle tissue oxygenation (Chance et al., 1988). We hypothesized that with a model CCS, muscle tissue oxygenation will show a greater decline during exercise and a slower recovery post-exercise than under normal conditions.

  8. Preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Susan Ritger; Amin, Shantu G.; Anderson, Kim A.; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Sharma, Arun K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Williams, David E.; Corley, Richard A.

    2011-12-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants generated as byproducts of natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. Despite significant public health concern, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling efforts for PAHs have so far been limited to naphthalene, plus simpler PK models for pyrene, nitropyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The dearth of published models is due in part to the high lipophilicity, low volatility, and myriad metabolic pathways for PAHs, all of which present analytical and experimental challenges. Our research efforts have focused upon experimental approaches and initial development of PBPK models for the prototypic PAH, B[a]P, and the more potent, albeit less studied transplacental carcinogen, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). For both compounds, model compartments included arterial and venous blood, flow limited lung, liver, richly perfused and poorly perfused tissues, diffusion limited fat, and a two compartment theoretical gut (for oral exposures). Hepatic and pulmonary metabolism was described for both compounds, as were fractional binding in blood and fecal clearance. Partition coefficients for parent PAH along with their diol and tetraol metabolites were estimated using published algorithms and verified experimentally for the hydroxylated metabolites. The preliminary PBPK models were able to describe many, but not all, of the available data sets, comprising multiple routes of exposure (oral, intravenous) and nominal doses spanning several orders of magnitude. Supported by Award Number P42 ES016465 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present PBPK models for benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B[a]P model accurately predicts data from multiple sources over a wide dose range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DBC model was based on the B[a]P model as less chemical specific

  9. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-03-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants.

  10. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants. PMID:27009902

  11. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants. PMID:27009902

  12. The biological effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy based on a whole-body pharmacokinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Tomé, Wolfgang; Weichert, Jamey P.; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Biologically effective dose (BED) may be more of a relevant quantity than absorbed dose for establishing tumour response relationships. By taking into account the dose rate and tissue-specific parameters such as repair and radiosensitivity, it is possible to compare the relative biological effects of different targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) agents. The aim of this work was to develop an analytical tumour BED calculation for TRT that could predict a relative biological effect based on normal body and tumour pharmacokinetics. This work represents a step in the direction of establishing relative pharmacokinetic criteria of when the BED formalism is more applicable than absorbed dose for TRT. A previously established pharmacokinetic (PK) model for TRT was used and adapted into the BED formalism. An analytical equation for the protraction factor, which incorporates dose rate and repair rate, was derived. Dose rates within the normal body and tumour were related to the slopes of their time-activity curves which were determined by the ratios of their respective PK parameters. The relationships between the tumour influx-to-efflux ratio (k34:k43), central compartment efflux-to-influx ratio (k12:k21), central elimination (kel), and tumour repair rate (μ), and tumour BED were investigated. As the k34:k43 ratio increases and the k12:k21 ratio decreases, the difference between tumour BED and D increases. In contrast, as the k34:k43 ratios decrease and the k12:k21 ratios increase, the tumour BED approaches D. At large k34:k43 ratios, the difference between tumour BED and D increases to a maximum as kel increases. At small k34:k43 ratios, the tumour BED approaches D at very small kel. At small μ and small k34:k43 ratios, the tumour BED approaches D. For large k34:k43 ratios, large μ values cause tumour BED to approach D. This work represents a step in the direction of establishing relative PK criteria of when the BED formalism is more applicable than absorbed dose for TRT

  13. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and its Metabolite Triandimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Pharmacokinetic data for par...

  14. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL TO ESTIMATE ABSORBED CARBARYL DOSE IN CHILDREN AFTER TURF APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to investigate exposure scenarios of children to carbaryl following turf application. Physiological, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters describing the fate and effects of carbaryl in rats were scaled ...

  15. Rabbit as an animal model for intravitreal pharmacokinetics: Clinical predictability and quality of the published data.

    PubMed

    Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2015-08-01

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice in drug delivery to the retina and/or choroid. Rabbit is the most commonly used animal species in intravitreal pharmacokinetics, but it has been criticized as being a poor model of human eye. The critique is based on some anatomical differences, properties of the vitreous humor, and observed differences in drug concentrations in the anterior chamber after intravitreal injections. We have systematically analyzed all published information on intravitreal pharmacokinetics in the rabbit and human eye. The analysis revealed major problems in the design of the pharmacokinetic studies. In this review we provide advice for study design. Overall, the pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution, half-life) in the human and rabbit eye have good correlation and comparable absolute values. Therefore, reliable rabbit-to-man translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics should be feasible. The relevant anatomical and physiological parameters in rabbit and man show only small differences. Furthermore, the claimed discrepancy between drug concentrations in the human and rabbit aqueous humor is not supported by the data analysis. Based on the available and properly conducted pharmacokinetic studies, the differences in the vitreous structure in rabbits and human patients do not lead to significant pharmacokinetic differences. This review is the first step towards inter-species translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics. More information is still needed to dissect the roles of drug delivery systems, disease states, age and ocular manipulation on the intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbit and man. Anyway, the published data and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the rabbit is a useful animal model in intravitreal pharmacokinetics.

  16. A mechanism-based model for the population pharmacokinetics of free and bound aflibercept in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Hoai-Thu; Veyrat-Follet, Christine; Vivier, Nicole; Dubruc, Catherine; Sanderink, Gerard; Mentré, France; Comets, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    AIM Aflibercept (VEGF-Trap), a novel anti-angiogenic agent that binds to VEGF, has been investigated for the treatment of cancer. The aim of this study was to develop a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic (PK) model for aflibercept to characterize its binding to VEGF and its PK properties in healthy subjects. METHODS Data from two phase I clinical studies with aflibercept administered as a single intravenous infusion were included in the analysis. Free and bound aflibercept concentration−time data were analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modelling approach with MONOLIX 3.1. RESULTS The best structural model involved two compartments for free aflibercept and one for bound aflibercept, with a Michaelis–Menten type binding of free aflibercept to VEGF from the peripheral compartment. The typical estimated clearances for free and bound aflibercept were 0.88 l day−1 and 0.14 l day−1, respectively. The central volume of distribution of free aflibercept was 4.94 l. The maximum binding capacity was 0.99 mg day−1 and the concentration of aflibercept corresponding to half of maximum binding capacity was 2.91 µg ml−1. Interindividual variability of model parameters was moderate, ranging from 13.6% (Vmax) to 49.8% (Q). CONCLUSION The present PK model for aflibercept adequately characterizes the underlying mechanism of disposition of aflibercept and its nonlinear binding to VEGF. PMID:21575034

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling using microsoft excel and visual basic for applications.

    PubMed

    Marino, Dale J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are mathematical descriptions depicting the relationship between external exposure and internal dose. These models have found great utility for interspecies extrapolation. However, specialized computer software packages, which are not widely distributed, have typically been used for model development and utilization. A few physiological models have been reported using more widely available software packages (e.g., Microsoft Excel), but these tend to include less complex processes and dose metrics. To ascertain the capability of Microsoft Excel and Visual Basis for Applications (VBA) for PBPK modeling, models for styrene, vinyl chloride, and methylene chloride were coded in Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL), Excel, and VBA, and simulation results were compared. For styrene, differences between ACSL and Excel or VBA compartment concentrations and rates of change were less than +/-7.5E-10 using the same numerical integration technique and time step. Differences using VBA fixed step or ACSL Gear's methods were generally <1.00E-03, although larger differences involving very small values were noted after exposure transitions. For vinyl chloride and methylene chloride, Excel and VBA PBPK model dose metrics differed by no more than -0.013% or -0.23%, respectively, from ACSL results. These differences are likely attributable to different step sizes rather than different numerical integration techniques. These results indicate that Microsoft Excel and VBA can be useful tools for utilizing PBPK models, and given the availability of these software programs, it is hoped that this effort will help facilitate the use and investigation of PBPK modeling.

  18. A pharmacokinetic model of the intracellular dosimetry of inhaled nickel.

    PubMed

    Hack, C Eric; Covington, Tammie R; Lawrence, Greg; Shipp, Annette M; Gentry, Robinan; Yager, Janice; Clewell, Harvey J

    2007-03-01

    The potential associations between exposure to nickel compounds and cancer have been evaluated in both animal and epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed workers. The results of the epidemiological studies suggest that not all nickel compounds are equally carcinogenic, an observation supported by the animal bioassay results. Given the complexity and the differences in the modes of uptake of different forms of nickel by cells and the subsequent delivery of nickel to the nucleus, it would be expected that some forms of nickel would be more potent than others. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model would be useful in estimating the cellular exposure to nickel resulting from inhalation of the different forms of nickel. To this end, a preliminary model of a tracheobronchial epithelial cell was developed to describe the differences in the extracellular and intracellular kinetics of the different classes of nickel compounds. Data available in the published literature were used to define the initial model parameters. The resulting cellular dosimetry model was able to describe kinetic data on three forms of nickel (soluble chloride and insoluble sulfide and subsulfide). This preliminary model development effort has identified critical data gaps that could be filled by additional research. The ultimate goal will be to integrate a refined cellular dosimetry model with published lung deposition/clearance and systemic distribution/clearance models for nickel. The use of such an integrated PBPK model would allow for more biologically based risk estimates for the inhalation of the different nickel compounds, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  19. Glucosamine sulfate effect on the degenerated patellar cartilage: preliminary findings by pharmacokinetic magnetic resonance modeling.

    PubMed

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Rodrigo, José Luis; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Carot, José Miguel

    2009-06-01

    Normal and degenerated cartilages have different magnetic resonance (MR) capillary permeability (K(trans)) and interstitial interchangeable volume (v(e)). Our hypothesis was that glucosamine sulfate treatment modifies these neovascularity abnormalities in osteoarthritis. Sixteen patients with patella degeneration, randomly distributed into glucosamine or control groups, underwent two 1.5-Tesla dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (treatment initiation and after 6 months). The pain visual analog scale (VAS) and American Knee Society (AKS) score were used. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used. Percentages of variations (postreatment-pretreatment/pretreatment) were compared (t-test for independent data). In the glucosamine group, pain and functional outcomes statistically improved (VAS: 7.3 +/- 1.1 to 3.6 +/- 1.3, p < 0.001; AKS: 18.6 +/- 6.9 to 42.9 +/- 2.7, p < 0.01). Glucosamine significantly increased K(trans) at 6 months (-54.4 +/- 21.2% vs 126.7 +/- 56.9%, p < 0.001, control vs glucosamine). In conclusion, glucosamine sulfate decreases pain while improving functional outcome in patients with cartilage degeneration. Glucosamine sulfate increases K(trans), allowing its proposal as a surrogate imaging biomarker after 6 months of treatment. PMID:19214525

  20. Reconstructing Exposures from Biomarkers using Exposure-Pharmacokinetic Modeling - A Case Study with Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for a short half-life chemical, carbaryl, were characterized using the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), an exposure model, and a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CARES was...

  1. USE OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS TO ASSESS OCCUPATIONAL AND RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urinary biomarker measurements were analyzed using a dynamic pharmacokinetic model. The dynamic model provided the structure to link spot urine samples with corresponding exposure and absorbed dose. Data from both occupational and residential studies were analyzed. In the Agri...

  2. Multi-Compartment T2 Relaxometry Using a Spatially Constrained Multi-Gaussian Model

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Ashish; Pandya, Sneha; Shen, Xiaobo; LoCastro, Eve; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Gauthier, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The brain’s myelin content can be mapped by T2-relaxometry, which resolves multiple differentially relaxing T2 pools from multi-echo MRI. Unfortunately, the conventional fitting procedure is a hard and numerically ill-posed problem. Consequently, the T2 distributions and myelin maps become very sensitive to noise and are frequently difficult to interpret diagnostically. Although regularization can improve stability, it is generally not adequate, particularly at relatively low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of around 100–200. The purpose of this study was to obtain a fitting algorithm which is able to overcome these difficulties and generate usable myelin maps from noisy acquisitions in a realistic scan time. To this end, we restrict the T2 distribution to only 3 distinct resolvable tissue compartments, modeled as Gaussians: myelin water, intra/extra-cellular water and a slow relaxing cerebrospinal fluid compartment. We also impose spatial smoothness expectation that volume fractions and T2 relaxation times of tissue compartments change smoothly within coherent brain regions. The method greatly improves robustness to noise, reduces spatial variations, improves definition of white matter fibers, and enhances detection of demyelinating lesions. Due to efficient design, the additional spatial aspect does not cause an increase in processing time. The proposed method was applied to fast spiral acquisitions on which conventional fitting gives uninterpretable results. While these fast acquisitions suffer from noise and inhomogeneity artifacts, our preliminary results indicate the potential of spatially constrained 3-pool T2 relaxometry. PMID:24896833

  3. Differential pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling of robenacoxib and ketoprofen in a feline model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pelligand, L; King, J N; Hormazabal, V; Toutain, P L; Elliott, J; Lees, P

    2014-08-01

    Robenacoxib and ketoprofen are acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Both are licensed for once daily administration in the cat, despite having short blood half-lives. This study reports the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling of each drug in a feline model of inflammation. Eight cats were enrolled in a randomized, controlled, three-period cross-over study. In each period, sterile inflammation was induced by the injection of carrageenan into a subcutaneously implanted tissue cage, immediately before the subcutaneous injection of robenacoxib (2 mg/kg), ketoprofen (2 mg/kg) or placebo. Blood samples were taken for the determination of drug and serum thromboxane (Tx)B2 concentrations (measuring COX-1 activity). Tissue cage exudate samples were obtained for drug and prostaglandin (PG)E2 concentrations (measuring COX-2 activity). Individual animal pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition were generated by PK/PD modelling. S(+) ketoprofen clearance scaled by bioavailability (CL/F) was 0.114 L/kg/h (elimination half-life = 1.62 h). For robenacoxib, blood CL/F was 0.684 L/kg/h (elimination half-life = 1.13 h). Exudate elimination half-lives were 25.9 and 41.5 h for S(+) ketoprofen and robenacoxib, respectively. Both drugs reduced exudate PGE2 concentration significantly between 6 and 36 h. Ketoprofen significantly suppressed (>97%) serum TxB2 between 4 min and 24 h, whereas suppression was mild and transient with robenacoxib. In vivo IC50 COX-1/IC50 COX-2 ratios were 66.9:1 for robenacoxib and 1:107 for S(+) ketoprofen. The carboxylic acid nature of both drugs may contribute to the prolonged COX-2 inhibition in exudate, despite short half-lives in blood.

  4. Modeling pO(2) distributions in the bone marrow hematopoietic compartment. I. Krogh's model.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, D C; Wenning, L A; Miller, W M; Papoutsakis, E T

    2001-01-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) is a tissue of complex architectural organization, which includes granulopoietic loci, erythroblastic islets, and lymphocytic nodules. Oxygen tension (pO(2)) is an important determinant of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Thus, understanding the impact of the BM architectural organization on pO(2) levels in extravascular hematopoietic tissue is an important biophysical problem. However, currently it is impossible to measure pO(2) levels and their spatial variations in the BM. Homogeneous Kroghian models were used to estimate pO(2) distribution in the BM hematopoietic compartment (BMHC) and to conservatively simulate pO(2)-limited cellular architectures. Based on biophysical data of hematopoietic cells and characteristics of BM physiology, we constructed a tissue cylinder solely occupied by granulocytic progenitors (the most metabolically active stage of the most abundant cell type) to provide a physiologically relevant limiting case. Although the number of possible cellular architectures is large, all simulated pO(2) profiles fall between two extreme cases: those of homogeneous tissues with adipocytes and granulocytic progenitors, respectively. This was illustrated by results obtained from a parametric criterion derived for pO(2) depletion in the extravascular tissue. Modeling results suggest that stem and progenitor cells experience a low pO(2) environment in the BMHC. PMID:11463616

  5. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models in chemical risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Moiz; Fisher, Jeffrey; Blount, Benjamin; Ruiz, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting "in silico" tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application-health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The "human PBPK model toolkit" is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:22523493

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling of trichloroethylene and trichloroacetic acid in humans.

    PubMed

    Allen, B C; Fisher, J W

    1993-02-01

    The development and application of appropriate physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of chemical contaminants will provide a rational basis for risk assessment extrapolation. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread contaminant found in soil, groundwater, and the atmosphere. Exposures to TCE and its metabolites have been found to be carcinogenic in rodents. In this study, a PBPK model for TCE and its major metabolite, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), is developed for humans. The model parameters, estimated from the relevant published literature on human exposures to TCE and its metabolites, are described. Key parameters describing the metabolism of TCE and the kinetics of TCA were estimated by optimization. The optimization was accomplished by simultaneously matching model predictions to observations of TCE concentrations in blood and exhaled breath, TCA plasma concentrations, and urinary TCA excretion from five published studies. The optimized human PBPK model provides an excellent description of TCE and TCA kinetics. The predictions were especially good for TCA plasma concentrations following repeated TCE inhalation, an exposure scenario similar to that occurring in the workplace. The human PBPK model can be used to estimate dose metrics resulting from TCE exposures and is therefore useful when considering the estimation of human health risks associated with such exposures.

  7. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models in Chemical Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Moiz; Fisher, Jeffrey; Blount, Benjamin; Ruiz, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting “in silico” tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application—health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The “human PBPK model toolkit” is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:22523493

  8. Simultaneous pharmacokinetic modeling of cocaine and its metabolites, norcocaine and benzoylecgonine, after intravenous and oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Lau, C E

    2001-09-01

    To accurately assess the mechanism of involvement of the active metabolite norcocaine in the effects of oral cocaine, it is essential to determine the rate and extent of the formation of norcocaine. Although this study was designed specifically for this aim, it was also of interest to characterize the metabolite kinetics of benzoylecgonine for comparative purpose. We first characterized the pharmacokinetics of cocaine, norcocaine, and benzoylecgonine by the i.v. route of administration; all three drugs decayed biexponentially. These pharmacokinetic estimates were then used for determination of the formation of norcocaine and benzoylecgonine after i.v. and p.o. (20-40 mg/kg) cocaine administration. Although t(1/2alpha), and t(1/2beta) were similar across the three compounds, the values of volume of distribution in the central compartment and clearance for benzoylecgonine were much smaller than those of cocaine and norcocaine. Norcocaine was not detected following i.v. cocaine; however, serum norcocaine concentrations were as high as those of oral cocaine. Both routes of cocaine administration produced benzoylecgonine. A pharmacokinetic model for the metabolite kinetics was proposed by sequentially adding the models that most adequately described the formation of each metabolite to the model of cocaine. For oral cocaine, the absolute bioavailability was 3.48%, whereas 6.04 and 2.26% of cocaine were converted to benzoylecgonine and norcocaine, respectively, during first-pass absorption regardless of dose. Furthermore, the majority of norcocaine and 92% of benzoylecgonine were formed during the first-pass absorption, leaving 8% of benzoylecgonine produced in systemic circulation. The profile of norcocaine as a metabolite confirmed the involvement of norcocaine in cocaine's behavioral effects.

  9. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for the antibiotic ertapenem.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Michele L; Manning, Cammey C; Forbes, Whitney; Maiden, Michelle; Nikas, Ariel N

    2016-02-01

    Ertapenem is an antibiotic commonly used to treat a broad spectrum of infections, which is part of a broader class of antibiotics called carbapenem. Unlike other carbapenems, ertapenem has a longer half-life and thus only has to be administered once a day. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to investigate the uptake, distribution, and elimination of ertapenem following a single one gram dose. PBPK modeling incorporates known physiological parameters such as body weight, organ volumes, and blood flow rates in particular tissues. Furthermore, ertapenem is highly bound in human blood plasma; therefore, nonlinear binding is incorporated in the model since only the free portion of the drug can saturate tissues and, hence, is the only portion of the drug considered to be medicinally effective. Parameters in the model were estimated using a least squares inverse problem formulation with published data for blood concentrations of ertapenem for normal height, normal weight males. Finally, an uncertainty analysis of the parameter estimation and model predictions is presented. PMID:26776257

  10. In Vitro Dissolution and In Vivo Bioavailability of Six Brands of Ciprofloxacin Tablets Administered in Rabbits and Their Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the in vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of six brands of ciprofloxacin oral tablets available in the UAE market using rabbits. The in vitro dissolution profiles of the six ciprofloxacin products were determined using the USP dissolution paddle method. Pharmacokinetic modeling using compartmental and noncompartmental analysis was done to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of ciprofloxacin after single-dose oral administration. In vitro release study revealed that the amount of ciprofloxacin released in 20 minutes was not less than 80% of the labeled amount which is in accordance with the pharmacopoeial requirements. All tested products are considered to be very rapid dissolving except for formulae A and D. Ciprofloxacin plasma concentration in rabbits was best fitted to a two-compartment open model. The lowest bioavailability was determined to be for product A (93.24%) while the highest bioavailability was determined to be for product E (108.01%). Postmarketing surveillance is very crucial to ensure product quality and eliminating substandard products to be distributed and, consequently, ensure better patient clinical outcome. The tested ciprofloxacin generic products distributed in the UAE market were proven to be of good quality and could be used interchangeably with the branded ciprofloxacin product. PMID:24995312

  11. Development of good modelling practice for phsiologically based pharmacokinetic models for use in risk assessment: The first steps

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing use of tissue dosimetry estimated using pharmacokinetic models in chemical risk assessments in multiple countries necessitates the need to develop internationally recognized good modelling practices. These practices would facilitate sharing of models and model eva...

  12. Two compartment model of diazepam biotransformation in an organotypical culture of primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Acikgoez, Ali; Karim, Najibulla; Giri, Shibashish; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-01-15

    Drug biotransformation is one of the most important parameters of preclinical screening tests for the registration of new drug candidates. Conventional existing tests rely on nonhuman models which deliver an incomplete metabolic profile of drugs due to the lack of proper CYP450 expression as seen in human liver in vivo. In order to overcome this limitation, we used an organotypical model of human primary hepatocytes for the biotransformation of the drug diazepam with special reference to metabolites in both the cell matrix phase and supernatant and its interaction of three inducers (phenobarbital, dexamethasone, aroclor 1254) in different time responses (1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h). Phenobarbital showed the strongest inducing effect in generating desmethyldiazepam and induced up to a 150 fold increase in oxazepam-content which correlates with the increased availability of the precursor metabolites (temazepam and desmethyldiazepam). Aroclor 1254 and dexamethasone had the strongest inducing effect on temazepam and the second strongest on oxazepam. The strong and overlapping inductive role of phenobarbital strengthens the participation of CYP2B6 and CYP3A in diazepam N-demethylation and CYP3A in temazepam formation. Aroclor 1254 preferentially generated temazepam due to the interaction with CYP3A and potentially CYP2C19. In parallel we represented these data in the form of a mathematical model with two compartments explaining the dynamics of diazepam metabolism with the effect of these other inducers in human primary hepatocytes. The model consists of ten differential equations, with one for each concentration c{sub i,j} (i = diazepam, temazepam, desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam, other metabolites) and one for each compartment (j = cell matrix phase, supernatant), respectively. The parameters p{sub k} (k = 1, 2, 3, 4, 13) are rate constants describing the biotransformation of diazepam and its metabolites and the other parameters (k = 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15) explain the

  13. A Multi-Compartment 3-D Finite Element Model of Rectocele and Its Interaction with Cystocele

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as POP-Q point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  14. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  15. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  16. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of arsenic in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Gentry, P Robinan; Covington, Tammie R; Mann, Sabine; Shipp, Annette M; Yager, Janice W; Clewell, Harvey J

    2004-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the carcinogenicity of inorganic arsenic is that while human exposures to high concentrations of inorganic arsenic in drinking water are associated with increases in skin, lung, and bladder cancer, inorganic arsenic has not typically caused tumors in standard laboratory animal test protocols. Inorganic arsenic administered for periods of up to 2 yr to various strains of laboratory mice, including the Swiss CD-1, Swiss CR:NIH(S), C57Bl/6p53(+/-), and C57Bl/6p53(+/+), has not resulted in significant increases in tumor incidence. However, Ng et al. (1999) have reported a 40% tumor incidence in C57Bl/6J mice exposed to arsenic in their drinking water throughout their lifetime, with no tumors reported in controls. In order to investigate the potential role of tissue dosimetry in differential susceptibility to arsenic carcinogenicity, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inorganic arsenic in the rat, hamster, monkey, and human (Mann et al., 1996a, 1996b) was extended to describe the kinetics in the mouse. The PBPK model was parameterized in the mouse using published data from acute exposures of B6C3F1 mice to arsenate, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and validated using data from acute exposures of C57Black mice. Predictions of the acute model were then compared with data from chronic exposures. There was no evidence of changes in the apparent volume of distribution or in the tissue-plasma concentration ratios between acute and chronic exposure that might support the possibility of inducible arsenite efflux. The PBPK model was also used to project tissue dosimetry in the C57Bl/6J study, in comparison with tissue levels in studies having shorter duration but higher arsenic treatment concentrations. The model evaluation indicates that pharmacokinetic factors do not provide an explanation for the difference in outcomes across the various mouse bioassays. Other possible explanations may relate

  17. Lifetime pharmacokinetic model for hydrophobic contaminants in marine mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; Mackay, D.; Koning, J. de

    1999-11-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model is developed that describes the uptake and release of a hydrophobic organic chemical by a marine mammal over its entire lifetime, i.e., from birth to death. This model is applied to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The processes treated are growth; uptake from food, milk, and air; disposition of the chemical among arterial and venous blood, liver, muscle, blubber, and rapidly perfused tissues; and losses by metabolism, release in exhaled air; and by egestion. A separate model is developed for females, which includes pregnancy, birth, and lactation. Food consumption is deduced from size, growth, and from activity-dependent bioenergetic data. The results obtained by simulating continuous PCB exposure over a 30-year period are in accordance with reported concentrations and show the importance of milk transfer to both mother and progeny and the tendency for continued accumulation over the animal's lifetime. Implications of the results are discussed, especially the need for improved data on diets, gut absorption characteristics, and various physiological parameters used in the model.

  18. A simple pharmacokinetic model linking plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts.

    PubMed

    Mariano, R N; Turino, L N; Cabrera, M I; Scándolo, D E; Maciel, M G; Grau, R J A

    2010-10-01

    On the basis of pharmacokinetic modeling, this study provides some insights into predicting in vivo plasma progesterone concentrations when using bovine intravaginal inserts for systemic progesterone delivery. More significantly, this contribution is the first attempt to build a simple pharmacokinetic model that links plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts. After evaluating three rival pharmacokinetic models and considering some phenomena involved in the intravaginal administration of progesterone, a primary pharmacokinetic model having a good data fitting capability with only two adjustable parameters is proposed to the above mentioned task. Kinetic parameters are given for lactating Holstein dairy cows with two levels of daily milk yields; and non-pregnant, non-lactating Holstein-Friesian cattle. Model predictions indicate the occurrence of a preferential distribution of the intravaginally administered progesterone dose through a first uterine pass effect.

  19. Mathematical analysis of steady-state solutions in compartment and continuum models of cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhenzhen; Chou, Ching-Shan; Yi, Tau-Mu; Nie, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Cell polarization, in which substances previously uniformly distributed become asymmetric due to external or/and internal stimulation, is a fundamental process underlying cell mobility, cell division, and other polarized functions. The yeast cell S. cerevisiae has been a model system to study cell polarization. During mating, yeast cells sense shallow external spatial gradients and respond by creating steeper internal gradients of protein aligned with the external cue. The complex spatial dynamics during yeast mating polarization consists of positive feedback, degradation, global negative feedback control, and cooperative effects in protein synthesis. Understanding such complex regulations and interactions is critical to studying many important characteristics in cell polarization including signal amplification, tracking dynamic signals, and potential trade-off between achieving both objectives in a robust fashion. In this paper, we study some of these questions by analyzing several models with different spatial complexity: two compartments, three compartments, and continuum in space. The step-wise approach allows detailed characterization of properties of the steady state of the system, providing more insights for biological regulations during cell polarization. For cases without membrane diffusion, our study reveals that increasing the number of spatial compartments results in an increase in the number of steady-state solutions, in particular, the number of stable steady-state solutions, with the continuum models possessing infinitely many steady-state solutions. Through both analysis and simulations, we find that stronger positive feedback, reduced diffusion, and a shallower ligand gradient all result in more steady-state solutions, although most of these are not optimally aligned with the gradient. We explore in the different settings the relationship between the number of steady-state solutions and the extent and accuracy of the polarization. Taken together

  20. Pharmacokinetic modeling of the sinusoidal efflux of anionic ligands from the isolated perfused rat liver: the influence of albumin.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Nijssen, H M; Strating, C B; Meijer, D K; Groothuis, G M

    1993-08-01

    This study contains a pharmacokinetic analysis on the efflux of organic anions from the liver into the bloodstream (sinusoidal efflux) with specific reference to the influence of albumin. The net sinusoidal efflux rate of dibromosulfophthalein (DBSP) from preloaded livers, being the resultant of sinusoidal efflux and reuptake of ligand by hepatocytes downstream the sinusoid, can be strongly increased by the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein having multiple binding sites for DBSP. We previously attributed this effect to a reduction of reuptake through extracellular binding of the organic anion to the protein, rather than to an intrinsic stimulatory effect on the actual membrane transport process from the cells. In the present study we tested this hypothesis using a pharmacokinetic multicompartment liver model. This model resembles the parallel tube model in that the liver is described by several compartments placed in series instead of a single well-stirred compartment and it takes into account rates of dissociation and association in binding to proteins in the sinusoidal space. The model parameters were fitted from the sinusoidal efflux and biliary excretion data from efflux experiments measuring the stimulatory effect of various concentrations of BSA. Equilibrium binding of DBSP to albumin as well as the dissociation rate constant (koff) were determined in vitro with rapid filtration techniques. The experimental data could not be fitted satisfactorily when using the experimentally obtained values of the protein association and dissociation rate constants (kon and koff). However, they could be simulated accurately assuming 16 times higher values for the association and dissociation rate constant compared to those determined in vitro. Time constants of the perfusate flow, liver (re)uptake, and protein association and dissociation indicate that binding equilibrium does not exist within the sinusoids and that, in particular at low protein

  1. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  2. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  3. High Throughput pharmacokinetic modeling using computationally predicted parameter values: dissociation constants (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the ionization association and dissociation constant (pKa) are vital to modeling the pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals in vivo. Methodologies for the prediction of compound sequestration in specific tissues using partition coefficients require a parameter that ch...

  4. A Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic Model for Liver Transporter Substrates Under Liver Cirrhosis Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, R; Barton, HA; Maurer, TS

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a disease characterized by the loss of functional liver mass. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to interpret and predict how the interplay among physiological changes in cirrhosis affects pharmacokinetics. However, previous PBPK models under cirrhotic conditions were developed for permeable cytochrome P450 substrates and do not directly apply to substrates of liver transporters. This study characterizes a PBPK model for liver transporter substrates in relation to the severity of liver cirrhosis. A published PBPK model structure for liver transporter substrates under healthy conditions and the physiological changes for cirrhosis are combined to simulate pharmacokinetics of liver transporter substrates in patients with mild and moderate cirrhosis. The simulated pharmacokinetics under liver cirrhosis reasonably approximate observations. This analysis includes meta-analysis to obtain system-dependent parameters in cirrhosis patients and a top-down approach to improve understanding of the effect of cirrhosis on transporter-mediated drug disposition under cirrhotic conditions. PMID:26225262

  5. Multicompartment, numerical model of cellular events in the pharmacokinetics of gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Ledley, T S; Ledley, F D

    1994-06-01

    DNA expression vectors may be administered to patients like conventional medicines to have a finite and controlled duration of action. The clinical application of these medicines will require a precise understanding of the kinetics of the administered gene, the mRNA transcript, and the gene product. The apparent kinetic properties of the therapeutic gene product, including the level and duration of action, will be determined by various intrinsic kinetic processes including: (i) distribution and biological fate of the DNA expression vector; (ii) rates of DNA uptake into cells and dynamics of intracellular trafficking; (iii) half-life of the DNA vector in the cell; (iv) transcription rate; (v) half-life of mRNA; (vi) translation rate; and (vii) post-translational processing, distribution, and fate of the gene product. To consider in a theoretical manner how the intrinsic kinetics of cellular processes may affect the apparent level of a therapeutic gene product over time, we have constructed a multicompartment, numerical model. The model has six compartments, designated MILIEU, ENDOSOME, CELL, RNA, PROTEIN, and PRODUCT. The apparent level and kinetics of the gene product over time are calculated with different values for the intrinsic t1/2 of DNA in the MILIEU, ENDOSOME, and CELL; the intrinsic t1/2 of mRNA; the intrinsic t1/2 of the gene product; endosomal stability; and transcription rate. The model demonstrates how first-order kinetics can result from the summation of complex kinetic processes and provides a theoretical basis for future pharmacokinetic studies. This theoretical model illustrates how the half-lives of DNA, RNA, and gene product each affect the level of the product and highlights strategies for enhancing the therapeutic profile of gene therapies. PMID:7948130

  6. Development of a multicompartmental, multiple cell type bioreactor and corresponding pharmacokinetic model for naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, L.M.

    1993-12-31

    The impracticality of large scale animal testing of compounds has spurred development of in vitro testing methods and the development of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. A weakness of previous work in these areas is that tissue interactions occurring in vivo are not reproduced. Through computer modeling of reactive systems and development of a multicompartmental, multiple cell type bioreactor these limitations can be overcome. These approaches were used to study naphthalene toxicology. In the PBPK developed for naphthalene, tissue interactions result from a mathematical description of the biotransformation of naphthalene and naphthalene oxide in the lung and liver and circulation of the semi-stable naphthalene oxide throughout the body. This model is believed to be the first describing both parent compound and metabolite with complete PBPKs. The model successfully simulates the in vivo work done with naphthalene. A weakness of PBPKs is that a large number of parameters must be determined. To overcome this limitation, a cell culture analog (CCA) of a PBPK was developed. The CCA contains multiple chambers, each of which represents a tissue or group of similar tissues. Since the lung and liver are important in naphthalene toxicology, a prototype with cells derived from these tissues was constructed. The system was deemed suitable for measuring commonly used indicators of in vitro toxicity. The prototype system was modified to minimize naphthalene sorption by the materials of construction. This system was used in conjunction with cultured H4IIE rat hepatoma cells and L2 rat lung cells to study the importance of circulated naphthalene metabolites (naphthalene oxides) on lung cell toxicity in rodents. By increasing the number of cells and/or inducing cytochrome P450 activity in the liver compartment, lung cell mortality was increased. Glutathione depletion in the lung and liver cells was also observed.

  7. Programming of a flexible computer simulation to visualize pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, J; Kobal, G; Geisslinger, G

    2004-01-01

    Teaching pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models can be made more effective using computer simulations. We propose the programming of educational PK or PK/PD computer simulations as an alternative to the use of pre-built simulation software. This approach has the advantage of adaptability to non-standard or complicated PK or PK/PD models. Simplicity of the programming procedure was achieved by selecting the LabVIEW programming environment. An intuitive user interface to visualize the time courses of drug concentrations or effects can be obtained with pre-built elements. The environment uses a wiring analogy that resembles electrical circuit diagrams rather than abstract programming code. The goal of high interactivity of the simulation was attained by allowing the program to run in continuously repeating loops. This makes the program behave flexibly to the user input. The programming is described with the aid of a 2-compartment PK simulation. Examples of more sophisticated simulation programs are also given where the PK/PD simulation shows drug input, concentrations in plasma, and at effect site and the effects themselves as a function of time. A multi-compartmental model of morphine, including metabolite kinetics and effects is also included. The programs are available for download from the World Wide Web at http:// www. klinik.uni-frankfurt.de/zpharm/klin/ PKPDsimulation/content.html. For pharmacokineticists who only program occasionally, there is the possibility of building the computer simulation, together with the flexible interactive simulation algorithm for clinical pharmacological teaching in the field of PK/PD models.

  8. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for atrazine and its main metabolites in the adult male C57BL/6 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2011-02-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide that is widely used and relatively persistent in the environment. In laboratory rodents, excessive exposure to ATR is detrimental to the reproductive, immune, and nervous systems. To better understand the toxicokinetics of ATR and to fill the need for a mouse model, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for ATR and its main chlorotriazine metabolites (Cl-TRIs) desethyl atrazine (DE), desisopropyl atrazine (DIP), and didealkyl atrazine (DACT) was developed for the adult male C57BL/6 mouse. Taking advantage of all relevant and recently made available mouse-specific data, a flow-limited PBPK model was constructed. The ATR and DACT sub-models included blood, brain, liver, kidney, richly and slowly perfused tissue compartments, as well as plasma protein binding and red blood cell binding, whereas the DE and DIP sub-models were constructed as simple five-compartment models. The model adequately simulated plasma levels of ATR and Cl-TRIs and urinary dosimetry of Cl-TRIs at four single oral dose levels (250, 125, 25, and 5 mg/kg). Additionally, the model adequately described the dose dependency of brain and liver ATR and DACT concentrations. Cumulative urinary DACT amounts were accurately predicted across a wide dose range, suggesting the model's potential use for extrapolation to human exposures by performing reverse dosimetry. The model was validated using previously reported data for plasma ATR and DACT in mice and rats. Overall, besides being the first mouse PBPK model for ATR and its Cl-TRIs, this model, by analogy, provides insights into tissue dosimetry for rats. The model could be used in tissue dosimetry prediction and as an aid in the exposure assessment to this widely used herbicide.

  9. 76 FR 10476 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead Crew-Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... OCR compartment will contain six private berths, an emergency hatch that opens directly into the main... doors and hatches to the OCR compartment must be simple and obvious. The OFCR compartment doors and hatches must be able to be closed from the main passenger cabin. Doors or hatches that separate...

  10. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials.

