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Sample records for compartment-specific androgen action

  1. Disorders of androgen action.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Charles; Lumbroso, Serge; Paris, Françoise; Jeandel, Claire; Terouanne, B; Belon, Charles; Audran, F; Poujol, N; Georget, V; Gobinet, J; Jalaguier, S; Auzou, G; Nicolas, J C

    2002-08-01

    Disorders of androgen action are the main cause of male pseudohermaphroditism and include 5alphaR deficiency and androgen receptor defects. 5alphaR deficiency is characterized by female genitalia with some degree of masculinization, clitoromegaly, and severely bifid scrotum corresponding to the so-called pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias. At the onset of puberty, increased muscle mass, development of pubic hair, and phallic growth are associated with the acquisition of male gender identity. Normal or increased levels of testosterone and an elevated testosterone-to-dihydrotestosterone ratio after human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation testing suggest 5alphareductase deficiency, and the diagnosis can be ascertained by identifying the mutation in the 5alphaR-2 gene. Whatever the patient's age at diagnosis, psychological evaluation with 5alphaRD is vital. Androgen receptor defects encompass two clinical expressions: the complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndromes. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome should be suspected at birth in the presence of inguinal hernia in a girl without genital ambiguity. At puberty, the sign of alert is primary amenorrhea with normal female phenotype and harmonious mammary development but no pubic hair growth. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome covers a wide spectrum of undervirilized phenotypes ranging from clitoromegaly at birth to infertile men. In all cases, complementary investigations should include plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone as well as androgen-binding capacity in cultured genital skin fibroblasts. Diagnosis is confirmed by identification of the androgen receptor gene mutation. Although patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome are raised as females, patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome should be managed according to age at diagnosis, response to treatment with exogenous androgens, and the presence of an androgen gene mutation. Gonadectomy in complete androgen

  2. Non-genomic Actions of Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Foradori, C. D.; Weiser, M. J.; Handa, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work in the endocrine and neuroendocrine fields has viewed androgen receptors (AR) as a transcription factor activated by testosterone or one of its many metabolites. The bound androgen receptor acts as transcription factor and binds to specific DNA response elements in target gene promoters, causing activation or repression of transcription and subsequently protein synthesis. Over the past two decades evidence has begun to accumulate to implicate androgens, dependent or independent of the AR, in rapid actions at the cellular and organism level. Androgen’s rapid time course of action; effects in the absence or inhibition of the cellular machinery necessary for transcription/translation; and/or the effects of androgens not able to translocate to the nucleus suggest a method of androgen action not initially dependent on genomic mechcanisms (i.e. non-genomic in nature). In the present paper the non-genomic effects of androgens are reviewed, along with a discussion of the possible role non-genomic androgen actions have on animal physiology and behavior. PMID:18093638

  3. Androgen actions on endothelium functions and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing-Jing; Wen, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lin, Jian; Hong, Yuan; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The roles of androgens on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology are controversial as both beneficial and detrimental effects have been reported. Although the reasons for this discrepancy are unclear, multiple factors such as genetic and epigenetic variation, sex-specificity, hormone interactions, drug preparation and route of administration may contribute. Recently, growing evidence suggests that androgens exhibit beneficial effects on cardiovascular function though the mechanism remains to be elucidated. Endothelial cells (ECs) which line the interior surface of blood vessels are distributed throughout the circulatory system, and play a crucial role in cardiovascular function. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are considered an indispensable element for the reconstitution and maintenance of an intact endothelial layer. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as an initiating step in development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of endothelial functions by androgens through either genomic or nongenomic signal pathways is one possible mechanism by which androgens act on the cardiovascular system. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms by which androgens affect EC and EPC functions will allow us to determine whether androgens possess beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. This in turn may be critical in the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases. This article seeks to review recent progress in androgen regulation of endothelial function, the sex-specificity of androgen actions, and its clinical applications in the cardiovascular system. PMID:27168746

  4. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied.

  5. Effects of androgens on insulin action in women: is androgen excess a component of female metabolic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Corbould, A

    2008-10-01

    Hyperinsulinemia as a consequence of insulin resistance causes hyperandrogenemia in women. The objective was to review evidence for the converse situation, i.e. whether androgens adversely influence insulin action. Androgen excess could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes, and in obese peripubertal girls. An Entrez-PubMed search was conducted to identify studies addressing the relationship of androgens with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in women. Studies reporting outcomes of androgen administration, interventions to reduce androgen effects in hyperandrogenemic women, and basic studies investigating androgen effects on insulin target tissues were reviewed. Multiple studies showed associations between serum testosterone and insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes risk in women, but their cross-sectional nature did not allow conclusions about causality. Androgen administration to healthy women was associated with development of insulin resistance. Intervention studies in women with hyperandrogenism were limited by small subject numbers and use of indirect methods for assessing insulin sensitivity. However, in three of the seven studies using euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps, reduction of androgen levels or blockade of androgen action improved insulin sensitivity. Testosterone administration to female rats caused skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Testosterone induced insulin resistance in adipocytes of women in vitro. In conclusion, the metabolic consequences of androgen excess in women have been under-researched. Studies of long-term interventions that lower androgen levels or block androgen effects in young women with hyperandrogenism are needed to determine whether these might protect against metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in later life.

  6. Regulators of Androgen Action Resource: a one-stop shop for the comprehensive study of androgen receptor action.

    PubMed

    DePriest, Adam D; Fiandalo, Michael V; Schlanger, Simon; Heemers, Frederike; Mohler, James L; Liu, Song; Heemers, Hannelore V

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the main target for treatment of non-organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Failure of life-prolonging AR-targeting androgen deprivation therapy is due to flexibility in steroidogenic pathways that control intracrine androgen levels and variability in the AR transcriptional output. Androgen biosynthesis enzymes, androgen transporters and AR-associated coregulators are attractive novel CaP treatment targets. These proteins, however, are characterized by multiple transcript variants and isoforms, are subject to genomic alterations, and are differentially expressed among CaPs. Determining their therapeutic potential requires evaluation of extensive, diverse datasets that are dispersed over multiple databases, websites and literature reports. Mining and integrating these datasets are cumbersome, time-consuming tasks and provide only snapshots of relevant information. To overcome this impediment to effective, efficient study of AR and potential drug targets, we developed the Regulators of Androgen Action Resource (RAAR), a non-redundant, curated and user-friendly searchable web interface. RAAR centralizes information on gene function, clinical relevance, and resources for 55 genes that encode proteins involved in biosynthesis, metabolism and transport of androgens and for 274 AR-associated coregulator genes. Data in RAAR are organized in two levels: (i) Information pertaining to production of androgens is contained in a 'pre-receptor level' database, and coregulator gene information is provided in a 'post-receptor level' database, and (ii) an 'other resources' database contains links to additional databases that are complementary to and useful to pursue further the information provided in RAAR. For each of its 329 entries, RAAR provides access to more than 20 well-curated publicly available databases, and thus, access to thousands of data points. Hyperlinks provide direct access to gene

  7. Diverse mechanisms of anti-androgen action: impact on male rat reproductive tract development.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists have identified environmental chemicals that display anti-androgenic activity via multiple mechanisms of action. Early studies focused on pesticides acting as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists but it soon became apparent that was not the only endocrine mode by which c...

  8. Impact of Male Hormonal Contraception on Prostate Androgens and Androgen Action in Healthy Men: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Lin, Daniel W.; Amory, John K.; Wright, Jonathan L.; Marck, Brett T.; Nelson, Peter S.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Bremner, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Male hormonal contraception (MHC) combines hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis blockade with exogenous androgen delivery to maintain extragonadal androgen end-organ effects. Concern exists that MHC may adversely impact prostate health. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the molecular impact of MHC on intraprostatic androgen concentrations and androgen action. Design: This was a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Setting: The study was conducted at an academic medical center. Participants: 32 healthy men aged 25–55 yr participated in the study. Intervention: Interventions included placebo, daily transdermal testosterone (T) (T-gel), T-gel + depomedroxyprogesterone acetate (T+DMPA), or T-gel + dutasteride daily (T+D) for 12 wk, and prostate biopsy during treatment wk 10. Main Outcome Measures: Serum and prostate androgen concentrations and prostate epithelial-cell gene expression were measured. Results: Thirty men completed the study. Serum T levels were significantly increased in T-gel and T+D groups compared with baseline (P < 0.05) but were decreased with the addition of DMPA. Intraprostatic androgens were no different from placebo with T-gel treatment. Addition of DMPA to T resulted in 40% lower intraprostatic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentration (P = 0.0273 vs. placebo), whereas combining dutasteride with T resulted in a 90% decrease in intraprostatic DHT (P = 0.0012), 11-fold increased intraprostatic T (P = 0.0011), and 7-fold increased intraprostatic androstenedione (P = 0.0011). Significant differences in global or androgen-regulated prostate epithelial-cell gene expression were not observed. Androgen-regulated gene expression correlated with epithelial-cell androgen receptor and prostatic DHT in placebo, T-gel, and T+DMPA arms and with T and androstenedione levels in the T+D arm. Conclusions: MHC regimens do not markedly alter gene expression in benign prostate epithelium, suggesting they may not alter risk

  9. Steroid inhibitors of androgen-potentiated actions on skin.

    PubMed

    Ebling, F J; Randall, V A

    1983-07-01

    Antiandrogens, such as cyproterone acetate, and oestrogens both inhibit sebaceous secretion in rats and have a potentiality for the treatment of hirsutism and acne in the human female. However, they act at different points. In castrated rats treated with testosterone, 3 micrograms/day oestradiol produced a greater decrease in sebum secretion than a dose of cyproterone acetate over 1000 times larger; moreover the antiandrogen reduced the incidence of sebaceous mitoses whereas the oestradiol did not. In hirsute women, oral administration of 100 mg of cyproterone acetate daily caused a 40% reduction in sebum secretion within 10 days; a further 20% was subsequently produced by combined therapy with cyproterone acetate and ethinyloestradiol. Significant decreases in the diameter and rate of growth of thigh hairs were not established until around the fourth monthly cycle of treatment. The actions were believed to be mainly peripheral, though contributory factors could also have been the small but significant reductions in plasma androgens produced by the antiandrogen, and the marked rise in sex hormone binding globulin produced by the oestrogen. That it is theoretically possible for cyproterone acetate or oestradiol to act locally follows from an unequivocal demonstration that either compound produced a local depression of sebum secretion when applied topically to rats.

  10. Androgen receptor action in osteoblasts in male mice is dependent on their stage of maturation.

    PubMed

    Russell, Patricia K; Clarke, Michele V; Cheong, Karey; Anderson, Paul H; Morris, Howard A; Wiren, Kristine M; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Davey, Rachel A

    2015-05-01

    Androgen action via the androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal skeletal growth and bone maintenance post-puberty in males; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which androgens exert their actions in osteoblasts remains relatively unexplored in vivo. To identify autonomous AR actions in osteoblasts independent of AR signaling in other tissues, we compared the extent to which the bone phenotype of the Global-ARKO mouse was restored by replacing the AR in osteoblasts commencing at either the (1) proliferative or (2) mineralization stage of their maturation. In trabecular bone, androgens stimulated trabecular bone accrual during growth via the AR in proliferating osteoblasts and maintained trabecular bone post-puberty via the AR in mineralizing osteoblasts, with its predominant action being to inhibit bone resorption by decreasing the ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) to osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene expression. During growth, replacement of the AR in proliferating but not mineralizing osteoblasts of Global-ARKOs was able to partially restore periosteal circumference, supporting the concept that androgen action in cortical bone to increase bone size during growth is mediated via the AR in proliferating osteoblasts. This study provides further significant insight into the mechanism of androgen action via the AR in osteoblasts, demonstrating that it is dependent on the stage of osteoblast maturation.

  11. Metabolic action of prolactin in regressing prostate: independent of androgen action

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.; Assimos, D.; Lee, C.; Grayhack, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of the observed synergistic effect of prolactin and androgen on the lateral lobe of the rat prostate is not established. The observation that prolactin alone delayed the rate of loss of weight, protein, and DNA of the lateral lobe in castrated rats has led us to question the assumption that the effect of prolactin is produced by a modification of recognized androgen-induced intracellular changes. The present study was conducted to explore whether or not the sites of prolactin action in the rat prostate coincided with those recognized as the androgen effect. Two anterior pituitaries from female donors were grafted under the right renal capsule of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Seven days later, bilateral orchiectomy and unilateral nephrectomy were performed in these rats. In one half of the animals, the kidney bearing the pituitary grafts was removed. In the other half, the contralateral kidney was removed. Seven days following the orchiectomy-nephrectomy, animals bearing the pituitary grafts had a higher level of serum prolactin (93 +/- 7 ng/ml, mean +/- SE) than in those without the graft (26 +/- 3 ng/ml). This condition of hyperprolactinemia was associated with the delay of castration-induced regression in the lateral prostate. The rate of protein degradation, as judged by the amount of radioactivity remaining in the tissue following a single i.v. pulse of /sup 3/H-leucine 24 hr before orchiectomy-nephrectomy, was significantly slower in the lateral prostate in graft-bearing animals than in those without grafts.

  12. Neuroendocrine androgen action is a key extraovarian mediator in the development of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Aimee S L; Edwards, Melissa C; Desai, Reena; Jimenez, Mark; Gilchrist, Robert B; Handelsman, David J; Walters, Kirsty A

    2017-03-20

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex hormonal disorder characterized by reproductive, endocrine, and metabolic abnormalities. As the origins of PCOS remain unknown, mechanism-based treatments are not feasible and current management relies on treatment of symptoms. Hyperandrogenism is the most consistent PCOS characteristic; however, it is unclear whether androgen excess, which is treatable, is a cause or a consequence of PCOS. As androgens mediate their actions via the androgen receptor (AR), we combined a mouse model of dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced PCOS with global and cell-specific AR-resistant (ARKO) mice to investigate the locus of androgen actions that mediate the development of the PCOS phenotype. Global loss of the AR reveals that AR signaling is required for all DHT-induced features of PCOS. Neuron-specific AR signaling was required for the development of dysfunctional ovulation, classic polycystic ovaries, reduced large antral follicle health, and several metabolic traits including obesity and dyslipidemia. In addition, ovariectomized ARKO hosts with wild-type ovary transplants displayed normal estrous cycles and corpora lutea, despite DHT treatment, implying extraovarian and not intraovarian AR actions are key loci of androgen action in generating the PCOS phenotype. These findings provide strong evidence that neuroendocrine genomic AR signaling is an important extraovarian mediator in the development of PCOS traits. Thus, targeting AR-driven mechanisms that initiate PCOS is a promising strategy for the development of novel treatments for PCOS.

  13. Ornithine decarboxylase activity as a marker of androgen and antiandrogen action in the rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, M A; Suescun, M O; Calandra, R S

    1988-05-01

    After castration, there was a marked decrease in serum androgen concentration at 6 h, and a dramatic inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) at 12 h. Administration of testosterone propionate to castrated rats at a dose of 0.05 mg/animal restored ODC activity to the normal value. However, no change was observed when intact rats were treated with testosterone even at a 40-fold higher dose, indicating that endogenous androgens present in intact rats are far in excess for maintenance of maximal levels of activity. Administration of the antiandrogen flutamide to intact rats caused a moderate decrease in epididymal weight, whereas this effect was more pronounced in castrated, androgen-treated rats. In the latter, the effect of flutamide was significant at the lowest dose used (0.5 mg/day). ODC activity was significantly decreased by flutamide treatment of intact rats, but even at the highest dose used (10 mg/day) only a 39% inhibition was observed. In flutamide-treated rats, LH concentrations were markedly increased, as were serum and epididymal androgens. In androgen-treated castrated rats, flutamide caused epididymal ODC to fall to undetectable values. These results show that: (1) androgens are essential for the maintenance of ODC activity in the epididymis; (2) epididymal ODC activity is maximally stimulated by endogenous androgens, at least in the pubertal rat; (3) the apparent potency of flutamide is substantially lowered by an increase in epididymal androgens. We suggest that ODC is a sensitive marker of the action of androgens and antiandrogens in the epididymis.

  14. Androgen resistance.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  15. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus as the Site of Androgen Action on Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Model, Zina; Butler, Matthew P.; LeSauter, Joseph; Silver, Rae

    2015-01-01

    Androgens act widely in the body in both central and peripheral sites. Prior studies indicate that in the mouse, suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) cells bear androgen receptors (ARs). The SCN of the hypothalamus in mammals is the locus of a brain clock that regulates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. Gonadectomy results in reduced AR expression in the SCN and in marked lengthening of the period of free-running activity rhythms. Both responses are restored by systemic administration of androgens, but the site of action remains unknown. Our goal was to determine whether intracranial androgen implants targeted to the SCN are sufficient to restore the characteristic free-running period in gonadectomized male mice. The results indicate that hypothalamic implants of testosterone propionate in or very near the SCN produce both anatomical and behavioral effects, namely increased AR expression in the SCN and restored period of free-running locomotor activity. The effect of the implant on the period of the free-running locomotor rhythm is positively correlated with the amount of AR expression in the SCN. There is no such correlation of period change with amount of AR expression in other brain regions examined, namely the preoptic area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and premammillary nucleus. We conclude that the SCN is the site of action of androgen effects on the period of circadian activity rhythmicity. PMID:26012711

  16. Compartment specific response of antioxidants to drought stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Luschin-Ebengreuth, Nora; Stabentheiner, Edith; Müller, Maria; Zechmann, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Compartment specific changes in ascorbate and glutathione contents were studied during drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and in ascorbate and glutathione deficient mutants vtc2-1 and pad2-1, respectively, over a time period of 10 days. The results of this study revealed a strong decrease of glutathione contents in both mutants (up to 52% in mitochondria of pad2-1 and 40% in nuclei of vtc2-1) at early time points when drought stress was not yet measurable in leaves even though the soil showed a drop in relative water contents. These results indicate that glutathione is used at early time points to signal drought stress from roots to leaves. Such roles could not be confirmed for ascorbate which remained unchanged in most cell compartments until very late stages of drought. During advanced drought stress the strong depletion of ascorbate and glutathione in chloroplasts (up to 50% in Col-0 and vtc2-1) and peroxisomes (up to 56% in Col-0) could be correlated with a strong accumulation of H2O2. The strong increase of H2O2 and ascorbate in vacuoles (up to 111%) in wildtype plants indicates that ascorbate plays an important role for the detoxification of ROS in vacuoles during drought stress. PMID:25219315

  17. Androgen and estrogen receptor mediated mechanisms of testosterone action in male rat pelvic autonomic ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Purves-Tyson, T.D.; Arshi, M.S.; Handelsman, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Keast, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Although male reproductive function is primarily androgen dependent, many studies suggest that estrogens have direct actions on the male reproductive organs. Pelvic autonomic neurons provide the motor control of the internal reproductive organs and the penis and various properties of these neurons are affected by endogenous androgens. However, the possible role of estrogens at this site has not been examined. Here we have investigated the significance of estrogens produced by aromatisation of testosterone in the physiological actions of androgens on adult male rat pelvic ganglion neurons. RT-PCR studies showed that aromatase and both estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are expressed in these ganglia. Western blotting also showed that aromatase is expressed in male pelvic ganglia. Using immunohistochemical visualisation, ERα was predominantly expressed by nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-positive parasympathetic pelvic ganglion neurons. In vivo studies showed that the decrease in pelvic ganglion soma size caused by gonadectomy could be prevented by administration of testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but not 17β-estradiol (E2), showing that this maintenance action of testosterone is mediated entirely by androgenic mechanisms. However, in vitro studies of cultured pelvic ganglion neurons revealed that T, DHT and E each stimulated the growth of longer and more complex neurites in both noradrenergic and cholinergic NOS-expressing neurons. The effects of T were attenuated by either androgen or estrogen receptor antagonists, or by inhibition of aromatase. Together these studies demonstrate that estrogens are likely to be synthesised in the male pelvic ganglia, produced from testosterone by local aromatase. The effects of androgens on axonal growth are likely to be at least partly mediated by estrogenic mechanisms, which may be important for understanding disease-, aging- and injury-induced plasticity in this part of the nervous system. PMID:17629410

  18. Acid phosphatase activity: a marker of androgen action in prostate explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Shao, T C; Kong, A Y; Cunningham, G R

    1987-01-01

    Acid phosphatase activity in rat ventral prostate explants has been assayed to determine if this parameter could serve as a specific and quantitative marker of androgen action in this in vitro model. Dihydrotestosterone (10 nM) caused an absolute increase in both total (42.5 +/- 2.9 vs control 27.1 +/- 4.0 nmoles p-nitrophenol generated in 30 min/micrograms DNA, P less than .01) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity (34.1 +/- 1.5 vs control 17.2 +/- 2.8 U/micrograms DNA, P less than .05), and this effect was maximal on the 4th day of culture. This was the time when explant weight and DNA content tended to fall or only to be maintained by androgen. Similar changes were observed with the potent synthetic androgen, mibolerone. The addition of either the antiandrogen cyproterone acetate or flutamide in a 100-fold excess to that of androgen caused significant inhibition in acid phosphatase activity. No significant change was observed at low concentrations of estradiol or progesterone, and only minimal and inconsistent increases in activity were noted at high concentrations. No increase was noted when cortisol, cyproterone acetate, or flutamide was added to the media. We conclude that measurement of acid phosphatase activity in cultured explants of rat ventral prostate provides a biochemical marker of androgenicity that is more specific than measurement of [3H]-thymidine incorporation.

  19. Peripheral androgen action helps modulate vocal production in a suboscine passerine

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Heston, Jonathan B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2015-01-01

    Androgenic activation of intracellular androgen receptors (AR) influences avian vocal production, though this has largely been investigated at the level of the brain. We investigated the influence of predominantly peripheral AR on vocal output in wild Golden-collared Manakins (Manacus vitellinus). In this suboscine species, males court females by performing acrobatic displays and by producing relatively simple chee-poo vocalizations. To assess whether peripheral AR influences the acoustic structure of these vocal signals, we treated reproductively active adult males with the peripherally selective antiandrogen bicalutamide and then measured phonation performance. Inhibiting AR outside of the central nervous system increased the duration of the chee note and decreased the fundamental frequency of the poo note. This treatment caused no discernable change to chee-poo frequency modulation or entropy. Our results show that activation of peripheral AR mediates note-specific changes to temporal and pitch characteristics of the Golden-collared Manakin’s main sexual call. Thus, our study provides one of the first demonstrations that androgenic action originating outside of the brain and likely on musculoskeletal targets can modulate avian vocal production. PMID:25780269

  20. Peripheral androgen action helps modulate vocal production in a suboscine passerine.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Heston, Jonathan B; Schlinger, Barney A

    2014-07-01

    Androgenic activation of intracellular androgen receptors (AR) influences avian vocal production, though this has largely been investigated at the level of the brain. We investigated the influence of predominantly peripheral AR on vocal output in wild Golden-collared Manakins (Manacus vitellinus). In this suboscine species, males court females by performing acrobatic displays and by producing relatively simple chee-poo vocalizations. To assess whether peripheral AR influences the acoustic structure of these vocal signals, we treated reproductively active adult males with the peripherally selective antiandrogen bicalutamide and then measured phonation performance. Inhibiting AR outside of the central nervous system increased the duration of the chee note and decreased the fundamental frequency of the poo note. This treatment caused no discernable change to chee-poo frequency modulation or entropy. Our results show that activation of peripheral AR mediates note-specific changes to temporal and pitch characteristics of the Golden-collared Manakin's main sexual call. Thus, our study provides one of the first demonstrations that androgenic action originating outside of the brain and likely on musculoskeletal targets can modulate avian vocal production.

  1. Heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits have different paracrine action in the modulation of luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, A.J.W.; Dahl, K.D.; Vaughan, J.; Tucker, E.; Rivier, J.; Bardin, C.W.; Vale, W.

    1987-07-01

    Inhibin, a gonadal hormone capable of preferential suppression of pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion, has recently been purified. The major form of this protein is an ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer encoded by two separate genes. In contrast to the FSH-suppressing action of the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer, the ..beta beta.. homodimer stimulates FSH secretion. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-secreting pituitary cells and gonadal androgen-producing cells have long been shown to form a closed-loop feedback axis. Based on recent studies demonstrated the FSH stimulation of inhibin biosynthesis by ovarian granulosa and testis Sertoli cells, an additional closed-loop feedback axis exists between pituitary FSH- and gonadal inhibin-producing cells. Because uncharacterized Sertoli cell factors have been suggested to either stimulate or inhibit androgen production by testicular Leydig cells, the authors have tested the intragonadal paracrine actions of heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits. In primary cultures of testis cells, the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer of inhibin enhances Leydig cell androgen biosynthesis stimulated by LH, whereas the ..beta beta.. homodimer suppresses androgen production. The data indicate that the inhibin-related gene products synthesized by Sertoli and granulosa cells may form heterodimers or homodimers to serve as intragonadal paracrine signals in the modulation of LH-stimulated androgen biosynthesis and allow cross-communication between the two feedback loops.

  2. Feed-forward inhibition of androgen receptor activity by glucocorticoid action in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Sean M; He, Bin; Newberg, Justin Y; Ochsner, Scott A; Loose, David S; Lanz, Rainer B; McKenna, Neil J; Buehrer, Benjamin M; McGuire, Sean E; Marcelli, Marco; Mancini, Michael A

    2012-09-21

    We compared transcriptomes of terminally differentiated mouse 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes to identify cell-specific differences. Gene expression and high content analysis (HCA) data identified the androgen receptor (AR) as both expressed and functional, exclusively during early human adipocyte differentiation. The AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibited human adipocyte maturation by downregulation of adipocyte marker genes, but not in 3T3-L1. It is interesting that AR induction corresponded with dexamethasone activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR); however, when exposed to the differentiation cocktail required for adipocyte maturation, AR adopted an antagonist conformation and was transcriptionally repressed. To further explore effectors within the cocktail, we applied an image-based support vector machine (SVM) classification scheme to show that adipocyte differentiation components inhibit AR action. The results demonstrate human adipocyte differentiation, via GR activation, upregulates AR but also inhibits AR transcriptional activity.

  3. Compartment-specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The tripeptide thiol glutathione (γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) is the most important sulfur containing antioxidant in plants and essential for plant defense against abiotic and biotic stress conditions. It is involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), redox signaling, the modulation of defense gene expression, and the regulation of enzymatic activities. Even though changes in glutathione contents are well documented in plants and its roles in plant defense are well established, still too little is known about its compartment-specific importance during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Due to technical advances in the visualization of glutathione and the redox state through microscopical methods some progress was made in the last few years in studying the importance of subcellular glutathione contents during stress conditions in plants. This review summarizes the data available on compartment-specific importance of glutathione in the protection against abiotic and biotic stress conditions such as high light stress, exposure to cadmium, drought, and pathogen attack (Pseudomonas, Botrytis, tobacco mosaic virus). The data will be discussed in connection with the subcellular accumulation of ROS during these conditions and glutathione synthesis which are both highly compartment specific (e.g., glutathione synthesis takes place in chloroplasts and the cytosol). Thus this review will reveal the compartment-specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. PMID:25368627

  4. Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity as a Novel Mechanism of Action of Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Adena E.; Burnstein, Kerry L.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental sodium arsenite is a toxin that is associated with male infertility due to decreased and abnormal sperm production. Arsenic trioxide (ATO), another inorganic trivalent semimetal, is an effective therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia, and there is investigation of its possible efficacy in prostate cancer. However, the mechanism of arsenic action in male urogenital tract tissues is not clear. Because the androgen receptor (AR) plays an important role in spermatogenesis and prostate cancer, we explored the possibility that trivalent arsenic regulates AR function. We found that arsenic inhibited AR transcriptional activity in prostate cancer and Sertoli cells using reporter gene assays testing several androgen response element-containing regions and by assessing native target gene expression. Arsenic inhibition of AR activity was not due to down-regulation of AR protein levels, decreased hormone binding to AR, disruption of AR nuclear translocation, or interference with AR-DNA binding in vitro. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies revealed that arsenic inhibited AR recruitment to an AR target gene enhancer in vivo. Consistent with a deficiency in AR-chromatin binding, arsenic disrupted AR amino and carboxyl termini interaction. Furthermore, ATO caused a significant decrease in prostate cancer cell proliferation that was more pronounced in cells expressing AR compared with cells depleted of AR. In addition, inhibition of AR activity by ATO and by the AR antagonist, bicalutamide, was additive. Thus, arsenic-induced male infertility may be due to inhibition of AR activity. Further, because AR is an important target in prostate cancer therapy, arsenic may serve as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:19131511

  5. A splicing variant of the androgen receptor detected in a metastatic prostate cancer exhibits exclusively cytoplasmic actions.

    PubMed

    Jagla, Monika; Fève, Marie; Kessler, Pascal; Lapouge, Gaëlle; Erdmann, Eva; Serra, Sebastian; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Céraline, Jocelyn

    2007-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that displays genomic actions characterized by binding to androgen-response elements in the promoter of target genes as well as nongenomic actions that do not require nuclear translocation and DNA binding. In this study, we report exclusive cytoplasmic actions of a splicing variant of the AR detected in a metastatic prostate cancer. This AR variant, named AR23, results from an aberrant splicing of intron 2, wherein the last 69 nucleotides of the intronic sequence are retained, leading to the insertion of 23 amino acids between the two zinc fingers in the DNA-binding domain. We show that the nuclear entry of AR23 upon dihydrotestosterone (DHT) stimulation is impaired. Alternatively, DHT-activated AR23 forms cytoplasmic and perinuclear aggregates that partially colocalize with the endoplasmic reticulum and are devoid of genomic actions. However, in LNCaP cells, this cytoplasmic DHT-activated AR23 remains partially active as evidenced by the activation of transcription from androgen-responsive promoters, the stimulation of NF-kappaB transcriptional activity and by the decrease of AP-1 transcriptional activity. Our data reveal novel cytoplasmic actions for this splicing AR variant, suggesting a contribution in prostate cancer progression.

  6. Some rewarding effects of androgens may be mediated by actions of its 5α-reduced metabolite 3α-Androstanediol

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-01

    The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AS) is a growing problem; however, the effects and mechanisms underlying their addictive effects are not well understood. Research findings regarding androgen abuse in people and hedonic effects of androgens in laboratory rats are reviewed. Androgens, like other steroids, can have traditional actions via cognate intracellular steroid receptors, as well as other substrates. Our recent results indicate that testosterone (T) metabolites may have actions in part via γ–aminobutyric acid (GABA)A/benzodiazepine receptor complexes (GBRs) and/or dopaminergic neurons in the nucleus accumbens, to mediate T’s positive hedonic states. This may provide the basis for positive reinforcing effects of androgen seeking and use behavior. Following a comprehensive review of the background literature, our findings are presented that have explored the extent to which metabolites of T mediate euphorogenic effects of androgens by acting in the nucleus accumbens. Then results regarding whether GBRs are necessary substrates for androgens’ positive hedonic effects are discussed. Lastly, research that addresses if dopaminergic neurons in the nucleus accumbens are necessary for these effects of androgens are discussed. This review provides a comprehensive examination of the hedonic properties and abuse/addiction potential of androgens and the putative mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:17112575

  7. Role of RNA secondary structure in emergence of compartment specific hepatitis B virus immune escape variants

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Chakravarty, Runu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of subgenotype specific RNA secondary structure in the compartment specific selection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) immune escape mutations. METHODS This study was based on the analysis of the specific observation of HBV subgenotype A1 in the serum/plasma, while subgenotype A2 with G145R mutation in the peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Genetic variability found among the two subgenotypes was used for prediction and comparison of the full length pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) secondary structure and base pairings. RNA secondary structures were predicted for 37 °C using the Vienna RNA fold server, using default parameters. Visualization and detailed analysis was done using RNA shapes program. RESULTS In this analysis, using similar algorithm and conditions, entirely different pgRNA secondary structures for subgenotype A1 and subgenotype A2 were predicted, suggesting different base pairing patterns within the two subgenotypes of genotype A, specifically, in the HBV genetic region encoding the major hydrophilic loop. We observed that for subgenotype A1 specific pgRNA, nucleotide 358U base paired with 1738A and nucleotide 587G base paired with 607C. However in sharp contrast, in subgenotype A2 specific pgRNA, nucleotide 358U was opposite to nucleotide 588G, while 587G was opposite to 359U, hence precluding correct base pairing and thereby lesser stability of the stem structure. When the nucleotides at 358U and 587G were replaced with 358C and 587A respectively (as observed specifically in the PBL associated A2 sequences), these nucleotides base paired correctly with 588G and 359U, respectively. CONCLUSION The results of this study show that compartment specific mutations are associated with HBV subgenotype specific alterations in base pairing of the pgRNA, leading to compartment specific selection and preponderance of specific HBV subgenotype with unique mutational pattern. PMID:27878103

  8. Role of androgen and estrogen receptors for the action of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

    PubMed

    Engdahl, Cecilia; Lagerquist, Marie K; Stubelius, Alexandra; Andersson, Annica; Studer, Erik; Ohlsson, Claes; Westberg, Lars; Carlsten, Hans; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena

    2014-03-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an abundant steroid hormone, and its mechanism of action is yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the importance of androgen receptors (ARs) and estrogen receptors (ERs) for DHEA function. Orchidectomized C57BL/6 mice were treated with DHEA, DHT, 17β-estradiol-3-benzoate (E2), or vehicle. Orchidectomized AR-deficient (ARKO) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were treated with DHEA or vehicle for 2.5 weeks. At termination, bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated, thymus and seminal vesicles were weighted, and submandibular glands (SMGs) were histologically examined. To evaluate the in vivo ER activation of the classical estrogen signaling pathway, estrogen response element reporter mice were treated with DHEA, DHT, E2, or vehicle, and a reporter gene was investigated in different sex steroid-sensitive organs after 24 hours. DHEA treatment increased trabecular BMD and thymic atrophy in both WT and ARKO mice. In WT mice, DHEA induced enlargement of glands in the SMGs, whereas this effect was absent in ARKO mice. Furthermore, DHEA was able to induce activation of classical estrogen signaling in bone, thymus, and seminal vesicles but not in the SMGs. In summary, the DHEA effects on trabecular BMD and thymus do not require signaling via AR and DHEA can activate the classical estrogen signaling in these organs. In contrast, DHEA induction of gland size in the SMGs is dependent on AR and does not involve classical estrogen signaling. Thus, both ERs and ARs are involved in mediating the effects of DHEA in an organ-dependent manner.

  9. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Davies, John D; Bunch, Trevor I; Pasterski, Vickie; Mastroyannopoulou, Kiki; MacDougall, Jane

    2012-10-20

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome in its complete form is a disorder of hormone resistance characterised by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype and testes producing age-appropriate normal concentrations of androgens. Pathogenesis is the result of mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor gene, which encodes for the ligand-activated androgen receptor--a transcription factor and member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This Seminar describes the clinical manifestations of androgen insensitivity syndrome from infancy to adulthood, reviews the mechanism of androgen action, and shows examples of how mutations of the androgen receptor gene cause the syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team and include gonadectomy to avoid gonad tumours in later life, appropriate sex-hormone replacement at puberty and beyond, and an emphasis on openness in disclosure.

  10. Compartment-specific antioxidative defense in Arabidopsis against virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; Koffler, Barbara E; Roitsch, Thomas; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2012-07-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during biotic stress is either part of a hypersensitive response of the plant or induced directly by the pathogen. Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione counteract the accumulation of ROS and are part of the defense reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of ascorbate and glutathione during a virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Peroxisomes were found to be the hotspot for glutathione accumulation reaching 452% and 258% of control levels 24 h postinoculation during the virulent and avirulent infection, respectively. An accumulation of ascorbate could also be observed in vacuoles during Pseudomonas syringae infection, whereas glutathione remained absent in this cell compartment. Neither glutathione nor ascorbate accumulated in the apoplast during pathogen infection demonstrating an only negligible role of these antioxidants in the apoplast during pathogen infection. Compartment-specific changes followed a recently proposed stress model with an increase of ascorbate and glutathione in most cell compartments at the early stages of infection and a strong drop at the later stage of infection when a strong accumulation of ROS and symptoms occurred in the leaves. This study highlights the importance of certain cell compartments and antioxidants in general for the protection of pathogen-induced ROS accumulation.

  11. ComPPI: a cellular compartment-specific database for protein-protein interaction network analysis.

    PubMed

    Veres, Daniel V; Gyurkó, Dávid M; Thaler, Benedek; Szalay, Kristóf Z; Fazekas, Dávid; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present ComPPI, a cellular compartment-specific database of proteins and their interactions enabling an extensive, compartmentalized protein-protein interaction network analysis (URL: http://ComPPI.LinkGroup.hu). ComPPI enables the user to filter biologically unlikely interactions, where the two interacting proteins have no common subcellular localizations and to predict novel properties, such as compartment-specific biological functions. ComPPI is an integrated database covering four species (S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens). The compilation of nine protein-protein interaction and eight subcellular localization data sets had four curation steps including a manually built, comprehensive hierarchical structure of >1600 subcellular localizations. ComPPI provides confidence scores for protein subcellular localizations and protein-protein interactions. ComPPI has user-friendly search options for individual proteins giving their subcellular localization, their interactions and the likelihood of their interactions considering the subcellular localization of their interacting partners. Download options of search results, whole-proteomes, organelle-specific interactomes and subcellular localization data are available on its website. Due to its novel features, ComPPI is useful for the analysis of experimental results in biochemistry and molecular biology, as well as for proteome-wide studies in bioinformatics and network science helping cellular biology, medicine and drug design.

  12. ComPPI: a cellular compartment-specific database for protein–protein interaction network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Daniel V.; Gyurkó, Dávid M.; Thaler, Benedek; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Fazekas, Dávid; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present ComPPI, a cellular compartment-specific database of proteins and their interactions enabling an extensive, compartmentalized protein–protein interaction network analysis (URL: http://ComPPI.LinkGroup.hu). ComPPI enables the user to filter biologically unlikely interactions, where the two interacting proteins have no common subcellular localizations and to predict novel properties, such as compartment-specific biological functions. ComPPI is an integrated database covering four species (S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens). The compilation of nine protein–protein interaction and eight subcellular localization data sets had four curation steps including a manually built, comprehensive hierarchical structure of >1600 subcellular localizations. ComPPI provides confidence scores for protein subcellular localizations and protein–protein interactions. ComPPI has user-friendly search options for individual proteins giving their subcellular localization, their interactions and the likelihood of their interactions considering the subcellular localization of their interacting partners. Download options of search results, whole-proteomes, organelle-specific interactomes and subcellular localization data are available on its website. Due to its novel features, ComPPI is useful for the analysis of experimental results in biochemistry and molecular biology, as well as for proteome-wide studies in bioinformatics and network science helping cellular biology, medicine and drug design. PMID:25348397

  13. Compartment-Specific Antioxidative Defense in Arabidopsis Against Virulent and Avirulent Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Koffler, Barbara E.; Roitsch, Thomas; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during biotic stress is either part of a hypersensitive response of the plant or induced directly by the pathogen. Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione counteract the accumulation of ROS and are part of the defense reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of ascorbate and glutathione during a virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Peroxisomes were found to be the hotspot for glutathione accumulation reaching 452% and 258% of control levels 24 h postinoculation during the virulent and avirulent infection, respectively. An accumulation of ascorbate could also be observed in vacuoles during Pseudomonas syringae infection, whereas glutathione remained absent in this cell compartment. Neither glutathione nor ascorbate accumulated in the apoplast during pathogen infection demonstrating an only negligible role of these antioxidants in the apoplast during pathogen infection. Compartment-specific changes followed a recently proposed stress model with an increase of ascorbate and glutathione in most cell compartments at the early stages of infection and a strong drop at the later stage of infection when a strong accumulation of ROS and symptoms occurred in the leaves. This study highlights the importance of certain cell compartments and antioxidants in general for the protection of pathogen-induced ROS accumulation. PMID:22571419

  14. Non-Genomic Actions of the Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacky K.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2017-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a validated drug target for prostate cancer based on its role in proliferation, survival, and metastases of prostate cancer cells. Unfortunately, despite recent improvements to androgen deprivation therapy and the advent of better antiandrogens with a superior affinity for the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), most patients with recurrent disease will eventually develop lethal metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Expression of constitutively active AR splice variants that lack the LBD contribute toward therapeutic resistance by bypassing androgen blockade and antiandrogens. In the canonical pathway, binding of androgen to AR LBD triggers the release of AR from molecular chaperones which enable conformational changes and protein–protein interactions to facilitate its nuclear translocation where it regulates the expression of target genes. However, preceding AR function in the nucleus, initial binding of androgen to AR LBD in the cytoplasm may already initiate signal transduction pathways to modulate cellular proliferation and migration. In this article, we review the significance of signal transduction pathways activated by rapid, non-genomic signaling of the AR during the progression to metastatic CRPC and put into perspective the implications for current and novel therapies that target different domains of AR. PMID:28144231

  15. Synergistic androgenic effect of a petroleum product caused by the joint action of at least three different types of compounds.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Candido, Angelica; Vrabie, Cozmina M; Scarlett, Alan G; Rowland, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    In a previous study, we found a dose-dependent synergistic effect in recombinant yeast stably transfected with the human androgen receptor (AR), in response to co-exposure to testosterone and a commercially-available lubricant (engine) oil for cars. As there is relatively little knowledge on synergistic toxic effects and causative compounds, particularly for the androgenic system, the objective of the present study was to investigate this oil in more detail. The oil was fractionated into SARA fractions (so-called 'saturates', 'aromatics', 'resins', and 'asphaltenes') by open column chromatography. Surprisingly, when exposing the recombinant AR yeast to testosterone in combination with the separate SARA fractions, the synergistic effect could not be reproduced fully. After pooling the fractions again however, the full synergism returned. From subsequent exposures to combinations of two or three SARA fractions, it appeared that both the 'saturates' and the 'resins' fraction were required for obtaining the synergistic response with testosterone. This clearly demonstrates a synergistic effect related to the androgenic system caused by the joint action of at least three chemically-distinct compounds, or groups of compounds (i.e. testosterone, 'resins' and 'saturates'). Although detailed chemical analyses could not reveal the identity of the causative compounds and the in vivo relevance of the present results remains unclear, the results do add to the growing body of evidence on the potentially extremely complex character of mixture effects.

  16. Relative importance of prenatal and postnatal androgen action in determining growth of the penis and anogenital distance in the rat before, during and after puberty.

    PubMed

    van den Driesche, S; Scott, H M; MacLeod, D J; Fisken, M; Walker, M; Sharpe, R M

    2011-12-01

    Experimental animal studies show that measurement of anogenital distance (AGD) and/or penis length may provide lifelong 'read-outs' of foetal androgen exposure during the masculinization programming window (MPW). However, variation in postnatal androgen exposure may complicate interpretation of such measurements. This is important to clarify if such measurements are to be applied to humans. The present aim was to evaluate effects of prenatal and/or postnatal manipulation of androgen production/action on growth of AGD and the penis in rats. Pregnant rats were treated daily before (e13.5-e21.5) and after birth (postnatal days 1-15) with either vehicle, 500 mg/kg di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) or 100 mg/kg flutamide (postnatal only) in prenatal + postnatal treatment combinations (N = 6 treatment combinations); DBP impairs androgen production whereas flutamide impairs androgen action. Male offspring were killed on postnatal day 8 (prepuberty), 25 (early puberty) or 90 (adulthood) when AGD was measured, the penis dissected out and its weight and length measured; plasma testosterone and ventral prostate weight were measured at day 90 to assess endogenous androgen exposure. In controls, penis length, girth and AGD increased 2.2-, 5.3-and 5.9-fold respectively from day 8 to day 90. Significant inhibition of penis growth and final length and girth was induced by treatments that inhibited postnatal androgen action. Conversely, growth and ultimate (adult) AGD was inhibited by prenatal inhibition of androgen production whereas postnatal androgen inhibition had negligible effect. Nevertheless, AGD and penis length were highly correlated at every age (R(2) > 0.33; p < 0.0001). However, altered endogenous androgen exposure may confound interpretation of changes in adults exposed prenatally/postnatally to DBP/flutamide. We conclude that AGD provides a lifelong guide to prenatal androgen exposure (in the MPW) whereas penis size reflects both prenatal + postnatal androgen exposure. At

  17. Corepressive Action of CBP on Androgen Receptor Transactivation in Pericentric Heterochromatin in a Drosophila Experimental Model System▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Suzuki, Eriko; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Kimura, Shuhei; Fujiyama, Sally; Ueda, Takashi; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Shirode, Yuko; Kouzmenko, Alexander P.; Li, Feng; Tabata, Testuya; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-bound nuclear receptors (NR) activate transcription of the target genes. This activation is coupled with histone modifications and chromatin remodeling through the function of various coregulators. However, the nature of the dependence of a NR coregulator action on the presence of the chromatin environment at the target genes is unclear. To address this issue, we have developed a modified position effect variegation experimental model system that includes an androgen-dependent reporter transgene inserted into either a pericentric heterochromatin region or a euchromatic region of Drosophila chromosome. Human androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active truncation mutant (AR AF-1) were transcriptionally functional in both chromosomal regions. Predictably, the level of AR-induced transactivation was lower in the pericentric heterochromatin. In genetic screening for AR AF-1 coregulators, Drosophila CREB binding protein (dCBP) was found to corepress AR transactivation at the pericentric region whereas it led to coactivation in the euchromatic area. Mutations of Sir2 acetylation sites or deletion of the CBP acetyltransferase domain abrogated dCBP corepressive action for AR at heterochromatic areas in vivo. Such a CBP corepressor function for AR was observed in the transcriptionally silent promoter of an AR target gene in cultured mammalian cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the action of NR coregulators may depend on the state of chromatin at the target loci. PMID:19075001

  18. Site- and compartment-specific changes in bone with hindlimb unloading in mature adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, S. A.; Allen, M. R.; Hogan, H. A.; Delp, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine site- and compartment-specific changes in bone induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) in the mature adult male rat (6 months old). Tibiae, femora, and humeri were removed after 14, 21, and 28 days of HU for determination of bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), mechanical properties, and bone formation rate (BFR), and compared with baseline (0 day) and aging (28 day) controls. HU resulted in 20%-21% declines in cancellous BMD at the proximal tibia and femoral neck after 28 day HU vs. 0 day controls (CON). Cortical shell BMD at these sites was greater (by 4%-6%) in both 28 day HU and 28 day CON vs. 0 day CON animals, and nearly identical to that gain seen in the weight-bearing humerus. Mechanical properties at the proximal tibia exhibited a nonsignificant decline after HU vs. those of 0 day CON rats. At the femoral neck, a 10% decrement was noted in ultimate load in 28 day HU rats vs. 28 day CON animals. Middiaphyseal tibial bone increased slightly in density and area during HU; no differences in structural and material properties between 28 day HU and 28 day CON rats were noted. BFR at the tibial midshaft was significantly lower (by 90%) after 21 day HU vs. 0 day CON; this decline was maintained throughout 28 day HU. These results suggest there are compartment-specific differences in the mature adult skeletal response to hindlimb unloading, and that the major impact over 28 days of unloading is on cancellous bone sites. Given the sharp decline in BFR for midshaft cortical bone, it appears likely that deficits in BMD, area, or mechanical properties would develop with longer duration unloading.

  19. Biocompatible click chemistry enabled compartment-specific pH measurement inside E. coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maiyun; Jalloh, Abubakar S; Wei, Wei; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Peng; Chen, Peng R

    2014-09-19

    Bioorthogonal reactions, especially the Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, have revolutionized our ability to label and manipulate biomolecules under living conditions. The cytotoxicity of Cu(I) ions, however, has hindered the application of this reaction in the internal space of living cells. By systematically surveying a panel of Cu(I)-stabilizing ligands in promoting protein labelling within the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, we identify a highly efficient and biocompatible catalyst for intracellular modification of proteins by azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This reaction permits us to conjugate an environment-sensitive fluorophore site specifically onto HdeA, an acid-stress chaperone that adopts pH-dependent conformational changes, in both the periplasm and cytoplasm of E. coli. The resulting protein-fluorophore hybrid pH indicators enable compartment-specific pH measurement to determine the pH gradient across the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. This construct also allows the measurement of E. coli transmembrane potential, and the determination of the proton motive force across its inner membrane under normal and acid-stress conditions.

  20. Androgens and women's health.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G P

    1998-01-01

    Androgenic disorders are those conditions in women characterized by excessive androgen action. They are the most common endocrinopathy of women, affecting from 10% to 20%. Signs are: persistent acne, hirsutism and androgenic alopecia, which is the female equivalent of male pattern baldness. A subgroup, those traditionally labeled as having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), additionally have anovulation, as well as menstrual abnormalities and, often, obesity. Although women with androgenic disorders usually present themselves for help with the skin or menstrual changes, there are other important implications regarding their health. Women with PCOS have varying degrees of insulin resistance, and an increased incidence of Type II diabetes mellitus, as well as unfavorable lipid patterns. The presence of these risk factors is suggested by upper segment obesity, darkening of the skin, and the other skin changes that make up acanthosis nigricans. Diagnosis involves measurement of circulating androgens (of which free testosterone is most important), together with prolactin and FSH when menstrual dysfunction is present. Many women with androgenic skin changes have normal serum androgen levels, suggesting increased end organ sensitivity to androgens. Others have hyperandrogenism (of ovarian or adrenal origin). Treatment is usually successful in controlling acne, reducing hirsutism and stabilizing, or partially reversing, androgenic alopecia. Pharmacological approaches involve suppressing androgen levels, for example, the use of an appropriate oral contraceptive, or antagonizing androgen action with several medications that have this activity. Unfortunately, most women with androgenic disorders are frustrated in their efforts to obtain medical help. Understanding androgenic disorders will enable the physician to significantly help the majority of women with these conditions.

  1. Impaired motoneuronal retrograde transport in two models of SBMA implicates two sites of androgen action.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael Q; Poort, Jessica L; Baqri, Rehan M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2011-11-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) impairs motor function in men and is linked to a CAG repeat mutation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Defects in motoneuronal retrograde axonal transport may critically mediate motor dysfunction in SBMA, but the site(s) where AR disrupts transport is unknown. We find deficits in retrograde labeling of spinal motoneurons in both a knock-in (KI) and a myogenic transgenic (TG) mouse model of SBMA. Likewise, live imaging of endosomal trafficking in sciatic nerve axons reveals disease-induced deficits in the flux and run length of retrogradely transported endosomes in both KI and TG males, demonstrating that disease triggered in muscle can impair retrograde transport of cargo in motoneuron axons, possibly via defective retrograde signaling. Supporting the idea of impaired retrograde signaling, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor treatment of diseased muscles reverses the transport/trafficking deficit. Transport velocity is also affected in KI males, suggesting a neurogenic component. These results demonstrate that androgens could act via both cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms to disrupt axonal transport in motoneurons affected by SBMA.

  2. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; McInnes, Kerry; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Morgan, Stephanie; Atanassova, Nina; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Milne, Laura; Mitchell, Rod T; Smith, Lee B

    2015-03-01

    Leydig cell number and function decline as men age, and low testosterone is associated with all "Western" cardio-metabolic disorders. However, whether perturbed androgen action within the adult Leydig cell lineage predisposes individuals to this late-onset degeneration remains unknown. To address this, we generated a novel mouse model in which androgen receptor (AR) is ablated from ∼75% of adult Leydig stem cell/cell progenitors, from fetal life onward (Leydig cell AR knockout mice), permitting interrogation of the specific roles of autocrine Leydig cell AR signaling through comparison to adjacent AR-retaining Leydig cells, testes from littermate controls, and to human testes, including from patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). This revealed that autocrine AR signaling is dispensable for the attainment of final Leydig cell number but is essential for Leydig cell maturation and regulation of steroidogenic enzymes in adulthood. Furthermore, these studies reveal that autocrine AR signaling in Leydig cells protects against late-onset degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium in mice and inhibits Leydig cell apoptosis in both adult mice and patients with CAIS, possibly via opposing aberrant estrogen signaling. We conclude that autocrine androgen action within Leydig cells is essential for the lifelong support of spermatogenesis and the development and lifelong health of Leydig cells.

  3. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Laura; McInnes, Kerry; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Morgan, Stephanie; Atanassova, Nina; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Milne, Laura; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cell number and function decline as men age, and low testosterone is associated with all “Western” cardio-metabolic disorders. However, whether perturbed androgen action within the adult Leydig cell lineage predisposes individuals to this late-onset degeneration remains unknown. To address this, we generated a novel mouse model in which androgen receptor (AR) is ablated from ∼75% of adult Leydig stem cell/cell progenitors, from fetal life onward (Leydig cell AR knockout mice), permitting interrogation of the specific roles of autocrine Leydig cell AR signaling through comparison to adjacent AR-retaining Leydig cells, testes from littermate controls, and to human testes, including from patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). This revealed that autocrine AR signaling is dispensable for the attainment of final Leydig cell number but is essential for Leydig cell maturation and regulation of steroidogenic enzymes in adulthood. Furthermore, these studies reveal that autocrine AR signaling in Leydig cells protects against late-onset degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium in mice and inhibits Leydig cell apoptosis in both adult mice and patients with CAIS, possibly via opposing aberrant estrogen signaling. We conclude that autocrine androgen action within Leydig cells is essential for the lifelong support of spermatogenesis and the development and lifelong health of Leydig cells.—O’Hara, L., McInnes, K., Simitsidellis, I., Morgan, S., Atanassova, N., Slowikowska-Hilczer, J., Kula, K., Szarras-Czapnik, M., Milne, L., Mitchell, R. T., Smith, L. B. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men. PMID:25404712

  4. Role of endogenous opiates in the expression of negative feedback actions of androgen and estrogen on pulsatile properties of luteinizing hormone secretion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Samojlik, E; Ertel, N H

    1984-01-01

    We have tested the participation of endogenous opiate pathways in the negative feedback actions of gonadal steroids on pulsatile properties of luteinizing (LH) hormone release in normal men. To this end, sex steroid hormones were infused intravenously at dosages that under steady state conditions selectively suppressed either the frequency or the amplitude of the pulsatile LH signal. The properties of pulsatile LH secretion were assessed quantitatively by computerized analysis of LH series derived from serial blood sampling over 12 h of observation. When the pure (nonaromatizable) androgen, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, was infused continuously for 108 h at the blood production rate of testosterone, we were able to achieve selective inhibition of LH pulse frequency akin to that observed in experimental animals after low-dosage androgen replacement. Under these conditions, serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol-17 beta did not change significantly, but serum 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased approximately two- to threefold, with a corresponding increase in levels of its major metabolite, 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol. In separate experiments, the infusion of estradiol-17 beta at its blood production rate over a 4.5-d interval selectively suppressed LH pulse amplitude without influencing LH pulse frequency. Estrogen infusion increased serum estradiol-17 beta levels approximately twofold without significantly altering blood androgen concentrations. We then used these schedules of selective androgen or estrogen infusion to investigate the participation of endogenous opiates in the individual inhibitory feedback actions of pure androgen or estrogen on pulsatile LH release by administering a potent and specific opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, during the infusions. Our observations indicate that, despite the continuous infusion of a dosage of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone that significantly suppresses LH pulse frequency, co

  5. Androgens and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Randall, Valerie Anne

    2008-01-01

    Hair's importance in human communication means that abnormalities like excess hair in hirsutism or hair loss in alopecia cause psychological distress. Androgens are the main regulator of human hair follicles, changing small vellus follicles producing tiny, virtually invisible hairs into larger intermediate and terminal follicles making bigger, pigmented hairs. The response to androgens varies with the body site as it is specific to the hair follicle itself. Normally around puberty, androgens stimulate axillary and pubic hair in both sexes, plus the beard, etc. in men, while later they may also inhibit scalp hair growth causing androgenetic alopecia. Androgens act within the follicle to alter the mesenchyme-epithelial cell interactions, changing the length of time the hair is growing, the dermal papilla size and dermal papilla cell, keratinocyte and melanocyte activity. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of androgen action in follicles should improve therapies for poorly controlled hair disorders like hirsutism and alopecia.

  6. Trans-seasonal action of androgen in the control of spring courtship behavior in male red-sided garter snakes.

    PubMed Central

    Crews, D

    1991-01-01

    Gonadal steroids have traditionally been found to have short-term effects on the mating behavior of adult vertebrates, such that increased steroid hormone levels influence behavior over the course of a few days. Long-term effects also have been observed in which embryonic exposure to steroid hormone influences the sexual behavior of adults. The generality of the paradigms that have resulted from this work must be viewed with caution as all of the species studied exhibit a particular reproductive pattern. Here it is shown that in the adult red-sided garter snake, the seasonal androgen peak in the summer has a delayed action (8 months) on the male's readiness to court the next spring following emergence from hibernation. This suggests that the interval between the exposure to and the effects of steroid hormones in adult vertebrates may range from short latencies to long latencies and that the present dichotomy of organizing (permanent) versus activating (transient) effects of steroid hormones may not apply in certain instances. PMID:2023900

  7. [A morphohistochemical study of the embryotropic action of steroids with androgenic properties].

    PubMed

    Starkov, M V; Shashkina, L F; Remezova, M I

    1975-01-01

    Morphohistochemical study of an embryotoxic and teratogenic action of acetate of androstenolone, acetate of 16-dehydropregnenolone, and methyltestosterone applied dayly to the skin of white rats during the entire course of gestation was carried out. A marked embryotoxic effect of acetate of androstenolone has been established. The teratogenic effect of the agents under study manifested itself in impairment of the processes of differentiation of structural elements of organs and tissues, or in rough underdevelopment of foetuses on the whole (following the exposure to acetate of androstenolone). In addition, a decrease in contents of nucleic acids and proteins in tissues, as well as some disorders of the carbohydrate metabolism in different organs and tissues were noted. The authors recommend to use histological and histochemical methods in investigations of embryotropic action of low doses of steroids.

  8. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mongan, Nigel P; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Bunch, Trevor; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2015-08-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) results from androgen receptor dysfunction and is a common cause of disorder of sex development. The AIS phenotype largely depends on the degree of residual androgen receptor (AR) activity. This review describes the molecular action of androgens and the range of androgen receptor gene mutations, essential knowledge to understand the pathogenesis of the complete and partial forms of this syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended for clinical management from infancy through to adulthood. Hormone replacement therapy is needed following gonadectomy. Patients who choose to retain the gonads are at risk of developing germ cell tumors for which sensitive circulating tumor markers may soon become available. Whilst the contribution of AR dysfunction to complete AIS is well understood, the involvement of the AR and associated proteins as contributors to partial AIS is an area of active research. Disorders of sex development such as AIS which are related to AR dysfunction offer a breadth of manifestations for the clinician to manage and opportunities for further research on the mechanism of androgen action.

  9. The Willow Microbiome Is Influenced by Soil Petroleum-Hydrocarbon Concentration with Plant Compartment-Specific Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Stacie; Yergeau, Étienne; Tremblay, Julien; Legendre, Pierre; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between plants and microorganisms, which is the driving force behind the decontamination of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination in phytoremediation technology, is poorly understood. Here, we aimed at characterizing the variations between plant compartments in the microbiome of two willow cultivars growing in contaminated soils. A field experiment was set-up at a former petrochemical plant in Canada and after two growing seasons, bulk soil, rhizosphere soil, roots, and stems samples of two willow cultivars (Salix purpurea cv. FishCreek, and Salix miyabeana cv. SX67) growing at three PHC contamination concentrations were taken. DNA was extracted and bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were amplified and sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Following multivariate statistical analyses, the level of PHC-contamination appeared as the primary factor influencing the willow microbiome with compartment-specific effects, with significant differences between the responses of bacterial, and fungal communities. Increasing PHC contamination levels resulted in shifts in the microbiome composition, favoring putative hydrocarbon degraders, and microorganisms previously reported as associated with plant health. These shifts were less drastic in the rhizosphere, root, and stem tissues as compared to bulk soil, probably because the willows provided a more controlled environment, and thus, protected microbial communities against increasing contamination levels. Insights from this study will help to devise optimal plant microbiomes for increasing the efficiency of phytoremediation technology. PMID:27660624

  10. Promotion of testa rupture during garden cress germination involves seed compartment-specific expression and activity of pectin methylesterases.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Claudia; Weitbrecht, Karin; Pearce, Simon P; Hampstead, Anthony; Büttner-Mainik, Annette; Lee, Kieran J D; Voegele, Antje; Oracz, Krystyna; Dekkers, Bas J W; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wood, Andrew T A; Bentsink, Leónie; King, John R; Knox, J Paul; Holdsworth, Michael J; Müller, Kerstin; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) controls the methylesterification status of pectins and thereby determines the biophysical properties of plant cell walls, which are important for tissue growth and weakening processes. We demonstrate here that tissue-specific and spatiotemporal alterations in cell wall pectin methylesterification occur during the germination of garden cress (Lepidium sativum). These cell wall changes are associated with characteristic expression patterns of PME genes and resultant enzyme activities in the key seed compartments CAP (micropylar endosperm) and RAD (radicle plus lower hypocotyl). Transcriptome and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis as well as PME enzyme activity measurements of separated seed compartments, including CAP and RAD, revealed distinct phases during germination. These were associated with hormonal and compartment-specific regulation of PME group 1, PME group 2, and PME inhibitor transcript expression and total PME activity. The regulatory patterns indicated a role for PME activity in testa rupture (TR). Consistent with a role for cell wall pectin methylesterification in TR, treatment of seeds with PME resulted in enhanced testa permeability and promoted TR. Mathematical modeling of transcript expression changes in germinating garden cress and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds suggested that group 2 PMEs make a major contribution to the overall PME activity rather than acting as PME inhibitors. It is concluded that regulated changes in the degree of pectin methylesterification through CAP- and RAD-specific PME and PME inhibitor expression play a crucial role during Brassicaceae seed germination.

  11. Molecular insight into the differential anti-androgenic activity of resveratrol and its natural analogs: In Silico approach to understand biological actions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. Androgen receptor reactivation during the androgen-independent stage of prostate cancer is mediated by numerous mechanisms including expression of AR mutants and splice variants that become non-responsive to con...

  12. Androgen Action via Testicular Arteriole Smooth Muscle Cells Is Important for Leydig Cell Function, Vasomotion and Testicular Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michelle; Sharpe, Richard M.; Moffat, Lindsey; Atanassova, Nina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Kilter, Sigrid; Bergh, Anders; Smith, Lee B.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of blood flow through the testicular microvasculature by vasomotion is thought to be important for normal testis function as it regulates interstitial fluid (IF) dynamics which is an important intra-testicular transport medium. Androgens control vasomotion, but how they exert these effects remains unclear. One possibility is by signalling via androgen receptors (AR) expressed in testicular arteriole smooth muscle cells. To investigate this and determine the overall importance of this mechanism in testis function, we generated a blood vessel smooth muscle cell-specific AR knockout mouse (SMARKO). Gross reproductive development was normal in SMARKO mice but testis weight was reduced in adulthood compared to control littermates; this reduction was not due to any changes in germ cell volume or to deficits in testosterone, LH or FSH concentrations and did not cause infertility. However, seminiferous tubule lumen volume was reduced in adult SMARKO males while interstitial volume was increased, perhaps indicating altered fluid dynamics; this was associated with compensated Leydig cell failure. Vasomotion was impaired in adult SMARKO males, though overall testis blood flow was normal and there was an increase in the overall blood vessel volume per testis in adult SMARKOs. In conclusion, these results indicate that ablating arteriole smooth muscle AR does not grossly alter spermatogenesis or affect male fertility but does subtly impair Leydig cell function and testicular fluid exchange, possibly by locally regulating microvascular blood flow within the testis. PMID:21049031

  13. Stargazin (TARP gamma-2) is required for compartment-specific AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity in cerebellar stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alexander C; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-03-16

    In the cerebellar cortex, parallel fiber-to-stellate cell (PF-SC) synapses exhibit a form of synaptic plasticity manifested as a switch in the subunit composition of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) from calcium-permeable, GluA2-lacking to calcium-impermeable, GluA2-containing receptors. Here, we examine the role of stargazin (γ-2), canonical member of the transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein (TARP) family, in the regulation of GluA2-lacking AMPARs and synaptic plasticity in SCs from epileptic and ataxic stargazer mutant mice. We found that AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is severely diminished in stargazer SCs, and that the rectification index (RI) of AMPAR current is reduced. Activity-dependent plasticity in the rectification of synaptic AMPARs is also impaired in stargazer SCs. Despite the dramatic loss in synaptic AMPARs, extrasynaptic AMPARs are preserved. We then examined the role of stargazin in regulating the rectification of extrasynaptic AMPARs in nucleated patches and found, in contrast to previous reports, that wild-type extrasynaptic AMPARs have moderate RI values (average RI = 0.38), while those in stargazer SCs are low (average RI = 0.24). The GluA2-lacking AMPAR blocker, philanthotoxin-433 (PhTx-433), was used as an alternative measure of GluA2 content in wild-type and stargazer SCs. Despite the difference in RI, PhTx-433 sensitivity of both synaptic and extrasynaptic AMPARs remains unchanged, suggesting that the dramatic changes in RI and the impairment in synaptic plasticity observed in the stargazer mouse are not the result of a specific impairment in GluA2 trafficking. Together, these data suggest that stargazin regulates compartment-specific AMPAR trafficking, as well as activity-dependent plasticity in synaptic AMPAR rectification at cerebellar PF-SC synapses.

  14. Dynamic compartment specific changes in glutathione and ascorbate levels in Arabidopsis plants exposed to different light intensities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Excess light conditions induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) directly in the chloroplasts but also cause an accumulation and production of ROS in peroxisomes, cytosol and vacuoles. Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione occur in all cell compartments where they detoxify ROS. In this study compartment specific changes in antioxidant levels and related enzymes were monitored among Arabidopsis wildtype plants and ascorbate and glutathione deficient mutants (vtc2-1 and pad2-1, respectively) exposed to different light intensities (50, 150 which was considered as control condition, 300, 700 and 1,500 μmol m-2 s-1) for 4 h and 14 d. Results The results revealed that wildtype plants reacted to short term exposure to excess light conditions with the accumulation of ascorbate and glutathione in chloroplasts, peroxisomes and the cytosol and an increased activity of catalase in the leaves. Long term exposure led to an accumulation of ascorbate and glutathione mainly in chloroplasts. In wildtype plants an accumulation of ascorbate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) could be observed in vacuoles when exposed to high light conditions. The pad2-1 mutant reacted to long term excess light exposure with an accumulation of ascorbate in peroxisomes whereas the vtc2-1 mutant reacted with an accumulation of glutathione in the chloroplasts (relative to the wildtype) and nuclei during long term high light conditions indicating an important role of these antioxidants in these cell compartments for the protection of the mutants against high light stress. Conclusion The results obtained in this study demonstrate that the accumulation of ascorbate and glutathione in chloroplasts, peroxisomes and the cytosol is an important reaction of plants to short term high light stress. The accumulation of ascorbate and H2O2 along the tonoplast and in vacuoles during these conditions indicates an important route for H2O2 detoxification under these conditions. PMID

  15. Regulation of progesterone-binding breast cyst protein GCDFP-24 secretion by estrogens and androgens in human breast cancer cells: a new marker of steroid action in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Simard, J; Dauvois, S; Haagensen, D E; Lévesque, C; Mérand, Y; Labrie, F

    1990-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that androgens are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation under both basal and estrogen-induced incubation conditions, while they suppress expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for the antagonism between androgens and estrogens in breast cancer and to obtain a new tumor marker for the actions of these two steroids, we have investigated the effects of androgens and estrogens on expression of the major protein found in human breast gross cystic disease fluid, namely GCDFP-24. This study was performed in ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. After a 9-day incubation period, physiological concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol stimulated proliferation of ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 cells by 2- to 3.5-fold while simultaneously exerting a marked 70-90% inhibition of GCDFP-24 secretion. The estrogenic effects on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell proliferation were both competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the new steroidal pure antiestrogen EM-139. On the other hand, a maximal concentration (10 nM) of the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone decreased by 50% the proliferation of ZR-75-1 cells; the half-maximal inhibitory effect was exerted at 0.01 nM. The androgen exerted a 3- to 4-fold stimulatory effect on GCDFP-24 secretion at an EC50 value of 0.01 nM. The effect of dihydrotestosterone on these parameters was competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the pure antiandrogen OH-flutamide. The present data show that the effects of estrogens and androgens in ZR-75-1 cells on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell growth are opposite. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, estrogens stimulate cell growth, while GCDFP-24 secretion is inhibited. The present data also suggest that GCDFP-24 could well be a good biochemical marker for monitoring the response to androgenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the therapy of advanced breast cancer.

  16. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan Arwel; Werner, Ralf; Bunch, Trevor; Hiort, Olaf

    2012-10-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) fall within the generic category of 46,XY DSD (disorder of sex development) and present as phenotypes associated with complete or partial resistance to the action of androgens. Three categories are recognized: complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), mild androgen insensitivity syndrome (MAIS). The androgen receptor (AR) is encoded by an 8 exon gene on the X chromosome long arm. More than 800 mutations in the AR gene have been reported in AIS patients (www.androgendb.mcgill.ca/). They are distributed throughout the gene with a preponderance located in the ligand binding domain. The most severe mutations are generally associated with a CAIS phenotype, but the correlation is less defined in PAIS. CAIS presents typically as primary amenorrhoea in an adolescent female and less commonly in infancy with bilateral inguinal/labial swellings due to testes. The differential diagnosis in CAIS is limited, whereas in PAIS, numerous other causes of DSD can also produce the typical phenotype of micropenis, severe hypospadias and bifid scrotum. Management issues in CAIS involve timing of gonadectomy, appropriate hormone replacement therapy and assessment of the need for vaginal dilation or rarely, vaginal surgery. The risk of gonadal germ cell tumor is low during childhood and adolescence but increases in later adulthood. Expert psychological counseling is mandatory to manage the disconnect between chromosomal, gonadal and phenotypic sex and to choreograph the evolving process of disclosure from late childhood through to maturity. It is implicit that management in AIS requires a multidisciplinary team and engagement with patient advocacy groups.

  17. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  18. Androgen antagonists in androgen target tissues.

    PubMed

    Tindall, D J; Chang, C H; Lobl, T J; Cunningham, G R

    1984-01-01

    Most antiandrogens appear to act by binding to the androgen receptor and competitively inhibiting the binding of testosterone and cihydrotestosterone to the receptor. Focusing on those compounds which appear to inhibit androgen receptor mediated responses, this review discusses the chemistry of those antiandrogens which have been studied to the extent that their mechanism of action is at least partially understood, outlines the mechanism of androgen action as it is currently understood and suggests how antiandrogens might fit in with this mechanism, indicates the major metabolites of several important antiandrogens, and discusses the clinical applications of several antiandrogens. Cyproterone acetate has been studied extensively as a potential male contraceptive. Although it was recognized that 100 mg of cyproterone acetate per day inhibited spermatogenesis, that dose also reduced libido and potency. Following the administration of 10 or 20 mg of cyproterone acetate per day to 15 males for 26 weeks, the following observations were made: the number of motile sperm was reduced; the quality of their motion was impaired; and the ability of the sperm to penetrate cervical mucus was decreased. Sperm density was also suppressed, but neither it nor sperm motility were inhibited to the extent necessary for contraception. Antiandrogens have been demonstrated to be beneficial in treating 5 clinical syndromes or diseases: acne, seborrhea, hirsutism with or without menstrual abnormalities; precocious puberty; benign prostatic hypertrophy; cancer of the prostate; and sexual deviates. Since 3 of these conditions are very common, effective and safe treatment would have a large market. At this time, antiandrogens are widely used in Europe for treatment of seborrhea, acne, and hirsutism and a large Veterans Administration Cooperative Study in the US was approved but has not yet been funded to compare antiandrogens with other treatments for cancer of the prostate. Studies to assess

  19. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, A O

    2001-06-20

    Androgens are important steroid hormones for expression of the male phenotype. They have characteristic roles during male sexual differentiation, during development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics, and during the initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis. The two most important androgens in this respect are testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Each androgen has its own specific role during male sexual differentiation, testosterone is involved in the development and differentiation of Wolffian duct derived structures, whereas 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite of testosterone, is the active ligand in the urogenital sinus and tubercle and their derived structures. The actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor. This ligand dependent transcription factor belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors, including those for the other steroid hormones. The androgen receptor gene is located on the X-chromosome at Xq11--12 and codes for a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. Only one androgen receptor cDNA has been identified sofar, despite two different ligands. It is generally accepted that defects in the androgen receptor gene prevent the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46, XY individuals. The end-organ resistance to androgens has been designated as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and is distinct from other forms of male pseudohermaphroditism like 17 beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase type 3 deficiency, leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivating LH receptor mutations or 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency. Furthermore, two additional pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function -- spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, or Kennedy's disease) and prostate cancer. In the AR gene, four different types of mutations have been detected in DNA from individuals with AIS -- (i) single point mutations resulting in

  20. Androgens, androgen receptors, and male gender role behavior.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J D

    2001-09-01

    Studies of genetic males with single gene mutations that impair testosterone formation or action and consequently prevent development of the normal male phenotype provide unique insight into the control of gender role behavior. 46,XY individuals with either of two autosomal recessive mutations [17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17 beta-HSD3) deficiency or steroid 5 alpha-reductase 2 (5 alpha-R2) deficiency] have a female phenotype at birth and are raised as females but frequently change gender role behavior to male after the expected time of puberty. In contrast, genetic males with mutations that impair profoundly the function of the androgen receptor are also raised as females and have consistent female behavior as adults. Furthermore, the rare men with mutations that impair estrogen synthesis or the estrogen receptor have male gender role behavior. These findings indicate that androgens are important determinants of gender role behavior (and probably of gender identity) and that this action is mediated by the androgen receptor and not the result of conversion of androgen to estrogen. The fact that all genetic males with 17 beta-HSD3 or 5 alpha-R2 deficiency do not change gender role behavior indicates that other factors are also important determinants of this process.

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Preclinical Characterization of the Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator (SARM) RAD140.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chris P; Shomali, Maysoun; Lyttle, C Richard; O'Dea, Louis St L; Herendeen, Hillary; Gallacher, Kyla; Paquin, Dottie; Compton, Dennis R; Sahoo, Bishwabhusan; Kerrigan, Sean A; Burge, Matthew S; Nickels, Michael; Green, Jennifer L; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Tchesnokov, Alexei; Hattersley, Gary

    2011-02-10

    This report describes the discovery of RAD140, a potent, orally bioavailable, nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM). The characterization of RAD140 in several preclinical models of anabolic androgen action is also described.

  2. Androgen receptor, androgen-producing enzymes and their transcription factors in extramammary Paget disease.

    PubMed

    Azmahani, Abdullah; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Ozawa, Yohei; McNamara, Keely M; Fujimura, Taku; Haga, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Aiba, Setsuya; Sasano, Hironobu

    2015-11-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) has been known to frequently express androgen receptor (AR). Therefore, androgens could play roles in the biological behavior of Paget cells. 5α-Reductase (5α-red) types 1 and 2 and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 5 (17β-HSD5) are pivotal in situ regulators of androgen production in androgen-responsive tissues including androgen-dependent neoplasms. Therefore, in this study, we immunolocalized AR, androgen-producing enzymes, and their transcription factors to assess the state of in situ androgen production and actions and its correlation of invasiveness in EMPD. We studied 51 cases of EMPD with known clinicopathological status. AR, 5α-red1, 17β-HSD5, and β-catenin immunoreactivity was evaluated by using the modified H-score method while cyclin D1, p53, forkhead box protein P1, and a proliferation marker, Ki-67, were quantified using labeling index. The mean scores of AR, 5α-red1, and 17β-HSD5 in invasive EMPD were all significantly higher than noninvasive EMPD (P < .0001). Ki-67 labeling index as well as the cyclin D1 score was also significantly higher in invasive than noninvasive lesions of EMPD. These results demonstrated that androgen receptor and androgen-producing enzymes were both associated with cell cycle regulation and subsequently the invasiveness of EMPD lesions and could also indicate those above as potential markers of invasive potentials in EMPD.

  3. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-01-01

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  4. Androgen receptor modulators: a marriage of chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Iain J

    2013-06-01

    Androgenic steroids are important for male development in utero and secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. In addition, androgens play a role in non-reproductive tissues, such as bone and muscle in both sexes. The actions of the androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated by a single receptor protein, the androgen receptor. Over the last 60-70 years there has been considerable research interest in the development of inhibitors of androgen receptor for the management of diseases such as prostate cancer. However, more recently, there is also a growing appreciation of the need for selective androgen modulators that would demonstrate tissue-selective agonist or antagonist activity. The chemistry and biology of selective agonists, antagonists and selective androgen receptor modulators will be discussed in this review.

  5. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility.

  6. Compartment-specific pH monitoring in Bacillus subtilis using fluorescent sensor proteins: a tool to analyze the antibacterial effect of weak organic acids.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Johan W A; Brul, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The internal pH (pHi) of a living cell is one of its most important physiological parameters. To monitor the pH inside Bacillus subtilis during various stages of its life cycle, we constructed an improved version (IpHluorin) of the ratiometric, pH-sensitive fluorescent protein pHluorin by extending it at the 5' end with the first 24 bp of comGA. The new version, which showed an approximate 40% increase in fluorescence intensity, was expressed from developmental phase-specific, native promoters of B. subtilis that are specifically active during vegetative growth on glucose (PptsG) or during sporulation (PspoIIA, PspoIIID, and PsspE). Our results show strong, compartment-specific expression of IpHluorin that allowed accurate pHi measurements of live cultures during exponential growth, early and late sporulation, spore germination, and during subsequent spore outgrowth. Dormant spores were characterized by an pHi of 6.0 ± 0.3. Upon full germination the pHi rose dependent on the medium to 7.0-7.4. The presence of sorbic acid in the germination medium inhibited a rise in the intracellular pH of germinating spores and inhibited germination. Such effects were absent when acetic was added at identical concentrations.

  7. A yeast screen system for aromatase inhibitors and ligands for androgen receptor: yeast cells transformed with aromatase and androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Mak, P; Cruz, F D; Chen, S

    1999-11-01

    Endocrine disruptors are hormone mimics that modify hormonal action in humans and animals. It is thought that some endocrine disruptors modify estrogen and androgen action in humans and animals by suppressing aromatase activity. Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the key enzyme that converts C19 androgens to aromatic C18 estrogenic steroids. We have developed a novel aromatase inhibitor screening method that allows us to identify antiaromatase activity of various environmental chemicals. The screen was developed by coexpressing the human aromatase and the mouse androgen receptor in yeast cells, which carry the androgen-responsive ss-galactosidase reporter plasmid. Functional expression of aromatase in yeast has been demonstrated using the [3H]-water release assay with intact cells as well as with yeast microsomes. The aromatase activity could be blocked by known aromatase inhibitors such as aminoglutethimide (AG). Yeast-produced androgen receptors were able to transactivate a yeast basal promoter linked to an androgen-responsive element in response to androgens. The resultant triple yeast transformant responded to the treatment of testosterone, androstenedione, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT). In the absence of the aromatase inhibitor AG, transcriptional activation was observed only for the nonaromatizable androgen 5 alpha-DHT. However, the two aromatizable androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) induced the reporter activity in the presence of AG. Using this yeast-based assay, we confirmed that two flavones, chrysin and alpha-naphtholflavone, are inhibitors of aromatase. Thus, this yeast system allows us to develop a high-throughput screening method, without using radioactive substrate, to identify aromatase inhibitors as well as new ligands (nonaromatizable androgen mimics) for the androgen receptors. In addition, this screening method also allows us to distinguish nonandrogenic aromatase inhibitors from inhibitors with androgenic activity. This yeast

  8. Disruption of Androgen Receptor Signaling in Males by Environmental Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Luccio-Camelo, Doug C.; Prins, Gail S

    2011-01-01

    Androgen-disruptors are environmental chemicals in that interfere with the biosynthesis, metabolism or action of endogenous androgens resulting in a deflection from normal male developmental programming and reproductive tract growth and function. Since male sexual differentiation is entirely androgen-dependent, it is highly susceptible to androgen-disruptors. Animal models and epidemiological evidence link exposure to androgen disrupting chemicals with reduced sperm counts, increased infertility, testicular dysgenesis syndrome, and testicular and prostate cancers. Further, there appears to be increased sensitivity to these agents during critical developmental windows when male differentiation is at its peak. A variety of in vitro and in silico approaches have been used to identify broad classes of androgen disrupting molecules that include organochlorinated pesticides, industrial chemicals, and plasticizers with capacity to ligand the androgen receptor. The vast majority of these synthetic molecules act as anti-androgens. This review will highlight the evidence for androgen disrupting chemicals that act through interference with the androgen receptor, discussing specific compounds for which there is documented in vivo evidence for male reproductive tract perturbations. PMID:21515368

  9. Androgen regulation of axon growth and neurite extension in motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Keith N.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Foecking, Eileen M.; Poletti, Angelo; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2008-01-01

    Androgens act on the CNS to affect motor function through interaction with a widespread distribution of intracellular androgen receptors (AR). This review highlights our work on androgens and process outgrowth in motoneurons, both in vitro and in vivo. The actions of androgens on motoneurons involve the generation of novel neuronal interactions that are mediated by the induction of androgen-dependent neurite or axonal outgrowth. Here, we summarize the experimental evidence for the androgenic regulation of the extension and regeneration of motoneuron neurites in vitro using cultured immortalized motoneurons, and axons in vivo using the hamster facial nerve crush paradigm. We place particular emphasis on the relevance of these effects to SBMA and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:18387610

  10. CUDC-101, a Novel Inhibitor of Full-Length Androgen Receptor (flAR) and Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Activity: Mechanism of Action and In Vivo Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huiying; Mediwala, Sanjay N; Szafran, Adam T; Mancini, Michael A; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent disease expected to cause the death of more than 27,000 Americans in 2015. There are only a few available treatments for CRPC, making the discovery of new drugs an urgent need. We report that CUDC-101 (an inhibitor od HER2/NEU, EGFR and HDAC) inhibits both the full length AR (flAR) and the AR variant AR-V7. This observation prompted experiments to discover which of the known activities of CUDC-101 is responsible for the inhibition of flAR/AR-V7 signaling. We used pharmacologic and genetic approaches, and found that the effect of CUDC-101 on flAR and AR-V7 was duplicated only by other HDAC inhibitors, or by silencing the HDAC isoforms HDAC5 and HDAC10. We observed that CUDC-101 treatment or AR-V7 silencing by RNAi equally reduced transcription of the AR-V7 target gene, PSA, without affecting viability of 22Rv1 cells. However, when cellular proliferation was used as an end point, CUDC-101 was more effective than AR-V7 silencing, raising the prospect that CUDC-101 has additional targets beside AR-V7. In support of this, we found that CUDC-101 increased the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and decreased that of the oncogene HER2/NEU. To determine if CUDC-101 reduces growth in a xenograft model of prostate cancer, this drug was given for 14 days to castrated male SCID mice inoculated with 22Rv1 cells. Compared to vehicle, CUDC-101 reduced xenograft growth in a statistically significant way, and without macroscopic side effects. These studies demonstrate that CUDC-101 inhibits wtAR and AR-V7 activity and growth of 22Rv1 cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects result from the ability of CUDC-101 to target not only HDAC signaling, which was associated with decreased flAR and AR-V7 activity, but multiple additional oncogenic pathways. These observations raise the possibility that treatment of CRPC may be achieved by using similarly multi-targeted approaches.

  11. Adolescent androgenic alopecia.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Patrick Henry; Schwartz, Robert A

    2011-10-01

    Adolescent androgenic alopecia is pattern hair loss occurring in boys and girls younger than 18 years, whereas early-onset androgenic alopecia refers to pattern hair loss before 35 years of age. A number of studies published in the last decade have helped to elucidate the prevalence of adolescent androgenic alopecia, have clarified the genetic as well as physiologic mechanisms underlying hair loss, and have revealed the associated psychologic and systemic morbidities. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of adolescent androgenic alopecia.

  12. Effects of androgen on immunohistochemical localization of androgen receptor and Connexin 43 in mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Li, Jianhua; An, Yulin; Zhang, Shuiwen

    2015-10-01

    Androgens have essential roles in the regulation of follicular development and female fertility. Androgen excess is the leading defect in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and involved in the ovarian dysfunction. The aim of this study was to elucidate the regarding regulatory role of androgen in the follicular development of female mouse. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analyses were performed to detect androgen receptor (AR) and Connexin 43 (Cx43) expression in ovaries from both control and testosterone-treated group mice. In this study, localizations of AR and Cx43 were dramatically altered in testosterone-treated mouse ovaries. In addition, AR expression was significantly increased, whereas Cx43 expression was markedly decreased after testosterone treatment. Alterations of AR and Cx43 expression by testosterone with concomitant reduction of MII oocytes. Overall, these results suggest the involvement of androgen in the regulation of AR and Cx43 localizations in mouse ovary. Alterations of AR and Cx43 expression by testosterone may affect normal folliculogenesis. Together these findings will enable us to begin understanding the important roles of AR and Cx43 actions in the regulation of follicular development, as well as providing insights into the role of AR and Cx43 actions in the androgen-associated reproductive diseases such as PCOS.

  13. Do androgens influence hair growth by altering the paracrine factors secreted by dermal papilla cells?

    PubMed

    Randall, V A; Hibberts, N A; Thornton, M J; Merrick, A E; Hamada, K; Kato, S; Jenner, T J; de Oliveira, I; Messenger, A G

    2001-01-01

    Androgens regulate many aspects of human hair growth in both sexes. After puberty they transform tiny vellus follicles in many areas, e.g. the face, to terminal ones producing long, thick, pigmented hairs. In genetically predisposed individuals, androgens also cause the reverse transformation of terminal scalp follicles into vellus ones, causing balding. In the current hypothesis for androgen action, androgens control most follicular cells indirectly acting via the mesenchyme-derived dermal papilla which regulates many aspects of follicular activity. In this model androgens binding to androgen receptors in dermal papilla cells alter their production of regulatory molecules which influence other follicular components; these molecules may be soluble paracrine factors and/or extracellular matrix proteins. This hypothesis is supported by immunohistochemical localisation of androgen receptors in dermal papilla cell nuclei and the demonstrations that androgen receptor content and testosterone metabolism patterns of cultured dermal papilla cells from various body sites reflect hair growth in androgen-insensitivity syndromes. The next question is whether androgens alter the paracrine factors secreted by dermal papilla cells. Cultured dermal papilla cells do release soluble, proteinaceous factors into their media which stimulate the growth of keratinocytes and other dermal papilla cells. This mitogenic potential can cross species from humans to rodents. Importantly, testosterone in vitro stimulates the mitogenic potential of beard cells, but in contrast inhibits production by balding scalp cells reflecting their in vivo androgenic responses. Since androgens in vitro do alter the secretion of paracrine factors the current focus lies in identifying specific factors produced, e.g. IGF-I and stem cell factor (SCF), using ELISA and RT-PCR, and comparing their expression in cells from follicles with varying responses to androgens in vivo or under androgen stimulation in vitro

  14. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  15. Differential Mechanisms of Androgen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Tincello, DG, Shalet, SM and Wu FC. Point mutatons detected in the androgen receptor gene of three men with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome . Clin...with androgen insensitivity syndrome (Turek-Plewa et al, 2006, Kohler, et al, 2005, Komori et al, 1997, Brown et al 1992, Saunders et al 1992... Androgen insensitivity syndrome is often associated with the decreased androgen receptor activity. The identification mutations in our xenografted

  16. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  17. Arrhythmogenic effect of androgens on the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Argenziano, Mariana; Tiscornia, Gisela; Moretta, Rosalia; Casal, Leonardo; Potilinski, Constanza; Amorena, Carlos; Gras, Eduardo Garcia

    2017-01-01

    In most species androgens shorten the cardiac action potential and reduce the risk of afterdepolarizations. Despite the central role of the rat model in physiological studies, the effects of androgens on the rat heart are still inconclusive. We therefore performed electrophysiological studies on the perfused rat right ventricular free wall. We found a correlation between androgenic activity and a propensity to generate ventricular ectopic action potentials. We also found that the testosterone treatment increased action potential duration at 90 % of repolarization (APD90), while androgenic inhibition increased the time to peak and decreased APD90. We observed that the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.3 and the bi-directional membrane ion transporter NCX in the rat myocardium were regulated by androgenic hormones. One possible explanation for these findings is that due to the expression of specific ion channels in the rat myocardium, the action potential response to its hormonal background is different from those described in other experimental models. Our results indicate that androgenic control of NCX expression plays a key role in determining arrhythmogenicity in the rat heart.

  18. The differential role of androgens in early human sex development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sexual development in humans is only partly understood at the molecular level. It is dependent on genetic control primarily induced by the sex chromosomal differences between males and females. This leads to the development of the gonads, whereby afterwards the differentiation of the apparent phenotype is controlled by hormone action. Sex steroids may exert permanent and temporary effects. Their organizational features of inducing permanent changes in phenotype occur through genetic control of downstream genes. In this, androgens are the key elements for the differentiation of male internal and external genitalia as well as other sexual organs and general body composition, acting through a single androgen receptor. The androgen receptor is a nuclear transcription factor modulating DNA transcription of respective target genes and thereby driving development and growth in a stringent manner. The specificity of androgen action seems to be a strictly time-controlled process with the androgen receptor acting in concert with different metabolites and an array of cofactors modulating the cellular response and thereby permanently altering the phenotype of any given individual. For every cell programmed by androgens, a specific ‘androgen response index’ must be proposed. PMID:23800242

  19. Androgens Regulate T47D Cells Motility and Invasion through Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Shortrede, Jorge Eduardo; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Russo, Eleonora; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in approximately 70 to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple-negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodeling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER), while the non-aromatizable androgen – DHT – only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer and, eventually, to develop new strategies for breast cancer treatment. PMID:27746764

  20. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Sinnesael, Mieke; Cielen, Nele; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deldicque, Louise; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Androgens have well-established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle, although the direct effects of the androgen receptor (AR) in muscle remain unclear. We generated satellite cell-specific AR-knockout (satARKO) mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in satellite cells, the muscle precursor cells. Total-limb maximal grip strength is decreased by 7% in satARKO mice, with soleus muscles containing ∼10% more type I fibers and 10% less type IIa fibers than the corresponding control littermates. The weight of the perineal levator ani muscle is markedly reduced (-52%). Thus, muscle AR is involved in fiber-type distribution and force production of the limb muscles, while it is a major determinant of the perineal muscle mass. Surprisingly, myostatin (Mstn), a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, is one of the most androgen-responsive genes (6-fold reduction in satARKO) through direct transcription activation by the AR. Consequently, muscle hypertrophy in response to androgens is augmented in Mstn-knockout mice. Our finding that androgens induce Mstn signaling to restrain their own anabolic actions has implications for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.-Dubois, V., Laurent, M. R., Sinnesael, M., Cielen, N., Helsen, C., Clinckemalie, L., Spans, L., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Deldicque, L., Hespel, P., Carmeliet, G., Vanderschueren, D., and Claessens, F. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

  1. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+) cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction.

  2. Androgens Regulate Gene Expression in Avian Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird’s body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction. PMID:23284699

  3. A yeast screen system for aromatase inhibitors and ligands for androgen receptor: yeast cells transformed with aromatase and androgen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Cruz, F D; Chen, S

    1999-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are hormone mimics that modify hormonal action in humans and animals. It is thought that some endocrine disruptors modify estrogen and androgen action in humans and animals by suppressing aromatase activity. Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the key enzyme that converts C19 androgens to aromatic C18 estrogenic steroids. We have developed a novel aromatase inhibitor screening method that allows us to identify antiaromatase activity of various environmental chemicals. The screen was developed by coexpressing the human aromatase and the mouse androgen receptor in yeast cells, which carry the androgen-responsive ss-galactosidase reporter plasmid. Functional expression of aromatase in yeast has been demonstrated using the [3H]-water release assay with intact cells as well as with yeast microsomes. The aromatase activity could be blocked by known aromatase inhibitors such as aminoglutethimide (AG). Yeast-produced androgen receptors were able to transactivate a yeast basal promoter linked to an androgen-responsive element in response to androgens. The resultant triple yeast transformant responded to the treatment of testosterone, androstenedione, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT). In the absence of the aromatase inhibitor AG, transcriptional activation was observed only for the nonaromatizable androgen 5 alpha-DHT. However, the two aromatizable androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) induced the reporter activity in the presence of AG. Using this yeast-based assay, we confirmed that two flavones, chrysin and alpha-naphtholflavone, are inhibitors of aromatase. Thus, this yeast system allows us to develop a high-throughput screening method, without using radioactive substrate, to identify aromatase inhibitors as well as new ligands (nonaromatizable androgen mimics) for the androgen receptors. In addition, this screening method also allows us to distinguish nonandrogenic aromatase inhibitors from inhibitors with androgenic activity. This yeast

  4. Androgens and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Bart L.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone is the major gonadal sex steroid produced by the testes in men. Testosterone is also produced in smaller amounts by the ovaries in women. The adrenal glands produce the weaker androgens dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and androstenedione. These androgens collectively affect skeletal homeostasis throughout life in both men and women, particularly at puberty and during adult life. Because testosterone can be metabolized to estradiol by the aromatase enzyme, there has been controversy as to which gonadal sex steroid has the greater skeletal effect. The current evidence suggests that estradiol plays a greater role in maintenance of skeletal health than testosterone, but that androgens also have direct beneficial effects on bone. Supraphysiological levels of testosterone likely have similar effects on bone as lower levels via direct interaction with androgen receptors, as well as effects mediated by estrogen receptors after aromatization to estradiol. Whether high doses of synthetic, non-aromatizable androgens may, in fact, be detrimental to bone due to suppression of endogenous testosterone (and estrogen) levels is a potential concern that warrants further study. PMID:18992761

  5. New Strategy for Prostate Cancer Prevention Based on Selenium Suppression of Androgen Receptor Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    regulates androgen receptor, and finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor, has a synerigistic effect in inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer cells...Liu, Y., Ling, Y. Z., and Brodie, A. M. Antiandrogenic effects of novel androgen synthesis inhibitors on hormone-dependent prostate cancer . Cancer ...reductase inhibitor, inhibits androgen action and promotes cell death in the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Prostate , 58: 130-144, 2004. 14

  6. Update on androgenicity.

    PubMed

    Thorneycroft, I H

    1999-02-01

    The development of a new generation of progestins deemed less androgenic than their earlier counterparts has led to a number of misconceptions regarding their possible benefits in combination oral contraceptives. All combination oral contraceptives are beneficial for treating such androgenic conditions as acne and hirsutism. The only expressed androgenic effect of some first- and second-generation combined oral contraceptives are changes in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels. However, the overall effect of today's low-dose oral contraceptives is largely lipid neutral, and human and monkey studies have shown that oral contraceptive use is associated with reduced, not increased, atherosclerosis rates. Myocardial infarction rates are not increased among oral contraceptive users, except among those who are heavy smokers.

  7. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  8. Measurement of androgens.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Testosterone is the major androgen measured in clinical and research investigations of both men and women. Nevertheless, many other androgens have an important role in the investigation of andrenal and gonadal physiology and pathology. Commercial assays are generally used in clinical laboratories but these have poor precision at low concentrations and poor sensitivity. Extraction assays, described in this chapter, can be much more sensitive and precise. There is interest in measuring free steriods and a steady-state gel filtration method used in the author's laboratory is described. Methods are also provided for the measurement of steroids in saliva and hair.

  9. Targeting the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Terence W; Ryan, Charles J

    2012-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is critical to the growth and survival of prostate cancer. Although medical castration and antiandrogen therapy can decrease AR activity and lower PSA, castration resistance eventually develops. Recent work exploring the molecular structure and evolution of AR in response to hormonal therapies has revealed novel mechanisms of progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and yielded new targets for drug development. This review focuses on understanding the mechanisms of persistent AR signaling in the castrate environment, and highlights new therapies either currently available or in clinical trials, including androgen synthesis inhibitors and novel direct AR inhibitors.

  10. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Asra; Hanif, Farha; Hanif, Shumaila Muhammad; Abdullah, Farhan Essa; Shamim, Muhammad Shahid

    2008-07-01

    The incidence of Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) is about 1 in 20,000. People with CAIS are normal appearing females, despite the presence of testes and a 46, XY chromosome constitution. We came across a case in which a 17 years old girl presented with the complaint of inguinal hernia and amenorrhea. Subsequent investigations were done revealing absence of female internal genitalia and the presence of abdominal mass, possibly testes. Syndrome has been linked to mutations in AR, the gene for the human Androgen Receptor, located at Xq11-12 leading to the insensitivity of the receptor to testosterone. Gonadectomy was performed and life long Hormone replacement therapy was advised.

  11. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein.

  12. Food components and contaminants as (anti)androgenic molecules.

    PubMed

    Marcoccia, Daniele; Pellegrini, Marco; Fiocchetti, Marco; Lorenzetti, Stefano; Marino, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Androgens, the main male sex steroids, are the critical factors responsible for the development of the male phenotype during embryogenesis and for the achievement of sexual maturation and puberty. In adulthood, androgens remain essential for the maintenance of male reproductive function and behavior. Androgens, acting through the androgen receptor (AR), regulate male sexual differentiation during development, sperm production beginning from puberty, and maintenance of prostate homeostasis. Several substances present in the environment, now classified as endocrine disruptors (EDCs), strongly interfere with androgen actions in reproductive and non-reproductive tissues. EDCs are a heterogeneous group of xenobiotics which include synthetic chemicals used as industrial solvents/lubricants, plasticizers, additives, agrochemicals, pharmaceutical agents, and polyphenols of plant origin. These compounds are even present in the food as components (polyphenols) or food/water contaminants (pesticides, plasticizers used as food packaging) rendering the diet as the main route of exposure to EDCs for humans. Although huge amount of literature reports the (anti)estrogenic effects of different EDCs, relatively scarce information is available on the (anti)androgenic effects of EDCs. Here, the effects and mechanism of action of phytochemicals and pesticides and plasticizers as possible modulators of AR activities will be reviewed taking into account that insight derived from principles of endocrinology are required to estimate EDC consequences on endocrine deregulation and disease.

  13. Stromal Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Damien A.; Buchanan, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer development and progression is the result of complex interactions between epithelia cells and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, in a series of dynamic process amenable to regulation by hormones. Whilst androgen action through the androgen receptor (AR) is a well-established component of prostate cancer biology, it has been becoming increasingly apparent that changes in AR signalling in the surrounding stroma can dramatically influence tumour cell behavior. This is reflected in the consistent finding of a strong association between stromal AR expression and patient outcomes. In this review, we explore the relationship between AR signalling in fibroblasts/myofibroblasts and prostate cancer cells in the primary site, and detail the known functions, actions, and mechanisms of fibroblast AR signaling. We conclude with an evidence-based summary of how androgen action in stroma dramatically influences disease progression. PMID:28117763

  14. Androgen replacement for women.

    PubMed Central

    Basson, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a postmenopausal syndrome comprising specific changes in sexual desire and response associated with low free testosterone exists. To determine whether this syndrome is ameliorated by testosterone replacement. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Literature documenting that replacement of physiological levels of testosterone is beneficial and safe is scant. Only one randomized prospective blinded study examines sexual outcome in detail. MAIN MESSAGE: Testosterone is an important metabolic and sex hormone produced by the ovary throughout life. The variable reduction in ovarian testosterone production coincident with menopause is sometimes associated with a syndrome of specific changes in sexual desire and sexual response. Estrogen deficiency also impairs sexual response, but its replacement will not improve and might exacerbate sexual symptoms from androgen loss. Diagnosis of androgen deficiency is clinical, based on accurate assessment of a woman's sexual status before and after menopause and only confirmed (rather than diagnosed) by a low level of free testosterone. Partial androgen replacement restores much of the sexual response and facilitates sexual desire that is triggered by external cues. Avoiding supraphysiological levels of testosterone lessens risk of masculinization. Avoiding alkylated testosterone lessens hepatic or lipid impairment. CONCLUSION: Further prospective randomized studies of replacement of physiological levels of testosterone in women with androgen deficiency syndrome are needed, using formulations of testosterone available in Canada. The consistency of sexual changes, the associated personal and relationship distress, together with our clinical experience of the gratifying response to physiological replacement, make further studies urgently needed. PMID:10509222

  15. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: a rare case of disorder of sex development.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Alfonsa; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Borrielli, Irene; Dugo, Nella

    2013-01-01

    Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) could be considered as a disease that causes resistance to androgens actions, influencing both the morphogenesis and differentiation of the body structures, and systems in which this hormone exerts its effects. It depends on an X-linked mutations in the Androgen Receptor (AR) gene that express a variety of phenotypes ranging from male infertility to completely normal female external genitalia. The clinical phenotypes of AIS could vary and be classified into three categories, as complete (CAIS), partial (PAIS), and mild (MAIS) forms, according to the severity of androgen resistance. We will describe a case of CAIS in a 16-year-old patient.

  16. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome or testicular feminization: review of literature based on a case report

    PubMed Central

    Souhail, Regragui; Amine, Slaoui; Nadia, Abounouh; Tarik, Karmouni; Khalid, El Khader; Abdellatif, Koutani; Ahmed, Ibn Attya

    2016-01-01

    Testicular feminization, or the androgen insensitivity syndrome, is a rare disease. Because of various abnormalities of the X chromosome, a male, genetically XY, has some physical characteristics of a woman or a full female phenotype. Indeed the androgen insensitivity syndrome occurs because of a resistance to the actions of the androgen hormones, which in turn switches the development towards the aspect of a woman. We report a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome in a 30 years old woman who presented primary amenorrhea. We aim to improve our knowledge of this illness from the data that provides us this study, and a review of the literature. PMID:28270903

  17. Profiling of Androgen Response in Rainbow Trout Pubertal Testis: Relevance to Male Gonad Development and Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Antoine D.; Lardenois, Aurélie; Goupil, Anne-Sophie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Houlgatte, Rémi; Chalmel, Frédéric; Le Gac, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of testicular somatic cells to promote and sustain germ cell differentiation is largely regulated by sexual steroids and notably androgens. In fish species the importance of androgens is emphasized by their ability to induce sex reversal of the developing fries and to trigger spermatogenesis. Here we studied the influence of androgens on testicular gene expression in trout testis using microarrays. Following treatment of immature males with physiological doses of testosterone or 11-ketotestosterone, 418 genes that exhibit changes in expression were identified. Interestingly, the activity of testosterone appeared stronger than that of 11-ketotestosterone. Expression profiles of responsive genes throughout testis development and in isolated germ cells confirmed androgens to mainly affect gene expression in somatic cells. Furthermore, specific clusters of genes that exhibit regulation coincidently with changes in the natural circulating levels of androgens during the reproductive cycle were highlighted, reinforcing the physiological significance of these data. Among somatic genes, a phylogenetic footprinting study identified putative androgen response elements within the proximal promoter regions of 42 potential direct androgen target genes. Finally, androgens were also found to alter the germ line towards meiotic expression profiles, supporting the hypothesis of a role for the somatic responsive genes in driving germ cell fate. This study significantly increases our understanding of molecular pathways regulated by androgens in vertebrates. The highly cyclic testicular development in trout together with functions associated with regulated genes reveal potential mechanisms for androgen actions in tubule formation, steroid production, germ cell development and sperm secretion. PMID:23301058

  18. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome with thermolability in the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenji; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Soh, Jintetsu; Ohe, Hiroshi; Shima, Hiroki; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2006-01-01

    We report case of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome in a 12-year-old boy referred to our clinic complaining of bilateral gynecomastia and left undescended testicle. Laparoscopy for undescended testicle and bilateral mastectomy were performed, and the left testicle was absent. When skin fibroblasts of the scrotum obtained during surgery were cultured to analyse the androgen receptors, a slight thermolability was observed. Genomic examination of the androgen receptor gene could not detect any mutations.

  19. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  20. A Novel Mechanism of Androgen Receptor Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    erbB2 gene , termed herstatin. Previous work demonstrated that this protein exhibits binding to all members of the erbB family and induces down...investigated herstatin gene expression in deidentified clinical samples comprised of matched normal prostate and adjacent prostate cancer from the...herstatin gene expression in matched normal and tumor samples from prostate cancer patients. In light of potential concerns about the relevance of

  1. Dual-color bioluminescent bioreporter for forensic analysis: evidence of androgenic and anti-androgenic activity of illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Cevenini, Luca; Michelini, Elisa; D'Elia, Marcello; Guardigli, Massimo; Roda, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Bioassays represent promising complementary techniques to conventional analytical approaches used in doping analysis to detect illicit drugs like anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). The fact that all AAS share a common mechanism of action via the human androgen receptor (hAR) enables the use of bioassays, relying on the activation of hAR as antidoping screening tools. Previously, we developed a dual-color bioreporter based on yeast cells engineered to express hAR and androgen response elements driving the expression of the bioluminescent (BL) reporter protein Photinus pyralis luciferase. A second reporter protein, the red-emitting luciferase PpyRE8, was introduced in the bioreporter as internal viability control. Here, we report the first forensic application of a straightforward, accurate, and cost-effective bioassay, relying on spectral resolution of the two BL signals, in 96-microwell format. The bioreporter responds to dihydrotestosterone as reference androgen in a concentration-dependent manner from 0.08 to 1,000 nM with intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients of 11.4 % and 13.1 %, respectively. We also demonstrated the suitability of this dual-color bioreporter to assess (anti)-androgenic activity of pure AAS, mixtures of AAS, and other illicit drugs provided by the Scientific Police. Significant anti-androgenic activity was observed in samples labeled as marijuana and hashish, containing Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol as major constituent.

  2. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boehmer, A L; Brinkmann, O; Brüggenwirth, H; van Assendelft, C; Otten, B J; Verleun-Mooijman, M C; Niermeijer, M F; Brunner, H G; Rouwé, C W; Waelkens, J J; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, W J; van der Kwast, T H; de Vroede, M A; Drop, S L

    2001-09-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivity syndrome patients, genetic counseling of their families, and insight into the functional domains of the AR. The commonly accepted concept of dependence on fetal androgens of the development of Wolffian ducts was studied in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) patients. In a nationwide survey in The Netherlands, all cases (n = 49) with the presumptive diagnosis androgen insensitivity syndrome known to pediatric endocrinologists and clinical geneticists were studied. After studying the clinical phenotype, mutation analysis and functional analysis of mutant receptors were performed using genital skin fibroblasts and in vitro expression studies. Here we report the findings in families with multiple affected cases. Fifty-nine percent of androgen insensitivity syndrome patients had other affected relatives. A total of 17 families were studied, seven families with CAIS (18 patients), nine families with partial androgen insensitivity (24 patients), and one family with female prepubertal phenotypes (two patients). No phenotypic variation was observed in families with CAIS. However, phenotypic variation was observed in one-third of families with partial androgen insensitivity resulting in different sex of rearing and differences in requirement of reconstructive surgery. Intrafamilial phenotypic variation was observed for mutations R846H, M771I, and deletion of amino acid N682. Four newly identified mutations were found. Follow-up in families with different AR gene mutations provided information on residual androgen action in vivo and the development of the prepubertal and adult phenotype. Patients with a functional complete defective AR had some pubic hair, Tanner

  3. [Dermatologic indications for anti-androgenic treatment].

    PubMed

    Zaun, H; Ludwig, E

    1978-11-01

    In spite of remarkable therapeutic results obtained by gestagens with antiandrogenic activity, usually combined with estrogen, in oily seborrhea, acne, Fox-Fordyce disease, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism many dermatologist still hesitate to treat the named disorders by hormones. The reason for their hesitation appears to be the erroneous belief, that the named disturbances represent hormonal disorders the treatment of which does not belong to dermatology. After a survey on the mechanism of action of antiandrogens the basic difference between androgen dependent skin disorders and endocrinopathies with manifestation on the skin and its appendages is explained. Androgen dependent skin disorders, like oily seborrhea and most cases of acne are not the result of endocrine disturbances in the sense of an pathologically increased or decreased production of sexual hormons. Administering sexual hormons the physician takes advantage of the sebosuppressive effect of female sexual hormons as he does of the antiallergic activity of the hormon cortisol (and related compounds) in the treatment of eczemas. The antiandrogenic treatment of androgenetic alopecia, hirsutism and androgenetic acne--with their underlying hormonal disturbance, consisting in an increased production of androgens, represents an quasi etiological therapy. As in these cases the hormonal disturbances finds its expression mainly or exclusively in disorders of the skin or hair growth, the dermatologist, preferentially in cooperation with endocrinogists and/or gynacologists remains entitled to take over the treatment. The available drugs are discussed and suggestions are made for their appropriate use.

  4. Hematological changes during androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Mathis; Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2012-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with a plethora of adverse effects, consistent with the androgen dependency of multiple reproductive and somatic tissues. One such tissue is the hemopoietic system, and one of the most predictable consequences of ADT is the development of anemia. Although anemia caused by ADT is rarely severe, ADT is often given to frail, elderly men with increased susceptibility to anemia due to multiple other causes. ADT-associated anemia may contribute to fatigue and reduced quality of life (QoL) in such men, although this requires further study. While anemia is an independent risk factor of mortality in men with prostate cancer, it is not known whether treatment of ADT-associated anemia alters clinically important outcomes, or whether treatment affects mortality. Awareness of the phenomenon of ADT-induced anemia should avoid unnecessary work-up in mild cases of normocytic normochromic anemia. However, assessment and treatment of more severe anemia may be required. This should be determined on an individual basis. In contrast to the well-described actions of ADT on erythropoiesis, its effect on other hemopoietic lineages has been less well elucidated. While preclinical studies have found roles for androgens in maturation and differentiated function of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets, the implications of these findings for men with prostate cancer receiving ADT require further studies.

  5. Prenatal androgen treatment alters body composition and glucose homeostasis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Milos; Aird, Fraser; Levine, Jon E; Dunaif, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Prenatal androgen produces many reproductive and metabolic features of polycystic ovary syndrome in female rodents, sheep, and monkeys. We investigated the impact of such prenatal treatment in adult male rats. Pregnant dams received free testosterone (T; aromatizable androgen), dihydrotestosterone (D; nonaromatizable androgen), or vehicle control (C) on embryonic days 16-19. Neither of the prenatal androgen treatments resulted in increased body weight from weaning to age 65 days in males. However, at 65 days, there were significant increases in retroperitoneal (P < 0.001 T versus C; P < 0.05 D versus C), epididymal (P < 0.05 T versus C), and subcutaneous (P < 0.01 T versus C) fat pads in prenatally androgenized males. While both androgens altered body composition, subcutaneous fat depots increased only in T males. T males had elevated glucose levels (P < 0.01) compared to C males. There were no differences among the three groups in insulin sensitivity, circulating lipid and leptin levels, or hepatic triglyceride content. Real-time PCR analysis of insulin signaling pathway genes in retroperitoneal fat revealed a transcriptional downregulation of adipsin and insulin receptor substrate-1 in T and α-1D adrenergic receptor in D compared to C males. We conclude that transient exposure to androgen excess in utero increases body fat in adult male rats. Only T males exhibit increased circulating glucose levels and subcutaneous fat suggesting that these changes may be mediated by aromatization of androgen to estrogen rather than by direct androgenic actions.

  6. Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Rachel A; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2nd messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. PMID:27057074

  7. Gonadal and adrenal androgens are potent regulators of human bone cell metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasperk, C H; Wakley, G K; Hierl, T; Ziegler, R

    1997-03-01

    Androgens stimulate bone formation and play an important role in the maintenance of bone mass. Clinical observations suggest that both gonadal and adrenal androgens contribute to the positive impact of androgenic steroids on bone metabolism. We investigated the mechanism of action of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated compound dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) on human osteoblastic cells (HOCs) in vitro. The DHEA- and DHEAS-induced effects were analyzed in parallel with the actions elicited by the gonadal androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). There was no qualitative difference between the effects of gonadal and adrenal androgens on HOC metabolism in vitro. Both were stimulatory as regards cell proliferation and differentiated functions, but the gonadal androgen DHT was significantly more potent than DHEA. The actions of DHT and DHEA on HOC proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) production could be prevented by the androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide and inhibitory transforming growth factor beta antibodies (TGF-beta ab), respectively, but were not affected by the presence of the 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD) and 5-alpha-reductase (5-AR) inhibitor 17 beta-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-4-methyl- 4aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one (4-MA). This indicates that DHT and DHEA (1) exert their mitogenic effects by androgen receptor-mediated mechanisms, (2) stimulate ALP production by increased TGF-beta expression, (3) that the action of DHT is not affected by the presence of 4-MA, and that (4) DHEA does not need to be metabolized by 3 beta HSD or 5-AR first to exert its effects on HOCs in vitro.