  11. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Pediatric Oncology Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Rioux, Nathalie; Waters, Nigel J

    2016-07-01

    Childhood cancer represents more than 100 rare and ultra-rare diseases, with an estimated 12,400 new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. As such, this much smaller patient population has led to pediatric oncology drug development lagging behind that for adult cancers. Developing drugs for pediatric malignancies also brings with it a number of unique trial design considerations, including flexible enrollment approaches, age-appropriate formulation, acceptable sampling schedules, and balancing the need for age-stratified dosing regimens, given the smaller patient populations. The regulatory landscape for pediatric pharmacotherapy has evolved with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) legislation such as the 2012 FDA Safety and Innovation Act. In parallel, regulatory authorities have recommended the application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, for example, in the recently issued FDA Strategic Plan for Accelerating the Development of Therapies for Pediatric Rare Diseases. PBPK modeling provides a quantitative and systems-based framework that allows the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on drug exposure to be modeled in a mechanistic fashion. The application of PBPK modeling in drug development for pediatric cancers is relatively nascent, with several retrospective analyses of cytotoxic therapies, and latterly for targeted agents such as obatoclax and imatinib. More recently, we have employed PBPK modeling in a prospective manner to inform the first pediatric trials of pinometostat and tazemetostat in genetically defined populations (mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged and integrase interactor-1-deficient sarcomas, respectively). In this review, we evaluate the application of PBPK modeling in pediatric cancer drug development and discuss the important challenges that lie ahead in this field.

  12. Effect of reducing the paediatric stavudine dose by half: a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Sy, Sherwin K B; Malmberg, Ruben; Matsushima, Aoi; Asin-Prieto, Eduardo; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Cotton, Mark F; Derendorf, Hartmut; Innes, Steve

    2015-04-01

    Owing to significant dose-related toxicity, the adult stavudine dose was reduced in 2007. The paediatric dose, however, has not been reduced. Although the intended paediatric dose is 1 mg/kg twice daily (b.i.d.), the current weight-band dosing approach results in a mean actual dose of 1.23±0.47 mg/kg. Both efficacy and mitochondrial toxicity depend on the concentration of the intracellular metabolite stavudine triphosphate (d4T-TP). We simulated the effect of reducing the paediatric dose to 0.5 mg/kg. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model consisting of 13 tissue compartments plus a full ADAM model was used to describe the elimination of stavudine. The volume of distribution at steady-state and apparent oral clearance were simulated and the resulting AUC profile was compared with literature data in adult and paediatric populations. A biochemical reaction model was utilised to simulate intracellular d4T-TP levels for both the standard and proposed reduced paediatric doses. Simulated and observed exposure after oral dosing showed adequate agreement. Mean steady-state d4T-TP for 1.23 mg/kg b.i.d. was 27.9 (90% CI 27.0-28.9) fmol/10(6) cells, 25% higher than that achieved by the 40 mg adult dose. The 0.5 mg/kg dose resulted in d4T-TP of 13.2 (12.7-13.7) fmol/10(6) cells, slightly higher than the adult dose of 20 mg b.i.d. [11.5 (11.2-11.9) fmol/10(6) cells], which has excellent antiviral efficacy and substantially less toxicity. Current paediatric dosing may result in even higher d4T-TP than the original 40 mg adult dose. Halving the paediatric dose would significantly reduce the risk of mitochondrial toxicity without compromising antiviral efficacy.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  14. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, Christopher M.; Chang, Daniel T.; Brooks, Raina D.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Phillips, Martin B.; Hypes, Ethan D.; Fair, Matthew J.; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Johnson, Jeffre; Dary, Curtis C.; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be a great resource for the construction of models pertaining to new chemicals. A PBPK knowledgebase was compiled and developed from existing PBPK-related articles and used to develop new models. From 2,039 PBPK-related articles published between 1977 and 2013, 307 unique chemicals were identified for use as the basis of our knowledgebase. Keywords related to species, gender, developmental stages, and organs were analyzed from the articles within the PBPK knowledgebase. A correlation matrix of the 307 chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase was calculated based on pharmacokinetic-relevant molecular descriptors. Chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase were ranked based on their correlation toward ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Next, multiple chemicals were selected to represent exact matches, close analogues, or non-analogues of the target case study chemicals. Parameters, equations, or experimental data relevant to existing models for these chemicals and their analogues were used to construct new models, and model predictions were compared to observed values. This compiled knowledgebase provides a chemical structure-based approach for identifying PBPK models relevant to other chemical entities. Using suitable correlation metrics, we demonstrated that models of chemical analogues in the PBPK knowledgebase can guide the construction of PBPK models for other chemicals. PMID:26871706

  15. Two-Compartment Kinetic Modeling of Radiocesium Accumulation in Marine Bivalves under Hypothetical Exposure Regimes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Tan, Qiao-Guo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Interpreting the variable concentrations of (137)Cs in the field biological samples requires mechanistic understanding of both environmental and biological behavior of (137)Cs. In this study, we used a two-compartment model to estimate and compare the (137)Cs biokinetics in three species of subtropical marine bivalves. Significant interspecific difference of (137)Cs biokinetics was observed among oysters, mussels, and scallops. There was considerable (137)Cs assimilation from phytoplankton in the bivalves, but the calculated trophic transfer factors were generally between 0.04 and 0.4. We demonstrated a major efflux of radiocesium in the scallops (with a rate constant of 0.207 d(-1)), whereas the efflux was comparable between oysters and mussels (0.035-0.038 d(-1)). A two-compartment kinetic model was developed to simulate the (137)Cs accumulation in the three bivalves under four hypothetical exposure regimes. We showed that the bivalves respond differently to the exposure regimes in terms of time to reach equilibrium, equilibrium concentration, and maximum concentration. Bivalves suffering more frequent intermittent exposure may have higher maximum concentrations than those receiving less frequent exposure. The interspecific difference of (137)Cs accumulation in bivalves has important implications for biomonitoring and implementing management techniques. This study represents one of the first attempts to combine both dissolved and dietary pathways to give a realistic simulation of (137)Cs accumulation in marine bivalves under dynamic exposure regimes.

  16. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes determined in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral or intravenous administrations were extrapolated to give human plasma concentrations. 2. Plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and R-/S-warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole and midazolam previously observed in cynomolgus monkeys were scaled to human oral biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Results of the simplified human PBPK models were consistent with reported experimental PK data in humans or with values simulated by a fully constructed population-based simulator (Simcyp). 3. Oral administrations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan (human P450 2D probes) in monkeys reportedly yielded plasma concentrations similar to their quantitative detection limits. Consequently, ratios of in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearances of metoprolol and dextromethorphan determined in monkeys and humans were used with simplified PBPK models to extrapolate intravenous PK in monkeys to oral PK in humans. 4. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkeys, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 substrates, could be a suitable model for humans, especially when used in conjunction with simple PBPK models.

  17. Methamphetamine blood concentrations in human abusers: application to pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K; Harvey, Dennis; Laćan, Goran

    2007-04-01

    Characterization of methamphetamine's (METH) dose-dependent effects on brain neurochemistry may represent a critical component for better understanding the range of resultant behavioral pathologies. Most human studies, however, have assessed only the effects of long term, high dose METH abuse (e.g., greater than 1000 mg/day) in individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for METH dependence. Yet, for the majority of METH abusers, their patterns of METH exposure that consist of lower doses remain less well-characterized. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 105 individuals detained by police for possible criminal activity and testing positive for stimulants by EMIT assay. METH blood concentrations were subsequently quantified by GC-MS and were predominantly in the low micromolar range (0.1-11.1 microM), with median and mean values of 1.3 microM (0.19 mg/l) and 2 microM (0.3 mg/l), respectively. Pharmacokinetic calculations based on these measured values were used to estimate initial METH body burdens, the median value being 52 mg. Modeling a 52 mg dose for a 4 day-METH maintenance exposure pattern of 4 doses/day at 4 h intervals showed that blood concentrations remained between 1 and 4 microM during this period. Collectively, these data present evidence for a METH exposure pattern distinct from high dose-METH abuse and provide the rationale for assessing potential brain pathology associated with such lower dose-METH exposure.

  18. Bioequivalence and population pharmacokinetic modeling of two forms of antibiotic, cefuroxime lysine and cefuroxime sodium, after intravenous infusion in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Longshan; Li, Qing; Li, Xingang; Yin, Ran; Chen, Xiaohui; Geng, Lulu; Bi, Kaishun

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bioequivalence and the population pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime lysine and cefuroxime sodium in healthy beagle dogs. A randomized 2-period crossover design in 18 healthy beagle dogs after receiving 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg of cefuroxime lysine or cefuroxime sodium was conducted. A 3-compartment open model was used as the basic model for the population pharmacokinetic study. Both of the antibiotics exhibited dose-proportional pharmacokinetics over the dose range of 20-80 mg/kg. The mean relative bioavailability of cefuroxime lysine versus cefuroxime sodium was 1.05 (range, 0.71 to 1.42), with a significant difference between males and females. The estimates of population pharmacokinetic of CL, V(1), Q(2), V(2), Q(3), V(3) were 3.74 mL/h, 1.70 mL, 29.5 mL/min, 3.58 mL, 0.31 mL/min, and 158 mL for cefuroxime lysine and 4.10 mL/h, 1.00 mL, 38.5 mL/min, 4.19 mL, 0.06 mL/min, and 13.6 mL for cefuroxime sodium, respectively. The inter-individual variability was determined to be less than 29.1%. A linear pharmacokinetic was revealed for cefuroxime lysine and cefuroxime sodium in dogs after intravenous infusion, and the bioequivalence of these forms of the antibiotic was observed with the significant gender-related differences in mean relative bioavailability of cefuroxime lysine versus cefuroxime sodium.

  19. Tuneable resolution as a systems biology approach for multi-scale, multi-compartment computational models.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Denise E; Hunt, C Anthony; Marino, Simeone; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2014-01-01

    The use of multi-scale mathematical and computational models to study complex biological processes is becoming increasingly productive. Multi-scale models span a range of spatial and/or temporal scales and can encompass multi-compartment (e.g., multi-organ) models. Modeling advances are enabling virtual experiments to explore and answer questions that are problematic to address in the wet-lab. Wet-lab experimental technologies now allow scientists to observe, measure, record, and analyze experiments focusing on different system aspects at a variety of biological scales. We need the technical ability to mirror that same flexibility in virtual experiments using multi-scale models. Here we present a new approach, tuneable resolution, which can begin providing that flexibility. Tuneable resolution involves fine- or coarse-graining existing multi-scale models at the user's discretion, allowing adjustment of the level of resolution specific to a question, an experiment, or a scale of interest. Tuneable resolution expands options for revising and validating mechanistic multi-scale models, can extend the longevity of multi-scale models, and may increase computational efficiency. The tuneable resolution approach can be applied to many model types, including differential equation, agent-based, and hybrid models. We demonstrate our tuneable resolution ideas with examples relevant to infectious disease modeling, illustrating key principles at work.

  20. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  1. An on-chip small intestine-liver model for pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Takashi; Nakayama, Hidenari; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-06-01

    Testing of drug effects and cytotoxicity by using cultured cells has been widely performed as an alternative to animal testing. However, the estimation of pharmacokinetics by conventional cell-based assay methods is difficult because of the inability to evaluate multiorgan effects. An important challenge in the field is to mimic the organ-to-organ network in the human body by using a microfluidic network connecting small-scale tissues based on recently emerging MicroTAS (Micro Total Analysis Systems) technology for prediction of pharmacokinetics. Here, we describe an on-chip small intestine-liver coupled model for pharmacokinetic studies. To construct an in vitro pharmacokinetic model that appropriately models in vivo conditions, physiological parameters such as the structure of internal circulation, volume ratios of each organ, and blood flow ratio of the portal vein to the hepatic artery were mimicked using microfluidic networks. To demonstrate interactions between organs in vitro in pharmacokinetic studies, Caco-2, HepG2, and A549 cell cultures were used as organ models of the small intestine, liver, and lung, respectively, and connected to each other through a microporous membrane and microchannels to prepare a simple model of a physiological organ-to-organ network. The on-chip organ model assay using three types of substrate-epirubicine (EPI), irinotecan (CPT-11), and cyclophosphamide (CPA)-were conducted to model the effects of orally administered or biologically active anticancer drugs. The result suggested that the device can replicate physiological phenomena such as activity of the anticancer drugs on the target cells. This microfluidic device can thus be used as an in vitro organ model to predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the human body and may thus provide not only an alternative to animal testing but also a method of obtaining parameters for in silico models of physiologically based pharmacokinetics. PMID:25385717

  2. Global stability of a multiple infected compartments model for waterborne diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Cao, Jinde

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, mathematical analysis is carried out for a multiple infected compartments model for waterborne diseases, such as cholera, giardia, and rotavirus. The model accounts for both person-to-person and water-to-person transmission routes. Global stability of the equilibria is studied. In terms of the basic reproduction number R0, we prove that, if R0⩽1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and the infection always disappears; whereas if R0>1, there exists a unique endemic equilibrium which is globally asymptotically stable for the corresponding fast-slow system. Numerical simulations verify our theoretical results and present that the decay rate of waterborne pathogens has a significant impact on the epidemic growth rate. Also, we observe numerically that the unique endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable for the whole system. This statement indicates that the present method need to be improved by other techniques.

  3. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  4. Carbamazepine population pharmacokinetics in children: mixed-effect models.

    PubMed

    Delgado Iribarnegaray, M F; Santo Bueldga, D; García Sánchez, M J; Otero, M J; Falcão, A C; Domínguez-Gil, A

    1997-04-01

    The aim of the authors' study was to investigate the factors affecting carbamazepine (CBZ) clearance (CL) in children with epilepsy. The factors evaluated were total body weight (TBW), age, dose, sex, and phenobarbital (PB) and valproic acid (VA) comedication. A total of 387 steady-state serum concentration samples was analyzed. These were collected during CBZ therapy from 201 children, aged 1-14 years and weighting 9-78 kg. Population CL was calculated by using NONMEM, with a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The absorption rate, bioavailability, and volume of distribution were set at values found in the literature. The model found best to describe the data was CL = (0.0122 TBW + 0.0467 Dose) Age0.331 (1.289 PB). The interindividual variability in CL had a variation coefficient (CV) of 11.8%, and the residual error, described by using an additive model, was 1.5 mg/l. The results show that CL increases linearly with TBW and nonlinearly with age; thus older children have a lower CL with respect to TBW than do younger ones. Likewise CL was seen to increase with the increase in the CBZ dose, suggesting a dose-dependent autoinduction of CBZ metabolism. Concomitant PB administration affected CL: however, sex and VA comedication did not affect it significantly. The final regression model for CL, was validated in a different group of 74 children. The standarized prediction error (SPE) was not significantly different from zero (SPE = 0.028), indicating that the model proposed for CL can be used to make accurate dosage recommendations. With these population estimates, CBZ doses that would be suitable for pediatric patients of different ages are proposed.

  5. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  6. A mathematical model of single target site location by Brownian movement in subcellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Kuthan, Hartmut

    2003-03-01

    The location of distinct sites is mandatory for many cellular processes. In the subcompartments of the cell nucleus, only very small numbers of diffusing macromolecules and specific target sites of some types may be present. In this case, we are faced with the Brownian movement of individual macromolecules and their "random search" for single/few specific target sites, rather than bulk-averaged diffusion and multiple sites. In this article, I consider the location of a distant central target site, e.g. a globular protein, by individual macromolecules executing unbiased (i.e. drift-free) random walks in a spherical compartment. For this walk-and-capture model, the closed-form analytic solution of the first passage time probability density function (p.d.f.) has been obtained as well as the first and second moment. In the limit of a large ratio of the radii of the spherical diffusion space and central target, well-known relations for the variance and the first two moments for the exponential p.d.f. were found to hold with high accuracy. These calculations reinforce earlier numerical results and Monte Carlo simulations. A major implication derivable from the model is that non-directed random movement is an effective means for locating single sites in submicron-sized compartments, even when the diffusion coefficients are comparatively small and the diffusing species are present in one copy only. These theoretical conclusions are underscored numerically for effective diffusion constants ranging from 0.5 to 10.0 microm(2) s(-1), which have been reported for a couple of nuclear proteins in their physiological environment. Spherical compartments of submicron size are, for example, the Cajal bodies (size: 0.1-1.0 microm), which are present in 1-5 copies in the cell nucleus. Within a small Cajal body of radius 0.1 microm a single diffusing protein molecule (with D=0.5 microm(2) s(-1)) would encounter a medium-sized protein of radius 2.5 nm within 1 s with a probability near

  7. [A nonlinear multi-compartment lung model for optimization of breathing airflow pattern].

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongming; Gu, Lingyan; Chen, Fuhua

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult to select the appropriate ventilation mode in clinical mechanical ventilation. This paper presents a nonlinear multi-compartment lung model to solve the difficulty. The purpose is to optimize respiratory airflow patterns and get the minimum of the work of inspiratory phrase and lung volume acceleration, minimum of the elastic potential energy and rapidity of airflow rate changes of expiratory phrase. Sigmoidal function is used to smooth the respiratory function of nonlinear equations. The equations are established to solve nonlinear boundary conditions BVP, and finally the problem was solved with gradient descent method. Experimental results showed that lung volume and the rate of airflow after optimization had good sensitivity and convergence speed. The results provide a theoretical basis for the development of multivariable controller monitoring critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:25997262

  8. Pharmacokinetic characterization of the novel TAZ modulator TM-25659 using a multicompartment kinetic model in rats and a possibility of its drug-drug interactions in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Choi, Sung Heum; Song, Jin-Sook; Kwak, Eun-Young; Chae, Yoon-Jee; Im, So Hee; Lee, Byung Hoi; Seo, Hyewon; Cho, Woon-Ki; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Nak Jeong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Myung Ae

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of the novel TAZ modulator TM-25659 in rats following intravenous and oral administration at dose ranges of 0.5-5 mg/kg and 2-10 mg/kg, respectively. Plasma protein binding, plasma stability, liver microsomal stability, CYP inhibition, and transport in Caco-2 cells were also evaluated. After intravenous injection, systemic clearance, steady-state volumes of distribution, and half-life were dose-independent, with values ranging from 0.434-0.890 mL · h(-1) · kg(-1), 2.02-4.22 mL/kg, and 4.60-7.40 h, respectively. Mean absolute oral bioavailability was 50.9% and was not dose dependent. Recovery of TM-25659 was 43.6% in bile and <1% in urine. In pharmacokinetic modeling studies, the three-compartment (3C) model was appropriate for understanding these parameters in rats. TM-25659 was stable in plasma. Plasma protein binding was approximately 99.2%, and was concentration-independent. TM-25659 showed high permeation of Caco-2 cells and did not appear to inhibit CYP450. TM-25659 was metabolized in phase I and II steps in rat liver microsomes. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics of TM-25659 was characterized for intravenous and oral administration at doses of 0.5-5 and 2-10 mg/kg, respectively. TM-25659 was eliminated primarily by hepatic metabolism and urinary excretion.

  9. Modeling Single and Repeated Dose Pharmacokinetics of PFOA in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) displays complicated pharmacokinetics in that plasma serum concentration indicates a long half life – 3.8 years in humans (Olsen et al. 2007) – but also rapidly achieves steady-state (Lau et al., 2006). Attempts to address this have included using d...

  10. PREDICTIVE PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETICS MODELING (PBPK) OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic pesticides that have many different applications in agriculture, horticulture, and homes, and medicinal uses for animals and humans. Differences in the toxicity of pyrethroids are the result of their pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic pr...

  11. A population pharmacokinetic model for the complex systemic absorption of ropivacaine after femoral nerve block in patients undergoing knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, François; Drolet, Pierre; Fallaha, Michel; Varin, France

    2012-12-01

    Because of its slow systemic absorption and flip-flop kinetics, ropivacaine's pharmacokinetics after a peripheral nerve block has never been thoroughly characterized. The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for ropivacaine after loco-regional administration and to identify patient characteristics that may influence the drug's absorption and disposition. Frequent plasma samples were taken up to 93 h after a 100 mg dose given as femoral block for postoperative analgesia in 15 orthopedic patients. Ropivacaine plasma concentration-time data were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling method. A one-compartment model with parallel inverse Gaussian and time-dependent inputs best described ropivacaine plasma concentration-time curves. Ropivacaine systemic absorption was characterized by a rapid phase (mean absorption time of 25 ± 4.8 min) followed by a much slower phase (half-life of 3.9 ± 0.65 h). Interindividual variability (IIV) for these parameters, 58 and 9 %, indicated that the initial absorption phase was more variable. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F = 77.2 ± 11.5 L, IIV = 26 %) was influenced by body weight (Δ 1.49 % per kg change) whereas the absorption rate constant (slower phase) of ropivacaine was affected by age (Δ 2.25 % per year change). No covariate effects were identified for the apparent clearance of the drug (CL/F =10.8 ± 1.0 L/h, 34  IIV = 34 %). These findings support our hypothesis that modeling a complex systemic absorption directly from plasma concentration-time curves exhibiting flip-flop kinetics is possible. Only the age-effect was considered as relevant for possible dosing adjustments.

  12. Three-compartment model for contaminant accumulation by semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gale, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Passive sampling of dissolved hydrophobic contaminants with lipid (triolein)-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) has been gaining acceptance for environmental monitoring. Understanding of the accumulation process has employed a simple polymer film-control model of uptake by the polymer-enclosed lipid, while aqueous film control has been only briefly discussed. A more complete three-compartment model incorporating both aqueous film (turbulent-diffusive) and polymer film (diffusive) mass transfer is developed here and is fit to data from accumulation studies conducted in constant-concentration, flow-through dilutors. This model predicts aqueous film control of the whole device for moderate to high K(ow) compounds, rather than polymer film control. Uptake rates for phenanthrene and 2,2',5,5'- tetrachlorobiphenyl were about 4.8 and 4.2 L/day/standard SPMD, respectively. Maximum 28 day SPMD concentration factors of 30 000 are predicted for solutes with log K(ow) values of >5.5. Effects of varying aqueous and polymer film thicknesses and solute diffusivities in the polymer film are modeled, and overall accumulation by the whole device is predicted to remain under aqueous film control, although accumulation in the triolein may be subject to polymer film control. The predicted half-life and integrative response of SPMDs to pulsed concentration events is proportional to log K(SPMD).Passive sampling of dissolved hydrophobic contaminants with lipid (triolein)-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) has been gaining acceptance for environmental monitoring. Understanding of the accumulation process has employed a simple polymer film-control model of uptake by the polymer-enclosed lipid, while aqueous film control has been only briefly discussed. A more complete three-compartment model incorporating both aqueous film (turbulent-diffusive) and polymer film (diffusive) mass transfer is developed here and is fit to data from accumulation studies conducted in

  13. Determination of robust ocular pharmacokinetic parameters in serum and vitreous humor of albino rabbits following systemic administration of ciprofloxacin from sparse data sets by using IT2S, a population pharmacokinetic modeling program.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Liu, W; Perkins, R; Madu, A; Madu, C; Mayers, M; Miller, M H

    1995-08-01

    Robust determination of the concentration-time profile of anti-infective agents in certain specialized compartments is often limited by the inability to obtain more than a single sample from such a site in any one subject. Vitreous humor and cerebrospinal fluid are obvious examples for which the determination of concentrations of anti-infective agents is limited. Advances in pharmacodynamics have pointed out the importance of understanding the profiles of drugs in the plasma and in specialized compartments in order to dose the drugs to obtain the best patient outcomes. Advances in population pharmacokinetic modeling hold the promise of allowing proper estimation of drug penetration into the vitreous (or other specialized compartment) with only a single vitreous sample, in conjunction with plasma sampling. We have developed a rabbit model which allows multiple samples of vitreous to be obtained without breaking down the blood-vitreous barrier. We have employed this model to test the hypothesis that robust estimates of vitreous penetration by the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin can be obtained from a traditional intensive plasma sampling set plus a single vitreous sample. We studied 33 rabbits which were receiving 40 mg of ciprofloxacin per kg of body weight intravenously as short infusions and from which multiple plasma and vitreous samples were obtained and assayed for ciprofloxacin content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were analyzed by the iterative two-stage population modeling technique (IT2S), employing the iterative two-stage program of Forrest et al. (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 37:1065-1072, 1993). Two data sets were analyzed: all plasma and vitreous samples versus all plasma samples and the initially obtained single vitreous sample. The pharmacokinetic parameter values identified were used to calculate the percent vitreous penetration as the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the vitreous to that for the plasma. The

  14. Determination of robust ocular pharmacokinetic parameters in serum and vitreous humor of albino rabbits following systemic administration of ciprofloxacin from sparse data sets by using IT2S, a population pharmacokinetic modeling program.

    PubMed Central

    Drusano, G L; Liu, W; Perkins, R; Madu, A; Madu, C; Mayers, M; Miller, M H

    1995-01-01

    Robust determination of the concentration-time profile of anti-infective agents in certain specialized compartments is often limited by the inability to obtain more than a single sample from such a site in any one subject. Vitreous humor and cerebrospinal fluid are obvious examples for which the determination of concentrations of anti-infective agents is limited. Advances in pharmacodynamics have pointed out the importance of understanding the profiles of drugs in the plasma and in specialized compartments in order to dose the drugs to obtain the best patient outcomes. Advances in population pharmacokinetic modeling hold the promise of allowing proper estimation of drug penetration into the vitreous (or other specialized compartment) with only a single vitreous sample, in conjunction with plasma sampling. We have developed a rabbit model which allows multiple samples of vitreous to be obtained without breaking down the blood-vitreous barrier. We have employed this model to test the hypothesis that robust estimates of vitreous penetration by the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin can be obtained from a traditional intensive plasma sampling set plus a single vitreous sample. We studied 33 rabbits which were receiving 40 mg of ciprofloxacin per kg of body weight intravenously as short infusions and from which multiple plasma and vitreous samples were obtained and assayed for ciprofloxacin content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were analyzed by the iterative two-stage population modeling technique (IT2S), employing the iterative two-stage program of Forrest et al. (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 37:1065-1072, 1993). Two data sets were analyzed: all plasma and vitreous samples versus all plasma samples and the initially obtained single vitreous sample. The pharmacokinetic parameter values identified were used to calculate the percent vitreous penetration as the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the vitreous to that for the plasma. The

  15. Compartment-based hydrodynamics and water quality modeling of a northern Everglades wetland, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongqing; Meselhe, Ehab A.; Waldon, Michael G.; Harwell, Matthew C.; Chen, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    The last remaining large remnant of softwater wetlands in the US Florida Everglades lies within the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. However, Refuge water quality today is impacted by pumped stormwater inflows to the eutrophic and mineral-enriched 100-km canal, which circumscribes the wetland. Optimal management is a challenge and requires scientifically based predictive tools to assess and forecast the impacts of water management on Refuge water quality. In this research, we developed a compartment-based numerical model of hydrodynamics and water quality for the Refuge. Using the numerical model, we examined the dynamics in stage, water depth, discharge from hydraulic structures along the canal, and exchange flow among canal and marsh compartments. We also investigated the transport of chloride, sulfate and total phosphorus from the canal to the marsh interior driven by hydraulic gradients as well as biological removal of sulfate and total phosphorus. The model was calibrated and validated using long-term stage and water quality data (1995-2007). Statistical analysis indicates that the model is capable of capturing the spatial (from canal to interior marsh) gradients of constituents across the Refuge. Simulations demonstrate that flow from the eutrophic and mineral-enriched canal impacts chloride and sulfate in the interior marsh. In contrast, total phosphorus in the interior marsh shows low sensitivity to intrusion and dispersive transport. We conducted a rainfall-driven scenario test in which the pumped inflow concentrations of chloride, sulfate and total phosphorus were equal to rainfall concentrations (wet deposition). This test shows that pumped inflow is the dominant factor responsible for the substantially increased chloride and sulfate concentrations in the interior marsh. Therefore, the present day Refuge should not be classified as solely a rainfall-driven or ombrotrophic wetland. The model provides an effective screening tool for

  16. In vitro-in vivo Pharmacokinetic correlation model for quality assurance of antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo Valencia, Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The in vitro-in vivo pharmacokinetic correlation models (IVIVC) are a fundamental part of the drug discovery and development process. The ability to accurately predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of a drug based on in vitro observations can have several applications during a successful development process. Objective: To develop a comprehensive model to predict the in vivo absorption of antiretroviral drugs based on permeability studies, in vitro and in vivo solubility and demonstrate its correlation with the pharmacokinetic profile in humans. Methods: Analytical tools to test the biopharmaceutical properties of stavudine, lamivudine y zidovudine were developed. The kinetics of dissolution, permeability in caco-2 cells and pharmacokinetics of absorption in rabbits and healthy volunteers were evaluated. Results: The cumulative areas under the curve (AUC) obtained in the permeability study with Caco-2 cells, the dissolution study and the pharmacokinetics in rabbits correlated with the cumulative AUC values in humans. These results demonstrated a direct relation between in vitro data and absorption, both in humans and in the in vivo model. Conclusions: The analytical methods and procedures applied to the development of an IVIVC model showed a strong correlation among themselves. These IVIVC models are proposed as alternative and cost/effective methods to evaluate the biopharmaceutical properties that determine the bioavailability of a drug and their application includes the development process, quality assurance, bioequivalence studies and pharmacosurveillance. PMID:26600625

  17. AN EXAMPLE OF MODEL STRUCTURE DIFFERENCES USING SENSITIVITY ANALYSES IN PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial chemical and an environmental contaminant. TCE and its metabolites may be carcinogenic and affect human health. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models that differ in compartmentalization are developed for TCE metabo...

  18. Development of a Population Pharmacokinetic Model To Describe Azithromycin Whole-Blood and Plasma Concentrations over Time in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Anic-Milic, T.; Oreskovic, K.; Padovan, J.; Brouwer, K. L. R.; Zuo, P.; Schmith, V. D.

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZI), a broad-spectrum antibiotic, accumulates in polymorphonuclear cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The distribution of AZI in proinflammatory cells may be important to the anti-inflammatory properties. Previous studies have described plasma AZI pharmacokinetics. The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of AZI in whole blood (concentration in whole blood [Cb]) and plasma (concentration in plasma [Cp]) of healthy subjects. In this study, 12 subjects received AZI (500 mg once a day for 3 days). AZI Cb and Cp were quantified in serial samples collected up to 3 weeks after the last dose and analyzed using noncompartmental and compartmental methods. After the last dose, Cb was greater than Cp. Importantly, Cb, but not Cp, was quantifiable in all but one subject at 3 weeks. The blood area under the curve during a 24-h dosing interval (AUC24) was ∼2-fold greater than the plasma AUC24, but simulations suggested that Cb was not at steady state by day 3. Upon exploration of numerous models, an empirical 3-compartment model adequately described Cp and Cb, but Cp was somewhat underestimated. Intercompartmental clearance (CL; likely representing cells) was lower than apparent oral CL (18 versus 118 liters/h). Plasma, peripheral, and cell compartmental volumes were 439 liters, 2,980 liters, and 3,084 liters, respectively. Interindividual variability in CL was low (26.2%), while the volume of distribution variability was high (107%). This is the first report to describe AZI Cb in healthy subjects, the distribution parameters between Cp and Cb, and AZI retention in blood for up to 3 weeks following 3 daily doses. The model can be used to predict Cb from Cp for AZI under various dosing regimens. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01026064.) PMID:23629714

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of imipenem in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Eric; Kergueris, Marie France; Pannier, Michel; Jolliet, Pascale; Bourin, Michel

    2003-12-01

    The interindividual variability of imipenem pharmacokinetic parameters in burn patients suggest that these parameters have to be estimated with a large number of patients. The aim of this study is (i) to estimate these parameters with a population pharmacokinetic approach, and (ii) to test the influence of factors on pharmacokinetics parameters. Data are provided by therapeutic drug monitoring (n = 47,118 samples) and analysed by a nonlinear mixed effect modelling method. Among the tested covariates (age, gender, body weight, height, size of burn and creatinine plasma level) creatinine plasma level affects imipenem pharmacokinetic parameters substantially. The best fit is obtained with a two-compartment model integrating a linear-inverse relationship between imipenem clearance and creatinine plasma level. The estimates of imipenem clearance (16.37 +/- 0.204 L/h) and of the distribution volume of the central compartment (0.376 +/- 0.039 L/kg) are higher in the population of burn patients than the estimates in healthy subjects. This result is connected with high values of glomerule filtration rate and confirms the interest of therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem in burn patients and particularly for patients with extreme values of creatinine clearance.

  20. Human plasma concentrations of five cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in dogs and minipigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In the current study, despite some species difference in drug clearances, this modeling methodology was adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from commonly used medium-sized experimental animals, namely dogs and minipigs. Using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data, the observed plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in two young dogs were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in minipigs was also scaled to human monitoring equivalents. The human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by the simplified human PBPK models based on observed/reported pharmacokinetics in dogs/minipigs were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in humans. These results suggest that dogs and minipigs, in addition to monkeys, could be suitable models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models.

  1. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of POPs in Greenlanders.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Rigét, Frank F; Dietz, Rune; Krüger, Tanja; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2014-03-01

    Human exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and the potential health impact in the Arctic far from the emission sources have been highlighted in numerous studies. As a supplement to human POP biomonitoring studies, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was set up to estimate the fate of POPs in Greenlandic Inuit's liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to traditional Greenlandic diet. The PBPK model described metabolism, excretion and POP accumulation on the basis of their physicochemical properties and metabolic rates in the organisms. Basic correlations between chemically analyzed blood POP concentrations and calculated daily POP intake from food questionnaire of 118 middle age (18-35years) Greenlandic Inuits from four cities in West Greenland (Qaanaaq: n=40; Qeqertarsuaq: n=36; Nuuk: n=20; Narsaq: n=22) taken during 2003 to 2006 were analyzed. The dietary items included were polar bear, caribou, musk oxen, several marine species such as whales, seals, bird and fish as well as imported food. The contaminant concentrations of the dietary items as well as their chemical properties, uptake, biotransformation and excretion allowed us to estimate the POP concentration in liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to the traditional Greenlandic diet using the PBPK model. Significant correlations were found between chemically analyzed POP blood concentrations and calculated daily intake of POPs for Qeqertarsuaq, Nuuk and Narsaq Inuit but not for the northernmost settlement Qaanaaq, probably because the highest blood POP level was found in this district which might mask the interview-based POP calculations. Despite the large variation in circulating blood POP concentrations, the PBPK model predicted blood concentrations of a factor 2-3 within the actual measured values. Moreover, the PBPK model showed that estimated blood POP concentration increased significantly after consumption of meals

  2. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR intravenous and ingested DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMAV) IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the organoarsenical dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) was developed in mice. The model was calibrated using tissue time course data from multiple tissues in mice administered DMA(V) intravenously. The final model structure was ...

  3. FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS FOR USE IN SAFETY OR RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Proposed applications of increasingly sophisticated biologically-based computational models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, raise the issue of how to evaluate whether the models are adequate for proposed uses including safety or risk ...

  4. Higher Plants in life support systems: design of a model and plant experimental compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezard, Pauline; Farges, Berangere; Sasidharan L, Swathy; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    The development of closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) requires full control and efficient engineering for fulfilling the common objectives of water and oxygen regeneration, CO2 elimination and food production. Most of the proposed CELSS contain higher plants, for which a growth chamber and a control system are needed. Inside the compartment the development of higher plants must be understood and modeled in order to be able to design and control the compartment as a function of operating variables. The plant behavior must be analyzed at different sub-process scales : (i) architecture and morphology describe the plant shape and lead to calculate the morphological parameters (leaf area, stem length, number of meristems. . . ) characteristic of life cycle stages; (ii) physiology and metabolism of the different organs permit to assess the plant composition depending on the plant input and output rates (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water and nutrients); (iii) finally, the physical processes are light interception, gas exchange, sap conduction and root uptake: they control the available energy from photosynthesis and the input and output rates. These three different sub-processes are modeled as a system of equations using environmental and plant parameters such as light intensity, temperature, pressure, humidity, CO2 and oxygen partial pressures, nutrient solution composition, total leaf surface and leaf area index, chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance, water potential, organ biomass distribution and composition, etc. The most challenging issue is to develop a comprehensive and operative mathematical model that assembles these different sub-processes in a unique framework. In order to assess the parameters for testing a model, a polyvalent growth chamber is necessary. It should permit a controlled environment in order to test and understand the physiological response and determine the control strategy. The final aim of this model is to have an envi

  5. Optimization of a Free Water Elimination Two-Compartment Model for Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Andrew R.; Koay, Cheng Guan; Kecskemeti, Steven R.; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is used to measure the diffusion of water in tissue. The diffusion properties carry information about the relative organization and structure of the underlying tissue. In the case of a single voxel containing both tissue and a fast diffusing component such as free water, a single diffusion tensor is no longer appropriate. A two-tensor free water elimination model has previously been proposed to correct for the case of volume mixing. Here, this model was implemented in a straightforward but novel manner without the use of spatial constraints. The optimal acquisition parameters were investigated through Monte Carlo simulations and human brain imaging studies. At a signal-to-noise ratio of 40 with 64 diffusion-weighted encoding images, the most accurate estimates of fast diffusion signal were obtained with two diffusion-weighted shells (b-value in s/mm^2 x number of directions) of 500×32 and 1500×32. The potential bias in fractional anisotropy induced by this two-compartment model was more than an order of magnitude less than the error of using the single diffusion tensor model in the presence of partial volume effects with free water. This strategy may be useful for characterizing the diffusion of tissues adjacent to cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), tissues affected by edema, and removing artifacts from blurring and ghosting of the CSF signal. PMID:25271843

  6. Population pharmacokinetic models for cefuroxime and metronidazole used in combination as prophylactic agents in colorectal surgery: Model-based evaluation of standard dosing regimens.

    PubMed

    Asín-Prieto, Eduardo; Soraluce, Amaia; Trocóniz, Iñaki F; Campo Cimarras, Eugenia; Sáenz de Ugarte Sobrón, Jaione; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Isla, Arantxazu

    2015-05-01

    The antibiotics used for prophylaxis in colorectal surgery must maintain appropriate plasma concentrations during the entire surgery to avoid surgical site infections caused by aerobes and anaerobes; cefuroxime plus metronidazole is one of the combinations used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of cefuroxime plus metronidazole administration as prophylaxis in colorectal surgery. In total, 63 patients electively undergoing rectal or colon surgery were administered 1500mg of cefuroxime and 1500mg of metronidazole in 15-min and 1-h infusions, respectively, prior to surgery. Blood samples were withdrawn during and after surgery for determination of plasma concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. Population pharmacokinetic models were developed using NONMEM 7.2.0. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) simulations were performed to explore the ability of different dosage regimens to achieve the pharmacodynamic targets. Pharmacokinetics for both antibiotics were best described by a two-compartment model. Elimination of cefuroxime was conditioned by creatinine clearance (CLCr). The half-life of cefuroxime was 1.5h for patients with normal renal function and 4.9h in patients with renal impairment. Elimination and distribution of metronidazole were affected by patient body weight (BW). PK/PD analysis revealed that a single-dose protocol of 1500mg of cefuroxime and metronidazole is adequate in short surgeries (≤2h). However, for longer surgeries, recommendations are suggested depending on the patient's CLCr and BW. Additional doses of cefuroxime are needed for patients with moderate renal impairment or those presenting normal renal function. For metronidazole, an additional dose is needed for patients with a BW of 90kg.

  7. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for bisphenol A in pregnant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Yuko; Matsuyama, Wakoto; Wada, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Junko; Chan, Melissa Pui Ling; Nakayama, Aki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2007-10-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used to produce polymers for food contact and other applications, so there is potential for oral exposure of humans to trace amounts via ingestion. To date, no physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been located for BPA in pregnant mice with or without fetuses. An estimate by a mathematical model is essential since information on humans is difficult to obtain experimentally. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of our experiment following single oral administration of BPA to pregnant mice. The risk assessment of bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of human offspring is an important issue. There have been limited data on the exposure level of human fetuses to BPA (e.g. BPA concentration in cord blood) and no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in humans with or without fetuses. In the present study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the pharmacokinetics of BPA in a pregnant mouse with the prospect of future extrapolation to humans. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of an experiment we executed on pregnant mice following single oral administration of BPA. The model could describe the rapid transfer of BPA through the placenta to the fetus and the slow disappearance from fetuses. The simulated time courses after three-time repeated oral administrations of BPA by the constructed model fitted well with the experimental data, and the simulation for the 10 times lower dose was also consistent with the experiment. This suggested that the PBPK model for BPA in pregnant mice was successfully verified and is highly promising for extrapolation to humans who are expected to be exposed more chronically to lower doses.

  8. A consistent approach for the application of pharmacokinetic modeling in cancer and noncancer risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, Harvey J; Andersen, Melvin E; Barton, Hugh A

    2002-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling provides important capabilities for improving the reliability of the extrapolations across dose, species, and exposure route that are generally required in chemical risk assessment regardless of the toxic end point being considered. Recently, there has been an increasing focus on harmonization of the cancer and noncancer risk assessment approaches used by regulatory agencies. Although the specific details of applying pharmacokinetic modeling within these two paradigms may differ, it is possible to identify important elements common to both. These elements expand on a four-part framework for describing the development of toxicity: a) exposure, b) tissue dosimetry/pharmacokinetics, c) toxicity process/pharmacodynamics, and d) response. The middle two components constitute the mode of action. In particular, the approach described in this paper provides a common template for incorporating pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate tissue dosimetry into chemical risk assessment, whether for cancer or noncancer end points. Chemical risk assessments typically depend upon comparisons across species that often simplify to ratios reflecting the differences. In this paper we describe the uses of this ratio concept and discuss the advantages of a pharmacokinetic-based approach as compared to the use of default dosimetry. PMID:11781169

  9. Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modelling to Inform Development of Intramuscular Long Acting Nanoformulations for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rajoli, Rajith KR; Back, David J; Rannard, Steve; Meyers, Caren Freel; Flexner, Charles; Owen, Andrew; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Antiretrovirals (ARVs) are currently used for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection. Poor adherence and low tolerability of some existing oral formulations can hinder their efficacy. Long-acting (LA) injectable nanoformulations could help address these complications by simplifying ARV administration. The aim of this study is to inform the optimisation of intramuscular LA formulations for eight ARVs through physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling. Methods A whole-body PBPK model was constructed using mathematical descriptions of molecular, physiological and anatomical processes defining pharmacokinetics. These models were validated against available clinical data and subsequently used to predict the pharmacokinetics of injectable LA formulations Results The predictions suggest that monthly intramuscular injections are possible for dolutegravir, efavirenz, emtricitabine, raltegravir, rilpivirine and tenofovir provided that technological challenges to control release rate can be addressed. Conclusions These data may help inform the target product profiles for LA ARV reformulation strategies. PMID:25523214

  10. A two-compartment model of osmotic lysis in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Marissa A; Andemariam, Biree; Desai, Sanjay A

    2003-01-01

    We recently identified a voltage-dependent anion channel on the surface of human red blood cells (RBCs) infected with the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. This channel, the plasmodial erythrocyte surface anion channel (PESAC), likely accounts for the increased permeability of infected RBCs to various small solutes, as assessed quantitatively with radioisotope flux and patch-clamp studies. Whereas this increased permeability has also been studied by following osmotic lysis of infected cells in permeant solutes, these experiments have been limited to qualitative comparisons of lysis rates. To permit more quantitative examination of lysis rates, we have developed a mathematical model for osmotic fragility of infected cells based on diffusional uptake via PESAC and the two-compartment geometry of infected RBCs. This model, combined with a simple light scattering assay designed to track osmotic lysis precisely, produced permeability coefficients that match both previous isotope flux and patch-clamp estimates. Our model and light scattering assay also revealed Michaelian kinetics for inhibition of PESAC by furosemide, suggesting a 1:1 stoichiometry for their interaction. PMID:12524269

  11. Two-compartment model as a teaching tool for cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wrona, Artur; Balbus, Joanna; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Kubica, Krystian

    2015-12-01

    Cholesterol is a vital structural and functional molecule in the human body that is only slightly soluble in water and therefore does not easily travels by itself in the bloodstream. To enable cholesterol's targeted delivery to cells and tissues, it is encapsulated by different fractions of lipoproteins, complex particles containing both proteins and lipids. Maintaining cholesterol homeostasis is a highly regulated process with multiple factors acting at both molecular and tissue levels. Furthermore, to regulate the circulatory transport of cholesterol in lipoproteins, the amount of cholesterol present depends on and is controlled by cholesterol dietary intake, de novo synthesis, usage, and excretion; abnormal and/or unbalanced cholesterol levels have been shown to lead to severe outcomes, e.g., cardiovascular diseases. To investigate cholesterol transport in the circulatory system, we have previously developed a two-compartment mathematical model. Here, we show how this model can be used as a teaching tool for cholesterol homeostasis. Using the model and a hands-on approach, students can familiarize themselves with the basic components and mechanisms behind balanced cholesterol circulatory transport as well as investigate the consequences of and countermeasures to abnormal cholesterol levels. Among others, various treatments of high blood cholesterol levels can be simulated, e.g., with commonly prescribed de novo cholesterol synthesis inhibitors.

  12. Three-compartment model: critical evaluation based on neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Analiza M; Shen, Wei; Wang, ZiMian; Aloia, John F; Nelson, Miriam E; Heymsfield, Steven B; Sardinha, Luis B; Heshka, Stanley

    2004-11-01

    There is renewed interest in Siri's classic three-compartment (3C) body composition model, requiring body volume (BV) and total body water (TBW) estimates, because dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and in vivo neutron activation (IVNA) systems cannot accommodate subjects with severe obesity. However, the 3C model assumption of a constant ratio (alpha) of mineral (M) to total body protein (TBPro) and related residual mass density (D(RES)) based on cadaver analyses might not be valid across groups differing in sex, race, age, and weight. The aim of this study was to derive new 3C model coefficients in vivo and to compare these estimates to those derived by Siri. Healthy adults (n = 323) were evaluated with IVNA and DEXA and the measured components used to derive alpha and D(RES). For all subjects combined, values of alpha and D(RES) (means +/- SD, 0.351 +/- 0.043; 1.565 +/- 0.023 kg/l) were similar to Siri's proposed values of 0.35 and 1.565 kg/l, respectively. However, alpha and D(RES) varied significantly as a function of sex, race, weight, and age. Expected errors in percent body fat arising by application of Siri's model were illustrated in a second group of 264 adults, including some whose size exceeded DEXA limits but whose BV and TBW had been measured by hydrodensitometry and (2)H(2)O dilution, respectively. Extrapolation of predictions by newly developed models to very high weights allows percent fat error estimation when Siri's model is applied in morbidly obese subjects. The present study results provide a critical evaluation of potential errors in the classic 3C model and present new formulas for use in selected populations.

  13. Comparison of different blood compartments for the detection of circulating DNA using a rat model of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fréalle, E; Gantois, N; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Leroy, S; Zawadzki, C; Perkhofer, S; Aliouat, E M; Dei-Cas, E

    2015-09-01

    Pneumocystis is mostly found in the alveolar spaces, but circulation of viable organisms also occurs and suggests that the detection of DNA in blood could be used as a noninvasive procedure to improve the diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP). In order to determine the optimal compartment for Pneumocystis DNA detection, we used a rat model of PcP and tested the presence of Pneumocystis with a quantitative mtLSU targeting real-time PCR in four blood compartments: whole blood, clot, serum and Platelet-Rich-Plasma (PRP). All samples from 4 Pneumocystis-free control rats were negative. Pneumocystis was detected in 79, 64, 57, and 57% of samples from 14 PcP rats, respectively, but DNA release was not related to pulmonary loads. These data confirm the potential usefulness of Pneumocystis DNA detection in the blood for PcP diagnosis and suggest that whole blood could be the most appropriate compartment for Pneumocystis detection.

  14. Dose Assessment of Cefquinome by Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Mouse Model of Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Yu-Feng; Li, Xiao; Chen, Mei-Ren; Qiao, Gui-Lin; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to characterize the mammary gland pharmacokinetics of cefquinome after an intramammary administration and integrate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic profiles of cefquinome in gland tissue were measured using high performance liquid chromatograph. Therapeutic regimens covered various dosages ranging from 25 to 800 μg/gland and multiple dosing intervals of 8, 12, and 24 h. The in vivo bacterial killing activity elevated when dosage increased or when dosing intervals were shortened. The best antibacterial effect was demonstrated by a mean 1.5 log10CFU/gland visible count reduction. On the other hand, the results showed that the percentage of time duration of drug concentration exceeding the MIC during a dose interval (%T > MIC) was generally 100% because of the influence of drug distribution caused by the blood-milk barrier. Therefore, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameter of the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to the MIC (AUC0-24/MIC) was used to describe the efficacy of cefquinome instead of %T > MIC. When the magnitude of AUC0-24/MIC exceeding 16571.55 h⋅mL/g, considerable activity of about 1.5 log10CFU/g gland bacterial count reduction was observed in vivo. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, the clinical recommended regimen of three infusions of 75 mg per quarter every 12 h can achieve a 76.67% cure rate in clinical treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. PMID:27774090

  15. 75 FR 75 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead Crew Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... inside the compartment, even when crowding occurs at each side of the door. (e) For all doors installed... be shown to be openable when crowded against, even when crowding occurs at each side of the door....

  16. Determination of blood plasma fluorescence extinction coefficients for dyes used in three-compartment binding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Sexton, Kristian; Tichauer, Kenneth; Davis, Scott C.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-02-01

    A three-compartment kinetic model for the binding of a ligand to its receptor in tumor tissue has been explained and the kinetic rates of the model are currently being investigated. In order to determine the plasma excretion rates of the dyes of interest, the fluorescence extinction coefficients must be determined. The fluorescence extinction coefficients of the IRDye700DX-carboxylate (IRDye700DX-C) and IRDye800CW-conjugated to EGFR (IRDye800CW-EGF) have been to be 7.98 ×106 μM-1 cm-1 and 4.73x106 μM-1 cm-1, respectively. We determined that the linear range of these dyes in the blood plasma of a mouse was 0 - 0.26 μM. Administration of 1 nmol of each of these dyes to a mouse weighing 25-30g (0.04 μM - 0.033 μM, respectively) will result in blood plasma fluorescence in the linear and readable range.

  17. Modeling the cathode compartment of polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Dead and active reaction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikovsky, A.A.; Divisek, J.; Kornyshev, A.A.

    1999-11-01

    A two-dimensional model of the cathode compartment of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell has been developed. The existence of gas channels in the current collector is taken into account. The model is based on continuity equations for concentrations of the gases and Poisson's equations for potentials of membrane and carbon phase, coupled by Tafel relation for reaction kinetics. Stefan-Maxwell and Knudsen diffusion of gases are taken into account. The simulations were performed for high and low values of carbon phase conductivity. The results revealed (i) for a low value of carbon phase conductivity, a dead zone in the active layer in front of the gas channel is formed, where the reaction rate is small. The catalyst may be removed from this zone without significant loss in cell performance; (ii) For a high carbon phase conductivity value, such a zone is absent, but removal of the catalyst from the same part of the active layer forces the reaction to proceed more rapidly in the remaining parts, with only marginal losses in performance. This conclusion is valid for high diffusivity of oxygen. For low diffusivity, dead zones are formed in front of the current collector, so that catalyst can be removed from these zones. The results, thus, show the possibilities for a considerable reduction of the amount of catalyst.

  18. 76 FR 63823 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G280 Airplane Pilot-Compartment View...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...-SC for the GALP Model G280 airplane was published in the Federal Register on May 25, 2011 (76 FR... hydrophobic coating to provide adequate pilot-compartment view in the presence of precipitation. Sole reliance... during precipitation conditions. The regulations require this means to maintain such an area...

  19. Compartment modeling of dynamic brain PET—The impact of scatter corrections on parameter errors

    SciTech Connect

    Häggström, Ida Karlsson, Mikael; Larsson, Anne; Schmidtlein, C. Ross

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of scatter and its correction on kinetic parameters in dynamic brain positron emission tomography (PET) tumor imaging. The 2-tissue compartment model was used, and two different reconstruction methods and two scatter correction (SC) schemes were investigated. Methods: The GATE Monte Carlo (MC) software was used to perform 2 × 15 full PET scan simulations of a voxelized head phantom with inserted tumor regions. The two sets of kinetic parameters of all tissues were chosen to represent the 2-tissue compartment model for the tracer 3′-deoxy-3′-({sup 18}F)fluorothymidine (FLT), and were denoted FLT{sub 1} and FLT{sub 2}. PET data were reconstructed with both 3D filtered back-projection with reprojection (3DRP) and 3D ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM). Images including true coincidences with attenuation correction (AC) and true+scattered coincidences with AC and with and without one of two applied SC schemes were reconstructed. Kinetic parameters were estimated by weighted nonlinear least squares fitting of image derived time–activity curves. Calculated parameters were compared to the true input to the MC simulations. Results: The relative parameter biases for scatter-eliminated data were 15%, 16%, 4%, 30%, 9%, and 7% (FLT{sub 1}) and 13%, 6%, 1%, 46%, 12%, and 8% (FLT{sub 2}) for K{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}, k{sub 4}, V{sub a}, and K{sub i}, respectively. As expected, SC was essential for most parameters since omitting it increased biases by 10 percentage points on average. SC was not found necessary for the estimation of K{sub i} and k{sub 3}, however. There was no significant difference in parameter biases between the two investigated SC schemes or from parameter biases from scatter-eliminated PET data. Furthermore, neither 3DRP nor OSEM yielded the smallest parameter biases consistently although there was a slight favor for 3DRP which produced less biased k{sub 3} and K{sub i

  20. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to explore potential metabolic pathways of bromochloromethane in rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromochloromethane (BCM) is a volatile organic compound and a by-product of disinfection of water by chlorination. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are used in risk assessment applications and a PBPK model for BCM, Updated with F-344 specific input parameters,...

  1. Effect of reducing the paediatric stavudine dose by half: a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Sherwin K.B.; Malmberg, Ruben; Matsushima, Aoi; Asin-Prieto, Eduardo; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Cotton, Mark F.; Derendorf, Hartmut; Innes, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Owing to significant dose-related toxicity, the adult stavudine dose was reduced in 2007. The paediatric dose, however, has not been reduced. Although the intended paediatric dose is 1 mg/kg twice daily (b.i.d.), the current weight-band dosing approach results in a mean actual dose of 1.23 ± 0.47 mg/kg. Both efficacy and mitochondrial toxicity depend on the concentration of the intracellular metabolite stavudine triphosphate (d4T-TP). We simulated the effect of reducing the paediatric dose to 0.5 mg/kg. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model consisting of 13 tissue compartments plus a full ADAM model was used to describe the elimination of stavudine. The volume of distribution at steady-state and apparent oral clearance were simulated and the resulting AUC profile was compared with literature data in adult and paediatric populations. A biochemical reaction model was utilised to simulate intracellular d4T-TP levels for both the standard and proposed reduced paediatric doses. Simulated and observed exposure after oral dosing showed adequate agreement. Mean steady-state d4T-TP for 1.23 mg/kg b.i.d. was 27.9 (90% CI 27.0–28.9) fmol/106 cells, 25% higher than that achieved by the 40 mg adult dose. The 0.5 mg/kg dose resulted in d4T-TP of 13.2 (12.7–13.7) fmol/106 cells, slightly higher than the adult dose of 20 mg b.i.d. [11.5 (11.2–11.9) fmol/106 cells], which has excellent antiviral efficacy and substantially less toxicity. Current paediatric dosing may result in even higher d4T-TP than the original 40 mg adult dose. Halving the paediatric dose would significantly reduce the risk of mitochondrial toxicity without compromising antiviral efficacy. PMID:25697412

  2. Incorporating target-mediated drug disposition in a minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang

    2014-01-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) usually accounts for nonlinear pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by their targets owing to high affinity and limited capacity. TMDD is frequently reported for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for such reason. Minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models (mPBPK), which accommodate the unique PK behaviors of mAb, provide a general approach for analyzing mAbs PK and predicting mAb interstitial concentrations in two groups of tissues. This study assessed the feasibility of incorporating TMDD into mPBPK models to consider target-binding in either plasma (cTMDD) or interstitial fluid (ISF) (pTMDD). The dose-related signature profiles of the pTMDD model reveal a parallel early decay phase, in contrast with the cTMDD model that exhibits a faster initial decline for low doses. The parallel early phase in the pTMDD model is associated with the slow perivascular extravasation of mAb, which restricts the initial decline regardless of interstitial target-mediated elimination. The cTMDD and pTMDD models both preserve the long terminal phase that is typically perceived in conventional two-compartment (2CM) and TMDD models. Having TMDD in ISF impacts the typical relationships between plasma concentrations and receptor occupancy, and between saturation of apparent nonlinear clearance and saturation of receptors. The vascular reflection coefficient (σv) was found to affect receptor occupancy in ISF. In the cTMDD model, saturation of nonlinear clearance is equivalent to saturation of receptors. However, in the pTMDD model, they are no longer equal and all parameters pertaining to receptors or receptor binding (Rtotal, KD, Kss, kint) shifts such relationships. Different TMDD models were utilized in analyzing PK for seven mAbs from digitized literature data. When the target is in plasma, the cTMDD model performed similarly to the 2CM and TMDD models, but with one less system parameter. When the

  3. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: A population pharmacokinetic study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Methods Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of racmethadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. Results In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G > T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G > T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. Conclusion This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:25456329

  4. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR TRICHLOROETHYLENE WITH SPECIFICITY FOR THE LONG EVANS RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A PBPK model for TCE with specificity for the male LE rat that accurately predicts TCE tissue time-course data has not been developed, although other PBPK models for TCE exist. Development of such a model was the present aim. The PBPK model consisted of 5 compartments: fat; slowl...

  5. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  6. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Investigation of Colistin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using an In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J.; Bulitta, Jurgen B.; Forrest, Alan; Tsuji, Brian T.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.

    2010-01-01

    Colistin plays a key role in treatment of serious infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aims of this study were to (i) identify the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index (i.e., the area under the unbound concentration-time curve to MIC ratio [ƒAUC/MIC], the unbound maximal concentration to MIC ratio [ƒCmax/MIC], or the cumulative percentage of a 24-h period that unbound concentrations exceed the MIC [ƒT>MIC]) that best predicts colistin efficacy and (ii) determine the values for the predictive PK/PD index required to achieve various magnitudes of killing effect. Studies were conducted in a one-compartment in vitro PK/PD model for 24 h using P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, PAO1, and the multidrug-resistant mucoid clinical isolate 19056 muc. Six intermittent dosing intervals, with a range of ƒCmax colistin concentrations, and two continuous infusion regimens were examined. PK/PD indices varied from 0.06 to 18 for targeted ƒCmax/MIC, 0.36 to 312 for ƒAUC/MIC, and 0 to 100% for ƒT>MIC. A Hill-type model was fit to killing effect data, which were expressed as the log10 ratio of the area under the CFU/ml curve for treated regimens versus control. With ƒCmax values equal to or above the MIC, rapid killing was observed following the first dose; substantial regrowth occurred by 24 h with most regimens. The overall killing effect was best correlated with ƒAUC/MIC (R2 = 0.931) compared to ƒCmax/MIC (R2 = 0.868) and ƒT>MIC (R2 = 0.785). The magnitudes of ƒAUC/MIC required for 1- and 2-log10 reductions in the area under the CFU/ml curve relative to growth control were 22.6 and 30.4, 27.1 and 35.7, and 5.04 and 6.81 for ATCC 27853, PAO1, and 19056 muc, respectively. The PK/PD targets identified will assist in designing optimal dosing strategies for colistin. PMID:20585118

  7. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling and Simulation Approaches: A Systematic Review of Published Models, Applications, and Model Verification.

    PubMed

    Sager, Jennifer E; Yu, Jingjing; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Isoherranen, Nina

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and simulation of drug disposition has emerged as an important tool in drug development, clinical study design and regulatory review, and the number of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling related publications and regulatory submissions have risen dramatically in recent years. However, the extent of use of PBPK modeling by researchers, and the public availability of models has not been systematically evaluated. This review evaluates PBPK-related publications to 1) identify the common applications of PBPK modeling; 2) determine ways in which models are developed; 3) establish how model quality is assessed; and 4) provide a list of publically available PBPK models for sensitive P450 and transporter substrates as well as selective inhibitors and inducers. PubMed searches were conducted using the terms "PBPK" and "physiologically based pharmacokinetic model" to collect published models. Only papers on PBPK modeling of pharmaceutical agents in humans published in English between 2008 and May 2015 were reviewed. A total of 366 PBPK-related articles met the search criteria, with the number of articles published per year rising steadily. Published models were most commonly used for drug-drug interaction predictions (28%), followed by interindividual variability and general clinical pharmacokinetic predictions (23%), formulation or absorption modeling (12%), and predicting age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and disposition (10%). In total, 106 models of sensitive substrates, inhibitors, and inducers were identified. An in-depth analysis of the model development and verification revealed a lack of consistency in model development and quality assessment practices, demonstrating a need for development of best-practice guidelines.

  8. Dose-dependent metabolism of 2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane: a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in the male Fischer 344 rat.

    PubMed

    Vinegar, A; Williams, R J; Fisher, J W; McDougal, J N

    1994-11-01

    2,2-Dichloro-1,1,1-trifluorethane (HCFC-123) is used industrially as a refrigerant, as a foam blowing agent, and as a solvent. It is also being considered as a replacement for halons and chlorinated fluorocarbons which have been banned by the Montreal Protocol because they deplete atmospheric ozone. Male Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01% HCFC-123 by inhalation. Parent compound was measured in blood, fat, and exhaled breath and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was measured in blood and urine. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed which included a gut compartment and a variable size fat compartment in addition to the standard flow-limited compartments. Compartment volumes and flows were chosen from the literature, partition coefficients were measured in the laboratory, and metabolic parameters were optimized from experimental data using model simulations. Laboratory experiments showed that the TFA blood concentration during the 1.0% exposure was more than 50% less than the TFA blood concentration during the 0.1% exposure. After cessation of the 4-hr exposure, TFA blood concentrations from the 1.0% exposure rebounded and peaked between 12 and 26 hr after the exposure at about the same concentration as the 0.1% peak. This rebound phenomenon suggested that it was not killing of the metabolic enzymes but substrate inhibition that made the TFA blood concentrations lower than expected. Substrate inhibition by halothane, a structural analog of HCFC-123, has been described in the literature. Only by including a term for substrate inhibition in the PBPK model could pharmacokinetic data for TFA in blood be simulated adequately. This combination of laboratory experimentation and PBPK modeling can be applied to relate the levels of parent and metabolite to toxic effects with some hope of elucidating the toxic species. This work is the first step toward developing models that can be used to predict the toxicokinetics of HCFC-123 in humans

  9. Application of a Bayesian approach to physiological modelling of mavoglurant population pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Thierry; Dumitras, Swati; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2015-12-01

    Mavoglurant (MVG) is an antagonist at the metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 currently under clinical development at Novartis Pharma AG for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. The aim of this study was to develop and optimise a population whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (WBPBPK) model for MVG, to predict the impact of drug-drug interaction (DDI) and age on its pharmacokinetics. In a first step, the model was fitted to intravenous (IV) data from a clinical study in adults using a Bayesian approach. In a second step, the optimised model was used together with a mechanistic absorption model for exploratory Monte Carlo simulations. The ability of the model to predict MVG pharmacokinetics when orally co-administered with ketoconazole in adults or administered alone in 3-11 year-old children was evaluated using data from three other clinical studies. The population model provided a good description of both the median trend and variability in MVG plasma pharmacokinetics following IV administration in adults. The Bayesian approach offered a continuous flow of information from pre-clinical to clinical studies. Prediction of the DDI with ketoconazole was consistent with the results of a non-compartmental analysis of the clinical data (threefold increase in systemic exposure). Scaling of the WBPBPK model allowed reasonable extrapolation of MVG pharmacokinetics from adults to children. The model can be used to predict plasma and brain (target site) concentration-time profiles following oral administration of various immediate-release formulations of MVG alone or when co-administered with other drugs, in adults as well as in children. PMID:26231433

  10. Application of a Bayesian approach to physiological modelling of mavoglurant population pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Thierry; Dumitras, Swati; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2015-12-01

    Mavoglurant (MVG) is an antagonist at the metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 currently under clinical development at Novartis Pharma AG for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. The aim of this study was to develop and optimise a population whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (WBPBPK) model for MVG, to predict the impact of drug-drug interaction (DDI) and age on its pharmacokinetics. In a first step, the model was fitted to intravenous (IV) data from a clinical study in adults using a Bayesian approach. In a second step, the optimised model was used together with a mechanistic absorption model for exploratory Monte Carlo simulations. The ability of the model to predict MVG pharmacokinetics when orally co-administered with ketoconazole in adults or administered alone in 3-11 year-old children was evaluated using data from three other clinical studies. The population model provided a good description of both the median trend and variability in MVG plasma pharmacokinetics following IV administration in adults. The Bayesian approach offered a continuous flow of information from pre-clinical to clinical studies. Prediction of the DDI with ketoconazole was consistent with the results of a non-compartmental analysis of the clinical data (threefold increase in systemic exposure). Scaling of the WBPBPK model allowed reasonable extrapolation of MVG pharmacokinetics from adults to children. The model can be used to predict plasma and brain (target site) concentration-time profiles following oral administration of various immediate-release formulations of MVG alone or when co-administered with other drugs, in adults as well as in children.

  11. Integrated population pharmacokinetics of etanercept in healthy subjects and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Simon Y; Shu, Cathye; Korth-Bradley, Joan; Raible, Donald; Palmisano, Maria; Wadjula, Joseph; Fatenejad, Saeed; Bjornsson, Thorir

    2011-06-01

    Etanercept pharmacokinetics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and psoriasis were assessed separately with distinct models using population pharmacokinetics methods of limited precision. The different model structures and associated significant covariates identified by these earlier methods made it difficult to compare etanercept pharmacokinetics among disease groups. This integrated analysis aimed to establish a framework to evaluate previously established population pharmacokinetic models of etanercept, and to identify consistent and important demographic and disease factors that affected etanercept pharmacokinetics in a diverse population of healthy subjects and patients with RA and AS. In this integrated analysis, cumulative rich and sparse etanercept concentration data from 53 healthy volunteers, 212 patients with RA, and 346 patients with AS were examined and compared using nonlinear mixed effect methodology implemented the in NONMEM VI software package. A more precise estimation method (FOCEi) was employed and compared with the first-order method in population pharmacokinetics model building and evaluation. The integrated analysis found that an optimal population pharmacokinetics model with a 2-compartment structure adequately characterized etanercept pharmacokinetics in all subject groups. Health status or disease type did not significantly affect etanercept pharmacokinetics. In adult patients with RA and AS, age and body weight do not significantly affect etanercept pharmacokinetics. PMID:20852002

  12. [Study of pharmacokinetics of digoxin in ovariectomized rats model].

    PubMed

    Jin, Yong-wen; Qin, Hong-yan; Rao, Zhi; Zhang, Guo-qiang; Ma, Yan Rong; Wei, Yu-Hui; Wu, Xin-an

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the change of plasma concentration of digoxin (DIG) in rats with ovariectomy. Twelve female SD rats were randomly assigned into ovariectomized group and sham group (n = 6). All rats plasma was collected after a single dose of 2 mg x kg(-1) DIG administrated orally, serum DIG concentration was determined by LC-MS/MS. The level of P-gp in the intestinal was analyzed by Western blotting. Pharmacokinetic calculations were performed on each individual using DAS 2.0 practical pharmacokinetic software. Compared with the sham group, C(max) of ovariectomized group decreased significantly (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference of AUC(0-t), and the level of P-gp was elevated in ovariectomized group. It was found that C(max) of DIG was significantly reduced after ovariectomy, and the change was associated with the decreased level of estrogen, which contributes to the increased level of P-gp. PMID:27169283

  13. ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    Linskey, C.F.1, Harrison, R.A.2., Zhao, G.3., Barton, H.A., Lipscomb, J.C4., and Evans, M.V2., 1UNC, ESE, Chapel Hill, NC ; 2USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC; 3 UN...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DELTAMETHRIN IN DEVELOPING SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work describes the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, in the developing male Sprague-Dawley rat. Generalized Michaelis-Menten equations were used to calculate metabolic rate constants and organ weights ...

  15. In vitro and in vivo experimental data for pyrethroid pharmacokinetic models: the case of bifenthrin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic synthetic pesticides. Exposure to pyrethroids has increased due to declining use of other classes of pesticides. Our studies are focused on generating in vitro and in vivo data for the development of pharmacokinetic models for pyrethroids. Us...

  16. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  17. APPLICATION OF IN VITRO BIOTRANSFORMATION DATA AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING TO RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse biological effects of toxic substances are dependent upon the exposure concentration and the duration of exposure. Pharmacokinetic models can quantitatively relate the external concentration of a toxicant in the environment to the internal dose of the toxicant in the ...

  18. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to explore potential metabolic pathways of bromochloromethane in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromochloromethane (BCM) is a volatile compound and a by-product of disinfection of water by ofchlorination. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are used in risk assessment applications. An updated PBPKmodel for BCM is generated and applied to hypotheses testing c...

  19. Feasibility of Metabolic Parameter Estimation in Pharmacokinetic Models of Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a toxic chemical that was once used in degreasers and detergents, and some remnants of the chemical may be present in the water supply. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can assist in understanding resulting internal d...

  20. Pharmacokinetic Model of the Transport of Fast-Acting Insulin From the Subcutaneous and Intradermal Spaces to Blood.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dayu; Kulkarni, Sandip D; Chan, Alice; Keith, Stephen; Pettis, Ron; Kovatchev, Boris P; Farhi, Leon S; Breton, Marc D

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models describing the transport of insulin from the injection site to blood assist clinical decision making and are part of in silico platforms for developing and testing of insulin delivery strategies for treatment of patients with diabetes. The ability of these models to accurately describe all facets of the in vivo insulin transport is therefore critical for their application. Here, we propose a new model of fast-acting insulin analogs transport from the subcutaneous and intradermal spaces to blood that can accommodate clinically observed biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of injected insulin, 2 phenomena that are not captured by existing PK models. To develop the model we compare 9 insulin transport PK models which describe hypothetical insulin delivery pathways potentially capable of approximating biphasic appearance of exogenous insulin. The models are tested with respect to their ability to describe clinical data from 10 healthy volunteers which received 1 subcutaneous and 2 intradermal insulin injections on 3 different occasions. The optimal model, selected based on information and posterior identifiability criteria, assumes that insulin is delivered at the administrative site and is then transported to the bloodstream via 2 independent routes (1) diffusion-like process to the blood and (2) combination of diffusion-like processes followed by an additional compartment before entering the blood. This optimal model accounts for biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of exogenous insulin. It agrees better with the clinical data as compared to commonly used models and is expected to improve the in silico development and testing of insulin treatment strategies, including artificial pancreas systems. PMID:25759184

  1. Purified radiolabeled antithrombin III metabolism in three families with hereditary AT III deficiency: application of a three-compartment model

    SciTech Connect

    Knot, E.A.; de Jong, E.; ten Cate, J.W.; Iburg, A.H.; Henny, C.P.; Bruin, T.; Stibbe, J.

    1986-01-01

    Purified human radioiodinated antithrombin III (125I-AT III) was used to study its metabolism in six members from three different families with a known hereditary AT III deficiency. Six healthy volunteers served as a control group. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) showed the purified AT III to be homogeneous. Amino acid analysis of the protein revealed a composition identical to a highly purified internal standard. The specific activity was 5.6 U/mg. Analysis of plasma radioactivity data was performed, using a three-compartment model. Neither plasma disappearance half-times nor fractional catabolic rate constants differed significantly between patients and control subjects. The mean absolute catabolic rate in the patient group was significantly lower than that of the control group at 2.57 +/- 0.44 and 4.46 +/- 0.80 mg/kg/day, respectively. In addition, the mean patient alpha 1-phase, flux ratio (k1,2 and k2,1) of the second compartment alpha 2-phase and influx (k3,1) of the third compartment were significantly reduced as compared with control values. It has been tentatively concluded that the observed reduction in the second compartment may be caused by a decrease in endothelial cell surface binding.

  2. Use of population pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation to capture individual animal variability in the prediction of flunixin withdrawal times in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Baynes, R E; Leavens, T; Tell, L A; Riviere, J E

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model and predict tissue residues and the withdrawal interval (WDI) of flunixin in cattle. Data were pooled from published PK studies in which flunixin was administered through various dosage regimens to diverse populations of cattle. A set of liver data used to establish the regulatory label withdrawal time (WDT) also were used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fitted to plasma and liver concentrations by a population PK modeling approach. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the population mean and variabilities of PK parameters to predict liver concentrations of flunixin. The PK of flunixin was described best by a 3-compartment model with an extra liver compartment. The WDI estimated in this study with liver data only was the same as the label WDT. However, a longer WDI was estimated when both plasma and liver data were included in the population PK model. This study questions the use of small groups of healthy animals to determine WDTs for drugs intended for administration to large diverse populations. This may warrant a reevaluation of the current procedure for establishing WDT to prevent violative residues of flunixin.

  3. Human urine and plasma concentrations of bisphenol A extrapolated from pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Takamori; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Makiko; Shida, Satomi; Nishiyama, Sayako; Takano, Ryohji; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to extrapolate to humans the pharmacokinetics of estrogen analog bisphenol A determined in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Higher plasma concentrations and urinary excretions of bisphenol A glucuronide (a primary metabolite of bisphenol A) were observed in chimeric mice than in control mice after oral administrations, presumably because of enterohepatic circulation of bisphenol A glucuronide in control mice. Bisphenol A glucuronidation was faster in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. These findings suggest a predominantly urinary excretion route of bisphenol A glucuronide in chimeric mice with humanized liver. Reported human plasma and urine data for bisphenol A glucuronide after single oral administration of 0.1mg/kg bisphenol A were reasonably estimated using the current semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model extrapolated from humanized mice data using algometric scaling. The reported geometric mean urinary bisphenol A concentration in the U.S. population of 2.64μg/L underwent reverse dosimetry modeling with the current human semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model. This yielded an estimated exposure of 0.024μg/kg/day, which was less than the daily tolerable intake of bisphenol A (50μg/kg/day), implying little risk to humans. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling will likely prove useful for determining the species-dependent toxicological risk of bisphenol A.

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm.

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm. PMID:26297692

  6. Pharmacokinetics of ambroxol and clenbuterol tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Ge; Song, Li-Xue; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Xue-Ting; Di, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers after a single or multiple dosages oral administration. Methods: A total of 9 healthy adult subjects were given Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in a single dosage or multiple dosages respectively. LC/MS/MS were used for the determination of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol of in plasma. The important pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by DAS 2.0 software (compartment model). Results: Single and multiple dosage groups of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol were all fitted two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetics fitted first order kinetics process. No difference in pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol in single and multiple dosage groups volunteers was observed, Which showed no marked changes, suggesting that multiple dosing did not influence the velocity of drug metabolism. Moreover, parameters of Clenbuterol had significant difference between the single and multiple dosage groups (P<0.05), showing there was accumulation in the body. 9 subjects had completed single or multiple dosages oral administration test, with no adverse drug reactions appeared during the test. Conclusion: There was no obvious accumulation of Ambroxol after repeated dosing. But obvious accumulation of Clenbuterol was noted in multiple-dose administration. The established method is sensitive, accurate, reliable and specific, and it can meet the requirement of clinical pharmacokinetic trial. PMID:26770490

  7. Modeling and predicting drug pharmacokinetics in patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Rowland Yeo, Karen; Aarabi, Mohsen; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2011-03-01

    Current guidance issued by the US FDA to assess the impact of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of a drug under development has recently been updated to include evaluation of drugs with nonrenal elimination routes. Renal impairment not only affects elimination of the drug in the kidney, but also the nonrenal route of drugs that are extensively metabolized in the liver. Renal failure may influence hepatic drug metabolism either by inducing or suppressing hepatic enzymes, or by its effects on other variables such as protein binding, hepatic blood flow and accumulation of metabolites. Prior simulation of the potential exposure of individuals with renal impairment may help in the selection of a safe and effective dosage regimen. In this article, we discuss the application of a systems biology approach to simulate drug disposition in subjects with renal impairment.