  8. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Nicolás; Motos, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a disorder caused by a mutation of the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR; Xq11-q12). The prevalence of AIS has been estimated to be one case in every 20,000 to 64,000 newborn males for the complete syndrome (CAIS), and the prevalence is unknown for the partial syndrome (PAIS). The symptoms range from phenotypically normal males with impaired spermatogenesis to phenotypically normal women with primary amenorrhea. Various forms of ambiguous genitalia have been observed at birth. The diagnosis is confirmed by determining the exact mutation in the AR gene. PAIS individuals require precise diagnosis as early as possible so that the sex can be assigned, treatment can be recommended, and they can receive proper genetic counseling. After birth, differential diagnosis should be performed using other forms of abnormal sexual differentiation of primary amenorrhea. The treatment of AIS is based on reinforcement sexual identity, gonadectomy planning, and hormone replacement therapy. The prognosis for CAIS is good if the testicular tissue is removed at the appropriate time. For PAIS, the prognosis depends on the ambiguity of the genitalia and physical and psychosocial adjustment to the assigned sex.

  9. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain may mediate resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Steroid receptors such as glucocorticoid receptor may substitute for androgen receptor. Drugs with novel mechanisms of action or combination therapy, along with biomarkers for patient selection, may be needed to improve the therapy of CRPC. PMID:24927631

  10. Androgenic anabolic steroid use among male adolescents in Falkenberg.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, S

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports show that androgenic anabolic steroids are used by many teenagers, not as a deliberate attempt to give them strength, better athletic performance, etc., but to improve their looks. The so-called macho cult among young boys tempts them into using androgenic anabolic steroids to give them bigger muscles and a more powerful appearance. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of androgenic anabolic steroid use among teenagers in a small town and to create a platform for future work with the aim of decreasing the misuse of these drugs. In Falkenberg, a town in the county of Halland in the west of Sweden, the pupils at two high schools were investigated by means of an anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire. A total of 1383 students (688 males and 695 females) aged 14-19 years participated in the study, giving a participation rate of 96%. The number of answers completed was 99%. The use of androgenic anabolic steroids is a reality among male teenagers in Falkenberg, with 5.8% of them using the drugs. Among 15- to 16-year-old boys misuse of these drugs is as high as 10%, and of these 50% (5.0% of total) also inject ampoules of the drugs. This prevalence is alarming since the adverse effects of androgenic anabolic steroids are more serious in teenagers. Serious action must be taken to inform teenagers of the consequences of misusing drugs.

  11. Inhibition of recovery of spermatogenesis in irradiated rats by different androgens.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Gunapala; Wilson, Gene; Hardy, Matthew P; Niu, Enmei; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Meistrich, Marvin L

    2002-09-01

    We previously showed that exogenous testosterone (T) inhibited GnRH-antagonist-stimulated spermatogenic recovery in irradiated rats through an androgen-receptor-mediated action. In the present study, we tested whether the inhibition is attributable to T, a specific androgenic metabolite of T, or a general property of androgens in this system. In addition, we also tested whether estradiol-17beta (E2), a metabolite of T, is similarly inhibitory. Rats irradiated with 5 Gy were treated with a GnRH antagonist during wk 3-7. Neither irradiation nor GnRH-antagonist treatment produced biologically significant changes in the relative intratesticular levels of several androgenic metabolites. Next, groups of rats, irradiated and treated with GnRH antagonist as above, were given various doses of one of the following androgens: T, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, methyltrienolone, or E2. The percentage of tubules showing differentiation (tubule differentiation index) was increased to 68% by the GnRH antagonist, from a value of 0.1% in irradiated-only rats at 13 wk after irradiation. All of the added androgens inhibited spermatogenic recovery, lowering the tubule differentiation index to between 0.4-36%, but no inhibition was observed with the addition of E2. Of all the androgen treatments tested, T (given as daily injections of T propionate) minimally inhibited spermatogenic recovery while maintaining androgen-responsive tissue weights, and might be most useful in clinical studies. Hormonal measurements in androgen-treated rats were most consistent with the androgen inhibition of spermatogenic recovery in irradiated rats being a combined result of a direct inhibitory effect of all androgens on the testis and an indirect effect through the pituitary by raising levels of FSH, which seems to add to the inhibition of spermatogenic recovery.

  12. Androgen Metabolism in Progression to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    related hormones. BJU. Int. 101, 1084- 1089 . Bao,B.Y., Chuang,B.F., Wang,Q., Sartor,O., Balk,S.P., Brown,M., Kantoff,P.W., and Lee,G.S. (2008). Androgen...in castration- resistant prostate cancer, with a correlative assessment of androgen-related hormones. BJU. Int. 101, 1084- 1089 . Bao,B.Y., Chuang,B.F

  13. Androgens regulate ovarian follicular development by increasing follicle stimulating hormone receptor and microRNA-125b expression.

    PubMed

    Sen, Aritro; Prizant, Hen; Light, Allison; Biswas, Anindita; Hayes, Emily; Lee, Ho-Joon; Barad, David; Gleicher, Norbert; Hammes, Stephen R

    2014-02-25

    Although androgen excess is considered detrimental to women's health and fertility, global and ovarian granulosa cell-specific androgen-receptor (AR) knockout mouse models have been used to show that androgen actions through ARs are actually necessary for normal ovarian function and female fertility. Here we describe two AR-mediated pathways in granulosa cells that regulate ovarian follicular development and therefore female fertility. First, we show that androgens attenuate follicular atresia through nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways by enhancing expression of the microRNA (miR) miR-125b, which in turn suppresses proapoptotic protein expression. Second, we demonstrate that, independent of transcription, androgens enhance follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor expression, which then augments FSH-mediated follicle growth and development. Interestingly, we find that the scaffold molecule paxillin regulates both processes, making it a critical regulator of AR actions in the ovary. Finally, we report that low doses of exogenous androgens enhance gonadotropin-induced ovulation in mice, further demonstrating the critical role that androgens play in follicular development and fertility. These data may explain reported positive effects of androgens on ovulation rates in women with diminished ovarian reserve. Furthermore, this study demonstrates mechanisms that might contribute to the unregulated follicle growth seen in diseases of excess androgens such as polycystic ovary syndrome.

  14. Androgen dependent mechanisms of pro-angiogenic networks in placental and tumor development.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Veronika M; de Brot, Simone; Robinson, Robert S; Jeyapalan, Jennie N; Rakha, Emad; Walton, Thomas; Gardner, David S; Lund, Emma F; Whitchurch, Jonathan; Haigh, Daisy; Lochray, Jack M; Robinson, Brian D; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Fray, Rupert G; Persson, Jenny L; Ødum, Niels; Miftakhova, Regina R; Rizvanov, Albert A; Hughes, Ieuan A; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Heery, David M; Rutland, Catrin S; Mongan, Nigel P

    2017-02-20

    The placenta and tumors share important characteristics, including a requirement to establish effective angiogenesis. In the case of the placenta, optimal angiogenesis is required to sustain the blood flow required to maintain a successful pregnancy, whereas in tumors establishing new blood supplies is considered a key step in supporting metastases. Therefore the development of novel angiogenesis inhibitors has been an area of active research in oncology. A subset of the molecular processes regulating angiogenesis are well understood in the context of both early placentation and tumorigenesis. In this review we focus on the well-established role of androgen regulation of angiogenesis in cancer and relate these mechanisms to placental angiogenesis. The physiological actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand dependent transcription factor. Androgens and the AR are essential for normal male embryonic development, puberty and lifelong health. Defects in androgen signalling are associated with a diverse range of clinical disorders in men and women including disorders of sex development (DSD), polycystic ovary syndrome in women and many cancers. We summarize the diverse molecular mechanisms of androgen regulation of angiogenesis and infer the potential significance of these pathways to normal and pathogenic placental function. Finally, we offer potential research applications of androgen-targeting molecules developed to treat cancer as investigative tools to help further delineate the role of androgen signalling in placental function and maternal and offspring health in animal models.

  15. Molecular biology of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Jarmo

    2012-04-16

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is the most common specific cause of 46,XY disorder in sex development. The androgen signaling pathway is complex but so far, the only gene linked with AIS is the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR are found in most subjects with complete AIS but in partial AIS, the rate has varied 28-73%, depending on the case selection. More than 400 different mutations in AR leading to AIS have been reported. Most mutations are missense substitutions located in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. However, when systematically screened, a substantial amount of mutations can be detected also in the N-terminal domain encoded by exon 1. Within this exon lie two trinucleotide, CAG and GGN repeat regions which are polymorphic in length. Their role in androgen insensitivity is somewhat unclear. Recent advances in protein modeling have resulted in better understanding of the mechanism of known AR mutations.

  16. Immunohistochemical analysis of androgen effects on androgen receptor expression in developing Leydig and Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, L X; Bardin, C W; Hardy, M P

    1997-03-01

    Leydig and Sertoli cells are both targets of androgen action in the testis. Androgen exerts contrasting effects on the two cell types partially inhibiting steroidogenesis in adult Leydig cell and stimulating adult Sertoli cell functions required to support spermatogenesis. The developmental changes in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of androgen receptor (AR) also differ between Leydig and Sertoli cells, with Leydig cell AR mRNA being highest on day 35 postpartum, whereas Sertoli cell AR mRNA levels are highest on day 90. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the concentrations of AR in Leydig and Sertoli cells are differentially regulated during development using quantitative immunostaining. AR protein levels were measured in rat testes after hormonal treatments at three developmental stages: on days 21, 35, and 90 postpartum. At each age, five groups of animals were treated for 4 days with: 1) vehicle; 2) LHRH antagonist (NalGlu, 0.3 mg/kg BW.day) to suppress endogenous levels of androgen that accompany inhibition of LH and FSH secretion; 3) NalGlu + LH (0.2 mg/kg BW.day); 4) NalGlu + testosterone (T, at 7.5 mg/kg BW.day); and 5) NalGlu + MENT (a potent synthetic androgen, 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, 0.7 mg/kg BW.day). AR protein was visualized by immunohistochemistry and measured by computer-assisted image analysis in Leydig and Sertoli cells using frozen sections of tests. After NalGlu treatment, AR levels in Leydig cells declined sharply to 42% and 31% of vehicle control (P < 0.01) in the 21 and 35 days postpartum age groups, respectively, but in 90-day-old rats there was no change. AR levels were partially maintained by exogenous LH, and completely maintained by exogenous androgen treatments in Leydig cells from 21- and 35-day-old rats, whereas in Leydig cells from 90-day-old rats, AR levels were unaffected in all treatment groups. In contrast, after NalGlu treatment, the AR concentration in Sertoli cells from 90-day-old rats were reduced

  17. [Control measures for anabolic androgenic steroid medicines].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Mourelle, Raquel; Carracedo-Martínez, Eduardo; Ces Gens, Eugenio; Cadórniga Valiño, Luis; Álvaro Esteban, Pilar; Pose Reino, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause serious adverse effects when used without a therapeutic purpose. This article aims to show that the AAS are susceptible to being sold on the black market. We also aim to describe how certain limitations on the health inspection services of the Galician health service to pursue these illegal actions prompted a regulatory initiative demanding that additional actions be granted to community pharmacies when dispensing AAS. Four pharmacy inspections detected the diversion of a total of 3118 packages of AAS, which led to the opening of four disciplinary proceedings. In two of these, specialized police forces were called in as there was sufficient evidence of possible diversion to gymnasiums, resulting in a police operation called Operation Fitness.

  18. [Mechanism of the refractory state of androgen hormone in Armadillidium vulgare Latr. (crustacean, isopod, oniscoid) harboring a feminizing bacteria].

    PubMed

    Juchault, P; Legrand, J J

    1985-12-01

    In thelygenous lines of Armadillidium vulgare, neo-females and intersex males (iM) with feminizing symbiotic bacteria are not masculinized by an extract from iM androgenic gland, which, however, masculinizes bacterialess genetic females. Injection of iM hemolymph extract masculinizes these genetic females. This indicates that androgenic hormone is present in iM hemolymph. Lack of androgenic hormone activity in thelygenous lines is supposed to result from the action of bacteria on the androgenic hormone receptors. Since a temporary recovery of the male differentiation of iM can be induced by implantation of different parts of central nervous system, bacteria effect is probably indirect, through an action on a neurosecretory system, perhaps one of those controlling the functioning of the androgenic gland.

  19. 7 alpha-Methyl-19-nortestosterone: an ideal androgen for replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, K; Kumar, N; Bardin, C W

    1994-01-01

    MENT is a synthetic androgen which cannot be 5 alpha-reduced. Therefore, relative to T, its stimulatory action on the prostate is lower than that on the muscle and pituitary. Like T, MENT undergoes enzymatic aromatization to an estrogen. We conclude that the use of MENT instead of T for androgen replacement therapy could have health-promoting effects by reducing the occurrence of prostate disease.

  20. Androgen receptor (AR) in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Eugene; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are still the highest leading cause of death worldwide. Several risk factors have been linked to CVDs, including smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and gender among others. Sex hormones, especially the androgen and its receptor, androgen receptor (AR), have been linked to many diseases with a clear gender difference. Here, we summarize the effects of androgen/AR on CVDs, including hypertension, stroke, atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), myocardial hypertrophy, and heart failure, as well as the metabolic syndrome/diabetes and their impacts on CVDs. Androgen/AR signaling exacerbates hypertension, and anti-androgens may suppress hypertension. Androgen/AR signaling plays dual roles in strokes, depending on different kinds of factors; however, generally males have a higher incidence of strokes than females. Androgen and AR differentially modulate atherosclerosis. Androgen deficiency causes elevated lipid accumulation to enhance atherosclerosis; however, targeting AR in selective cells without altering serum androgen levels would suppress atherosclerosis progression. Androgen/AR signaling is crucial in AAA development and progression, and targeting androgen/AR profoundly restricts AAA progression. Men have increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with age-matched women that may be due to androgens. Finally, androgen/AR plays important roles in contributing to obesity and insulin/leptin resistance to increase the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  2. Androgen, Estrogen and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have accomplished the following: 1) Characterized androgen responsive genes in mouse bone marrow (BM) via...castration (androgen ablation) and estrogen stimulation. 2) Measurements of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and of genes that regulate the local... gene expression in the bone marrow. In males, the main source of estrogen is through conversion of androgen by aromatase. We postulate that gene

  3. Premature adrenarche: novel lessons from early onset androgen excess.

    PubMed

    Idkowiak, Jan; Lavery, Gareth G; Dhir, Vivek; Barrett, Timothy G; Stewart, Paul M; Krone, Nils; Arlt, Wiebke

    2011-08-01

    Adrenarche reflects the maturation of the adrenal zona reticularis resulting in increased secretion of the adrenal androgen precursor DHEA and its sulphate ester DHEAS. Premature adrenarche (PA) is defined by increased levels of DHEA and DHEAS before the age of 8 years in girls and 9 years in boys and the concurrent presence of signs of androgen action including adult-type body odour, oily skin and hair and pubic hair growth. PA is distinct from precocious puberty, which manifests with the development of secondary sexual characteristics including testicular growth and breast development. Idiopathic PA (IPA) has long been considered an extreme of normal variation, but emerging evidence links IPA to an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome (MS) and thus ultimately cardiovascular morbidity. Areas of controversy include the question whether IPA in girls is associated with a higher rate of progression to the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and whether low birth weight increases the risk of developing IPA. The recent discoveries of two novel monogenic causes of early onset androgen excess, apparent cortisone reductase deficiency and apparent DHEA sulphotransferase deficiency, support the notion that PA may represent a forerunner condition for PCOS. Future research including carefully designed longitudinal studies is required to address the apparent link between early onset androgen excess and the development of insulin resistance and the MS.

  4. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kesha; Lee, Nicole K L; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (AR(ΔZF2)) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57(Kip2), Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle, and the expression of all but p57(Kip2) was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  5. Local oestrogenic/androgenic balance in the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Krause, D N; Duckles, S P; Gonzales, R J

    2011-09-01

    Reproductive effects of sex steroids are well-known; however it is increasingly apparent that these hormones have important actions on non-reproductive tissues such as the vasculature. The latter effects can be relevant throughout the lifespan, not just limited to reproductive years, and are not necessarily restricted to one gender or the other. Our work has established that cerebral blood vessels are a non-reproductive target tissue for sex steroids. We have found that oestrogen and androgens alter vascular tone, endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in cerebral vessels. Often the actions of oestrogen and androgens oppose each other. Moreover, it is clear that cerebral vessels are directly targeted by sex steroids, as they express specific receptors for these hormones. Interestingly, cerebral blood vessels also express enzymes that metabolize sex steroids. These findings suggest that local synthesis of 17ß-estradiol and dihydrotestosterone can occur within the vessel wall. One of the enzymes present, aromatase, converts testosterone to 17ß-estradiol, which would alter the local balance of androgenic and oestrogenic influences. Thus cerebral vessels are affected by circulating sex hormones as well as locally synthesized sex steroids. The presence of vascular endocrine effector mechanisms has important implications for male-female differences in cerebrovascular function and disease. Moreover, the cerebral circulation is a target for gonadal hormones as well as anabolic steroids and therapeutic drugs used to manipulate sex steroid actions. The long-term consequences of these influences are yet to be determined.

  6. 4-Nitro-3-phenylphenol has both androgenic and anti-androgenic-like effects in rats

    PubMed Central

    TRISOMBOON, Jiratthiya; LI, ChunMei; SUZUKI, Akira; WATANABE, Gen; TAYA, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disruption of 4-nitro-3-phenylphenol (PNMPP) on immature male Wistar-Imamichi rats, the rat pituitary was exposed to PNMPP (10–5–10–9 M) for 24 h with or without gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in experiment I. In addition, the Leydig cells (10–5–10–9 M) were exposed to PNMPP for 24 h with or without human chronic gonadotropin (hCG) in experiment II. Our results showed that the PNMPP at 10–5–10–7 M suppressed follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) productions from GnRH-stimulated pituitary cells. At the same time, PNMPP 10–5–10–7 M induced an increase in testosterone production from the Leydig cells treated with or without hCG. Based on our results, it can be concluded that that PNMPP might have both androgen agonist action by decreasing FSH and LH production in the pituitary and anti-androgenic action by increasing testosterone production in the Leydig cell. PMID:25736398

  7. 4-Nitro-3-phenylphenol has both androgenic and anti-androgenic-like effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Trisomboon, Jiratthiya; Li, ChunMei; Suzuki, Akira; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disruption of 4-nitro-3-phenylphenol (PNMPP) on immature male Wistar-Imamichi rats, the rat pituitary was exposed to PNMPP (10(-5)-10(-9) M) for 24 h with or without gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in experiment I. In addition, the Leydig cells (10(-5)-10(-9) M) were exposed to PNMPP for 24 h with or without human chronic gonadotropin (hCG) in experiment II. Our results showed that the PNMPP at 10(-5)-10(-7) M suppressed follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) productions from GnRH-stimulated pituitary cells. At the same time, PNMPP 10(-5)-10(-7) M induced an increase in testosterone production from the Leydig cells treated with or without hCG. Based on our results, it can be concluded that that PNMPP might have both androgen agonist action by decreasing FSH and LH production in the pituitary and anti-androgenic action by increasing testosterone production in the Leydig cell.

  8. Development and Characterization of Uterine Glandular Epithelium Specific Androgen Receptor Knockout Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Skulte, Katherine A; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2015-11-01

    While estrogen action is the major driver of uterine development, androgens acting via the androgen receptor (AR) may also promote uterine growth as suggested by uterine phenotypes in global AR knockout (ARKO) female mice. Because AR is expressed in uterine endometrial glands, we generated (Cre/loxP) uterine gland epithelium-specific ARKO (ugeARKO) to determine the role of endometrial gland-specific androgen actions. However, AR in uterine gland epithelium may not be required for normal uterine development and function because ugeARKO females had normal uterine development and fertility. To determine if exogenous androgens acting via AR can fully support uterine growth in the absence of estrogens, the ARKO and ugeARKO females were ovariectomized and treated with supraphysiological doses of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (nonaromatizable androgen). Both dihydrotestosterone and testosterone supported full uterine regrowth in wild-type females while ARKO females had no regrowth (comparable to ovariectomized only). These findings suggest that androgens acting via AR can promote full uterine regrowth in the absence of estrogens. The ugeARKO had 50% regrowth when compared to intact uterine glands, and histomorphologically, both the endometrial and myometrial areas were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, suggesting glandular epithelial AR located in the endometrium may indirectly modify myometrial development. Additionally, to confirm Cre function in endometrial glands, we generated uge-specific PTEN knockout mouse model. The ugePTEN knockout females developed severe endometrial hyperplasia and therefore present a novel model for future research.

  9. Androgen responsiveness of the pituitary gonadotrope cell line LbetaT2.

    PubMed

    Lawson, M A; Li, D; Glidewell-Kenney, C A; López, F J

    2001-09-01

    Androgens have a profound effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis by reducing the synthesis and release of the pituitary gonadotropin LH. The effect on LH is partly a consequence of a direct, steroid-dependent action on pituitary function. Although androgen action has been well studied in vivo, in vitro cell models of androgen action on pituitary gonadotropes have been scarce. Recently, an LH-expressing cell line, LbetaT2, was generated by tumorigenesis targeted to the LH-producing cells of the mouse pituitary. The purpose of these studies was to determine the presence of androgen receptor (AR) and establish its function in this cell line. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the LbetaT2 cell line expresses AR mRNA. Transient transfection assays, using the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter, showed that a functional AR is also present. Testosterone (TEST), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT), and fluoxymesterone (FLUOXY) increased reporter gene activity in the rank order of potencies MENT>DHT> TEST>FLUOXY. Additionally, activation of MMTV promoter activity by DHT in LbetaT2 cells was diminished by the AR antagonists casodex and 2-hydroxy-flutamide, indicating that the effects of DHT are mediated through AR. In summary, these studies showed that the LbetaT2 cell line is a useful model for the evaluation and molecular characterization of androgen action in pituitary gonadotropes.

  10. G-protein alpha-s and -12 subunits are involved in androgen-stimulated PI3K activation and androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianjun; Youn, Hyewon; Yang, Jun; Du, Ningchao; Liu, Jihong; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Benyi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates androgenic hormone action in cells. We recently demonstrated the involvement of phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase (PI3K) p110beta in AR transactivation and gene expression. In this study, we determined the upstream signals that lead to PI3K/p110beta activation and AR transactivation after androgen stimulation. METHODS Human prostate cancer LAPC-4 and 22Rv1 cell lines were used for the experiments. AR transactivation was assessed using an androgen responsive element-driven luciferase (ARE-LUC) assay. Cell proliferation was examined using BrdU incorporation and MTT assays. Target genes were silenced using small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach. Gene expression was evaluated at the mRNA level (real-time RT-PCR) and protein level (Western blot). PI3K kinase activities were measured using immunoprecipitation-based in vitro kinase assay. The AR-DNA binding activity was determined using Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. RESULTS First, at the cellular plasma membrane, disrupting the integrity of caveolae microdomain with methyl-β- cyclodextrin (M-β-CD) abolished androgen-induced AR transactivation and gene expression. Then, knocking down caveolae structural proteins caveolin-1 or -2 with the gene-specific siRNAs significantly reduced androgen-induced AR transactivation. Next, silencing Gαs and Gα12 genes but not other G-proteins blocked androgen-induced AR transactivation and cell proliferation. Consistently, overexpression of Gαs or Gα12 active mutants enhanced androgen-induced AR transactivation, of which Gαs active mutant sensitized the AR to castration-level of androgen (R1881). Most interestingly, knocking down Gαs but not Gα12 subunit significantly suppressed androgen-stimulated PI3K p110beta activation. However, chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that both Gαs or Gα12 subunits are involved in androgen-induced AR interaction with the AR

  11. Oral contraceptives as anti-androgenic treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Lemay, André; Poulin, Yves

    2002-07-01

    Although acne is seldom associated with high serum levels of androgens, it has been shown that female acne patients have definite increases in ovarian and adrenal androgen levels when compared to appropriate controls. As shown in several pilot and in multiple open and comparative studies, oral contraceptives (OCs) are effective in causing a significant regression of mild to moderate acne. These results have been confirmed by multicentre randomized trials where low-dose OCs did not cause side effects different from those of the placebo-controlled group. The beneficial effect of OCs is related to a decrease in ovarian and adrenal androgen precursors; to an increase in sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which limits free testosterone; and to a decrease in 3a-androstenediol glucuronide conjugate, the catabolite of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) formed in peripheral tissues. The estrogen-progestin combination containing cyproterone acetate (CPA) is particularly effective in treating acne, since this progestin also has a direct peripheral anti-androgenic action in blocking the androgen receptor. Only two open studies and one randomized study on small numbers of patients have reported some efficacy of spironolactone used alone or in combination with an OC in the treatment of acne. The new non-steroidal anti-androgens flutamide and finasteride are being evaluated for the treatment of hirsutism. Oral antibiotics are prescribed to patients with inflammatory lesions, where they are effective in decreasing the activity of microbes, the activity of microbial enzymes, and leukocyte chemotaxis. Concomitant intake of an OC and an antibiotic usually prescribed for acne does not impair the contraceptive efficacy of the OC. A second effective contraceptive method should be used whenever there would be decreased absorption or efficacy of the OC (digestive problems, breakthrough bleeding), lack of compliance and use of a type or dose of antibiotic different from that usually prescribed

  12. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhaskararao, G; Himabindu, Y; Nayak, Samir Rajan; Sriharibabu, M

    2014-07-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome, and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome includes multidisciplinary approach and involves gonedectomy to avoid gonadal tumors in later life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and psychological support are required in long-term basis.

  13. Androgen excess: Investigations and management.

    PubMed

    Lizneva, Daria; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Walker, Walidah; Azziz, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Androgen excess (AE) is a key feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and results in, or contributes to, the clinical phenotype of these patients. Although AE will contribute to the ovulatory and menstrual dysfunction of these patients, the most recognizable sign of AE includes hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia or female pattern hair loss (FPHL). Evaluation includes not only scoring facial and body terminal hair growth using the modified Ferriman-Gallwey method but also recording and possibly scoring acne and alopecia. Moreover, assessment of biochemical hyperandrogenism is necessary, particularly in patients with unclear or absent hirsutism, and will include assessing total and free testosterone (T), and possibly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and androstenedione, although these latter contribute limitedly to the diagnosis. Assessment of T requires use of the highest quality assays available, generally radioimmunoassays with extraction and chromatography or mass spectrometry preceded by liquid or gas chromatography. Management of clinical hyperandrogenism involves primarily either androgen suppression, with a hormonal combination contraceptive, or androgen blockade, as with an androgen receptor blocker or a 5α-reductase inhibitor, or a combination of the two. Medical treatment should be combined with cosmetic treatment including topical eflornithine hydrochloride and short-term (shaving, chemical depilation, plucking, threading, waxing, and bleaching) and long-term (electrolysis, laser therapy, and intense pulse light therapy) cosmetic treatments. Generally, acne responds to therapy relatively rapidly, whereas hirsutism is slower to respond, with improvements observed as early as 3 months, but routinely only after 6 or 8 months of therapy. Finally, FPHL is the slowest to respond to therapy, if it will at all, and it may take 12 to 18 months of therapy for an observable response.

  14. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. Appication of selective androgen receptor modulator to the therapy of sarcopenia].

    PubMed

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Makito; Nomiyama, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    The research to develop a drug, so called selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) , which shows beneficial androgenic action on bone and muscle, but hardly possesses the stimulatory action on prostate has been making a progress. However, no drug is available in the market at present. Most of such drugs are developed, aiming at the application to age-related muscle reduction (sarcopenia) and osteoporosis. Recently, in a clinical trial of SARM (enbosarm) administration to healthy elderly men, a promising data showing the increase of lean body mass and physical function has been reported. Future clinical applications of SARMs are expected.

  15. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, or end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty, and hypogonadism. This review summarizes the current standing of research and development of SARMs, crystallography of AR with SARMs, plausible mechanisms for their action and the potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs. PMID:19079612

  16. Androgen and the elaborate courtship behavior of a tropical lekking bird.

    PubMed

    Fusani, Leonida; Day, Lainy B; Canoine, Virginie; Reinemann, Dan; Hernandez, Estefanía; Schlinger, Barney A

    2007-01-01

    In most bird species, male courtship behavior is controlled by testosterone (T) and its metabolites. In species breeding in temperate and arctic regions T circulates at high levels during a relatively short courtship period because high levels of T can be costly in terms of immunocompetence and parental care. Few studies have investigated androgen modulation of courtship behavior in tropical birds. Male golden-collared manakins (Manacus vitellinus) aggregate in leks for several months and perform spectacular, acrobatic courtship displays. Here we examined whether T is elevated in golden-collared manakins during the displaying period and if courtship behavior is modulated by androgen action on androgen receptors. We measured T levels in displaying males at the beginning of the breeding season and again, one month later. In addition, both wild and captive males were treated with the anti-androgen, flutamide, and their courtship behavior was recorded for several weeks. T levels were relatively high shortly after leks were established but decreased substantially a month later, even though the amount of courtship did not change. Flutamide reduced male courtship activity for one week, but display behavior then increased after two weeks of flutamide treatment. Our studies show that androgens modulate male manakin courtship, but the amount of courtship is not directly correlated with the concentration of circulating T. These results suggest that the relationships between androgen and courtship might differ between tropical and temperate birds.

  17. THE SPINAL NUCLEUS OF THE BULBOCAVERNOSUS: FIRSTS IN ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT NEURAL SEX DIFFERENCES

    PubMed Central

    Sengelaub, Dale R.; Forger, Nancy G.

    2008-01-01

    Cell number in the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) of rats was the first neural sex difference shown to differentiate under the control of androgens, acting via classical intracellular androgen receptors. SNB motoneurons reside in the lumbar spinal cord and innervate striated muscles involved in copulation, including the bulbocavernosus (BC) and levator ani (LA). SNB cells are much larger and more numerous in males than in females, and the BC/LA target muscles are reduced or absent in females. The relative simplicity of this neuromuscular system has allowed for considerable progress in pinpointing sites of hormone action, and identifying the cellular bases for androgenic effects. It is now clear that androgens act at virtually every level of the SNB system, in development and throughout adult life. In this review we focus on effects of androgens on developmental cell death of SNB motoneurons and BC/LA muscles; the establishment and maintenance of SNB motoneuron soma size and dendritic length; BC/LA muscle morphology and physiology; and behaviors controlled by the SNB system. We also describe new data on neurotherapeutic effects of androgens on SNB motoneurons after injury in adulthood. PMID:18191128

  18. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Schmit, V.; Weinstein, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with /sup 125/I-lipoproteins (human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)). The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly /sup 125/I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin (mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)). In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production.

  19. Androgen Receptor Signaling in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Chen, Jinbo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging preclinical findings have indicated that steroid hormone receptor signaling plays an important role in bladder cancer outgrowth. In particular, androgen-mediated androgen receptor signals have been shown to correlate with the promotion of tumor development and progression, which may clearly explain some sex-specific differences in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses the available data, suggesting the involvement of androgens and/or the androgen receptor pathways in urothelial carcinogenesis as well as tumor growth. While the precise mechanisms of the functions of the androgen receptor in urothelial cells remain far from being fully understood, current evidence may offer chemopreventive or therapeutic options, using androgen deprivation therapy, in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28241422

  20. Beyond aggression: Androgen-receptor blockade modulates social interaction in wild meerkats.

    PubMed

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Greene, Lydia K; Goncalves, Ines Braga; Fenkes, Miriam; Wisse, Jillian H; Drewe, Julian A; Manser, Marta B; Clutton-Brock, Tim; Drea, Christine M

    2016-02-01

    In male vertebrates, androgens are inextricably linked to reproduction, social dominance, and aggression, often at the cost of paternal investment or prosociality. Testosterone is invoked to explain rank-related reproductive differences, but its role within a status class, particularly among subordinates, is underappreciated. Recent evidence, especially for monogamous and cooperatively breeding species, suggests broader androgenic mediation of adult social interaction. We explored the actions of androgens in subordinate, male members of a cooperatively breeding species, the meerkat (Suricata suricatta). Although male meerkats show no rank-related testosterone differences, subordinate helpers rarely reproduce. We blocked androgen receptors, in the field, by treating subordinate males with the antiandrogen, flutamide. We monitored androgen concentrations (via baseline serum and time-sequential fecal sampling) and recorded behavior within their groups (via focal observation). Relative to controls, flutamide-treated animals initiated less and received more high-intensity aggression (biting, threatening, feeding competition), engaged in more prosocial behavior (social sniffing, grooming, huddling), and less frequently initiated play or assumed a 'dominant' role during play, revealing significant androgenic effects across a broad range of social behavior. By contrast, guarding or vigilance and measures of olfactory and vocal communication in subordinate males appeared unaffected by flutamide treatment. Thus, androgens in male meerkat helpers are aligned with the traditional trade-off between promoting reproductive and aggressive behavior at a cost to affiliation. Our findings, based on rare endocrine manipulation in wild mammals, show a more pervasive role for androgens in adult social behavior than is often recognized, with possible relevance for understanding tradeoffs in cooperative systems.

  1. Imaging characteristics of androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jay; Knoll, Abraham; Gilet, Anthony; Kim, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), also known as testicular feminization, is a genetic disorder which leads to lack of response to androgens caused by a defect in the androgen receptor. It is relatively uncommon and is usually diagnosed through clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, physical exam, radiological imaging, and genetic analysis. Our case is a middle-aged woman with complete AIS and demonstrates the importance of the various imaging modalities that are implemented in initially diagnosing and assisting in surgical management.

  2. Functional characterization and anti-cancer action of the clinical phase II cardiac Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor istaroxime: in vitro and in vivo properties and cross talk with the membrane androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Konstantinos; Dimas, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Tsapara, Anna; Alkahtani, Saad; Honisch, Sabina; Prousis, Kyriakos C.; Alarifi, Saud; Calogeropoulou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Sodium potassium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase) is a validated pharmacological target for the treatment of various cardiac conditions. Recent published data with Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors suggest a potent anti-cancer action of these agents in multiple indications. In the present study, we focus on istaroxime, a Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor that has shown favorable safety and efficacy properties in cardiac phase II clinical trials. Our experiments in 22 cancer cell lines and in prostate tumors in vivo proved the strong anti-cancer action of this compound. Istaroxime induced apoptosis, affected the key proliferative and apoptotic mediators c-Myc and caspase-3 and modified actin cystoskeleton dynamics and RhoA activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, istaroxime was capable of binding to mAR, a membrane receptor mediating rapid, non-genomic actions of steroids in prostate and other cells. These results support a multi-level action of Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors in cancer cells and collectively validate istaroxime as a strong re-purposing candidate for further cancer drug development. PMID:27027435

  3. Differential display RT PCR of total RNA from human foreskin fibroblasts for investigation of androgen-dependent gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Nitsche, E.M.; Moquin, A.; Adams, P.S.

    1996-05-03

    Male sexual differentiation is a process that involves androgen action via the androgen receptor. Defects in the androgen receptor, many resulting from point mutations in the androgen receptor gene, lead to varying degrees of impaired masculinization in chromosomally male individuals. To date no specific androgen regulated morphogens involved in this process have been identified and no marker genes are known that would help to predict further virilization in infants with partial androgen insensitivity. In the present study we first show data on androgen regulated gene expression investigated by differential display reverse transcription PCR (dd RT PCR) on total RNA from human neonatal genital skin fibroblasts cultured in the presence or absence of 100 nM testosterone. Using three different primer combinations, 54 cDNAs appeared to be regulated by androgens. Most of these sequences show the characteristics of expressed mRNAs but showed no homology to sequences in the database. However 15 clones with significant homology to previously cloned sequences were identified. Seven cDNAs appear to be induced by androgen withdrawal. Of these, five are similar to ETS (expression tagged sequences) from unknown genes; the other two show significant homology to the cDNAs of ubiquitin and human guanylate binding protein 2 (GBP-2). In addition, we have identified 8 cDNA clones which show homologies to other sequences in the database and appear to be upregulated in the presence of testosterone. Three differential expressed sequences show significant homology to the cDNAs of L-plastin and one to the cDNA of testican. This latter gene codes for a proteoglycan involved in cell social behavior and therefore of special interest in this context. The results of this study are of interest in further investigation of normal and disturbed androgen-dependent gene expression. 49 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Hormonal status of male reproductive system: androgens and estrogens in the testis and epididymis. In vivo and in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Bilińska, Barbara; Wiszniewska, Barbara; Kosiniak-Kamysz, Kazimierz; Kotula-Balak, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Monika; Hejmej, Anna; Sadowska, Jolanta; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Wenda-Rózewicka, Lidia

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to summarize our results on the role of androgens and estrogens in human, rodent and equine testes and epididymides, in both, physiological and patological conditions, obtained in the space of the Solicited Project (084/PO6/2002) financially supported by the State Committee for Scientific Research during the last three years. Testosterone produced by Leydig cells of the testes is clearly the major androgen in the circulation of men and adult males of most mammalian species. However, androgen metabolites make up a significant fraction of total circulating steroids. Moreover, androgen metabolism may proceed to amplify the action of testosterone through its conversion to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or its aromatization to estradiol. The distribution of androgen and estrogen receptors (ARs and ERs) within male reproductive tissues is important because of their crucial role in mediating androgen and/or estrogen action. Attempts were undertaken to discuss not only the role of aromatase and ERs in mediating the action of estrogens in the male, but also the importance of DHT in hormonal regulation of the epididymis. In the latter, alterations caused by finasteride treatment and lead-induced oxidative stress are described. Male reproductive function of the testis and epididymis reflected by the alterations in enzymatic activity, distribution of steroid hormone receptors, differences in steroid hormone levels and altered gene expression of antioxidant enzymes are also discussed.

  5. A new highly specific and robust yeast androgen bioassay for the detection of agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bovee, Toine F H; Helsdingen, Richard J R; Hamers, Astrid R M; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Nielen, Michel W F; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P

    2007-11-01

    Public concern about the presence of natural and anthropogenic compounds which affect human health by modulating normal endocrine functions is continuously growing. Fast and simple high-throughput screening methods for the detection of hormone activities are thus indispensable. During the last two decades, a panel of different in vitro assays has been developed, mainly for compounds with an estrogenic mode of action. Here we describe the development of an androgen transcription activation assay that is easy to use in routine screening. Recombinant yeast cells were constructed that express the human androgen receptor and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to androgens. Compared with other reporters, the yEGFP reporter protein is very convenient because it is directly measurable in intact living cells, i.e., cell wall disruption and the addition of a substrate are not needed. When yeast was exposed to 17beta-testosterone, the concentration where half-maximal activation is reached (EC(50)) was 50 nM. The relative androgenic potencies, defined as the ratio between the EC(50) of 17beta-testosterone and the EC(50) of the compound, of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, methyltrienolone, and 17beta-boldenone are 2.3, 1.4, and 0.15 respectively. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that this new yeast androgen bioassay is fast, sensitive, and very specific and also suited to detect compounds that have an antiandrogenic mode of action.

  6. A new highly specific and robust yeast androgen bioassay for the detection of agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Helsdingen, Richard J. R.; Hamers, Astrid R. M.; van Duursen, Majorie B. M.; Nielen, Michel W. F.; Hoogenboom, Ron L. A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Public concern about the presence of natural and anthropogenic compounds which affect human health by modulating normal endocrine functions is continuously growing. Fast and simple high-throughput screening methods for the detection of hormone activities are thus indispensable. During the last two decades, a panel of different in vitro assays has been developed, mainly for compounds with an estrogenic mode of action. Here we describe the development of an androgen transcription activation assay that is easy to use in routine screening. Recombinant yeast cells were constructed that express the human androgen receptor and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to androgens. Compared with other reporters, the yEGFP reporter protein is very convenient because it is directly measurable in intact living cells, i.e., cell wall disruption and the addition of a substrate are not needed. When yeast was exposed to 17β-testosterone, the concentration where half-maximal activation is reached (EC50) was 50 nM. The relative androgenic potencies, defined as the ratio between the EC50 of 17β-testosterone and the EC50 of the compound, of 5α-dihydrotestosterone, methyltrienolone, and 17β-boldenone are 2.3, 1.4, and 0.15 respectively. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that this new yeast androgen bioassay is fast, sensitive, and very specific and also suited to detect compounds that have an antiandrogenic mode of action. PMID:17849102

  7. Antagonizing effects of membrane-acting androgens on the eicosanoid receptor OXER1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalyvianaki, Konstantina; Gebhart, Veronika; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Panagiotopoulou, Christina; Kiagiadaki, Fotini; Pediaditakis, Iosif; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Moustou, Eleni; Tzardi, Maria; Notas, George; Castanas, Elias; Kampa, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence during the last decades revealed that androgen can exert membrane initiated actions that involve signaling via specific kinases and the modulation of significant cellular processes, important for prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis. Results of the present work clearly show that androgens can specifically act at the membrane level via the GPCR oxoeicosanoid receptor 1 (OXER1) in prostate cancer cells. In fact, OXER1 expression parallels that of membrane androgen binding in prostate cancer cell lines and tumor specimens, while in silico docking simulation of OXER1 showed that testosterone could bind to OXER1 within the same grove as 5-OxoETE, the natural ligand of OXER1. Interestingly, testosterone antagonizes the effects of 5-oxoETE on specific signaling pathways and rapid effects such as actin cytoskeleton reorganization that ultimately can modulate cell migration and metastasis. These findings verify that membrane-acting androgens exert specific effects through an antagonistic interaction with OXER1. Additionally, this interaction between androgen and OXER1, which is an arachidonic acid metabolite receptor expressed in prostate cancer, provides a novel link between steroid and lipid actions and renders OXER1 as new player in the disease. These findings should be taken into account in the design of novel therapeutic approaches in prostate cancer. PMID:28290516

  8. Parallel evolution between aromatase and androgen receptor in the animal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Basant; Tiwary, Besant K; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    There are now many known cases of orthologous or unrelated proteins in different species that have undergone parallel evolution to satisfy a similar function. However, there are no reported cases of parallel evolution for proteins that bind a common ligand but have different functions. We focused on two proteins that have different functions in steroid hormone biosynthesis and action but bind a common ligand, androgen. The first protein, androgen receptor (AR), is a nuclear hormone receptor and the second one, aromatase (cytochrome P450 19 [CYP19]), converts androgen to estrogen. We hypothesized that binding of the androgen ligand has exerted common selective pressure on both AR and CYP19, resulting in a signature of parallel evolution between these two proteins, though they perform different functions. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that rates of amino acid change in AR and CYP19 are strongly correlated across the metazoan phylogeny, whereas no significant correlation was found in the control set of proteins. Moreover, we inferred that genomic toolkits required for steroid biosynthesis and action were present in a basal metazoan, cnidarians. The close similarities between vertebrate and sea anemone AR and CYP19 suggest a very ancient origin of their endocrine functions at the base of metazoan evolution. Finally, we found evidence supporting the hypothesis that the androgen-to-estrogen ratio determines the gonadal sex in all metazoans.

  9. Low-dose oral contraceptives: progestin potency, androgenicity, and atherogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement drugs on blood lipids that affect cardiovascular disease (atherogenic effects) are reviewed by comparing their androgenicity and progestin potency. Although early oral contraceptives with high doses of estrogen were indicted for increasing risk of thromboembolic disorders and heart attacks, today's pills low in estrogen still bear the same risk for cardiovascular events. A brief explanation of the lipoproteins is presented, emphasizing the importance of High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) in protecting against heart disease and stroke. Menstruating women have naturally high HDL. The estrogen in oral contraceptives and postmenopausal estrogen replacements increases HDL as much as 30%, while decreasing LDL, the component carrying most of the cholesterol. It seems that the progestin in oral contraceptives will lower HDL, and studies show that this action is related to androgenicity and dose of the progestin. Progestins such as levonorgestrel and norgestrel are more androgenic, while norethynodrel, ethynodiol diacetate and norethindrone are less so. When used in combination with estrogens, progestins are less androgenic, but when used alone, the androgenic and atherogenic effects dominate. The lower the estrogen dose in the combination, say around 20-35 mcg ethinyl estradiol, the more atherogenic the progestin. These actions are confirmed theoretically by measurements of sex hormone binding globulin, a blood protein that reflects estrogen activity, as well as by epidemiologic studies in Sweden and Great Britain, where rates of heart attack and stroke in pill users remain as high as they were when pills contained high doses of estrogen.

  10. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  11. Species comparisons in molecular and functional attributes of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    While endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have the potential to act via several mechanisms of action, one of the most widely studied is the ability of environmental chemicals to interact directly with either the estrogen (ER) or androgen receptor (AR). In vitro screening assay...

  12. Expression Signatures for a Model Androgen and Antiandrogen in the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas Ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trenbolone and flutamide are prototypical model compounds for respectively androgen and antiandrogen modes of action. Trenbolone is an anabolic steroid used in cattle industry to increase weight gain and feed efficiency, and flutamide is a pharmaceutical used to treat prostate c...

  13. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and their relevance to human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract d...

  14. The role of androgen and androgen receptor in skin-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Chang, Philip; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-09-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) may play important roles in several skin-related diseases, such as androgenetic alopecia and acne vulgaris. Current treatments for these androgen/AR-involved diseases, which target the synthesis of androgens or prevent its binding to AR, can cause significant adverse side effects. Based on the recent studies using AR knockout mice, it has been suggested that AR and androgens play distinct roles in the skin pathogenesis, and AR seems to be a better target than androgens for the treatment of these skin diseases. Here, we review recent studies of androgen/AR roles in several skin-related disorders, including acne vulgaris, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism, as well as cutaneous wound healing.

  15. Exercise and Serum Androgens in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerlind, Kim C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study examining the effect of a 10-week hydraulic resistance exercise program on serum androgen levels, strength, and lean body weight in 18 college women revealed that training did not result in significant increases in androgen hormones, although there were significant gains in strength. (Author/CB)

  16. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome--a review.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Meghan B; Eyvazzadeh, Aimee D; Quint, Elisabeth; Smith, Yolanda R

    2008-12-01

    This review paper highlights important diagnostic and therapeutic concerns for girls with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS). CAIS is an androgen receptor defect disorder associated with vaginal and uterine agenesis in women with a 46,XY karyotype. The major clinical issues surrounding this syndrome include timing of gonadectomy, hormone replacement, vaginal dilation, and attention to psychological issues.

  17. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents. PMID:25045626

  18. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    McGrath, K-C Y; McRobb, L S; Heather, A K

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  19. [A potential of selective androgen receptor modulator(SARM)for the therapy of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Yanase, Toshihiko

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the drugs, which show anabolic, effect on bone and muscle without stimulating prostate has been developed. They show tissue-specific selective androgen actions and called selective androgen receptor modulators(SARMs). The development of drug targeting bone and muscle in male is very promising as a treatment tool for osteoporosis and sarcopenia in the near future. The clinical study is under going especially in the field of cachexia associated with cancer, but unfortunately there is no drug in the current market at present. The current situation of the development of SARMs will be reviewed.

  20. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5α-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic

  1. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Elliot R.; McGrath, Kristine C. Y.; Heather, Alison K.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping. PMID:23389345

  2. Combined exposures to anti-androgenic chemicals: steps towards cumulative risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Kortenkamp, A; Faust, M

    2010-04-01

    There is widespread exposure to anti-androgens, a group of chemicals able to disrupt androgen action in foetal life, with irreversible de-masculinizing consequences. Substances of concern include certain phthalates, pesticides and chemicals used in cosmetics and personal care products. Although people come into contact with several anti-androgens, chemicals risk assessment normally does not take account of the effects of combined exposures. However, a disregard for combination effects may lead to underestimations of risks and for this reason, we have assessed the feasibility of conducting cumulative risk assessment, where the focus is on considering the effects of exposure to multiple chemicals, via multiple routes and pathways. Following recent recommendations by the US National Research Council, we have, for the first time, included phthalates and other anti-androgenic chemicals, a total of 15 substances. On the basis of exposure estimates for the individual chemicals and reference doses for anti-androgenicity, we have used the hazard index approach. We show that the cumulative risks from anti-androgen exposures exceed acceptable levels for people on the upper end of exposure levels. The value obtained for median exposures to the 15 substances can be judged tolerable. However, significant knowledge gaps exist that prevent us from arriving at definitive conclusions. Of greatest concern is an absence of appropriate in vivo toxicity data about large numbers of in vitro androgen receptor antagonists. Knowledge about the effect profiles of these chemicals will lead to higher risk estimates. Our analysis suggests that risk reductions can be achieved by limiting exposures to the plasticizer diethyl hexyl phthalate, the cosmetic ingredients butyl- and propyl paraben, the pesticides vinclozolin, prochloraz and procymidone and bisphenol A.

  3. PMA induces androgen receptor downregulation and cellular apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Takeuchi, Ario; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Dejima, Takashi; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induces cellular apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, the growth of which is governed by androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but the mechanism by which PMA exerts this effect remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the mechanistic action of PMA in prostate cancer cells with regard to AR. We showed that PMA decreased E2F1 as well as AR expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Furthermore, PMA activated JNK and p53 signaling, resulting in the induction of cellular apoptosis. In LNCaP cells, androgen deprivation and a novel anti-androgen enzalutamide (MDV3100) augmented cellular apoptosis induced by PMA. Moreover, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) C4-2 cells were more sensitive to PMA compared with LNCaP cells and were sensitized to PMA by enzalutamide. Finally, the expression of PKC, E2F1, and AR was diminished in PMA-resistant cells, indicating that the gain of independence from PKC, E2F1, and AR functions leads to PMA resistance. In conclusion, PMA exerted its anti-cancer effects via the activation of pro-apoptotic JNK/p53 and inhibition of pro-proliferative E2F1/AR in prostate cancer cells including CRPC cells. The therapeutic effects of PMA were augmented by androgen deletion and enzalutamide in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells, as well as by enzalutamide in castration-resistant cells. Taken together, PMA derivatives may be promising therapeutic agents for treating prostate cancer patients including CRPC patients.

  4. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator RAD140 Is Neuroprotective in Cultured Neurons and Kainate-Lesioned Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V. Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S.; Miller, Chris P.; Hattersley, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed “selective androgen receptor modulators” (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24428527

  6. New insights into the androgen-targeted therapies and epigenetic therapies in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Abhijit M; Njar, Vincent C O

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR), a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC). Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  7. Small-Molecule-Mediated Degradation of the Androgen Receptor through Hydrophobic Tagging.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jeffrey L; Neklesa, Taavi K; Cox, Carly S; Roth, Anke G; Buckley, Dennis L; Tae, Hyun Seop; Sundberg, Thomas B; Stagg, D Blake; Hines, John; McDonnell, Donald P; Norris, John D; Crews, Craig M

    2015-08-10

    Androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription is a major driver of prostate tumor cell proliferation. Consequently, it is the target of several antitumor chemotherapeutic agents, including the AR antagonist MDV3100/enzalutamide. Recent studies have shown that a single AR mutation (F876L) converts MDV3100 action from an antagonist to an agonist. Here we describe the generation of a novel class of selective androgen receptor degraders (SARDs) to address this resistance mechanism. Molecules containing hydrophobic degrons linked to small-molecule AR ligands induce AR degradation, reduce expression of AR target genes and inhibit proliferation in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell lines. These results suggest that selective AR degradation may be an effective therapeutic prostate tumor strategy in the context of AR mutations that confer resistance to second-generation AR antagonists.

  8. Androgens act synergistically to enhance estrogen-induced upregulation of human tissue kallikreins 10, 11, and 14 in breast cancer cells via a membrane bound androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2008-04-01

    The regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones plays an important role in the normal development and function of many organs, as well as in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers, especially breast cancer. However, clinical data suggest that combined testosterone and estrogen treatments on post-menopausal women increase the risk of breast cancer. Experiments have shown that many, if not all kallikreins are under steroid hormone regulation in breast cancer cell lines. Their implication as prognostic and diagnostic markers has also been well-documented. Thus, we investigated the effect of combined hormone stimulation with androgens and 17beta-estradiol on the ductal caricinoma cell line BT474. This cell line has been shown to be sensitive to both, androgens (secreting PSA) and estrogens (secreting a number of kallikreins including KLK10, 11, and KLK14). We found that PSA expression was downregulated upon combined hormone stimulation, confirming reports that estrogen can antagonize and block the activity of the androgen receptor. Upon analysis of estrogen-sensitive kallikreins 10, 11, and 14, all showed to be synergistically enhanced in their expression three- to fourfold, upon joint hormone treatment versus individual hormone stimulation. The enhancement is dependent upon the action of androgens as treatment with the androgen receptor antagonist cyproterone actetate normalized the expression of KLK10, 11, and KLK14 to estrogen-stimulation levels. The synergistic effects between estrogens and androgens on estrogen-sensitive genes may have implications on the role of the kallikreins in associated risk of breast cancer and progression.

  9. Novel androgen-induced activity of an antimicrobial β-defensin: Regulation of Wolffian duct morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Camilla M; Ferreira, Lucas G A; Thimoteo, Daniel S; Smith, Lee B; Hinton, Barry T; Avellar, Maria Christina W

    2017-02-15

    The Wolffian duct (WD) undergoes morphological changes induced by androgens to form the epididymis, which is an organ essential for sperm maturation. Androgen action in WD epithelium involves paracrine factors of mesenchymal origin that function by still poorly understood mechanisms. Here we studied the antimicrobial β-defensin SPAG11C as a new player in duct morphogenesis, localized prenatally in the WD mesenchyme. Organotypic culture of rat WDs and tissues from Androgen Receptor (AR) knockout mice (ARKO) were used. Our results show that androgen/AR signaling differentially regulated SPAG11C expression at mRNA and protein levels in the developing WD. WDs incubated with recombinant human SPAG11C were shorter and less coiled as a result of reduced epithelial cell proliferation, but not increased apoptosis. Our results suggested β-defensin SPAG11C as an androgen-target required for WD morphogenesis. This highlights the multifunctional repertoire of the β-defensin protein family and their potential contribution to the in utero environment that determines male reproductive success.

  10. Dose-Dependent Effects of Androgens on the Circadian Timing System and Its Response to Light

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew P.; Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; LeSauter, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the locus of a master clock that regulates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. Gonadectomy in male mice lengthens the period of circadian rhythms and increases the day-to-day variability of activity onset time. Both of these responses are rescued by the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone. Androgen receptors (AR) are localized in SCN neurons that receive direct retinal input. To explore how androgens affect circadian clock function and its responsiveness to photic cues, we measured wheel-running behavior and SCN AR expression in intact, gonadectomized, and testosterone-replaced mice, held under various photic conditions. Gonadectomy lengthened circadian period in constant dim light but not in constant darkness. Increasing intensities of constant light parametrically increased circadian period, and this was potentiated at all intensities by gonadectomy. In contrast, gonadectomy did not alter light-induced pupil constriction, suggesting a nonretinal locus of hormone action. In hormone-replaced animals housed in constant darkness, T concentration was positively correlated with precision of activity onset and with SCN AR expression and negatively correlated with duration of activity. We infer the existence of two androgenic mechanisms: one modulates SCN responsiveness to light, and the second modulates SCN timekeeping and locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, the effects of androgens on period are a result of hormonal modulation of the SCN's response to photic input rather than to a change in the inherent period of oscillators in the absence of light. PMID:22492303

  11. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  12. Expression of a hyperactive androgen receptor leads to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Cai, Changmeng; Giwa, Ahmed; Bivins, Aaronica; Chen, Shao-Yong; Sabry, Dina; Govardhan, Kumara; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2008-07-01

    Cellular changes that affect the androgen receptor (AR) can cause prostate cancer to transition from androgen dependent to androgen independent, which is usually lethal. One common change in prostate tumors is overexpression of the AR, which has been shown to lead to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This led us to hypothesize that expression of a hyperactive AR would be sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, stable lune cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell lines were generated, which express a virion phosphoprotein (VP)16-AR hybrid protein that contains full-length AR fused to the strong viral transcriptional activation domain VP16. This fusion protein elicited as much as a 20-fold stronger transcriptional activity than the natural AR. Stable expression of VP16-AR in LNCaP cells yielded androgen-independent cell proliferation, while under the same growth conditions the parental LNCaP cells exhibited only androgen-dependent growth. These results show that expression of a hyperactive AR is sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To study the molecular basis of this enhanced growth, we measured the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase-alpha1 (sGCalpha1), a subunit of the sGC, an androgen-regulated gene that has been shown to be involved in prostate cancer cell growth. Interestingly, the expression of sGCalpha1 is androgen independent in VP16-AR-expressing cells, in contrast to its androgen-induced expression in control LNCaP cells. RNA(I)-dependent inhibition of sGCalpha1 expression resulted in significantly reduced proliferation of VP16-AR cells, implicating an important role for sGCalpha1 in the androgen-independent growth of these cells.

  13. Novel androgen receptor gene mutation in patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ning, Ye; Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Huixing; Lu, Jianqi; Li, Zheng

    2012-07-01

    To present a rare case of a patient probably with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) and studied its potential genetic cause. A 24-year-old woman with a normal-appearing vulva and vagina presented to us because of primary amenorrhea. Imaging studies showed no uterus or ovary development but inguinal cryptorchism. Histopathologic examination revealed normal testicular structures. Sequencing the CAIS-associated androgen receptor gene revealed a novel missense mutation of T to G (F698L). A novel androgen receptor gene mutation in the ligand binding domain was detected in the present patient with CAIS, supporting the important role of an androgen receptor defect in the etiology of CAIS.

  14. Synthetic Androgens as Designer Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed. PMID:26074745

  15. Synthetic androgens as designer supplements.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed.

  16. Androgen Receptor Signaling in Salivary Gland Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalin, Martin G.; Watson, Philip A.; Ho, Alan L.; Morris, Luc G. T.

    2017-01-01

    Salivary gland cancers comprise a small subset of human malignancies, and are classified into multiple subtypes that exhibit diverse histology, molecular biology and clinical presentation. Local disease is potentially curable with surgery, which may be combined with adjuvant radiotherapy. However, metastatic or unresectable tumors rarely respond to chemotherapy and carry a poorer prognosis. Recent molecular studies have shown evidence of androgen receptor signaling in several types of salivary gland cancer, mainly salivary duct carcinoma. Successful treatment with anti-androgen therapy in other androgen receptor-positive malignancies such as prostate and breast cancer has inspired researchers to investigate this treatment in salivary gland cancer as well. In this review, we describe the prevalence, biology, and therapeutic implications of androgen receptor signaling in salivary gland cancer. PMID:28208703

  17. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  18. Genetics Home Reference: androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically raised as females and have a female gender identity. Affected individuals have male internal sex organs ( ... and may have a male or a female gender identity. People with mild androgen insensitivity are born ...

  19. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a novel splice donor site mutation and activation of a cryptic splice donor site in the androgen receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Infante, Joana B; Alvelos, Maria I; Bastos, Margarida; Carrilho, Francisco; Lemos, Manuel C

    2016-01-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndrome is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder characterized by resistance to the actions of androgens in an individual with a male karyotype. We evaluated a 34-year-old female with primary amenorrhea and a 46,XY karyotype, with normal secondary sex characteristics, absence of uterus and ovaries, intra-abdominal testis, and elevated testosterone levels. Sequence analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene revealed a novel splice donor site mutation in intron 4 (c.2173+2T>C). RT-PCR analysis showed that this mutation resulted in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site located in the second half of exon 4 and in the synthesis of a shorter mRNA transcript and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. This novel mutation associated with a rare mechanism of abnormal splicing further expands the spectrum of mutations associated with the androgen insensitivity syndrome and may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in splicing defects.

  20. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Fagman, Johan B.; Wilhelmson, Anna S.; Motta, Benedetta M.; Pirazzi, Carlo; Alexanderson, Camilla; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Holmäng, Agneta; Anesten, Fredrik; Jansson, John-Olov; Levin, Malin; Borén, Jan; Ohlsson, Claes; Krettek, Alexandra; Romeo, Stefano; Tivesten, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Androgens have important cardiometabolic actions in males, but their metabolic role in females is unclear. To determine the physiologic androgen receptor (AR)–dependent actions of androgens on atherogenesis in female mice, we generated female AR-knockout (ARKO) mice on an atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)–deficient background. After 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, but not on a normal chow diet, atherosclerosis in aorta was increased in ARKO females (+59% vs. control apoE-deficient mice with intact AR gene). They also displayed increased body weight (+18%), body fat percentage (+62%), and hepatic triglyceride levels, reduced insulin sensitivity, and a marked atherogenic dyslipidemia (serum cholesterol, +52%). Differences in atherosclerosis, body weight, and lipid levels between ARKO and control mice were abolished in mice that were ovariectomized before puberty, consistent with a protective action of ovarian androgens mediated via the AR. Furthermore, the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone reduced atherosclerosis (−41%; thoracic aorta), subcutaneous fat mass (−44%), and cholesterol levels (−35%) in ovariectomized mice, reduced hepatocyte lipid accumulation in hepatoma cells in vitro, and regulated mRNA expression of hepatic genes pivotal for lipid homeostasis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the AR protects against diet-induced atherosclerosis in female mice and propose that this is mediated by modulation of body composition and lipid metabolism.—Fagman, J. B., Wilhelmson, A. S., Motta, B. M., Pirazzi, C., Alexanderson, C., De Gendt, K., Verhoeven, G., Holmäng, A., Anesten, F., Jansson, J.-O., Levin, M., Borén, J., Ohlsson, C., Krettek, A., Romeo, S., Tivesten, A. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice. PMID:25550469

  1. Clinical markers of androgenicity in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sheehan-Dare, R A; Hughes, B R; Cunliffe, W J

    1988-12-01

    Androgenic stimulation of sebaceous glands is necessary for development of acne. If hyperandrogenaemia were a major determinant of acne in women, the frequency of other clinical markers of androgenicity should increase with acne severity. To investigate this, 268 female subjects (aged 12-44 years) were studied. Subjects were divided into groups on the basis of acne severity: physiological, moderate, and severe. With exclusion of women taking oral contraceptives or anti-androgen therapy, subjects in each group were similar with respect to age at menarche and incidence of menstrual irregularity of amenorrhoea. Reports of excessive body hair, and clinical hirsutes on examination were few and there were no significant differences between acne severity groups. No correlation was observed between acne and hirsutes grades in all subjects (rank correlation coefficient = 0.096). Mild male pattern androgenic alopecia occurred in similar proportions of subjects in the three groups. Female pattern androgenic alopecia was observed in only two subjects. We have shown no correlation between acne severity and clinical markers of androgenicity in women. This suggests that in most cases factors other than hyperandrogenaemia are necessary for the development of acne.

  2. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men.

  3. Androgen Receptors in a Cichlid Fish, Astatotilapia burtoni: Structure, Localization, and Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    HARBOTT, LENE K.; BURMEISTER, SABRINA S.; WHITE, RICHARD B.; VAGELL, MIKE; FERNALD, RUSSELL D.

    2009-01-01

    Androgens are an important output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis that controls reproduction in all vertebrates. In male teleosts two androgens, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone, control sexual differentiation and development in juveniles and reproductive behavior in adults. Androgenic signals provide feedback at many levels of the HPG axis, including the hypothalamic neurons that synthesize and release gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), but the precise cellular site of androgen action in the brain is not known. Here we describe two androgen receptor subtypes, ARα and ARβ, in the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni and show that these subtypes are differentially located throughout the adult brain in nuclei known to function in the control of reproduction. ARα was expressed in the ventral part of the ventral telencephalon, the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus and the ventral hypothalamus, whereas ARβ was more widely expressed in the dorsal and ventral telencephalon, the POA, and the ventral and dorsal hypothalamus. We provide the first evidence in any vertebrate that the GnRH1-releasing neurons, which serve as the central control point of the HPG axis, express both subtypes of AR. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that A. burtoni AR subtypes have different expression levels in adult tissue, with ARα showing significantly higher expression than ARβ in the pituitary, and ARβ expressed at a higher level than ARα in the anterior and middle brain. These data provide important insight into the role of androgens in regulating the vertebrate reproductive axis. PMID:17614300

  4. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract development in rats with a special focus on the reproductive toxicant phthalates. Observed mixture data are compared to mathematical mixture model predictions to determine how the individual chemicals in a mixture interact (e.g., response addition – probabilities of response for each individual chemical are added; dose-addition – the doses of each individual chemical at a given mixture dose are combined together based on the relative potency of the individual chemicals). Phthalate mixtures are observed to act in a dose-additive manner based on the relative potency of the individual phthalates to suppress fetal testosterone production. Similar dose-additive effects have been reported for mixtures of phthalates with anti-androgenic pesticides of differing mechanisms. Data from these phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonitoring data to determine individual hazard ratios. Furthermore, data from the toxicological studies can inform the analysis of human biomonitoring data on the association of detected chemicals and their metabolites with measured health outcomes. Data from phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonit

  5. Androgen excess in cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Marynick, S P; Chakmakjian, Z H; McCaffree, D L; Herndon, J H

    1983-04-28

    We measured hormone levels in 59 women and 32 men with longstanding cystic acne resistant to conventional therapy. Affected women had higher serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone, and luteinizing hormone and lower levels of sex-hormone-binding globulin than controls. Affected men had higher levels of serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and 17-hydroxyprogesterone and lower levels of sex-hormone-binding globulin than controls. To lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, dexamethasone was given to men, and dexamethasone or an oral contraceptive pill, Demulen (or both), was given to women. Of the patients treated for six months, 97 per cent of the women and 81 per cent of the men had resolution or marked improvement in their acne. The dose of dexamethasone required to reduce dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels was low, rarely exceeding the equivalent of 20 mg of hydrocortisone per day. We conclude that most patients with therapeutically resistant cystic acne have androgen excess and that lowering elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate results in improvement or remission of acne in most instances.

  6. The Buzz About Anabolic Androgenic Steroids: Electrophysiological Effects in Excitable Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, Joseph G.; Penatti, Carlos A. A.; Porter, Donna M.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2012-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) comprise a large and growing class of synthetic androgens used clinically to promote tissue-building in individuals suffering from genetic disorders, injuries and diseases. Despite these beneficial therapeutic applications, the predominant use of AAS is illicit: these steroids are self-administered to promote athletic performance and body image. Hand in hand with the desired anabolic actions of the AAS are untoward effects on the brain and behavior. While the signaling routes by which the AAS impose both beneficial and harmful actions may be quite diverse, key endpoints are likely to include ligand-gated and voltage-dependent ion channels that govern the activity of electrically excitable tissues. Here we review the known effects of AAS on molecular targets that play critical roles in controlling electrical activity, with a specific focus on the effects of AAS on neurotransmission mediated by GABAA receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:22576754

  7. Sex differences in the effects of androgens acting in the central nervous system on metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morford, Jamie; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sexually dimorphic aspects of metabolic regulation is the bidirectional modulation of glucose and energy homeostasis by testosterone in males and females. Testosterone deficiency predisposes men to metabolic dysfunction, with excess adiposity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, whereas androgen excess predisposes women to insulin resistance, adiposity, and type 2 diabetes. This review discusses how testosterone acts in the central nervous system, and especially the hypothalamus, to promote metabolic homeostasis or dysfunction in a sexually dimorphic manner. We compare the organizational actions of testosterone, which program the hypothalamic control of metabolic homeostasis during development, and the activational actions of testosterone, which affect metabolic function after puberty. We also discuss how the metabolic effect of testosterone is centrally mediated via the androgen receptor. PMID:28179813

  8. Sex differences in the effects of androgens acting in the central nervous system on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morford, Jamie; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2016-12-01

    One of the most sexually dimorphic aspects of metabolic regulation is the bidirectional modulation of glucose and energy homeostasis by testosterone in males and females. Testosterone deficiency predisposes men to metabolic dysfunction, with excess adiposity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, whereas androgen excess predisposes women to insulin resistance, adiposity, and type 2 diabetes. This review discusses how testosterone acts in the central nervous system, and especially the hypothalamus, to promote metabolic homeostasis or dysfunction in a sexually dimorphic manner. We compare the organizational actions of testosterone, which program the hypothalamic control of metabolic homeostasis during development, and the activational actions of testosterone, which affect metabolic function after puberty. We also discuss how the metabolic effect of testosterone is centrally mediated via the androgen receptor.

  9. Identification of Androgen Receptor Antagonists in Fish Using a Simple Bioassay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas .

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable effort has been expended on the development of bioassays to detect chemicals that affect endocrine function controlled by the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis via different mechanisms/modes of action (MOA). Antagonism of the androgen receptor (AR)...

  10. Androgen circle of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Homburg, Roy

    2009-07-01

    Although the aetiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is still not known and the search for causative genes is proving elusive, it is generally agreed that hyperandrogenism is at the heart of the syndrome. Here, it is proposed that excess androgens are the root cause of PCOS starting from their influence on the female fetus in programming gene expression, producing the characteristic signs and symptoms which are then exacerbated by a propagation of excess ovarian androgen production from multiple small follicles, anovulation and insulin resistance in the reproductive life-span, thus setting up a vicious perpetual circle of androgen excess. This opinion paper, rather than being a full-scale review, is intentionally biased in support of this hypothesis that androgen excess is the 'root of all evil' in PCOS; in the hope that its acceptance could lead to more direct treatment of the syndrome in all its facets rather than the symptomatic treatment of side effects of androgen excess that we are addressing today.

  11. Cell Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Estrogen and Androgen Receptor PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Elisabeth D. Martinez CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgetown University Medical Center...Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen DAMD17-99-1-9199 Receptor 6. AUTHOR(S) Elisabeth D. Martinez 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...with androgens. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES breast cancer, cell cycle, androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, non- 66 steroidal activators, L

  12. Discovery AND Therapeutic Promise OF Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects. PMID:15994457

  13. The Role of HOX Proteins in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 14. ABSTRACT HOX genes encode a large family of transcription factors involved in key...Massachusetts. Abstract: HOX Gene Expression Modulates Androgen- and Vitamin D-Mediated Actions in Human Prostate Cancer Cells. Daddario SN, Lambert...JR, Lucia MS, Nordeen SK. Poster presentation at the 88th Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society. June 2007. Toronto, Canada. Abstract: HOX Gene

  14. Androgens and Male Sexual Function: A Review of Human Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiavi, Raul C.; White, Daniel

    1976-01-01

    The scope of this article is a review and brief discussion of recently gathered information on androgens and sexual behavior in men. Current pharmacological research does not furnish specific evidence that administration of androgens or preprations that stimulate the secretion of endogenous androgens have beneficial effects on functional…

  15. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  16. Maternal Gestational Androgen Levels in Female Marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi) Vary Across Trimesters but Do Not Vary With the Sex Ratio of Litters

    PubMed Central

    French, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Adam S.; Birnie, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal hormones can dramatically modify offspring phenotypes via organizational actions on morphological and behavioral development. In placental mammals, there is the possibility that some portion of hormones in maternal circulation may be derived from fetal origin. We tested the possibility that maternal androgens in pregnant female marmosets reflected, in part, contributions from male fetuses by comparing levels of urinary androgens across pregnancy in females carrying varying numbers of male offspring. We monitored urinary androgen excretion in 18 pregnancies from five female white-faced marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi). Androgen levels rose significantly in the first trimester of pregnancy, reached a peak in the middle of the second trimester, and then declined gradually until parturition. At no point in pregnancy were levels of urinary androgens higher in females carrying litters that had 50% or more males than females carrying litters that were less than 50% male. Levels of maternal androgens were not associated with litter size, the number of males in the litter, or with the proportion of the litter that was male. The high levels of androgen in pregnant females are therefore likely of strictly maternal origin, and any modification of fetal growth and development can be considered a ‘maternal effect’. PMID:19646445

  17. In Vitro Reporter Assays for Screening of Chemicals That Disrupt Androgen Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paul Khurana, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs) modulate hormone signaling and cause developmental and reproductive anomalies. Today, there is a global concern regarding endocrine disruption effects, particularly those mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Androgen or male hormones are critical for the development and maintenance of male characteristics and numerous EDCs exist in the environment with the potential to disrupt androgen action. The threat is more during critical developmental windows when there is increased sensitivity to these compounds. Timely screening and detection of the EDCs is essential to minimize deleterious effects produced by these toxic chemicals. As a first line of screening, in vitro transcription assays are very useful due to their speed, convenience, and cost effectiveness. In this paper, recent in vitro reporter assays for detecting androgenic or antiandrogenic activity of EDCs have been reviewed. Two important cell systems used for this purpose, namely, the mammalian or yeast cell systems, have been discussed. Use of reporter genes such as bacterial luciferase (lux) and green fluorescent protein (gfp) has significantly improved speed and sensitivity of detection. Also, many of the current reporter assay systems can be used in a high throughput format allowing speedy evaluation of multiple potential EDCs at a lower price. PMID:25435875

  18. Androgen deprivation therapy as backbone therapy in the management of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merseburger, Axel S; Alcaraz, Antonio; von Klot, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is well established as a backbone therapy for metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa), and both European and American guidelines emphasize the importance of maintaining ADT after progression to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the use of ADT varies widely in clinical practice despite these recommendations. Both research and development of increasingly precise assay technologies have improved our understanding of androgen production and signaling, and the recent data have suggested that a new serum testosterone cutoff value of <0.7 nmol/L should be employed. Most clinical trials to date have used the historical 1.7 nmol/L cutoff, but the <0.7 nmol/L cutoff has been associated with improved patient outcomes. Combining agents with different mechanisms of action to achieve intense androgen blockade may improve survival both before and after progression to CRPC. Data suggest that this intensive approach to androgen deprivation could delay the transition to CPRC and hence improve survival dramatically. Various combinations of backbone ADT with chemotherapy or radiotherapy are under investigation. Administration of ADT is established in patients with intermediate or high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) receiving radiotherapy with curative intent. This article reviews the current and potential role of ADT as backbone therapy in both hormone-sensitive PCa and CRPC with a focus on mPCa. PMID:27942220

  19. Pathological changes in anabolic androgenic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    Several classes of recreational and prescription drugs have additional effects on the heart and vasculature, which may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality in chronic users. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The role these hormones may play in their occurrence of sudden cardiac death is also investigated. 98 medico-legal cases including 6 anabolic androgenic steroid users were retrospectively reviewed. Autopsies, histology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Pathological changes consisted of various degrees of interstitial and perivascular fibrosis as well as fibroadipous metaplasia and perineural fibrosis within the myocardium of the left ventricle. Within the limits of the small number of investigated cases, our results appear to confirm former observations on this topic and suggest anabolic androgenic steroid's potential causative role in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac deaths in chronic users.

  20. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Presenting with Gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Won; Kwak, Dong Shin; Jung, In Sub; Kwak, Joo Hee; Park, Jung Hwan; Hong, Sang Mo; Lee, Chang Bum; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Dong Sun; Choi, Woong Hwan; Ahn, You Hern

    2015-06-01

    Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast caused by the proliferation of glandular breast tissue. Determining the various causes of gynecomastia such as physiological causes, drugs, systemic diseases, and endocrine disorders is important. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a rare endocrine disorder presenting with gynecomastia and is a disorder of male sexual differentiation caused by mutations within the androgen receptor gene. All individuals with AIS have the 46 XY karyotype, although AIS phenotypes can be classified as mild, partial or complete and can differ among both males and females including ambiguous genitalia or infertility in males. We experienced a case of partial AIS presenting with gynecomastia and identified the androgen receptor gene mutation.

  1. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J

    2016-02-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity.

  2. Anabolic-androgenic steroids and related substances.

    PubMed

    Yesalis, Charles E; Bahrke, Michael S

    2002-08-01

    Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone, and anabolic-androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone. Anabolic steroids are used to enhance athletic performance and appearance. Adverse effects include those on the liver, serum lipids, psyche/behavior, and the reproductive system. Androstenedione is an anabolic-androgenic steroid used to increase blood testosterone levels for the purposes of increasing strength, lean body mass, and sexual performance. However, there is no research indicating androstenedione or its related compounds, significantly increases strength and/or lean body mass by increasing testosterone levels. The long-term health effects of prolonged androstenedione supplementation are unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a weak androgen also used to elevate testosterone levels. DHEA is also advertised as an antiobesity and antiaging supplement capable of improving libido, vitality, and immunity levels. However, research demonstrates that DHEA supplementation does not increase serum testosterone concentrations or increase strength in men, and it may have virilizing effects on women.

  3. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity. PMID:25416742

  4. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  5. Glycosylatable GFP as a compartment-specific membrane topology reporter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hunsang; Min, Jisoo; Heijne, Gunnar von; Kim, Hyun

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An N-linked glycosylation site is introduced near the GFP fluorophore. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer gGFP is not glycosylated and is fully fluorescent in the cytosol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer gGFP is glycosylated and non-fluorescent in the lumen of the ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer gGFP is fused to membrane proteins of known topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its applicability as a membrane topology reporter is demonstrated. -- Abstract: Determination of the membrane topology is an essential step in structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins, yet the choices of membrane topology reporters are limited and the experimental analysis can be laborious, especially in eukaryotic cells. Here, we present a robust membrane topology reporter, glycosylatable green fluorescent protein (gGFP). gGFP is fully fluorescent in the yeast cytosol but becomes glycosylated and does not fluoresce in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Thus, by assaying fluorescence and the glycosylation status of C-terminal fusions of gGFP to target membrane proteins in whole-cell lysates, the localization of the gGFP moiety (and hence the fusion joint) relative to the ER membrane can be unambiguously determined.

  6. Estrogenic and progestational activity of 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, a synthetic androgen.

    PubMed

    Beri, R; Kumar, N; Savage, T; Benalcazar, L; Sundaram, K

    1998-11-01

    Synthetic androgens exhibit estrogenic/antiestrogenic and progestational activities in addition to their androgenic effects. To investigate the pharmacological action of the synthetic androgen, 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT), we examined its action in female rodents. The criteria employed for estrogenic/antiestrogenic effects were, uterine weight increase, vaginal cornification, induction of progesterone receptors (PR) synthesis and stimulation of peroxidase activity in the uteri of ovariectomized rats and mice. MENT increased uterine weight in a dose dependent manner, but did not cause vaginal cornification or stimulate PR synthesis in the uterus. The uterotropic activity of MENT was 200-fold lower than that of estradiol. Estrogen receptor (ER) bound [3H]-E2 was displaced by E2 and MENT with ED50 values of 70 pg and 250 ng, respectively, a 3,500 fold difference in their binding affinity. The low binding of MENT to ER, in contrast to its relatively high uterotropic action, suggested that receptors other than ER may be involved in its action on the uterus. The progestational activity of MENT in immature rabbits using the McPhail index assay was comparable to that of progesterone. Binding affinities of MENT and progesterone to PR were also comparable. However, the action of MENT on the uterus does not seem to be a progestational effect since mifepristone, an antiprogestin, had no effect on MENT-induced uterine growth. Specific androgen receptors (AR) in uterine cytosol were demonstrated. The involvement of AR in MENT action was confirmed by using an antiandrogen (flutamide) and an antiestrogen (ICI-182) in ovariectomized mice. Although MENT did not block the uterotropic effect of E2, it inhibited the E2-induced cornification of vaginal epithelium, induction of uterine PR synthesis and increase in uterine peroxidase activity in ovariectomized rats. The antiestrogenic effect of MENT was also blocked by flutamide. These results suggest that the uterotropic and

  7. ANABOLIC-ANDROGENIC STEROID DEPENDENCE? INSIGHTS FROM ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. However, using conditioned place preference and self-administration, studies in animals have demonstrated that AAS are reinforcing in a context where athletic performance is irrelevant. Furthermore, AAS share brain sites of action and neurotransmitter systems in common with other drugs of abuse. In particular, recent evidence links AAS with opioids. In humans, AAS abuse is associated with prescription opioid use. In animals, AAS overdose produces symptoms resembling opioid overdose, and AAS modify the activity of the endogenous opioid system. PMID:18275992

  8. Anabolic-androgenic steroid dependence? Insights from animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I

    2008-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. However, using conditioned place preference and self-administration, studies in animals have demonstrated that AAS are reinforcing in a context where athletic performance is irrelevant. Furthermore, AAS share brain sites of action and neurotransmitter systems in common with other drugs of abuse. In particular, recent evidence links AAS with opioids. In humans, AAS abuse is associated with prescription opioid use. In animals, AAS overdose produces symptoms resembling opioid overdose, and AAS modify the activity of the endogenous opioid system.

  9. Androgen hypersensitivity in prostate cancer: molecular perspectives on androgen deprivation therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ruth; Marignol, Laure; Keane, John P; Lynch, Thomas H; Hollywood, Donal

    2011-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is initially successful in treating advanced prostate cancer. However, after a period of time tumors inevitably recur. Improved understanding of the various biochemical causes of resistance to hormonal therapy is of crucial importance for developing more effective therapeutic strategies in this cohort of patients. This review discusses the preclinical evidence for androgen hypersensitivity (AH), as a mechanism by which tumors become hormone-refractory (HR). We propose that the growth of some such tumors may be not only stimulated by, but also dependent on low hormone levels, and furthermore, that normal hormone concentrations can have an inhibitory effect on growth. The incidence and importance of AH merits further investigation both in preclinical studies and during clinical trials of intermittent androgen withdrawal or testosterone replacement. We suggest that a subset of HR prostate cancer patients who have androgen-hypersensitive tumors could be particularly amenable to these treatments. Finally, potential approaches for developing biomarkers to identify such patients are explored.

  10. Topical androgen antagonism promotes cutaneous wound healing without systemic androgen deprivation by blocking β-catenin nuclear translocation and cross-talk with TGF-β signaling in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, Gianluca; Bhasin, Shalender; Bakhit, Mena; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Safer, Joshua D; Bhawan, Jag; Jasuja, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Orchidectomy in rodents and lower testosterone levels in men are associated with improved cutaneous wound healing. However, due to the adverse effects on skeletal and sexual tissues, systemic androgen blockade is not a viable therapeutic intervention. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that topical application of an androgen antagonist would elicit accelerated wound healing without systemic androgen antagonism. Full-thickness cutaneous wounds were created on adult C57BL6/J mice. Daily topical application of androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide, resulted in improved gap closure similar to orchiectomized controls and faster than orchidectomized mice treated with topical testosterone. In vivo data showed that the effects of androgen antagonism on wound closure primarily accelerate keratinocytes migration without effecting wound contraction. Consequently, mechanisms of testosterone action on reepithelialization were investigated in vitro by scratch wounding assays in confluent keratinocytes. Testosterone inhibited keratinocyte migration and this effect was in part mediated through promotion of nuclear translocation of β-catenin and by attenuating transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling through β-catenin. The link between Wnt and TGF beta signaling was confirmed by blocking β-catenin and by following TGF-β-induced transcription of a luciferase reporter gene. Together, these data show that blockade of β-catenin can, as a potential target for novel therapeutic interventions, accelerate cutaneous wound healing.

  11. Androgens induce sebaceous differentiation in sebocyte cells expressing a stable functional androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Barrault, Christine; Garnier, Julien; Pedretti, Nathalie; Cordier-Dirikoc, Sevda; Ratineau, Emeline; Deguercy, Alain; Bernard, François-Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Androgens act through non-genomic and androgen receptor (AR)-dependent genomic mechanisms. AR is expressed in the sebaceous gland and the importance of androgens in the sebaceous function is well established. However, the in vitro models used to date have failed to evidence a clear genomic effect (e.g., modification of gene expression profile) of androgens on human sebocyte cells. In order to study the impact of active androgens in sebocytes, we constructed a stable human sebocyte cell line derived from SEBO662 [17] constitutively expressing a fully functional AR. In these SEBO662 AR+ cells, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced AR nuclear translocation and the strong modulation of a set of transcripts (RASD1, GREB1...) known to be androgen-sensitive in other androgenic cells and tissues. Moreover, we observed that DHT precociously down-regulated markers for immature follicular cells (KRT15, TNC) and for hair lineage (KRT75, FST) and up-regulated the expression of genes potentially related to sebocyte differentiation (MUC1/EMA, AQP3, FADS2). These effects were fully confirmed at the protein level. In addition, DHT-stimulated SEBO662 AR+, cultured in a low-calcium defined keratinocyte medium without serum or any complement, neosynthesize lipids, including sebum lipids, and store increased amounts of triglycerides in lipid droplets. DHT also induces morphological changes, increases cell size, and treatments over 7 days lead to a time-dependent increase in the population of apoptotic DNA-fragmented cells. Taken together, these results show for the first time that active androgens alone can engage immature sebocytes in a clear lipogenic differentiation process (Graphical abstract). These effects depend on the expression of a functional AR in these cells. This model should be of interest for revisiting the mechanisms of the sebaceous function in vitro and for the design of relevant pharmacological models for drug or compound testing.

  12. Chemical Suppression of the Reactivated Androgen Signaling Pathway in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The project studies the role of Hedgehog/ Gli signaling in generating the androgen growth-independent...behavior of castration resistant prostate cancer and will test the ability of drugs that target Hedgehog or Gli as a means to suppress this behavior...work in Aim 3 will determine the extent to which Gli activity is involved in intratumoral steroidogenesis that supports androgen growth independence of

  13. Androgen-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle protein balance.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Michael L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-22

    Androgens significantly alter muscle mass in part by shifting protein balance in favor of net protein accretion. During various atrophic conditions, the clinical impact of decreased production or bioavailability of androgens (termed hypogonadism) is important as a loss of muscle mass is intimately linked with survival outcome. While androgen replacement therapy increases muscle mass in part by restoring protein balance, this is not a comprehensive treatment option due to potential side effects. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which androgens alter protein balance is needed for the development of androgen-independent therapies. While the data in humans suggest androgens alter protein balance (both synthesis and breakdown) in the fasted metabolic state, a predominant molecular mechanism(s) behind this observation is still lacking. This failure is likely due in part to inconsistent experimental design between studies including failure to control nutrient/feeding status, the method of altering androgens, and the model systems utilized.

  14. Racial differences in the androgen/androgen receptor pathway in prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pettaway, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Pathologic and epidemiologic data suggest that while little racial variation exists in prostate cancer prevalence ("autopsy cancer"), striking racial variation exists for the clinically diagnosed form of the disease. A review of the available literature was performed to define whether racial differences in serum androgen levels or qualitative or quantitative differences in the androgen receptor were correlated with prostate cancer incidence or severity. Black men were found to be exposed to higher circulating testosterone levels from birth to about age 35 years. Such differences were not consistently noted among older men. Significant differences also were found for dihydrotestosterone metabolites among black, white, and Asian men. Unique racial genetic polymorphisms were noted for the gene for 5 alpha-reductase type 2 among black and Asian men. Novel androgen receptor mutations recently have been described among Japanese, but not white, men with latent prostate cancer. Finally, androgen receptor gene polymorphisms leading to shorter or longer glutamine and glycine residues in the receptor protein are correlated with racial variation in the incidence and severity of prostate cancer. This same polymorphism also could explain racial variation in serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Collectively, these data strongly suggest racial differences within the androgen/androgen receptor pathway not only exist but could be one cause of clinically observed differences in the biology of prostate cancer among racial groups. Images Figure 1 PMID:10628124

  15. Clinical outcomes of anti-androgen withdrawal and subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy for advanced prostate cancer following failure of initial maximum androgen blockade.

    PubMed

    Momozono, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Hideaki; Tei, Hiromoto; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the significance of anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) who relapsed after initial maximum androgen blockade (MAB). The present study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 272 consecutive advanced PC patients undergoing anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide following the failure of initial MAB using bicalutamide. With the exception of 41 patients (15.1%) who did not undergo anti-androgen withdrawal due to the characteristics of PC suggesting aggressive diseases, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) declined from the baseline value in 83 patients (35.9%), including 18 (7.8%) with PSA decline >50%, but not in the remaining 148 (64.1%). No significant difference in the overall survival (OS) or cancer-specific survival (CSS) among the three groups was observed based on the response to anti-androgen withdrawal. Following the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide, PSA decline was observed in 185 patients (68.0%), including 103 (37.9%) who achieved a PSA reduction of >50%; however, the PSA level continued to elevate in the remaining 87 (32.0%). Furthermore, of the numerous factors examined, only the duration of the initial MAB therapy was shown to be significantly correlated with the PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy. Multivariate analysis of several factors identified revealed that only PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy was an independent predictor of CSS and OS. If initial MAB is effective, the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy may be considered; however, anti-androgen withdrawal should be omitted, irrespective of the characteristics of advanced PC.

  16. Season-related changes in circulating androgen, brain aromatase, and perch-calling in male ring doves.

    PubMed

    Fusani, Leonida; Van't Hof, Thomas; Hutchison, John B

    2003-02-01

    The perch-call of ring doves (Streptopelia risoria) is related to territorial defence and mate attraction. Perch-calls are sexually dimorphic and individually different in structure. The expression of perch-call is androgen-dependent and is controlled by the action of testosterone on the preoptic-hypothalamic areas. However, it is not known whether the acoustic features of the call vary with the reproductive condition. We studied plasma androgen levels, brain steroid metabolism, and perch-calling of male ring doves kept in winter-like (low temperature, short days) or spring-like (mild temperature, long day) conditions. Circulating levels of androgen were higher in males kept on spring-like condition. Spring males spent more time in perch-calling than winter males. However, a detailed analysis of the call structure revealed no difference for any time or frequency parameter between groups. This work shows that in ring doves season-dependent variations in the circulating levels of androgen are correlated with differences in the amount of time males spend in perch-calling. In addition, the study suggests that in adult males the acoustic structure of the perch-calls is not influenced by season-related changes in androgen levels.

  17. Hyperostosis frontalis interna and androgen suppression.

    PubMed

    May, Hila; Peled, Natan; Dar, Gali; Abbas, Janan; Medlej, Bahaa; Masharawi, Youssef; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2010-08-01

    Although hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI) has been documented in the medical literature for over 300 years, its etiology remains undetermined. It is generally assumed to be associated with hormonal disturbances of the gonads. The aim of this study was to examine the association between androgen deprivation and development of HFI in males. Two groups of males over 60-years old were compared: a control group that included 180 healthy males, 45 suffering from benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and a study group of 127 males with prostate cancer: 67 who received complete androgen block treatment, and 60 who received different treatments or none at all. CT head scans were used to identify and classify HFI (Brilliance 64, Philips Medical Systems, slice thickness 3 mm x 1.5 mm). It was found that males who received a complete androgen block manifested significantly higher prevalence of HFI compared to healthy males. However, no significant difference in HFI prevalence was found between males suffering from BPH and healthy males or males with prostate cancer who had not received a complete androgen block. A positive association between length of hormonal treatment and manifestation of HFI was shown. It can be concluded that BPH does not promote development of HFI; males who are hormonally treated for prostate cancer are at a higher risk of developing HFI compared to healthy males; the longer the duration of hormonal treatment, the higher the risk of developing HFI.

  18. High abundance androgen receptor in goldfish brain: characteristics and seasonal changes

    SciTech Connect

    Pasmanik, M.; Callard, G.V.

    1988-08-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts its actions in brain directly via androgen receptors or, after aromatization to estradiol, via estrogen receptors. Brain aromatase activity in teleost fish is 100-1000 times greater than in mammals and would be expected to significantly reduce the quantity of androgen available for receptor binding. Experiments were carried out on the goldfish Carassius auratus to determine if androgen receptors are present in teleost brain and whether their physicochemical properties reflect elevated aromatase. Cytosolic and nuclear extracts were assayed with the use of (/sup 3/H)T and charcoal, Sephadex LH-20, or DNA-cellulose chromatography to separate bound and free steroids. Binding activity was saturable and had an equally high affinity for T and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Although mibolerone was a relatively weak competitor, the putative teleost androgen 11-ketotestosterone, methyltrienolone (R1881), estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol were poor ligands. Characteristics that distinguish this receptor from a steroid-binding protein in goldfish serum are the presence of binding activity in both nuclear and cytosolic extracts, a low rate of ligand-receptor dissociation, electrophoretic mobility, sedimentation properties in low vs. high salt, and tissue distribution. DNA cellulose-adhering and nonadhering forms were detected, but these did not differ in other variables measured. Although goldfish androgen receptors resembled those of mammals in all important physicochemical characteristics, they were unusually abundant compared to levels in rat brain, but comparable to levels in prostate and other male sex hormone target organs. Moreover, there were seasonal variations in total receptors, with a peak at spawning (April) 4- to 5-fold higher than values in reproductively inactive fish.

  19. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyoung; Kang, Minsung; Wang, Hong; Naik, Gurudatta; Mobley, James A; Sonpavde, Guru; Garvey, W Timothy; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2017-04-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy has been identified to induce oxidative stress in prostate cancer (PCa), leading to reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in a hormone-refractory manner. Thus, antioxidant therapies have gained attention as adjuvants for castration-resistant PCa. Here, we report for the first time that human endostatin (ES) prevents androgen-independent growth phenotype in PCa cells through its molecular targeting of AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and downstream pro-oxidant signaling. This reversal after ES treatment significantly decreased PCa cell proliferation through down-regulation of GR and up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione levels. Proteome and biochemical analyses of ES-treated PCa cells further indicated a significant up-regulation of enzymes in the major reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging machinery, including catalase, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, biliverdin reductase, and thioredoxin reductase, resulting in a concomitant reduction of intracellular ROS. ES further augmented the antioxidant system through up-regulation of glucose influx, the pentose phosphate pathway, and NAD salvaging pathways. This shift in cancer cell redox homeostasis by ES significantly decreased the effect of protumorigenic oxidative machinery on androgen-independent PCa growth, suggesting that ES can suppress GR-induced resistant phenotype upon AR antagonism and that the dual targeting action of ES on AR and GR can be further translated to PCa therapy.-Lee, J. H., Kang, M., Wang, H., Naik, G., Mobley, J. A., Sonpavde, G., Garvey, W. T., Darley-Usmar, V. M., Ponnazhagan, S. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

  20. Identification of androgen receptor protein and 5α-reductase mRNA in human ocular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, E.; Wickham, L; da Silveira, L. A; Krenzer, K.; Yu, F.; Toda, I.; Sullivan, B.; Sullivan, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Androgens have been reported to influence the structural organisation, functional activity, and/or pathological features of many ocular tissues. In addition, these hormones have been proposed as a topical therapy for such conditions as dry eye syndromes, corneal wound healing, and high intraocular pressure. To advance our understanding of androgen action in the eye, the purpose of the present study was twofold: firstly, to determine whether tissues of the anterior and posterior segments contain androgen receptor protein, which might make them susceptible to hormone effects following topical application; and, secondly, to examine whether these tissues contain the mRNA for types 1 and/or 2 5α-reductase, an enzyme that converts testosterone to the very potent metabolite, dihydrotestosterone.
METHODS—Human ocular tissues and cells were obtained and processed for histochemical and molecular biological procedures. Androgen receptor protein was identified by utilising specific immunoperoxidase techniques. The analysis of type 1 and type 2 5α-reductase mRNAs was performed by the use of RT-PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequence analysis. All immunohistochemical evaluations and PCR amplifications included positive and negative controls.
RESULTS—These findings show that androgen receptor protein exists in the human lacrimal gland, meibomian gland, cornea, bulbar and forniceal conjunctivae, lens epithelial cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells. In addition, our results demonstrate that the mRNAs for types 1 and 2 5α-reductase occur in the human lacrimal gland, meibomian gland, bulbar conjunctiva, cornea, and RPE cells.
CONCLUSION—These combined results indicate that multiple ocular tissues may be target sites for androgen action.

 PMID:10611104

  1. Prenatal androgens time neuroendocrine sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Wood, R I; Ebling, F J; I'Anson, H; Bucholtz, D C; Yellon, S M; Foster, D L

    1991-05-01

    The present study determined whether exposure to gonadal steroids in utero dictates the postnatal control of gonadotropin secretion in the lamb. There is a marked sex difference in the timing of neuroendocrine sexual maturation in sheep; while male lambs undergo a reduction in sensitivity to inhibitory gonadal steroid feedback by 10 weeks of age, females remain hypersensitive until 30 weeks. The hypothesis was tested that prenatal androgens advance the time of the decrease in feedback sensitivity, and hence the pubertal increase in pulsatile gonadotropin secretion. Pregnant ewes were injected each week with 100 mg testosterone cypionate im from 30-90 days of gestation (term is approximately 150 days). Five female lambs were born with masculinized external genitalia (penis and scrotum). These females, together with eight androgenized males, eight control males, and eight control females, were gonadectomized at 2 weeks of age and implanted with a Silastic capsule of estradiol to produce a constant steroid feedback signal. Blood samples were collected twice weekly to monitor trends in LH secretion. For determination of LH pulse frequency, samples were collected frequently (every 12 min for 4 h) at various intervals between 5 and 32 weeks of age. In males, a sustained increase in LH from biweekly blood samples, indicative of reduced sensitivity to inhibitory steroid feedback, began at 10.1 +/- 1.4 weeks (mean +/- SE) of age in control males and at 5.4 +/- 0.1 weeks in androgenized males. By contrast, control females remained hypersensitive much longer as evidenced by the delay in the LH rise until 27.2 +/- 0.8 weeks. The response of the five androgenized females was intermediate; LH increased at 4, 7, 16, 20, and 21 weeks of age with an early increase of LH being associated with more pronounced masculinization of the genitalia. Patterns of pulsatile LH secretion reflected differences in serum LH measured from biweekly blood samples. For example, at 20 weeks of age

  2. Androgen receptor and prostate cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, Lorella; Muratori, Monica; Carloni, Vinicio; Zecchi, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia; Forti, Gianni; Baldi, Elisabetta

    2003-02-01

    Evidence indicates that androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells have a lower malignant potential. We previously demonstrated that expression of androgen receptor (AR) by transfection of the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line PC3 decreases invasion and adhesion of these cells through modulation of alpha6beta4 expression. Treatment with the androgen further reduced adhesion and invasion of the cells without, however, modifying alpha6beta4. Here we investigated whether the androgen has a direct effect on alpha6beta4-EGF receptor (EGFR) interaction and signalling leading to invasion of these cells. Immunoconfocal microscopy demonstrated that in control cells (PC3-Neo), alpha6beta4 and EGFR colocalize and redistribute in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). In PC3-AR cells colocalization and redistribution between the two molecules was reduced and abolished by pre-treatment with R1881. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of beta4 in response to EGF was reduced in PC3-AR cells compared to PC3-Neo. Immunoconfocal and co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated colocalization at membrane level and co-immunoprecipitation of EGFR and AR, indicating an interaction between the two proteins. PI3K activity, a key signalling pathway for invasion of these cells, was decreased in PC3-AR cells in response to EGF and further reduced by treatment with R1881. EGFR internalization was strongly reduced in PC3-AR compared with PC3-Neo cells and was reduced by treatment with R1881. In conclusion, the expression of AR by transfection in PC3 cells confers a less malignant phenotype by interfering with EGFR--alpha6beta4 interaction and signalling leading to invasion through a mechanism involving an interaction between the classic AR and EGFR.

  3. Epithelial ovarian cancer: testing the 'androgens hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Green, Adèle C; Nagle, Christina M; Jordan, Susan J; Whiteman, David C; Bain, Christopher J; Webb, Penelope M

    2008-12-01

    In 1998, Risch proposed a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer relating to the role of androgens in stimulating epithelial cell proliferation. Although this hypothesis has been widely discussed, direct evidence to support it is scant. To address this issue, we have conducted a detailed analysis of factors possibly associated with high circulating levels of androgens, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), hirsutism and acne (all clinically associated with hyperandrogenism) using the data collected in an Australia-wide, population-based case-control study. Cases aged 18-79 years with a new diagnosis of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (n=1276) or borderline malignant tumour (n=315) were identified through a network of clinics and cancer registries throughout Australia. Controls (n=1508) were selected from the National Electoral Roll. Women self-reported a history of PCOS, acne, hirsutism and also use of testosterone supplements or the androgenic medication Danazol. We found no evidence that a history of PCOS, acne or hirsutism was associated with ovarian cancer overall, or with specific subtypes, with the exception of serous borderline tumours that were positively associated with a history of PCOS (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.0-6.1). Women who had ever used testosterone supplements had an increased risk of ovarian cancer (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.1-12.0); however, use of the androgenic medication Danazol did not increase risk (OR 1.0; 95% CI 0.4-2.9). Overall, our results do not support the hypothesis that androgen-related disorders increase the risk of ovarian cancer.

  4. Androgen Signaling Disruption during Fetal and Postnatal Development Affects Androgen Receptor and Connexin 43 Expression and Distribution in Adult Boar Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Hejmej, Anna; Górowska, Ewelina; Kotula-Balak, Małgorzata; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zarzycka, Marta; Zając, Justyna; Bilińska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    To date, limited knowledge exists regarding the role of the androgen signaling during specific periods of development in the regulation of androgen receptor (AR) and connexin 43 (Cx43) in adult prostate. Therefore, in this study we examined mRNA and protein expression, and tissue distribution of AR and Cx43 in adult boar prostates following fetal (GD20), neonatal (PD2), and prepubertal (PD90) exposure to an antiandrogen flutamide (50 mg/kg bw). In GD20 and PD2 males we found the reduction of the luminal compartment, inflammatory changes, decreased AR and increased Cx43 expression, and altered localization of both proteins. Moreover, enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation were detected in the prostates of these animals. In PD90 males the alterations were less evident, except that Cx43 expression was markedly upregulated. The results presented herein indicate that in boar androgen action during early fetal and neonatal periods plays a key role in the maintenance of normal phenotype and functions of prostatic cells at adulthood. Furthermore, we demonstrated that modulation of Cx43 expression in the prostate could serve as a sensitive marker of hormonal disruption during different developmental stages. PMID:24151599

  5. Uncarboxylated Osteocalcin and Gprc6a Axis Produce Intratumoral Androgens in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    at metastatic sites by the activity of androgen biosynthetic enzymes . Recent study shows that Gprc6a/Osteocalcin axis regulates physiological... enzymes . This data suggest that prostate cancer bone tumors hijack Osteocalcin/Gprc6a axis for the production of intratumoral androgens via...overexpression of certain androgen biosynthetic enzyme expression. Bone tumor expressed androgens promote disease progression via tumoral androgen production

  6. Discordant measures of androgen-binding kinetics in two mutant androgen receptors causing mild or partial androgen insensitivity, respectively.

    PubMed

    Shkolny, D L; Beitel, L K; Ginsberg, J; Pekeles, G; Arbour, L; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M A

    1999-02-01

    We have characterized two different mutations of the human androgen receptor (hAR) found in two unrelated subjects with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS): in one, the external genitalia were ambiguous (partial, PAIS); in the other, they were male, but small (mild, MAIS). Single base substitutions have been found in both individuals: E772A in the PAIS subject, and R871G in the MAIS patient. In COS-1 cells transfected with the E772A and R871G hARs, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for mibolerone (MB) and methyltrienolone are normal. Nonetheless, the mutant hAR from the PAIS subject (E772A) has elevated nonequilibrium dissociation rate constants (k(diss)) for both androgens. In contrast, the MAIS subject's hAR (R871G) has k(diss) values that are apparently normal for MB and methyltrienolone; in addition, the R871G hAR's ability to bind MB resists thermal stress better than the hAR from the PAIS subject. The E772A and R871G hARs, therefore, confer the same pattern of discordant androgen-binding parameters in transfected COS-1 cells as observed previously in the subjects' genital skin fibroblasts. This proves their pathogenicity and correlates with the relative severity of the clinical phenotype. In COS-1 cells transfected with an androgen-responsive reporter gene, trans-activation was 50% of normal in cells containing either mutant hAR. However, mutant hAR-MB binding is unstable during prolonged incubation with MB, whereas normal hAR-MB binding increases. Thus, normal equilibrium dissociation constants alone, as determined by Scatchard analysis, may not be indicative of normal hAR function. An increased k(diss) despite a normal Kd for a given androgen suggests that it not only has increased egress from a mutant ligand-binding pocket, but also increased access to it. This hypothesis has certain implications in terms of the three-dimensional model of the ligand-binding domain of the nuclear receptor superfamily.

  7. Novel point mutation in the splice donor site of exon-intron junction 6 of the androgen receptor gene in a patient with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sammarco, I; Grimaldi, P; Rossi, P; Cappa, M; Moretti, C; Frajese, G; Geremia, R

    2000-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations have been shown to cause androgen insensitivity syndrome with altered sexual differentiation in XY individuals, ranging from a partial insensitivity with male phenotype and azoospermia to a complete insensitivity with female phenotype and the absence of pubic and axillary sexual hair after puberty. In this study we present an 11-yr-old XY girl, with clinical manifestations peculiar for impaired androgen biological action, including female phenotype, blind-ending vagina, small degree of posterior labial fusion, and absence of uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. At the time of the diagnosis the patient had a FSH/LH ratio according to the puberal stage, undetectable 17beta-estradiol, and high levels of testosterone (80.1 ng/mL). After bilateral gonadectomy, performed at the age of 11 yr, histological examination showed small embryonic seminiferous tubules containing prevalently Sertoli cells and occasional spermatogonia together with abundant fibrous tissue. Molecular study of the patient showed a guanine to thymine transversion in position +5 of the donor splice site in the junction between exon 6 and intron 6 of the AR gene. The result of RT-PCR amplification of the AR messenger ribonucleic acid from cultured genital skin fibroblasts of the patient suggests that splicing is defective, and intron 6 is retained in most of the receptor messenger ribonucleic acid molecules. We show by immunoblotting that most of the expressed protein lacks part of the C-terminal hormone-binding domain, and a small amount of normal receptor is observed. This is probably responsible for the reduced binding capacity in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The molecular basis of the alteration in this case is a novel, uncommon mutation, leading to a phenotype indicative of a partial androgen insensitivity syndrome, Quigley's grade 5.

  8. Mutations in the amino-terminal domain of the human androgen receptor may be associated with partial androgen insensitivity and impaired transactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Holterhus, P-M; Werner, R; Struve, D; Hauffa, B P; Schroeder, C; Hiort, O

    2005-09-01

    The majority of genetic variations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are point mutations leading to impairment of the DNA- or hormone-binding domains. The N-terminus encoded by the first exon of the AR-gene usually harbors disruptive mutations associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) while missense mutations related with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) are seemingly rare. We present a 46,XY male with scrotal hypospadias in whom we detected a S432 F point mutation within the N-terminus. Transient transfections of an AR expression plasmid carrying the S432 F mutation using Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells revealed a significant partial reduction in transactivation of the co-transfected androgen responsive (ARE) (2)TATA luciferase reporter gene thus confirming PAIS. In two further 46, XY patients with slight to moderate virilization defects, we detected an S411 N mutation, and a 9 base pair deletion leading to the loss of amino acids 409 to 411 (L-A-S), respectively. These mutations did not compromise AR-function under the chosen experimental settings. The S432 F-patient supports particular significance of the AR-N-terminus for mild forms of AIS while the functional role of the two further mutations remains unclear. The N-terminus is a species-specific AR-domain possibly also involved in contributing to target tissue selectivity of AR-actions via mediating co-regulator interactions. Therefore, mild molecular defects of the AR-N-terminus may not necessarily inhibit general transactivation properties using currently established reporter gene models.

  9. Androgens in polycystic ovary syndrome: the role of exercise and diet.

    PubMed

    Giallauria, Francesco; Palomba, Stefano; Vigorito, Carlo; Tafuri, Maria Giovanna; Colao, Annamaria; Lombardi, Gaetano; Orio, Francesco

    2009-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in premenopausal women and is characterized by chronic ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. Clinical studies have shown that hyperandrogenism is linked with insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome in PCOS women. This review article summarizes the several potential mechanisms for the association of androgen excess with insulin resistance, including both direct and indirect actions of androgens on insulin target tissues. This review article also focuses on the beneficial effects of exercise training and diet on glucose metabolism and hyperandrogenism in PCOS women, pointing out that whether in conjunction with pharmacotherapy or as a stand-alone treatment, diet and exercise training represent a fundamental strategy in the treatment of PCOS women.

  10. Androgens modify Wnt agonists/antagonists expression balance in dermal papilla cells preventing hair follicle stem cell differentiation in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Leirós, Gustavo José; Ceruti, Julieta María; Castellanos, María Lía; Kusinsky, Ana Gabriela; Balañá, María Eugenia

    2017-01-05

    In androgenetic alopecia, androgens impair dermal papilla-induced hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) differentiation inhibiting Wnt signaling. Wnt agonists/antagonists balance was analyzed after dihydrotestosterone (DHT) stimulation in androgen-sensitive dermal papilla cells (DPC) cultured as spheroids or monolayer. In both culture conditions, DHT stimulation downregulated Wnt5a and Wnt10b mRNA while the Wnt antagonist Dkk-1 was upregulated. Notably, tissue architecture of DPC-spheroids lowers Dkk-1 and enhances Wnt agonists' basal expression; probably contributing to DPC inductivity. The role of Wnt agonists/antagonists as mediators of androgen inhibition of DPC-induced HFSC differentiation was evaluated. Inductive DPC-conditioned medium supplemented with DKK-1 impaired HFSC differentiation mimicking androgens' action. This effect was associated with inactivation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in differentiating HFSC by both DPC-conditioned media. Moreover, addition of WNT10b to DPC-medium conditioned with DHT, overcame androgen inhibition of HFSC differentiation. Our results identify DKK1 and WNT10b as paracrine factors which modulate the HFSC differentiation inhibition involved in androgen-driven balding.

  11. The Stress Response Mediator ATF3 Represses Androgen Signaling by Binding the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbo; Jiang, Ming; Cui, Hongmei; Chen, Mengqian; Buttyan, Ralph; Hayward, Simon W.; Hai, Tsonwin; Wang, Zhengxin

    2012-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a common mediator of cellular stress response signaling and is often aberrantly expressed in prostate cancer. We report here that ATF3 can directly bind the androgen receptor (AR) and consequently repress AR-mediated gene expression. The ATF3-AR interaction requires the leucine zipper domain of ATF3 that independently binds the DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains of AR, and the interaction prevents AR from binding to cis-acting elements required for expression of androgen-dependent genes while inhibiting the AR N- and C-terminal interaction. The functional consequences of the loss of ATF3 expression include increased transcription of androgen-dependent genes in prostate cancer cells that correlates with increased ability to grow in low-androgen-containing medium and increased proliferative activity of the prostate epithelium in ATF3 knockout mice that is associated with prostatic hyperplasia. Our results thus demonstrate that ATF3 is a novel repressor of androgen signaling that can inhibit AR functions, allowing prostate cells to restore homeostasis and maintain integrity in the face of a broad spectrum of intrinsic and environmental insults. PMID:22665497

  12. Androgens and Androgen Derivatives: Science, Myths, and Theories: Explored From a Special Operations Perspective.

    PubMed

    Givens, Melissa L; Deuster, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Androgen use outside of legitimate medical therapy is a perceived concern that is drawing attention across military and specifically Special Operations Forces (SOF) communities. For leadership and the medical community to properly address the issue and relate to those individuals who are using or considering use, it will be crucial to understand the scope of the problem. Limited data suggest that the prevalence of androgen use may be increasing, and inferences made from the scientific literature suggest that SOF may be a population of concern. While risks of androgen use are well known, there are little data specific to military performance that can be applied to a rigorous risk:benefit analysis, allowing myths and poorly supported theories to perpetuate within the community. Further efforts to define the potential benefits balanced against the short- and long-term risks should be undertaken. Providers within the SOF community should arm themselves with information to engage androgen users and leadership in meaningful discussion regarding androgen use.

  13. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Xu, Haikun; An, Wei; Zhu, Dechun; Li, Dejun

    2016-06-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  14. Molecular studies of a patient with complete androgen insensitivity and a 47,XXY karyotype.

    PubMed

    Girardin, C M; Deal, C; Lemyre, E; Paquette, J; Lumbroso, R; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A; Van Vliet, G

    2009-09-01

    A phenotypic female with complete androgen insensitivity from a maternally inherited mutation in the androgen receptor had a 47,XXY karyotype. Partial maternal X isodisomy explained the expression of androgen insensitivity despite the presence of 2 X chromosomes.

  15. Male genital leiomyomas showing androgen receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Vieites, Begoña; Evgenyeva, Elena; Vázquez-Veiga, Hugo; Forteza, Jeronimo

    2007-12-01

    Genital leiomyoma in men include those superficial leiomyomas arising in the scrotum and the areola. They are unusual neoplasms: few cases have been reported in the literature and they usually escape clinical diagnosis. Three cases of male genital leiomyomas are reported: two in the scrotum and one in the areola. They were all conservatively excised and the behaviour was completely benign in all cases. Histopathological examination showed the typical findings of superficial leiomyomas, with some minor differences between cases arising in the scrotum and those from the areola. Immunohistochemical findings not only confirmed the smooth muscle nature of all cases but also showed unequivocal immunostaining for androgen receptors in the leiomyomas from the scrotum. Immunostaining for androgen receptors in scrotal leiomyomas is, as far as we are aware, a previously unknown characteristic of male genital leiomyomas. This finding supports the role of steroid hormones in the growth of genital leiomyomas, similar to leiomyomas found in other locations.