  8. Pharmacokinetic study of medicinal polymers: models based on dextrans

    SciTech Connect

    Kulakov, V.N.; Pimenova, G.N.; Matveev, V.A.; Sedov, V.V.; Vasil'ev, A.E.

    1986-09-01

    The authors study the pharmacokinetics of dextrans with various molecular masses modified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) using a radioisotope method. The radionuclide /sup 125/I was selectively bound to a FITC residue attached to the polysaccharide by electrochemical iodination under potentiostatic conditions. In the experiments, dextrans modified by FITC were labeled with /sup 125/I (DF-/sup 125/I) by electrochemical iodination. The separation of DF-/sup 125/I and FITC from ionic forms of the radionuclide not bound to the polymer was carried out. The properties of the samples obtained are presented. The radioactivity accumulated in the rate organs and urine studied are shown. The features of DF-/sup 125/I behavior in the blood and liver are examined.

  9. A murine model for genetic manipulation of the T cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Kuo, M L; Rivera, A; Sutkowski, N; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-10-01

    The expression of exogenous genes in long-lived primary T cells is potentially beneficial for the treatment of various diseases including cancer, AIDS, genetic defects of the lymphoid compartment, and systemic enzyme deficiencies such as hemophilia. One approach for genetic modification of T cells is to introduce therapeutic genes into hematopoietic stem cells that would give rise to cells of the lymphoid lineage. Efficient gene transfer and expression in stem cells is often problematic, however. A more direct approach is to introduce the genes into mature primary T lymphocytes since the transferred genes can be maintained and expressed for long periods by long-lived peripheral T cells. In this report, we describe the adoptive transfer into SCID mice of both murine and human primary T cells that have been efficiently transduced with exogenous genes. Primary murine T cells transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene persisted for at least 5 months in lymphoid organs of SCID mice, continuously expressing the exogenous gene. Primary human T cells were also used as target cells for transfer of the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Expression of the lacZ gene could be detected in over 20% of the transduced primary T cells before adoptive transfer into SCID mice. Transduced human T cells were injected into SCID mice intraperitoneally (ip), and the beta-galactosidase activity could be detected in cells collected from peritoneal exudate washes of recipient mice 6 weeks post-injection. These results demonstrate the availability of a murine model in which the long-term effects of expression of exogenous genes in both murine and human T cells can be tested. PMID:8913290

  10. A genetic algorithm based global search strategy for population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model selection

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Mark; Sherer, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    The current algorithm for selecting a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model is based on the well-established forward addition/backward elimination method. A central strength of this approach is the opportunity for a modeller to continuously examine the data and postulate new hypotheses to explain observed biases. This algorithm has served the modelling community well, but the model selection process has essentially remained unchanged for the last 30 years. During this time, more robust approaches to model selection have been made feasible by new technology and dramatic increases in computation speed. We review these methods, with emphasis on genetic algorithm approaches and discuss the role these methods may play in population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model selection. PMID:23772792

  11. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic knowledgebase and web-based interface for rapid model ranking and querying

    EPA Science Inventory

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific pa...

  12. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of non-linear brain distribution of morphine: influence of active saturable influx and P-glycoprotein mediated efflux

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, D; Freijer, J; de Mik, D; Bouw, M R; Danhof, M; de Lange, E C M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Biophase equilibration must be considered to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) correlations of opioids. The objective was to characterise in a quantitative manner the non-linear distribution kinetics of morphine in brain. Experimental approach: Male rats received a 10-min infusion of 4 mg kg−1 of morphine, combined with a continuous infusion of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibitor GF120918 or vehicle, or 40 mg kg−1 morphine alone. Unbound extracellular fluid (ECF) concentrations obtained by intracerebral microdialysis and total blood concentrations were analysed using a population modelling approach. Key results: Blood pharmacokinetics of morphine was best described with a three-compartment model and was not influenced by GF120918. Non-linear distribution kinetics in brain ECF was observed with increasing dose. A one compartment distribution model was developed, with separate expressions for passive diffusion, active saturable influx and active efflux by Pgp. The passive diffusion rate constant was 0.0014 min−1. The active efflux rate constant decreased from 0.0195 min−1 to 0.0113 min−1 in the presence of GF120918. The active influx was insensitive to GF120918 and had a maximum transport (Nmax/Vecf) of 0.66 ng min−1 ml−1 and was saturated at low concentrations of morphine (C50=9.9 ng ml−1). Conclusions and implications: Brain distribution of morphine is determined by three factors: limited passive diffusion; active efflux, reduced by 42% by Pgp inhibition; low capacity active uptake. This implies blood concentration-dependency and sensitivity to drug-drug interactions. These factors should be taken into account in further investigations on PK-PD correlations of morphine. PMID:17471182

  13. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  14. Fourier domain closed-form formulas for estimation of kinetic parameters in reversible multi-compartment models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Compared with static imaging, dynamic emission computed tomographic imaging with compartment modeling can quantify in vivo physiologic processes, providing useful information about molecular disease processes. Dynamic imaging involves estimation of kinetic rate parameters. For multi-compartment models, kinetic parameter estimation can be computationally demanding and problematic with local minima. Methods This paper offers a new perspective to the compartment model fitting problem where Fourier linear system theory is applied to derive closed-form formulas for estimating kinetic parameters for the two-compartment model. The proposed Fourier domain estimation method provides a unique solution, and offers very different noise response as compared to traditional non-linear chi-squared minimization techniques. Results The unique feature of the proposed Fourier domain method is that only low frequency components are used for kinetic parameter estimation, where the DC (i.e., the zero frequency) component in the data is treated as the most important information, and high frequency components that tend to be corrupted by statistical noise are discarded. Computer simulations show that the proposed method is robust without having to specify the initial condition. The resultant solution can be fine tuned using the traditional iterative method. Conclusions The proposed Fourier-domain estimation method has closed-form formulas. The proposed Fourier-domain curve-fitting method does not require an initial condition, it minimizes a quadratic objective function and a closed-form solution can be obtained. The noise is easier to control, simply by discarding the high frequency components, and emphasizing the DC component. PMID:22995548

  15. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model for Gentamicin and Its Adaptive Resistance with Predictions of Dosing Schedules in Newborn Infants

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Elisabet I.; Cars, Otto; Friberg, Lena E.

    2012-01-01

    Gentamicin is commonly used in the management of neonatal infections. Development of adaptive resistance is typical for aminoglycosides and reduces the antibacterial effect. There is, however, a lack of understanding of how this phenomenon influences the effect of different dosing schedules. The aim was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model that describes the time course of the bactericidal activity of gentamicin and its adaptive resistance and to investigate different dosing schedules in preterm and term newborn infants based on the developed model. In vitro time-kill curve experiments were conducted on a strain of Escherichia coli (MIC of 2 mg/liter). The gentamicin exposure was either constant (0.125 to 16 mg/liter) or dynamic (simulated concentration-time profiles in a kinetic system with peak concentrations of 2.0, 3.9, 7.8, and 16 mg/liter given as single doses or as repeated doses every 6, 12, or 24 h). Semimechanistic PKPD models were fitted to the bacterial counts in the NONMEM (nonlinear mixed effects modeling) program. A model with compartments for growing and resting bacteria, with a function allowing the maximal bacterial killing of gentamicin to reduce with exposure, characterized both the fast bactericidal effect and the adaptive resistance. Despite a lower peak concentration, preterm neonates were predicted to have a higher bacterial killing effect than term neonates for the same per-kg dose because of gentamicin's longer half-life. The model supported an extended dosing interval of gentamicin in preterm neonates, and for all neonates, dosing intervals of 36 to 48 h were as effective as a 24-h dosing interval for the same total dose. PMID:22037853

  16. In Vivo Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Cefquinome in an Experimental Mouse Model of Staphylococcus Aureus Mastitis following Intramammary Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Yu-Feng; Chen, Mei-Ren; Li, Xiao; Qiao, Gui-Lin; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus remains the major cause of morbidity of bovine mastitis worldwide leading to massive economic losses. Cefquinome is a fourth generation cephalosporin, which preserves susceptibility and antibacterial activity against S. aureus. This work aims to study the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling following intramammary administration of cefquinome against S. aureus mastitis. The mouse model of S. aureus mastitis was developed for the PK/PD experiments. The plasma PK characteristics after intramammary injection of cefquinome at various single doses of 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 μg per gland (both fourth pairs of glands: L4 and R4) were calculated using one-compartment and first-order absorption model. PD study was investigated based on twenty-one intermittent dosing regimens, of which total daily dose ranged from 25 to 4800 μg per mouse and dosage intervals included 8, 12 or 24 h. The sigmoid Emax model of inhibitory effect was employed for PK/PD modeling. The results of PK/PD integration of cefquinome against S. aureus suggested that the percentage of duration that drug concentration exceeded the minimal inhibitory concentration (%T>MIC) and the ratio of area under time-concentration curve over MIC (AUC/MIC) are important indexes to evaluate the antibacterial activity. The PK/PD parameters of %T>MIC and AUC0-24/MIC were 35.98% and 137.43 h to obtain a 1.8 logCFU/gland reduction of bacterial colony counts in vivo, against S. aureus strains with cefquinome MIC of 0.5μg/ml. PMID:27218674

  17. Elucidation of arctigenin pharmacokinetics after intravenous and oral administrations in rats: integration of in vitro and in vivo findings via semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Zhang, Yufeng; Wo, Siukwan; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Although arctigenin (AR) has attracted substantial research interests due to its promising and diverse therapeutic effects, studies regarding its biotransformation were limited. The current study aims to provide information regarding the pharmacokinetic properties of AR via various in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling. Our in vitro rat microsome incubation studies revealed that glucuronidation was the main intestinal and liver metabolic pathway of AR, which occurred with V max, K m, and Clint of 47.5 ± 3.4 nmol/min/mg, 204 ± 22 μM, and 233 ± 9 μl/min/mg with intestinal microsomes and 2.92 ± 0.07 nmol/min/mg, 22.7 ± 1.2 μM, and 129 ± 4 μl/min/mg with liver microsomes, respectively. In addition, demethylation and hydrolysis of AR occurred with liver microsomes but not with intestinal microsomes. In vitro incubation of AR and its metabolites in intestinal content demonstrated that glucuronides of AR excreted in bile could be further hydrolyzed back to the parent compound, suggesting its potential enterohepatic circulation. Furthermore, rapid formation followed by fast elimination of arctigenic acid (AA) and arctigenin-4'-O-glucuronide (AG) was observed after both intravenous (IV) and oral administrations of AR in rats. Linear pharmacokinetics was observed at three different doses for AR, AA, and AG after IV administration of AR (0.48-2.4 mg/kg, r (2) > 0.99). Finally, an integrated semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic model using in vitro enzyme kinetic and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters was successfully developed to describe plasma concentrations of AR, AA, and AG after both IV and oral administration of AR at all tested doses.

  18. Elucidation of arctigenin pharmacokinetics after intravenous and oral administrations in rats: integration of in vitro and in vivo findings via semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Zhang, Yufeng; Wo, Siukwan; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Although arctigenin (AR) has attracted substantial research interests due to its promising and diverse therapeutic effects, studies regarding its biotransformation were limited. The current study aims to provide information regarding the pharmacokinetic properties of AR via various in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling. Our in vitro rat microsome incubation studies revealed that glucuronidation was the main intestinal and liver metabolic pathway of AR, which occurred with V max, K m, and Clint of 47.5 ± 3.4 nmol/min/mg, 204 ± 22 μM, and 233 ± 9 μl/min/mg with intestinal microsomes and 2.92 ± 0.07 nmol/min/mg, 22.7 ± 1.2 μM, and 129 ± 4 μl/min/mg with liver microsomes, respectively. In addition, demethylation and hydrolysis of AR occurred with liver microsomes but not with intestinal microsomes. In vitro incubation of AR and its metabolites in intestinal content demonstrated that glucuronides of AR excreted in bile could be further hydrolyzed back to the parent compound, suggesting its potential enterohepatic circulation. Furthermore, rapid formation followed by fast elimination of arctigenic acid (AA) and arctigenin-4'-O-glucuronide (AG) was observed after both intravenous (IV) and oral administrations of AR in rats. Linear pharmacokinetics was observed at three different doses for AR, AA, and AG after IV administration of AR (0.48-2.4 mg/kg, r (2) > 0.99). Finally, an integrated semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic model using in vitro enzyme kinetic and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters was successfully developed to describe plasma concentrations of AR, AA, and AG after both IV and oral administration of AR at all tested doses. PMID:25274606

  19. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2015-12-15

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d6-BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d6-BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d6-BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. PMID:26522835

  20. The Sheep as a Model of Preclinical Safety and Pharmacokinetic Evaluations of Candidate Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, David; Dias, Nicola; Holding, Jeremy; Muntendam, Alex; Oostebring, Freddy; Dreier, Peter; Rohan, Lisa; Nuttall, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    When developing novel microbicide products for the prevention of HIV infection, the preclinical safety program must evaluate not only the active pharmaceutical ingredient but also the product itself. To that end, we applied several relatively standard toxicology study methodologies to female sheep, incorporating an assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and local toxicity of a dapivirine-containing human vaginal ring formulation (Dapivirine Vaginal Ring-004). We performed a 3-month general toxicology study, a preliminary pharmacokinetic study using drug-loaded vaginal gel, and a detailed assessment of the kinetics of dapivirine delivery to plasma, vaginal, and rectal fluid and rectal, vaginal, and cervical tissue over 28 days of exposure and 3 and 7 days after removal of the ring. The findings of the general toxicology study supported the existing data from both preclinical and clinical studies in that there were no signs of toxicity related to dapivirine. In addition, the presence of the physical dapivirine ring did not alter local or systemic toxicity or the pharmacokinetics of dapivirine. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the dapivirine ring produced significant vaginal tissue levels of dapivirine. However, no dapivirine was detected in cervical tissue samples using the methods described here. Plasma and vaginal fluid levels were lower than those in previous clinical studies, while there were detectable dapivirine levels in the rectal tissue and fluid. All tissue and fluid levels tailed off rapidly to undetectable levels following removal of the ring. The sheep represents a very useful model for the assessment of the safety and pharmacokinetics of microbicide drug delivery devices, such as the vaginal ring. PMID:25845860

  1. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of antibacterial activity of cefpodoxime and cefixime in in vitro kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Rand, Kenneth H; Obermann, Bernd; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2005-02-01

    The bacterial time-kill curves of cefpodoxime and cefixime against four bacterial strains (Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae/penicillin sensitive and S. pneumoniae/penicillin intermediate) were compared in in vitro infection models in which various human pharmacokinetic profiles of unbound antibiotic were simulated. This approach offers more detailed information than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) does about the time course of antibacterial efficacy of an antibiotic. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model based on unbound antibiotic concentrations at the site of infection, and a sigmoid Emax-relationship with EC50 as the antibiotic concentration necessary to produce 50% of the maximum effect, effectively described the antimicrobial efficacy of both cefpodoxime and cefixime. The EC50 values of cefpodoxime and cefixime were consistent with their respective MIC values. Both antibiotics had similar high potency against H. influenzae (EC50: 0.04 mg/L) and M. catarrhalis (EC50: 0.12 mg/L), while the potency of cefpodoxime against S. pneumoniae strains was about 10-fold higher than that of cefixime (EC50s/sensitive strain: 0.02 mg/L versus 0.27 mg/L; EC50s/intermediate strain: 0.09 mg/L versus 0.69 mg/L). Applications of this model and unbound tissue PK profiles obtained from a previous clinical study performed in our group, showed that cefpodoxime has higher bacteriological potency than cefixime against S. pneumoniae. Simulations based on this model allow the comparison of antibacterial efficacy of different antibiotics and dosing regimens.

  2. Nonparametric Bayes approach for a semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan

    Both frequentist and Bayesian approaches have been used to characterize population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics(PK/PD) models. These methods focus on estimating the population parameters and assessing the association between the characteristics of PK/PD and the subject covariates. In this work, we propose a Dirichlet process mixture model to classify the patients based on their individualized pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. Then we can predict the new patients' dose-response curves given their concentration-time profiles. Additionally, we implement a modern Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm for sampling inference of parameters. The detailed sampling procedures as well as the results are discussed in a simulation data and a real data example. We also evaluate an approximate solution of a system of nonlinear differential equations from Euler's method and compare the results with a general numerical solver, ode from R package, deSolve.

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics of Peramivir in Healthy Volunteers and Influenza Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yumiko; Ishibashi, Toru; Hollister, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Peramivir is an intravenous anti-influenza agent that inhibits viral growth by selectively inhibiting neuraminidase in human influenza A and B viruses. To characterize its pharmacokinetics, a population pharmacokinetic analysis of peramivir was performed using 3,199 plasma concentration data samples from 332 subjects in six clinical studies in Japan and the United States, including studies with renal impairment subjects, elderly subjects, and influenza patients. A three-compartment model well described the plasma concentration data for peramivir, and creatinine clearance was found to be the most important factor influencing clearance. Age and body weight were also found to be covariates for clearance and the volume of distribution, respectively. No difference in pharmacokinetics was found between genders or between Japanese and U.S. subjects. Small differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between uninfected subjects and influenza patients (clearance was 18% higher and the volume of distribution was 6% lower in influenza patients). Monte Carlo simulations indicated that single adjusted doses of 1/3- and 1/6-fold for patients with moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively, would give areas under the curve comparable to those for patients with normal renal function. The population pharmacokinetic model developed for peramivir should be useful for understanding its pharmacokinetic characteristics and for dose adjustment on the basis of renal function. PMID:26282420

  4. Population Pharmacokinetics and Therapeutic Efficacy of Febuxostat in Patients with Severe Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daiki; Chisaki, Yugo; Noda, Satoshi; Araki, Hisazumi; Uzu, Takashi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Yoshitaka; Morita, Shin-Ya; Terada, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of severe renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), including hemodialysis) on the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic effects of febuxostat using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. This study recruited patients with hyperuricemia who were initially treated with allopurinol, but were switched to febuxostat, and it consists of 2 sub-studies: a pharmacokinetic study (26 patients) and retrospective efficacy evaluation study (51 patients). The demographic and clinical data of patients were collected from electronic medical records. Plasma febuxostat concentrations were obtained at each hospital visit. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed with NONMEM version 7.2. A total of 128 plasma febuxostat concentrations from 26 patients were used in the population pharmacokinetic analysis. The data were best described by a 1-compartment model with first order absorption. Covariate analysis revealed that renal function did not influence the pharmacokinetics of febuxostat, whereas actual body weight significantly influenced apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The retrospective efficacy analysis showed the favorable therapeutic response of febuxostat switched from allopurinol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. No serious adverse event associated with febuxostat was observed irrespective of renal function. The population pharmacokinetic analysis and therapeutic analysis of febuxostat revealed that severe renal dysfunction had no influence on the pharmacokinetic parameters of febuxostat. These results suggest that febuxostat is tolerated well by patients with severe renal impairment.

  5. Pharmacokinetic study of a systemically administered novel liposomal Temoporfin formulation in an animal tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Jenny; Johansson, Ann; Bendsoe, Niels; Gräfe, Susanna; Trebst, Tilmann; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Katarina

    2007-02-01

    Meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC)(international generic name Temoporfin) is a potent photosensitizer used for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study the pharmacokinetics of a systemically administered novel lipid formulation of Temoporfin in a murine tumor model has been investigated. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements were performed at several time intervals following drug administration, yielding information on the Temoporfin concentration within excised internal organs as a function of time after injection. Both point-monitoring and imaging setups were used. The acquired fluorescence data were correlated to the concentration of Temoporfin obtained with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). There was a significant correlation between the fluorescence methods and HPLC for most organs investigated. The pharmacokinetics of this new liposomal formulation of Temoporfin exhibited a rather flat temporal profile in the time interval 2-8 hours in this study.

  6. Application of multi-compartment wound models to plutonium-contaminated wounds incurred by former workers at rocky flats.

    PubMed

    Falk, Roger B; Daugherty, Nancy M; Aldrich, Joe M; Furman, F Joseph; Hilmas, Duane E

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the analysis of urine bioassay data, spanning four decades, from five workers who had wounds contaminated with plutonium at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant during the period 1961-1967. The cases were selected from participants in the Department of Energy-sponsored Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats, which provided medical monitoring, modern bioassay measurements, and internal dose re-evaluations for former Rocky Flats workers. The cases include a variety of wound types, excision treatment regimes, and monitoring information. These wound cases illustrate the use of two multi-compartment wound models and three plutonium urine excretion models for retrospective calculation of internal plutonium depositions resulting from wounds for which no chelation therapy was administered. Wound model compartment fractions and half times are determined for each case and urine excretion model as are composite parameter values. The urine analysis and wound count measurements obtained under the program provide data with state-of-the art measurement sensitivity, as well as the opportunity to include long-term excretion and wound site data that exceed 10,000 d post-exposure for retrospective intake and dose evaluations. These data are provided to the radiation dosimetry community for use in developing and testing improved models for plutonium deposition in wounds. PMID:16832194

  7. Liver fibrosis impairs hepatic pharmacokinetics of liver transplant drugs in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu-Hong; Liu, Xin; Khlentzos, Alexander M; Asadian, Peyman; Li, Peng; Thorling, Camilla A; Robertson, Thomas A; Fletcher, Linda M; Crawford, Darrell H G; Roberts, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate hepatic pharmacokinetics of the four most common drugs (metoprolol, omeprazole, spironolactone, and furosemide) given to patients undergoing liver transplantation before surgery. The investigation was carried out in CCl(4)-induced fibrotic perfused rat livers and the results were compared to those in normal rat liver. Drug outflow fraction-time profiles were obtained after bolus injection into a single-pass-perfused normal or fibrotic rat liver. The pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using previously developed barrier-limited and space-distributed models. The results showed a marked increase in the liver fibrosis index for CCl(4)-treated rats compared to controls (p<0.05). The extraction ratios (E) for all drugs were significantly lower (p<0.05) in fibrotic than in normal livers and the decrease in E was consistent with the decrease in intrinsic clearance and permeability-surface area product. In addition, other than for furosemide, the mean transit times for all drugs were significantly longer (p<0.01) in the fibrotic livers than in normal livers. Pharmacokinetic model and stepwise regression analyses suggest that these differences arise from a reduction in both the transport of drugs across the basolateral membrane and their metabolic clearance and were in a manner similar to those previously found for another group of drugs.

  8. Anthropometric estimations of percent body fat in NCAA Division I female athletes: a 4-compartment model validation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jordan R; Tobkin, Sarah E; Smith, Abbie E; Lockwood, Chris M; Walter, Ashley A; Cramer, Joel T; Beck, Travis W; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2009-07-01

    Anthropometric equations, based on 2-compartment models, have been routinely used to estimate body composition in female college athletes; however, these equations are not without error. In an attempt to decrease the error associated with anthropometric equations, updated equations were developed using multiple-compartment models, although the validity of these equations has not yet been established. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine the validity of the updated anthropometric equations and compare them with previously validated generalized equations for estimating percent fat (%fat) in female athletes. Twenty-nine white female NCAA Division I athletes (20 +/- 1 years) volunteered to have their %fat estimated using anthropometric measurements. Skinfold equations included generalized and updated equations and a height and weight-based equation. %fat values were compared with a criterion 4-compartment model. All equations produced low total error (TE) (< or =3.38%fat) and SEE values (< or =2.97%fat) and high r values (r > or = 0.78). The 2 updated skinfold equations produced the highest constant error (CE) values, but the tightest limits of agreement (< or = -1.58 +/- 4.86%fat; CE +/- 2SD) compared with the 3 generalized Jackson et al. equations (< or =0.92 +/- 5.34%fat), whereas the limits of agreement for the height and weight-based equation (+/- 6.00%fat) were the widest. Compared with the updated skinfold equations, the generalized Jackson et al. skinfold equations produced nearly identical TE values. Results suggest that the updated skinfold equations are valid but not superior to the generalized Jackson et al. equations, and the height and weight-based equation of Fornetti et al. is not recommended due to the large individual error in this population. Additionally, more than 3 skinfold sites did not improve %fat values. Therefore, the Jackson et al. sum of 3 skinfold equation is the suggested skinfold equation in the white female NCAA

  9. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fosfomycin in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Suzanne L.; Frantzeskaki, Frantzeska; Wallis, Steven C.; Diakaki, Chryssa; Giamarellou, Helen; Koulenti, Despoina; Karaiskos, Ilias; Lipman, Jeffrey; Dimopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the population pharmacokinetics of fosfomycin in critically ill patients. In this observational study, serial blood samples were taken over several dosing intervals of intravenous fosfomycin treatment. Blood samples were analyzed using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Five hundred fifteen blood samples were collected over one to six dosing intervals from 12 patients. The mean (standard deviation) age was 62 (17) years, 67% of patients were male, and creatinine clearance (CLCR) ranged from 30 to 300 ml/min. A two-compartment model with between-subject variability on clearance and volume of distribution of the central compartment (Vc) described the data adequately. Calculated CLCR was supported as a covariate on fosfomycin clearance. The mean parameter estimates for clearance on the first day were 2.06 liters/h, Vc of 27.2 liters, intercompartmental clearance of 19.8 liters/h, and volume of the peripheral compartment of 22.3 liters. We found significant pharmacokinetic variability for fosfomycin in this heterogeneous patient sample, which may be explained somewhat by the observed variations in renal function. PMID:26239990

  10. 76 FR 44246 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Series Airplanes; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... the Federal Register on May 10, 2011 (76 FR 26949). No comments were received and the special...; Overhead Flight Attendant Rest Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... overhead flight attendant rest compartment. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not...

  11. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health. Part I: Moving beyond pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riviere, J E; Gabrielsson, J; Fink, M; Mochel, J

    2016-06-01

    The application of mathematical modeling to problems in animal health has a rich history in the form of pharmacokinetic modeling applied to problems in veterinary medicine. Advances in modeling and simulation beyond pharmacokinetics have the potential to streamline and speed-up drug research and development programs. To foster these goals, a series of manuscripts will be published with the following goals: (i) expand the application of modeling and simulation to issues in veterinary pharmacology; (ii) bridge the gap between the level of modeling and simulation practiced in human and veterinary pharmacology; (iii) explore how modeling and simulation concepts can be used to improve our understanding of common issues not readily addressed in human pharmacology (e.g. breed differences, tissue residue depletion, vast weight ranges among adults within a single species, interspecies differences, small animal species research where data collection is limited to sparse sampling, availability of different sampling matrices); and (iv) describe how quantitative pharmacology approaches could help understanding key pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of a drug candidate, with the goal of providing explicit, reproducible, and predictive evidence for optimizing drug development plans, enabling critical decision making, and eventually bringing safe and effective medicines to patients. This study introduces these concepts and introduces new approaches to modeling and simulation as well as clearly articulate basic assumptions and good practices. The driving force behind these activities is to create predictive models that are based on solid physiological and pharmacological principles as well as adhering to the limitations that are fundamental to applying mathematical and statistical models to biological systems.

  12. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health. Part I: Moving beyond pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riviere, J E; Gabrielsson, J; Fink, M; Mochel, J

    2016-06-01

    The application of mathematical modeling to problems in animal health has a rich history in the form of pharmacokinetic modeling applied to problems in veterinary medicine. Advances in modeling and simulation beyond pharmacokinetics have the potential to streamline and speed-up drug research and development programs. To foster these goals, a series of manuscripts will be published with the following goals: (i) expand the application of modeling and simulation to issues in veterinary pharmacology; (ii) bridge the gap between the level of modeling and simulation practiced in human and veterinary pharmacology; (iii) explore how modeling and simulation concepts can be used to improve our understanding of common issues not readily addressed in human pharmacology (e.g. breed differences, tissue residue depletion, vast weight ranges among adults within a single species, interspecies differences, small animal species research where data collection is limited to sparse sampling, availability of different sampling matrices); and (iv) describe how quantitative pharmacology approaches could help understanding key pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of a drug candidate, with the goal of providing explicit, reproducible, and predictive evidence for optimizing drug development plans, enabling critical decision making, and eventually bringing safe and effective medicines to patients. This study introduces these concepts and introduces new approaches to modeling and simulation as well as clearly articulate basic assumptions and good practices. The driving force behind these activities is to create predictive models that are based on solid physiological and pharmacological principles as well as adhering to the limitations that are fundamental to applying mathematical and statistical models to biological systems. PMID:26592724

  13. Validation of a Best-Fit Pharmacokinetic Model for Scopolamine Disposition after Intranasal Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S-L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Motion Sickness. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were determined per Investigative New Drug (IND) evaluation guidance by the Food and Drug Administration. Earlier, we reported the development of a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine (SCOP) concentrations using data collected from an IND clinical trial with INSCOP. This data analysis project is designed to validate the reported best fit PK model for SCOP by comparing observed and model predicted SCOP concentration-time profiles after administration of INSCOP.

  14. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling and simulation using the electrical circuit simulation program SPICE2.

    PubMed

    Thakker, K M

    1984-01-01

    The use of the electrical circuit simulation program SPICE2 for performing digital computer simulations of linear and non-linear pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models is described. SPICE2 utilizes the principles of network thermodynamics (thermodynamics of electrical circuits). These principles dictate analogy between the conservation laws of chemical reactions and mass transport and Kirchhoff's laws of current and voltage balance, and also prove that Fick's law of diffusion is isomorphous with the conductance form of Ohm's law. Detailed descriptions of program inputs, formats, and options for simulation of linear and non-linear pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic systems are provided, with appropriate examples. Single as well as multiple dose simulations (accumulation kinetics and dynamics) are discussed. The advantages of SPICE2 over other available simulation packages, including user-friendliness, ease of operation, versatility, power, and the economy of time and effort afforded, are emphasized. The educational value of SPICE2 as a highly versatile tool for teaching both fundamental and complex pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic concepts, as well as its routine usage in elucidating complex research problems, are also discussed.

  15. Novel endogenous glycan therapy for retinal diseases: safety, in vitro stability, ocular pharmacokinetic modeling, and biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Shankar; Li, Huiling; Palamoor, Mallika; de Obarrio, Walter T Luchsinger; Madhura, Dorababu; Meibohm, Bernd; Jablonski, Monica M

    2014-03-01

    Asialo, tri-antennary oligosaccharide (NA3 glycan) is an endogenous compound, which supports proper folding of outer segment membranes, promotes normal ultrastructure, and maintains protein expression patterns of photoreceptors and Müller cells in the absence of retinal pigment epithelium support. It is a potential new therapeutic for atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other retinal degenerative disorders. Herein, we evaluate the safety, in vitro stability, ocular pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of NA3. NA3 was injected into the vitreous of New Zealand white rabbits at two concentrations viz. 1 nM (minimum effective concentration (MEC)) and 100 nM (100XMEC) at three time points. Safety was evaluated using routine clinical and laboratory tests. Ocular pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of [(3)H]NA3 were estimated using scintillation counting in various parts of the eye, multiple peripheral organs, and plasma. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by non-compartmental modeling. A 2-aminobenzamide labeling and hydrophilic interaction liquid interaction chromatography were used to assess plasma and vitreous stability. NA3 was well tolerated by the eye. The concentration of NA3 in eye tissues was in the order: vitreous > retina > sclera/choroid > aqueous humor > cornea > lens. Area under the curve (0 to infinity) (AUC∞) was the highest in the vitreous thereby providing a positive concentration gradient for NA3 to reach the retina. Half-lives in critical eye tissues ranged between 40 and 60 h. NA3 concentrations were negligible in peripheral organs. Radioactivity from [(3)H]NA3 was excreted via urine and feces. NA3 was stable at 37°C in vitreous over a minimum of 6 days, while it degraded rapidly in plasma. Collectively, these results document that NA3 shows a good safety profile and favorable ocular pharmacokinetics.

  16. MODELING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND PHARMACOKINETICS IN RAT PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK model predictions of internal dosimetry in young rats were compared to adult animals for benzene, chloroform (CHL), methylene chloride, methyl ethly ketone (MEK), perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene.

  17. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling for absorption, transport, metabolism and excretion.

    PubMed

    Pang, K Sandy; Durk, Matthew R

    2010-12-01

    The seminal paper on the liver physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model by Rowland et al. (J Pharmacokinet Biopharm 1:123-136, 1973) that described the influence of blood flow, intrinsic clearance, and binding on hepatic clearance had inspired further development of PBPK modeling of the liver, kidney and intestine as well as whole body. Shortly thereafter, a series of papers from Pang and Rowland compared the well-stirred and parallel-tube liver models and sparked further development on clearance concepts in the liver, including those described by the dispersion model. From 2005 onwards, several seminal papers by Rodgers and Rowland, in their recognition of the binding of molecules to tissue acidic and neutral phospholipids, improved the methodology in providing estimates of the tissue-to-plasma coefficient and rendering easy calculation of these hard-to-get constants. The improvement has strongly consolidated the basic premise on PBPK modeling and simulations and these basics have allowed scientists to focus on other important variables: membrane barriers, and transporter and enzyme and their heterogeneities that further impact drug disposition. In particular, the PBPK models have delved into sequential metabolism and futile cycling to illustrate how transporters and enzymes could affect the metabolism of drugs and metabolites. PBPK models that are especially pertinent to metabolite kinetics are being utilized in drug studies and risk assessment. These types of PBPK modeling reveal differences in kinetics between the formed vs. preformed metabolite, showing special considerations for membrane barriers, and the influence of competing pathways and competing organs.

  18. Mechanism-Based Model of the Pharmacokinetics of Enfuvirtide, an HIV Fusion Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Utkala; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a model of the pharmacokinetics of enfuvirtide, a potent inhibitor of the fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with target cells. We assume that subcutaneously administered enfuvirtide accumulates in the injection region, diffuses locally, and gets absorbed into blood, where it reversibly associates with lipidic cell membranes and is eventually eliminated. We develop mathematical descriptions of each of these processes and predict the time-evolution of the concentration of enfuvirtide in plasma, Cp. We find, interestingly, that diffusion of enfuvirtide in the subcutaneous region is decoupled from absorption, which enables deduction of analytical expressions for Cp following single dose administration and ordinary differential equations following multiple dose administration and renders our model amenable to data analysis. Model predictions provide excellent fits to observed plasma concentration-time profiles of enfuvirtide following the intravenous and subcutaneous administration of a single dose and without any adjustable parameters capture quantitatively concentration-time profiles following the administration of multiple doses. Our model thus presents a robust description of the pharmacokinetics of enfuvirtide and may be applied in conjunction with models of viral dynamics to assess responses of HIV-1 patients to alternative enfuvirtide-based therapies. Further, our model reveals that key pharmacokinetic characteristics of enfuvirtide, viz., steady state values of peak and trough concentrations and area under the concentration-time curve, vary nearly linearly with dosage over a broad range of dosages and for different dosing regimens, which enables a priori estimation of enfuvirtide exposure levels for different treatment protocols and may serve to establish guidelines for therapy optimization. PMID:18258267

  19. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Manganese I. Dose-Dependencies of Uptake and Elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Dorman, David C.; Covington, Tammie R.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Homeostatic mechanisms controlling uptake, storage, and elimination of dietary manganese (Mn) afford protection against fluctuations in tissue manganese (Mn) levels. Homeostatic control of inhaled Mn is less well understood, but important in assessing likely risks of Mn inhalation. We have used two compartmental kinetic models to characterize the influence of Mn exposure level and route (oral, inhalation) on uptake, elimination and transport of Mn. The models were fitted to or used to interpret data from five whole body Mn elimination studies, from one dietary Mn balance study, and from two biliary elimination studies, one acute and one chronic. As dietary Mn concentrations increased from low-sufficiency (1.5 ppm) to sufficiency (20 ppm), control of Mn uptake shifts from the intestine (principally), to more proportional control by both intestinal tissues and the liver. Using a 2-compartment distribution model, the increased elimination of 54Mn tracer doses in response to increases in dietary (rats and mice) or inhaled Mn (rats) resulted from increases in Mn elimination rate constants rather than changes in intercompartmental transfer rate constants between a central compartment and deep compartment. The PK analysis also indicated differential control of absorption in single gavage oral dose studies versus continuous high oral doses in the feed. The gavage study indicated increased elimination rate constants and the chronic study had reduced rate constants for absorption. These dose-dependencies in uptake and elimination are necessary inputs for comprehensive PK models guiding human health risk assessments with Mn.