  16. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  17. [Case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ohba, Kojiro; Hayashida, Yasushi; Hakariya, Hironobu; Ichinose, Syunsuke; Naitou, Shinji

    2009-05-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome, gonadectomy, estrogen supplementation a 23-year-old single female visited our gynecological clinic because of primary amenorrhea. The patient's breast development was good. However the patient had thin pubic hair and blind-ending vagina. Serum levels of estrogen E2, testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follide stimulating hormone (FSH) were 37.0, 497 pg/ml, 22.0 and 8.7 mIU/ml, respectively. Chromosomal analysis was a karyotype of 46, XY. There was no uterus and no ovaries. However, there were bilateral inguinal elastic masses which were gonads. The patient was diagnosed with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and bilateral gonadectomy was performed. The postoperative course was good and the patient is receiving estrogen replacement therapy.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bianca, S; Cataliotti, A; Bartoloni, G; Torrente, I; Barrano, B; Boemi, G; Lo Presti, M; Indaco, L; Barone, C; Ettore, G

    2009-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) (OMIM 300068) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with an XY karyotype that is caused by androgen receptor (AR) defects. We report a prenatal diagnosis case with clinical and molecular findings. The fetal phenotype was female, moreover the autopsy revealed the presence of abdominal testes confirmed by histopathological examination. The AR gene molecular analysis performed on the fetal DNA showed the presence of a c.2493C>T change in exon 4. The single nucleotide change resulted in a Q711X amino acid substitution within the AR ligand-binding domain of the protein that has never been described before in the literature. AIS is an important consideration in pregnancies that show sex discordance in ultrasonography and karyotype results with the opportunity to perform molecular analysis of the AR gene in order to confirm the diagnosis.

  19. An examination of how different mutations at arginine 855 of the androgen receptor result in different androgen insensitivity phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Elhaji, Youssef A; Wu, Jian Hui; Gottlieb, Bruce; Beitel, Lenore K; Alvarado, Carlos; Batist, Gerald; Trifiro, Mark A

    2004-08-01

    Two substitutions at an identical location in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR), R855C and R855H, are associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and partial AIS, respectively. Kinetic analysis of the mutant receptors in genital skin fibroblasts and in transfected cells revealed very low total binding (Bmax) and increased rate constants of dissociation (k) for the R855C mutant; and normal Bmax and k, with slightly elevated equilibrium affinity constants (Kd), but decreased transactivational capacity for the R855H mutant. Further analysis of the R855H mutant revealed both thermolability and decreased N/C-terminal inter-actions in the presence and absence of the co-activator transcriptional intermediary factor 2. To establish the nature of these functional differences we have used molecular dynamic modeling to create four-dimensional models of each of the mutant receptors. Molecular dynamic modeling produced profoundly different models for each of the mutants: in modeling of R855C a surprisingly significant distant alteration in the position of helix 12 of the helix 12 positioning of the AR ligand binding domain (AR-LBD) occurs, which would predict severe ligand binding abnormalities and complete AIS; in modeling of R855H, no dramatic effect on the position of helix 12 was seen; thus, binding properties of the receptor are not compromised. Molecular dynamics four-dimensional modeling clearly supports the biochemical and kinetic studies of both mutants. Such novel computational modeling may lead to a better understanding of the structure-function relationships and the molecular mechanics of ligand binding not only of the AR-LBD but also of other nuclear receptors.

  20. Treatment of androgenic disorders in women: acne, hirsutism, and alopecia.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G P; Bergfeld, W F

    1990-01-01

    Androgen excess disorders--acne, alopecia, and hirsutism--can be treated effectively with endocrine therapy such as androgen receptor blockers or antagonists, or with androgen suppression. Spironolactone, estrogen, and dexamethasone are considered the most effective approaches to treatment. Whatever the modality, careful planning is key to success, with recognition that response rates vary from patient to patient. A treatment regimen generally continues for at least 2 years.

  1. Inhibitors for Androgen Receptor Activation Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    new class of chemical therapeutics for treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray crystallography, high throughput screening, medicinal... treatments because anti-androgen resis- tance usually develops. We conducted functional and x-ray screens to identify compounds that bind the AR surface and...possibility that such compounds could be used for prostate cancer treatment . It is unlikely that natural T3 or Triac concentrations approach levels required

  2. Consequences of use of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Marcel J; Blake, Kathleen; Griffith, Jill; Yates, Andrew; Copley, LaRae M

    2007-08-01

    Whether providing anticipatory guidance to the young adolescent patient, conducting a preparticipation examination on a young athlete, or treating a sick user of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), the primary care physician must be familiar with the adverse consequences of the use of these compounds. This article reviews the endocrine, cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatic, and miscellaneous effects of AASs, highlighting effects reported in children and adolescents, and relying on consequences in adults when pediatric data is unavailable.

  3. Acute effect of androgens on maximal force-generating capacity and electrically evoked calcium transient in mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Fraysse, Bodvael; Vignaud, Alban; Fane, Bourama; Schuh, Mélanie; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Metzger, Daniel; Ferry, Arnaud

    2014-09-01

    As androgens might have rapid androgen-receptor (AR) independent action on muscle cells, we analysed the in vivo acute effect of androgens on maximal force generation capacity and electrically evoked calcium transient responsible for the excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle from wild-type male mice and muscle fibre androgen receptor (AR) deficient (AR(skm-/y)) male mice. We tested the hypothesis that acute in vivo androgen treatment improves contractility and modifies calcium transient in mouse hindlimb muscles. In addition, we determined whether the reduced maximal force generation capacity of AR(skm-/y) mice is caused by an alteration in calcium transient. We found that acute dehydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone treatment of mice does not change in situ maximal force, power or fatigue resistance of tibialis anterior muscles. In agreement with this observation, maximal force and twitch kinetics also remained unchanged when both whole extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle or fibre bundles were incubated in vitro with DHT. Electrically evoked calcium transient, i.e. calcium amplitude, time to peak and decay, was also not modified by DHT treatment of EDL muscle fibre bundles. Finally, we found no difference in calcium transient between AR(skm-/y) and wild-type mice despite the reduced maximal force in EDL fibre bundles of AR(skm-/y) mice. In conclusion, acute androgen treatment has no ergogenic effect on muscle contractility and does not affect calcium transient in response to stimulation. In addition, the reduced maximal force of AR(skm-/y) mice is not related to calcium transient dysfunction.

  4. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) as Function Promoting Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The last decade has witnessed unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Recent Findings While steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5α-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with AR contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. Summary SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis. PMID:19357508

  5. Androgen receptor profiling predicts prostate cancer outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stelloo, Suzan; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; van der Poel, Henk G; de Jong, Jeroen; van Leenders, Geert JLH; Jenster, Guido; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bergman, Andries M; Zwart, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in men. Biomarkers for outcome prediction are urgently needed, so that high-risk patients could be monitored more closely postoperatively. To identify prognostic markers and to determine causal players in prostate cancer progression, we assessed changes in chromatin state during tumor development and progression. Based on this, we assessed genomewide androgen receptor/chromatin binding and identified a distinct androgen receptor/chromatin binding profile between primary prostate cancers and tumors with an acquired resistance to therapy. These differential androgen receptor/chromatin interactions dictated expression of a distinct gene signature with strong prognostic potential. Further refinement of the signature provided us with a concise list of nine genes that hallmark prostate cancer outcome in multiple independent validation series. In this report, we identified a novel gene expression signature for prostate cancer outcome through generation of multilevel genomic data on chromatin accessibility and transcriptional regulation and integration with publically available transcriptomic and clinical datastreams. By combining existing technologies, we propose a novel pipeline for biomarker discovery that is easily implementable in other fields of oncology. PMID:26412853

  6. Nuclear exclusion of the androgen receptor by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Rimler, Avi; Culig, Zoran; Lupowitz, Zippora; Zisapel, Nava

    2002-05-01

    Androgen receptors (AR) play a crucial role in androgen-mediated processes and prostate cancer progression. The pineal hormone melatonin attenuates the androgen-dependent growth of benign and cancer prostate epithelial cells in vitro and may reverse clinical resistance to androgen ablation therapy in patients progressing on gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Where along the AR cascade does melatonin act remains to be determined. The effects of melatonin on AR localization, level and activity were assessed using androgen-insensitive prostate carcinoma PC3 cells stably transfected with a wild-type AR-expressing vector (PC3-AR).AR was localized to the PC3-AR cell nucleus in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Melatonin caused a robust exclusion of the AR from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm. The nuclear export inhibitor, leptomycin B prevented this process. The exclusion was selective since melatonin had no such effect on the nuclear localization of estrogen receptors alpha (ERalpha) in these cells. Melatonin also caused nuclear exclusion of the AR in the presence of DHT. In addition, it attenuated androgen induced reporter gene activity in PC3 cells co-transfected with the human AR and AR reporter plasmids. Elevated androgen concentrations counteracted melatonin's effects. Melatonin did not decrease AR level or androgen binding in the cells. The nuclear localization of the AR is a hallmark of its cellular activity. These data point to AR nuclear exclusion as a possible mechanism to attenuate androgen responses in target tissues.

  7. Androgen regulates ADAMTS15 gene expression in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Molokwu, Chidi N; Adeniji, Olajumoke O; Chandrasekharan, Shankar; Hamdy, Freddie C; Buttle, David J

    2010-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a major cause of mortality, largely as a consequence of metastases and transformation to androgen-independent growth. Metalloproteinases are implicated in cancer progression. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) are expressed in prostate cancer cells, with ADAMTS-1 and ADAMTS-15 being the most abundant. ADAMTS-15 but not ADAMTS-1 expression was downregulated by androgen in LNCaP prostate cancer cells, possibly through androgen response elements associated with the gene. ADAMTS-15 expression is predictive for survival in breast cancer, and the situation may be similar in prostate cancer, as androgen independence is usually due to aberrant signaling through its receptor.

  8. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome with R840H mutation in androgen receptor: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jui-Lung; Chang, Kuang-Huey; Sheu, Jin-Cherng; Lee, Yann-Jinn; Tsai, Li-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is the major cause of male pseudohermaphroditism. The severity of the disorders varies widely, ranging from the phenotypic women with female external genitalia in cases of complete AIS to the phenotype of ambiguous genitalia in partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) and a rare group of phenotypic normal males with azoospermia. Here, we report an infant of PAIS with a missense mutation at position 2881 (G-->A) in exon 7, encoding substitution of histidine for arginine at codon 840 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Both the biochemical and molecular studies are presented. Establishing the diagnosis of PAIS is very important for gender assignment to an infant of ambiguous genitalia. The molecular analysis will facilitate genetic counselling to the maternal side relatives for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis.

  9. C601S mutation in the androgen receptor results in partial loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajender; Singh, Pooja; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2010-11-01

    The present study was undertaken on a case of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome to look at the etiology of the disorder. The patient exhibited a female phenotype despite 46,XY chromosome complement. Direct DNA sequencing of coding region of the androgen receptor gene in this case revealed a 2329G>C substitution (cDNA sequence reference) in exon 3 of the gene. The substitution resulted in replacement of Cys with Ser at codon 601 of the ligand-binding domain of the protein. Analyses on 200 control samples revealed absence of this substitution(s). In vitro assays were done using COS-1 cells. The mutation resulted in partial (∼40%) loss of ligand-binding and significant (∼70%) loss of downstream transactivation function. The mutation was absent in the controls. The findings are particularly interesting since another substitution at the same codon (TGC-TTC) has been reported in association with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

  10. A case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome with a novel androgen receptor mutation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Vivian L; Sheffer-Babila, Sharone; Lee, Ting A; Tanaka, Kathryn; Zhou, Ping

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 14-year-old girl with primary amenorrhea and phenotypic as well as hormonal features of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who tested positive for a novel missense androgen receptor gene mutation resulting in serine-to-isoleucine change at position 703 in exon 4 in the ligand-binding domain. The interesting features of this case include a persistence of Müllerian derivatives, Sertoli cell adenoma, Tanner III pubic hair, and a normal bone mineral density. These features are not typically described in CAIS. This novel mutation associated with a unique clinical presentation serves to significantly enrich the literature on this rare and fascinating disorder of androgen insensitivity syndrome.

  11. Cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of F877L mutant androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Van Hook, Kathryn; King, Carly J.; Schwartzman, Jacob; Lisac, Robert; Urrutia, Joshua; Sehrawat, Archana; Woodward, Josha; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gulati, Roman; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Gleave, Martin; Korkola, James E.; Gao, Lina; Heiser, Laura M.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed and second-most lethal cancer among men in the United States. The vast majority of prostate cancer deaths are due to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) – the lethal form of the disease that has progressed despite therapies that interfere with activation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. One emergent resistance mechanism to medical castration is synthesis of intratumoral androgens that activate the AR. This insight led to the development of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. However, resistance to enzalutamide invariably develops, and disease progression is nearly universal. One mechanism of resistance to enzalutamide is an F877L mutation in the AR ligand-binding domain that can convert enzalutamide to an agonist of AR activity. However, mechanisms that contribute to the agonist switch had not been fully clarified, and there were no therapies to block AR F877L. Using cell line models of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we determined that cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of mutant F877L AR. Further, enzalutamide treatment of AR F877L-expressing cell lines recapitulated the effects of androgen activation of F877L AR or wild-type AR. Because the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ-1 was previously shown to block androgen activation of wild-type AR, we tested JQ-1 in AR F877L-expressing CRPC models. We determined that JQ-1 suppressed androgen or enzalutamide activation of mutant F877L AR and suppressed growth of mutant F877L AR CRPC tumors in vivo, demonstrating a new strategy to treat tumors harboring this mutation. PMID:27276681

  12. Androgen replacement therapy: present and future.

    PubMed

    Gooren, Louis J G; Bunck, Mathijs C M

    2004-01-01

    The major goal of androgen substitution is to replace testosterone at levels as close to physiological levels as is possible. For some androgen-dependent functions testosterone is a pro-hormone, peripherally converted to 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 17beta-estradiol (E2), of which the levels preferably should be within normal physiological ranges. Furthermore, androgens should have a good safety profile without adverse effects on the prostate, serum lipids, liver or respiratory function, and they must be convenient to use and patient-friendly, with a relative independence from medical services. Natural testosterone is viewed as the best androgen for substitution in hypogonadal men. The reason behind the selection is that testosterone can be converted to DHT and E2, thus developing the full spectrum of testosterone activities in long-term substitution. The mainstays of testosterone substitution are parenteral testosterone esters (testosterone enantate and testosterone cipionate) administered every 2-3 weeks. A major disadvantage is the strongly fluctuating levels of plasma testosterone, which are not in the physiological range at least 50% of the time. Also, the generated plasma E2 is usually supraphysiological. A major improvement is parenteral testosterone undecanoate producing normal plasma levels of testosterone for 12 weeks, with normal plasma levels of DHT and E2 also. Subcutaneous testosterone implants provide the patient, depending on the dose of implants, with normal plasma testosterone for 3-6 months. However, their use is not widespread. Oral testosterone undecanoate dissolved in castor oil bypasses the liver via its lymphatic absorption. At a dosage of 80 mg twice daily, plasma testosterone levels are largely in the normal range, but plasma DHT tends to be elevated. For two decades transdermal testosterone preparations have been available and have an attractive pharmacokinetic profile. Scrotal testosterone patches generate supraphysiological

  13. Preservation of androgen secretion during estrogen suppression with aminoglutethimide in the treatment of metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Samojlik, E; Veldhuis, J D; Wells, S A; Santen, R J

    1980-01-01

    menopausal women were evaluated separately. No significant differences between the two groups were observed for E1, E2, T, DHT, DHEA-S, delta 4-A, LH, FSH, and prolactin. We conclude that equivalent and highly significant estrogen suppression occurs with either AG or surgical adrenalectomy although androgen secretion is preserved during AG treatment but not after surgical adrenalectomy. The combined effects of estrogen deprivation associated with androgen preservation might be significant in the therapeutic action of AG in hormone-responsive neoplasms. PMID:6986409

  14. A novel point mutation (R840S) in the androgen receptor in a Brazilian family with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Melo, K F; Latronico, A C; Costa, E M; Billerbeck, A E; Mendonca, B B; Arnhold, I J

    1999-10-01

    Mutations of the androgen receptor gene causing androgen insensitivity syndrome in 46, XY individuals, result in phenotypes ranging from complete female to ambiguous genitalia to males with minor degrees of undervirilization. We studied two Brazilian brothers with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. They were born with perineal hypospadias, bifid scrotum, small penis and cryptorchidism, and developed gynecomastia at puberty. Genomic DNA was extracted and denaturinggradient gel electrophoresis of exon 7 of the androgen receptor gene followed by sequence analysis revealed a new mutation, a C A transversion, altering codon 840 from arginine (CGT) to serine (AGT). R840 is located in the androgen binding domain, in a "hot spot" region, important for the formation and function of the hormone receptor-complex and within the region that is involved in androgen receptor dimerization. Replacement of arginine (basic) by serine (neutral and polar) is a nonconservative substitution. Three mutations in this residue (R840C, R840G nonconservative and R840H, conservative) were previously reported in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and when expressed "in vitro" lead to a subnormal transactivation of a reporter gene. We conclude that the novel R840 mutation in the androgen receptor is the cause of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome in this Brazilian family.

  15. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    . Generally, AAS seem to induce increments of aggression and hostility. Mood disturbances (e.g. depression, [hypo-]mania, psychotic features) are likely to be dose and drug dependent. AAS dependence or withdrawal effects (such as depression) seem to occur only in a small number of AAS users. Dissatisfaction with the body and low self-esteem may lead to the so-called 'reverse anorexia syndrome' that predisposes to the start of AAS use. Many other adverse effects have been associated with AAS misuse, including disturbance of endocrine and immune function, alterations of sebaceous system and skin, changes of haemostatic system and urogenital tract. One has to keep in mind that the scientific data may underestimate the actual untoward effects because of the relatively low doses administered in those studies, since they do not approximate doses used by illicit steroid users. The mechanism of action of AAS may differ between compounds because of variations in the steroid molecule and affinity to androgen receptors. Several pathways of action have been recognised. The enzyme 5-alpha-reductase seems to play an important role by converting AAS into dihydrotestosterone (androstanolone) that acts in the cell nucleus of target organs, such as male accessory glands, skin and prostate. Other mechanisms comprises mediation by the enzyme aromatase that converts AAS in female sex hormones (estradiol and estrone), antagonistic action to estrogens and a competitive antagonism to the glucocorticoid receptors. Furthermore, AAS stimulate erythropoietin synthesis and red cell production as well as bone formation but counteract bone breakdown. The effects on the cardiovascular system are proposed to be mediated by the occurrence of AAS-induced atherosclerosis (due to unfavourable influence on serum lipids and lipoproteins), thrombosis, vasospasm or direct injury to vessel walls, or may be ascribed to a combination of the different mechanisms. AAS-induced increment of muscle tissue can be attributed

  16. Central pattern generators for social vocalization: Androgen-dependent neurophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2008-01-01

    Historically, most studies of vertebrate central pattern generators (CPGs) have focused on mechanisms for locomotion and respiration. Here, we highlight new results for ectothermic vertebrates, namely teleost fish and amphibians, showing how androgenic steroids can influence the temporal patterning of CPGs for social vocalization. Investigations of vocalizing teleosts show how androgens can rapidly (within minutes) modulate the neurophysiological output of the vocal CPG (fictive vocalizations that mimic the temporal properties of natural vocalizations) inclusive of their divergent actions between species, as well as intraspecific differences between male reproductive morphs. Studies of anuran amphibians (frogs) demonstrate that long-term steroid treatments (wks) can masculinize the fictive vocalizations of females, inclusive of its sensitivity to rapid modulation by serotonin. Given the conserved organization of vocal control systems across vertebrate groups, the vocal CPGs of fish and amphibians provide tractable models for identifying androgen-dependent events that are fundamental to the mechanisms of vocal motor patterning. These basic mechanisms can also inform our understanding of the more complex CPGs for vocalization, and social behaviors in general, that have evolved among birds and mammals. PMID:18262186

  17. Interactions of androgens and estradiol on sex accessory ducts of larval tiger salamanders, Ambystoma tigrinum.

    PubMed

    Norris, D O; Carr, J A; Summers, C H; Featherston, R

    1997-06-01

    Immature tiger salamander larvae were treated with 12.5 or 25 micrograms of estradiol, testosterone, or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or 12.5 micrograms of estradiol combined with 12.5 micrograms of either testosterone or DHT. Müllerian duct epithelium was more stimulated by combined steroid treatment than by any steroid alone. Estradiol antagonized the action of DHT in the Wolffian duct. Both of the androgens and estradiol when administered alone at the higher dose stimulated enlargement of connective tissue surrounding the ducts, but the combined 12.5 micrograms androgen/12.5 micrograms estrogen treatment was more effective even though the total steroid administered was the same. The effectiveness of DHT on müllerian cells of this species is evidence against a required aromatization of androgens to explain paradoxical steroid effects and suggests that fundamental differences may exist in steroid receptors of müllerian ducts, connective tissue, and Wolffian ducts. A possible role for the urodele duct system for assessing estrogenic activity of environmental contaminants is discussed.

  18. The prohormone 19-norandrostenedione displays selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) like properties after subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Diel, P; Friedel, A; Geyer, H; Kamber, M; Laudenbach-Leschowsky, U; Schänzer, W; Schleipen, B; Thevis, M; Vollmer, G; Zierau, O

    2008-04-01

    One of the most frequently misused steroid precursors (prohormones) is 19-norandrostenedione (4-estrene-3,17-dione, NOR), which is, after oral administration, readily metabolised to nortestosterone, also known as nandrolone (durabolin). In this study we have characterised molecular mechanisms of its action determined its tissue specific androgenic and anabolic potency after subcutaneous (s.c.) administration and investigated potential adverse effects. Receptor binding tests demonstrate that NOR binds with high selectivity to the AR. The potency of NOR to transactivate androgen receptor (AR) dependent reporter gene expression was 10 times lower as compared to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In vivo experiments in orchiectomised rats demonstrated that s.c. treatment with NOR resulted only in a stimulation of the weight of the levator ani muscle; the prostate and seminal vesicle weights remained completely unaffected. Like testosterone, administration of NOR resulted in a stimulation of AR and myostatin mRNA expression in the gastrocnemius muscle. NOR does not affect prostate proliferation, the liver weight and the expression of the tyrosine aminotransferase gene (TAT) in the liver. Summarizing these data it is obvious that NOR, if administrated s.c. and in contrast to its metabolite nandrolone, highly selectively stimulates the growth of the skeletal muscle but has only weak androgenic properties. This observation may have relevance with respect to therapeutic aspects but also doping prevention.

  19. Expression of androgen-binding protein (ABP) in human cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Schock, H W; Herbert, Z; Sigusch, H; Figulla, H R; Jirikowski, G F; Lotze, U

    2006-04-01

    Cardiomyocytes are known to be androgen targets. Changing systemic steroid levels are thought to be linked to various cardiac ailments, including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The mode of action of gonadal steroid hormones on the human heart is unknown to date. In the present study, we used high-resolution immunocytochemistry on semithin sections (1 microm thick), IN SITU hybridization, and mass spectrometry to investigate the expression of androgen-binding protein (ABP) in human myocardial biopsies taken from male patients with DCM. We observed distinct cytoplasmic ABP immunoreactivity in a fraction of the myocytes. IN SITU hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide probes revealed specific hybridization signals in these cells. A portion of the ABP-positive cells contained immunostaining for androgen receptor. With SELDI TOF mass spectrometry of affinity purified tissue extracts of human myocardium, we confirmed the presence of a 50 kDa protein similar to ABP. Our observations provide evidence of an intrinsic expression of ABP in human heart. ABP may be secreted from myocytes in a paracrine manner perhaps to influence the bioavailabity of gonadal steroids in myocardium.

  20. Central pattern generators for social vocalization: androgen-dependent neurophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bass, Andrew H; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2008-05-01

    Historically, most studies of vertebrate central pattern generators (CPGs) have focused on mechanisms for locomotion and respiration. Here, we highlight new results for ectothermic vertebrates, namely teleost fish and amphibians, showing how androgenic steroids can influence the temporal patterning of CPGs for social vocalization. Investigations of vocalizing teleosts show how androgens can rapidly (within minutes) modulate the neurophysiological output of the vocal CPG (fictive vocalizations that mimic the temporal properties of natural vocalizations) inclusive of their divergent actions between species, as well as intraspecific differences between male reproductive morphs. Studies of anuran amphibians (frogs) demonstrate that long-term steroid treatments (wks) can masculinize the fictive vocalizations of females, inclusive of its sensitivity to rapid modulation by serotonin. Given the conserved organization of vocal control systems across vertebrate groups, the vocal CPGs of fish and amphibians provide tractable models for identifying androgen-dependent events that are fundamental to the mechanisms of vocal motor patterning. These basic mechanisms can also inform our understanding of the more complex CPGs for vocalization, and social behaviors in general, that have evolved among birds and mammals.

  1. Metabolic Complications of Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Philip J.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Androgen deprivation therapy has a variety of well recognized adverse effects including vasomotor flushing, loss of libido, fatigue, gynecomastia, anemia and osteoporosis. This review focuses on the more recently described metabolic complications of androgen deprivation therapy including obesity, insulin resistance and lipid alterations as well as the association of androgen deprivation therapy with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods We reviewed the medical literature using the PubMed® search terms prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, obesity, insulin resistance, lipids, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction. We provide a focused review and our perspective on the relevant literature. Results Androgen deprivation therapy decreases lean mass and increases fat mass. It also decreases insulin sensitivity while increasing low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Consistent with these adverse metabolic effects, androgen deprivation therapy may be associated with a greater incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Some of these androgen deprivation therapy related metabolic changes (obesity, insulin resistance and increased triglycerides) overlap with features of the metabolic syndrome. However, in contrast to the metabolic syndrome, androgen deprivation therapy increases subcutaneous fat and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions Androgen deprivation therapy increases obesity, decreases insulin sensitivity and adversely alters lipid profiles. It may be associated with a greater incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The benefits of androgen deprivation therapy should be weighed against these and other potential harms. Little is known about the optimal strategy to mitigate the adverse metabolic effects of androgen deprivation therapy. Thus, we recommend an emphasis on existing strategies

  2. Artificial masculinization in tilapia involves androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Estrogens have a pivotal role in natural female sexual differentiation of tilapia while lack of steroids results in testicular development. Despite the fact that androgens do not participate in natural sex differentiation, synthetic androgens, mainly 17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) are effective in the production of all-male fish in aquaculture. The sex inversion potency of synthetic androgens may arise from their androgenic activity or else as inhibitors of aromatase activity. The current study is an attempt to differentiate between the two alleged activities in order to evaluate their contribution to the sex inversion process and aid the search for novel sex inversion agents. In the present study, MT inhibited aromatase activity, when applied in vitro as did the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In comparison, exposure to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, was considerably more effective. Androgenic activity of MT was evaluated by exposure of Sciaenochromis fryeri fry to the substance and testing for the appearance of blue color. Flutamide, an androgen antagonist, administered concomitantly with MT, reduced the appearance of the blue color and the sex inversion potency of MT in a dose-dependent manner. In tilapia, administration of MT, fadrozole or DHT resulted in efficient sex inversion while flutamide reduced the sex inversion potency of all three compounds. In the case of MT and DHT the decrease in sex inversion efficiency caused by flutamide is most likely due to the direct blocking of the androgen binding to its cognate receptor. The negative effect of flutamide on the efficiency of the fadrozole treatment may indicate that the masculinizing activity of fadrozole may be attributed to excess, un-aromatized, androgens accumulated in the differentiating gonad. The present study shows that when androgen receptors are blocked, there is a reduction in the efficiency of sex inversion treatments. Our results suggest that in contrast to

  3. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  4. A NOVEL CELL LINE, MDA-KB2, THAT STABLY EXPRESSES AN ANDROGEN AND GLUCOCORTICOID RESPONSIVE REPORTER FOR THE DETECTION OF HORMONE RECEPTOR AGONISTS AND ANTAGONISTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed that in vitro assays for estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) mediated actions be included in a Tier I screening battery to detect hormonally active chemicals. Herein we describe the development of a novel stab...

  5. Lifestyle/dietary supplement partial androgen suppression and/or estrogen manipulation. A novel PSA reducer and preventive/treatment option for prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Moyad, Mark A

    2002-02-01

    There is a large interest in prostate cancer prevention and/or slowing the progression of this disease via dietary/lifestyle/supplement interventions. Numerous mechanisms have been suggested as to how these interventions may lower PSA levels. However, it is possible that the primary mechanism of action is partial androgen suppression and/or estrogen manipulation.

  6. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  7. Androgenic and estrogenic metabolites in serum of mice fed dehydroepiandrosterone: relationship to antihyperglycemic effects.

    PubMed

    Leiter, E H; Beamer, W G; Coleman, D L; Longcope, C

    1987-09-01

    The steroid prehormone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has potent antihyperglycemic effects when fed in the diet of genetically diabetic C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze changes in sex steroid levels in serum of mice fed DHEA, and to compare the antihyperglycemic potencies of the various metabolites in order to clarify the mechanism of DHEA action. Steroid radioimmunoassays showed that dietary DHEA entered the blood in high concentrations and was actively metabolized to both androgens (testosterone, T; dihydrotestosterone, DHT) and estrogens (estrone, E1; 17 beta-estradiol, E2). This metabolism did not require intact adrenal glands or gonads. In C57BL/KsJ normal (+/+) males, conversion of DHEA to androgens was the prominent feature; in db/db males, DHEA feeding not only increased serum T and DHT, but also serum E1 and E2 levels. The db/db mice had increased amounts of adipose tissue that sequestered more intravenously injected 3H-E2; this additional body fat could account for increased aromatization of DHEA-derived estrogen precursors. Comparisons of the relative antihyperglycemic potencies of androgenic and estrogenic steroid metabolites of DHEA in db/db mice showed that the estrogens and metabolites with estrogenic properties (androstenediol) or those convertible to estrogens (DHEA sulfate) were the most potent. Although 17 beta-E2 was effective by injection or per os, DHEA was effective only when administered per os, implicating alimentary tract conversion of DHEA to more biologically active reactants. Based on the pivotal position of DHEA as a prehormone for androgens, estrogens, and etiocholanolones, an explanation of the seemingly paradoxical effects exerted by this compound in blocking autoimmune disease, hyperglycemia, obesity, and neoplasia was proposed.

  8. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Karen R; Smith, Lee B; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S; Chambers, Thomas J G; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O'Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L M; Anderson, Richard A; Sharpe, Richard M

    2014-05-06

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk.

  9. Discovery Proteomics Identifies a Molecular Link between the Coatomer Protein Complex I and Androgen Receptor-dependent Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Lee, Jinhee; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription is a hallmark of human prostate cancers. At the molecular level, ligand-mediated AR activation is coordinated through spatial and temporal protein-protein interactions involving AR-interacting proteins, which we designate the “AR-interactome.” Despite many years of research, the ligand-sensitive protein complexes involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells have not been clearly defined. Here, we describe the development, characterization, and utilization of a novel human LNCaP prostate tumor cell line, N-AR, which stably expresses wild-type AR tagged at its N terminus with the streptavidin-binding peptide epitope (streptavidin-binding peptide-tagged wild-type androgen receptor; SBP-AR). A bioanalytical workflow involving streptavidin chromatography and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry was used to identify SBP-AR and associated ligand-sensitive cytosolic proteins/protein complexes linked to AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Functional studies verified that ligand-sensitive proteins identified in the proteomic screen encoded modulators of AR-mediated transcription, suggesting that these novel proteins were putative SBP-AR-interacting proteins in N-AR cells. This was supported by biochemical associations between recombinant SBP-AR and the ligand-sensitive coatomer protein complex I (COPI) retrograde trafficking complex in vitro. Extensive biochemical and molecular experiments showed that the COPI retrograde complex regulates ligand-mediated AR transcriptional activation, which correlated with the mobilization of the Golgi-localized ARA160 coactivator to the nuclear compartment of prostate tumor cells. Collectively, this study provides a bioanalytical strategy to validate the AR-interactome and define novel AR-interacting proteins involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Moreover, we describe a cellular system to study how compartment-specific AR

  10. Development of Novel Drugs That Target Coactivation Sites of the Androgen Receptor for Treatment of Antiandrogen-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AR) inhibitors with novel mechanism of action is slowly increasing since commercial anti-androgens ( Bicalutamide , Flutamide, Nilutamide and...purposes, in this assay, gold standards Enzalutamide and Bicalutamide shows IC50 of 100 nM and 600 nM respectively. Importantly, nine compounds exhibit... Bicalutamide (CDX) and Enzalutamide (MDV). PC3 cells (C) lacking the AR were not inhibited. O.D. (492 nM) O.D. (492 nM) O.D. (492 nM

  11. Identification of a novel androgen receptor agonist (or “androgen mimic”) of environmental concern: spironolactone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist in humans to treat certain conditions such as hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female pattern hair loss. The drug is also used to treat hypertension as a diuretic. With this commo...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  13. Testicular cancer in androgen insensitivity syndrome in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Ponce, José; Chilaca Rosas, Fátima; Molina Calzada, Carlos; Granados García, Martín; Jiménez Ríos, Miguel Angel; De la Garza Salazar, Jaime

    2008-12-01

    Male pseudohermaphroditism and androgen insensitivity syndrome cases have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer due to many factors such as mutations, hormonal disturbances involving gonadotropins and cryptorchidism. We describe the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of two cases with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and testicular cancer development, which were handled at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF IN VITRO ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY IN KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of In Vitro Androgenic Activity in Feedlot Effluent. Lambright, CS 1 , Guillette, LJ, Jr.2, Gray, LE, Jr.1 , 1USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC, 2 University of Florida, Dept. of Zoology, Gainesville FL

    Recent studies have shown the presence of androgenic activity in water...

  15. Identification of Androgen Receptor-Specific Enhancer RNAs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor-Specific Enhancer RNAs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0120 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...enhancer RNAs in response to androgen treatment such that these enhancer RNAs may serve as novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis

  16. Illicit Use of Androgens and Other Hormones: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent advances in studies of illicit use of androgens and other hormones. Recent findings Androgens and other appearance- and performance-enhancing substances are widely abused worldwide. Three notable clusters of findings have emerged in this field in recent years. First, studies almost unanimously find that androgen users engage in polypharmacy, often ingesting other hormones (e.g., human growth hormone, thyroid hormones, and insulin), ergo/thermogenic drugs (e.g., caffeine, ephedrine, clenbuterol), and classical drugs of abuse (e.g., cannabis, opiates, and cocaine). Second, reports of long-term psychiatric and medical adverse effects of androgens continue to accumulate. In cardiovascular research particularly, controlled studies have begun to supersede anecdotal evidence, strengthening the case that androgens (possibly acting synergistically with other abused drugs) may cause significant morbidity and even mortality. Third, it is increasingly recognized that androgen use may lead to a dependence syndrome with both psychological and physiological origins. Androgen dependence likely affects some millions of individuals worldwide, and arguably represents the least studied major class of illicit drug dependence. Summary Given mounting evidence of the adverse effects of androgens and associated polypharmacy, this topic will likely represent an expanding area of research and an issue of growing public-health concern. PMID:22450858

  17. Role of Hsp90 in Androgen-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Nelson, Zhou Wang: HDAC6 Regulates Androgen Receptor Hypersensitivity and Nuclear Localization via Modulating Hsp90 Acetylation in Castration... Hypersensitivity and Nuclear Localization via Modulating Hsp90 Acetylation in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer, Molecular Endocrinology 2009, 23...1963-1972. HDAC6 Regulates Androgen Receptor Hypersensitivity and Nuclear Localization via Modulating Hsp90 Acetylation in Castration-Resistant

  18. [Wheat androgenic embryoids and calli: data of scanning electron microscopy].

    PubMed

    Kruglova, N N; Gorbunova, V Iu; Abramov, S N; Sel'dimirova, O A

    2001-01-01

    The surface of wheat androgenic embryoids and calli at different developmental stages was studied using SEM. The embryoids were already characterized by regular cell divisions at the early developmental stages, while the calli were represented by irregular cell conglomerates. This trend was preserved during further development of androgenic structures. SEM studies of the surface of so-called secondary embryoids confirmed these observations.

  19. A novel androgen receptor mutation resulting in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and bilateral Leydig cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajender; Shastry, Prabhakar K; Rasalkar, Avinash A; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, K

    2006-01-01

    Androgens drive male secondary sexual differentiation and maturation. Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene cause a broad spectrum of abnormal phenotypes in humans, ranging from mild through partial to complete androgen insensitivity. We have analyzed the AR gene by using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and direct sequencing and have studied gonads histologically in a familial case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. Sequence analysis of the AR gene showed a novel C2578T missense mutation, resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved leucine residue with phenylalanine (L859F) in ligand-binding domain of the receptor. The residue L859, located in helix 10 of the androgen receptor, plays a significant role in overall architecture of ligand-binding pocket. The mutation was absent from the father, normal brother of the patients, and 100 normal males recruited in this study as controls. The inheritance of the mutation in the family clearly shows that C2578T is the underlying mutation for the eventual phenotype in the patients. Histology of patient's gonads showed Leydig cell hyperplasia, with a few or no spermatogonium. It is thought that AR gene mutations result in hormonal imbalance, resulting in the high levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and ultimately Leydig cell hyperplasia or tumor formation. In the present study, we have reported a rare familial case of Leydig cell hyperplasia despite consistently normal LH levels. The finding will help in giving counseling to this family and prevent the transmission of the mutated X chromosome to the coming generations.

  20. Enhancement of Vitamin D Action in Prostate Cancer through Silencing of CYP24

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    PCR analysis of endogenous CYP24A1 mRNA levels in presence of 10nM Vitamin D3 or vehicle (ethanol; EtOH) in LnCAP, DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer...p. 5 C.4. Androgen Administration Enhances the Growth Inhibitory Effect of Vitamin D3 : We studied the actions of androgen (alone or together...with vitamin D3 ) administration on cell using WST-1 colorimetric assay (Fig.5). In LNCaP (expresses a mutant AR and displays androgen

  1. Androgen, Estrogen and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    binding protein-5 expression. Xu C, Graf LF, Fazli L, Coleman IM, Mauldin DE, Li D, Nelson PS, Gleave M, Plymate SR, Cox ME, Torok-Storb BJ, Knudsen BS...Meeting presentations: Xu C, Graf LF, Fazli L, Nelson PS, Plymate SR, Cox ME, Torok-Storb BJ, Knudsen BS (2007) Androgen-regulation of the Bone...Marrow Microenvironment targets IGFBP-5. Innovative Minds in Prostate Cancer Today (IMPaCT). Atlanta, Georgia. P8-7. Xu C, Graf LF, Fazli L

  2. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in Three Sisters

    PubMed Central

    Verim, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSD) are congenital anomalies due to atypical development of chromosomes, gonads and anatomy. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), also known as testicular feminization (TF) is a rare DSD disease. The majority of CAIS patients apply to hospital with the complaint of primary amenorrhea or infertility. Given that CAIS patients are all phenotypically female while having 46, XY karyotypes, CAIS diagnosis should be disclosed in an age-appropriate manner preferably by a mental health professional. Cases are reported here for three 46XY siblings consistent with CAIS. PMID:24520507

  3. Androgen deprivation therapy-associated vasomotor symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jason M; Kohli, Manish; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is widely used as standard therapy in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. While efficacious, ADT is associated with multiple side effects, including decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, diabetes, loss of muscle tone and altered body composition, osteoporosis, lipid changes, memory loss, gynecomastia and hot flashes. The breadth of literature for the treatment of hot flashes is much smaller in men than that in women. While hormonal therapy of hot flashes has been shown to be effective, multiple non-hormonal medications and treatment methods have also been developed. This article reviews current options for the treatment of hot flashes in patients taking ADT. PMID:22286861

  4. The effect of Permixon on androgen receptors.

    PubMed

    el-Sheikh, M M; Dakkak, M R; Saddique, A

    1988-01-01

    Permixon, the liposterolic extract of the plant Serenoa Repens is a recently introduced drug for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The effect of Permixon on dihydrotestosterone and testosterone binding by eleven different tissue specimens was tested. The drug reduced the mean uptake of both hormones by 40.9% and 41.9% respectively in all tissue specimens. Since hirsutism and virilism are among other gynecological problems caused either by excessive androgen stimulation or excess endorgan response, we suggest that Permixon could be a useful treatment in such conditions and recommend further investigations of the possible therapeutic values of the drug in gynecological practice.

  5. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY.
    MC Cardon, PC Hartig,LE Gray, Jr. and VS Wilson.
    U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Typically, in vitro hazard assessments for ...

  6. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay
    Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. Wilson
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  7. 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, a synthetic androgen with high potency: structure-activity comparisons with other androgens.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Crozat, A; Li, F; Catterall, J F; Bardin, C W; Sundaram, K

    1999-12-31

    CNNT. There was a good correlation between bioactivity and binding affinity to AR for the 7alpha-substituted androgens compared to T. In contrast, relative to their binding affinity to AR, the androgenic potency of DHT and 19-NT was lower compared to T. The reason for the lower in vivo androgenic activity of 19-NT is attributable to its enzymatic conversion to 5alpha-reduced-19-NT in the prostate. In the case of DHT, the lower bioactivity could be attributed to its faster metabolic clearance rate relative to T. The correlation was further investigated in vitro by co-transfection of rat ARcDNA expression plasmid and a reporter plasmid encoding the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by an androgen inducible promoter into CV-1 cells. All the androgens led to a dose-dependent increase in the CAT activity. MENT was found to be the most potent followed by DHT, 19-NT, T, and CNNT. The specificity of the androgenic response was confirmed by its inhibition with hydroxyflutamide, an antiandrogen. Thus, there was a good correlation between binding affinity and in vitro bioactivity in the transient transfection assay for the androgens. This suggests that the in vivo bioactivity of androgens could be influenced not only by binding affinity to receptors but also by factors such as absorption, binding to serum proteins and metabolism. However, the high potency of MENT is primarily related to its higher affinity to AR.

  8. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    One critically important problem in prostate cancer research is to find new approaches to slow down the transition of prostate cancer from an...androgen-dependent state to a lethal androgen-refractory state. Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory

  9. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    One critically important problem in prostate cancer research is to find new approaches to slow down the transition of prostate cancer from an...androgen-dependent state to a lethal androgen-refractory state. Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory

  10. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  11. Stress and Androgen Activity During Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Shanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal stress is known to alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, and more recent evidence suggests that it may also affect androgen activity. In animal models, prenatal stress disrupts the normal surge of testosterone in the developing male, whereas in females, associations differ by species. In humans, studies show that (1) associations between prenatal stress and child outcomes are often sex-dependent, (2) prenatal stress predicts several disorders with notable sex differences in prevalence, and (3) prenatal exposure to stressful life events may be associated with masculinized reproductive tract development and play behavior in girls. In this minireview, we examine the existing literature on prenatal stress and androgenic activity and present new, preliminary data indicating that prenatal stress may also modify associations between prenatal exposure to diethylhexyl phthalate, (a synthetic, antiandrogenic chemical) and reproductive development in infant boys. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to both chemical and nonchemical stressors may alter sex steroid pathways in the maternal-placental-fetal unit and ultimately alter hormone-dependent developmental endpoints. PMID:26241065

  12. Development of a novel cell based androgen screening model

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Carmela; Rege, Juilee; Turcu, Adina; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Robins, Diane M; Rainey, William E

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the majority of androgen effects on target cells. The DNA cis-regulatory elements that respond to AR share sequence similarity with cis-regulatory elements for glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid and progesterone receptors (GR, MR and PR respectively). As a result, many of the current AR screening models are complicated by inaccurate activation of reporters by one of these receptor pathways. Identification of more selective androgen testing systems would be beneficial for clinical, pharmacological and toxicologic screening of AR activators. The present study describes the development of a selective androgen-responsive reporter cell line that expresses AR but does not express GR, MR and PR. CV1 cells were stably transduced to express human AR and an androgen-responsive gaussia luciferase gene. Clonal populations of AR expressing cells were isolated. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) and western analysis confirmed stable integration of AR in the most responsive clonal line which was named ‘CV1-ARluc’. Stimulation of CV1AR-luc with androgenic ligands (testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) for 18 h caused an increase in luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Other steroid hormones including aldosterone, cortisol, and progesterone did not stimulate luciferase response. The CV1-ARluc also increased luciferase activity when treated with human serum extracts. In conclusion, the CV1-ARluc cells provide a novel model system for screening of new AR agonists and antagonists and can determine the androgenic activity of human serum samples. PMID:26581480

  13. Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    the androgen axis, including those encoding enzymes of testosterone synthesis ( cytochrome P450c17) and conversion (steroid-5--reductase type 2...J., Gronberg, H., 2006. Germ- line genetic variation in the key androgen-regulating genes androgen receptor, cytochrome P450 , and steroid-5-alpha...4 Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy INTRODUCTION Androgen

  14. Transcriptional responses in male Japanese medaka exposed to antiandrogens and antiandrogen/androgen mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liwei; Peng, Tao; Liu, Fang; Ren, Lin; Peng, Zuhua; Ji, Guorong; Zhou, Yinfang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of androgenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in water is thought to be linked to deviation from normal male developmental and reproductive functions in exposed aquatic organisms. Because aquatic environments represent a chemically complex medium, the combined effects of androgenic EDCs require urgent attention. In the present study, the effects of two model androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, flutamide (FLU), and vinclozolin (VIN), were first determined individually in male Japanese medaka using the transcriptional response for genes associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The fish were further exposed to binary mixtures of VIN and 17β-trenbolone (TRE, AR agonist) to confirm the theoretical opposing effects of the AR antagonist and agonist. The results showed that exposure to FLU or VIN alone induced very similar transcriptional responses, demonstrating that gene transcription analysis could be successfully employed in identifying the action of single chemicals. For example, both exposures increased the transcription of cyp17b but decreased that of cyp19b in the gonad, demonstrating the compensatory response for AR blockage. However, in the case of exposure to mixtures, although the joint antagonistic action of TRE and VIN affected the most genes, the transcription profiles after exposure to mixtures were not consistent with expectations based on the results for individual chemicals, such as hepatic vtg, and star or cyp19a in gonads. Therefore, the limitation of gene transcription analyses in exposures to mixtures, as well as the potential for the extrapolation of single chemicals, should be considered in future studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1591-1599, 2016.

  15. Neurotoxic properties of the anabolic androgenic steroids nandrolone and methandrostenolone in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Pistarà, V; Corsaro, A; Tomasello, Flora; Giuffrida, Maria Laura; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse is associated with multiple neurobehavioral disturbances. The sites of action and the neurobiological sequels of AAS abuse are unclear at present. We investigated whether two different AASs, nandrolone and methandrostenolone, could affect neuronal survival in culture. The endogenous androgenic steroid testosterone was used for comparison. Both testosterone and nandrolone were neurotoxic at micromolar concentrations, and their effects were prevented by blockade of androgen receptors (ARs) with flutamide. Neuronal toxicity developed only over a 48-hr exposure to the steroids. The cell-impermeable analogues testosterone-BSA and nandrolone-BSA, which preferentially target membrane-associated ARs, were also neurotoxic in a time-dependent and flutamide-sensitive manner. Testosterone-BSA and nandrolone-BSA were more potent than their parent compounds, suggesting that membrane-associated ARs were the relevant sites for the neurotoxic actions of the steroids. Unlike testosterone and nandrolone, toxicity by methandrostenolone and methandrostenolone-BSA was insensitive to flutamide, but it was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU-486. Methandrostenolone-BSA was more potent than the parent compound, suggesting that its toxicity relied on the preferential activation of putative membrane-associated GRs. Consistently with the evidence that membrane-associated GRs can mediate rapid effects, a brief challenge with methandrostenolone-BSA was able to promote neuronal toxicity. Activation of putative membrane steroid receptors by nontoxic (nanomolar) concentrations of either nandrolone-BSA or methandrostenolone-BSA became sufficient to increase neuronal susceptibility to the apoptotic stimulus provided by β-amyloid (the main culprit of AD). We speculate that AAS abuse might facilitate the onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases not usually linked to drug abuse.

  16. Testosterone represses ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and Murf-1 expression in an androgen-sensitive rat skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Maragno, Ana Leticia G C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Gomes, Marcelo D; Godinho, Rosely O

    2010-02-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy induced by denervation and metabolic diseases has been associated with increased ubiquitin ligase expression. In the present study, we evaluate the influence of androgens on muscle ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1/MAFbx/FBXO32 and Murf-1/Trim63 expression and its correlation with maintenance of muscle mass by using the testosterone-dependent fast-twitch levator ani muscle (LA) from normal or castrated adult male Wistar rats. Gene expression was determined by qRT-PCR and/or immunoblotting. Castration induced progressive loss of LA mass (30% of control, 90 days) and an exponential decrease of LA cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratio (nuclear domain; 22% of control after 60 days). Testosterone deprivation induced a 31-fold increase in LA atrogin-1 mRNA and an 18-fold increase in Murf-1 mRNA detected after 2 and 7 days of castration, respectively. Acute (24 h) testosterone administration fully repressed atrogin-1 and Murf-1 mRNA expression to control levels. Atrogin-1 protein was also increased by castration up to 170% after 30 days. Testosterone administration for 7 days restored atrogin-1 protein to control levels. In addition to the well known stimulus of protein synthesis, our results show that testosterone maintains muscle mass by repressing ubiquitin ligases, indicating that inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome catabolic system is critical for trophic action of androgens in skeletal muscle. Besides, since neither castration nor androgen treatment had any effect on weight or ubiquitin ligases mRNA levels of extensor digitorum longus muscle, a fast-twitch muscle with low androgen sensitivity, our study shows that perineal muscle LA is a suitable in vivo model to evaluate regulation of muscle proteolysis, closely resembling human muscle responsiveness to androgens.

  17. Steroid Sulfatase Deficiency and Androgen Activation Before and After Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Subtil, Sandra; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Dias, Renuka P.; Amin, Rakesh; Barrett, Timothy G.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Kirk, Jeremy M. W.; Moss, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steroid sulfatase (STS) cleaves the sulfate moiety off steroid sulfates, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate (DHEAS), the inactive sulfate ester of the adrenal androgen precursor DHEA. Deficient DHEA sulfation, the opposite enzymatic reaction to that catalyzed by STS, results in androgen excess by increased conversion of DHEA to active androgens. STS deficiency (STSD) due to deletions or inactivating mutations in the X-linked STS gene manifests with ichthyosis, but androgen synthesis and metabolism in STSD have not been studied in detail yet. Patients and Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 30 males with STSD (age 6–27 y; 13 prepubertal, 5 peripubertal, and 12 postpubertal) and 38 age-, sex-, and Tanner stage-matched healthy controls. Serum and 24-hour urine steroid metabolome analysis was performed by mass spectrometry and genetic analysis of the STS gene by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and Sanger sequencing. Results: Genetic analysis showed STS mutations in all patients, comprising 27 complete gene deletions, 1 intragenic deletion and 2 missense mutations. STSD patients had apparently normal pubertal development. Serum and 24-hour urinary DHEAS were increased in STSD, whereas serum DHEA and testosterone were decreased. However, total 24-hour urinary androgen excretion was similar to controls, with evidence of increased 5α-reductase activity in STSD. Prepubertal healthy controls showed a marked increase in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in postpubertal controls and in STSD patients of any pubertal stage. Conclusions: In STSD patients, an increased 5α-reductase activity appears to compensate for a reduced rate of androgen generation by enhancing peripheral androgen activation in affected patients. In healthy controls, we discovered a prepubertal surge in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in STSD, indicative of physiologically up-regulated STS activity before puberty. This may

  18. Androgenic disorders of women: diagnostic and therapeutic decision making.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G P

    1995-01-16

    Women with androgenic disorders usually seek medical attention to ameliorate the effects of androgens on appearance or on fertility, less commonly for oligomenorrhea or for prevention of metabolic complications. These conditions affect at least 5-10% of women and can be very disturbing to the affected woman. Careful attention to possible androgenic changes is necessary when performing physical examination because changes are often concealed. Treatment for skin and hair changes depends less on the nature of the changes than on the underlying endocrine causation. The two endocrine factors are androgen levels and receptor sensitivity. The latter is a factor in all androgenic changes, and therapy is rarely successful without use of medication to block androgen receptors. If androgen levels are even minimally elevated, suppression of the source gland--ovary or adrenal--is appropriate. Ovarian suppression is usually by means of an oral contraceptive; for adrenal suppression, a glucocorticoid is effective. Response to medical therapy of androgenic disorders is slow; physicians and patients must be willing to wait weeks, or months, for the beginning of improvement. Endocrine therapy does not seem to help associated diabetes or dyslipidemia. Overall, medical therapy of androgenic disorders is more effective than generally recognized. The principal pitfalls are failing to select medication based on the specific endocrine disturbance and failing to wait long enough for improvement to appear. Side effects do occur but are generally uncomfortable or inconvenient rather than dangerous. Treatment is highly rewarding, however, for there are few situations in medicine in which treatment is so appreciated by the patient.

  19. Blood androgen levels in male baboons throughout the year

    SciTech Connect

    Taranov, A.G.; Goncharov, N.P.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes a study of possible dependence of the androgen level in male baboons on the time of year. Plasma was obtained by centrifugation of the blood at 3000 rpm and the following androgens were determined by radioimmunoassay, using chromatographic separation of the steroids on columns with celite: testosterone, 5s-dihydrotestosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone. Plasma steriod concentrations were calculated and the results were subjected to statistical analysis by Students test. Seasonal change in the concentration of steroids in the animals' blood plasma were discovered. The results of androgen assay throughout the year and determination of their mean annual concentrations are shown.

  20. [Bone and Men's Health. Androgen replacement therapy and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sumito

    2010-02-01

    During aging process in men, decline of androgen level is involved in symptoms of hypogonadism, and recent findings suggest that sex hormones are crucial for skeletal development and maintenance of bone mineral properties. In practice, androgen replacement therapy has not been established for bone-related symptoms in late onset hypogonadisim or male osteoporosis. Whereas recent evidences suggest that bone mineral properties are improved by androgen replacement therapy in aging male, further studies including large clinical trials are necessary to assess long-term benefits and risks by the therapy.

  1. [Bone and Men's Health. Bone selective androgen receptor modulators].

    PubMed

    Furuya, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Androgen, one of the sex steroid hormones shows various biological activities on the corresponding various tissues. Many efforts to produce novel drug materials maintaining a desired biological activity with an adequate tissue selectivity, which is so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) , are being performed. As one of such efforts, studies on SARMs against bone tissues which possess a significant potential to stimulate a bone formation with reducing undesirable androgenic virilizing activities are in progress all over the world. This review focuses on the research and development activities of such SARMs and discuses their usefulness for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  2. A simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozlowski, C.P.; Bauman, J.E.; Hahn, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Female birds deposit significant amounts of steroid hormones into the yolks of their eggs. Studies have demonstrated that these hormones, particularly androgens, affect nestling growth and development. In order to measure androgen concentrations in avian egg yolks, most authors follow the extraction methods outlined by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). We describe a simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks. Our method, which has been validated through recovery and linearity experiments, consists of a single ethanol precipitation that produces substantially higher recoveries than those reported by Schwabl.

  3. A simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Corinne P; Bauman, Joan E; Hahn, D Caldwell

    2009-03-01

    Female birds deposit significant amounts of steroid hormones into the yolks of their eggs. Studies have demonstrated that these hormones, particularly androgens, affect nestling growth and development. In order to measure androgen concentrations in avian egg yolks, most authors follow the extraction methods outlined by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). We describe a simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks. Our method, which has been validated through recovery and linearity experiments, consists of a single ethanol precipitation that produces substantially higher recoveries than those reported by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). Zoo Biol 28:137-143, 2009.

  4. Androgenic anabolic steroids also impair right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Oflaz, Huseyin; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra

    2009-05-01

    Chronic anabolic steroid use suppresses left ventricular functions. However, there is no information regarding the chronic effects of anabolic steroids on right ventricular function which also plays a key role in global cardiac function. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of androgenic anabolic steroids usage among athletes on remodeling the right part of the heart. Androgenic-anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders had smaller diastolic velocities of both ventricles than drug-free bodybuilders and sedentary counterparts. This study shows that androgenic anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders exhibited depressed diastolic functions of both ventricles.

  5. Apolipoprotein D (APOD) is a putative biomarker of androgen receptor function in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Appari, Mahesh; Werner, Ralf; Wünsch, Lutz; Cario, Gunnar; Demeter, Janos; Hiort, Olaf; Riepe, Felix; Brooks, James D; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2009-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is the most common cause of disorders of sex development usually caused by mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. AIS is characterized by a poor genotype-phenotype correlation, and many patients with clinically presumed AIS do not seem to have mutations in the AR gene. We therefore aimed at identifying a biomarker enabling the assessment of the cellular function of the AR as a transcriptional activator. In the first step, we used complementary DNA (cDNA) microarrays for a genome-wide screen for androgen-regulated genes in two normal male primary scrotal skin fibroblast strains compared to two labia majora fibroblast strains from 46,XY females with complete AIS (CAIS). Apolipoprotein D (APOD) and two further transcripts were significantly upregulated by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in scrotum fibroblasts, while CAIS labia majora cells were unresponsive. Microarray data were well correlated with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR; R = 0.93). Subsequently, we used qRT-PCR in independent new cell cultures and confirmed the significant DHT-dependent upregulation of APOD in five normal scrotum strains [13.5 +/- 8.2 (SD)-fold] compared with three CAIS strains (1.2 +/- 0.7-fold, p = 0.028; t test) and six partial androgen insensitivity syndrome strains (2 +/- 1.3-fold, p = 0.034; t test). Moreover, two different 17ss-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase III deficiency labia majora strains showed APOD induction in the range of normal scrotum (9.96 +/- 1.4-fold), supporting AR specificity. Therefore, qRT-PCR of APOD messenger RNA transcription in primary cultures of labioscrotal skin fibroblasts is a promising tool for assessing AR function, potentially allowing a function-based diagnostic evaluation of AIS in the future.

  6. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Indian families with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, M R; Rastogi, Amit; Raman, Rajiva; Gupta, Dinesh K; Singh, S K

    2009-12-01

    Mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is known to cause androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). In an X-linked recessive manner, an AR mutation gets transmitted to the offspring through carrier mothers in 70% of cases, the other 30% arising de novo. However, reports on AR mutations amongst Indian patients with AIS are scarce in the literature. This study reports mutations in AR from two Indian families, each having a proband with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) phenotype. Clinical, endocrine and cytogenetic evaluation of these affected children was performed. Mutational analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis followed by sequencing. The two point mutations were in exon 5: p.M742I, familial in patient 1 and p.V746M de novo in patient 2. These are hitherto unrecognized mutations in our population. Similar mutational studies are suggested in patients with AIS, in order to identify their frequency and clinical severity in our population.

  7. Elevated hypothalamic aromatization at the onset of precocious puberty in transgenic female mice hypersecreting human chorionic gonadotropin: effect of androgens.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Betina; Ratner, Laura D; Scerbo, María J; Di Giorgio, Noelia P; Poutanen, Matti; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Calandra, Ricardo S; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A R; Cambiasso, María J; Rulli, Susana B

    2014-06-05

    Transgenic female mice overexpressing the α- and β- subunits of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCGαβ+) exhibited precocious puberty, as evidenced by early vaginal opening. Chronically elevated hCG in 21-day-old hCGαβ+ females stimulated gonadal androgen production, which exerted negative feedback over the endogenous gonadotropin synthesis, and activated the hypothalamic GnRH pulsatility and gene expression. Transgenic females also exhibited elevated hypothalamic aromatization in the preoptic area (POA), which is the sexually-differentiated area that controls the LH surge in adulthood. Ovariectomy at 14 days of age was unable to rescue this phenotype. However, the blockade of androgen action by flutamide from postnatal day 6 onwards reduced the aromatase levels in the POA of hCGαβ+ females. Our results suggest that early exposure of females to androgen action during a critical period between postnatal days 6-14 induces sex-specific organizational changes of the brain, which affect the aromatase expression in the POA at the onset of precocious puberty.

  8. Human nutritional supplements in the horse. Dehydroepiandrosterone versus androstenedione: comparative effects on the androgen profile and consequences for doping analysis.

    PubMed

    Dehennin, L; Bonnaire, Y; Plou, P

    2001-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione are weak androgens, which need conversion to more potent testosterone in order to enhance anabolic action. Consequences of oral dosing at 1 mg/kg on the urinary and plasma androgen profile of mare and gelding have been evaluated with an analytical method involving conjugate fractionation and selective hydrolysis, group separation, and quantitation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring of trimethylsilyl ethers. Peak levels of testosterone total conjugates in urine (range 300-6000 microg/L) were attained a few hours after dosing. Renal clearance was fast, so the testosterone detection period lasted only 20 to 33 h, the longest time being generated by androstenedione. The urinary testosterone/epitestosterone ratio for detection of exogenous testosterone in the mare was inoperative after DHEA administration because there was a concomitant increase of epitestosterone, which thereby acted as a masking agent. Androstanediols and androstenediols, as well as some 17-ketosteroids, were additional markers. A transient increase of circulating free testosterone has been evidenced, and this would support possible anabolic/androgenic action by supplementation with DHEA and androstenedione along the oral route.

  9. The PPAR{gamma} ligand ciglitazone regulates androgen receptor activation differently in androgen-dependent versus androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Patrice E.; Lyles, Besstina E.; Stewart, LaMonica V.

    2010-12-10

    The androgen receptor (AR) regulates growth and progression of androgen-dependent as well as androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists have been reported to reduce AR activation in androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To determine whether PPAR{gamma} ligands are equally effective at inhibiting AR activity in androgen-independent prostate cancer, we examined the effect of the PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and rosiglitazone on C4-2 cells, an androgen- independent derivative of the LNCaP cell line. Luciferase-based reporter assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} ligand reduced dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced increases in AR activity in LNCaP cells. However, in C4-2 cells, these compounds increased DHT-induced AR driven luciferase activity. In addition, ciglitazone did not significantly alter DHT-mediated increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein or mRNA levels within C4-2 cells. siRNA-based experiments demonstrated that the ciglitazone-induced regulation of AR activity observed in C4-2 cells was dependent on the presence of PPAR{gamma}. Furthermore, overexpression of the AR corepressor cyclin D1 inhibited the ability of ciglitazone to induce AR luciferase activity in C4-2 cells. Thus, our data suggest that both PPAR{gamma} and cyclin D1 levels influence the ability of ciglitazone to differentially regulate AR signaling in androgen-independent C4-2 prostate cancer cells.

  10. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Lauren M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short ‘winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a ‘seasonal switch’ from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands. PMID:26582025

  11. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Rudolph, Lauren M; Sengelaub, Dale R; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-11-22

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short 'winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a 'seasonal switch' from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands.

  12. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  13. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete’s urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as ‘T-equivalent’ concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  14. Classifying chemical mode of action using gene networks and machine learning: a case study with the herbicide linuron.

    PubMed

    Ornostay, Anna; Cowie, Andrew M; Hindle, Matthew; Baker, Christopher J O; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    The herbicide linuron (LIN) is an endocrine disruptor with an anti-androgenic mode of action. The objectives of this study were to (1) improve knowledge of androgen and anti-androgen signaling in the teleostean ovary and to (2) assess the ability of gene networks and machine learning to classify LIN as an anti-androgen using transcriptomic data. Ovarian explants from vitellogenic fathead minnows (FHMs) were exposed to three concentrations of either 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), flutamide (FLUT), or LIN for 12h. Ovaries exposed to DHT showed a significant increase in 17β-estradiol (E2) production while FLUT and LIN had no effect on E2. To improve understanding of androgen receptor signaling in the ovary, a reciprocal gene expression network was constructed for DHT and FLUT using pathway analysis and these data suggested that steroid metabolism, translation, and DNA replication are processes regulated through AR signaling in the ovary. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that FLUT and LIN shared more regulated gene networks in common compared to DHT. Using transcriptomic datasets from different fish species, machine learning algorithms classified LIN successfully with other anti-androgens. This study advances knowledge regarding molecular signaling cascades in the ovary that are responsive to androgens and anti-androgens and provides proof of concept that gene network analysis and machine learning can classify priority chemicals using experimental transcriptomic data collected from different fish species.

  15. Targeting the Androgen Receptor with Steroid Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a major therapeutic target in prostate cancer pharmacology. Progression of prostate cancer has been linked to elevated expression of AR in malignant tissue, suggesting that AR plays a central role in prostate cancer cell biology. Potent therapeutic agents can be precisely crafted to specifically target AR, potentially averting systemic toxicities associated with nonspecific chemotherapies. In this review, we describe various strategies to generate steroid conjugates that can selectively engage AR with high potency. Analogies to recent developments in nonsteroidal conjugates targeting AR are also evaluated. Particular focus is placed on potential applications in AR pharmacology. The review culminates with a description of future prospects for targeting AR. PMID:24936953

  16. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter; Llewellyn, William; Van Mol, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused for decades by both professional and amateur athletes in order to improve physical performance or muscle mass. AAS abuse can cause adverse effects, among which are hepatotoxic effects. These effects include cholestatic icterus and possibly peliosis hepatis and hepatocellular carcinoma or adenoma. In particular, 17α-alkylated AAS appear to be hepatotoxic, whereas nonalkylated AAS appear not to be. The 17α-alkyl substitution retards hepatic metabolism of the AAS rendering it orally bioavailable. The mechanism responsible for the hepatotoxicity induced by 17α-alkylated AAS remains poorly understood. However, oxidative stress has been repeatedly shown to be associated with it. In this manuscript we present a hypothesis which describes a potential mechanism responsible for AAS-induced hepatotoxicity, based on several observations from the literature which suggest oxidative stress being a causal factor.

  17. Androgenic alopecia in women: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Midha, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to investigate androgenic alopecia (AA) utilizing clinical and investigative procedures to establish the pattern of AA in the Indian subcontinent. A total of 35 consecutive women presenting with AA were included. After obtaining informed consent, a detailed history/examination, hair pull test, trichogram, and a scalp biopsy were performed in patients. AA classification was attempted across Ludwig and Norwood guidelines. Of 35 women, 16 had grade I, 10 had grade II, and 1 had grade III Ludwig classification. In addition, 6 other women had Christmas tree baldness: 1 each of fronto-parietal and male pattern baldness. Several investigations including hormonal profile were inconclusive; however, hair pull test and trichogram may be helpful in understanding the sequence in AA in women. AA has infrequently been reported, particularly India and in Asia in general.

  18. Anabolic androgenic steroids abuse and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Bello, S; Bonsignore, A; Cantatore, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Fineschi, V

    2011-05-01

    In the athletes the wide use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) cause series damage in various organs, in particular, analyzing the liver, elevation on the levels of liver enzymes, cholestatic jaundice, liver tumors, both benign and malignant, and peliosis hepatis are described. A prolonged AAS administration provokes an increase in the activities of liver lysosomal hydrolases and a decrease in some components of the microsomal drug-metabolizing system and in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes without modifying classical serum indicators of hepatic function. Liver is a key organ actively involved in numerous metabolic and detoxifying functions. As a consequence, it is continuously exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous oxidants that are by-products of many biochemical pathways and, in fact, it has been demonstrated that intracellular oxidant production is more active in liver than in tissues, like the increase of inflammatory cytokines, apoptosis and the inhibitors of apoptosis NF- κB and Heat Shock Proteins.

  19. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs

    PubMed Central

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance. Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials. PMID:22461251

  20. Multiple arterial thromboses associated with anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Neil Arthur; Abbas, Jonathan Raihan; Simms, Malcolm Harold

    2014-03-01

    The use of supraphysiological doses of anabolic androgenic steroids can have serious side effects. This article reports the case of a young man who suffered potentially life-threatening arterial thromboses following the use of these drugs.

  1. Antihypertensive effects of androgens in conscious, spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Perusquía, Mercedes; Herrera, Nieves; Ferrer, Mercedes; Stallone, John N

    2017-03-01

    Androgens are vasoactive steroids that induce acute vasodilation in a number of isolated vascular beds from different species, but the effects of these hormones on systemic blood pressure (BP) have been studied little. Although it has been reported that androgens exert systemic hypotensive effects through peripheral vasodilation in normotensive rats, there have not been any reports of systemic hypotensive effects of androgens in animals with hypertension. This study was designed to evaluate the acute effects of testosterone (TES) and its 5-reduced metabolites on systemic BP in hypertensive rats and to test the hypothesis that hypotestosteronemia may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Chronic, indwelling catheters were implanted in carotid artery and jugular vein of 18-21-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive-control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, for BP recording and drug administration, respectively. Bolus injections of TES, 5α- or 5β-dihydrotestosterone (5α- and 5β-DHT), were administrated cumulatively to conscious rats at doses of 0.1-100μmolkg(-1)min(-1). 5β-DHT was also administrated during the pressor effect of Bay K 8644, an L-type voltage-operated Ca(2+) channel (L-VOCC) agonist. In separate experiments, BP of orchidectomized normotensive male WKY and Wistar rats, with or without androgen-replacement therapy, was evaluated weekly for 10 weeks by tail-cuff plethysmography. TES and its metabolites reduced BP in a dose-dependent manner, while heart rate was reduced with some androgens at the highest doses. The hypotensive effects of androgens were markedly greater in SHR, with a rank order potency of: 5β-DHT>TES>5α-DHT. 5β-DHT, the most potent antihypertensive androgen, abolished the pressor response to Bay K 8644 in SHR. TES deprivation by orchidectomy increased BP in normotensive WKY and Wistar rats, but this hypertension was prevented by TES replacement therapy. BP responses to androgens are androgen structure

  2. Inhibiting androgen receptor nuclear entry in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Julie A.; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Parent, Alexander A.; Stagg, David B.; Ellison, Stephanie J.; Alley, Holly M.; Chao, Christina A.; Lawrence, Scott A.; Stice, James P.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Baker, Jennifer G.; Kim, Sung Hoon; McDonnell, Donald P.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Norris, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical resistance to the second-generation antiandrogen enzalutamide in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), despite persistent androgen receptor (AR) activity in tumors, highlights the unmet medical need for next generation antagonists. We have identified and characterized tetra-aryl cyclobutanes (CBs) as a new class of competitive AR antagonists that exhibit a unique mechanism of action. These CBs are structurally distinct from current antiandrogens (hydroxyflutamide, bicalutamide, and enzalutamide), and inhibit AR-mediated gene expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in several models of CRPC. Conformational profiling revealed that CBs stabilize an AR conformation resembling an unliganded receptor. Using a variety of techniques, it was determined that the AR:CB complex was not recruited to AR-regulated promoters and, like apo AR, remains sequestered in the cytoplasm bound to heat shock proteins. Thus, we have identified third generation AR antagonists whose unique mechanism of action suggests that they may have therapeutic potential in CRPC. PMID:27501397

  3. Characterizing Mechanisms of Resistance to Androgen Deprivation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0161 TITLE: Characterizing Mechanisms of Resistance to Androgen Deprivation in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...INVESTIGATOR: Ginevra Botta CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: DANA-FARBER CANCER INSTITUTE BOSTON MA 02215 REPORT DATE: November 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Final...Characterizing mechanisms of Resistance to Androgen Deprivation in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0161 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Major enzymes controlling the androgenic pressure in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Yves; Provost, Pierre R

    2013-09-01

    A sex difference is observed in the incidence and morbidity of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the neonate and in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The involvement of androgens is well evidenced in RDS and it is suspected in BPD. Interestingly, the developing lung is not an inert tissue just exposed to circulating androgens, but is rather an active androgen metabolizing tissue, expressing enzymes involved in both androgen synthesis and inactivation. The present review focuses on the major enzymes involved in androgen metabolism within the developing lung. Testosterone synthesis and inactivation by AKR1C3/Akr1c6 (human/mouse 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) type 5) and HSD17B2 (17β-HSD type 2), respectively, play an important role in the developing lung. Akr1c14 (3α-HSD) shows a strong increase in expression according to developmental time. The canalicular stage of lung development corresponding to the surge of surfactant lipid synthesis, which is linked to RDS, as well as saccularization/alveolarization, which are linked to BPD, are covered by this review for the mouse and human species. The androgen metabolizing enzymes expressed within the developing lung can become potential pharmaceutical targets in the objective of accelerating lung maturation by specific treatments. The classic deleterious effects of androgens on lung maturation and the surge of surfactant synthesis in males are well known. Conversely, androgens also have positive impacts on the development of both male and female lungs. Steroidogenic enzymes are key regulators of these positive effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'.

  5. Progressive central puberty in a toddler with partial androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dougan, Grace C; Uli, Naveen; Shulman, Dorothy I

    2014-03-01

    A male infant was diagnosed with partial androgen insensitivity caused by a novel mutation in the androgen receptor. At 3.5 months of age, he received 100 mg of testosterone intramuscularly over the course of 3 months to increase phallic size. He developed pubic hair after 5 months and signs of progressive central precocious puberty when re-examined at 17.5 months, which subsequently was suppressed with depot leuprolide.

  6. Cell Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    EC50 . "* It has been established that the estrogen receptor shows highest activity when the cells are treated by serum starvation and are mainly in GO...of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Elisabeth D. Martinez CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgetown University Medical Center... Estrogen and Androgen Receptor DAMD 17-99-1- 9199 6. AUTHOR(S) Elisabeth D. Martinez 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING

  7. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Eradication of established tumors by vaccination with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles delivering human papillomavirus 16 E7...Androgen Ablation (AA) constitutes the most common therapy for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. While initially effective at reducing tumor burden...most patients recur with androgen insensitive disease. There exists a clear need to augment the clinical efficacy of hormone-based therapies , and

  8. Suppression of Androgen Receptor Transactivation by Akt Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    sufficient for the survival of nerve growth factor-dependent sympathetic neurons . J Neurosci. 18:2933-2943. 10 Principal Investigator: Chang...dominant inherited cancer syndromes Abbreviations: aa, Amino acid; AR, androgen receptor; such as Cowden’s disease , which is associated with CDK...Endocrine mechanisms of disease , an inherited breast and thyroid cancer syn- disease : expression and degradation of androgen drome. Nat Genet 16:64-67

  9. Early embryonic androgen exposure induces transgenerational epigenetic and metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Chua, Angela K; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Ning-Ai; Goodarzi, Mark O

    2014-08-01

    Androgen excess is a central feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which affects 6% to 10% of young women. Mammals exposed to elevated androgens in utero develop PCOS-like phenotypes in adulthood, suggesting fetal origins of PCOS. We hypothesize that excess androgen exposure during early embryonic development may disturb the epigenome and disrupt metabolism in exposed and unexposed subsequent generations. Zebrafish were used to study the underlying mechanism of fetal origins. Embryos were exposed to androgens (testosterone and dihydrotestosterone) early at 26 to 56 hours post fertilization or late at 21 to 28 days post fertilization. Exposed zebrafish (F0) were grown to adults and crossed to generate unexposed offspring (F1). For both generations, global DNA methylation levels were examined in ovaries using a luminometric methylation assay, and fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels were measured. We found that early but not late androgen exposure induced changes in global methylation and glucose homeostasis in both generations. In general, F0 adult zebrafish exhibited altered global methylation levels in the ovary; F1 zebrafish had global hypomethylation. Fasting blood glucose levels were decreased in F0 but increased in F1; postprandial glucose levels were elevated in both F0 and F1. This androgenized zebrafish study suggests that transient excess androgen exposure during early development can result in transgenerational alterations in the ovarian epigenome and glucose homeostasis. Current data cannot establish a causal relationship between epigenetic changes and altered glucose homeostasis. Whether transgenerational epigenetic alteration induced by prenatal androgen exposure plays a role in the development of PCOS in humans deserves study.

  10. Concept and Viability of Androgen Annihilation for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, James L.

    2014-01-01

    There remains no standard of care for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy but who have no radiographic metastases, even though this is the second largest group of prostate cancer (CaP) patients in the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may cure some men with advanced CaP based on single institution series and a randomized clinical trial of immediate versus delayed ADT for men found to have pelvic lymph node metastasis at the time of radical prostatectomy. ADT may be more effective when initiated for minimal disease burden, which can be detected using PSA after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, and if more complete disruption of the androgen axis using newer agents decreases the chance that androgen-sensitive cells survive to adapt to a low androgen environment. Androgens may be “annihilated” sing simultaneously a luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) antagonist or agonist to inhibit testicular production of testosterone, a cytochrome P45017A1 (CYP17A1) inhibitor to diminish metabolism of testosterone via the adrenal pathway and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the backdoor pathway, a 5α-reductase inhibitor to diminish testosterone reduction to DHT and backdoor metabolism of progesterone substrates to DHT, and a newer anti-androgen to compete better with DHT for the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain. Early initiation of androgen annihilation for induction as part of planned intermittent ADT should be safe, may reduce tumor burden below a threshold that allows eradication by the immune system, and may cure many men who have failed definitive local therapy. PMID:24771515

  11. Selective Androgen Receptor Downregulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    used to down-regulate the AR include antisense oligonucleotides (9, 10), ribozyme treatments (11, 12), AR dominant negatives (13) and small...findings suggest that ICI may present a useful treatment option for patients with AR-dependent PCa. Unlike the ribozyme , antisense, siRNA, or dominant...of the androgen receptor messenger RNA and functional inhibition of androgen receptor activity by a hammerhead ribozyme . Mol Endocrinol, 12: 1558

  12. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    rights reserved.1. Introduction White adipose tissue (WAT) is a loose connective tissue that is crucial in the regulation of whole-body fatty-acid...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0275 TITLE: Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue -Prostate Cancer Interactions PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2010-05/31/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0275 Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue -Prostate Cancer

  13. Impact of Early Postnatal Androgen Exposure on Voice Development

    PubMed Central

    Grisa, Leila; Leonel, Maria L.; Gonçalves, Maria I. R.; Pletsch, Francisco; Sade, Elis R.; Custódio, Gislaine; Zagonel, Ivete P. S.; Longui, Carlos A.; Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of early postnatal androgen exposure on female laryngeal tissue may depend on certain characteristics of this exposure. We assessed the impact of the dose, duration, and timing of early androgen exposure on the vocal development of female subjects who had been treated for adrenocortical tumor (ACT) in childhood. Methods The long-term effects of androgen exposure on the fundamental vocal frequency (F0), vocal pitch, and final height and the presence of virilizing signs were examined in 9 adult (age, 18.4 to 33.5 years) and 10 adolescent (13.6 to 17.8 years) female ACT patients. We also compared the current values with values obtained 0.9 years to 7.4 years after these subjects had undergone ACT surgery, a period during which they had shown normal androgen levels. Results Of the 19 subjects, 17 (89%) had been diagnosed with ACT before 4 years of age, 1 (5%) at 8.16 years, and 1 (5%) at 10.75 years. Androgen exposure (2 to 30 months) was sufficiently strong to cause pubic hair growth in all subjects and clitoromegaly in 74% (14/19) of the subjects, but did not reduce their height from the target value. Although androgen exposure induced a remarkable reduction in F0 (132 Hz) and moderate pitch virilization in 1 subject and partial F0 virilization, resulting in F0 of 165 and 169 Hz, in 2 subjects, the majority had normal F0 ranging from 189 to 245 Hz. Conclusions Female laryngeal tissue is less sensitive to androgen exposure between birth and adrenarche than during other periods. Differential larynx sensitivity to androgen exposure in childhood and F0 irreversibility in adulthood are age-, concentration-, duration-, and timing-dependent events that may also be affected by exposure to inhibitory or stimulatory hormones. Further studies are required to better characterize each of these factors. PMID:23284635

  14. Characterizing and Targeting Androgen Receptor Pathway-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH- 10 -1-0771 TITLE: Characterizing and Targeting Androgen...NUMBER Seattle, WA 98109-1024 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S...pros- tate cancer cells in the absence of exogenous AR ligands, we performed a high-throughput RNAi screen ( HTRS ) using two androgen-sensitive prostate

  15. Androgen Receptor Involvement in Rat Amelogenesis: An Additional Way for Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals to Affect Enamel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jedeon, Katia; Loiodice, Sophia; Salhi, Khaled; Le Normand, Manon; Houari, Sophia; Chaloyard, Jessica; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2016-11-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that interfere with the steroid axis can affect amelogenesis, leading to enamel hypomineralization similar to that of molar incisor hypomineralization, a recently described enamel disease. We investigated the sex steroid receptors that may mediate the effects of EDCs during rat amelogenesis. The expression of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and progesterone receptor was dependent on the stage of ameloblast differentiation, whereas ERβ remained undetectable. AR was the only receptor selectively expressed in ameloblasts involved in final enamel mineralization. AR nuclear translocation and induction of androgen-responsive element-containing promoter activity upon T treatment, demonstrated ameloblast responsiveness to androgens. T regulated the expression of genes involved in enamel mineralization such as KLK4, amelotin, SLC26A4, and SLC5A8 but not the expression of genes encoding matrix proteins, which determine enamel thickness. Vinclozolin and to a lesser extent bisphenol A, two antiandrogenic EDCs that cause enamel defects, counteracted the actions of T. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, the following: 1) ameloblasts express AR; 2) the androgen signaling pathway is involved in the enamel mineralization process; and 3) EDCs with antiandrogenic effects inhibit AR activity and preferentially affect amelogenesis in male rats. Their action, through the AR pathway, may specifically and irreversibly affect enamel, potentially leading to the use of dental defects as a biomarker of exposure to environmental pollutants. These results are consistent with the steroid hormones affecting ameloblasts, raising the issue of the hormonal influence on amelogenesis and possible sexual dimorphism in enamel quality.

  16. Autoimmune anti-androgen-receptor antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, S; Witte, D

    1985-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies to human and rat androgen receptors are present at high titers in the blood sera of some patients with prostate diseases. The antibodies from some serum samples were associated with a purified IgG fraction and interacted with the 3.8S cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes of rat ventral prostate to form 9- to 12S units. Other serum samples, however, formed 14- to 19S units, suggesting that other immunoglobulins might be involved. In the presence of an anti-human immunoglobulin as a second antibody, the androgen-receptor-antibody complexes could be immunoprecipitated. The antibodies interacted with the nuclear and the cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes, either the DNA-binding or the nonbinding form, but not with receptors for estradiol, progestin, or dexamethasone from a variety of sources. Human testosterone/estradiol-binding globulin, rat epididymal androgen-binding protein, or rat prostate alpha-protein (a nonreceptor steroid-binding protein) also did not interact with the antibodies to form immunoprecipitates. About 37% of male and 3% of female serum samples screened had significant antibody titer. The chance of finding serum with a high titer is much better in males older than 66 years than in the younger males or females at all ages. The presence of the high-titer antibodies may make it possible to prepare monoclonal antibodies to androgen receptors without purification of the receptors for immunization. PMID:3866227

  17. Hormone Treatment and Muscle Anabolism during Aging: Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, E. Lichar; Durham, William J.; Urban, Randall J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in circulating testosterone concentrations and decreased musculature in men. While testosterone administration is often considered when symptoms of hypogonadism are presented, the long-term effects of androgen use on muscle physiology are not yet fully understood. The definition of hypogonadism in men remains obscure but is generally indicated by total testosterone concentrations less than a threshold value of 300-500 ng/dL. Androgen replacement therapy is generally safe in men and women with low endogenous testosterone concentrations. The development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide additional options in treatment of hypogonadism while lowering the potential of side effects often associated with long-term androgen use. Androgen administration, either alone or in combination with other treatments, can be successful in improving muscle mass by increasing protein anabolism and reducing protein catabolism in men and women. Further research is necessary to optimize the anabolic and anticatabolic properties of androgens for treatment and prevention of muscle loss in men and women. PMID:20452103

  18. Enhanced Androgen Signaling With Androgen Receptor Overexpression in the Osteoblast Lineage Controls Skeletal Turnover, Matrix Quality and Bone Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    exhibited exclusively at periosteal surfaces, but in mature osteoblasts androgens inhibit osteogenesis with detrimental effects on matrix quality...consequence of increased AR abundance in likely target (tissues or cells) for androgen in vivo, i.e., periosteal cells and the osteoblast lineage compared...cortical bone, with no expression seen in periosteal fibroblasts (11). In the trabecular area of metaphyseal bone, strong expression was observed at

  19. Enhanced Androgen Signaling with Androgen Receptor Overexpression in the Osteoblast Lineage Controls Skeletal Turnover, Matrix Quality and Bone Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    exhibited exclusively at periosteal surfaces, but in mature osteoblasts androgens inhibit osteogenesis with detrimental effects on matrix quality, bone...androgen in vivo, i.e., periosteal cells and the osteoblast lineage compared to mature osteoblasts and osteocytes. These models, characterized by the...surfaces, and in a large proportion of osteocytes in femurs throughout cortical bone, with no expression seen in periosteal fibroblasts (11). In the

  20. Chronic Exposure to Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Alters Neuronal Function in the Mammalian Forebrain via Androgen Receptor- and Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Henderson, Leslie P

    2009-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can promote detrimental effects on social behaviors for which γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor-mediated circuits in the forebrain play a critical role. While all AAS bind to androgen receptors (AR), they may also be aromatized to estrogens and thus potentially impart effects via estrogen receptors (ER). Chronic exposure of wild type male mice to a combination of chemically distinct AAS increased action potential (AP) frequency, selective GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs, and GABAergic synaptic current decay in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Experiments performed with pharmacological agents and in AR-deficient Tfm mutant mice suggest that the AAS-dependent enhancement of GABAergic transmission in wild type mice is AR-mediated. In AR-deficient mice, the AAS elicited dramatically different effects, decreasing AP frequency, sIPSC amplitude and frequency and the expression of selective GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs. Surprisingly, in the absence of AR signaling, the data indicate that the AAS do not act as ER agonists, but rather suggest a novel in vivo action in which the AAS inhibit aromatase and impair endogenous ER signaling. These results show that the AAS have the capacity to alter neuronal function in the forebrain via multiple steroid signaling mechanisms and suggest that effects of these steroids in the brain will depend not only on the balance of AR- vs. ER-mediated regulation for different target genes, but also on the ability of these drugs to alter steroid metabolism and thus the endogenous steroid milieu. PMID:19812324

  1. Chronic exposure to anabolic androgenic steroids alters neuronal function in the mammalian forebrain via androgen receptor- and estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Henderson, Leslie P

    2009-10-07

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can promote detrimental effects on social behaviors for which GABA type A (GABA(A)) receptor-mediated circuits in the forebrain play a critical role. While all AAS bind to androgen receptors (AR), they may also be aromatized to estrogens and thus potentially impart effects via estrogen receptors (ER). Chronic exposure of wild-type male mice to a combination of chemically distinct AAS increased action potential (AP) frequency, selective GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs, and GABAergic synaptic current decay in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Experiments performed with pharmacological agents and in AR-deficient Tfm mutant mice suggest that the AAS-dependent enhancement of GABAergic transmission in wild-type mice is AR-mediated. In AR-deficient mice, the AAS elicited dramatically different effects, decreasing AP frequency, spontaneous IPSC amplitude and frequency and the expression of selective GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs. Surprisingly, in the absence of AR signaling, the data indicate that the AAS do not act as ER agonists, but rather suggest a novel in vivo action in which the AAS inhibit aromatase and impair endogenous ER signaling. These results show that the AAS have the capacity to alter neuronal function in the forebrain via multiple steroid signaling mechanisms and suggest that effects of these steroids in the brain will depend not only on the balance of AR- versus ER-mediated regulation for different target genes, but also on the ability of these drugs to alter steroid metabolism and thus the endogenous steroid milieu.

  2. Loss of androgen receptor binding to selective androgen response elements causes a reproductive phenotype in a knockin mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schauwaers, Kris; De Gendt, Karel; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Atanassova, Nina; Haelens, Annemie; Callewaert, Leen; Moehren, Udo; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Verhoeven, Guido; Verrijdt, Guy; Claessens, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Androgens influence transcription of their target genes through the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) that subsequently interacts with specific DNA motifs in these genes. These DNA motifs, called androgen response elements (AREs), can be classified in two classes: the classical AREs, which are also recognized by the other steroid hormone receptors; and the AR-selective AREs, which display selectivity for the AR. For in vitro interaction with the selective AREs, the androgen receptor DNA-binding domain is dependent on specific residues in its second zinc-finger. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these selective elements, we generated a germ-line knockin mouse model, termed SPARKI (SPecificity-affecting AR KnockIn), in which the second zinc-finger of the AR was replaced with that of the glucocorticoid receptor, resulting in a chimeric protein that retains its ability to bind classical AREs but is unable to bind selective AREs. The reproductive organs of SPARKI males are smaller compared with wild-type animals, and they are also subfertile. Intriguingly, however, they do not display any anabolic phenotype. The expression of two testis-specific, androgen-responsive genes is differentially affected by the SPARKI mutation, which is correlated with the involvement of different types of response elements in their androgen responsiveness. In this report, we present the first in vivo evidence of the existence of two functionally different types of AREs and demonstrate that AR-regulated gene expression can be targeted based on this distinction. PMID:17360365

  3. In-vitro characterization of androgen receptor mutations associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome reveals distinct functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Werner, R; Zhan, J; Gesing, J; Struve, D; Hiort, O

    2008-01-01

    Adequate androgen receptor (AR) function is crucial for male sex development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics. Mutations in the AR lead to androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) characterized by an end-organ resistance to androgens. The clinical appearance of individuals with 46,XY karyotype and an AR mutation varies widely from normal male to the ultimate completely female phenotype of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). We have analyzed the androgen receptor missense mutations P723S, P904S, and H917R, clinically associated with CAIS, which were described to have a normal maximum androgen binding (Bmax) but elevated equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd's) and compared their properties with the F916X deletion mutant, leading to the loss of the last four amino acids of the AR. Functional analysis allowed a quantitative and qualitative discrimination of these mutants in transactivation, amino-terminal/carboxy-terminal (N/C)-interaction, and coactivation capacity, varying widely with each distinct mutation. We conclude that mutations in the AR have to be characterized meticulously, not only to prove any quantitative functional deficit as a proof of consequence, but also to gain knowledge on qualitative functional properties. This is necessary as a possible link to genotype-phenotype correlation in AIS, but also with respect to medical decision making in CAIS.

  4. Effects of currently used pesticides in assays for estrogenicity, androgenicity, and aromatase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Rasmussen, Thomas Hoj; Gjermandsen, Irene Marianne; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2002-02-15

    Twenty-four pesticides were tested for interactions with the estrogen receptor (ER) and the androgen receptor (AR) in transactivation assays. Estrogen-like effects on MCF-7 cell proliferation and effects on CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were also investigated. Pesticides (endosulfan, methiocarb, methomyl, pirimicarb, propamocarb, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, dimethoate, chlorpyriphos, dichlorvos, tolchlofos-methyl, vinclozolin, iprodion, fenarimol, prochloraz, fosetyl-aluminum, chlorothalonil, daminozid, paclobutrazol, chlormequat chlorid, and ethephon) were selected according to their frequent use in Danish greenhouses. In addition, the metabolite mercaptodimethur sulfoxide, the herbicide tribenuron-methyl, and the organochlorine dieldrin, were included. Several of the pesticides, dieldrin, endosulfan, methiocarb, and fenarimol, acted both as estrogen agonists and androgen antagonists. Prochloraz reacted as both an estrogen and an androgen antagonist. Furthermore, fenarimol and prochloraz were potent aromatase inhibitors while endosulfan was a weak inhibitor. Hence, these three pesticides possess at least three different ways to potentially disturb sex hormone actions. In addition, chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin, tolclofos-methyl, and tribenuron-methyl induced weak responses in one or both estrogenicity assays. Upon cotreatment with 17beta-estradiol, the response was potentiated by endosulfan in the proliferation assay and by pirimicarb, propamocarb, and daminozid in the ER transactivation assay. Vinclozolin reacted as a potent AR antagonist and dichlorvos as a very weak one. Methomyl, pirimicarb, propamocarb, and iprodion weakly stimulated aromatase activity. Although the potencies of the pesticides to react as hormone agonists or antagonists are low compared to the natural ligands, the integrated response in the organism might be amplified by the ability of the pesticides to act via several mechanism and the frequent simultaneous exposure to

  5. A selective androgen receptor modulator enhances male-directed sexual preference, proceptive behavior, and lordosis behavior in sexually experienced, but not sexually naive, female rats.

    PubMed

    Kudwa, A E; López, F J; McGivern, R F; Handa, R J

    2010-06-01

    Androgens influence many aspects of reproductive behavior, including sexual preference of females for males. In oophorectomized women with sexual desire disorder, testosterone patches improve libido, but their use is limited because of adverse side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators offer an improved safety profile for both sexes: enhancing libido and muscle and bone growth in a manner similar to steroidal androgens but with fewer adverse effects, such as hirsutism, acne, and prostate growth. The current study investigated the action of a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo-[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one]) on male-directed sexual preference, proceptivity, and lordosis behavior of female rats. LGD-3303 is a nonsteroidal, nonaromatizable, highly selective ligand for the androgen receptor and effectively crosses the blood-brain barrier. Gonadectomized female rats were treated with LGD-3303 (3-30 mg/kg) or vehicle by daily oral gavage. Results showed that LGD-3303 treatment enhanced sexual preference of females for males but only if females had previous sexual experience. This occurred after 1 or 7 d of treatment. In contrast, preference for males was inhibited by LGD-3303 treatments of sexually naive females. The LGD-3303 increase in male preference was blocked by pretreatment with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. LGD-3303 treatment increased lordosis and proceptivity behaviors in ovariectomized females primed with suboptimal doses of estradiol benzoate plus progesterone. These data support the concept that LGD-3303 can stimulate aspects of female sexual behavior and may serve as a potential therapeutic for women with sexual desire disorders.

  6. Synthesis and antibacterial activity evaluation of two androgen derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer

    2015-01-01

    In this study two androgen derivatives were synthesized using several strategies; the first stage an aza-steroid derivative (3) was developed by the reaction of a testosterone derivative (1) with thiourea (2) in presence of hydrogen chloride. The second step, involves the synthesis of an amino-steroid derivative (4) by the reaction of 1 with 2 using boric acid as catalyst. The third stage was achieved by the preparation of an aminoaza-androgen derivative (6) by the reaction of 3 with ethylenediamine using boric acid as catalyst. In addition, the compound 6 was made reacting with dihydrotestosterone to form a new androgen derivative (7) in presence of boric acid. The following step was achieved by the reaction of 7 with chloroacetyl chloride to synthesize an azetidinone-androgen derivative (8) using triethylamine as catalyst. Additionally, a thiourea-androgen derivative (9) was synthetized by the reaction of 4 with dihydrotestosterone using boric acid as catalyst. Finally, the compound 9 was made reacting with chloroacetyl chloride in presence of triethylamine to synthesize a new azetidinone-androgen derivative (10). On the other hand, antibacterial activity of compounds synthesized was evaluated on Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae) and Gram positive (Staphylococos aureus) bacteria. The results indicate that only the compound 3 and 8 decrease the growth bacterial of E. coli and V. cholerae. Nevertheless, growth bacterial of S. aureus was not inhibited by these compounds. These data indicate that antibacterial activity exerted by the compounds 3 and 8 depend of their structure chemical in comparison with the controls and other androgen derivatives that are involved in this study.

  7. The Effects of Androgens on Murine Cortical Bone Do Not Require AR or ERα Signaling in Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Ucer, Serra; Iyer, Srividhya; Bartell, Shoshana M; Martin-Millan, Marta; Han, Li; Kim, Ha-Neui; Weinstein, Robert S; Jilka, Robert L; O’Brien, Charles A; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2016-01-01

    In men, androgens are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of bone mass in both the cortical and cancellous bone compartment. Male mice with targeted deletion of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes have lower cancellous bone mass, but no cortical bone phenotype. We have investigated the possibility that the effects of androgens on the cortical compartment result from AR signaling in osteoprogenitors or cells of the osteoclast lineage; or via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in either or both of these two cell types upon conversion of testosterone to estradiol. To this end, we generated mice with targeted deletion of an AR or an ERα allele in the mesenchymal (ARf/y;Prx1-Cre or ERαf/f;Osx1-Cre) or myeloid cell lineage (ARf/y; LysM-Cre or ERαf/f;LysM-Cre) and their descendants. Male ARf/y;Prx1-Cre mice exhibited decreased bone volume and trabecular number, and increased osteoclast number in the cancellous compartment. Moreover, they did not undergo the loss of cancellous bone volume and trabecular number caused by orchidectomy (ORX) in their littermate controls. In contrast, ARf/y;LysM-Cre, ERαf/f; Osx1-Cre, or ERαf/f;LysM-Cre mice had no cancellous bone phenotype at baseline and lost the same amount of cancellous bone as their controls following ORX. Most unexpectedly, adult males of all four models had no discernible cortical bone phenotype at baseline, and lost the same amount of cortical bone as their littermate controls after ORX. Recapitulation of the effects of ORX by AR deletion only in the ARf/y;Prx1-Cre mice indicates that the effects of androgens on cancellous bone result from AR signaling in osteoblasts—not on osteoclasts or via aromatization. The effects of androgens on cortical bone mass, on the other hand, do not require AR or ERα signaling in any cell type across the osteoblast or osteoclast differentiation lineage. Therefore, androgens must exert their effects indirectly by actions on some other cell

  8. The Effects of Androgens on Murine Cortical Bone Do Not Require AR or ERα Signaling in Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Ucer, Serra; Iyer, Srividhya; Bartell, Shoshana M; Martin-Millan, Marta; Han, Li; Kim, Ha-Neui; Weinstein, Robert S; Jilka, Robert L; O'Brien, Charles A; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2015-07-01

    In men, androgens are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of bone mass in both the cortical and cancellous bone compartment. Male mice with targeted deletion of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes have lower cancellous bone mass, but no cortical bone phenotype. We have investigated the possibility that the effects of androgens on the cortical compartment result from AR signaling in osteoprogenitors or cells of the osteoclast lineage; or via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in either or both of these two cell types upon conversion of testosterone to estradiol. To this end, we generated mice with targeted deletion of an AR or an ERα allele in the mesenchymal (AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre or ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre) or myeloid cell lineage (AR(f/y);LysM-Cre or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre) and their descendants. Male AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice exhibited decreased bone volume and trabecular number, and increased osteoclast number in the cancellous compartment. Moreover, they did not undergo the loss of cancellous bone volume and trabecular number caused by orchidectomy (ORX) in their littermate controls. In contrast, AR(f/y);LysM-Cre, ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre, or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre mice had no cancellous bone phenotype at baseline and lost the same amount of cancellous bone as their controls following ORX. Most unexpectedly, adult males of all four models had no discernible cortical bone phenotype at baseline, and lost the same amount of cortical bone as their littermate controls after ORX. Recapitulation of the effects of ORX by AR deletion only in the AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice indicates that the effects of androgens on cancellous bone result from AR signaling in osteoblasts-not on osteoclasts or via aromatization. The effects of androgens on cortical bone mass, on the other hand, do not require AR or ERα signaling in any cell type across the osteoblast or osteoclast differentiation lineage. Therefore, androgens must exert their effects indirectly by actions on

  9. Androgens Attenuate Vitamin D Production Induced by UVB Irradiation of the Skin of Male Mice by an Enzymatic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yingben; Ying, Lee; Horst, Ronald L; Watson, Gordon; Goltzman, David

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous exposure to UVB irradiation is an important source of vitamin D. Here, we examined sex-specific differences in cutaneous vitamin D production in mice. Both male and female mice on a vitamin D-deficient diet manifested vitamin D deficiency, with mineral abnormalities, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and osteomalacia. UVB irradiation significantly increased vitamin D levels in the skin of female mice and normalized serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels, as well as mineral and skeletal abnormalities. However, in male mice, the vitamin D response to UVB was attenuated and mineral and skeletal abnormalities were not normalized. The vitamin D precursor, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC), was significantly lower in the skin of male than female mice. This reduction was due to local androgen action in the skin as demonstrated by castration studies and skin-specific androgen receptor deletion in male mice, both of which reversed the male phenotype. Local androgen regulation in the skin of the CYP11A1 gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme that metabolizes cholesterol, 7DHC, and vitamin D, appeared to contribute to the gender differences in UVB-induced vitamin D production and to its reversal of vitamin D deficiency. Sex-specific, enzymatically regulated differences in cutaneous production of vitamin D may therefore be of importance to ensure vitamin D sufficiency.

  10. AM1 study of the electronic structure of some androgens 5{beta}-reduced

    SciTech Connect

    Kubli-Garfias, C.; Vazquez, R.; Vega-Velazquez, C. |

    1996-12-31

    Among the possible derivatives of testosterone are known the metabolites reduced at position 5. From this, two conformations are feasible; trans and cis resulting in 5{alpha} and 5{beta}-configured compounds. In this work four of the most important 5{beta}-reduced androgens were studied, namely: 5{beta}-androstanedione (5{beta}- androstane-3,17-dione (1)), 5{beta}-dihydrotestosterone (17{beta}-hydroxy-5{beta} androstan-3- one; (2)), etiocholanol-one (3{alpha}-hyroxy-5{beta}-androstan-17-one (3)) and epietiocholanolone (3{beta}-hydroxy-5{beta}-androstan-17-one; (4)). Initially geometries were optimized with molecular mechanics (MM2), and refined by the Austin Model 1 method (AM1). Thus, the following electronic structure properties were calculated: heat of formation ({Delta}Hf), dipole moment, and frontier orbitals (HOMO and LUMO). Although HOMO and LUMO were somewhat similar in energies, they were located differently into the molecular frame. Thus, HOMO was located at 17C-carbonyl group in structures 1,3 and 4 and at the carbonyl at C3 in 2; The LUMO was placed in the carbonyl at C3 in 1 and 2, whereas in 3 and 4 was placed at C17. It is concluded that these location of valence orbitals might facilitate the action of enzymes yielding androstanediols, explaining the last step in the metabolism of androgens.

  11. Spatial Localization and Quantitation of Androgens in Mouse Testis by Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and reproductive function. They are transported to their site of action as blood-borne endocrine hormones but can also be produced within tissues to act in intracrine and paracrine fashions. Because of this, circulating concentrations may not accurately reflect the androgenic influence within specific tissue microenvironments. Mass spectrometry imaging permits regional analysis of small molecular species directly from tissue surfaces. However, due to poor ionization and localized ion suppression, steroid hormones are difficult to detect. Here, derivatization with Girard T reagent was used to charge-tag testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone allowing direct detection of these steroids in mouse testes, in both basal and maximally stimulated states, and in rat prostate. Limits of detection were ∼0.1 pg for testosterone. Exemplary detection of endogenous steroids was achieved by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and either Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance detection (at 150 μm spatial resolution) or quadrupole-time-of-flight detection (at 50 μm spatial resolution). Structural confirmation was achieved by collision induced fragmentation following liquid extraction surface analysis and electrospray ionization. This application broadens the scope for derivatization strategies on tissue surfaces to elucidate local endocrine signaling in health and disease. PMID:27676129

  12. Effects of androgenic gland ablation on growth and reproductive parameters of Cherax quadricarinatus males (Parastacidae, Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Tropea, Carolina; Hermida, Gladys N; López Greco, Laura S

    2011-11-01

    This work investigates the effects of androgenic gland (AG) ablation on the structure of the reproductive system, development of secondary sexual characters and somatic growth in Cherax quadricarinatus males. The AG ablation, which was performed at an early developmental stage (initial weight: 1.85±0.03 g), had no effect on the somatic growth parameters (specific growth rate and growth increment), but it prevented the re-formation of male gonopores and appendices masculinae. However, the red patch differentiation and chelae size were similar to those in control males. All the ablated animals developed a male reproductive system. Testis structure was macroscopically and histologically normal. The distal portion of the vas deferens (DVD) was enlarged in some animals, with histological alterations of the epithelium and the structure of the spermatophore. Results suggest that the higher growth in males than in females may be due to an indirect effect of the AG on energy investment in reproduction rather than to a direct effect of an androgen. This is the first report of a potential action of the AG on the secretory activity of the distal VD and the structural organization of the spermatophore. Although the AG may play a role in the development of male copulatory organs, its association with the red patch development deserves further research. The results obtained in the present study support and complement those from intersexes of the same species.

  13. Androgen receptor expression in satellite cells of the neonatal levator ani of the rat.

    PubMed

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Monks, D Ashley

    2013-06-01

    Androgens are thought to mediate sexual differentiation of spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) motoneurons via actions on androgen receptors (ARs) within their target muscles bulbocavernosus and levator ani (LA). However, the cells within these muscles which mediate masculinization of the SNB remain undefined. Until recently, myocytes were thought to be the most likely candidate cell type. However, genetic tests of AR function in myocytes have failed to support a sufficient role for these cells in producing masculine SNB morphology, suggesting the involvement of other cell types. To identify other candidate cell types in the LA, we evaluated whether satellite cells or fibroblasts express AR. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to evaluate whether satellite cells and fibroblasts express AR in neonatal male and female rats in the LA and an adjacent sexually monomorphic control muscle (CM). We found that a small proportion of satellite cells in the LA express AR and that this proportion is significantly greater in the LA compared to the CM. No sex differences were found between the proportions of satellite cells expressing AR in either muscle. Less colocalization of satellite cells and AR was seen in postnatal day 3 muscle than in postnatal day 1 muscle. In contrast, only negligible amounts of fibroblasts labeled with S100A4 express AR in either the LA or the CM. Together, findings support satellite cells, but not fibroblasts, as a candidate cell type involved in the sexual differentiation of the SNB neuromuscular system.

  14. Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

    SciTech Connect

    T. Borges; G. Eisele; C. Byrd

    2001-07-31

    An area that has been overlooked within personnel security evaluations is employee use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). Current drug testing within the federal government does not include testing for anabolic steroids, and the difficulties to implement such testing protocols-not to mention the cost involved-make AAS testing highly improbable. The basis of this report is to bring to the forefront the damage that anabolic steroids can cause from both a physical and a psychological standpoint. Most individuals who use AASs do so to increase their muscle mass because they wish to gain some type of competitive edge during athletic competition or they wish to enhance their physical features for self-satisfaction and self-esteem (i.e., body building). Security officers are one group of men who often take high doses of anabolic steroids, according to the Second Report of the Senate Standing Committee (1990). The negative psychological characteristics for AAS use is extensive and includes prominent hostility, aggressiveness, irritability, euphoria, grandiose beliefs, hyperactivity, reckless behavior, increased sexual appetite, unpredictability, poor impulse control, mood fluctuations, and insomnia. The drug may invoke a sense of power and invincibility (Leckman and Scahill, 1990). Depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia, fatigue, impaired concentration, decreased libido, and even suicidality (Pope and Katz, 1992) have been noted with steroid withdrawal. It appears that long-term users of AAS experience similar characteristics as other substance abusers (i.e., craving, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms).

  15. Illicit Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2009-01-01

    The anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are a family of hormones that includes testosterone and its derivatives. These substances have been used by elite athletes since the 1950s, but they did not become widespread drugs of abuse in the general population until the 1980s. Thus, knowledge of the medical and behavioral effects of illicit AAS use is still evolving. Surveys suggest that many millions of boys and men, primarily in Western countries, have abused AAS to enhance athletic performance or personal appearance. AAS use among girls and women is much less common. Taken in supraphysiologic doses, AAS show various long-term adverse medical effects, especially cardiovascular toxicity. Behavioral effects of AAS include hypomanic or manic symptoms, sometimes accompanied by aggression or violence, which usually occur while taking AAS, and depressive symptoms occurring during AAS withdrawal. However, these symptoms are idiosyncratic and afflict only a minority of illicit users; the mechanism of these idiosyncratic responses remains unclear. AAS users may also ingest a range of other illicit drugs, including both “body-image” drugs to enhance physical appearance or performance, and classical drugs of abuse. In particular, AAS users appear particularly prone to opioid use. There may well be a biological basis for this association, since both human and animal data suggest that AAS and opioids may share similar brain mechanisms. Finally, AAS may cause a dependence syndrome in a substantial minority of users. AAS dependence may pose a growing public health problem in future years, but remains little studied. PMID:19769977

  16. Anabolic-androgenic steroids and the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Rogol, A D; Yesalis, C E

    1992-03-01

    This article has reviewed some of the hormonal and behavioral maturation that occurs during adolescence, which are characterized by remarkable physical changes and behavioral vulnerability. Risk taking of many varieties is common and drugs (including anabolic-androgenic steroids) form a part of the prevailing culture in many places. These steroids probably are not severe health hazards when taken intermittently and in low to moderate doses. The 17-alkylated derivatives are clearly the more likely to cause hepatotoxicity. Thus, the scare tactics formerly used (severe constitutional side effects) are doomed to failure. The tenuous link between these drugs and objective behavioral and addictive effects must be strengthened before health strategies based on this issue can be validated. Clearly, the lack of scientific information has impeded, if not precluded, the formulation of an effective health education strategy. The most potent deterrent to the use of steroid drugs by athletes must be the moral issue of fair play and maintaining a "level playing field." We strongly support directed research in these areas and hope that the credibility of the scientific community can be regained after its faulted "stop steroid use" campaigns based on the lack of steroid efficacy in bringing about desired results or on their dire consequences have been replaced with credible evidence to refute their use on these and other grounds.

  17. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V.

    2016-01-01

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors. PMID:27623747

  18. Different types of androgen receptor mutations in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jialiang; Hou, Jiangang; Li, Bingkun; Li, Dongyang; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Xiang

    2015-02-01

    Mutations of androgen receptor (AR) are the most frequent cause of 46, XY disorders of sex development and associated with a variety of phenotypes, ranging from phenotypic women (complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS)) to milder degrees of undervirilization (partial form or PAIS) or men with only infertility (mild form or MAIS). From 2009 to 2012, two young Chinese female individuals with CAIS from two families were referred to our hospital due to primary amenorrhea. Defects in testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) synthesis were excluded. Physical examination revealed that the patients have normal female external genitalia, normal breast development, vellus hair in the axilla and on the arms and legs, but absence of pubic hair, and a blind-ending vagina. Two different types of AR mutations have been detected by sequencing of genomic DNA: Family A showed deletion of exon 2 in AR gene; Family B showed a single nucleotide C-to-T transition in exon 8 of AR gene resulting in a proline 893-to-leucine substitution (Pro893Leu). Testicular histology showed developmental immaturity of seminiferous tubules with the absence of spermatogenic cells or spermatozoa. No AR immunoreactivity was observed in either case. Three adult patients recovered well from bilateral orchiectomy. The juvenile patient of family B was followed up. Our present study on these two families revealed two different types of AR mutation. The definitive diagnosis of AIS was based on clinical examination and genetic investigations. Our findings verified the mechanism of CAIS and also enriched AR Gene Mutation Database.

  19. The clinical and molecular spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O.; Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Holterhus, P.M.; Nitsche, E.M.; Kruse, K.

    1996-05-03

    Androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) are due to end-organ resistance to androgenic steroids in males leading to defective virilization of the external genitalia. The phenotype encompasses a wide array of genital ambiguity and may range from completely female to undervirilized but unequivocally male with infertility. This disorder is caused by mutations of the androgen receptor and is an X-linked recessive trait. We have studied 47 patients with AIS and have characterized the underlying molecular abnormality in the androgen receptor gene. Twenty patients had complete AIS and twenty-seven had partial AIS. Of the latter, 11 were of predominantly female phenotypic appearance and gender was assigned accordingly, while 16 were raised as males. Within the group of complete AIS, two patients had gross deletions within the gene, one had a small deletion, and one had an insertion. In the other patients with complete AIS, as well as all individuals with partial AIS, single nucleotide substitutions within the coding region were detected, each leading to an amino acid alteration. Seven codons were involved in more than one mutation in different cases. In addition, in one patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, an elongation of a glutamine-repeat was characterized. We conclude that mutations in the androgen receptor gene may be present throughout the whole coding region. However, our study provides evidence that several mutational hot spots exist. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Identification of Comamonas testosteroni as an androgen degrader in sewage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fu-Chun; Ismail, Wael; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shih, Chao-Jen; Wu, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the masculinization of freshwater wildlife exposed to androgens in polluted rivers. Microbial degradation is a crucial mechanism for eliminating steroid hormones from contaminated ecosystems. The aerobic degradation of testosterone was observed in various bacterial isolates. However, the ecophysiological relevance of androgen-degrading microorganisms in the environment is unclear. Here, we investigated the biochemical mechanisms and corresponding microorganisms of androgen degradation in aerobic sewage. Sewage samples collected from the Dihua Sewage Treatment Plant (Taipei, Taiwan) were aerobically incubated with testosterone (1 mM). Androgen metabolite analysis revealed that bacteria adopt the 9, 10-seco pathway to degrade testosterone. A metagenomic analysis indicated the apparent enrichment of Comamonas spp. (mainly C. testosteroni) and Pseudomonas spp. in sewage incubated with testosterone. We used the degenerate primers derived from the meta-cleavage dioxygenase gene (tesB) of various proteobacteria to track this essential catabolic gene in the sewage. The amplified sequences showed the highest similarity (87–96%) to tesB of C. testosteroni. Using quantitative PCR, we detected a remarkable increase of the 16S rRNA and catabolic genes of C. testosteroni in the testosterone-treated sewage. Together, our data suggest that C. testosteroni, the model microorganism for aerobic testosterone degradation, plays a role in androgen biodegradation in aerobic sewage. PMID:27734937

  1. An update on plant derived anti-androgens.

    PubMed

    Grant, Paul; Ramasamy, Shamin

    2012-01-01

    Anti-androgens are an assorted group of drugs and compounds that reduce the levels or activity of androgen hormones within the human body. Disease states in which this is relevant include polycystic ovarian syndrome, hirsutism, acne, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and endocrine related cancers such as carcinoma of the prostate. We provide an overview and discussion of the use of anti-androgen medications in clinical practice and explore the increasing recognition of the benefits of plant-derived anti-androgens, for example, spearmint tea in the management of PCOS, for which some evidence about efficacy is beginning to emerge. Other agents covered include red reishi, which has been shown to reduce levels 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme that facilitates conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT); licorice, which has phytoestrogen effects and reduces testosterone levels; Chinese peony, which promotes the aromatization of testosterone into estrogen; green tea, which contains epigallocatechins and also inhibits 5-alpha reductase, thereby reducing the conversion of normal testosterone into the more potent DHT; black cohosh, which has been shown to kill both androgenresponsive and non-responsive human prostate cancer cells; chaste tree, which has a reduces prolactin from the anterior pituitary; and saw palmetto extract, which is used as an anti-androgen although it shown no difference in comparison to placebo in clinical trials.