  20. Preliminary Modelling of Mass Flux at the Surface of Plant Leaves within the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Madeleine; Paille, Christel; Lasseur, Christophe

    The ESA project Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an ecosystem of micro-organisms and higher plants, constructed with the objective of being operated as a tool to understand artificial ecosystems to be used for a long-term or permanent manned planetary base (e.g. Moon or Mars). The purpose of such a system is to provide for generation of food, water recycling, atmospheric regeneration and waste management within defined standards of quality and reliability. As MELiSSA consists of individual compartments which are connected to each other, the robustness of the system is fully dependent on the control of each compartment, as well as the flow management between them. Quality of consumables and reliability of the ecosystem rely on the knowledge, understanding and control of each of the components. This includes the full understanding of all processes related to the higher plants. To progress in that direction, this paper focuses on the mechanical processes driving the gas and liquid exchanges between the plant leaf and its environment. The process responsible for the mass transfer on the surface of plant leaves is diffusion. The diffusion flux is dependent on the behaviour of the stoma of the leaf and also on the leaf boundary layer (BL). In this paper, the physiology of the leaf is briefly examined in order to relate parameters such as light quality, light quantity, CO2 concentration, temperature, leaf water potential, humidity, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) gradients and pollutants to the opening or closing of stomata. The diffusion process is described theoretically and the description is compared to empirical approaches. The variables of the BL are examined and the effect airflow in the compartment has on the BL is investigated. Also presented is the impact changes in different environmental parameters may have on the fluid exchanges. Finally, some tests, to evaluate the accuracy of the concluded model, are suggested.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of amikacin and chloramphenicol in the aqueous humor of rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, M; Rush, D; Madu, A; Motyl, M; Miller, M H

    1991-01-01

    Composite data describing ocular pharmacokinetics are unreliable because of intersubject variation. To address this problem, an animal model was developed in which multiple aqueous samples from single subjects were obtained. Following direct anterior chamber or intravenous administration of amikacin or chloramphenicol, pharmacokinetic analysis of drug concentrations in the serum and anterior chamber was performed by using a nonlinear least-squares regression program. The number of anterior chamber paracenteses performed did not alter the beta elimination rates or percent penetration into the anterior chamber. The aqueous humor and peripheral-compartment terminal slopes were identical. These data indicate that complete ocular concentration-time curves can be obtained without altering antibiotic pharmacokinetics. Following direct injection into the anterior chamber, the elimination rates for both antibiotics followed a one-compartment model, whereas those following intravenous administration best fit an open, first-order, two-compartment model. Following intravenous administration, the anterior chamber elimination rate constants for both drugs were equal to that of the serum and significantly longer than that following direct injection. The elimination rates of both drugs following direct injection were similar. Systemic administration resulted in drug levels in aqueous humor that persisted longer than those following direct injection. Chloramphenicol, a lipophilic compound, gave higher mean concentrations in aqueous humor than did amikacin. Our model provides a new approach which rigorously examines ocular pharmacokinetics and provides data which suggest that for selected compounds the parenteral route of administration is preferable. PMID:1952850

  2. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Isoniazid and Its Application in Individualizing Tuberculosis Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Christoph; Aschmann, Hélène E.; Baier, Vanessa; Blank, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its high early bactericidal activity, isoniazid (INH) plays an essential role in tuberculosis treatment. Genetic polymorphisms of N-acetyltransferase type 2 (NAT2) cause a trimodal distribution of INH pharmacokinetics in slow, intermediate, and fast acetylators. The success of INH-based chemotherapy is associated with acetylator and patient health status. Still, a standard dose recommended by the FDA is administered regardless of acetylator type or immune status, even though adverse effects occur in 5 to 33% of all patients. Slow acetylators have a higher risk of development of drug-induced toxicity, while fast acetylators and immune-deficient patients face lower treatment success rates. To mechanistically assess the trade-off between toxicity and efficacy, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the NAT2-dependent pharmacokinetics of INH and its metabolites. We combined the PBPK model with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model of antimycobacterial drug effects in the lungs. The resulting PBPK/PD model allowed the simultaneous simulation of treatment efficacies at the site of infection and exposure to toxic metabolites in off-target organs. Subsequently, we evaluated various INH dosing regimens in NAT2-specific immunocompetent and immune-deficient virtual populations. Our results suggest the need for acetylator-specific dose adjustments for optimal treatment outcomes. A reduced dose for slow acetylators substantially lowers the exposure to toxic metabolites and thereby the risk of adverse events, while it maintains sufficient treatment efficacies. Vice versa, intermediate and fast acetylators benefit from increased INH doses and a switch to a twice-daily administration schedule. Our analysis outlines how PBPK/PD modeling may be used to design and individualize treatment regimens. PMID:27480867

  3. Prediction of human pharmacokinetics using physiologically based modeling: a retrospective analysis of 26 clinically tested drugs.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Stefan S; Sinha, Vikash K; Fenu, Luca A; Nijsen, Marjoleen J; Mackie, Claire E; Gilissen, Ron A H J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different physiologically based modeling strategies for the prediction of human pharmacokinetics. Plasma profiles after intravenous and oral dosing were simulated for 26 clinically tested drugs. Two mechanism-based predictions of human tissue-to-plasma partitioning (P(tp)) from physicochemical input (method Vd1) were evaluated for their ability to describe human volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)). This method was compared with a strategy that combined predicted and experimentally determined in vivo rat P(tp) data (method Vd2). Best V(ss) predictions were obtained using method Vd2, providing that rat P(tp) input was corrected for interspecies differences in plasma protein binding (84% within 2-fold). V(ss) predictions from physicochemical input alone were poor (32% within 2-fold). Total body clearance (CL) was predicted as the sum of scaled rat renal clearance and hepatic clearance projected from in vitro metabolism data. Best CL predictions were obtained by disregarding both blood and microsomal or hepatocyte binding (method CL2, 74% within 2-fold), whereas strong bias was seen using both blood and microsomal or hepatocyte binding (method CL1, 53% within 2-fold). The physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model, which combined methods Vd2 and CL2 yielded the most accurate predictions of in vivo terminal half-life (69% within 2-fold). The Gastroplus advanced compartmental absorption and transit model was used to construct an absorption-disposition model and provided accurate predictions of area under the plasma concentration-time profile, oral apparent volume of distribution, and maximum plasma concentration after oral dosing, with 74%, 70%, and 65% within 2-fold, respectively. This evaluation demonstrates that PBPK models can lead to reasonable predictions of human pharmacokinetics. PMID:17620347

  4. Pharmacokinetics and dose response of anti-TB drugs in rat infection model of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Vishwas, K G; Kumar, Mahesh; Reddy, Jitendar; Parab, Manish; Manikanth, C L; Pavithra, B S; Shandil, R K

    2014-05-01

    Robust and physiologically relevant infection models are required to investigate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) correlations for anti-tuberculosis agents at preclinical discovery. We have validated an inhalation-based rat infection model of tuberculosis harbouring mycobacteria in a replicating state, that is suitable for investigating pharmacokinetics and drug action of anti-tubercular agents. A reproducible and actively replicating lung infection was established in Wistar rats by inhalation of a series of graded inocula of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Following an initial instillation of ∼10(5) log10 CFU/lung, M. tuberculosis grew logarithmically for the first 3 weeks, and then entered into a chronic phase with no net increase in pulmonary bacterial loads. Dose response of front-line anti-TB drugs was investigated following pharmacokinetic measurements in the plasma of infected rats. Rifampicin, Isoniazid, and Ethambutol dosed per orally exhibited bactericidality and good dose response with maximal effect of 5.66, 4.66, and 4.80 log10 CFU reductions in the lungs, respectively. In contrast, Pyrazinamide was merely bacteriostatic with 1.92 log10 CFU/lung reduction and did not reduce the bacterial burden beyond the initial bacterial loads present at beginning of treatment in spite of high Pyrazinamide blood levels. Rat infection model with actively replicating bacilli provides a physiologically distinct and pharmacologically relevant model that can be exploited to distinguish investigational compounds in to bacteriostatic or bactericidal scaffolds. We propose that this rat infection model though need more drug substance, can be used in early discovery settings to investigate pharmacology of novel anti-tubercular agents for the treatment of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

  5. EVALUATION OF MULTIPLE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING STRUCTURES FOR TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of PBPK models were developed for trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate biological processes that may affect the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of TCE and its metabolites.

  6. Exploring how extracellular electric field modulates neuron activity through dynamical analysis of a two-compartment neuron model.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xi-Le; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Chan, Wai-Lok; Deng, Bin; Han, Chun-Xiao

    2014-06-01

    To investigate how extracellular electric field modulates neuron activity, a reduced two-compartment neuron model in the presence of electric field is introduced in this study. Depending on neuronal geometric and internal coupling parameters, the behaviors of the model have been studied extensively. The neuron model can exist in quiescent state or repetitive spiking state in response to electric field stimulus. Negative electric field mainly acts as inhibitory stimulus to the neuron, positive weak electric field could modulate spiking frequency and spike timing when the neuron is already active, and positive electric fields with sufficient intensity could directly trigger neuronal spiking in the absence of other stimulations. By bifurcation analysis, it is observed that there is saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, supercritical Hopf bifurcation and subcritical Hopf bifurcation appearing in the obtained two parameter bifurcation diagrams. The bifurcation structures and electric field thresholds for triggering neuron firing are determined by neuronal geometric and coupling parameters. The model predicts that the neurons with a nonsymmetric morphology between soma and dendrite, are more sensitive to electric field stimulus than those with the spherical structure. These findings suggest that neuronal geometric features play a crucial role in electric field effects on the polarization of neuronal compartments. Moreover, by determining the electric field threshold of our biophysical model, we could accurately distinguish between suprathreshold and subthreshold electric fields. Our study highlights the effects of extracellular electric field on neuronal activity from the biophysical modeling point of view. These insights into the dynamical mechanism of electric field may contribute to the investigation and development of electromagnetic therapies, and the model in our study could be further extended to a neuronal network in which the effects of electric fields on

  7. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model.

    PubMed

    Fgaier, Hedia; Mustafa, Ibrahim H I; Awad, Asmaa A R; Elkamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh) in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C) model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD.

  8. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model

    PubMed Central

    Fgaier, Hedia; Mustafa, Ibrahim H. I.; Awad, Asmaa A. R.; Elkamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh) in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C) model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD. PMID:26413144

  9. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the antitumor effect of TM208 and EGFR-TKI resistance in human breast cancer xenograft mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xi-wei; Ji, Shuang-min; Li, Run-tao; Wu, Ke-hua; Zhu, Xiao; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The novel anticancer compound TM208 is an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Since the development of resistance to EGFR-TKIs is a major challenge in their clinical usage, we investigated the profiles of resistance following continuous treatment with TM208 in human breast cancer xenograft mice, and identified the relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition. Methods: Female BALB/c nude mice were implanted with human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and the xenograft mice received TM208 (50 or 150 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or vehicle for 18 d. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of TM208 were evaluated. Results: The PK properties of TM208 were described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption kinetics. Our study showed the inhibitory effects of TM208 on tumor pEGFR levels gradually reached a maximum effect, after which it became weaker over time, which was characterized by a combined tolerance/indirect response PD model with an estimated EC50 (55.9 μg/L), as well as three parameters ('a' of 27.2%, 'b' of 2730%, 'c' of 0.58 h−1) denoting the maximum, extent and rate of resistance, respectively. The relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition was characterized by a combined logistic tumor growth/transit compartment model with estimated parameters associated with tumor growth characteristics kng (0.282 day−1), drug potency kTM208 (0.0499 cm3/day) and the kinetics of tumor cell death k1 (0.141 day−1), which provided insight into drug mechanisms and behaviors. Conclusion: The proposed PK/PD model provides a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of TM208 in the treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, simulation based on a tolerance model allows prediction of the occurrence of resistance. PMID:27133303

  10. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling considering methylated trivalent arsenicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK modeling provides a quantitative biologically-based framework to integrate diverse types of information for application to risk analysis. For example, genetic polymorphisms in arsenic metabolizing enzymes (AS3MT) can lead to differences in target tissue dosimetry for key tri...

  11. Random sparse sampling strategy using stochastic simulation and estimation for a population pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-hui; Wang, Kun; Huang, Ji-han; Xu, Ling; Li, Lu-jin; Sheng, Yu-cheng; Zheng, Qing-shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the stochastic simulation and estimation method to evaluate the effects of sample size and the number of samples per individual on the model development and evaluation. The pharmacokinetic parameters and inter- and intra-individual variation were obtained from a population pharmacokinetic model of clinical trials of amlodipine. Stochastic simulation and estimation were performed to evaluate the efficiencies of different sparse sampling scenarios to estimate the compartment model. Simulated data were generated a 1000 times and three candidate models were used to fit the 1000 data sets. Fifty-five kinds of sparse sampling scenarios were investigated and compared. The results showed that, 60 samples with three points and 20 samples with five points are recommended, and the quantitative methodology of stochastic simulation and estimation is valuable for efficiently estimating the compartment model and can be used for other similar model development and evaluation approaches. PMID:24493975

  12. A Semi-Mechanistic Metabolism Model of CYP3A Substrates in Pregnancy: Predicting Changes in Midazolam and Nifedipine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, S K; Mohamed, A N; Hebert, M F; Haas, D M; Clark, S; Umans, J G; Caritis, S N; Li, L

    2012-01-01

    Physiological changes in pregnancy, including changes in body composition and metabolic enzyme activity, can alter drug pharmacokinetics. A semi-mechanistic metabolism model was developed to describe the pharmacokinetics of two cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substrates, midazolam and nifedipine, in obstetrics patients. The model parameters were optimized to fit the data of oral midazolam pharmacokinetics in pregnant women, by increasing CYP3A-induced hepatic metabolism 1.6-fold in the model with no change in gut wall metabolism. Fetal metabolism had a negligible effect on maternal plasma drug concentrations. Validation of the model was performed by applying changes in volume of distribution and metabolism, consistent with those observed for midazolam, to the pharmacokinetics parameters of immediate-release nifedipine in healthy volunteers. The predicted steady-state areas under the concentration–time curve (AUCs) for nifedipine were within 15% of the data observed in pregnant women undergoing treatment for preterm labor. This model predicts the pharmacokinetics of two CYP3A substrates in pregnancy, and may be applicable to other CYP3A substrates as well. PMID:23835882

  13. The development of a stochastic physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for lead.

    PubMed

    Beck, B D; Mattuck, R L; Bowers, T S; Cohen, J T; O'Flaherty, E

    2001-07-01

    This presentation describes the development of a prototype Monte Carlo module for the physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for lead, created by Dr Ellen O'Flaherty. The module uses distributions for the following: exposure parameters (soil and dust concentrations, daily soil and ingestion rate, water lead concentration, water ingestion rate, air lead concentration, inhalation rate and dietary lead intake); absoption parameters; and key pharmacokinetic parameters (red blood binding capacity and half saturation concentration). Distributions can be specified as time-invariant or can change with age. Monte Carlo model predicted blood levels were calibrated to empirically measured blood lead levels for children living in Midvale, Utah (a milling/smelting community). The calibrated model was then evaluated using blood lead data from Palmerton, Pennsylvania (a town with a former smelter) and Sandy, Utah, (a town with a former smelter and slag piles). Our initial evaluation using distributions for exposure parameters showed that the model accurately predicted geometric (GM) blood lead levels of Palmerton and Sandy and slightly over predicted the GSD. Consideration of uncertainty in red blood cell parameters substantially inflated the GM. Future model development needs to address the correlation among parameters and the use of parameters for long-term exposure derived from short-term studies.

  14. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of target-mediated drug disposition of bortezomib in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Mager, Donald E

    2015-10-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor with potent antineoplastic activity that exhibits dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (PK). Proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition is proposed as the primary source of its nonlinear and apparent nonstationary PK behavior. Single intravenous (IV) doses of bortezomib (0.25 and 1 mg/kg) were administrated to BALB/c mice, with blood and tissue samples obtained over 144 h, which were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating tissue drug-target binding was developed to test the hypothesis of proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition. The final model reasonably captured bortezomib plasma and tissue PK profiles, and parameters were estimated with good precision. The rank-order of model estimated tissue target density correlated well with experimentally measured proteasome concentrations reported in the literature, supporting the hypothesis that binding to proteasome influences bortezomib disposition. The PBPK model was further scaled-up to humans to assess the similarity of bortezomib disposition among species. Human plasma bortezomib PK profiles following multiple IV dosing (1.3 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 were simulated by appropriately scaling estimated mouse parameters. Simulated and observed bortezomib concentrations after multiple dosing were in good agreement, suggesting target-mediated bortezomib disposition is likely for both mice and humans. Furthermore, the model predicts that renal impairment should exert minimal influence on bortezomib exposure in humans, confirming that bortezomib dose adjustment is not necessary for patients with renal impairment.

  15. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Highly Protein-Bound Drugs and Impact of Errors in Plasma Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data was often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding, and blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for terminal elimination half-life (t1/2, 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–t, 95.4%), clearance (CLh, 95.4%), mean retention time (MRT, 95.4%), and steady state volume (Vss, 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. PMID:26531057

  16. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs and the impact of errors in plasma protein binding.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data were often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding and the blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate the model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for the terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 , 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax , 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t , 95.4%), clearance (CLh , 95.4%), mean residence time (MRT, 95.4%) and steady state volume (Vss , 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Pharmacokinetic modeling of P-glycoprotein function at the rat and human blood–brain barriers studied with (R)-[11C]verapamil positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study investigated the influence of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor tariquidar on the pharmacokinetics of P-gp substrate radiotracer (R)-[11C]verapamil in plasma and brain of rats and humans by means of positron emission tomography (PET). Methods Data obtained from a preclinical and clinical study, in which paired (R)-[11C]verapamil PET scans were performed before, during, and after tariquidar administration, were analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling. Administration of tariquidar was included as a covariate on the influx and efflux parameters (Qin and Qout) in order to investigate if tariquidar increased influx or decreased outflux of radiotracer across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Additionally, the influence of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) was tested on all model parameters, and the brain-to-plasma partition coefficient (VT-NLME) was calculated. Results Our model indicated that tariquidar enhances brain uptake of (R)-[11C]verapamil by decreasing Qout. The reduction in Qout in rats during and immediately after tariquidar administration (sevenfold) was more pronounced than in the second PET scan acquired 2 h after tariquidar administration (fivefold). The effect of tariquidar on Qout in humans was apparent during and immediately after tariquidar administration (twofold reduction in Qout) but was negligible in the second PET scan. SE was found to influence the pharmacological volume of distribution of the central brain compartment Vbr1. Tariquidar treatment lead to an increase in VT-NLME, and pilocarpine-induced SE lead to increased (R)-[11C]verapamil distribution to the peripheral brain compartment. Conclusions Using NLME modeling, we were able to provide mechanistic insight into the effects of tariquidar and SE on (R)-[11C]verapamil transport across the BBB in control and 48 h post SE rats as well as in humans. PMID:23072492

  18. An Engineering Approach to Biomedical Sciences: Advanced Testing Methods and Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Gaetano; Cascone, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the philosophy of a research in pharmacology field, driven by an engineering approach, was described along with some case histories and examples. The improvement in the testing methods for pharmaceutical systems (in-vitro techniques), as well as the proposal and the testing of mathematical models to describe the pharmacokinetics (in-silico techniques) are reported with the aim of pointing out methodologies and tools able to reduce the need of expensive and ethical problematic in-vivo measurements. PMID:23905061

  19. Use of a Microsoft Excel based add-in program to calculate plasma sinistrin clearance by a two-compartment model analysis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah M L; Sturgess, Christopher P; Dunning, Mark D; Neiger, Reto

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of renal function by means of plasma clearance of a suitable marker has become standard procedure for estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Sinistrin, a polyfructan solely cleared by the kidney, is often used for this purpose. Pharmacokinetic modeling using adequate software is necessary to calculate disappearance rate and half-life of sinistrin. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of a Microsoft excel based add-in program to calculate plasma sinistrin clearance, as well as additional pharmacokinetic parameters such as transfer rates (k), half-life (t1/2) and volume of distribution (Vss) for sinistrin in dogs with varying degrees of renal function.

  20. Percent body fat estimations in college men using field and laboratory methods: A three-compartment model approach

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jordan R; Tobkin, Sarah E; Smith, Abbie E; Roberts, Michael D; Ryan, Eric D; Dalbo, Vincent J; Lockwood, Chris M; Walter, Ashley A; Cramer, Joel T; Beck, Travis W; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    Background Methods used to estimate percent body fat can be classified as a laboratory or field technique. However, the validity of these methods compared to multiple-compartment models has not been fully established. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of field and laboratory methods for estimating percent fat (%fat) in healthy college-age men compared to the Siri three-compartment model (3C). Methods Thirty-one Caucasian men (22.5 ± 2.7 yrs; 175.6 ± 6.3 cm; 76.4 ± 10.3 kg) had their %fat estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) using the BodyGram™ computer program (BIA-AK) and population-specific equation (BIA-Lohman), near-infrared interactance (NIR) (Futrex® 6100/XL), four circumference-based military equations [Marine Corps (MC), Navy and Air Force (NAF), Army (A), and Friedl], air-displacement plethysmography (BP), and hydrostatic weighing (HW). Results All circumference-based military equations (MC = 4.7% fat, NAF = 5.2% fat, A = 4.7% fat, Friedl = 4.7% fat) along with NIR (NIR = 5.1% fat) produced an unacceptable total error (TE). Both laboratory methods produced acceptable TE values (HW = 2.5% fat; BP = 2.7% fat). The BIA-AK, and BIA-Lohman field methods produced acceptable TE values (2.1% fat). A significant difference was observed for the MC and NAF equations compared to both the 3C model and HW (p < 0.006). Conclusion Results indicate that the BP and HW are valid laboratory methods when compared to the 3C model to estimate %fat in college-age Caucasian men. When the use of a laboratory method is not feasible, BIA-AK, and BIA-Lohman are acceptable field methods to estimate %fat in this population. PMID:18426582

  1. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR TOLUENE IN THE LONG EVANS RAT: BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhaled toluene was developed for Long-Evans rats as a component of an exposure-dose-response (EDR) model for volatile organic compounds. The PBPK model was needed to link airborne toluene exposure to its concentration in b...

  2. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues. PMID:18721993

  3. A semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic model of saquinavir combined with itraconazole in HIV-1-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Lohitnavy, Manupat; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Sriarwut, Thanyalak; Pankaew, Anongnat; Jenjob, Anchalee; Phuphuak, Kiatiphong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of drug-drug interaction between saquinavir, a protease inhibitor used effectively for HIV/AIDS treatment, and itraconazole, an azole antifungal agent, is hypothesized to involve competitive inhibition at CYP3A4 enzyme, an important drug metabolizing enzyme in humans. The resulting interaction between these CYP3A4 substrates can be utilized clinically as a pharmacokinetic booster for prolonging saquinavir dosing regimen and/or decreasing saquinavir dose requirement in HIV/AIDS patients. To quantitatively describe this specific drug-drug interaction, based on the existing data, we aimed to develop a mathematical model incorporated with the competitive inhibition phenomena. PlotDigitizer was used to extract data from literature. Advance Continuous Simulating Language Extreme (ACSLX), a FORTRAN-based computer program, was employed as our developing tool. Our computer model simulations could successfully describe concentration-time course of saquinavir from selected pharmacokinetic studies in HIV-1-positive patients. To extend the model's utility as an aid in saquinavir dosage regimens, the developed model may be applied to other HIV/AIDS patients in genuine clinical settings. PMID:26736983

  4. Adjusting exposure limits for long and short exposure periods using a physiological pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, M.E.; MacNaughton, M.G.; Clewell, H.J. III; Paustenbach, D.J.

    1987-04-01

    This paper advocates use of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for determining adjustment factors for unusual exposure schedules. The PB-PK model requires data on the blood:air and tissue:blood partition coefficients, the rate of metabolism of the chemical, organ volumes, organ blood flows and ventilation rates in humans. Laboratory data on two industrially important chemicals - styrene and methylene chloride - were used to illustrate the PB-PK approach. At inhaled concentrations near their respective 8-hr Threshold Limit Value - Time-weighted averages both of these chemicals are primarily eliminated from the body by metabolism. For these two chemicals, the appropriate risk indexing parameters are integrated tissue dose or total amount of parent chemical metabolized. These examples also illustrate how the model can be used to calculate risk based on various other measures of delivered dose. For the majority of volatile chemicals, the parameter most closely associated with risk is the integrated tissue dose. This analysis suggests that when pharmacokinetic data are not available, a simple inverse formula may be sufficient for adjustment in most instances and application of complex kinetic models unnecessary. At present, this PB-PK approach is recommended only for exposure periods of 4 to 16 hr/day, because the mechanisms of toxicity for some chemicals may vary for very short- or very long-term exposures. For these altered schedules, more biological information on recovery in rest periods and changing mechanisms of toxicity are necessary before any adjustment is attempted.

  5. A paradigm shift in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling: rule of thumb for estimating free drug level in tissue compared with plasma to guide drug design.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    fraction in plasma derived from a static in vitro environment might be biased to guide drug design (the old paradigm), and, hence, it is recommended to use a PBPK model to reproduce more accurately the in vivo condition in tissue (the new paradigm). This newly developed approach can be used to predict free drug concentration in diverse tissue compartments for small molecules in toxicology and pharmacology studies, which can be leveraged to optimize the pharmacokinetics drivers of tissue distribution based upon physicochemical and physiological input parameters in an attempt to optimize free drug level in tissue. Overall, this present study provides guidance on the application of plasma and tissue concentration information in PBPK/PD research in preclinical and clinical studies, which is in accordance with the recent literature.

  6. Myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus monkey model and its relationship to pharmacokinetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aiming; Xie Shuilin; Sun He; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Wei Xiaoxiong; Dai Renke

    2009-03-15

    Fibrate drugs are PPAR{alpha} agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reportedly associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey no. 2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly, they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of humans. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity.

  7. Population Pharmacokinetics of Vancomycin in Postoperative Neurosurgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingang; Wu, Yuanxing; Sun, Shusen; Mei, Shenghui; Wang, Jiaqing; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zhigang

    2015-11-01

    Neurosurgical procedures may damage the blood-brain barrier to allow more vancomycin distribution into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from blood after intravenous administration. However, a large intersubject variability in CSF vancomycin concentration was observed. We aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to guide vancomycin dosing in patients after neurosurgical operation. Blood and CSF samples were collected and determined from postoperative neurosurgical patients after vancomycin administration. A three-compartment (central, peripheral, and CSF) model was proposed to characterize the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin. A nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approach was applied to fit the blood and CSF data simultaneously. The covariate analysis found that the CSF albumin level was strongly associated with the clearance between central and CSF compartment. Visual predictive check indicated that the proposed population pharmacokinetic model agrees well with the observed vancomycin concentrations. Individualized vancomycin dosage regimens could be developed for postoperative neurosurgical patients with different CSF albumin levels through model simulations. The CSF albumin level is a determinant of CSF vancomycin concentration.

  8. Development and Evaluation of a Gentamicin Pharmacokinetic Model That Facilitates Opportunistic Gentamicin Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Neonates and Infants.

    PubMed

    Germovsek, Eva; Kent, Alison; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Lutsar, Irja; Klein, Nigel; Turner, Mark A; Sharland, Mike; Nielsen, Elisabet I; Heath, Paul T; Standing, Joseph F

    2016-08-01

    Trough gentamicin therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is time-consuming, disruptive to neonatal clinical care, and a patient safety issue. Bayesian models could allow TDM to be performed opportunistically at the time of routine blood tests. This study aimed to develop and prospectively evaluate a new gentamicin model and a novel Bayesian computer tool (neoGent) for TDM use in neonatal intensive care. We also evaluated model performance for predicting peak concentrations and the area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 h to time t h (AUC0- t). A pharmacokinetic meta-analysis was performed on pooled data from three studies (1,325 concentrations from 205 patients). A 3-compartment model was used with the following covariates: allometric weight scaling, postmenstrual and postnatal age, and serum creatinine concentration. Final parameter estimates (standard errors) were as follows: clearance, 6.2 (0.3) liters/h/70 kg of body weight; central volume (V), 26.5 (0.6) liters/70 kg; intercompartmental disposition (Q), 2.2 (0.3) liters/h/70 kg; peripheral volume V2, 21.2 (1.5) liters/70 kg; intercompartmental disposition (Q2), 0.3 (0.05) liters/h/70 kg; peripheral volume V3, 148 (52.0) liters/70 kg. The model's ability to predict trough concentrations from an opportunistic sample was evaluated in a prospective observational cohort study that included data from 163 patients and 483 concentrations collected in five hospitals. Unbiased trough predictions were obtained; the median (95% confidence interval [CI]) prediction error was 0.0004 (-1.07, 0.84) mg/liter. Results also showed that peaks and AUC0- t values could be predicted (from one randomly selected sample) with little bias but relative imprecision, with median (95% CI) prediction errors being 0.16 (-4.76, 5.01) mg/liter and 10.8 (-24.9, 62.2) mg · h/liter, respectively. neoGent was implemented in R/NONMEM and in the freely available TDMx software. PMID:27270281

  9. COMPARISON OF THE USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL AND A CLASSICAL PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DIOXIN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In epidemiological studies, exposure assessments to TCDD, known as a possible human carcinogen, assume mono or biphasic elimination rates. Recent data suggests a dose dependent elimination rate for TCDD. A PBPK model, which uses a body burden dependent elimination rate, was dev...

  10. Development of an Integrated Micro-Analytical System for Lead in Saliva and Linkage to a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model Describing Lead Saliva Secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles ); Poet, Torka S. ); Lin, Yuehe ); Weitz, Karl K. ); Zhao, Rui; Thrall, Karla D. )

    2000-12-01

    There is a need to develop reliable portable analytical instruments for real-time monitoring of trace metals, such as lead (Pb) utilizing readily available non-invasive fluids like saliva. To interpret saliva results, an understanding of the pharmacokinetics of Pb secretion into the saliva is needed. A portable microfluidics/electrochemical device was developed for the rapid analysis of Pb based on square wave anodic stripping voltammetry, where a saliva sample flows over an electrode surface, Pb2+ is chemically reduced, accumulated, and the electric potential of the electrode scanned. To evaluate the relationship between saliva and blood Pb, rats were treated with single oral doses ranging from 20 to 500 mg Pb/kg of body weight, and 24 hours later salivation was induced by administering pilocarpine, a muscarinic agonist. Blood and saliva were collected and analyzed for Pb by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and by the micro-analytical system. The micro-analytical system was slightly less responsive ({approx}75-85%) than ICP-MS, however the response was linear over a concentration range of 1-2000 ppb suggesting that it can be utilized for the quantitation of salivary Pb. To relate saliva levels to internal dose of Pb (e.g. blood) and to total body burden, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for Pb was modified to incorporate a salivary gland compartment. The model was capable of predicting blood and saliva Pb concentration based on a limited data set. These preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that a fully developed, micro-analytical system can be utilized as an important tool for real-time biomonitoring of Pb for both occupational and environmental exposures.

  11. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model of Newly Developed Dexibuprofen Sustained Release Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Selvadurai

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling has emerged as a major tool in clinical pharmacology to optimize drug use by designing rational dosage forms and dosage regimes. Quantitative representation of the dose-concentration-response relationship should provide information for the prediction of the level of response to a certain level of drug dose. This paper describes the experimental details of the preformulation study, tablet manufacture, optimization, and bioanalytical methods for the estimation of dexibuprofen in human plasma. The hydrophilic matrix was prepared with xanthen gum with additives Avicel PH 102. The effect of the concentration of the polymer and different filler, on the in vitro drug release, was studied. Various pharmacokinetic parameters including AUC0–t, AUC0–∞, Cmax, Tmax, T1/2, and elimination rate constant (Kel) were determined from the plasma concentration of both formulations of test (dexibuprofen 300 mg) and reference (dexibuprofen 300 mg tablets). The merits of PK-PD in the development of dosage forms and how PK-PD model development necessitates the development of new drugs and bio analytical method development and validation are discussed. The objectives of the present study, namely, to develop and validate the methods to estimate the selected drugs in the biological fluids by HPLC, the development of in vitro dissolution methods, and PK-PD model development have been described. PMID:23316393

  12. Development of an inhalation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for 2,2, 4-trimethylpentane (TMP) in male Long-Evans rats using gas uptake experiments.

    PubMed

    El-Masri, Hisham A; Dowd, Sean; Pegram, Rex A; Harrison, Randy; Yavanhxay, Sisouphanh J; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Evans, Marina

    2009-12-01

    2,2,4-Trimethylpentane (TMP) is a volatile colorless liquid used primarily to increase the octane rating of combustible fuels. TMP is released in the environment through the manufacture, use, and disposal of products associated with the gasoline and petroleum industry. Short-term inhalation exposure to TMP (< 4 h; > 1000 ppm) caused sensory and motor irritations in rats and mice. Like many volatile hydrocarbons, acute exposure to TMP may also be expected to alter neurological functions. To estimate in vivo metabolic kinetics of TMP and to predict its target tissue dosimetry during inhalation exposures, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the chemical in Long-Evans male rats using closed-chamber gas-uptake experiments. Gas-uptake experiments were conducted in which rats (80-90 days old) were exposed to targeted initial TMP concentrations of 50, 100, 500, and 1000 ppm. The model consisted of compartments for the closed uptake chamber, lung, fat, kidney, liver, brain, and rapidly and slowly perfused tissues. Physiological parameters were obtained from literature. Partition coefficients for the model were experimentally determined for air/blood, fat, liver, kidney, muscle, and brain using vial equilibration methods. Common to other hydrocarbons, metabolism of TMP via oxidative reactions is assumed to mainly occur in the liver. The PBPK model simulations of the closed chamber data were used to estimate in vivo metabolic parameters for TMP in male Long-Evans rats.

  13. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Adeshina, Femi; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2013-12-15

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 < 1 min indicating complete and rapid absorption. The F value ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 for oral and various transmucosal routes. Oral Fentanyl was absorbed the slowest (t90 ∼ 300 min); the absorption of intranasal Fentanyl was relatively rapid (t90 ∼ 20–40 min); and the various oral transmucosal routes had intermediate absorption rates (t90 ∼ 160–300 min). Based on these results, for inhalation exposures, we assumed that all of the Fentanyl inhaled from the air during each breath directly, and instantaneously enters the arterial circulation. We present model predictions of Fentanyl blood concentrations in oral and inhalation scenarios relevant for PAL development, and provide an analytical expression that can be used to extrapolate between oral and inhalation routes for the derivation of PALs. - Highlights: • We develop a Fentanyl PBPK model for relating external dose to internal levels. • We calibrate the model to oral and inhalation exposures using > 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available

  14. Effect of gradient pulse duration on MRI estimation of the diffusional kurtosis for a two-compartment exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jens H.; Helpern, Joseph A.

    2011-06-01

    Hardware constraints typically require the use of extended gradient pulse durations for clinical applications of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI), which can potentially influence the estimation of diffusion metrics. Prior studies have examined this effect for the apparent diffusion coefficient. This study employs a two-compartment exchange model in order to assess the gradient pulse duration sensitivity of the apparent diffusional kurtosis (ADK), a quantitative index of diffusional non-Gaussianity. An analytic expression is derived and numerically evaluated for parameter ranges relevant to DW-MRI of brain. It is found that the ADK differs from the true diffusional kurtosis by at most a few percent. This suggests that ADK estimates for brain may be robust with respect to changes in pulse gradient duration.

  15. Population pharmacokinetic study of methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Zhai, S; Yang, L; Wu, H; Zhang, J; Ke, X

    2010-01-01

    A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe the factors that may affect the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate (MTX) in Chinese child patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) and to predict the individual pharmacokinetic parameters in these patients. One hundred and eighteen children with ALL who received MTX at the dose of 2 - 3.5 g/m(2) were enrolled in this study. 96 children were enrolled in the index group and 22 children in the validation group. The data were analyzed using nonlinear mixed effect model (NONMEM) software. A linear two-compartment model with linear elimination best described the data. The forward inclusion-backward elimination method was used to investigate the different covariates, including age, body weight, gender, etc. The Bayesian method was used to predict the individual pharmacokinetic parameters. Validation was applied using an internal and external approach. The population pharmacokinetic parameters and 95% confidence interval (CI) were obtained as follows: The clearance of central compartment (CL1), apparent volume of distribution of central compartment (V1), the clearance between central and peripheral compartment (CL2), and apparent volume of distribution of peripheral compartment (V2) were 5.04 (3.93 - 6.15) l/min, 16.1 (12.5 - 19.7) l, 0.203 (0.102 - 0.304) l/min and 7.05 (3.86 - 10.20) l, respectively. The inter-individual variability of CL1, V1, CL2, and V2 were 49.60%, 29.36%, 137.64%, and 107.70%, respectively. Gender, body surface area and the amount of alkalinization agent during 24 hours before MTX administration had significant effects on CL1. A strong relationship was found in this study between CL2 and age, as well as between V2 and age. A good correlation was further proved through the validation model. Moreover, some secondary pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated: the elimination half-life t1/2 was 2.34 h (CV = 36.7%), elimination constant k(e) was 0.33 h(-1) (CV = 33.2%), and the area under

  16. Assessing convergence of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations in hierarchical Bayesian models for population pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Michael G; Vicini, Paolo

    2004-09-01

    Advances in computer hardware and the associated computer-intensive algorithms made feasible by these advances [like Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) data analysis techniques] have made possible the application of hierarchical full Bayesian methods in analyzing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) data sets that are multivariate in nature. Pharmacokinetic data analysis in particular has been one area that has seized upon this technology to refine estimates of drug parameters from sparse data gathered in a large, highly variable population of patients. A drawback in this type of analysis is that it is difficult to quantitatively assess convergence of the Markov chains to a target distribution, and thus, it is sometimes difficult to assess the reliability of estimates gained from this procedure. Another complicating factor is that, although the application of MCMC methods to population PK-PD problems has been facilitated by new software designed for the PK-PD domain (specifically PKBUGS), experts in PK-PD may not have the necessary experience with MCMC methods to detect and understand problems with model convergence. The objective of this work is to provide an example of a set of diagnostics useful to investigators, by analyzing in detail three convergence criteria (namely the Raftery and Lewis, Geweke, and Heidelberger and Welch methods) on a simulated problem and with a rule of thumb of 10,000 chain elements in the Markov chain. We used two publicly available software packages to assess convergence of MCMC parameter estimates; the first performs Bayesian parameter estimation (PKBUGS/WinBUGS), and the second is focused on posterior analysis of estimates (BOA). The main message that seems to emerge is that accurately estimating confidence regions for the parameters of interest is more demanding than estimating the parameter means. Together, these tools provide numerical means by which an investigator can establish confidence in convergence and thus in the

  17. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Integration and Modeling of Enrofloxacin in Swine for Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianyi; Hao, Haihong; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Chen, Dongmei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dose regimens of enrofloxacin to reduce the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli (E.coli) using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach. The single dose (2.5 mg/kg body weight) of enrofloxacin was administered intramuscularly (IM) to the healthy pigs. Using cannulation, the pharmacokinetic properties, including peak concentration (Cmax), time to reach Cmax (Tmax), and area under the curve (AUC), were determined in plasma and ileum content. The Cmax, Tmax, and AUC in the plasma were 1.09 ± 0.11 μg/mL, 1.27 ± 0.35 h, and 12.70 ± 2.72 μg·h/mL, respectively. While in ileum content, the Cmax, Tmax, and AUC were 7.07 ± 0.26 μg/mL, 5.54 ± 0.42 h, and 136.18 ± 12.50 μg·h/mL, respectively. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 918 E. coli isolates, an E. coli O101/K99 strain (enrofloxacin MIC = 0.25 μg/mL) was selected for pharmacodynamic studies. The in vitro minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), mutant prevention concentration (MPC), and ex vivo time-killing curves for enrofloxacin in ileum content were established against the selected E. coli O101/K99 strain. Integrating the in vivo pharmacokinetic data and ex vivo pharmacodynamic data, a sigmoid Emax (Hill) equation was established to provide values for ileum content of AUC24h/MIC producing, bactericidal activity (52.65 h), and virtual eradication of bacteria (78.06 h). A dosage regimen of 1.96 mg/kg every 12 h for 3 days should be sufficient in the treatment of E. coli. PMID:26870006

  18. Predicting the Toxicokinetics of Trifluralin in Rainbow Trout Using Clearance-Volume Pharmacokinetic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R. ); Hayton, William L.; David J.Smith, William H.Gingerich, Maria G.Barker

    1999-10-13

    Trifluralin (TF) is a lipophilic, pre-emergent herbicide widely used in agriculture and known to bioconcentrate in fish. We have characterized the accumulation of TF in rainbow trout under a variety of experimental conditions. Our approach has been to use static water exposure systems and intra-vascular dosing in combination with clearance-volume pharmacokinetic (CV-PK) models to obtain quantitative estimates of uptake clearance, apparent volume of distribution and elimination due to xenobiotic metabolism. This paper will briefly discuss pertinent physicochemical data for TF and review the toxicokinetics of TF in rainbow trout. Emphasis will be placed on physiological interpretations of TF model parameters and practical aspects of modeling TF toxicokinetics with CV-PK models.