  2. An Update on Plant Derived Anti-Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paul; Ramasamy, Shamin

    2012-01-01

    Anti-androgens are an assorted group of drugs and compounds that reduce the levels or activity of androgen hormones within the human body. Disease states in which this is relevant include polycystic ovarian syndrome, hirsutism, acne, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and endocrine related cancers such as carcinoma of the prostate. We provide an overview and discussion of the use of anti-androgen medications in clinical practice and explore the increasing recognition of the benefits of plant-derived anti-androgens, for example, spearmint tea in the management of PCOS, for which some evidence about efficacy is beginning to emerge. Other agents covered include red reishi, which has been shown to reduce levels 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme that facilitates conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT); licorice, which has phytoestrogen effects and reduces testosterone levels; Chinese peony, which promotes the aromatization of testosterone into estrogen; green tea, which contains epigallocatechins and also inhibits 5-alpha reductase, thereby reducing the conversion of normal testosterone into the more potent DHT; black cohosh, which has been shown to kill both androgenresponsive and non-responsive human prostate cancer cells; chaste tree, which has a reduces prolactin from the anterior pituitary; and saw palmetto extract, which is used as an anti-androgen although it shown no difference in comparison to placebo in clinical trials. PMID:23843810

  3. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Estrogen, Androgen, and Progesterone Nuclear Receptors from a Freshwater Turtle (Pseudemys nelsoni)

    PubMed Central

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Ichikawa, Rie; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Kohno, Satomi; Guillette, Louis J.; Iguchi, Taisen

    2008-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential for the normal function of many organ systems in vertebrates. Reproductive activity in females and males, such as the differentiation, growth, and maintenance of the reproductive system, requires signaling by the sex steroids. Although extensively studied in mammals and a few fish, amphibians, and bird species, the molecular mechanisms of sex steroid hormone (estrogens, androgens, and progestins) action are poorly understood in reptiles. Here we evaluate hormone receptor ligand interactions in a freshwater turtle, the red-belly slider (Pseudemys nelsoni), after the isolation of cDNAs encoding an estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), an androgen receptor (AR), and a progesterone receptor (PR). The full-length red-belly slider turtle (t)ERα, tAR, and tPR cDNAs were obtained using 5′ and 3′ rapid amplification cDNA ends. The deduced amino acid sequences showed high identity to the chicken orthologs (tERα, 90%; tAR, 71%; tPR, 71%). Using transient transfection assays of mammalian cells, tERα protein displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription from an estrogen-responsive element-containing promoter. The other receptor proteins, tAR and tPR, also displayed androgen- or progestin-dependent activation of transcription from androgen- and progestin-responsive murine mammary tumor virus promoters. We further examined the transactivation of tERα, tAR and tPR by ligands using a modified GAL4-transactivation system. We found that the GAL4-transactivation system was not suitable for the measurement of tAR and tPR transactivations. This is the first report of the full coding regions of a reptilian AR and PR and the examination of their transactivation by steroid hormones. PMID:17916628

  4. Anti-androgens inhibit ABCB1 efflux and ATPase activity and reverse docetaxel resistance in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yezi; Liu, Chengfei; Armstrong, Cameron; Lou, Wei; Sandher, Amandeep; Gao, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies show that inhibition of ABCB1 expression overcomes acquired docetaxel resistance in C4-2B-TaxR cells. In this study, we examined if anti-androgens, such as bicalutamide and enzalutamide, could inhibit ABCB1 activity and overcome resistance to docetaxel. Experimental Design ABCB1 efflux activity was determined using a rhodamine efflux assay. ABCB1 ATPase activity was determined by Pgp-Glo™ assay systems. The effects of the anti-androgens bicalutamide and enzalutamide on docetaxel sensitivity were determined by cell growth assays and tumor growth in vivo. Results We found that bicalutamide and enzalutamide inhibit ABCB1 ATP-binding cassette transporter activity through blocking ABCB1 efflux activity. Bicalutamide inhibited ABCB1 efflux activity by 40%, while enzalutamide inhibited ABCB1 efflux activity by ~60%. Both bicalutamide and enzalutamide inhibit ABCB1 ATPase activity. In addition, bicalutamide and enzalutamide inhibit ABCB1 efflux activity and desensitize docetaxel resistant and androgen receptor (AR)-negative DU145 cells. Combination of bicalutamide with docetaxel had a significant anti-tumor effect in both AR-positive and AR-negative docetaxel resistant xenograft models, suggesting that bicalutamide desensitizes docetaxel resistant cells to docetaxel treatment independent of AR status. Conclusions We identified a novel mechanism of action for anti-androgens such as bicalutamide and enzalutamide as inhibitors of ABCB1 efflux and ATPase activity. Bicalutamide and enzalutamide desensitize docetaxel resistant prostate cancer cells to docetaxel treatment independent of AR status. These studies may lead to the development of combinational therapies with bicalutamide/enzalutamide and docetaxel as an effective regiment to treat advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) independent of AR status. PMID:25995342

  5. Stimulation of androgen-dependent gene expression by the adrenal precursors dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione in the rat ventral prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Labrie, C.; Simard, J.; Zhao, H.F.; Belanger, A.; Pelletier, G.; Labrie, F. )

    1989-06-01

    Androgens play a major role in the development, growth, and function of accessory sexual organs, especially the prostate. However, the testis is not the sole source of circulating androgens in man, since the adrenal gland secretes dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate, and androstenedione (delta 4-dione) in large quantities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of plasma concentrations of DHEA and delta 4-dione similar to those found in adult man on sensitive and specific markers of androgen action in the rat ventral prostate. In addition to ventral prostate weight, we have measured the steady state levels of the mRNAs encoding the C1 component of rat prostatic binding protein (PBP-C1) and spermine-binding protein (SBP) using 35S-labeled cDNA probes for in situ hybridization. One week after castration, ventral prostate weight fell 84%, while prostatic 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and androgen-dependent mRNAs were undetectable. When administered via Silastic implants to castrated adult rats for 1 week, plasma concentrations of 1.37 +/- 0.06 ng/ml DHEA or 0.43 +/- 0.08 ng/ml delta 4-dione independently caused increases in ventral prostate weight to 33% and 65% of normal values, respectively. The same plasma levels of DHEA and delta 4-dione resulted in high intraprostatic levels of DHT to 1.19 +/- 0.34 and 3.66 +/- 0.89 ng/g tissue, respectively. Furthermore, DHEA caused an increase in the steady state levels of PBP-C1 and SBP mRNAs to 50% and 57% of the normal state, respectively, while delta 4-dione caused increases corresponding to 80% and 119% of control values, respectively. Castrated adult rats receiving testosterone at a concentration of 1.66 +/- 0.37 ng/ml plasma maintained normal ventral prostate weight and gene expression levels.

  6. Systemic hypotensive effects of testosterone are androgen structure-specific and neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Perusquía, Mercedes; Greenway, Clayton D.; Perkins, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone (TES) and other androgens exert a direct vasorelaxing action on the vasculature in vitro that is structurally specific and independent of cytosolic androgen receptor (AR). The effects of intravenous androgen infusions on mean arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were determined in conscious, unrestrained, chronically catheterized, ganglionically blocked (hexamethonium, HEX; 30 mg/kg ip) male Sprague-Dawley (SD) and testicular-feminized male (Tfm; AR-deficient) rats, 16–20 wk of age. BP and HR were recorded at baseline and with increasing doses of androgens (0.375–6.00 μmol·kg−1·min−1 iv; 10 min/dose). Data are expressed as means ± SE (n = 5–8 rats/group). In SD rats, baseline BP and HR averaged 103 ± 4 mmHg and 353 ± 12 beats/min (bpm). TES produced a dose-dependent reduction in BP to a low of 87 ± 4 mmHg (Δ16%), while HR was unchanged (354 ± 14 bpm). Neither BP (109 ± 3 mmHg) nor HR (395 ± 13 bpm) were altered by vehicle (10% EtOH in 0.9% saline; 0.15 ml·kg−1·min−1, iv). In Tfm, TES produced a similar reduction in BP (99 ± 3 to 86 ± 3 mmHg, Δ13%); HR was unchanged (369 ± 18 bpm). In SD, 5β-dihydrotestosterone (genomically inactive metabolite) produced a greater reduction in BP than TES (102 ± 2 to 79 ± 2 mmHg, Δ23%); HR was unchanged (361 ± 9). A 20-μg iv bolus of sodium nitroprusside in both SD and Tfm rats reduced BP 30–40 mmHg, while HR was unchanged, confirming blockade by HEX. Pretreatment of SD rats with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor (S-methyl-thiocitrulline, SMTC; 20 μg·kg−1·min−1 × 30 min) abolished the hypotensive effects of TES infusion on BP (104 ± 2 vs. 101 ± 2 mmHg) and HR (326 ± 11 vs. 324 ± 8 bpm). These data suggest the systemic hypotensive effect of TES and other androgens involves a direct vasodilatory action on the peripheral vasculature which, like the effect observed in isolated arteries, is structurally specific and AR-independent, and involves

  7. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  8. New Strategy for Prostate Cancer Prevention Based on Selenium Suppression of Androgen Receptor Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Prostate Cancer Prevention Based on Selenium Suppression of Androgen Receptor Signaling PRINCIPAL...in suppressing androgen signaling in prostate cancer cells. We next examined the efficacy of emodin and finasteride in growth arrest in LNCaP...phosphorylated and suppressed by AKT [32,33], which is an important survival molecule for prostate cancer . In prostate cancer cells, androgen

  9. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  10. Androgen Activation of the Folate Receptor α Gene through Partial Tethering of the Androgen Receptor by C/EBPα○

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Zhang, Juan; Kelley, Karen M.M.; Gonit, Mesfin; Hao, Hong; Ratnam, Manohar

    2010-01-01

    The folate receptor α (FRα) is critical for normal embryonic and fetal development. The receptor has a relatively narrow tissue specificity which includes the visceral endoderm and the placenta and mediates delivery of folate, inadequacy of which results in termination of pregnancy or developmental defects. We have previously reported that the FRα gene is negatively and directly regulated by estrogen and positively but indirectly by progesterone and glucocorticoid. To further investigate hormonal control of this gene and in view of the growing evidence for the importance of the androgen receptor (AR) in endometrial and placental functions, we examined the response of the FRα gene to androgen. Here we demonstrate that the FRα gene is directly activated by androgen. The P4 promoter of the FRα gene is the target of hormone-dependent activation by the androgen receptor (AR) in a manner that is co-activator-dependent. The site of functional association of AR in the FRα gene maps to a 35bp region occurring ~1500bp upstream of the target promoter. The functional elements within this region are an androgen response element (ARE) half-site and a non-canonical C/EBP element that cooperate to recruit AR in a manner that is dependent on the DNA-bound C/EBPα. Since the placenta is rich in C/EBPα, the findings underscore the multiplicity of mechanisms by which the FRα gene is under the exquisite control of steroid hormones. PMID:20817090

  11. Androgens downregulate miR-21 expression in breast cancer cells underlining the protective role of androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Cesario, Maria Grazia; Donà, Ada; Rizza, Pietro; Aquila, Saveria; Avena, Paola; Lanzino, Marilena; Pellegrino, Michele; Vivacqua, Adele; Tucci, Paola; Morelli, Catia; Andò, Sebastiano; Sisci, Diego

    2016-03-15

    Although the protective role of androgen receptor (AR) in breast cancer (BC) is well established, the mechanisms involved remains largely unexplored. MicroRNAs play fundamental roles in many biological processes, including tumor cell development and metastasis. Herein, we report that androgens reduce BC cells proliferation acting as a negative modulator of the onco-miRNA-21.The synthetic androgen miboleron (Mib) decreases BC cell proliferation induced by miR-21 over-expression and AR knockdown evidenced the requirement of AR in the down-regulation of miR-21 expression. These effects seem to be a general mechanism occurring in BC tissues.Chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis disclosed the binding of AR to a specific ARE sequence in miR-21 proximal promoter and recognizes the recruitment of HDAC3 as component for AR-mediated transcriptional repression. Such event is associated to a significantly reduced PolII binding in Mib treated extracts confirming that activated AR is a transcriptional repressor of miR-21 expression, providing further insight into the protective role of androgens in breast cancer cells.Collectively, our data and the widespread AR expression in primary and metastatic breast tumours, suggest a careful examination of the therapeutic potential of androgens also in potentiating the effectiveness of anti-oestrogen adjuvant therapies.

  12. Androgens downregulate miR-21 expression in breast cancer cells underlining the protective role of androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Donà, Ada; Rizza, Pietro; Aquila, Saveria; Avena, Paola; Lanzino, Marilena; Pellegrino, Michele; Vivacqua, Adele; Tucci, Paola; Morelli, Catia; Andò, Sebastiano; Sisci, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Although the protective role of androgen receptor (AR) in breast cancer (BC) is well established, the mechanisms involved remains largely unexplored. MicroRNAs play fundamental roles in many biological processes, including tumor cell development and metastasis. Herein, we report that androgens reduce BC cells proliferation acting as a negative modulator of the onco-miRNA-21. The synthetic androgen miboleron (Mib) decreases BC cell proliferation induced by miR-21 over-expression and AR knockdown evidenced the requirement of AR in the down-regulation of miR-21 expression. These effects seem to be a general mechanism occurring in BC tissues. Chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis disclosed the binding of AR to a specific ARE sequence in miR-21 proximal promoter and recognizes the recruitment of HDAC3 as component for AR-mediated transcriptional repression. Such event is associated to a significantly reduced PolII binding in Mib treated extracts confirming that activated AR is a transcriptional repressor of miR-21 expression, providing further insight into the protective role of androgens in breast cancer cells. Collectively, our data and the widespread AR expression in primary and metastatic breast tumours, suggest a careful examination of the therapeutic potential of androgens also in potentiating the effectiveness of anti-oestrogen adjuvant therapies. PMID:26862856

  13. Expression of the androgen receptor in the testes and the concentrations of gonadotropins and sex steroid hormones in male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Leska, A; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-04-01

    Androgens, including testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4), are essential for puberty, fertility and sexual functions. The biological activity of those hormones is mediated via the androgen receptor (AR). The regulation of androgen action in birds is poorly understood. Therefore, the present study analysed mRNA and protein expression of AR in the testes, plasma concentrations of the luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), T, A4 and oestradiol (E2), as well as the levels of T, A4 and E2 in testicular homogenates of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. Plasma concentrations of LH and FSH, as well as plasma and testicular levels of T and A4 began to increase at 20weeks of age. The lowest plasma levels of E2 were noted at 20weeks relative to other growth stages. The 20th week of life seems to be the key phase in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys. The AR protein was found in the nuclei of testicular cells in all examined growth stages. Higher expression of AR protein in the testes beginning at 20weeks of age was accompanied by high plasma concentrations of LH and high plasma and testicular levels of androgens. This relationship seems to be necessary to regulate male sexual function.

  14. [Androgen insensitivity syndrome. Clinical features and molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Sólyom, J; Scheiber, D; Fekete, G

    2001-08-05

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked hereditary disorder caused by the mutation of the androgen receptor gene leading to variable phenotypes according to the depth of the hormonal resistance. There is a lack of knowledge regarding the criteria used to decide the management of infants with partial AIS, particularly with respect to sex of rearing. Therefore a national survey of patients with AIS in Hungary has been decided to compose a database for analyzing current practice. Preliminary results of the analysis for the mutations in the androgen receptor gene of Hungarian patients with AIS has been presented. The authors suggest that guidelines for clinicians on appropriate diagnostic and management strategies for AIS patients, particularly in the case of suspected partial AIS, would be helpful.

  15. Gonadotropin regulation of in vitro androgen production by reptilian testes.

    PubMed

    Wo Tsui, H; Licht, P

    1977-04-01

    The hormonal regulation of in vitro androgen production by minced testes from 7 species of reptiles representing the 3 major orders was studied using purified follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from tetrapod species. Androgen content was measured by radioimmunoassay. All 7 species showed a dose-dependent response to all preparations of FSH and LH tested. However, variations were found depending on the species tested and the source of the hormone. All snake hormones were particularly inactive in turtles. Some of the variation in relative potencies of hormone reflect phylogenetic specificity in the testes. Synergism between FSH and LH was tested in the sea turtle. While subliminal doses of FSH and LH produced a small stimulation of androgen production, each alone was ineffective. Both gonadotropins have intrinsic activity with regard to the stimulation of steroidogenesis.

  16. Prevalent flucocorticoid and androgen activity in US water sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stavreva, Diana A.; George, Anuja A.; Klausmeyer, Paul; Varticovski, Lyuba; Sack, Daniel; Voss, Ty C.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowiczl, Luke R.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a major health concern. The presence of estrogenic compounds in water and their deleterious effect are well documented. However, detection and monitoring of other classes of EDCs is limited. Here we utilize a high-throughput live cell assay based on sub-cellular relocalization of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GFP-GR and GFP-AR), in combination with gene transcription analysis, to screen for glucocorticoid and androgen activity in water samples. We report previously unrecognized glucocorticoid activity in 27%, and androgen activity in 35% of tested water sources from 14 states in the US. Steroids of both classes impact body development, metabolism, and interfere with reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems. This prevalent contamination could negatively affect wildlife and human populations.

  17. Androgen receptor in human health: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Hifzur Rahman; Nanda, Sanjeev; Parray, Aijaz; Saleem, Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Androgen is a key for the activation of Androgen Receptor (AR) in most of the disease conditions, however androgen-independent activation of AR is also found in aggressive type human malignancies. An intense search for the inhibitors of AR is underway to cure AR-dependent diseases. In addition to targeting various components of AR signaling pathway, compounds which directly target AR are under preclinical and clinical investigation. Various In vitro and preclinical animal studies suggest that different natural compounds have potential to act against AR. Some natural compounds have been found to be pharmacologically effective against AR irrespective of varying routs of administration viz; oral, intra-peritoneal and intravenous. This mini-review summarizes the studies conducted with different natural agents in determining their pharmacological utility against AR signaling.

  18. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C. K.; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; Zhang, Junyu; Sheng, Jianzhong; Huang, Hefeng

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders and a leading cause of female subfertility. The mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of PCOS remains to be illustrated. Here, we identify two alternative splice variants (ASVs) of the androgen receptor (AR), insertion and deletion isoforms, in granulosa cells (GCs) in ∼62% of patients with PCOS. AR ASVs are strongly associated with remarkable hyperandrogenism and abnormalities in folliculogenesis, and are absent from all control subjects without PCOS. Alternative splicing dramatically alters genome-wide AR recruitment and androgen-induced expression of genes related to androgen metabolism and folliculogenesis in human GCs. These findings establish alternative splicing of AR in GCs as the major pathogenic mechanism for hyperandrogenism and abnormal folliculogenesis in PCOS. PMID:25825716

  19. Limb muscles are androgen targets in an acrobatic tropical bird.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ni Y; Katz, Amnon; Day, Lainy B; Barske, Julia; Schlinger, Barney A

    2010-03-01

    Spectacular athleticism is a conspicuous feature of many animal courtship displays yet surprisingly little is known about androgen dependence of skeletal muscles underlying these displays. Testosterone (T) acts through androgen receptors (ARs) to stimulate muscular male Golden-collared manakins of Panama to perform a remarkably athletic courtship display that includes loud wingsnaps generated by the rapid and forceful lifting of the wings. We tested the hypothesis that androgen sensitivity, reflected in the expression levels of AR mRNA, is a muscular adaptation supporting these courtship displays. Quantitative PCR showed substantially greater AR mRNA expression in all limb muscles of wild male and female manakins compared with two other avian species that do not perform athletic displays, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers. AR expression levels in the massive skeletal muscles were comparable with the minute oscine syringeal muscle but greater than levels in nonmuscular androgen targets that did not differ across species. Compared with zebra finches, male manakins also had greater activity of the T-activating enzyme 5 alpha-reductase in a wing-lifting muscle. In addition, low levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ER) mRNA were detected in all muscles of control, T-treated, and estradiol-treated manakins. Treatment of manakins with T, but not estradiol, significantly increased skeletal muscle ER expression, suggesting that ER expression is AR-dependent. These results confirm manakin limb muscles as important androgen targets where T may act to promote the speed, force, and/or endurance required for the manakin display. Androgen-sensitive muscular phenotypes may adapt males of many species to perform impressive athletic displays.

  20. Androgens and esophageal cancer: What do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Sukocheva, Olga A; Li, Bin; Due, Steven L; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I

    2015-01-01

    Significant disparities exist between genders for the development and progression of several gastro-intestinal (GI) diseases including cancer. Differences in incidence between men vs women for colon, gastric and hepatocellular cancers suggest a role for steroid sex hormones in regulation of GI carcinogenesis. Involvement of intrinsic gender-linked mechanisms is also possible for esophageal adenocarcinoma as its incidence is disproportionally high among men. However, the cause of the observed gender differences and the potential role of androgens in esophageal carcinogenesis remains unclear, even though the cancer-promoting role of androgen receptors (AR) shown in other cancers such as prostate and bladder suggests this aspect warrants exploration. Several studies have demonstrated expression of ARs in esophageal cancer. However, only one study has suggested a potential link between AR signaling and outcome - poorer prognosis. Two groups have analyzed data from cohorts with prostate cancer and one of these found a decreased incidence of esophageal squamous and adenocarcinoma after androgen deprivation therapy. However, very limited information is available about the effects of androgen and AR-initiated signaling on esophageal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible mechanisms for androgens/AR involvement in the regulation of esophageal cancer growth are considered, and the potential use of AR as a prognostic factor and clinical target is highlighted, although insufficient evidence is available to support clinical trials of novel therapies. As esophageal adenocarcinoma is a gender linked cancer with a large male predominance further studies are warranted to clarify the role of androgens and ARs in shaping intracellular signaling and genomic responses in esophageal cancer. PMID:26034350

  1. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  2. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%). PMID:26819671

  3. Inflammation, Prostate Cancer and Negative Regulation of Androgen Receptor Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    activity, 2) microRNA -mediated regulation of prostate cancer cell proliferation. My data establish that the human AR level is negatively regulated by... cancer , scanning of the cancer microRNA array shows that miR-454 is up regulated in androgen-independent C4-2 cells and overexpression of miR-454...TERMS Androgen receptor, prostate cancer , TNF-α, NF-κB, microRNA 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  4. [Use and abuse of androgens and anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Alén, M

    1993-01-01

    At therapeutic dosages, androgen and anabolic steroids enhance neither muscle strength nor competitive performance. Endogenous androgen secretion is inhibited, and the net effect is negligible. The dosages taken by athletes and body-builders are 10-50 fold greater than the therapeutic dosages, and give rise to hyperandrogenic conditions. Although this improves endurance, strength and muscle development, at the same time a manifest hormone disturbance is developed with a variety of consequences. Abusers, who as a rule inject illicit preparations themselves, are also at risk of hepatitis and HIV.

  5. Enzalutamide: a new prostate cancer targeted therapy against the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Martín Lázaro; Mateos, Luis León; Estévez, Sergio Vázquez; Calvo, Ovidio Fernández; Herranz, Urbano Anido; Afonso, Francisco Javier Afonso; Santomé, Lucía; Aparicio, Luis Antón

    2015-03-01

    Enzalutamide (MDV3100), an androgen receptor-signalling inhibitor, represents the most recent compound added to the therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who progressed to docetaxel. The anti-tumour activity and safety of enzalutamide has been demonstrated in a phase III clinical trial, showing a benefit in overall survival, which was the primary endpoint. There are no head-to-head studies comparing the different treatment options in this subset of patients. In this article, most relevant data published in the literature have been reviewed, with special attention to the therapeutic alternatives currently available for postdocexatel mCRPC patients, emphasising the mechanisms of action of the different drugs, efficacy and quality of life-related aspects.

  6. Sex Steroid Actions in Male Bone

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Michaël R.; Claessens, Frank; Gielen, Evelien; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Börjesson, Anna E.; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroids are chief regulators of gender differences in the skeleton, and male gender is one of the strongest protective factors against osteoporotic fractures. This advantage in bone strength relies mainly on greater cortical bone expansion during pubertal peak bone mass acquisition and superior skeletal maintenance during aging. During both these phases, estrogens acting via estrogen receptor-α in osteoblast lineage cells are crucial for male cortical and trabecular bone, as evident from conditional genetic mouse models, epidemiological studies, rare genetic conditions, genome-wide meta-analyses, and recent interventional trials. Genetic mouse models have also demonstrated a direct role for androgens independent of aromatization on trabecular bone via the androgen receptor in osteoblasts and osteocytes, although the target cell for their key effects on periosteal bone formation remains elusive. Low serum estradiol predicts incident fractures, but the highest risk occurs in men with additionally low T and high SHBG. Still, the possible clinical utility of serum sex steroids for fracture prediction is unknown. It is likely that sex steroid actions on male bone metabolism rely also on extraskeletal mechanisms and cross talk with other signaling pathways. We propose that estrogens influence fracture risk in aging men via direct effects on bone, whereas androgens exert an additional antifracture effect mainly via extraskeletal parameters such as muscle mass and propensity to fall. Given the demographic trends of increased longevity and consequent rise of osteoporosis, an increased understanding of how sex steroids influence male bone health remains a high research priority. PMID:25202834

  7. Production of androgens by microbial transformation of progesterone in vitro: a model for androgen production in rivers.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Ronald L; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Angus, Robert A; Howell, W Mike; Kirk, Marion; Moore, Ray; Nance, Marione; Brown, Amber

    2004-11-01

    We have previously documented the presence of progesterone and androstenedione in the water column and bottom sediments of the Fenholloway River, Taylor County, Florida. This river receives paper mill effluent and contains masculinized female mosquitofish. We hypothesized that plant sterols (e.g., ss-sitosterol) derived from the pulping of pine trees are transformed by bacteria into progesterone and subsequently into 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, and other androgens. In this study, we demonstrate that these same androgens can be produced in vitro from the bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis. In a second part to this study, we reextracted and reanalyzed the sediment from the Fenholloway River and verified the presence of androstadienedione, a delta1 steroid with androgen activity.

  8. 7alpha,11beta-Dimethyl-19-nortestosterone: a potent and selective androgen response modulator with prostate-sparing properties.

    PubMed

    Cook, C Edgar; Kepler, John A

    2005-02-15

    7alpha,11beta-Dimethyl-19-nortestosterone, made by 1,6-methyl addition to 17beta-acetoxy-11beta-methylestra-4,6-dien-3-one, was a highly potent and selective androgen response modulator, with enhanced androgen receptor binding, androgenic activity and anabolic:androgenic ratio over its two monomethyl homologs.

  9. A comparison of progestin and androgen receptor binding using the CoMFA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughney, Deborah A.; Schwender, Charles F.

    1992-12-01

    A series of 48 steroids has been studied with the SYBYL QSAR module using Relative Binding Affinities (RBAs) to progesterone and androgen receptors obtained from the literature. Models for the progesterone and androgen data were developed. Both models show regions where sterics and electrostatics correlate to binding affinity but are different for androgen and progesterone which suggests differences possibly important for receptor selectivity. The progesterone model is more predictive than the androgen (predictive r2 of 0.725 vs. 0.545 for progesterone and androgen, respectively).

  10. Enzalutamide: targeting the androgen signalling pathway in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schalken, Jack; Fitzpatrick, John M

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in the understanding of the underlying cancer biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the androgen receptor (AR) signalling pathway remaining implicated throughout the prostate cancer disease continuum. Reactivation of the AR signalling pathway is considered to be a key driver of CRPC progression and, as such, the AR is a logical target for therapy in CRPC. The objective of this review was to understand the importance of AR signalling in the treatment of patients with metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) and to discuss the clinical benefits associated with inhibition of the AR signalling pathway. A search was conducted to identify articles relating to the role of AR signalling in CRPC and therapies that inhibit the AR signalling pathway. Current understanding of prostate cancer has identified the AR signalling pathway as a logical target for the treatment of CRPC. Available therapies that inhibit the AR signalling pathway include AR blockers, androgen biosynthesis inhibitors, and AR signalling inhibitors. Enzalutamide, the first approved AR signalling inhibitor, has a novel mode of action targeting AR signalling at three key stages. The direct mode of action of enzalutamide has been shown to translate into clinical responses in patients with mCRPC. In conclusion, the targeting of the AR signalling pathway in patients with mCRPC results in numerous clinical benefits. As the number of treatment options increase, more trials evaluating the sequencing and combination of treatments are required. This review highlights the continued importance of targeting a key driver in the progression of CRPC, AR signalling, and the clinical benefits associated with inhibition of the AR signalling pathway in the treatment of patients with CRPC.

  11. Androgen-dependent measurements of female genitalia in women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crouch, N S; Michala, Lina; Creighton, S M; Conway, G S

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of clitoral length and clitoral to urethral distance were made and analysed for a relationship in a group of 19 women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS)attending a specialist clinic for adult women with disorders of sexual development. These were compared with a control group of 50 women attending hospital for a gynaecological procedure.There was a positive correlation between clitoral length and clitoral to urethral distance for women with CAIS. In contrast, a negative correlation was seen between clitoral length and clitoral to urethral distance for women in the control group. Women with CAIS had a reduced mean clitoral length compared with controls(P = 0.001), but no difference was observed for the clitoral to urethral distance between the two groups (P = 0.116).

  12. Effects of model aromatizable (17α-methyltestosterone) and non-aromatizable (5α-dihydrotestosterone) androgens on the adult mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) in a short-term reproductive endocrine bioassay.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Robert; Lister, Andrea; Hewitt, L Mark; MacLatchy, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Androgens originating from pulp mill processing, sewage treatment facilities and agricultural activities have the potential for discharge into aquatic receiving environments. To assess androgen effects on reproductive endocrine status in fish in estuarine environments, male and female adult northern mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus macrolepidotus) were exposed to an aromatizable androgen (17α-methyltestosterone; MT) and a non-aromatizable androgen (5α-dihydrotestosterone; DHT) in a short-term reproductive endocrine bioassay. Fish were nominally exposed to 10 μg/L or 100 μg/L DHT, or 0.1 μg/L or 1 μg/L MT for 14 days during gonadal recrudescence. Actual concentrations of androgens, as measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA), were 10-49% of nominal MT 0.1, 3-6% of nominal MT 1, 5-10% of nominal DHT 10 and 3-25% of nominal DHT 100. Female mummichog were impacted to a greater degree by androgen exposure, with increased plasma testosterone (T) at 100 μg/L DHT, depressed plasma 17β-estradiol (E2) at both DHT concentrations and at 1 μg/L MT, as well as depressed in vitro E2 at both MT concentrations and 100 μg/L DHT. Males had depressed plasma T in the 10 μg/L DHT treatment and depressed in vitro 11-ketotestosterone production for both MT concentrations and 10 μg/L DHT. Ovarian aromatase gene expression was induced in females exposed to 1 μg/L MT. DHT at 100 μg/L increased hepatic vitellogenin-1 (VTG1) expression in males and depressed VTG1 expression in females. The range of responses between sexes and among species provides evidence for modes of actions and potential impacts of androgens in aquatic receiving environments.

  13. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  14. Androgen Receptor Regulates the Growth of Neuroblastoma Cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junyan; Wang, Dongmei; Guo, Lianying; Fang, Shengyun; Wang, Yang; Xing, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial tumors in children. At present about the true etiology of neuroblastoma is unclear and many studies have tried to find effective treatments for these primary malignant tumors. Although it has been illustrated that androgen receptor (AR) was expressed in neuroblastoma cells in some former reports, the biological role of androgen receptor in the development of neuroblastoma is not fully understood. Methods: Androgen (R1881) and the antagonists of androgen receptor (MDV3100 and ARN509) were used to study the role of the androgen receptor signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo on SH-SY5Y and Neuro-2a (N2a) cell lines. Results: We found that AR expression showed an R1881 dose-dependent manner in neuroblastoma cells in vitro and R1881was able to increase, while both antagonists of androgen receptor (MDV3100 and ARN509) significantly decrease, the proliferation, migration, invasion and sphere formation of SH-SY5Y and N2a cells. Moreover, androgen promoted the growth of N2a tumor in vivo. However, when androgen receptor (AR) was effectively knocked down in the two cell lines by siRNA, either promoting or inhibiting effect of the androgen or androgen receptor antagonists, respectively, was attenuated. Conclusion: Our results suggested that androgen receptor may involve in the progression of neuroblastoma as well as provided insight into a new target for the diagnosis and treatment of neuroblastoma patients. PMID:28326012

  15. Androgen Receptor Regulates the Growth of Neuroblastoma Cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junyan; Wang, Dongmei; Guo, Lianying; Fang, Shengyun; Wang, Yang; Xing, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial tumors in children. At present about the true etiology of neuroblastoma is unclear and many studies have tried to find effective treatments for these primary malignant tumors. Although it has been illustrated that androgen receptor (AR) was expressed in neuroblastoma cells in some former reports, the biological role of androgen receptor in the development of neuroblastoma is not fully understood. Methods: Androgen (R1881) and the antagonists of androgen receptor (MDV3100 and ARN509) were used to study the role of the androgen receptor signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo on SH-SY5Y and Neuro-2a (N2a) cell lines. Results: We found that AR expression showed an R1881 dose-dependent manner in neuroblastoma cells in vitro and R1881was able to increase, while both antagonists of androgen receptor (MDV3100 and ARN509) significantly decrease, the proliferation, migration, invasion and sphere formation of SH-SY5Y and N2a cells. Moreover, androgen promoted the growth of N2a tumor in vivo. However, when androgen receptor (AR) was effectively knocked down in the two cell lines by siRNA, either promoting or inhibiting effect of the androgen or androgen receptor antagonists, respectively, was attenuated. Conclusion: Our results suggested that androgen receptor may involve in the progression of neuroblastoma as well as provided insight into a new target for the diagnosis and treatment of neuroblastoma patients.

  16. Non-invasive monitoring of fecal androgens in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Dloniak, Stephanie M; French, Jeffrey A; Place, Ned J; Weldele, Mary L; Glickman, Stephen E; Holekamp, Kay E

    2004-01-01

    Spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) exhibit an array of behavioral and morphological characteristics that set them apart from other mammals: females are heavier and more aggressive than males, and females have external genitalia that closely resemble those of the male. Because androgenic hormones might mediate the expression of these traits, androgens are of great interest in this species. Past work on circulating androgens in wild hyenas has been limited, in part because of small sample sizes. In this study we validated a non-invasive method of monitoring variation in androgens by measuring total androgen metabolites in the feces of wild and captive spotted hyenas with an enzyme immunoassay. HPLC analysis revealed multiple immunoreactive androgen metabolites in fecal extracts from both males and females. LHRH challenge in three male and two female hyenas in captivity caused an increase in fecal androgens one to three days after LHRH injection. Furthermore, presence of bone in the diet did not affect fecal androgen concentrations in captive female hyenas. In wild spotted hyenas, time of day of fecal deposition, time elapsed between deposition and freezing of the sample, and time elapsed between freezing and extraction did not systematically affect fecal androgen concentrations. Finally, in wild hyenas, fecal androgen patterns mirrored plasma testosterone patterns in that adult immigrant males had higher concentrations than adult natal males, and pregnant females had higher concentrations than lactating females. These methods can therefore be used in future studies addressing relationships among fecal androgens, social status, reproductive state, and behavior in spotted hyenas.

  17. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Testosterone-mediated increase in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content, nuclear androgen receptor levels, and cell division in an androgen-independent prostate carcinoma of Noble rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, S M; Leav, I; Damassa, D; Kwan, P W; Merk, F B; Seto, H S

    1988-02-01

    An androgen-independent, transplantable prostate carcinoma line (AIT), originally derived from the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) of Noble rat, was implanted into orchiectomized Noble rats and its response to androgen stimulation was studied and compared to that of the regenerating DLP tissue in sexually ablated rats. AIT tumors carried in castrated hosts displayed a high basal level of proliferative activity (mitotic index (MI), 15.0 +/- 0.5) while DLP tissue in untreated castrates exhibited no proliferative activity. Following androgen stimulation by testosterone capsule implantation into host rats, the AIT responded with a marked increase in cell proliferation; MI values doubled to 30.0 +/- 2.9 on Day 5 following androgen stimulation. This androgen-induced increase in MI values was coincident with elevations in nuclear androgen receptor (20-fold increase) and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content (3-fold increase) in the tumor. However, by Day 10 following androgen treatment, indices of cell proliferation in the AIT declined to pre-androgen-stimulated levels (MI, 14.8 +/- 1.9) despite the continued elevations in nuclear androgen receptor and tissue 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone contents. Parallel changes in MI were also observed in the normal regenerating DLP following androgen stimulation. MI values in this tissue increased from nondetectable levels to 38.1 +/- 4.7 on Day 5 but declined to relatively low levels (4.5 +/- 0.9) by Day 10 following androgen replacement. Taken together these findings led us to conclude that the AIT carried in castrates is capable of responding to testosterone in a manner similar to that observed for androgen-stimulated DLP of sexually ablated rats. Thus, in both the neoplastic and regenerating tissues, the initial response to androgen is characterized by a marked enhancement of cell proliferation which was correlated with an increase in androgen receptor and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content. However, like its tissue of origin, the AIT

  19. Androgen receptor roles in the development of benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kouji; Mizokami, Atsushi; Lin, Wen-Jye; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-06-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a major cause of lower urinary tract symptoms, with an increased volume of transitional zone and associated with increased stromal cells. It is known that androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays a key role in development of BPH, and that blockade of this signaling decreases BPH volume and can relieve lower urinary tract symptoms, but the mechanisms of androgen/AR signaling in BPH development remain unclear, and the effectiveness of current drugs for treating BPH is still limited. The detailed mechanisms of androgen/AR signaling need to be clarified, and new therapies are needed for better treatment of BPH patients. This review focuses on roles of AR in epithelial and stromal cells in BPH development. In epithelial cells, AR may contribute to BPH development via epithelial cell-stromal cell interaction with alterations of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, leading to proliferation of stromal cells. Data from several mouse models with selective knockout of AR in stromal smooth-muscle cells and/or fibroblasts indicate that the AR in stromal cells can also promote BPH development. In prostatic inflammation, AR roles in infiltrating macrophages and epithelial and stromal cells have been linked to BPH development, which has led to discovery of new therapeutic targets. For example, targeting AR with the novel AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9 offers a potential therapeutic approach against BPH development.

  20. Posttranslational modification of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Travis; Tindall, Donald J; Huang, Haojie

    2013-07-16

    The androgen receptor (AR) is important in the development of the prostate by regulating transcription, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. AR undergoes posttranslational modifications that alter its transcription activity, translocation to the nucleus and stability. The posttranslational modifications that regulate these events are of utmost importance to understand the functional role of AR and its activity. The majority of these modifications occur in the activation function-1 (AF1) region of the AR, which contains the transcriptional activation unit 1 (TAU1) and 5 (TAU5). Identification of the modifications that occur to these regions may increase our understanding of AR activation in prostate cancer and the role of AR in the progression from androgen-dependent to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Most of the posttranslational modifications identified to date have been determined using the full-length AR in androgen dependent cells. Further investigations into the role of posttranslational modifications in androgen-independent activation of full-length AR and constitutively active splicing variants are warranted, findings from which may provide new therapeutic options for CRPC.

  1. Androgen insensitivity syndrome and Klinefelter's syndrome: sex and gender considerations.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Milton; Watson, Linda Ann

    2004-07-01

    Two of the most common intersex conditions, androgen insensitivity and Klinefelter's syndrome, are described with an emphasis on aspects that are of relevance to psychiatrists. Attention is focused on commonalities and differences between these syndromes and particular attention is given to how persons who have these conditions manifest sexual and gender adjustments to their situations. Tips on counseling and medical management are offered.

  2. Androgen receptor and antiandrogen therapy in male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Lauro, Luigi; Barba, Maddalena; Pizzuti, Laura; Vici, Patrizia; Sergi, Domenico; Di Benedetto, Anna; Mottolese, Marcella; Speirs, Valerie; Santini, Daniele; De Maria, Ruggero; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello

    2015-11-01

    Cancers arising in the male breast are uncommon. Male breast cancer is a hormone-driven disease that often expresses the estrogen receptor, and antiestrogen therapy represents the mainstay of treatment. Paradoxically, the advent of a wave of antiestrogens eclipsed the therapeutic potential of alternative therapeutic options. At the beginning of the hormonal therapy era the administration of antiandrogens to metastatic male breast cancer patients was proposed. Ever since the use of these compounds has largely been neglected. A therapeutic role for antiandrogens has been envisioned again in recent years. First, molecular characterization efforts pointed to the androgen receptor as a potential therapeutic target. Second, the development of aromatase inhibitors unexpectedly raised the need for neutralizing androgens in order to tackle endocrine feedback mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance. We herein provide an overview of molecular studies where the androgen receptor was investigated at the genomic, transcriptomic or phenotypic level. We then discuss androgens in the context of the endocrine networks nourishing male breast cancer. Finally, clinical evidence on antiandrogens is summarized along with strategies should be implemented to improve the medical management of these patients.

  3. 9S binding protein for androgens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Wilson, E M; Lea, O A; French, F S

    1977-05-01

    A steroid binding protein fraction with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 9 S (molecular weight approximately equal to 200,000) has been identified in 105,000 X g supernatants of several androgen-responsive organs. Highest concentrations were found in epididymis and testis, but small amounts were detected in prostate, seminal vesicle, kidney, submandibular gland, and lung. The 9S protein binds [3H]dihydrotestosterone (17beta-hydroxy-5alpha-androstan-3-one) and [3H]progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione) with equilibrium binding constants of approximately 10(5) M-1 and 10(6) M-1, respectively. The concentration of 9S binding sites in epididymis is approximately 10(-11) mol/mg of supernatant protein, which is at least 10(5) times greater than the concentration of androgen receptor. 9S binding protein appears to be a nonsecretory, intracellular protein and has properties different from the andorgen receptor. It is unretarded on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography at pH 8.0, and its sedimentation rate on sucrose gradients is not altered at high ionic strength (0.4 M KCl). Like the androgen receptor, its binding activity, which is maximal between pH 7 and 9.5, is heat labile, decreased by sulfhydryl reagents, and enhanced by 2-mercaptoethanol. It is suggested that because of its high concentration and low affinity, 9S binding protein may function in the intracellular accumulation of compartmentalization of androgens or progesterone.

  4. REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY OF ANDROGENIC GROWTH PROMOTORS IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproductive Toxicity of Androgenic Growth Promoters in the Fathead Minnow. Jensen, KM*, Kahl, MD, Makynen, EA, Hornung, MW, Ankley, GT. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN. Trenbolone acetate is a synthetic steroid which is extensively used in the US as a growth pro...

  5. Nonsteroidal Androgen Receptor Ligands: Versatile Syntheses and Biological Data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report herein a stereoselective and straightforward methodology for the synthesis of new androgen receptor ligands with (anti)-agonistic activities. Oxygen–nitrogen replacement in bicalutamide-like structures paves the way to the disclosure of a new class of analogues, including cyclized/nitrogen-substituted derivatives, with promising antiandrogen (or anabolic) activity. PMID:24900495

  6. ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ANTAGONISM BY THE ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE FENITROTHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen receptor antagonism by the organophosphate insecticide fenitrothion. Tamura, H., Maness, S.C., Reischmann, K. Dorman, D.C., Gray, L.E., and Gaido, K.W. (2000). Toxicol. Sci.

    Organophosphate insecticides represent one of the most widely used classes of pesticide...

  7. Psychological and Behavioral Effects of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrke, Michael S.

    This review of the literature on the psychological and behavioral effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) first looks at aspects of the history and prevalence of AS use in competitive sports. Research suggests that one-quarter to one-half million adolescents in the United States have used, or are currently using AS. Some effects of androgens…

  8. Hypercholesterolemia in Male Power Lifters Using Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of serum cholesterol concentrations in male power lifters who used anabolic-androgenic steroids for eight weeks, three years, or eight years indicated that mean serum cholesterol levels increased with drug use, but decreased promptly to near pre-steroid levels after steroid use ended. (Author/CB)

  9. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  10. Massive edema of the ovary associated with androgenic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Siller, B S; Gelder, M S; Alvarez, R D; Partridge, E E

    1995-11-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a rare tumor-like condition of the ovary characterized by marked enlargement of one or both ovaries due to marked accumulation of edema fluid in the ovarian stroma. This paper reviews the literature on massive ovarian edema and presents a case associated with androgenic manifestations.

  11. Selective Gene Regulation by Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    androgen receptor pathway in prostate cancer. Curr Opin Pharmacol, 2008. 8(4): p. 440-8. 6. Claessens, F., P. Alen , A. Devos, B. Peeters, G...Chem, 1996. 271(32): p. 19013-6. 7. Schoenmakers, E., P. Alen , G. Verrijdt, B. Peeters, G. Verhoeven, W. Rombauts, and F. Claessens, Differential DNA

  12. Cell-based assays for screening androgen receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Carmela; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Rainey, William E

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4), mediates the majority of androgen effects on target cells. The AR is activated following ligand binding that result in activation of target gene transcription. Several cell based model systems have been developed that allow sensitive detection and monitoring of steroids or other compounds with AR bioactivity. Most cell based AR reporter models use transgenic gene constructs that include an androgen response element (ARE) that controls reporter gene expression. The DNA cis-regulatory elements that respond to AR share sequence similarity with cis-regulatory elements for glucocorticoid (GR, NR3C1), mineralocorticoid (MR, NR3C2) and progesterone (PGR, NR3C3) receptors, which has compromised AR selectivity for some models. In recent years, the sensitivity and selectivity of AR bioassays have been significantly improved through careful selection of cell models, utilization of improved reporter genes and the use of yeast two hybrid AR systems. This review summarizes and compares the currently available androgen-responsive cell model systems. PMID:26036905

  13. Androgen pathway resistance in prostate cancer and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, Benjamin L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Metastatic prostate cancer is an incurable disease that is treated with a variety of hormonal therapies targeting various nodes of the androgen receptor (AR) pathway. Invariably patients develop resistance and become castration resistant. Common treatments for castration-resistant disease include novel hormonal therapies, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and radiopharmaceuticals. As this disease generally remains incurable, understanding the molecular underpinnings of resistance pathways is critical in designing therapeutic strategies to delay or overcome such resistance. Areas covered This review will explore the resistance mechanisms relevant to hormonal agents, such as AR-V7 expression and others, as well as discussing new approaches being developed to treat patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that take advantage of these new insights. A literature search was performed to identify all published clinical trials related to androgen therapy mechanisms of drug resistance in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Expert opinion Androgen therapy resistance mechanisms are varied, and include modification of all nodes in the androgen signaling pathway. The optimal treatment for men with relapsed metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is uncertain at this time. The authors recommend using available clinical data to guide treatment decision making until more specific biomarkers are clinically available. PMID:26067250

  14. Environmental concentrations of anti-androgenic pharmaceuticals do not impact sexual disruption in fish alone or in combination with steroid oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher; Brian, Jayne; Kanda, Rakesh; Scholze, Martin; Williams, Richard; Jobling, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Sexual disruption in wild fish has been linked to the contamination of river systems with steroid oestrogens, including the pharmaceutical 17α-ethinylestradiol, originating from domestic wastewaters. As analytical chemistry has advanced, more compounds derived from the human use of pharmaceuticals have been identified in the environment and questions have arisen as to whether these additional pharmaceuticals may also impact sexual disruption in fish. Indeed, pharmaceutical anti-androgens have been shown to induce such effects under laboratory conditions. These are of particular interest since anti-androgenic biological activity has been identified in the aquatic environment and is potentially implicated in sexual disruption alone and in combination with steroid oestrogens. Consequently, predictive modelling was employed to determine the concentrations of two anti-androgenic human pharmaceuticals, bicalutamide and cyproterone acetate, in UK sewage effluents and river catchments and their combined impacts on sexual disruption were then assessed in two fish models. Crucially, fish were also exposed to the anti-androgens in combination with steroid oestrogens to determine whether they had any additional impact on oestrogen induced feminisation. Modelling predicted that the anti-androgenic pharmaceuticals were likely to be widespread in UK river catchments. However, their concentrations were not sufficient to induce significant responses in plasma vitellogenin concentrations, secondary sexual characteristics or gross indices in male fathead minnow or intersex in Japanese medaka alone or in combination with steroid oestrogens. However, environmentally relevant mixtures of oestrone, 17β-oestradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol did induce vitellogenin and intersex, supporting their role in sexual disruption in wild fish populations. Unexpectedly, a male dominated sex ratio (100% in controls) was induced in medaka and the potential cause and implications are briefly discussed

  15. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  16. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  17. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  18. Oxandrolone blocks glucocorticoid signaling in an androgen receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Bauman, William A; Huang, Ruojun; Caplan, Avrom J; Cardozo, Christopher

    2004-05-01

    The anabolic steroid oxandrolone is increasingly used to preserve or restore muscle mass in those with HIV infection or serious burns. These effects are mediated, in part, by the androgen receptor (AR). Anti-glucocorticoid effects have also been reported for some anabolic steroids, and the goal of our studies was to determine whether oxandrolone had a similar mechanism of action. Studies with in vitro translated glucocorticoid receptor (GR), however, showed no inhibition of cortisol binding by oxandrolone. Conversely, experiments in cell culture systems demonstrated significant antagonism of cortisol-induced transcriptional activation by oxandrolone in cells expressing both the AR and GR. Inhibition was not overcome by increased cortisol concentration, and no inhibition by oxandrolone was observed in cells expressing GR alone, confirming that non-competitive mechanisms were involved. AR-dependent repression of transcriptional activation by oxandrolone was also observed with the synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and methylprednisolone. Furthermore, the AR antagonists 2-hydroxyflutamide and DDE also repressed GR transactivation in an AR-dependent manner. A mutant AR lacking a functional nuclear localization signal (AR(4RKM)) was active in oxandrolone-mediated repression of GR even though oxandrolone-bound AR(4RKM) failed to enter the nucleus and did not affect nuclear import of GR. These data indicate a novel action of oxandrolone to suppress glucocorticoid action via crosstalk between AR and GR.

  19. Androgen receptor roles in insulin resistance and obesity in males: the linkage of androgen-deprivation therapy to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents.

  20. Substitution of synthetic chimpanzee androgen receptor for human androgen receptor in competitive binding and transcriptional activation assays for EDC screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effect of receptor-mediated endocrine modulators across species is of increasing concern. In attempts to address these concerns we are developing androgen and estrogen receptor binding assays using recombinant hormone receptors from a number of species across differ...

  1. In vitro evaluation of oestrogenic/androgenic activity of the serum organochlorine pesticide mixtures previously described in a breast cancer case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Javier; Luzardo, Octavio P; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Machín, Rubén P; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D; Camacho, María; Valerón, Pilar F

    2015-12-15

    Some organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been individually linked to breast cancer (BC) because they exert oestrogenic effects on mammary cells. However, humans are environmentally exposed to more or less complex mixtures of these organochlorines, and the biological effects of these mixtures must be elucidated. In this work we evaluated the in vitro effects exerted on human BC cells by the OC mixtures that were most frequently detected in two groups of women who participated in a BC case-control study developed in Spain: healthy women and women diagnosed with BC. The cytotoxicity, oestrogenicity, and androgenicity of the most prevalent OC mixtures found in healthy women (H-mixture) and in BC patients (BC-mixture) were tested at concentrations that resembled those found in the serum of the evaluated women. Our results showed that both OC mixtures presented a similar oestrogenic activity and effect on cell viability, but BC-mixture showed an additional anti-androgenic effect. These results indicate that although the proliferative effect exerted by these mixtures on human breast cells seems to depend mainly on their oestrogenic action, the BC-mixture might additionally induce cell proliferation due to its anti-androgenic activity, therefore increasing the carcinogenic potential of this mixture. The findings of this study demonstrate that subtle variations in the composition of a mixture may induce relevant changes in its biological action.

  2. Assay reproducibility of serum androgen measurements using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Trabert, Britton; Xu, Xia; Falk, Roni T.; Guillemette, Chantal; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; McGlynn, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid and precise measures of androgen concentrations are needed for etiologic studies of hormonally-related cancers. We developed a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with two sample preparations to measure 11 androgens, including adrenal and gonadal androgenic precursors and their 5α-reduced metabolites. Methods Androgen levels were measured in serum from 20 healthy volunteers (5 men, 10 premenopausal women, 5 postmenopausal women). Two blinded, randomized aliquots per individual were assayed in each of three batches. A fourth batch of samples was measured at an external laboratory using comparable methodology to measure 9 of the 11 androgens. Coefficients of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated from the individual components of variance. Comparability of 9 androgens across laboratories was assessed using Spearman ranked correlations, Deming regression and bias plots. Results The laboratory CVs were <5% and ICCs were uniformly high (>95%) for all androgens measured across sex/menopausal status groups. Spearman ranked correlations for 9 hormones measured in the comparison laboratory were high (>0.85), suggesting good agreement. Conclusion Our high-performance LC-MS/MS assays of 11 androgens, including adrenal and gonadal androgenic precursors and their 5α-reduced metabolites demonstrated excellent laboratory reproducibility, and good comparability with an established method that measured 9 of the 11 hormones tested. The serum androgen metabolite assays are suitable for use in epidemiologic research. PMID:26416142

  3. The physiological and pharmacological basis for the ergogenic effects of androgens in elite sports.

    PubMed

    Choong, Karen; Lakshman, Kishore M; Bhasin, Shalender

    2008-05-01

    Androgen doping in power sports is undeniably rampant worldwide. There is strong evidence that androgen administration in men increases skeletal muscle mass, maximal voluntary strength and muscle power. However, we do not have good experimental evidence to support the presumption that androgen administration improves physical function or athletic performance. Androgens do not increase specific force or whole body endurance measures. The anabolic effects of testosterone on the skeletal muscle are mediated through androgen receptor signaling. Testosterone promotes myogenic differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells and inhibits their differentiation into the adipogenic lineage. Testosterone binding to androgen receptor induces a conformational change in androgen receptor protein, causing it to associate with beta-catenin and TCF-4 and activate downstream Wnt target genes thus promoting myogenic differentiation. The adverse effects of androgens among athletes and recreational bodybuilders are under reported and include acne, deleterious changes in the cardiovascular risk factors, including a marked decrease in plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol level, suppression of spermatogenesis resulting in infertility, increase in liver enzymes, hepatic neoplasms, mood and behavioral disturbances, and long term suppression of the endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Androgens are often used in combination with other drugs which may have serious adverse events of their own. In spite of effective methods for detecting androgen doping, the policies for screening of athletes are highly variable in different countries and organizations and even existing policies are not uniformly enforced.

  4. A Novel Androgen Receptor Splice Variant Is Upregulated during Prostate Cancer Progression and Promotes Androgen-depletion-resistant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiyong; Yang, Xi; Sun, Feng; Jiang, Richeng; Linn, Douglas E.; Chen, Hege; Chen, Hegang; Kong, Xiangtian; Melamed, Jonathan; Tepper, Clifford G.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Brodie, Angela M. H.; Edwards, Joanne; Qiu, Yun

    2009-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in progression to incurable androgen-ablation resistant prostate cancer (PCA). We have identified three novel AR splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain (designated as AR3, AR4 and AR5) in hormone insensitive PCA cells. AR3, one of the major splice variants expressed in human prostate tissues, is constitutively active and its transcriptional activity is not regulated by androgens or antiandrogens. Immunohistochemistry analysis on tissue microarrays containing 429 human prostate tissue samples shows that AR3 is significantly upregulated during PCA progression and AR3 expression level is correlated with the risk of tumor recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Overexpression of AR3 confers ablation-independent growth of PCA cells while specific knock-down of AR3 expression (without altering AR level) in hormone resistant PCA cells attenuates their growth under androgen-depleted conditions in both cell culture and xenograft models, suggesting an indispensable role of AR3 in ablation-independent growth of PCA cells. Furthermore, AR3 may play a distinct yet essential role in ablation-independent growth through regulating a unique set of genes including AKT1, which are not regulated by the prototype AR. Our data suggest that aberrant expression of AR splice variants may be a novel mechanism underlying ablation-independence during PCA progression and AR3 may serve as a prognostic marker to predict patient outcome in response to hormonal therapy. Given that these novel AR splice variants are not inhibited by currently available anti-androgen drugs, development of new drugs targeting these AR isoforms may potentially be effective for treatment of ablation-resistant PCA. PMID:19244107

  5. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens.