  19. Monitoring Tumor Hypoxia Using 18F-FMISO PET and Pharmacokinetics Modeling after Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiao; Srivatsan, Avinash; Jacobson, Orit; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhantong; Yang, Xiangyu; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Zheng, Hairong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an efficacious treatment for some types of cancers. However, PDT-induced tumor hypoxia as a result of oxygen consumption and vascular damage can reduce the efficacy of this therapy. Measuring and monitoring intrinsic and PDT-induced tumor hypoxia in vivo during PDT is of high interest for prognostic and treatment evaluation. In the present study, static and dynamic 18F-FMISO PET were performed with mice bearing either U87MG or MDA-MB-435 tumor xenografts immediately before and after PDT at different time points. Significant difference in tumor hypoxia in response to PDT over time was found between the U87MG and MDA-MB-435 tumors in both static and dynamic PET. Dynamic PET with pharmacokinetics modeling further monitored the kinetics of 18F-FMISO retention to hypoxic sites after treatment. The Ki and k3 parametric analysis provided information on tumor hypoxia by distinction of the specific tracer retention in hypoxic sites from its non-specific distribution in tumor. Dynamic 18F-FMISO PET with pharmacokinetics modeling, complementary to static PET analysis, provides a potential imaging tool for more detailed and more accurate quantification of tumor hypoxia during PDT. PMID:27546160

  20. Development and application of a multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oxytetracycline in dogs and humans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a commonly used tetracycline antibiotic in veterinary and human medicine. To establish a quantitative model for predicting OTC plasma and tissue exposure, a permeability-limited multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed in dogs. The model was calibrated with plasma pharmacokinetic data in beagle dogs following single intravenous (5 mg/kg), oral (100 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations. The model predicted other available dog data well, including drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and muscle after repeated exposure, and data in the mixed-breed dog. The model was extrapolated to humans and the human model adequately simulated measured plasma OTC concentrations after intravenous (7.14 mg/kg) and oral exposures (6.67 mg/kg). The dog model was applied to predict 24-h OTC area-under-the-curve after three therapeutic treatments. Results were 27.75, 51.76, and 64.17 μg/mL*h in the plasma, and 120.93, 225.64, and 279.67 μg/mL*h in the kidney for oral (100 mg/kg), intravenous (10 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations, respectively. This model can be used to predict plasma and tissue concentrations to aid in designing optimal therapeutic regimens with OTC in veterinary, and potentially, human medicine; and as a foundation for scaling to other tetracycline antibiotics and to other animal species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:233-243, 2015.

  1. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  2. 75 FR 81 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead Flightcrew Rest Compartment Occupiable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead... conditions for the Boeing Model 787-8 airplane. This airplane will have novel or unusual design features... for other novel or unusual design features of the Boeing Model 787-8 airplanes. DATES: We must...

  3. 75 FR 6092 - Special Conditions: Model C-27J Airplane; Class E Cargo Compartment Lavatory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Model C-27J Airplane; Class E Cargo.... SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for the Alenia Model C-27J airplane. This airplane has novel... certification of a twin-engine, commercial transport designated as the Model C-27J. The C-27J is a...

  4. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of trichloroethylene and its metabolites for use in risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, H J; Gentry, P R; Covington, T R; Gearhart, J M

    2000-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed that provides a comprehensive description of the kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites, trichloroethanol (TCOH), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), in the mouse, rat, and human for both oral and inhalation exposure. The model includes descriptions of the three principal target tissues for cancer identified in animal bioassays: liver, lung, and kidney. Cancer dose metrics provided in the model include the area under the concentration curve (AUC) for TCA and DCA in the plasma, the peak concentration and AUC for chloral in the tracheobronchial region of the lung, and the production of a thioacetylating intermediate from dichlorovinylcysteine in the kidney. Additional dose metrics provided for noncancer risk assessment include the peak concentrations and AUCs for TCE and TCOH in the blood, as well as the total metabolism of TCE divided by the body weight. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed on the model to evaluate its suitability for use in a pharmacokinetic risk assessment for TCE. Model predictions of TCE, TCA, DCA, and TCOH concentrations in rodents and humans are in good agreement with a variety of experimental data, suggesting that the model should provide a useful basis for evaluating cross-species differences in pharmacokinetics for these chemicals. In the case of the lung and kidney target tissues, however, only limited data are available for establishing cross-species pharmacokinetics. As a result, PBPK model calculations of target tissue dose for lung and kidney should be used with caution. PMID:10807559

  5. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of anesthetic drugs: from modeling to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia is a combination of unconsciousness, amnesia, and analgesia, expressed in sleeping patients by limited reaction to noxious stimulations. It is achieved by several classes of drugs, acting mainly on central nervous system. Compared to other therapeutic families, the anesthetic drugs, administered by intravenous or pulmonary route, are quickly distributed in the blood and induce in a few minutes effects that are fully reversible within minutes or hours. These effects change in parallel with the concentration of the drug, and the concentration time course of the drug follows with a reasonable precision mathematical models based on the Fick principle. Therefore, understanding concentration time course allows adjusting the dosing delivery scheme in order to control the effects.   The purpose of this short review is to describe the basis of pharmacokinetics and modeling, the concentration-effects relationship, and drug interactions modeling to offer to anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologists an overview of the rules to follow to optimize anesthetic drug delivery. PMID:26918133

  6. Percent body fat estimations in college women using field and laboratory methods: a three-compartment model approach

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jordan R; Hull, Holly R; Tobkin, Sarah E; Teramoto, Masaru; Karabulut, Murat; Roberts, Michael D; Ryan, Eric D; Kim, So Jung; Dalbo, Vincent J; Walter, Ashley A; Smith, Abbie T; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2007-01-01

    Background Methods used to estimate percent body fat can be classified as a laboratory or field technique. However, the validity of these methods compared to multiple-compartment models has not been fully established. This investigation sought to determine the validity of field and laboratory methods for estimating percent fat (%fat) in healthy college-age women compared to the Siri three-compartment model (3C). Methods Thirty Caucasian women (21.1 ± 1.5 yrs; 164.8 ± 4.7 cm; 61.2 ± 6.8 kg) had their %fat estimated by BIA using the BodyGram™ computer program (BIA-AK) and population-specific equation (BIA-Lohman), NIR (Futrex® 6100/XL), a quadratic (SF3JPW) and linear (SF3WB) skinfold equation, air-displacement plethysmography (BP), and hydrostatic weighing (HW). Results All methods produced acceptable total error (TE) values compared to the 3C model. Both laboratory methods produced similar TE values (HW, TE = 2.4%fat; BP, TE = 2.3%fat) when compared to the 3C model, though a significant constant error (CE) was detected for HW (1.5%fat, p ≤ 0.006). The field methods produced acceptable TE values ranging from 1.8 – 3.8 %fat. BIA-AK (TE = 1.8%fat) yielded the lowest TE among the field methods, while BIA-Lohman (TE = 2.1%fat) and NIR (TE = 2.7%fat) produced lower TE values than both skinfold equations (TE > 2.7%fat) compared to the 3C model. Additionally, the SF3JPW %fat estimation equation resulted in a significant CE (2.6%fat, p ≤ 0.007). Conclusion Data suggest that the BP and HW are valid laboratory methods when compared to the 3C model to estimate %fat in college-age Caucasian women. When the use of a laboratory method is not feasible, NIR, BIA-AK, BIA-Lohman, SF3JPW, and SF3WB are acceptable field methods to estimate %fat in this population. PMID:17988393

  7. Semiphysiological versus empirical modelling of the population pharmacokinetics of free and total cefazolin during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    van Hasselt, J G Coen; Allegaert, Karel; van Calsteren, Kristel; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a first population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for free and total cefazolin during pregnancy, which can be used for dose regimen optimization. Secondly, analysis of PK studies in pregnant patients is challenging due to study design limitations. We therefore developed a semiphysiological modeling approach, which leveraged gestation-induced changes in creatinine clearance (CrCL) into a population PK model. This model was then compared to the conventional empirical covariate model. First, a base two-compartmental PK model with a linear protein binding was developed. The empirical covariate model for gestational changes consisted of a linear relationship between CL and gestational age. The semiphysiological model was based on the base population PK model and a separately developed mixed-effect model for gestation-induced change in CrCL. Estimates for baseline clearance (CL) were 0.119 L/min (RSE 58%) and 0.142 L/min (RSE 44%) for the empirical and semiphysiological models, respectively. Both models described the available PK data comparably well. However, as the semiphysiological model was based on prior knowledge of gestation-induced changes in renal function, this model may have improved predictive performance. This work demonstrates how a hybrid semiphysiological population PK approach may be of relevance in order to derive more informative inferences.

  8. Towards Rational Dosing Algorithms for Vancomycin in Neonates and Infants Based on Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Esther J. H.; Välitalo, Pyry A. J.; Allegaert, Karel; de Cock, Roosmarijn F. W.; Simons, Sinno H. P.; Sherwin, Catherine M. T.; van den Anker, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the recent awareness that vancomycin doses should aim to meet a target area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) instead of trough concentrations, more aggressive dosing regimens are warranted also in the pediatric population. In this study, both neonatal and pediatric pharmacokinetic models for vancomycin were externally evaluated and subsequently used to derive model-based dosing algorithms for neonates, infants, and children. For the external validation, predictions from previously published pharmacokinetic models were compared to new data. Simulations were performed in order to evaluate current dosing regimens and to propose a model-based dosing algorithm. The AUC/MIC over 24 h (AUC24/MIC) was evaluated for all investigated dosing schedules (target of >400), without any concentration exceeding 40 mg/liter. Both the neonatal and pediatric models of vancomycin performed well in the external data sets, resulting in concentrations that were predicted correctly and without bias. For neonates, a dosing algorithm based on body weight at birth and postnatal age is proposed, with daily doses divided over three to four doses. For infants aged <1 year, doses between 32 and 60 mg/kg/day over four doses are proposed, while above 1 year of age, 60 mg/kg/day seems appropriate. As the time to reach steady-state concentrations varies from 155 h in preterm infants to 36 h in children aged >1 year, an initial loading dose is proposed. Based on the externally validated neonatal and pediatric vancomycin models, novel dosing algorithms are proposed for neonates and children aged <1 year. For children aged 1 year and older, the currently advised maintenance dose of 60 mg/kg/day seems appropriate. PMID:26643337

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Clofazimine in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Rosemary V.; Adamson, John; Moodley, Chivonne; Ngcobo, Bongani; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Dorasamy, Afton; Moodley, Sashen; Mgaga, Zinhle; Tapley, Asa; Bester, Linda A.; Singh, Sanil; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    The antileprosy drug clofazimine has shown potential for shortening tuberculosis treatment; however, the current dosing of the drug is not evidence based, and the optimal dosing is unknown. Our objective was to conduct a preclinical evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clofazimine in the mouse model of tuberculosis, with the goal of providing useful information on dosing for future studies. Pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated in infected and uninfected BALB/c mice. Pharmacodynamic parameters were evaluated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice that were treated for 12 weeks with one of six different clofazimine dosing regimens, i.e., doses of 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg of body weight/day and 3 regimens with loading doses. Clofazimine progressively accumulated in the lungs, livers, and spleens of the mice, reaching levels of greater than 50 μg/g in all tissues by 4 weeks of administration, while serum drug levels remained low at 1 to 2 μg/ml. Elimination of clofazimine was extremely slow, and the half-life was dependent on the duration of drug administration. Clofazimine exhibited dose-dependent tissue and serum concentrations. At any dose, clofazimine did not have bactericidal activity during the first 2 weeks of administration but subsequently demonstrated potent, dose-independent bactericidal activity. The antituberculosis activity of clofazimine was dependent on neither the dose administered nor the drug concentrations in the tissues, suggesting that much lower doses could be effectively used for tuberculosis treatment. PMID:25753644

  10. Pharmacokinetic modeling of tranexamic acid for patients undergoing cardiac surgery with normal renal function and model simulations for patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi Joy; Jerath, Angela; Bies, Robert R; Wąsowicz, Marcin; Pang, K Sandy

    2015-07-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA), an effective anti-fibrinolytic agent that is cleared by glomerular filtration, is used widely for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery. However, an effective dosing regimen has not been fully developed in patients with renal impairment. The aims of this study were to characterize the inter-patient variability associated with pharmacokinetic parameters and to recommend a new dosing adjustment based on the BART dosing regimen for CPB patients with chronic renal dysfunction (CRD). Recently published data on CPB patients with normal renal function (n = 15) were re-examined with a two-compartment model using the ADAPT5 and NONMEMVII to identify covariates that explain inter-patient variability and to ascertain whether sampling strategies might affect parameter estimation. A series of simulations was performed to adjust the BART dosing regimen for CPB patients with renal impairment. Based on the two-compartmental model, the number of samples obtained after discontinuation of TXA infusion was found not to be critical in parameter estimation (p > 0.05). Both body weight and creatinine clearance were identified as significant covariates (p < 0.005). Simulations showed significantly higher than normal TXA concentrations in CRD patients who received the standard dosing regimen in the BART trial. Adjustment of the maintenance infusion rate based on the percent reduction in renal clearance resulted in predicted plasma TXA concentrations that were safe and therapeutic (~100 mg·L(-1) ). Our proposed dosing regimen, with consideration of renal function, is predicted to maintain effective target plasma concentrations below those associated with toxicity for patients with renal failure for CPB. PMID:25704361

  11. Constant optimization of oral drug absorption kinetics in the compartment absorption and transit models using particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabowo, K.; Sumaryada, T.; Kartono, A.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation of predictive modeling oral drug namely Compartment Absorption and Transit (CAT) using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm has been performed. This research will be carried out optimization of kinetic constant value oral drug use PSO algorithm to obtain the best global transport constant values for CAT equation that can predict drug concentration in plasma. The value of drug absorption rate constant for drug atenolol 25 mg is k10, k12, k21, k13 and k31 with each value is 0.8562, 0.3736, 0.2191, 0.4334 and 1.000 have been obtained thus raising the value of the coefficient of determination of a model CAT. From the experimental data plasma drug concentrations used are Atenolol, the coefficient of determination (R2) obtained from simulations atenolol 25 mg (PSO) was 81.72% and 99.46%. Better correlation between the dependent variable as the drug concentration and explanatory variables such as mass medication, plasma volume, and rate of absorption of the drug has increased in CAT models using PSO algorithm. Based on the results of CAT models fit charts can predict drug concentration in plasma.

  12. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Yang, Katy S; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body, but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors and model drug behaviour under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of the PARP-1 inhibitor distribution in real time, showing that PARP-1 inhibitors reach their cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modelling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumour cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARP-1 inhibitor concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA-repair inhibition. This suggests that single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modelling improve our understanding of drug action at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  13. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Yang, Katy S.; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H.; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors (PARPi) and model drug behavior under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of PARPi distribution in real time, showing that PARPi reaches its cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modeling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumor cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARPi concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA repair inhibition. This suggests that single cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modeling improves our understanding of drug action at single cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  14. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael D.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Yoon, Miyoung; Keene, Athena M.; Dorman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans) and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers. PMID:22645610

  15. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling To Determine the Dose of ST-246 To Protect against Smallpox in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Janet M.; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H.; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J. F.; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E.; Honeychurch, Kady M.; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a “material threat” and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population. PMID:23254433

  16. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to determine the dose of ST-246 to protect against smallpox in humans.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Janet M; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J F; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E; Honeychurch, Kady M; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a "material threat" and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population.

  17. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Harish; Adeshina, Femi; Teeguarden, Justin G

    2013-12-15

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl - a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management - to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F=1 and t90<1 min indicating complete and rapid absorption. The F value ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 for oral and various transmucosal routes. Oral Fentanyl was absorbed the slowest (t90~300 min); the absorption of intranasal Fentanyl was relatively rapid (t90~20-40 min); and the various oral transmucosal routes had intermediate absorption rates (t90~160-300 min). Based on these results, for inhalation exposures, we assumed that all of the Fentanyl inhaled from the air during each breath directly, and instantaneously enters the arterial circulation. We present model predictions of Fentanyl blood concentrations in oral and inhalation scenarios relevant for PAL development, and provide an analytical expression that can be used to extrapolate between oral and inhalation routes for the derivation of PALs.

  18. Global optimization of a deuterium calibrated, discrete-state compartment model (DSCM): Application to the eastern Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Rosemary W. H.; Pohll, Greg M.; Earman, Sam; Hershey, Ronald L.

    2007-10-01

    SummaryAs part of a larger study to estimate groundwater recharge volumes in the area of the eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS), [Campana, M.E., 1975. Finite-state models of transport phenomena in hydrologic systems, PhD Dissertation: University of Arizona, Tucson] Discrete-state compartment model (DSCM) was re-coded to simulate steady-state groundwater concentrations of a conservative tracer. It was then dynamically linked with the shuffled complex evolution (SCE) optimization algorithm [Duan, Q., Soroosh, S., Gupta, V., 1992. Effective and efficient global optimization for conceptual rainfall-runoff models. Water Resources Research 28(4), 1015-1031] in which both flow direction and magnitude were adjusted to minimize errors in predicted tracer concentrations. Code validation on a simple four-celled model showed the algorithm consistent in model predictions and capable of reproducing expected cell outflows with relatively little error. The DSCM-SCE code was then applied to a 15-basin (cell) eastern NTS model developed for the DSCM. Auto-calibration of the NTS model was run given two modeling scenarios, (a) assuming known groundwater flow directions and solving only for magnitudes and, (b) solving for groundwater flow directions and magnitudes. The SCE is a fairly robust algorithm, unlike simulated annealing or modified Gauss-Newton approaches. The DSCM-SCE improves upon its original counterpart by being more user-friendly and by auto-calibrating complex models in minutes to hours. While the DSCM-SCE can provide numerical support to a working hypothesis, it can not definitively define a flow system based solely on δD values given few hydrogeologic constraints on boundary conditions and cell-to-cell interactions.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Gd(DO3A-Lys) and MR imaging studies in an orthotopic U87MG glioma tumor model.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Yang, Chang-Tong; Nasrallah, Fatima Ali; Tay, Hui Chien; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Robins, Edward G

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of Gd(DO3A-Lys), a macrocyclic gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent functionalized with a lysine derivative, was studied in Wistar rats. Kinetic data were fitted using a two-compartment model and revealed Gd(DO3A-Lys) to have a distribution half-life, t1/2 (α), of 1.3 min, an elimination half-life, t1/2 (β), of 24.9 min and a large volume of distribution, VD , of 0.49 L/kg indicative of the agent being able to rapidly distribute into tissues and organs. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in an orthotopic U87MG glioma mouse model demonstrated considerable enhancement of both the tumor and surrounding vasculature after intravenous administration of Gd(DO3A-Lys). Applying dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the glioma of different sizes further showed distinct uptake characteristics and patterns of enhancement, which suggests the potential for differentiating changes at different stages of tumor growth. Our results indicate that Gd(DO3A-Lys) could be a promising candidate for glioma MR imaging. PMID:25612157

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of hydrogen cyanide levels in human breath.

    PubMed

    Stamyr, Kristin; Mörk, Anna-Karin; Johanson, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a potent and fast-acting toxin increasingly recognized as an important cause of death in fire victims. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of cyanide poisoning are essential to avoid fatalities. Unfortunately, there are at present few rapid diagnostic methods. A noninvasive methodology would be to use HCN in exhaled air as a marker for systemic exposure. To explore this possibility, we developed a preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The model suggests that breath HCN levels following inhalation exposure at near-lethal and lethal conditions are 0.1-1 ppm, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude higher than the background breath level of about 0.01 ppm in unexposed subjects. Hence, our results imply that breath analysis may be used as a rapid diagnostic method for cyanide poisoning.

  1. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for sequential metabolism: effect of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphism on clopidogrel and clopidogrel active metabolite pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Djebli, Nassim; Fabre, David; Boulenc, Xavier; Fabre, Gérard; Sultan, Eric; Hurbin, Fabrice

    2015-04-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that needs to be converted to its active metabolite (clopi-H4) in two sequential cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent steps. In the present study, a dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in Simcyp for clopidogrel and clopi-H4 using a specific sequential metabolite module in four populations with phenotypically different CYP2C19 activity (poor, intermediate, extensive, and ultrarapid metabolizers) receiving a loading dose of 300 mg followed by a maintenance dose of 75 mg. This model was validated using several approaches. First, a comparison of predicted-to-observed area under the curve (AUC)0-24 obtained from a randomized crossover study conducted in four balanced CYP2C19-phenotype metabolizer groups was performed using a visual predictive check method. Second, the interindividual and intertrial variability (on the basis of AUC0-24 comparisons) between the predicted trials and the observed trial of individuals, for each phenotypic group, were compared. Finally, a further validation, on the basis of drug-drug-interaction prediction, was performed by comparing observed values of clopidogrel and clopi-H4 with or without dronedarone (moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor) coadministration using a previously developed and validated physiologically based PBPK dronedarone model. The PBPK model was well validated for both clopidogrel and its active metabolite clopi-H4, in each CYP2C19-phenotypic group, whatever the treatment period (300-mg loading dose and 75-mg last maintenance dose). This is the first study proposing a full dynamic PBPK model able to accurately predict simultaneously the pharmacokinetics of the parent drug and of its primary and secondary metabolites in populations with genetically different activity for a metabolizing enzyme.

  2. Synthetic cellularity based on non-lipid micro-compartments and protocell models.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Huang, Xin; Tang, T-Y Dora; Mann, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    This review discusses recent advances in the design and construction of protocell models based on the self-assembly or microphase separation of non-lipid building blocks. We focus on strategies involving partially hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (colloidosomes), protein-polymer globular nano-conjugates (proteinosomes), amphiphilic block copolymers (polymersomes), and stoichiometric mixtures of oppositely charged biomolecules and polyelectrolytes (coacervates). Developments in the engineering of membrane functionality to produce synthetic protocells with gated responses and control over multi-step reactions are described. New routes to protocells comprising molecularly crowded, cytoskeletal-like hydrogel interiors, as well as to the construction of hybrid protocell models are also highlighted. Together, these strategies enable a wide range of biomolecular and synthetic components to be encapsulated, regulated and processed within the micro-compartmentalized volume, and suggest that the development of non-lipid micro-ensembles offers an approach that is complementary to protocell models based on phospholipid or fatty acid vesicles. PMID:24952153

  3. The effect of infected external computers on the spread of viruses: A compartment modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan

    2013-12-01

    Inevitably, there exist infected computers outside of the Internet. This paper aims to understand how infected external computers affect the spread of computer viruses. For that purpose, a new virus-antivirus spreading model, which takes into account the effect of infected/immune external computers, is established. A systematic study shows that, unlike most previous models, the proposed model admits no virus-free equilibrium and admits a globally asymptotically stable viral equilibrium. This result implies that it would be practically impossible to eradicate viruses on the Internet. As a result, inhibiting the virus prevalence to below an acceptable level would be the next best thing. A theoretical study reveals the effect of different parameters on the steady virus prevalence. On this basis, a number of suggestions are made so as to contain virus spreading.

  4. The TERENO-preAlpine Observatory: A Research Infrastructure for Hydrometeorological Observation and -Modeling across Compartments and Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Beck, C.; Brosy, C.; Chwala, C.; Emeis, S.; Fersch, B.; Garvelmann, J.; Gasche, R.; Jahn, C.; Junkermann, W.; Keis, F.; Kiese, R.; Krieg, R.; Mauder, M.; Ralf, M.; Neidl, F.; Philipp, A.; Schäfer, K.; Schmid, H. P. E.; Völksch, I.; Warscher, M.; Werhahn, J.; Wolf, B.; Senatore, A.; Rödiger, T.

    2015-12-01

    The improved understanding of the interlinked atmospheric and terrestrial hydrological processes requires concerted and compartment-crossing observation and -modeling efforts. Through the TERENO preAlpine Observatory, located in the southern Bavarian region of Germany, comprehensive technical infrastructure is being established to allow joint analyses of water-, energy- and nutrient fluxes. The observatory extends from the Ammergau mountains in the South till Lake Ammersee in the North. The observatory is designated as an international research platform, open for participation and integration. The technical infrastructure consists of a multitude of precipitation gauges at different altitudes, an X-band radar, and a set of commercial microwave radio links allowing to derive line integrated precipitation estimates, numerous snow monitoring stations, a SnowPack Analyzer, neutron based SnowFox devices, as well as a snow melt lysimeter and time-lapse photography. For the quantification of the combined water and energy fluxes, three eddy covariance systems including four-component net-radiometers and soil-heat flux instrumentation are operated. Soil moisture patterns and dynamics are measured with a wireless sensor network consisting of 55 in-situ soil moisture profiles, a cosmic ray probe probe and 36 precision weighing vegetated lysimeters at different locations and altitudes. Groundwater dynamics and hydrogeochemical composition of the two main local aquifers are monitored at five observation wells as well as streamflow at three weirs at various cross sections. Additionally, stable water isotopes are analyzed. The operational monitoring is complemented by intensive measurement campaigns, like the ScaleX campaign in June and July 2015 for which we present first results. Here, additional remote sensing measurements of atmospheric wind, humidity and temperature profiles are performed, which are complemented by micro-light aircraft- and UAV-based remote sensing for three

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DELTAMETHRIN IN ADULT AND DEVELOPING SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work describes the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, in the developing male Sprague-Dawley rat. Generalized Michaelis-Menten equations were used to calculate metabolic rate constants and organ weights ...

  6. PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC (PBPK/PD) MODEL FOR PREDICTING THE DERMAL DOSE AND DISPOSITION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are particularly suited for interpretation of cumulative risk via the dermal route for which aggregate exposure must be assessed for chemicals having a common mechanism of toxicity. To this end, a quantita...

  7. Development of Multi-Route Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Models for Ethanol in the Adult, Pregnant, and Neonatal Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofuel blends of 10% ethanol (EtOH) and gasoline are common in the United States, and higher EtOH concentrations are being considered (15-85%). Currently, no physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are available to describe the kinetics of EtOH-based biofuels. PBPK...

  8. Development of a Pediatric Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Sirolimus: Applying Principles of Growth and Maturation in Neonates and Infants.

    PubMed

    Emoto, C; Fukuda, T; Johnson, T N; Adams, D M; Vinks, A A

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the maturation of sirolimus clearance in a cohort of very young pediatric patients with vascular anomalies. The relationship between allometrically scaled in vivo clearance and age was described by the Emax model in patients aged 1 month to 2 years. Consistent with the observed increase, in vitro intrinsic clearance of sirolimus using pediatric liver microsomes showed a similar age-dependent increase. In children older than 2 years, allometrically scaled sirolimus clearance did not show further maturation. Simulated clearance estimates with a sirolimus physiologically based pharmacokinetic model that included CYP3A4/5/7 and CYP2C8 maturation profiles were in close agreement with observed in vivo clearance values. In addition, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model-simulated sirolimus pharmacokinetic profiles predicted the actual observations well. These results demonstrate the utility of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach for the prediction of the developmental trajectory of sirolimus metabolic activity and its effects on total body clearance in neonates and infants. PMID:26225230

  9. Pharmacokinetic study of ioxaglate, a low osmolality contrast medium, in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Laporte, V; Guenzet, J; Langlois, S; Pengloan, J; Rouleau, P

    1986-11-01

    Determination of changes in plasma concentration of ioxaglate in patients with renal failure made it possible to demonstrate that distribution and clearance of this contrast medium, as in the case of classic uroangiographic products, conform to an open two-compartment model with clearance from the central compartment. Various pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The metabolic clearance of ioxaglate was lower for all 6 patients studied, as compared with results for 3 normal subjects tested, but less marked than with iodamide, a contrast medium involving tubular secretion.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastian, G; Barrail, A; Urien, S

    2003-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin in metastatic cancer patients. Oxaliplatin was administered by 2- or 4-h infusions, 50, 65, 75, 85, 100 or 130 mg/m2 to 56 patients. Blood samples were collected over 28 h. Plasma concentrations of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed-effects modeling method. Ultrafilterable oxaliplatin concentration-time profiles showed a secondary peak or a shoulder aspect post-infusion, attributed to the existence of an enterohepatic recirculation (EHR). They were best described by a two-compartment model incorporating an EHR component. Plasma clearance (CL) was related positively to body weight (BW) and negatively to serum creatinine (SCr), and was greater in male patients than in female patients. This covariate modeling resulted in a decrease in the interindividual variability for CL from 104 to 62%. The central distribution volume (V1) and inter-compartmental clearance (Q) were related to BW. Typical population estimates of CL, central distribution volume (V1), input rate constant into gallbladder (k1B) and lag time for drug reabsorption (TLAG) were 14.1 or 8.5 l/h (male or female patients), 24.9 l, 1.8 h-1 and 2.0 h, respectively. The final pharmacokinetic model was validated using 200 bootstrap samples of the original data. We conclude that a two-compartment with EHR model adequately described ultrafilterable oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics, explaining a secondary transient increase in concentration. This study identified combined-covariate-effects ultrafilterable oxaliplatin clearance, supporting dose adjustment of oxaliplatin based on BW, gender and corrected for SCr level, if drug exposure is thought to be related to therapeutic or toxic issues.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastian, G; Barrail, A; Urien, S

    2003-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin in metastatic cancer patients. Oxaliplatin was administered by 2- or 4-h infusions, 50, 65, 75, 85, 100 or 130 mg/m2 to 56 patients. Blood samples were collected over 28 h. Plasma concentrations of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed-effects modeling method. Ultrafilterable oxaliplatin concentration-time profiles showed a secondary peak or a shoulder aspect post-infusion, attributed to the existence of an enterohepatic recirculation (EHR). They were best described by a two-compartment model incorporating an EHR component. Plasma clearance (CL) was related positively to body weight (BW) and negatively to serum creatinine (SCr), and was greater in male patients than in female patients. This covariate modeling resulted in a decrease in the interindividual variability for CL from 104 to 62%. The central distribution volume (V1) and inter-compartmental clearance (Q) were related to BW. Typical population estimates of CL, central distribution volume (V1), input rate constant into gallbladder (k1B) and lag time for drug reabsorption (TLAG) were 14.1 or 8.5 l/h (male or female patients), 24.9 l, 1.8 h-1 and 2.0 h, respectively. The final pharmacokinetic model was validated using 200 bootstrap samples of the original data. We conclude that a two-compartment with EHR model adequately described ultrafilterable oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics, explaining a secondary transient increase in concentration. This study identified combined-covariate-effects ultrafilterable oxaliplatin clearance, supporting dose adjustment of oxaliplatin based on BW, gender and corrected for SCr level, if drug exposure is thought to be related to therapeutic or toxic issues. PMID:14597876

  12. A Multi-Compartment Model for Interneurons in the Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Halnes, Geir; Augustinaite, Sigita; Heggelund, Paul; Einevoll, Gaute T.; Migliore, Michele

    2011-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons (INs) in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) shape the information flow from retina to cortex, presumably by controlling the number of visually evoked spikes in geniculate thalamocortical (TC) neurons, and refining their receptive field. The INs exhibit a rich variety of firing patterns: Depolarizing current injections to the soma may induce tonic firing, periodic bursting or an initial burst followed by tonic spiking, sometimes with prominent spike-time adaptation. When released from hyperpolarization, some INs elicit rebound bursts, while others return more passively to the resting potential. A full mechanistic understanding that explains the function of the dLGN on the basis of neuronal morphology, physiology and circuitry is currently lacking. One way to approach such an understanding is by developing a detailed mathematical model of the involved cells and their interactions. Limitations of the previous models for the INs of the dLGN region prevent an accurate representation of the conceptual framework needed to understand the computational properties of this region. We here present a detailed compartmental model of INs using, for the first time, a morphological reconstruction and a set of active dendritic conductances constrained by experimental somatic recordings from INs under several different current-clamp conditions. The model makes a number of experimentally testable predictions about the role of specific mechanisms for the firing properties observed in these neurons. In addition to accounting for the significant features of all experimental traces, it quantitatively reproduces the experimental recordings of the action-potential- firing frequency as a function of injected current. We show how and why relative differences in conductance values, rather than differences in ion channel composition, could account for the distinct differences between the responses observed in two different neurons, suggesting that INs may be

  13. Covariate pharmacokinetic model building in oncology and its potential clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Joerger, Markus

    2012-03-01

    When modeling pharmacokinetic (PK) data, identifying covariates is important in explaining interindividual variability, and thus increasing the predictive value of the model. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling with stepwise covariate modeling is frequently used to build structural covariate models, and the most commonly used software-NONMEM-provides estimations for the fixed-effect parameters (e.g., drug clearance), interindividual and residual unidentified random effects. The aim of covariate modeling is not only to find covariates that significantly influence the population PK parameters, but also to provide dosing recommendations for a certain drug under different conditions, e.g., organ dysfunction, combination chemotherapy. A true covariate is usually seen as one that carries unique information on a structural model parameter. Covariate models have improved our understanding of the pharmacology of many anticancer drugs, including busulfan or melphalan that are part of high-dose pretransplant treatments, the antifolate methotrexate whose elimination is strongly dependent on GFR and comedication, the taxanes and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the latter being subject of cytochrome p450 3A4 (CYP3A4) associated metabolism. The purpose of this review article is to provide a tool to help understand population covariate analysis and their potential implications for the clinic. Accordingly, several population covariate models are listed, and their clinical relevance is discussed. The target audience of this article are clinical oncologists with a special interest in clinical and mathematical pharmacology.

  14. Error analysis of the quantification of hepatic perfusion using a dual-input single-compartment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shohei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-11-01

    We performed an error analysis of the quantification of liver perfusion from dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) data using a dual-input single-compartment model for various disease severities, based on computer simulations. In the simulations, the time-density curves (TDCs) in the liver were generated from an actually measured arterial input function using a theoretical equation describing the kinetic behavior of the contrast agent (CA) in the liver. The rate constants for the transfer of CA from the hepatic artery to the liver (K1a), from the portal vein to the liver (K1p), and from the liver to the plasma (k2) were estimated from simulated TDCs with various plasma volumes (V0s). To investigate the effect of the shapes of input functions, the original arterial and portal-venous input functions were stretched in the time direction by factors of 2, 3 and 4 (stretching factors). The above parameters were estimated with the linear least-squares (LLSQ) and nonlinear least-squares (NLSQ) methods, and the root mean square errors (RMSEs) between the true and estimated values were calculated. Sensitivity and identifiability analyses were also performed. The RMSE of V0 was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, k2 and K1p in an increasing order. The RMSEs of K1a, K1p and k2 increased with increasing V0, while that of V0 tended to decrease. The stretching factor also affected parameter estimation in both methods. The LLSQ method estimated the above parameters faster and with smaller variations than the NLSQ method. Sensitivity analysis showed that the magnitude of the sensitivity function of V0 was the greatest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in a decreasing order, while the variance of V0 obtained from the covariance matrices was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in an increasing order. The magnitude of the sensitivity function and the variance increased and decreased, respectively, with increasing disease severity and decreased

  15. An Asymptotic Analysis of a 2-D Model of Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by Bulk Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, J.; Ward, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    A class of coupled cell-bulk ODE-PDE models is formulated and analyzed in a two-dimensional domain, which is relevant to studying quorum-sensing behavior on thin substrates. In this model, spatially segregated dynamically active signaling cells of a common small radius ɛ ≪ 1 are coupled through a passive bulk diffusion field. For this coupled system, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to construct steady-state solutions and to formulate a spectral problem that characterizes the linear stability properties of the steady-state solutions, with the aim of predicting whether temporal oscillations can be triggered by the cell-bulk coupling. Phase diagrams in parameter space where such collective oscillations can occur, as obtained from our linear stability analysis, are illustrated for two specific choices of the intracellular kinetics. In the limit of very large bulk diffusion, it is shown that solutions to the ODE-PDE cell-bulk system can be approximated by a finite-dimensional dynamical system. This limiting system is studied both analytically, using a linear stability analysis and, globally, using numerical bifurcation software. For one illustrative example of the theory, it is shown that when the number of cells exceeds some critical number, i.e., when a quorum is attained, the passive bulk diffusion field can trigger oscillations through a Hopf bifurcation that would otherwise not occur without the coupling. Moreover, for two specific models for the intracellular dynamics, we show that there are rather wide regions in parameter space where these triggered oscillations are synchronous in nature. Unless the bulk diffusivity is asymptotically large, it is shown that a diffusion-sensing behavior is possible whereby more clustered spatial configurations of cells inside the domain lead to larger regions in parameter space where synchronous collective oscillations between the small cells can occur. Finally, the linear stability analysis for these cell

  16. Radiological assessment by compartment model POSEIDON-R of radioactivity released in the ocean following Fukushima Daiichi accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Maderich, Vladimir; Heling, Rudie; Jung, Kyung Tae; Myoung, Jung-Goo

    2013-04-01

    The modified compartment model POSEIDON-R (Lepicard et al, 2004), was applied to the North-Western Pacific and adjacent seas. It is for the first time, that a compartment model was used in this region, where 25 Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) are operated. The aim of this study is to perform a radiological assessment of the releases of radioactivity due to the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The model predicts the dispersion of radioactivity in water column and in the sediments, and the transfer of radionuclides throughout the marine food web, and the subsequent doses to the population due to the consumption of fishery products. A generic predictive dynamical food-chain model is used instead of concentration factor (CF) approach. The radionuclide uptake model for fish has as central feature the accumulation of radionuclides in the target tissue. Three layer structure of the water column makes it possible to describe deep-water transport adequately. In total 175 boxes cover the Northwestern Pacific, the East China Sea, and the Yellow Sea and East/Japan Sea. Water fluxes between boxes were calculated by averaging three-dimensional currents obtained by hydrodynamic model ROMS over a 10-years period. Tidal mixing between boxes was parameterized. The model was validated on observation data on the Cs-137 in water for the period 1945-2004. The source terms from nuclear weapon tests are regional source term from the bomb tests on Atoll Enewetak and Atoll Bikini and global deposition from weapons tests. The correlation coefficient between predicted and observed concentrations of Cs-137 in the surface water is 0.925 and RMSE=1.43 Bq/m3. A local-scale coastal box was used according POSEIDON's methodology to describe local processes of activity transport, deposition and food web around the Fukushima Daiichi NPP. The source term to the ocean from the Fukushima accident includes a 10-days release of Cs-134 (5 PBq) and Cs-137 (4 PBq) directly into the ocean and 6 and 5 PBq of Cs-134 and

  17. Measurement of body fat in young and elderly women: comparison between a four-compartment model and widely used reference methods.

    PubMed

    Bergsma-Kadijk, J A; Baumeister, B; Deurenberg, P

    1996-05-01

    Body composition was measured in twenty young females aged 19-27 years and eighteen elderly females, aged 65-78 years by densitometry (underwater weighing), deuterium oxide dilution and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). From body weight, bone-mineral content, total body water and body density, percentage body fat (BF%) was calculated using a four-compartment model. BF% obtained by this four-compartment model was regarded as a reference method and BF% obtained by the single methods were compared with this value. Differences in BF% from the four-compartment model minus the single methods were 2.1 (SD 1.2) for densitometry, 3.1 (SD 1.8) for DXA and -0.6 (SD 0.9) BF% for deuterium oxide dilution in the young women. In the elderly women these values were -0.6 (SD 2.3), 5.3 (SD 3.8) and 0.7 (SD 2.2) BF%. When a three-compartment model (calculated from body density and total body water) was compared with the four-compartment model, the bias was 0.4 (SD 0.3) BF% in the young and 0.0 (SD 0.3) BF% in the elderly women. From the mineral and water fractions in the fat-free mass the true density of the fat-free mass was calculated as 1.1070 (SD 0.0047) kg/l in the young females and 1.0970 (SD 0.0088) kg/l in the elderly women (P < 0.001). This study shows that the single methods have considerable mean and individual biases compared with the four-compartment model, but that a three-compartment model calculated from density and total body water offers an acceptable alternative. The difference in calculated density of the fat-free mass between the young and the elderly women shows the need to adapt Siri's formula for specific groups.

  18. Area method for the estimation of partition coefficients for physiological pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Gallo, J M; Lam, F C; Perrier, D G

    1987-06-01

    A new technique, the area method, is derived for the determination of partition coefficients for both blood-flow limited and membrane limited physiological pharmacokinetic models. This method was compared to a standard technique by Monte Carlo simulation. Partition coefficients were calculated for the blood-flow limited case for both eliminating and noneliminating organs. It was found that the area method compared favorably to a standard technique and was less prone to error. This may be attributed to the more subjective interpretation as to which data points are included in the terminal phase, since the standard method relies on the accurate determination of the terminal slope for the calculation of partition coefficients. Both methods are satisfactory for the calculation of partition coefficients with the area method being more accurate and precise. PMID:3668804

  19. Utility of population pharmacokinetic modeling in the assessment of therapeutic protein-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Andrew T; Earp, Justin C; Gupta, Manish; Hanley, William; Hu, Chuanpu; Wang, Diane D; Zajic, Stefan; Zhu, Min

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of pharmacokinetic (PK) based drug-drug interactions (DDI) is essential for ensuring patient safety and drug efficacy. With the substantial increase in therapeutic proteins (TP) entering the market and drug development, evaluation of TP-drug interaction (TPDI) has become increasingly important. Unlike for small molecule (e.g., chemical-based) drugs, conducting TPDI studies often presents logistical challenges, while the population PK (PPK) modeling may be a viable approach dealing with the issues. A working group was formed with members from the pharmaceutical industry and the FDA to assess the utility of PPK-based TPDI assessment including study designs, data analysis methods, and implementation strategy. This paper summarizes key issues for consideration as well as a proposed strategy with focuses on (1) PPK approach for exploratory assessment; (2) PPK approach for confirmatory assessment; (3) importance of data quality; (4) implementation strategy; and (5) potential regulatory implications. Advantages and limitations of the approach are also discussed.

  20. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic(PB-PK) model for ethylene dibromide: relevance of extrahepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hissink, A M; Wormhoudt, L W; Sherratt, P J; Hayes, J D; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P; van Bladeren, P J

    2000-08-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model was developed for ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane, EDB) for rats and humans, partly based on previously published in vitro data (Ploemen et al., 1997). In the present study, this PB-PK model has been validated for the rat. In addition, new data were used for the human class ThetaGST T1-1. Validation experiments are described in order to test the predictive value of kinetics to describe "whole-body" metabolism. For the validation experiments, groups of cannulated rats were dosed orally or intravenously with different doses of EDB. Obtained blood concentration-time curves of EDB for all dosing groups were compared to model predictions. It appeared that metabolism, which previously was assumed to be restricted to the liver, was underestimated. Therefore, we extended the PB-PK model to include all the extrahepatic organs, in which the enzymes involved in EDB metabolism have been detected and quantified. With this extended model, the blood concentrations were much more accurately described compared to the predictions of the "liver-model". Therefore, extrahepatic metabolism was also included in the human model. The present study illustrates the potential application of in vitro metabolic parameters in risk assessment, as well as the use of PB-PK modelling as a tool to understand and predict in vivo data.

  1. Theory of NMR Signal Dephasing in a Generalized Two-Compartment Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukstanskii, Alexander; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy

    2001-03-01

    A new wave of interest into the theory of NMR signal dephasing in the presence of mesoscopic static field inhomogeneities has been generated by possible applications in MRI, mostly in fMRI. An exact solution of this problem has been found in a static dephasing regime for two geometrical models: randomly distributed spheres or infinitely long cylinders of a magnetic susceptibility \\chi i embedded in a given media with a susceptibility \\chi e [1,2]. In the present communication the theory is generalized by modeling the real objects (blood vessel, red blood cells, trabecular bone, etc) by ellipsoids of revolution (prolate and oblate spheroids). We found that the signal lineshape is not Gaussian. For prolate spheroids, the time domain FID signal, S, shows three characteristic time regimes: 1) t<= 4.5t_c, Ssymbol126exp [-\\varsigma b_1(t/t_c)^2]; 2) 4.5t_c> β t_c, Ssymbol126exp [-\\varsigma C(t/t_c)], where t_csymbol126[(\\chi _i-\\chi _e)B_0]-1, B0 is the external magnetic field, \\varsigma is the volume fraction of the objects; C is a universal constant, b_1,2 and β are functions of the spheroid axis ratio. 038

    038

    1. D.A.Yablonskiy, E.M.Haacke, Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 32, 749 (1994) 038 2. D.A.Yablonskiy, ibid., 39, 417 (1998)

  2. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of isoniazid, acetylisoniazid, and isonicotinic acid in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Seng, Kok-Yong; Hee, Kim-Hor; Soon, Gaik-Hong; Chew, Nicholas; Khoo, Saye H; Lee, Lawrence Soon-U

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we aimed to quantify the effects of the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) phenotype on isoniazid (INH) metabolism in vivo and identify other sources of pharmacokinetic variability following single-dose administration in healthy Asian adults. The concentrations of INH and its metabolites acetylisoniazid (AcINH) and isonicotinic acid (INA) in plasma were evaluated in 33 healthy Asians who were also given efavirenz and rifampin. The pharmacokinetics of INH, AcINH, and INA were analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) to estimate the population pharmacokinetic parameters and evaluate the relationships between the parameters and the elimination status (fast, intermediate, and slow acetylators), demographic status, and measures of renal and hepatic function. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption best described the INH pharmacokinetics. AcINH and INA data were best described by a two- and a one-compartment model, respectively, linked to the INH model. In the final model for INH, the derived metabolic phenotypes for NAT2 were identified as a significant covariate in the INH clearance, reducing its interindividual variability from 86% to 14%. The INH clearance in fast eliminators was 1.9- and 7.7-fold higher than in intermediate and slow eliminators, respectively (65 versus 35 and 8 liters/h). Creatinine clearance was confirmed as a significant covariate for AcINH clearance. Simulations suggested that the current dosing guidelines (200 mg for 30 to 45 kg and 300 mg for >45 kg) may be suboptimal (3 mg/liter ≤ Cmax ≤ 6 mg/liter) irrespective of the acetylator class. The analysis established a model that adequately characterizes INH, AcINH, and INA pharmacokinetics in healthy Asians. Our results refine the NAT2 phenotype-based predictions of the pharmacokinetics for INH.

  3. Bayesian population analysis of a washin-washout physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Moerk, Anna-Karin; Jonsson, Fredrik; Johanson, Gunnar

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to derive improved estimates of population variability and uncertainty of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model parameters, especially of those related to the washin-washout behavior of polar volatile substances. This was done by optimizing a previously published washin-washout PBPK model for acetone in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. The sensitivity of the model parameters was investigated by creating four different prior sets, where the uncertainty surrounding the population variability of the physiological model parameters was given values corresponding to coefficients of variation of 1%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, respectively. The PBPK model was calibrated to toxicokinetic data from 2 previous studies where 18 volunteers were exposed to 250-550 ppm of acetone at various levels of workload. The updated PBPK model provided a good description of the concentrations in arterial, venous, and exhaled air. The precision of most of the model parameter estimates was improved. New information was particularly gained on the population distribution of the parameters governing the washin-washout effect. The results presented herein provide a good starting point to estimate the target dose of acetone in the working and general populations for risk assessment purposes.

  4. Metformin and cimetidine: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling to investigate transporter mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Burt, H J; Neuhoff, S; Almond, L; Gaohua, L; Harwood, M D; Jamei, M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Tucker, G T; Rowland-Yeo, K

    2016-06-10

    Metformin is used as a probe for OCT2 mediated transport when investigating possible DDIs with new chemical entities. The aim of the current study was to investigate the ability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to simulate the effects of OCT and MATE inhibition by cimetidine on metformin kinetics. PBPK models were developed, incorporating mechanistic kidney and liver sub-models for metformin (OCT and MATE substrate) and a mechanistic kidney sub-model for cimetidine. The models were used to simulate inhibition of the MATE1, MATE2-K, OCT1 and OCT2 mediated transport of metformin by cimetidine. Assuming competitive inhibition and using cimetidine Ki values determined in vitro, the predicted metformin AUC ratio was 1.0 compared to an observed value of 1.46. The observed AUC ratio could only be recovered with this model when the cimetidine Ki for OCT2 was decreased 1000-fold or the Ki's for both OCT1 and OCT2 were decreased 500-fold. An alternative description of metformin renal transport by OCT1 and OCT2, incorporating electrochemical modulation of the rate of metformin uptake together with 8-18-fold decreases in cimetidine Ki's for OCTs and MATEs, allowed recovery of the extent of the observed effect of cimetidine on metformin AUC. While the final PBPK model has limitations, it demonstrates the benefit of allowing for the complexities of passive permeability combined with active cellular uptake modulated by an electrochemical gradient and active efflux. PMID:27019345

  5. Estimating marbofloxacin withdrawal time in broiler chickens using a population physiologically based pharmacokinetics model.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Yang, Y R; Wang, L; Huang, X H; Qiao, G; Zeng, Z L

    2014-12-01

    Residue depletion of marbofloxacin in broiler chicken after oral administration at 5 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days was studied in this study. The areas under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to ∞ (AUC0-∞ s) of marbofloxacin in tissues and plasma were used to calculate tissue/plasma partition coefficients (PX s). Based on PX s and the other parameters derived from published studies, a flow-limited physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model was developed to predict marbofloxacin concentrations, which were then compared with those derived from the residue depletion study so as to validate this model. Considering individual difference in drug disposition, a Monte Carlo simulation included 1000 iterations was further incorporated into the validated model to generate a population PBPK model and to estimate the marbofloxacin residue withdrawal times in edible tissues. The withdrawal periods were compared to those derived from linear regression analysis. The PBPK model presented here successfully predicted the measured concentrations in all tissues. The withdrawal times in all edible tissues derived from the population PBPK model were longer than those from linear regression analysis, and based on the residues in kidney, a withdrawal time of 4 days was estimated for marbofloxacin after oral administration at 5 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days. It was shown that population PBPK model could be used to accurately predict marbofloxacin residue withdrawal time in edible tissues in broiler chickens.

  6. Estimating absorbed dose of pesticides in a field setting using biomonitoring data and pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Scher, Deanna P; Sawchuk, Ronald J; Alexander, Bruce H; Adgate, John L

    2008-01-01

    Linking biomarker data to pharmacokinetic (PK) models permits comparison of absorbed dose with a toxicological benchmark, which is an important step to understanding the health implications of pesticide exposure. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the feasibility of reconstructing the absorbed dose of two pesticides using PK models developed from biomarker data in a study of occupational application of these compounds. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected from farmers 24 h before through 96 h after a typical application of chlorpyrifos or 2,4-D. PK models were used to link the amounts found in urine samples to absorbed dose. Modeled total body dose estimates (in micrograms) were compared to measured dose from time 0-96 h. Despite the complexities surrounding the interpretation of biomonitoring data from a field setting, the models developed as part of this analysis accurately estimated the absorbed dose of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos when collection of urine samples was largely complete. Over half of the farmers were excluded from modeling due to suspected noncompliance with urine collection or confounding exposure events, which highlights the importance of these issues for designing and interpreting biomonitoring data in future studies. Further evaluation of PK models in scenarios using single void samples is warranted for improving field-based dose assessments.

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics and cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, M E; Krishnan, K

    1994-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling involves mathematically describing the complex interplay of the critical physicochemical and biological determinants involved in the disposition of chemicals. In this approach, the body is divided into a number of biologically relevant tissue compartments, arranged in an anatomically accurate manner, and defined with appropriate physiological characteristics. The extrapolation of pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals from high dose to low dose for various exposure routes and species is possible with this approach because these models are developed by integrating quantitative information on the critical determinants of chemical disposition under a biological modeling framework. The principal application of PBPK models is in the prediction of tissue dosimetry of toxic moiety (e.g., parent chemical, reactive metabolite, macromolecular adduct) of a chemical. Such an application has been demonstrated with dichloromethane, a liver and lung carcinogen in the B6C3F1 mouse. The PBPK model-based risk assessment approach estimated a cancer risk to people of 3.7 x 10(-8) for a lifetime inhalation exposure of 1 micrograms/m3, which is lower by more than two orders of magnitude than that calculated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency using the linearized multistage model (for low-dose extrapolation) and body surface correction factor (for interspecies scaling). The capability of predicting the target tissue exposure to toxic moiety in people with PBPK models should help reduce the uncertainty associated with the extrapolation procedures adopted in conventional dose-response assessment. PMID:8187697

  8. 1D-3D hybrid modeling-from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time.

    PubMed

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator-which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to the

  9. Differentiating T2 hyperintensity in neonatal white matter by two-compartment model of diffusional kurtosis imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Li, Xianjun; Li, Yanyan; Zeng, Lingxia; Jin, Chao; Sun, Qinli; Xu, Duan; Yu, Bolang; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In conventional neonatal MRI, the T2 hyperintensity (T2h) in cerebral white matter (WM) at term-equivalent age due to immaturity or impairment is still difficult to identify. To clarify such issue, this study used the metrics derived from a two-compartment WM model of diffusional kurtosis imaging (WM-DKI), including intra-axonal, extra-axonal axial and radial diffusivities (Da, De,// and De,⊥), to compare WM differences between the simple T2h and normal control for both preterm and full-term neonates, and between simple T2h and complex T2h with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Results indicated that compared with control, the simple T2h showed significantly increased De,// and De,⊥, but no significant change in Da in multiple premyelination regions, indicative of expanding extra-axonal diffusion microenvironment; while myelinated regions showed no changes. However, compared with simple T2h, the complex T2h with HIE had decreased Da, increased De,⊥ in both premyelination and myelinated regions, indicative of both intra- and extra-axonal diffusion alterations. While diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) failed to distinguish simple T2h from complex T2h with HIE. In conclusion, superior to DTI-metrics, WM-DKI metrics showed more specificity for WM microstructural changes to distinguish simple T2h from complex T2h with HIE. PMID:27075248

  10. Application of queueing theory to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Brill, P H; Moon, R E

    1980-05-01

    This paper considers the steady-state plasma drug concentration in a one-compartment, open pharmacokinetic model with multiple doses and first-order kinetics using a classical deterministic technique as well as a queueing theoretical stochastic analysis. The stochastic analysis employs a new method for obtaining the steady-state probability distribution of the content of a dam with compound Poisson input and a general release rule. It is shown that if the deterministic steady-state average concentration exists, it is equal to the mean value of the steady-state concentration, the probability distribution of which is obtained using the stochastic model. Moreover, the steady-state probability distribution of the concentration and its mean always exist in the stochastic model. Ramifications of the stochastic method of analysis are discussed.

  11. Rapid model exploration for complex hierarchical data: application to pharmacokinetics of insulin aspart.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Robert J B; Hovorka, Roman; Murphy, Helen R; Lunn, David

    2015-10-15

    We consider situations, which are common in medical statistics, where we have a number of sets of response data, from different individuals, say, potentially under different conditions. A parametric model is defined for each set of data, giving rise to a set of random effects. Our goal here is to efficiently explore a range of possible 'population' models for the random effects, to select the most appropriate model. The range of possible models is potentially vast, because the random effects may depend on observed covariates, and there may be multiple credible ways of partitioning their variability. Here, we consider pharmacokinetic (PK) data on insulin aspart, a fast acting insulin analogue used in the treatment of diabetes. PK models are typically nonlinear (in their parameters), often complex and sometimes only available as a set of differential equations, with no closed-form solution. Fitting such a model for just a single individual can be a challenging task. Fitting a joint model for all individuals can be even harder, even without the complication of an overarching model selection objective. We describe a two-stage approach that decouples the population model for the random effects from the PK model applied to the response data but nevertheless fits the full, joint, hierarchical model, accounting fully for uncertainty. This allows us to repeatedly reuse results from a single analysis of the response data to explore various population models for the random effects. This greatly expedites not only model exploration but also cross-validation for the purposes of model criticism. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26013427

  12. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling approaches in paediatric infectious diseases and immunology☆

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Charlotte I.S.; Germovsek, Eva; Hoare, Rollo L.; Lestner, Jodi M.; Lewis, Joanna; Standing, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modelling is used to describe and quantify dose–concentration–effect relationships. Within paediatric studies in infectious diseases and immunology these methods are often applied to developing guidance on appropriate dosing. In this paper, an introduction to the field of PKPD modelling is given, followed by a review of the PKPD studies that have been undertaken in paediatric infectious diseases and immunology. The main focus is on identifying the methodological approaches used to define the PKPD relationship in these studies. The major findings were that most studies of infectious diseases have developed a PK model and then used simulations to define a dose recommendation based on a pre-defined PD target, which may have been defined in adults or in vitro. For immunological studies much of the modelling has focused on either PK or PD, and since multiple drugs are usually used, delineating the relative contributions of each is challenging. The use of dynamical modelling of in vitro antibacterial studies, and paediatric HIV mechanistic PD models linked with the PK of all drugs, are emerging methods that should enhance PKPD-based recommendations in the future. PMID:24440429

  13. Studying permethrin exposure in flight attendants using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Binnian; Isukapalli, Sastry S; Weisel, Clifford P

    2013-07-01

    Assessment of potential health risks to flight attendants from exposure to pyrethroid insecticides, used for aircraft disinsection, is limited because of (a) lack of information on exposures to these insecticides, and (b) lack of tools for linking these exposures to biomarker data. We developed and evaluated a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to assess the exposure of flight attendants to the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin attributable to aircraft disinsection. The permethrin PBPK model was developed by adapting previous models for pyrethroids, and was parameterized using currently available metabolic parameters for permethrin. The human permethrin model was first evaluated with data from published human studies. Then, it was used to estimate urinary metabolite concentrations of permethrin in flight attendants who worked in aircrafts, which underwent residual and pre-flight spray treatments. The human model was also applied to analyze the toxicokinetics following permethrin exposures attributable to other aircraft disinsection scenarios. Predicted levels of urinary 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), a metabolite of permethrin, following residual disinsection treatment were comparable to the measurements made for flight attendants. Simulations showed that the median contributions of the dermal, oral and inhalation routes to permethrin exposure in flight attendants were 83.5%, 16.1% and 0.4% under residual treatment scenario, respectively, and were 5.3%, 5.0% and 89.7% under pre-flight spray scenario, respectively. The PBPK model provides the capability to simulate the toxicokinetic profiles of permethrin, and can be used in the studies on human exposure to permethrin.

  14. Bayesian population analysis of a harmonized physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of trichloroethylene and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hack, C Eric; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Jay Zhao, Q; Clewell, Harvey J

    2006-10-01

    Bayesian population analysis of a harmonized physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites was performed. In the Bayesian framework, prior information about the PBPK model parameters is updated using experimental kinetic data to obtain posterior parameter estimates. Experimental kinetic data measured in mice, rats, and humans were available for this analysis, and the resulting posterior model predictions were in better agreement with the kinetic data than prior model predictions. Uncertainty in the prediction of the kinetics of TCE, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroethanol (TCOH) was reduced, while the kinetics of other key metabolites dichloroacetic acid (DCA), chloral hydrate (CHL), and dichlorovinyl mercaptan (DCVSH) remain relatively uncertain due to sparse kinetic data for use in this analysis. To help focus future research to further reduce uncertainty in model predictions, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to help identify the parameters that have the greatest impact on various internal dose metric predictions. For application to a risk assessment for TCE, the model provides accurate estimates of TCE, TCA, and TCOH kinetics. This analysis provides an important step toward estimating uncertainty of dose-response relationships in noncancer and cancer risk assessment, improving the extrapolation of toxic TCE doses from experimental animals to humans.

  15. Assessing Treatment Response Through Generalized Pharmacokinetic Modeling of DCE-MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Kontopodis, Eleftherios; Kanli, Georgia; Manikis, Georgios C; Van Cauter, Sofie; Marias, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) enables the quantification of contrast leakage from the vascular tissue by using pharmacokinetic (PK) models. Such quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI data provides physiological parameters that are able to provide information of tumor pathophysiology and therapeutic outcome. Several assumptive PK models have been proposed to characterize microcirculation in the tumoral tissue. In this paper, we present a comparative study between the well-known extended Tofts model (ETM) and the more recent gamma capillary transit time (GCTT) model, with the latter showing initial promising results in the literature. To enhance the GCTT imaging biomarkers, we introduce a novel method for segmenting the tumor area into subregions according to their vascular heterogeneity characteristics. A cohort of 11 patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme with known therapeutic outcome was used to assess the predictive value of both models in terms of correctly classifying responders and nonresponders based on only one DCE-MRI examination. The results indicate that GCTT model’s PK parameters perform better than those of ETM, while the segmentation of the tumor regions of interest based on vascular heterogeneity further enhances the discriminatory power of the GCTT model. PMID:26327778

  16. Glibenclamide population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling in South African type 2 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rambiritch, Virendra; Naidoo, Poobalan; Pillai, Goonaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine the effective dose of glibenclamide by quantifying the dose–response relationship in South African type 2 diabetic patients. Patients and methods A total of 24 type 2 diabetic patients participated in a glibenclamide dose-escalation study during which glibenclamide, glucose, and insulin concentrations were quantified, while the dose of glibenclamide was progressively increased. All except four subjects contributed data on all dose-escalation steps; however, data from all 24 patients were included in the model-based analysis. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) relationships were modeled using the software Nonmem®. Six models were utilized to explore the effect of alternative glibenclamide dose and plasma concentration inputs on various metrics of glucose response. Results Six models adequately described the experimental data. The effective dose for a glucose-lowering effect suggested by PKPD modeling is less than 5 mg/day. Doses beyond 5 mg/day do not meaningfully add to glibenclamide effects on blood-glucose response. Conclusion The effective dose of glibenclamide, suggested by PKPD modeling, is less than 5 mg/day. Higher doses of glibenclamide, eg, 15 mg/day as originally recommended by the manufacturer, do not produce further decrease in the blood glucose level but may predispose the patients to adverse effects. PMID:27713650

  17. Ubiquity: a framework for physiological/mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model development and deployment.

    PubMed

    Harrold, John M; Abraham, Anson K

    2014-04-01

    Practitioners of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling routinely employ various software packages that enable them to fit differential equation based mechanistic or empirical models to biological/pharmacological data. The availability and choice of different analytical tools, while enabling, can also pose a significant challenge in terms of both, implementation and transferability. A package has been developed that addresses these issues by creating a simple text-based format, which provides methods to reduce coding complexity and enables the modeler to describe the components of the model based on the underlying physiochemical processes. A Perl script builds the system for multiple formats (ADAPT, MATLAB, Berkeley Madonna, etc.), enabling analysis across several software packages and reducing the chance for transcription error. Workflows can then be built around this package, which can increase efficiency and model availability. As a proof of concept, tools are included that allow models constructed in this format to be run with MATLAB both at the scripting level and through a generic graphical application that can be compiled and run as a stand-alone application.

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of levosimendan in patients with congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, E Niclas; Antila, Saila; McFadyen, Lynn; Lehtonen, Lasse; Karlsson, Mats O

    2003-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of levosimendan in patients with heart failure (NYHA grades III and IV) and its relationship to demographic factors, disease severity and concomitant use of digoxin and β-blocking agents. Methods Data from two efficacy studies with levosimendan administered by intravenous infusion were combined (190 patients in total). The data were analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modelling approach as implemented in the NONMEM program. The model development was done in three sequential steps. First the best structural model was determined (e.g. a one-, two- or three-compartment pharmacokinetic model). This was followed by the identification and incorporation of important covariates into the model. Lastly the stochastic part of the model was refined. Results A two-compartment model best described levosimendan pharmacokinetics. Clearance and the central volume of distribution were found to increase linearly with bodyweight. No other covariates, including concomitant use of digoxin and β-blocking agents, influenced the pharmacokinetics. In the final model, a 76-kg patient was estimated to have a clearance ± s.e. of 13.3 ± 0.4 l h−1 and a central volume of distribution of 16.8 ± 0.79 l. The interindividual variability was estimated to be 39% and 60% for clearance and central volume of distribution, respectively. Weight changed clearance by 1.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9%, 2.1%] and the central volume of distribution by 0.9% (95% CI 0.5%, 1.3%) per kg. Conclusions The population pharmacokinetics parameters of levosimendan in this patient group were comparable to those obtained by traditional methods in healthy volunteers and patients with mild heart failure. Bodyweight influenced the clearance and the central volume of distribution, which in practice is accounted for by weight adjusting doses. None of the other covariates, including digoxin and β-blocking agents, significantly

  19. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in children

    PubMed Central

    Kumpulainen, Elina; Välitalo, Pyry; Kokki, Merja; Lehtonen, Marko; Hooker, Andrew; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    AIMS This study was designed to characterize paediatric pharmacokinetics and central nervous system exposure of flurbiprofen. METHODS The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen were studied in 64 healthy children aged 3 months to 13 years, undergoing surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Children were administered preoperatively a single dose of flurbiprofen intravenously as prodrug (n = 27) or by mouth as syrup (n = 37). A single cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample (n = 60) was collected at the induction of anaesthesia, and plasma samples (n = 304) before, during and after the operation (up to 20 h after administration). A population pharmacokinetic model was built using the NONMEM software package. RESULTS Flurbiprofen concentrations in plasma were well described by a three compartment model. The apparent bioavailability of oral flurbiprofen syrup was 81%. The estimated clearance (CL) was 0.96 l h−1 70 kg−1. Age did not affect the clearance after weight had been included as a covariate. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 8.1 l 70 kg−1. Flurbiprofen permeated into the CSF, reaching concentrations that were seven-fold higher compared with unbound plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics can be described using only weight as a covariate in children above 6 months, while more research is needed in neonates and in younger infants. PMID:20840447

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of dibromoacetic acid in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Jessica L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Easterling, Michael R.; Melnick, Ronald L.

    2010-04-15

    A novel physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, which includes submodels for the common metabolites (glyoxylate (GXA) and oxalate (OXA)) that may be involved in the toxicity or carcinogenicity of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), has been developed. Particular attention is paid to the representation of hepatic metabolism, which is the primary elimination mechanism. DBA-induced suicide inhibition is modeled by irreversible covalent binding of the intermediate metabolite alpha-halocarboxymethylglutathione (alphaH1) to the glutathione-S-transferase zeta (GSTzeta) enzyme. We also present data illustrating the presence of a secondary non-GSTzeta metabolic pathway for DBA, but not dichloroacetic acid (DCA), that produces GXA. The model is calibrated with plasma and urine concentration data from DBA exposures in female F344 rats through intravenous (IV), oral gavage, and drinking water routes. Sensitivity analysis is performed to confirm identifiability of estimated parameters. Finally, model validation is performed with data sets not used during calibration. Given the structural similarity of dihaloacetates (DHAs), we hypothesize that the PBPK model presented here has the capacity to describe the kinetics of any member or mixture of members of this class in any species with the alteration of chemical-and species-specific parameters.

  1. Modeling the genetic etiology of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic links with the ARMA process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Berg, Arthur; Wu, Rongling

    2010-03-01

    Substantial variability exists among different patients in response to drugs. The identification of genetic factors that contribute to the interpersonal differentiation has been an important task for pharmacogenetic research and drug discovery. In this article, we have derived a high-dimensional statistical model for unveiling the genetic machinery for drug response by integrating two different but biologically related processes--pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD)--into a genetic mapping framework. Using an integrated model of PK and PD, we can identify specific DNA sequence variants and test how they relate to the differential effect of the body to the drug (PK) and the effect of the drug on the body (PD). To effectively model a two-stage hierarchic structure of the covariance matrix at the PD and PK level, we have for the first time introduced an autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) process to the mixture-based likelihood function for sequence mapping. Closed-form estimates of the determinant and inverse of the ARMA-based covariance matrix are incorporated into the estimation step, which significantly increases the computational efficiency. Simulation studies have been performed to test the statistical behavior of our model. Potential applications of this model to pharmacogenetic research are discussed. PMID:20309763

  2. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of dibromoacetic acid in F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Jessica L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Easterling, Michael R.; Melnick, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    A novel physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, which includes submodels for the common metabolites (glyoxylate (GXA) and oxalate (OXA)) that may be involved in the toxicity or carcinogenicity of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), has been developed. Particular attention is paid to the representation of hepatic metabolism, which is the primary elimination mechanism. DBA-induced suicide inhibition is modeled by irreversible covalent binding of the intermediate metabolite α-halocarboxymethylglutathione (αH1) to the glutathione-S-transferase zeta (GSTzeta) enzyme. We also present data illustrating the presence of a secondary non-GSTzeta metabolic pathway for DBA, but not dichloroacetic acid (DCA), that produces GXA. The model is calibrated with plasma and urine concentration data from DBA exposures in female F344 rats through intravenous (IV), oral gavage, and drinking water routes. Sensitivity analysis is performed to confirm identifiability of estimated parameters. Finally, model validation is performed with data sets not used during calibration. Given the structural similarity of dihaloacetates (DHAs), we hypothesize that the PBPK model presented here has the capacity to describe the kinetics of any member or mixture of members of this class in any species with the alteration of chemical- and species-specific parameters. PMID:20045428

  3. Use of pharmacokinetic modelling to individualize FFP dosing in factor V deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shakhnovich, V; Daniel, J; Wicklund, B; Kearns, G; Neville, K

    2013-03-01

    Therapy with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) confers serious risks, such as contraction of blood-borne viruses, allergic reaction, volume overload and development of alloantibodies. The aim of this study was to apply principles of pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling to individual factor content of FFP to optimize individualized dosing, while minimizing potential risks of therapy. We used PK modelling to successfully target individual factor replacement in an 8-month-old patient receiving FFP for treatment of a severe congenital factor V (FV) deficiency. The model fit for the FV activity vs. time data was excellent (r = 0.98) and the model accurately predicted FV activity during the intraoperative and postoperative period. Accurate PK modelling of individual factor activity in FFP has the potential to provide better targeted therapy, enabling clinicians to more precisely dose patients requiring coagulation products, while avoiding wasteful and expensive product overtreatment, minimizing potentially life-threatening complications due to undertreatment and limiting harmful product-associated risks.

  4. Controlled iontophoretic transport of huperzine A across skin in vitro and in vivo: effect of delivery conditions and comparison of pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Dhaval R; Patel, Pratikkumar; Merino, Virginia; Patravale, Vandana B; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2013-11-01

    determined in male Wistar rats in vivo (4 mM HupA; 0.5 mA · cm(-2) for 5 h with Ag/AgCl electrodes) using two-compartment models with either constant or time-variant input rates. A superior fit was obtained using the time-variant model, and the input rate in vivo was significantly greater than that in vitro. Based on these results and the known pharmacokinetics, it was estimated that therapeutic amounts of HupA could be delivered for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease using a reasonably sized patch.

  5. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of the Enterohepatic Recirculation of Fimasartan in Rats, Dogs, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Shin, Soyoung; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Chi, Yong Ha; Paik, Soo Heui; Myung, Jayhyuk; Yadav, Rajbharan; Horkovics-Kovats, Stefan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Shin, Beom Soo

    2015-09-01

    Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) can greatly enhance plasma drug exposures and therapeutic effects. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model that can simultaneously characterize the extent and time-course of EHC in three species using fimasartan, a novel angiotensin II receptor blocker, as a model drug. All fimasartan plasma concentration profiles in 32 rats (intravenous doses, 0.3-3 mg/kg; oral doses, 1-10 mg/kg), 34 dogs (intravenous doses, 0.3-1 mg/kg; oral doses, 1-10 mg/kg), and 42 healthy volunteers (single or multiple oral doses, 20-480 mg) were determined via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and simultaneously modeled in S-ADAPT. The proposed model quantitatively characterized EHC in three species after oral and intravenous dosing. The median (range) fraction of drug undergoing recirculation was 76.3% (64.9-88.7%) in rats, 33.3% (24.0-45.9%) in dogs, and 65.6% (56.5-72.0%) in humans. In the presence compared with the absence of EHC, the area under the curve in plasma was predicted to be 4.22-fold (2.85-8.85) as high in rats, 1.50-fold (1.32-1.85) in dogs, and 2.91-fold (2.30-3.57) in humans. The modeled oral bioavailability in rats (median (range), 38.7% (20.0-59.8%)) and dogs (median, 7.13% to 15.4%, depending on the formulation) matched the non-compartmental estimates well. In humans, the predicted oral bioavailability was 25.1% (15.1-43.9%) under fasting and 18.2% (12.2-31.0%) under fed conditions. The allometrically scaled area under the curve predicted from rats was 420 ng·h/mL for 60 mg fimasartan compared with 424 ± 63 ng·h/mL observed in humans. The developed population pharmacokinetic model can be utilized to characterize the impact of EHC on plasma drug exposure in animals and humans.

  6. Application of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Study Theophylline Metabolism and Its Interactions With Ciprofloxacin and Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Navid, A; Ng, D M; Wong, S E; Lightstone, F C

    2016-02-01

    Theophylline is a commonly used bronchodilator. However, due to its narrow therapeutic range, moderate elevation of serum concentration can result in adverse drug reactions (ADRs). ADRs occur because of interhuman pharmacokinetic variability and interactions with coprescribed medicines. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of theophylline, caffeine, and ciprofloxacin metabolisms to: examine theophylline pharmacokinetic variability, and predict population-level outcomes of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A simulation-based equation for personalized dosing of theophylline was derived. Simulations of DDI show that calculated personalized doses are safe even after cotreatment with large doses of strong inhibitors. Simulations of adult populations indicate that the elderly are most susceptible to ADRs stemming from theophylline-ciprofloxacin and theophylline-caffeine interactions. Females, especially Asians, due to their smaller average size, are more susceptible to DDI-induced ADRs following typical dosing practices. Our simulations also show that the higher adipose and lower muscle fractions in females significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of theophylline or ciprofloxacin.

  7. Quantitative Prediction of Drug–Drug Interactions Involving Inhibitory Metabolites in Drug Development: How Can Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Help?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Mao, J; Lin, J; Yu, H; Peters, S; Shebley, M

    2016-01-01

    This subteam under the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group (Innovation and Quality Consortium) investigated the quantitative role of circulating inhibitory metabolites in drug–drug interactions using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Three drugs with major circulating inhibitory metabolites (amiodarone, gemfibrozil, and sertraline) were systematically evaluated in addition to the literature review of recent examples. The application of PBPK modeling in drug interactions by inhibitory parent–metabolite pairs is described and guidance on strategic application is provided. PMID:27642087

  8. Revisiting Dosing Regimen Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Mathematical Modeling: Densification and Intensification of Combination Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Freyer, Gilles; Iliadis, Athanassios

    2016-08-01

    Controlling effects of drugs administered in combination is particularly challenging with a densified regimen because of life-threatening hematological toxicities. We have developed a mathematical model to optimize drug dosing regimens and to redesign the dose intensification-dose escalation process, using densified cycles of combined anticancer drugs. A generic mathematical model was developed to describe the main components of the real process, including pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy pharmacodynamics, and non-hematological toxicity risk. This model allowed for computing the distribution of the total drug amount of each drug in combination, for each escalation dose level, in order to minimize the average tumor mass for each cycle. This was achieved while complying with absolute neutrophil count clinical constraints and without exceeding a fixed risk of non-hematological dose-limiting toxicity. The innovative part of this work was the development of densifying and intensifying designs in a unified procedure. This model enabled us to determine the appropriate regimen in a pilot phase I/II study in metastatic breast patients for a 2-week-cycle treatment of docetaxel plus epirubicin doublet, and to propose a new dose-ranging process. In addition to the present application, this method can be further used to achieve optimization of any combination therapy, thus improving the efficacy versus toxicity balance of such a regimen.

  9. Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Advances in maintaining multiple human tissues on microfluidic platforms has led to a growing interest in the development of microphysiological systems for drug development studies. Determination of the proper design principles and scaling rules for body-on-a-chip systems is critical for their strategic incorporation into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model-aided drug development. While the need for a functional design considering organ-organ interactions has been considered, robust design criteria and steps to build such systems have not yet been defined mathematically. In this paper, we first discuss strategies for incorporating body-on-a-chip technology into the current PBPK modeling-based drug discovery to provide a conceptual model. We propose two types of platforms that can be involved in the different stages of PBPK modeling and drug development; these are μOrgans-on-a-chip and μHuman-on-a-chip. Then we establish the design principles for both types of systems and develop parametric design equations that can be used to determine dimensions and operating conditions. In addition, we discuss the availability of the critical parameters required to satisfy the design criteria, consider possible limitations for estimating such parameter values and propose strategies to address such limitations. This paper is intended to be a useful guide to the researchers focused on the design of microphysiological platforms for PBPK/PD based drug discovery. PMID:25739725

  10. Accuracy of DXA in estimating body composition changes in elite athletes using a four compartment model as the reference method

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) provides an affordable and practical assessment of multiple whole body and regional body composition. However, little information is available on the assessment of changes in body composition in top-level athletes using DXA. The present study aimed to assess the accuracy of DXA in tracking body composition changes (relative fat mass [%FM], absolute fat mass [FM], and fat-free mass [FFM]) of elite male judo athletes from a period of weight stability to prior to a competition, compared to a four compartment model (4C model), as the criterion method. Methods A total of 27 elite male judo athletes (age, 22.2 ± 2.8 yrs) athletes were evaluated. Measures of body volume by air displacement plethysmography, bone mineral content assessed by DXA, and total-body water assessed by deuterium dilution were used in a 4C model. Statistical analyses included examination of the coefficient of determinant (r2), standard error of estimation (SEE), slope, intercept, and agreement between models. Results At a group level analysis, changes in %FM, FM, and FFM estimates by DXA were not significantly different from those by the 4C model. Though the regression between DXA and the 4C model did not differ from the line of identity DXA %FM, FM, and FFM changes only explained 29%, 36%, and 38% of the 4C reference values, respectively. Individual results showed that the 95% limits of agreement were -3.7 to 5.3 for %FM, -2.6 to 3.7 for FM, and -3.7 to 2.7 for FFM. The relation between the difference and the mean of the methods indicated a significant trend for %FM and FM changes with DXA overestimating at the lower ends and underestimating at the upper ends of FM changes. Conclusions Our data indicate that both at group and individual levels DXA did not present an expected accuracy in tracking changes in adiposity in elite male judo athletes. PMID:20307312

  11. Compilation of basal metabolic and blood perfusion rates in various multi-compartment, whole-body thermoregulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The assignments of basal metabolic rates (BMR), basal cardiac output (BCO), and basal blood perfusion rates (BBPR) were compared in nine multi-compartment, whole-body thermoregulation models. The data are presented at three levels of detail: total body, specific body regions, and regional body tissue layers. Differences in the assignment of these quantities among the compared models increased with the level of detail, in the above order. The ranges of variability in the total body BMR was 6.5 % relative to the lowest value, with a mean of 84.3 ± 2 W, and in the BCO, it was 8 % with a mean of 4.70 ± 0.13 l/min. The least variability among the body regions is seen in the combined torso (shoulders, thorax, and abdomen: ±7.8 % BMR and ±5.9 % BBPR) and in the combined head (head, face, and neck ±9.9 % BMR and ±10.9 % BBPR), determined by the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. Much more variability is apparent in the extremities with the most showing in the BMR of the feet (±117 %), followed by the BBPR in the arms (±61.3 %). In the tissue layers, most of the bone layers were assigned zero BMR and BBPR, except in the shoulders and in the extremities that were assigned non-zero values in a number of models. The next lowest values were assigned to the fat layers, with occasional zero values. Skin basal values were invariably non-zero but involved very low values in certain models, e.g., BBPR in the feet and the hands. Muscle layers were invariably assigned high values with the highest found in the thorax, abdomen, and legs. The brain, lung, and viscera layers were assigned the highest of all values of both basal quantities with those of the brain layers showing rather tight ranges of variability in both basal quantities. Average basal values of the "time-seasoned" models presented in this study could be useful as a first step in future modeling efforts subject to appropriate adjustment of values to conform to most recently available and reliable data.

  12. Compartmented electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Shimotake, Hiroshi; Gay, Eddie C.; Martino, Fredric J.

    1977-06-14

    Electrodes for secondary electrochemical cells are provided with compartments for containing particles of the electrode reactant. The compartments are defined by partitions that are generally impenetrable to the particles of reactant and, in some instances, to the liquid electrolyte used in the cell. During cycling of the cell, reactant material initially loaded into a particular compartment is prevented from migrating and concentrating within the lower portion of the electrode or those portions of the electrode that exhibit reduced electrical resistance.

  13. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of actinomycin D in children with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher; Bonner, Jennifer J.; Johnson, Trevor N.; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Ghazaly, Essam A.; Gribben, John G.; Boddy, Alan V.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Use of the anti‐tumour antibiotic actinomycin D is associated with development of hepatotoxicity, particularly in young children. A paucity of actinomycin D pharmacokinetic data make it challenging to develop a sound rationale for defining dosing regimens in younger patients. The study aim was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model using a combination of data from the literature and generated from experimental analyses. Methods Assays to determine actinomycin D Log P, blood:plasma partition ratio and ABCB1 kinetics were conducted. These data were combined with physiochemical properties sourced from the literature to generate a compound file for use within the modelling‐simulation software Simcyp (version 14 release 1). For simulation, information was taken from two datasets, one from 117 patients under the age of 21 and one from 20 patients aged 16–48. Results The final model incorporated clinical renal and biliary clearance data and an additional systemic clearance value. The mean AUC0‐26h of simulated subjects was within 1.25‐fold of the observed AUC0‐26h (84 ng h ml−1 simulated vs. 93 ng h ml−1 observed). For the younger age ranges, AUC predictions were within two‐fold of observed values, with simulated data from six of the eight age/dose ranges falling within 15% of observed data. Simulated values for actinomycin D AUC0‐26h and clearance in infants aged 0–12 months ranged from 104 to 115 ng h ml−1 and 3.5–3.8 l h−1, respectively. Conclusions The model has potential utility for prediction of actinomycin D exposure in younger patients and may help guide future dosing. However, additional independent data from neonates and infants is needed for further validation. Physiological differences between paediatric cancer patients and healthy children also need to be further characterized and incorporated into PBPK models. PMID:26727248

  14. Enhancing population pharmacokinetic modeling efficiency and quality using an integrated workflow.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Henning; Radivojevic, Andrijana

    2014-08-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (popPK) analyses are at the core of Pharmacometrics and need to be performed regularly. Although these analyses are relatively standard, a large variability can be observed in both the time (efficiency) and the way they are performed (quality). Main reasons for this variability include the level of experience of a modeler, personal preferences and tools. This paper aims to examine how the process of popPK model building can be supported in order to increase its efficiency and quality. The presented approach to the conduct of popPK analyses is centered around three key components: (1) identification of most common and important popPK model features, (2) required information content and formatting of the data for modeling, and (3) methodology, workflow and workflow supporting tools. This approach has been used in several popPK modeling projects and a documented example is provided in the supplementary material. Efficiency of model building is improved by avoiding repetitive coding and other labor-intensive tasks and by putting the emphasis on a fit-for-purpose model. Quality is improved by ensuring that the workflow and tools are in alignment with a popPK modeling guidance which is established within an organization. The main conclusion of this paper is that workflow based approaches to popPK modeling are feasible and have significant potential to ameliorate its various aspects. However, the implementation of such an approach in a pharmacometric organization requires openness towards innovation and change-the key ingredient for evolution of integrative and quantitative drug development in the pharmaceutical industry.

  15. Population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling for assessing risk of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Sedghizadeh, Parish P.; Jones, Allan C.; LaVallee, Chris; Jelliffe, Roger W.; Le, Anh D.; Lee, Peter; Kiss, Andrew; Neely, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that patients with bisphosphonate (BP)-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) accumulate higher levels of BP in bone than those without BRONJ. Study Design Using the Pmetrics® package and published data, we designed a population pharmacokinetic model of pamidronate concentration in plasma and bone and derived a toxic bone BP threshold of 0.2 mM. With the model, and using patient individual BP duration and bone mineral content estimated from lean body weight, we calculated bone BP levels in 153 subjects. Results Mean bone BP in 69 BRONJ cases was higher than in 84 controls (0.20 vs. 0.10 mM, P<0.001) consistent with the toxic bone threshold of 0.2 mM. BRONJ was also associated with longer duration BP therapy (5.3 vs. 2.7 years, P<0.001), older age (76 vs. 70 years, P<0.001), and Asian race (49% vs. 14%, P<0.001). Conclusions Our model accurately discriminated BRONJ cases from controls, among patients on BP therapy. PMID:23246224

  16. Reconstructing exposures from biomarkers using exposure-pharmacokinetic modeling--A case study with carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathleen; Phillips, Martin; Grulke, Christopher; Yoon, Miyoung; Young, Bruce; McDougall, Robin; Leonard, Jeremy; Lu, Jingtao; Lefew, William; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for short half-life chemicals were characterized using computational models that link external exposures to biomarkers. Using carbaryl as an example, an exposure model, the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), was used to generate time-concentration profiles for 500 virtual individuals exposed to carbaryl. These exposure profiles were used as inputs into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict urinary biomarker concentrations. These matching dietary intake levels and biomarker concentrations were used to (1) compare three reverse dosimetry approaches based on their ability to predict the central tendency of the intake dose distribution; and (2) identify parameters necessary for a more accurate exposure reconstruction. This study illustrates the trade-offs between using non-iterative reverse dosimetry methods that are fast, less precise and iterative methods that are slow, more precise. This study also intimates the necessity of including urine flow rate and elapsed time between last dose and urine sampling as part of the biomarker sampling collection for better interpretation of urinary biomarker data of short biological half-life chemicals. Resolution of these critical data gaps can allow exposure reconstruction methods to better predict population-level intake doses from large biomonitoring studies.

  17. The method of averaging applied to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Adrian; de Winter, Willem; Hsu, Chyi-Hung; Mariam, Shiferaw; Neyens, Martine; Pinheiro, José; Woot de Trixhe, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The computational effort required to fit the pharmacodynamic (PD) part of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model can be considerable if the differential equations describing the model are solved numerically. This burden can be greatly reduced by applying the method of averaging (MAv) in the appropriate circumstances. The MAv gives an approximate solution, which is expected to be a good approximation when the PK profile is periodic (i.e. repeats its values in regular intervals) and the rate of change of the PD response is such that it is approximately constant over a single period of the PK profile. This paper explains the basis of the MAv by means of a simple mathematical derivation. The NONMEM® implementation of the MAv using the abbreviated FORTRAN function FUNCA is described and explained. The application of the MAv is illustrated by means of an example involving changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c%) following administration of canagliflozin, a selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor. The PK/PD model applied to these data is fitted with NONMEM® using both the MAv and the standard method using a numerical differential equation solver (NDES). Both methods give virtually identical results but the NDES method takes almost 8 h to run both the estimation and covariance steps, whilst the MAv produces the same results in less than 30 s. An outline of the NONMEM® control stream and the FORTRAN code for the FUNCA function is provided in the appendices. PMID:26142076

  18. Comparative pharmacokinetics of (/sup 65/Zn)zinc sulfate and (/sup 65/Zn)zinc pantothenate injected intravenously in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Guillard, O.; Courtois, P.; Murai, P.; Ducassou, D.; Reiss, D.

    1984-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of zinc sulfate were compared with those of a new zinc salt, pantothenate, in rabbits. Each salt was administered at a dosage of 3.3 microCi of zinc-65/kg of body weight. The measured pharmacokinetics of the two compounds responded to a two-compartment open model. The urinary elimination of the two salts was similar, as was their localization in the skin and fur, but zinc pantothenate was fixed by the liver to a lesser extent than was zinc sulfate.

  19. A multi-route model of nicotine-cotinine pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in humans.

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Housand, Conrad J; Smith, Jordan N; Hinderliter, Paul M; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles A

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  20. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  1. Development of a Physiologically Based Model to Describe the Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate in Juvenile and Adult Humans and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M.; Gearhart, Jeffery M.; Ruark, Christopher D.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Young, John F.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  2. An alternate metabolic hypothesis for a binary mixture of trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride: application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon tetrachloride (CC4) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are hepatotoxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and environmental contaminants. Previous physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models describe the kinetics ofindividual chemical disposition and metabolic clearance fo...

  3. An adaptive extended Kalman filter for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of tumor pharmacokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Wu, Linhui; Yi, Xi; Zhang, Limin; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2014-03-01

    According to the morphological differences in the vascularization between healthy and diseased tissues, pharmacokinetic-rate images of fluorophore can provide diagnostic information for tumor differentiation, and especially have the potential for staging of tumors. In this paper, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography method is firstly used to acquire metabolism-related time-course images of the fluorophore concentration. Based on a two-compartment model comprised of plasma and extracelluar-extravascular space, we next propose an adaptive-EKF framework to estimate the pharmacokinetic-rate images. With the aid of a forgetting factor, the adaptive-EKF compensate the inaccuracy initial values and emphasize the effect of the current data in order to realize a better online estimation compared with the conventional EKF. We use simulate data to evaluate the performance of the proposed methodology. The results suggest that the adaptive-EKF can obtain preferable pharmacokinetic-rate images than the conventional EKF with higher quantitativeness and noise robustness.

  4. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessment of faropenem in a lethal murine Bacillus anthracis inhalation postexposure prophylaxis model.

    PubMed

    Gill, Stanley C; Rubino, Christopher M; Bassett, Jennifer; Miller, Lynda; Ambrose, Paul G; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Beaudry, Amber; Li, Jinfang; Stone, Kimberly Clawson; Critchley, Ian; Janjic, Nebojsa; Heine, Henry S

    2010-05-01

    There are few options for prophylaxis after exposure to Bacillus anthracis, especially in children and women of childbearing potential. Faropenem is a beta-lactam in the penem subclass that is being developed as an oral prodrug, faropenem medoxomil, for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Faropenem was shown to have in vitro activity against B. anthracis strains that variably express the bla1 beta-lactamase (MIC range, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationships between the plasma faropenem free-drug (f) concentrations and efficacy against B. anthracis in a murine postexposure prophylaxis inhalation model. The plasma PKs and PKs-PDs of faropenem were evaluated in BALB/c mice following the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of doses ranging from 2.5 to 160 mg/kg of body weight. For the evaluation of efficacy, mice received by inhalation aerosol doses of B. anthracis (Ames strain; faropenem MIC, 0.06 microg/ml) at 100 times the 50% lethal dose. The faropenem dosing regimens (10, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/day) were administered i.p. at 24 h postchallenge at 4-, 6-, and 12-h intervals for 14 days. The sigmoid maximum-threshold-of-efficacy (E(max)) model fit the survival data, in which the free-drug area under the concentration-time curve (fAUC)/MIC ratio, the maximum concentration of free drug in plasma (fC(max))/MIC ratio, and the cumulative percentage of a 24-h period that the free-drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (f %T(MIC)) were each evaluated. Assessment of f %T(MIC) demonstrated the strongest correlation with survival (R(2) = 0.967) compared to the correlations achieved by assessment of fAUC/MIC or fC(max)/MIC, for which minimal correlations were observed. The 50% effective dose (ED(50)), ED(90), and ED(99) corresponded to f %T(MIC) values of 10.6, 13.4, and 16.4%, respectively, and E(max) was 89.3%. Overall, faropenem demonstrated a high

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of zinc oxide nanoparticles and zinc nitrate in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Wu, Bo-Chun; Chou, Wei-Chun; Ho, Chia-Chi; Chen, Jen-Kun; Liao, Chung-Min; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been widely used in consumer products, therapeutic agents, and drug delivery systems. However, the fate and behavior of ZnO NPs in living organisms are not well described. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to describe the dynamic interactions of (65)ZnO NPs in mice. We estimated key physicochemical parameters of partition coefficients and excretion or elimination rates, based on our previously published data quantifying the biodistributions of 10 nm and 71 nm (65)ZnO NPs and zinc nitrate ((65)Zn(NO3)2) in various mice tissues. The time-dependent partition coefficients and excretion or elimination rates were used to construct our physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. In general, tissue partition coefficients of (65)ZnO NPs were greater than those of (65)Zn(NO3)2, particularly the lung partition coefficient of 10 nm (65)ZnO NPs. Sensitivity analysis revealed that 71 nm (65)ZnO NPs and (65)Zn(NO3)2 were sensitive to excretion and elimination rates in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. Although the partition coefficient of the brain was relative low, it increased time-dependently for (65)ZnO NPs and (65)Zn(NO3)2. The simulation of (65)Zn(NO3)2 was well fitted with the experimental data. However, replacing partition coefficients of (65)ZnO NPs with those of (65)Zn(NO3)2 after day 7 greatly improved the fitness of simulation, suggesting that ZnO NPs might decompose to zinc ion after day 7. In this study, we successfully established a potentially predictive dynamic model for slowly decomposed NPs. More caution is suggested for exposure to (65)ZnO NPs <10 nm because those small (65)ZnO NPs tend to accumulate in the body for a relatively longer time than 71 nm (65)ZnO NPs and (65)Zn(NO3)2 do. PMID:26491297

  6. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationships of PD-0162819, a Biotin Carboxylase Inhibitor Representing a New Class of Antibacterial Compounds, Using In Vitro Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Michael; Dority, Michael; Buist, Susan; Mehrens, Shawn; Zhu, Tong; Xiao, Deqing; Miller, J. Richard; Hanna, Debra

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships of a prototype biotin carboxylase (BC) inhibitor, PD-0162819, against Haemophilus influenzae 3113 in static concentration time-kill (SCTK) and one-compartment chemostat in vitro infection models. H. influenzae 3113 was exposed to PD-0162819 concentrations of 0.5 to 16× the MIC (MIC = 0.125 μg/ml) and area-under-the-curve (AUC)/MIC ratios of 1 to 1,100 in SCTK and chemostat experiments, respectively. Serial samples were collected over 24 h. For efficacy driver analysis, a sigmoid maximum-effect (Emax) model was fitted to the relationship between bacterial density changes over 24 h and corresponding PK/PD indices. A semimechanistic PK/PD model describing the time course of bacterial growth and death was developed. The AUC/MIC ratio best explained efficacy (r2 = 0.95) compared to the peak drug concentration (Cmax)/MIC ratio (r2 = 0.76) and time above the MIC (T>MIC) (r2 = 0.88). Static effects and 99.9% killing were achieved at AUC/MIC values of 500 and 600, respectively. For time course analysis, the net bacterial growth rate constant, maximum bacterial density, and maximum kill rate constant were similar in SCTK and chemostat studies, but PD-0162819 was more potent in SCTK than in the chemostat (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.046 versus 0.34 μg/ml). In conclusion, basic PK/PD relationships for PD-0162819 were established using in vitro dynamic systems. Although the bacterial growth parameters and maximum drug effects were similar in SCTK and the chemostat system, PD-0162819 appeared to be more potent in SCTK, illustrating the importance of understanding the differences in preclinical models. Additional studies are needed to determine the in vivo relevance of these results. PMID:21986824

  7. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships of PD-0162819, a biotin carboxylase inhibitor representing a new class of antibacterial compounds, using in vitro infection models.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Adam; Kuhn, Michael; Dority, Michael; Buist, Susan; Mehrens, Shawn; Zhu, Tong; Xiao, Deqing; Miller, J Richard; Hanna, Debra

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships of a prototype biotin carboxylase (BC) inhibitor, PD-0162819, against Haemophilus influenzae 3113 in static concentration time-kill (SCTK) and one-compartment chemostat in vitro infection models. H. influenzae 3113 was exposed to PD-0162819 concentrations of 0.5 to 16× the MIC (MIC = 0.125 μg/ml) and area-under-the-curve (AUC)/MIC ratios of 1 to 1,100 in SCTK and chemostat experiments, respectively. Serial samples were collected over 24 h. For efficacy driver analysis, a sigmoid maximum-effect (E(max)) model was fitted to the relationship between bacterial density changes over 24 h and corresponding PK/PD indices. A semimechanistic PK/PD model describing the time course of bacterial growth and death was developed. The AUC/MIC ratio best explained efficacy (r(2) = 0.95) compared to the peak drug concentration (C(max))/MIC ratio (r(2) = 0.76) and time above the MIC (T>MIC) (r(2) = 0.88). Static effects and 99.9% killing were achieved at AUC/MIC values of 500 and 600, respectively. For time course analysis, the net bacterial growth rate constant, maximum bacterial density, and maximum kill rate constant were similar in SCTK and chemostat studies, but PD-0162819 was more potent in SCTK than in the chemostat (50% effective concentration [EC(50)] = 0.046 versus 0.34 μg/ml). In conclusion, basic PK/PD relationships for PD-0162819 were established using in vitro dynamic systems. Although the bacterial growth parameters and maximum drug effects were similar in SCTK and the chemostat system, PD-0162819 appeared to be more potent in SCTK, illustrating the importance of understanding the differences in preclinical models. Additional studies are needed to determine the in vivo relevance of these results.

  8. Toward a general physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for intravenously injected nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carlander, Ulrika; Li, Dingsheng; Jolliet, Olivier; Emond, Claude; Johanson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    To assess the potential toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs), information concerning their uptake and disposition (biokinetics) is essential. Experience with industrial chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs reveals that biokinetics can be described and predicted accurately by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. The nano PBPK models developed to date all concern a single type of NP. Our aim here was to extend a recent model for pegylated polyacrylamide NP in order to develop a more general PBPK model for nondegradable NPs injected intravenously into rats. The same model and physiological parameters were applied to pegylated polyacrylamide, uncoated polyacrylamide, gold, and titanium dioxide NPs, whereas NP-specific parameters were chosen on the basis of the best fit to the experimental time-courses of NP accumulation in various tissues. Our model describes the biokinetic behavior of all four types of NPs adequately, despite extensive differences in this behavior as well as in their physicochemical properties. In addition, this simulation demonstrated that the dose exerts a profound impact on the biokinetics, since saturation of the phagocytic cells at higher doses becomes a major limiting step. The fitted model parameters that were most dependent on NP type included the blood:tissue coefficients of permeability and the rate constant for phagocytic uptake. Since only four types of NPs with several differences in characteristics (dose, size, charge, shape, and surface properties) were used, the relationship between these characteristics and the NP-dependent model parameters could not be elucidated and more experimental data are required in this context. In this connection, intravenous biodistribution studies with associated PBPK analyses would provide the most insight.

  9. Toward a general physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for intravenously injected nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Carlander, Ulrika; Li, Dingsheng; Jolliet, Olivier; Emond, Claude; Johanson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    To assess the potential toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs), information concerning their uptake and disposition (biokinetics) is essential. Experience with industrial chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs reveals that biokinetics can be described and predicted accurately by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. The nano PBPK models developed to date all concern a single type of NP. Our aim here was to extend a recent model for pegylated polyacrylamide NP in order to develop a more general PBPK model for nondegradable NPs injected intravenously into rats. The same model and physiological parameters were applied to pegylated polyacrylamide, uncoated polyacrylamide, gold, and titanium dioxide NPs, whereas NP-specific parameters were chosen on the basis of the best fit to the experimental time-courses of NP accumulation in various tissues. Our model describes the biokinetic behavior of all four types of NPs adequately, despite extensive differences in this behavior as well as in their physicochemical properties. In addition, this simulation demonstrated that the dose exerts a profound impact on the biokinetics, since saturation of the phagocytic cells at higher doses becomes a major limiting step. The fitted model parameters that were most dependent on NP type included the blood:tissue coefficients of permeability and the rate constant for phagocytic uptake. Since only four types of NPs with several differences in characteristics (dose, size, charge, shape, and surface properties) were used, the relationship between these characteristics and the NP-dependent model parameters could not be elucidated and more experimental data are required in this context. In this connection, intravenous biodistribution studies with associated PBPK analyses would provide the most insight. PMID:26929620

  10. Toward a general physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for intravenously injected nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carlander, Ulrika; Li, Dingsheng; Jolliet, Olivier; Emond, Claude; Johanson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    To assess the potential toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs), information concerning their uptake and disposition (biokinetics) is essential. Experience with industrial chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs reveals that biokinetics can be described and predicted accurately by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. The nano PBPK models developed to date all concern a single type of NP. Our aim here was to extend a recent model for pegylated polyacrylamide NP in order to develop a more general PBPK model for nondegradable NPs injected intravenously into rats. The same model and physiological parameters were applied to pegylated polyacrylamide, uncoated polyacrylamide, gold, and titanium dioxide NPs, whereas NP-specific parameters were chosen on the basis of the best fit to the experimental time-courses of NP accumulation in various tissues. Our model describes the biokinetic behavior of all four types of NPs adequately, despite extensive differences in this behavior as well as in their physicochemical properties. In addition, this simulation demonstrated that the dose exerts a profound impact on the biokinetics, since saturation of the phagocytic cells at higher doses becomes a major limiting step. The fitted model parameters that were most dependent on NP type included the blood:tissue coefficients of permeability and the rate constant for phagocytic uptake. Since only four types of NPs with several differences in characteristics (dose, size, charge, shape, and surface properties) were used, the relationship between these characteristics and the NP-dependent model parameters could not be elucidated and more experimental data are required in this context. In this connection, intravenous biodistribution studies with associated PBPK analyses would provide the most insight. PMID:26929620

  11. Pharmacokinetics of oral ivabradine in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Riesen, S C; Ni, W; Carnes, C A; Lindsey, K J; Phelps, M A; Schober, K E

    2011-10-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical method for the measurement of the novel heart rate-lowering drug ivabradine and its major metabolite, S-18982, was cross-validated in the plasma of eight healthy cats. Plasma concentrations were then determined after single and repeated oral administration of ivabradine. Individual plasma concentrations versus time from each cat were used in compartmental analysis using the commercially available software WinNonlin. Both ivabradine and S-18982 reached their maximum concentrations of 103.33 and 3.86 ng/mL within 1 h. Following repeated administration, areas under the plasma concentration-time curves for ivabradine and S-18982 did not significantly increase. Two-compartmental and one-compartmental models with first-order input and elimination provided the best fit to the data for ivabradine and S-18982, respectively. Both models were combined to produce a single 4-compartment model characterizing ivabradine and S-18982 pharmacokinetics. The results of this study indicate that repeated oral doses of ivabradine produced plasma drug concentrations suitable for 12-h dosing intervals in healthy cats. Furthermore, the analytical assay and combined ivabradine/S-18982 model provide tools for further evaluation of ivabradine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in future studies in cats.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Vancomycin in Elderly Patients Aged over 80 Years.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Laurent; Cazaubon, Yoann; Debeurme, Guillaume; Loue, Constance; Ducher, Michel; Goutelle, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Since the 1950s, vancomycin has remained a reference treatment for severe infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin is a nephrotoxic and ototoxic drug mainly eliminated through the kidneys. It has a large interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, which justifies monitoring its plasma concentrations in patients. This is especially important in patients aged over 80 years, who frequently have renal impairment. However, the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in this population is very poorly described in the literature. The objective of this work was to propose a model able to predict the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in very elderly people. First, a population pharmacokinetic model was carried out using the algorithm NPAG (nonparametric adaptive grid) on a database of 70 hospitalized patients aged over 80 years and treated with vancomycin. An external validation then was performed on 41 patients, and the predictive capabilities of the model were assessed. The model had two compartments and six parameters. Body weight and creatinine clearance significantly influenced vancomycin volume of distribution and body clearance, respectively. The means (± standard deviations) of vancomycin volume of distribution and clearance were 36.3 ± 15.2 liter and 2.0 ± 0.9 liter/h, respectively. In the validation group, the bias and precision were -0.75 mg/liter and 8.76 mg/liter for population predictions and -0.39 mg/liter and 2.68 mg/liter for individual predictions. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic model of vancomycin in a very elderly population has been created and validated for predicting plasma concentrations of vancomycin.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Vancomycin in Elderly Patients Aged over 80 Years.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Laurent; Cazaubon, Yoann; Debeurme, Guillaume; Loue, Constance; Ducher, Michel; Goutelle, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Since the 1950s, vancomycin has remained a reference treatment for severe infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin is a nephrotoxic and ototoxic drug mainly eliminated through the kidneys. It has a large interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, which justifies monitoring its plasma concentrations in patients. This is especially important in patients aged over 80 years, who frequently have renal impairment. However, the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in this population is very poorly described in the literature. The objective of this work was to propose a model able to predict the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in very elderly people. First, a population pharmacokinetic model was carried out using the algorithm NPAG (nonparametric adaptive grid) on a database of 70 hospitalized patients aged over 80 years and treated with vancomycin. An external validation then was performed on 41 patients, and the predictive capabilities of the model were assessed. The model had two compartments and six parameters. Body weight and creatinine clearance significantly influenced vancomycin volume of distribution and body clearance, respectively. The means (± standard deviations) of vancomycin volume of distribution and clearance were 36.3 ± 15.2 liter and 2.0 ± 0.9 liter/h, respectively. In the validation group, the bias and precision were -0.75 mg/liter and 8.76 mg/liter for population predictions and -0.39 mg/liter and 2.68 mg/liter for individual predictions. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic model of vancomycin in a very elderly population has been created and validated for predicting plasma concentrations of vancomycin. PMID:27185796

  14. 77 FR 28533 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov/ . Docket: Background...-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design feature associated with the installation of large non-structural glass items in the cabin area...

  15. 77 FR 40255 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... airplane was published in the Federal Register on May 15, 2012 (77 FR 28533). No comments were received...-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... associated with the installation of large non-structural glass items in the cabin area of an...

  16. 76 FR 10482 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead Flightcrew-Rest Compartment Occupiable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    .... The ability of such persons to fit through the escape hatch must be considered in this determination... not prevent opening of the secondary escape hatch or rapid evacuation through the secondary escape... compartment is occupied. (1) This requirement does not apply to emergency-escape hatches installed in...

  17. Human plasma concentrations of herbicidal carbamate molinate extrapolated from the pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masanao; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Nishiyama, Sayako; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    To predict concentrations in humans of the herbicidal carbamate molinate, used exclusively in rice cultivation, a forward dosimetry approach was carried out using data from lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses orally administered to rats, wild type mice, and chimeric mice with humanized liver and from in vitro human and rodent experiments. Human liver microsomes preferentially mediated hydroxylation of molinate, but rat livers additionally produced molinate sulfoxide and an unidentified metabolite. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents for molinate and its primary sulfoxide from animal studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and human metabolic data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The slower disposition of molinate and accumulation of molinate sulfoxide in humans were estimated by modeling after single and multiple doses compared with elimination in rodents. The results from simplified PBPK modeling in combination with chimeric mice with humanized liver suggest that ratios of estimated parameters of molinate sulfoxide exposure in humans to those in rats were three times as many as general safety factor of 10 for species difference in toxicokinetics. Thus, careful regulatory decision is needed when evaluating the human risk resulting from exposure to low doses of molinate and related carbamates based on data obtained from rats. PMID:25016177

  18. Human plasma concentrations of herbicidal carbamate molinate extrapolated from the pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masanao; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Nishiyama, Sayako; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    To predict concentrations in humans of the herbicidal carbamate molinate, used exclusively in rice cultivation, a forward dosimetry approach was carried out using data from lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses orally administered to rats, wild type mice, and chimeric mice with humanized liver and from in vitro human and rodent experiments. Human liver microsomes preferentially mediated hydroxylation of molinate, but rat livers additionally produced molinate sulfoxide and an unidentified metabolite. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents for molinate and its primary sulfoxide from animal studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and human metabolic data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The slower disposition of molinate and accumulation of molinate sulfoxide in humans were estimated by modeling after single and multiple doses compared with elimination in rodents. The results from simplified PBPK modeling in combination with chimeric mice with humanized liver suggest that ratios of estimated parameters of molinate sulfoxide exposure in humans to those in rats were three times as many as general safety factor of 10 for species difference in toxicokinetics. Thus, careful regulatory decision is needed when evaluating the human risk resulting from exposure to low doses of molinate and related carbamates based on data obtained from rats.

  19. Prediction of denosumab effects on bone remodeling: A combined pharmacokinetics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Boughattas, Mohamed Hafedh; Daniel, Jean-Luc; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-07-01

    Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits receptor activator of nuclearfactor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). This key mediator of osteoclast activities has been shown to inhibit osteoclast differentiation and hence, to increase bone mineral density (BMD) in treated patients. In the current study, we develop a computer model to simulate the effects of denosumab treatments (dose and duration) on the proximal femur bone remodeling process quantified by the variation in proximal femur BMD. The simulation model is based on a coupled pharmacokinetics model of denosumab with a pharmacodynamics model consisting of a mechanobiological finite element remodeling model which describes the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed which controls the level of bone cell autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.׳s (2003) dynamic law which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cell dynamics rather than by adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed finite element model was implemented in the finite element code Abaqus (UMAT routine). In order to perform a preliminary validation, in vivo human proximal femurs were selected and scanned at two different time intervals (at baseline and at a 36-month interval). Then, a 3D FE model was generated and the denosumab-remodeling algorithm was applied to the scans at t0 simulating daily walking activities for a duration of 36 months. The predicted results (density variation) were compared to existing published ones performed on a human cohort (FREEDOM

  20. Validation of Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Vinyl Acetate Against Human Nasal Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Corley, Rick A.; Bloemen, Louis J.; Bogdanffy, M S.

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into thenasopharyngeal region sampled both 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13 C1 , 13 C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  1. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  2. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Framework for Quantitative Prediction of an Herb–Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, S J; Gufford, B T; Dua, R; Fediuk, D J; Graf, T N; Scarlett, Y V; Frederick, K S; Fisher, M B; Oberlies, N H; Paine, M F

    2014-01-01

    Herb–drug interaction predictions remain challenging. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to improve prediction accuracy of potential herb–drug interactions using the semipurified milk thistle preparation, silibinin, as an exemplar herbal product. Interactions between silibinin constituents and the probe substrates warfarin (CYP2C9) and midazolam (CYP3A) were simulated. A low silibinin dose (160 mg/day × 14 days) was predicted to increase midazolam area under the curve (AUC) by 1%, which was corroborated with external data; a higher dose (1,650 mg/day × 7 days) was predicted to increase midazolam and (S)-warfarin AUC by 5% and 4%, respectively. A proof-of-concept clinical study confirmed minimal interaction between high-dose silibinin and both midazolam and (S)-warfarin (9 and 13% increase in AUC, respectively). Unexpectedly, (R)-warfarin AUC decreased (by 15%), but this is unlikely to be clinically important. Application of this PBPK modeling framework to other herb–drug interactions could facilitate development of guidelines for quantitative prediction of clinically relevant interactions. PMID:24670388

  3. Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology of Voriconazole: Role of Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Rajendra S; Van Den Anker, Johannes N

    2016-09-01

    Voriconazole is a potent antifungal agent used for the treatment of invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Candida species in adult and pediatric patients. Voriconazole has a narrow therapeutic index and a large intra- and inter-individual pharmacokinetics (PK) variability. Several factors including non-linear PK, age, body weight, cytochrome P450 2C19 genotype, concomitant drugs, liver function, and food are responsible for the large variability in voriconazole PK. A combination of a narrow therapeutic index with a large PK variability results in treatment failure in many patients at clinically recommended doses. There is an urgent need to establish an optimal dosing regimen for pediatric patients <2 years of age because of a lack of recommended dosing guidelines and high (>60 %) treatment failure rates. Therapeutic drug monitoring is commonly used in clinical practice to optimize the voriconazole dosing regimens in pediatric patients, but it is associated with several practical limitations. Implementation of a PK model-guided individualized dose selection will help in reducing the PK variability and will improve therapeutic outcomes. In this review, we have summarized the covariates influencing the PK of voriconazole in adult and pediatric patients, emphasizing that the clearance of voriconazole is significantly different between adult and pediatric patients owing to developmental changes in the major clearance pathways. Moreover, we have provided the limitations of the current dosing regimens and have proposed a new dosing method using a PK model-guided dose individualization of voriconazole in pediatric patients.

  4. Continuous versus short-term infusion of cefuroxime: assessment of concept based on plasma, subcutaneous tissue, and bone pharmacokinetics in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Bibby, B