  6. Clinical, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of androgen insensitivity syndromes from south Indian cohort and detection and in-silico characterization of androgen receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    V G, Abilash; S, Radha; K M, Marimuthu; K, Thangaraj; S, Arun; S, Nishu; A, Mohana Priya; J, Meena; D, Anuradha

    2016-01-30

    Rare cases of 9 complete androgen insensitivity syndromes, 9 cases of partial androgen insensitivity syndromes and equal number of male control samples were selected for this study. Few strong variations in clinical features were noticed; Giemsa banded metaphase revealed a 46,XY karyotype and the frequency of chromosome aberrations were significantly higher when compared with control samples. DNA sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndromes revealed three missense mutations - c.C1713>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved histidine residue with glutamine p.(His571Glu) in DNA-binding domain, c.A1715>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved tyrosine residue with cysteine p.(Tyr572Cys) in DNA-binding domain and c.G2599>A resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved valine residue with methionine p.(Val867Met) in ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor gene respectively. The heterozygous type of mutations c.C1713>G and c.G2599>A observed in mothers of the patients for familial cases concluding that the mutation was inherited from the mother. The novel mutation c.C1713>G is reported first time in androgen insensitivity syndrome. In-silico analysis of mutations observed in androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndrome predicted that the substitution at Y572C and V867M could probably disrupt the protein structure and function.

  7. Paracetamol (acetaminophen), aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and indomethacin are anti-androgenic in the rat foetal testis.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, D M; Lesné, L; Le Fol, V; Desdoits-Lethimonier, C; Dejucq-Rainsford, N; Leffers, H; Jégou, B

    2012-06-01

    More than half the pregnant women in the Western world report taking mild analgesics. These pharmaceutical compounds have been associated with congenital cryptorchidism in humans, the best-known risk factor for low semen quality and testicular germ cell cancer. Furthermore, some of these mild analgesics exert potent anti-androgenic effects in the male rat and several endocrine-disrupting compounds, known to alter masculinization, have also been shown to be potent inhibitors of prostaglandin (PG) synthesis similar to mild analgesics. Using a 3-day ex vivo organotypic model system based on gestational day 14.5 rat testes, we herein show that testosterone production was inhibited by paracetamol, at doses of 0.1 μm to 100 μm. Similar results were obtained for aspirin (1-100 μm) and indomethacin (10 μm). The production of the other Leydig cell hormone, Insl3, was not disrupted by exposure to paracetamol. Investigations of the gross anatomy of the testis as well as Leydig cells number and rate of gonocyte apoptosis after the 3 days of ex vivo differentiation showed no significant effect of the analgesics tested compared with controls. These data indicate therefore that mild analgesics specifically inhibit testosterone production in rat foetal testes in vitro and that these compounds had no effect on gonocyte survival. Parallel determinations of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) production indicated that the effects of paracetamol and aspirin on PGD2 and testosterone were not connected, whereas the effects of indomethacin were correlated. We conclude that mild analgesics exert direct and specific anti-androgenic effects in rat foetal testis in our experimental setup and that the mechanism of action is probably uncoupled from the inhibition of PG synthesis.

  8. Androgens and estradiol-17beta production by porcine uterine cells: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Franczak, A; Kotwica, G

    2010-01-15

    Porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) uterine slices harvested during both early pregnancy and luteolysis produce steroid hormones. The aim of the present study was to determine (1) which porcine separated uterine cells secrete androgens: androstenedione (A(4)) and testosterone (T), and estradiol-17beta (E(2)) in culture; (2) if the production of A(4), T and E(2) in the uterine cells is regulated by P4 and OT; (3) if uterine tissues expressed cytochrome P450arom gene (CYP19). Uteri were collected on Days 14 to 16 of early pregnancy and the estrous cycle. Enzymatically separated epithelial cells, stromal cells, and myocytes were cultured in vitro for 2, 6, and 12h with control medium, progesterone (P(4); 10(-5) M), oxytocin (OT; 10(-7) M), and both hormones (P(4)+OT). The studied cells secreted A(4), T, and E(2) in vitro. Progesterone served as a substrate for steroid synthesis in the uterine cells. Isolated uterine cells, cultured separately, contributed in equal portion to the basal production of androgens (A(4) and T) during both early pregnancy and luteolysis. In pregnant pigs, the epithelial and stromal cells were rich sources of E(2) compared with myocytes. Myocytes produced E(2) mainly during luteolysis. Pregnant porcine endometrium and myometrium expressed the gene CYP19, which encodes for P450 aromatase, a steroidogenic enzyme. The results indicate an active steroidogenic pathway in porcine uterine cells. The epithelial cells, stromal cells, and myocytes participate in steroid production as an alternative source for their action in pigs.

  9. Impact of androgenic/antiandrogenic compounds (AAC) on human sex steroid metabolizing key enzymes.

    PubMed

    Alléra, A; Lo, S; King, I; Steglich, F; Klingmüller, D

    2004-12-01

    Various pesticides, industrial pollutants and synthetic compounds, to which human populations are exposed, are known or suspected to interfere with endogenous sex hormone functions. Such interference potentially affect the development and expression of the male and female reproductive system or both. Chemicals in this class are thus referred to as endocrine disruptors (ED). This emphazises on the relevance of screening ED for a wide range of sex hormone-mimicking effects. These compounds are believed to exert influence on hormonal actions predominantly by (i) interfering with endogenous steroids in that they functionally interact with plasma membrane-located receptors as well as with nuclear receptors both for estrogens and androgens or (ii) affecting the levels of sex hormones as a result of their impact on steroid metabolizing key enzymes. Essential sex hormone-related enzymes within the endocrine system of humans are aromatase, 5alpha-reductase 2 as well as specific sulfotransferases and sulfatases (so-called phase I and phase II enzymes, respectively). Using suitable human tissues and human cancer cell lines (placenta, prostate, liver and JEG-3, lymph node carcinoma of prostate (LnCaP) cells) we investigated the impact of 10 widely used chemicals suspected of acting as ED with androgenic or antiandrogenic activity (so-called AAC) on the activity of these sex hormone metabolizing key enzymes in humans. In addition, the respective effects of six substances were also studied as positive controls due to their well-known specific hormonal agonistic/antagonistic activities. The aim of this report and subsequent investigations is to improve human health risk assessment for AAC and other ED.

  10. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings…

  11. Antiandrogens and androgen depleting therapies in prostate cancer: novel agents for an established target

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Clegg, Nicola J.; Scher, Howard I

    2010-01-01

    Summary Activation of the androgen receptor is critical for prostate cancer growth at all points in the illness. Currently therapies targeting the androgen receptor, including androgen depletion approaches and antiandrogens, do not completely inhibit androgen receptor activity. Prostate cancer cells develop resistance to castration by acquiring changes such as AR overexpression that result in reactivation of the receptor. Based on understanding of these resistance mechanisms and androgen synthesis pathways, novel antiandrogens and androgen depleting agents have been tested. Notably, MDV3100, a novel antiandrogen designed for activity in prostate cancer model systems with overexpressed AR and, abiraterone acetate, a 17-α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase inhibitor that blocks steroid biosynthesis in the adrenal gland and in the tumor, have demonstrated significant activity in early phase trials and are being tested in the phase III setting. PMID:19796750

  12. A new dawn for androgens: Novel lessons from 11-oxygenated C19 steroids.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Elzette; Arlt, Wiebke; Storbeck, Karl-Heinz

    2017-02-05

    The abundant adrenal C19 steroid 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione (11OHA4) has been written off as a dead-end product of adrenal steroidogenesis. However, recent evidence has demonstrated that 11OHA4 is the precursor to the potent androgenic 11-oxygenated steroids, 11-ketotestosterone and 11-ketodihydrotestosterone, that bind and activate the human androgen receptor similarly to testosterone and DHT. The significance of this discovery becomes apparent when considering androgen dependent diseases such as castration resistant prostate cancer and diseases associated with androgen excess, e.g. congenital adrenal hyperplasia and polycystic ovary syndrome. In this review we describe the production and metabolism of 11-oxygenated steroids. We subsequently discuss their androgenic activity and highlight the putative role of these androgens in disease states.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2006-08-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators.

  14. Gender dysphoria and gender change in androgen insensitivity or micropenis.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Tom

    2005-08-01

    This review article answers three questions relevant to the medical management and care of individuals born with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), or a micropenis: (1) Do any of these individuals reassign themselves from their initial gender assignment? (2) Do more reassign than the ones who do not? (3) Is there evidence of gender dysphoria in those who do not self-initiate reassignment? Reviewed were all articles on CAIS, PAIS, and micropenis cited in K. J. Zucker (1999) plus articles published through 2004. There were no documented cases of gender change in individuals with CAIS (N= 156 females) or micropenis (N= 89: 79 males, 10 females). Nine (9.1%) out of 99 individuals with PAIS changed gender. Thus, self-initiated gender reassignment was rare. Gender dysphoria also appears to be a rare occurrence. The best predictor of adult gender identity in CAIS, PAIS, and micropenis is initial gender assignment.

  15. Optimised deconjugation of androgenic steroid conjugates in bovine urine.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mikael; Frandsen, Henrik L; Andersen, Jens H

    2017-04-01

    After administration of steroids to animals the steroids are partially metabolised in the liver and kidney to phase 2 metabolites, i.e., glucuronic acid or sulphate conjugates. During analysis these conjugated metabolites are normally deconjugated enzymatically with aryl sulphatase and glucuronidase resulting in free steroids in the extract. It is well known that some sulphates are not deconjugated using aryl sulphatase; instead, for example, solvolysis can be used for deconjugation of these aliphatic sulphates. The effectiveness of solvolysis on androgenic steroid sulphates was tested with selected aliphatic steroid sulphates (boldenone sulphate, nortestosteron sulphate and testosterone sulphate), and the method was validated for analysis of androgenic steroids in bovine urine using free steroids, steroid sulphates and steroid glucuronides as standards. Glucuronidase and sulphuric acid in ethyl acetate were used for deconjugation and the extract was purified by solid-phase extraction. The final extract was evaporated to dryness, re-dissolved and analysed by LC-MS/MS.

  16. Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator Ostarine in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Zilbermint, Mihail F; Dobs, Adrian S

    2009-10-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome, affecting up to 60% of the approximately 1.4 million patients diagnosed with cancer each year in the USA. This condition is characterized by progressive deterioration of a patient's nutritional status, weight loss, anorexia, diminished quality of life and increased mortality and morbidity. Current therapy with progestational, anti-inflammatory and anabolic agents is often ineffective and has a large number of undesirable effects. The newly developed nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator Ostarine has demonstrated promising results in Phase I and II clinical trials, increasing total lean body mass, enhancing functional performance and decreasing total tissue percent fat. This selective androgen receptor modulator may have the ability to perform as a potent anabolic agent with minimal side effects on other organs (prostate and hair follicles), thus presenting a new strategy in managing cancer cachexia. However, more extensive data is required before its efficacy is confirmed.

  17. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding

    PubMed Central

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic–clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  18. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  19. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  20. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  1. Androgens in human evolution. A new explanation of human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, J

    2001-01-01

    Human evolution consists of chronological changes in gene regulation of a continuous and relatively stable genome, activated by hormones, the production of which is intermittently affected by endogenous and exogenous forces. Periodic variations in the gonadal androgen, testosterone, and the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), significantly participated in all hominid transformations. The hominid characteristics of early Australopithecines are primarily a result of increased testosterone. The first significant cold of the early Pleistocene resulted in an increase in DHEA that simultaneously produced Homo and the robust Australopithecines. Subsequent Pleistocene climatic changes and differential reproduction produced changes in DHEA and testosterone ratios that caused extinction of the robust Australopithecines and further changes and continuation of Homo. Changes in testosterone and DHEA produce allometric and behavioral changes that are identifiable and vigorous in modern populations.

  2. The use of androgen receptor amino/carboxyl-terminal interaction assays to investigate androgen receptor gene mutations in subjects with varying degrees of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Shereen A; Gottlieb, Bruce; Lumbroso, Rose; Beitel, Lenore K; Elhaji, Youssef; Wu, Jian; Pinsky, Leonard; Trifiro, Mark A

    2003-05-01

    Five mutations in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (hAR) found in patients with varying degrees of androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) were investigated for their effects on receptor dynamics. These were Arg(871)Gly (mild), Ser(814)Asn (partial), Glu(772)Ala (partial), Val(866)Met (complete), and Arg(774)Cys (complete). Previous analysis showed that the mutant receptors exhibited near-normal kinetics, except Arg(774)Cys, which had severely reduced androgen binding, and Val(866)Met, which showed increased equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) and elevated dissociation rate (k) values. Ser(814)Asn exhibited ligand-selective k values, i.e. increased for dihydrotestosterone and mibolerone, but normal for methyltrenolene. Using mammalian two-hybrid assays, hAR amino/carboxyl (N/C)-terminal interactions of the mutant receptors were analyzed in the presence and absence of the hAR coactivator transcription intermediary factor 2 (TIF2). The mutations conferred decreased hAR N/C-terminal interaction, i.e. mild (approximately 1.5-fold), partial (2-fold), and complete (10-fold), that mirrored the degree of AIS. All mutant LBDs showed a 2- to 3-fold increase in N/C-terminal interactions when TIF2 was cotransfected, although of a magnitude still less than that of wild-type LBD with TIF2. The ligand-selective properties of the Ser(814)Asn mutant were also clearly reflected by the N/C-terminal interactions. Thus, measurement of N/C-terminal interactions may assist in the molecular analysis of mutant hARs associated with AIS.

  3. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0113 TITLE: Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models...Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by DAMDI7-02-1-0113 Finasteride Administration in Animal Models 6. AUTHOR(S) Zhou Wang, Ph.D. 7...differentiation but weaker in stimulating proliferation, which led to our hypothesis that intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) can be enhanced by finasteride

  4. PTEN Regulates Beta-Catenin in Androgen Signaling: Implication in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    of androgens, whereas purified Wnt3a showed a pronounced effect in the presence of low concentrations of ligands. We also showed that Wnt3a-CM and the...that the effect of PI3K/Akt in prostate cells is mediated through androgen signaling. The PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, and a tumor suppressor, PTEN...progression of prostate cancer remain largely unknown. Androgen ablation is an effective treatment for the majority of advanced prostate cancer patients

  5. Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Androgen Receptor Conformation and Interactions in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Interestingly, however, the dependence of AR transport in the androgen - insensitive LNCaP-C4-2 cells still follows the same dose response to DHT... insensitivity of the LNCaP-C4-2 model would have to originate from true androgen -independence rather than from a heightened response to lower levels...for the intramolecular AF fold. The remaining mutations therefore were not introduced. If the dimerization studies in the androgen - insensitive cell

  6. Hemorrhagic urethritis in female-to-male transsexual. Possible androgen-related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M S; Sanchez, R L

    1987-12-01

    This article describes a case of hematuria and urethritis related to androgen stimulation in a female-to-male transsexual receiving testosterone cypionate. Biopsy of the affected urethral tissue revealed periurethral glands which demonstrated a strong positive reaction with immunoperoxidase staining for prostatic specific antigen. When the androgen stimulus was reduced, the patient's symptoms resolved. This report gives evidence for possible androgen-induced pathology in the female urethra.

  7. Mechanism and Regulation of Gene Expression by Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Molenaar, J. Peterson, J. Hurenkamp, H. Brantjes, P. Moerer, ceptors and diverse mammalian activators. Mol. Cell 3:361-370. M. van de Wetering, 0. Destree ...served, there is much less homology among steroid hormone ability in vitro and increased AR trans-activation in re r ther N-termi l arts . Th er haalong...interactions may be linked to androgen insensitivity syndrome (13, 14). The con- The androgen receptor (AR)’ mediates androgen functions in served

  8. NF-KappaB2/p52 Activation and Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Sacramento, CA INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Benign prostatic hyperplasia and the initial stages of prostate cancer (CaP) exhibit androgen dependence... prostatic hyperplasia and the initial stages of prostate cancer (CaP) exhibit androgen dependence, but androgen ablation results only in temporary...Nagalakshmi Nadiminty, Ramakumar Tummala, Jae Yeon Chun, Christopher P. Evans, Allen C. Gao. UC Davis, Sacramento, CA Abstract Body: Introduction: Benign

  9. Anabolic androgenic steroids in delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Suneet K.; Sharma, Archana; Rai, Deependra K.; Thawani, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    This is the first case report depicting masking of symptoms of intestinal tuberculosis by anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) causing delay in diagnosis which lead to a major surgery. Negative tuberculosis skin test (TST) probably due to immunomodulating effects of AAS also contributed to the delay. Patient also had early dependence on AAS and rapid growth of scrotal sebaceous cysts, findings of which have not yet been reported. PMID:23326112

  10. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    androgen-dependent cell population; activation of oncogenes; inactivation of tumor suppression genes ; and interaction between cancer cells and tumor...BODY STATEMENT OF WORK Aim 1: Identify castration-affected and/or Glipr1-regulated genes in ventral prostate (VP) tissue, epididymal white...WAT, and ASCs on days 3, 14, and 35 after castration (6–9 months). 3. Isolate RNA and perform microarray analyses to characterize genes affected by

  11. Multiplexed Promoter-dependent Screen for Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    the compounds in the Spectrum library have been used in human therapy, another third are natural products and derivatives with undetermined...not sAREs are several flavonoids and anthracyclines, some of which are known to inhibit AR. Promising compounds will be re-screened, and dose...O’Mahony OA, Steinkamp MP, Albertelli MA, Brogley M, Rehman H, Robins DM. Profiling human androgen receptor mutations reveals treatment effects in a mouse

  12. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Bifunctional Modulators of the Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    o chromatin- modifying enzymes and/or complexes . In this way , genes that are typically regulated by androgen receptor and g l ucocort i coid...inhibition may be observed due to steric blockade at some genes . of molecules that recmit transcriptionally repressing complexes to AR, a predicted...I). However, in cellular models of prostate cancer, no significant gene -specific or phenotypic effects were observed. We thus implemented the

  13. Androgenic control of polyamine concentrations in rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, M A; Gonzalez, S I; Calandra, R S

    1992-09-01

    Unilateral orchidectomy resulted in a significant decrease in tissue content of putrescine and polyamines. However, no differences were detected when the results were expressed in terms of ng g-1 tissue. At 48 h after bilateral orchidectomy, a significant decrease in putrescine content was observed, but spermidine and spermine content were unaffected. The observed decrease in putrescine was prevented by treatment with testosterone propionate, but neither spermidine nor spermine were affected. Bilateral orchidectomy resulted in a significant decrease in the tissue content of putrescine, spermidine and spermine after 7 days. Treatment with testosterone propionate increased the content of putrescine, spermidine and spermine in the epididymis by about 200%, 92% and 34%, respectively. When results were expressed as nmol g-1, a significant decrease after castration in putrescine and spermidine, but not in spermine, was observed. Treatment with testosterone propionate restored putrescine concentration, but had no effect on spermidine and spermine concentrations. In castrated rats treated with testosterone propionate, the anti-androgen flutamide abolished the effect of the androgen on putrescine and spermidine content, but there was no effect on spermine. Acetylputrescine was not detected in the epididymis, while acetylpolyamines were detected at much lower concentrations than polyamines. After bilateral orchidectomy there was a decrease in the tissue content of all acetylpolyamines and an increase in their tissue concentration. The effect of castration on acetylpolyamine content was reversed by testosterone propionate treatment. We conclude that an active synthesis of polyamines occurs in the rat epididymis, and that this process depends upon the androgen environment. Regulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity appears to be the main step that is controlled by androgens.

  14. MicroRNA Targets of Human Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    A large number of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors contribute to the risk of prostate cancer . Among them are androgens, dietary factors ...our understanding with respect to molecular mechanisms, signaling pathways and intrinsic factors which contribute to the development of prostate cancer ...ribonuclease which function to process precursor- microRNAs (pre- miRNAs ) to mature miRNA (Denli et al. 2004; Sohn et al. 2007; Mueller et al. 2010). miRNAs are

  15. Targeting Androgen Receptor Aberrations in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Adam; Welti, Jonathan; Blagg, Julian; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) splice variants (SV) have been implicated in the development of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to AR targeting therapies, including abiraterone and enzalutamide. Agents targeting AR-SV are urgently needed to test this hypothesis and further improve the outcome of patients suffering from this lethal disease. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4280-2. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Yang et al., p. 4466.

  16. URI Regulation of Androgen Receptor-Mediated Cell Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    2001). The development of androgen-independent prostate cancer. Nat Rev Cancer 1, 34-45. Li, B., Carey, M., and Workman , J.L. (2007). The role of...transcription in prostate cancer cells. Cancer Res 69, 3140-3147. Rowe, H.M., Jakobsson, J ., Mesnard, D., Rougemont, J ., Reynard, S., Aktas, T...Maillard, P.V., Layard-Liesching, H., Verp, S., Marquis, J ., et al. (2010). KAP1 controls endogenous retroviruses in embryonic stem cells. Nature 463

  17. Perpetuating Effects of Androgen Deficiency on Insulin-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Judy L.; Jain, Ruhee; Rais, Maham; White, Ashley E.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Kievit, Paul; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Varlamov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is commonly used for treatment of prostate cancer, but is associated with side effects such as sarcopenia and insulin resistance. The role of lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise on insulin sensitivity and body composition in testosterone-deficient males is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationships between androgen status, diet, and insulin sensitivity. Subjects/Methods Middle-aged (11–12-yo) intact and orchidectomized male rhesus macaques were maintained for two months on a standard chow diet, and then exposed for six months to a Western-style, high-fat/calorie-dense diet (WSD) followed by four months of caloric restriction (CR). Body composition, insulin sensitivity, physical activity, serum cytokine levels, and adipose biopsies were evaluated before and after each dietary intervention. Results Both intact and orchidectomized animals gained similar proportions of body fat, developed visceral and subcutaneous adipocyte hypertrophy, and became insulin resistant in response to the WSD. CR reduced body fat in both groups, but reversed insulin resistance only in intact animals. Orchidectomized animals displayed progressive sarcopenia, which persisted after the switch to CR. Androgen deficiency was associated with increased levels of interleukin-6 and macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22), both of which were elevated during CR. Physical activity levels showed a negative correlation with body fat and insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Androgen deficiency exacerbated the negative metabolic side effects of the WSD, such that CR alone was not sufficient to improve altered insulin sensitivity, suggesting that ADT patients will require additional interventions to reverse insulin resistance and sarcopenia. PMID:27534842

  18. Anti-androgens in treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Amer, M; Ramadan, A; Abdel Monem, A

    1985-10-01

    Seventy-five women suffering from acne vulgaris classified into three groups according to the grade of the disease. Anti-androgenic tablets cyproterone acetate (CPA), were given in three cycles. The total number of patients whose condition improved was 52% after the first cycle, 55% after the second cycle, and 81.3% after the third cycle. No serious side effects were encountered. CPA is a suitable therapeutic modility for AV in women who use contraceptives.

  19. Characterizing and Targeting Androgen Receptor Pathway-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    single or multiple metastasis from the same patient. During the course of the study, we expanded this aim to include 196 prostate cancer metastasis...of figure the full human genome ordered by chromosome (1-X,Y). The Y-Axis (Rows) are individual patients with multiple tumors per patient. Note...specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) and H3K4me1,2 demethylation. AR similarly represses expression of multiple genes mediating androgen synthesis, DNA synthesis

  20. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 functions as an epigenetic activator of the androgen receptor to promote prostate cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Deng, X; Shao, G; Zhang, H-T; Li, C; Zhang, D; Cheng, L; Elzey, B D; Pili, R; Ratliff, T L; Huang, J; Hu, C-D

    2017-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an emerging epigenetic enzyme that mainly represses transcription of target genes via symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues on histones H4R3, H3R8 and H2AR3. Accumulating evidence suggests that PRMT5 may function as an oncogene to drive cancer cell growth by epigenetic inactivation of several tumor suppressors. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 promotes prostate cancer cell growth by epigenetically activating transcription of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of PRMT5 or inhibition of PRMT5 by a specific inhibitor reduces the expression of AR and suppresses the growth of multiple AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells. Significantly, knockdown of PRMT5 in AR-positive LNCaP cells completely suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Molecular analysis reveals that PRMT5 binds to the proximal promoter region of the AR gene and contributes mainly to the enriched symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 in the same region. Mechanistically, PRMT5 is recruited to the AR promoter by its interaction with Sp1, the major transcription factor responsible for AR transcription, and forms a complex with Brg1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, on the proximal promoter region of the AR gene. Furthermore, PRMT5 expression in prostate cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and PRMT5 expression correlates positively with AR expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Taken together, our results identify PRMT5 as a novel epigenetic activator of AR in prostate cancer. Given that inhibiting AR transcriptional activity or androgen synthesis remains the major mechanism of action for most existing anti-androgen agents, our findings also raise an interesting possibility that targeting PRMT5 may represent a novel approach for prostate cancer treatment by eliminating AR expression. PMID:27546619

  1. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 functions as an epigenetic activator of the androgen receptor to promote prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Shao, G; Zhang, H-T; Li, C; Zhang, D; Cheng, L; Elzey, B D; Pili, R; Ratliff, T L; Huang, J; Hu, C-D

    2017-03-02

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an emerging epigenetic enzyme that mainly represses transcription of target genes via symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues on histones H4R3, H3R8 and H2AR3. Accumulating evidence suggests that PRMT5 may function as an oncogene to drive cancer cell growth by epigenetic inactivation of several tumor suppressors. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 promotes prostate cancer cell growth by epigenetically activating transcription of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of PRMT5 or inhibition of PRMT5 by a specific inhibitor reduces the expression of AR and suppresses the growth of multiple AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells. Significantly, knockdown of PRMT5 in AR-positive LNCaP cells completely suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Molecular analysis reveals that PRMT5 binds to the proximal promoter region of the AR gene and contributes mainly to the enriched symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 in the same region. Mechanistically, PRMT5 is recruited to the AR promoter by its interaction with Sp1, the major transcription factor responsible for AR transcription, and forms a complex with Brg1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, on the proximal promoter region of the AR gene. Furthermore, PRMT5 expression in prostate cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and PRMT5 expression correlates positively with AR expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Taken together, our results identify PRMT5 as a novel epigenetic activator of AR in prostate cancer. Given that inhibiting AR transcriptional activity or androgen synthesis remains the major mechanism of action for most existing anti-androgen agents, our findings also raise an interesting possibility that targeting PRMT5 may represent a novel approach for prostate cancer treatment by eliminating AR expression.

  2. Effect of argan and olive oil consumption on the hormonal profile of androgens among healthy adult Moroccan men.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Abdelfettah; Jafri, Ali; Driouch, Issam; El Khasmi, Mohammed; Adlouni, Ahmed; Benajiba, Nada; Bamou, Youssef; Saile, Rachid; Benouhoud, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of virgin argan oil (VAO) and extra virgin olive oil (EVO) on the hormonal profile of androgens and anthropometric parameters among healthy adult Moroccan men during a controlled nutritional intervention. The study was carried out on 60 young and healthy male volunteers aged between 23 and 40 years old. During a stabilization period of 2 weeks they consumed butter. The group was then randomized into two categories, the first one consuming VAO and the second EVO for 3 weeks. Testosterone (T), luteinizing hormone (LH) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) serum concentrations were measured at the beginning of the study and at the end of each period. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the two groups (VAO and EVO) during each step of the study. Differences in androgens and anthropometric parameters between the baseline and after 3 weeks of the diet in the VAO and EVO groups were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. T and LH serum concentrations significantly increased after the intervention period. T levels increased by 19.9% and 17.4% (p < 0.0001), and LH levels by 18.5% (p < 0.007) and 42.6% (p < 0.0001), respectively, for VAO and EVO (p < 0.0001). However, DHEAS serum concentrations, body weight, body mass index, arterial pressure and daily energetic intake did not show any significant variation after the intervention with either argan or olive oils. The results suggest that consumption of AVO and EVO might be the origin of a positive action on the androgen hormonal profile of men.

  3. A crayfish insulin-like-binding protein: another piece in the androgenic gland insulin-like hormone puzzle is revealed.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-08-02

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a "pulldown" methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23-38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development.

  4. Heterogeneity in mouse seminal vesicle epithelial cells responding to androgen as evaluated by incorporation of (/sup 125/I)iododeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Terada, N.; Ogasawara, Y.; Yamane, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Kitamura, Y.

    1985-04-01

    When the uptake of 5-(/sup 125/I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine ((/sup 125/I)IdUrd) into the seminal vesicle of castrated mice was measured 3 days after starting injections of various doses of testosterone propionate (TP), logarithmic values of (/sup 125/I)IdUrd uptake were proportional to the logarithmic doses of TP in the range of 0.04-2 micrograms/g BW. The (/sup 125/I)IdUrd uptake values correlated well with the labeling and mitotic indices of epithelial cells. Since daily injections of 0.4 microgram TP/g BW did not increase significantly the weight or DNA content or protein content of the seminal vesicle, the (/sup 125/I)IdUrd uptake is a sensitive index of androgen action. Moreover, this suggests that low doses of androgen induce division of epithelial cells without resulting in the increase in cell number. The (/sup 125/I)IdUrd radioactivity in the seminal vesicle was measured 2-15 days after the injection of (/sup 125/I)IdUrd, since the value represented the fraction of surviving cells synthesizing DNA at the time of (/sup 125/I)IdUrd injection. When injections of 4 micrograms TP/g BW were continued, the incorporated radioactivity was retained. In contrast, continuous injections of 0.2 microgram TP/g BW did not maintain the radioactivity, of which incorporation was induced by the same dose of TP. Thus, the present result suggests the presence of heterogeneity in androgen-responsive epithelial cells of the seminal vesicle.

  5. Regulation of protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) signalling by the TPα and TPβ isoforms of the human thromboxane A2 receptor: Implications for thromboxane- and androgen- dependent neoplastic and epigenetic responses in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Aine G; Mulvaney, Eamon P; Kinsella, B Therese

    2017-04-01

    The prostanoid thromboxane (TX) A2 and its T Prostanoid receptor (the TP) are increasingly implicated in prostate cancer (PCa). Mechanistically, we recently discovered that both TPα and TPβ form functional signalling complexes with members of the protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) family, AGC- kinases essential for the epigenetic regulation of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription and promising therapeutic targets for treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Critically, similar to androgens, activation of the PRKs through the TXA2/TP signalling axis induces phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr11 (H3Thr11), a marker of androgen-induced chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation, raising the possibility that TXA2-TP signalling can mimic and/or enhance AR-induced cellular changes even in the absence of circulating androgens such as in CRPC. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate whether TXA2/TP-induced PRK activation can mimic and/or enhance AR-mediated cellular responses in the model androgen-responsive prostate adenocarcinoma LNCaP cell line. We reveal that TXA2/TP signalling can act as a neoplastic- and epigenetic-regulator, promoting and enhancing both AR-associated chromatin remodelling (H3Thr11 phosphorylation, WDR5 recruitment and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16) and AR-mediated transcriptional activation (e.g of the KLK3/prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2 genes) through mechanisms involving TPα/TPβ mediated-PRK1 and PRK2, but not PRK3, signalling complexes. Overall, these data demonstrate that TPα/TPβ can act as neoplastic and epigenetic regulators by mimicking and/or enhancing the actions of androgens within the prostate and provides further mechanistic insights into the role of the TXA2/TP signalling axis in PCa, including potentially in CRPC.

  6. Progestin, estrogen and androgen G-protein coupled receptors in fish gonads.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Dressing, Gwen; Pang, Yefei; Berg, Hakan; Tubbs, Christopher; Benninghoff, Abby; Doughty, Kelly

    2006-04-01

    The identities of the membrane receptors mediating the majority of rapid, cell surface-initiated, nongenomic (i.e. nonclassical) steroid actions described to date are unclear. Two novel 7-transmembrane spanning proteins, representing two distinct classes of steroid membrane receptors, membrane progestin receptor alpha (mPRalpha) and a membrane estrogen receptor (mER), GPR30, have recently been identified in several vertebrate species. Evidence that both receptors activate G-proteins and function as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is briefly reviewed. New data on progestin actions on fish gametes suggest a widespread involvement of mPRalpha in oocyte maturation and sperm hyperactivity in this vertebrate group. Information on the second messenger pathways activated upon estrogen binding to a membrane estrogen receptor in croaker gonads and preliminary evidence for the presence of a GPR30-like protein in fish gonads are discussed. Finally, initial characterization of the ligand binding, G-protein activation and molecular size of a membrane androgen receptor (mAR) in croaker ovaries suggests the presence of a third unique steroid receptor in fish gonads that also may function as a GPCR.

  7. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Management Considerations from Infancy to Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Jye; Vu, Bach-Mai K; Axelrad, Marni; Dietrich, Jennifer E; Gargollo, Patricio; Gunn, Sheila; Macias, Charles G; McCullough, Laurence B; Roth, David R; Sutton, V Reid; Karaviti, Lefkothea P

    2015-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an undervirilization syndrome in individuals with 46, XY karyotype. The undervirilization can be complete feminization or incomplete virilization with grades of ambiguity. AIS is caused by mutations in the androgen receptor, resulting in resistance to the physiologic activities of androgens. Differing degrees of resistance lead to three phenotypes: a complete form with female-appearing external genitalia, a partial form with a wide range of virilization, and a mild form with only minor undervirilization. AIS presents different challenges depending on whether resistance is complete or partial. Challenges include sex assignment, which impacts other medical decisions such as gonadectomy, hormonal replacement, and other surgical interventions. This review describes medical, psychosocial, and ethical concerns for each stage of development in complete and partial AIS, from the neonatal period to adulthood. These aspects of care should be addressed within an ethical framework by a multidisciplinary team, with the patients and families being the stakeholders in the decision-making process. We use the GRADE system when appropriate to appraise the existing evidence and provide recommendations and guidelines for management of AIS and appropriate transition of patients from pediatric to adult care.

  8. Primary combined androgen blockade in localized disease and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Mikio; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Mizokami, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu

    2008-04-01

    In spite of clinical practice guidelines such as NCI-PDQ - in which primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT) is not recommended as the primary treatment for localized prostate cancer - many patients have been treated with PADT. One of the reasons is that urologists themselves permit patients' desire because they know the effectiveness of PADT for some patients in their experiences. In this review we demonstrate basic mechanisms and the clinical efficacy of primary combined androgen blockade (PCAB) for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer. Then we discuss which patients are candidates for PCAB, and show that more than 30% of low- or intermediate-risk localized prostate cancers could be controlled in the long term with only PCAB. Short-term or intermittent PADT could not be recommended because of the possibilities of changing the character of the cancer cells by incomplete androgen ablation. We propose algorithms for the treatment of localized prostate cancer not only in low- and intermediate-risk groups but also in the high-risk group.

  9. Male gender identity in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    T'Sjoen, Guy; De Cuypere, Griet; Monstrey, Stan; Hoebeke, Piet; Freedman, F Kenneth; Appari, Mahesh; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Van Borsel, John; Cools, Martine

    2011-06-01

    Women and girls with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) invariably have a female typical core gender identity. In this case report, we describe the first case of male gender identity in a CAIS individual raised female leading to complete sex reassignment involving both androgen treatment and phalloplasty. CAIS was diagnosed at age 17, based on an unambiguously female phenotype, a 46,XY karyotype, and a 2660delT androgen receptor (AR) gene mutation, leading to a premature stop in codon 807. Bilateral gonadectomy was performed but a short period of estrogen treatment induced a negative emotional reaction and treatment was stopped. Since the age of 3, childhood-onset cross gender behavior had been noticed. After a period of psychotherapy, persisting male gender identity was confirmed. There was no psychiatric co-morbidity and there was an excellent real life experience. Testosterone substitution was started, however without inducing any of the desired secondary male characteristics. A subcutaneous mastectomy was performed and the patient received phalloplasty by left forearm free flap and scrotoplasty. Testosterone treatment was continued, without inducing virilization, and bone density remained normal. The patient qualifies as female-to-male transsexual and was treated according to the Standards of Care by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health with good outcome. However, we do not believe that female sex of rearing as a standard procedure should be questioned in CAIS. Our case challenges the role of a functional AR pathway in the development of male gender identity.

  10. Cues to Androgens and Quality in Male Gibbon Songs

    PubMed Central

    Barelli, Claudia; Mundry, Roger; Heistermann, Michael; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Animal vocal signals may provide information about senders and mediate important social interactions like sexual competition, territory maintenance and mate selection. Hence, it is important to understand whether vocal signals provide accurate information about animal attributes or status. Gibbons are non-human primates that produce loud, distinctive and melodious vocalizations resembling more those of birds than of other non-human primates. Wild gibbons are characterized by flexibility in social organization (i.e., pairs and multimale units) as well as in mating system (i.e., monogamy and polyandry). Such features make them a suitable model to investigate whether the physiology (hormonal status) and socio-demographic features find their correspondence in the structure of their songs. By combining male solo song recordings, endocrine outputs using non-invasive fecal androgen measures and behavioral observations, we studied 14 groups (10 pair-living, 4 multimale) of wild white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar) residing at Khao Yai National Park, Thailand. We collected a total of 322 fecal samples and recorded 48 songs from 18 adult animals. Our results confirmed inter-individuality in male gibbon songs, and showed a clear correlation between androgen levels and song structures. Gibbons with higher androgen levels produced calls having higher pitch, and similarly adult individuals produced longer calls than senior males. Thus, it is plausible that gibbon vocalizations provide receivers with information about singers' attributes. PMID:24367551

  11. Cues to androgens and quality in male gibbon songs.

    PubMed

    Barelli, Claudia; Mundry, Roger; Heistermann, Michael; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Animal vocal signals may provide information about senders and mediate important social interactions like sexual competition, territory maintenance and mate selection. Hence, it is important to understand whether vocal signals provide accurate information about animal attributes or status. Gibbons are non-human primates that produce loud, distinctive and melodious vocalizations resembling more those of birds than of other non-human primates. Wild gibbons are characterized by flexibility in social organization (i.e., pairs and multimale units) as well as in mating system (i.e., monogamy and polyandry). Such features make them a suitable model to investigate whether the physiology (hormonal status) and socio-demographic features find their correspondence in the structure of their songs. By combining male solo song recordings, endocrine outputs using non-invasive fecal androgen measures and behavioral observations, we studied 14 groups (10 pair-living, 4 multimale) of wild white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar) residing at Khao Yai National Park, Thailand. We collected a total of 322 fecal samples and recorded 48 songs from 18 adult animals. Our results confirmed inter-individuality in male gibbon songs, and showed a clear correlation between androgen levels and song structures. Gibbons with higher androgen levels produced calls having higher pitch, and similarly adult individuals produced longer calls than senior males. Thus, it is plausible that gibbon vocalizations provide receivers with information about singers' attributes.

  12. Conjunctival mucin deficiency in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS).

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Moretti, Costanzo; Micera, Alessandra; Bonini, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Sex steroid hormones are essential for a healthy ocular surface and the androgen receptor impairment found in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) has been described to cause meibomian gland dysfunction and functional dry eye for lipid tear film layer instability. However, it has not been reported if the mucous layer is also affected. A 37-year-old CAIS patient with persistent symptoms of dry eye underwent ophthalmological examination and was evaluated for qualitative and quantitative tear function tests and conjunctival cytology. Samples obtained from the conjunctival epithelium were stained for histology and immunohistochemistry and compared with three age-matched female controls. Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR for MUC1 and MUC5AC were also performed on these samples. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR showed a decrease in the expression of MUC1 and MUC5AC in CAIS. Changes in the tear film mucous layer were accompanied by a reduction in the tear film break up time test. This is the first report describing mucous layer alteration associated with androgen receptor impairment. Decreased mucin levels contribute in explaining the tear film instability in CAIS and should be considered an additional cause of dry eye in sex steroid hormone pathology.

  13. Clinical, ultrasound and hormonal markers of androgenicity in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Walton, S; Cunliffe, W J; Keczkes, K; Early, A S; McGarrigle, H H; Katz, M; Reese, R A

    1995-08-01

    Androgenic stimulation of sebaceous glands is an important factor in the development of acne. We examined 36 females (aged 14-34 years), selected because none had received oral contraceptives, anti-androgen therapy, or systemic antibiotics during the previous year, or isotretinoin therapy, prior to their participation in the study. Subjects were divided into groups on the basis of acne severity, as follows: physiological, mild and moderate. Only two patients had polycystic ovaries on ultrasound examination. Seven patients had irregular menses; none had evidence of hirsutism. We found that the severity of acne, based on the acne grade, was highly correlated with the inflammatory lesion count, and less correlated with the sebum excretion rate. Either acne grade or inflammatory lesion count could be related to some of the five androgenic hormone determinants; free testosterone (TESTOS), delta 4 androstenedione (DELTA 4), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrostenedione sulphate (DHEAS) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Multiple linear regression analysis determined the best model for predicting ACNE scores as involving DELTA 4 and DHEAS (positive effects), and SHBG (negative effect), P < 0.005, R2 = 0.36). In none of the patients were the levels of DHEAS or SHBG outside the normal range. The findings in the two patients with polycystic ovaries did not differ significantly from those in the remainder of the patients.

  14. Androgens predict parasitism in female meerkats: a new perspective on a classic trade-off.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Kendra N; Greene, Lydia K; Clutton-Brock, Tim; Drea, Christine M

    2016-10-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis posits that androgens in males can be a 'double-edged sword', actively promoting reproductive success, while also negatively impacting health. Because there can be both substantial androgen concentrations in females and significant androgenic variation among them, particularly in species portraying female social dominance over males or intense female-female competition, androgens might also play a role in mediating female health and fitness. We examined this hypothesis in the meerkat (Suricata suricatta), a cooperatively breeding, social carnivoran characterized by aggressively mediated female social dominance and extreme rank-related reproductive skew. Dominant females also have greater androgen concentrations and harbour greater parasite loads than their subordinate counterparts, but the relationship between concurrent androgen concentrations and parasite burdens is unknown. We found that a female's faecal androgen concentrations reliably predicted her concurrent state of endoparasitism irrespective of her social status: parasite species richness and infection by Spirurida nematodes, Oxynema suricattae, Pseudandrya suricattae and coccidia were greater with greater androgen concentrations. Based on gastrointestinal parasite burdens, females appear to experience the same trade-off in the costs and benefits of raised androgens as do the males of many species. This trade-off presumably represents a health cost of sexual selection operating in females.

  15. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satwant; Baynes, Alice; Lockyer, Anne E; Routledge, Edwin J; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  16. Glycosylation is an Androgen-Regulated Process Essential for Prostate Cancer Cell Viability.

    PubMed

    Munkley, Jennifer; Vodak, Daniel; Livermore, Karen E; James, Katherine; Wilson, Brian T; Knight, Bridget; Mccullagh, Paul; Mcgrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Harries, Lorna W; Leung, Hing Y; Robson, Craig N; Mills, Ian G; Rajan, Prabhakar; Elliott, David J

    2016-06-01

    Steroid androgen hormones play a key role in the progression and treatment of prostate cancer, with androgen deprivation therapy being the first-line treatment used to control cancer growth. Here we apply a novel search strategy to identify androgen-regulated cellular pathways that may be clinically important in prostate cancer. Using RNASeq data, we searched for genes that showed reciprocal changes in expression in response to acute androgen stimulation in culture, and androgen deprivation in patients with prostate cancer. Amongst 700 genes displaying reciprocal expression patterns we observed a significant enrichment in the cellular process glycosylation. Of 31 reciprocally-regulated glycosylation enzymes, a set of 8 (GALNT7, ST6GalNAc1, GCNT1, UAP1, PGM3, CSGALNACT1, ST6GAL1 and EDEM3) were significantly up-regulated in clinical prostate carcinoma. Androgen exposure stimulated synthesis of glycan structures downstream of this core set of regulated enzymes including sialyl-Tn (sTn), sialyl Lewis(X) (SLe(X)), O-GlcNAc and chondroitin sulphate, suggesting androgen regulation of the core set of enzymes controls key steps in glycan synthesis. Expression of each of these enzymes also contributed to prostate cancer cell viability. This study identifies glycosylation as a global target for androgen control, and suggests loss of specific glycosylation enzymes might contribute to tumour regression following androgen depletion therapy.

  17. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Lockyer, Anne E.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment. PMID:27448327

  18. S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity in the rat epididymis: ontogeny and androgenic control.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, M A; Calandra, R S

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the occurrence of high levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) activity in the rat epididymis, and its ontogeny and androgenic control. As early as 15 days of age, SAMDC activity exists, although a peak of activity is observed at 25 days. Bilateral orchidectomy resulted in a decline of epididymal SAMDC activity. However, an androgen-independent fraction, accounting for 34% of total activity, appears to exist in the epididymis. In 45-day-old orchidectomized rats, SAMDC activity was stimulated by testosterone treatment in a dose-dependent manner. However, treatment of 45-day-old intact animals with a high dose of the androgen failed to modify SAMDC activity, indicating that, at this age, the enzyme is maximally stimulated by endogenous androgens. The observed effect of testosterone on castrated rats was completely abolished by concomitant treatment with the antiandrogen flutamide. This compound was ineffective on the androgen-insensitive fraction. To assess the contribution of circulating and luminal androgens to the maintenance of epididymal SAMDC, rats were unilaterally orchidectomized and activity was determined in both epididymides after 7 days. The SAMDC activity was identical in epididymides from both sides, suggesting circulating androgens suffice to maintain normal levels of activity. It was concluded that androgens regulate epididymal SAMDC activity, although an androgen-independent fraction appears to exist.

  19. Androgens in women are essentially made from DHEA in each peripheral tissue according to intracrinology.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand; Martel, Céline; Bélanger, Alain; Pelletier, Georges

    2017-04-01

    The objective is to review how the cell-specific amounts of intracellular androgens are all made in women from circulating dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in each peripheral tissue, independently from the rest of the body. Following 500 million years of evolution, approximately three dozen cell-specific intracrine enzymes have been engineered in human peripheral tissues whereby the inactive sex steroid precursor DHEA mainly of adrenal origin is transformed into the appropriate minute intracellular amounts of androgens. These intracellular androgens are inactivated in the same cells, with no biologically significant release of active androgens in the circulation. The best estimate is that approximately 50% as much androgens are synthesized in women, compared to men of the same age. The problem with DHEA, however, the exclusive source of androgens in women of all ages, is that DHEA secretion has already decreased by an average of 60% at time of menopause and continues to decrease thereafter. The human-specific and highly sophisticated mechanisms of intracrinology permit each cell to control androgen availability according to its own needs independently from the remaining of the body. Such a mechanism is completely different from classical endocrinology well understood in men where testosterone of testicular origin is transported through the blood and has indiscriminate access to the androgen receptor (AR) in all AR-containing cells of the body. In men, both the endocrine and intracrine mechanisms are in operation while, in women, only the intracrine mechanisms responsible for intracellular formation from DHEA provide androgens.

  20. Can neonatal beta-adrenergic stimulation prevent the effects of androgenization in female rats?

    PubMed

    Vidal, M J; Aguilar, E

    1985-05-01

    A 25 micrograms dose of testosterone propionate injected at 4 days of age induced 90% anovulation at 100 days of age. The systemic administration of orciprenaline (8 or 16 micrograms) or yohimbine (100 micrograms) did not prevent androgenization. Twenty-five or fifty micrograms of orciprenaline injected intraventricularly reduced only partially (to 54 and 67% respectively) the effectiveness of androgenization. We concluded that beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation had a very limited ability to prevent androgenization, since the beta-stimulation obtained directly with orciprenaline prevented androgenization to a very limited extent, while the possible indirect stimulation through an increase in norepinephrine endogenous release by alpha-2 receptor blocker yohimbine was ineffective.

  1. Benefits of intermittent/continuous androgen deprivation in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    MURESANU, HORIA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims In 1941 Huggins described the effect of castration on prostate cancer. gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) analogues were introduced in 1985. Complete androgen blockade (association of GNRH analogue with antiandrogen) was introduced by Fernand Labrie to achieve suppression of suprarenal testosterone. Long time androgen deprivation lead to androgen independence of the prostate cancer cell. Our principal aim was to demonstrate longer survival rates on prostate cancer patients with intermittent androgen deprivation. Methods 82 patients in the Urology Department of Vasile Goldis West University Arad were included into two groups, with continuous and intermittent androgen deprivation. Treatment efficiency was assessed by the level of testosterone and PSA. Adverse events (AE) and serious adverse events were reported according to Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events (CTCAE) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Results Evolution towards castrate resistant prostate cancer: 12.5% from the intermittent androgen deprivation group and 23.8% from the continuous androgen deprivation group Mortality rate: 15% of patients from the intermittent androgen deprivation group; 19% of patients from the continuous androgen deprivation group Conclusions Better quality of life (Qol) in periods without treatment due to testosteron recovery; Less AE’s and metabolic syndrome (MS) related complications; Better survival and longer time of disease control and Cost reduction. PMID:27547063

  2. The role of the androgen receptor in the development and progression of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Izumi, Koji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    Men are at a higher risk of developing bladder cancer than women. Since bladder cancer cell lines and tissues were found to express the androgen receptor, efforts have been made to inspect whether androgen-mediated androgen receptor signals are implicated in bladder carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression. Mounting evidence supports the view that bladder cancer is a member of the endocrine-related tumors and may clearly explain the gender-specific difference in the incidence. However, the underlying mechanisms of how androgen receptor signals regulate bladder cancer growth are still far from fully characterized. Moreover, it remains controversial whether the androgen receptor pathway always plays a dominant role in bladder cancer progression. In this review, we summarize the available data on the involvement of androgen receptor signaling in bladder cancer. In particular, current evidence demonstrating the stimulatory effects of androgens on tumor progression or, more convincingly, tumorigenesis via the androgen receptor pathway may offer great potential for androgen deprivation as a therapeutic or chemopreventive option in patients with bladder cancer.

  3. The androgen receptor associates with the epidermal growth factor receptor in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, L; Muratori, M; Carloni, V; Marchiani, S; Formigli, L; Forti, G; Baldi, E

    2004-08-01

    Many recent evidences indicate that androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells have a lower malignant phenotype that is in particular characterized by a reduced migration and invasion. We previously demonstrated that expression of androgen receptor (AR) by transfection of the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line PC3 decreases invasion and adhesion of these cells (PC3-AR) through modulation of alpha6beta4 integrin expression. The treatment with the synthetic androgen R1881 further reduced invasion of the cells without, however, modifying alpha6beta4 expression on the cell surface, suggesting an interference with the invasion process in response to EGF. We investigated whether the presence of the AR could affect EGF receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling in response to EGF by evaluating autotransphosphorylation of the receptor as well as activation of downstream signalling pathways. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated a reduction of EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR in PC3-AR cells. In addition, EGF-stimulated PI3K activity, a key signalling pathway for invasion of these cells, was decreased in PC3-AR cells and further reduced by treatment with R1881, indicating decreased functionality of EGFR. An interaction between EGFR and AR has been demonstrated by immunoconfocal and co-immunoprecipitation analysis in PC3-AR cells, suggesting a possible interference of AR on EGFR signalling by interaction of the two proteins. In conclusion, our results suggest that the expression of AR by transfection in PC3 cells confers a less malignant phenotype by interfering with EGFR autophosphorylation and signalling in response to EGF leading to invasion through a mechanism involving an interaction between AR and EGFR.

  4. Partial androgen insensitivity and correlations with the predicted three dimensional structure of the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Yong, E L; Tut, T G; Ghadessy, F J; Prins, G; Ratnam, S S

    1998-02-01

    Genetic defects of the human androgen receptor (AR) can cause a wide spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) ranging from phenotypic females in those with complete AIS; ambiguous genitalia in partial AIS; to male infertility in minimal AIS. The majority of these defects are due to point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions. It is however unclear why certain mutations result in partial AIS, whereas others in the same exon cause the complete syndrome. We present a case of partial AIS due to a point mutation affecting codon 758 of the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) that changed the sense of the codon from asparagine to threonine (N758T). The mutant receptor displayed normal binding affinity to DHT but abnormal dissociation kinetics in both patient's fibroblasts and transfected COS-7 cells. The mutant AR was thermolabile, and resulted in approximately 50% reduction in receptor transactivation capacity when examined with a reporter gene incorporating an androgen-response-element. Although the 3-D structure of AR LBD is not known, the homologous region in a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, retinoid-X receptor (RXR-alpha), has been crystallized, allowing comparison of aligned amino-acid sequences of RXR-alpha and AR. The mutation, N758T, lies in a predicted linker region between the fifth alpha-helix (H5) and the first beta-strand (S1). Generally, mutations leading to partial AIS tend to cluster in the predicted linker regions located between the structural helices of the AR LBD. Most strikingly, the predicted linker regions contain over 70% of the mutant ARs associated with prostate cancer in the LBD. The occurrence of mutations associated with both partial AIS and prostate cancer in the same predicted linker regions, suggest that this clustering is not coincidental and that the predicted linker regions are likely to have important, but subtle, roles in defining androgen binding and ligand specificity.

  5. Functional analysis of a novel androgen receptor mutation, Q902K, in an individual with partial androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Umar, Arzu; Berrevoets, Cor A; Van, N Mai; van Leeuwen, Marije; Verbiest, Michael; Kleijer, Wim J; Dooijes, Dennis; Grootegoed, J Anton; Drop, Stenvert L S; Brinkmann, Albert O

    2005-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is caused by defects in the androgen receptor (AR) that render the AR partially or completely inactive. As a result, embryonic sex differentiation is impaired. Here, we describe a novel mutation in the AR found in a patient with partial AIS. The mutation results in a substitution of a glutamine (Q) by a lysine (K) residue at position 902, Q902K. The AR Q902K mutation was investigated in vitro with respect to its functional properties. The equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)s) of AR Q902K in the presence of either the synthetic androgen R1881 or the natural ligand DHT were slightly elevated. The R1881 dissociation rate (t(1/2)) was increased 3-fold for AR Q902K compared with wild type. Transcriptional activity was decreased to 85% of wild type, and the dose-response curve revealed that the sensitivity to hormone was decreased due to the mutation. Furthermore, the 114-kDa androgen-induced phosphorylated AR protein band was not detectable in genital skin fibroblasts. However, it could be detected in transfected CHO cells expressing the mutant receptor in the presence of 10 and 100 nm R1881. Functional interaction assays and a GST pull-down assay showed that the interaction between the NH2 and COOH terminus of AR Q902K was reduced to 50% of wild type. Furthermore, the transactivation by the coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) was decreased 2- to 3-fold. The half-maximal response in both assays was shifted to a higher hormone concentration compared with wild type. These results indicate that residue Q902 is involved in TIF2 and NH2/COOH interaction and that the Q to K mutation results in a mild impairment of AR function, which can explain the partial AIS phenotype of the patient.

  6. Inhibition of NF-kappa B signaling restores responsiveness of castrate resistant prostate cancer cells to anti-androgen treatment by decreasing androgen receptor variants expression

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Renjie; Yamashita, Hironobu; Yu, Xiuping; Wang, Jingbin; Franco, Omar E.; Wang, Yufen; Hayward, Simon W.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor splicing variants (ARVs) which lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD) are associated with the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), including resistance to the new generation of high affinity anti-androgens. However, the mechanism by which ARVs expression is regulated is not fully understood. In this study, we show that activation of classical NF-κB signaling increases the expression of ARVs in prostate cancer (PCa) cells and converts androgen sensitive PCa cells to become androgen insensitive; while, downregulation of NF-κB signaling inhibits ARVs expression and restores responsiveness of CRPC to anti-androgen therapy. In addition, we demonstrated that combination of anti-androgen with NF-κB targeted therapy inhibits efficiently tumor growth of human CRPC xenografts. These results indicate that induction ARVs by activated NF-κB signaling in PCa cells is a critical mechanism by which the PCa progresses to CRPC. This has important implications since it can prolong the survival of CRPC patients by restoring the tumors to once again respond to conventional androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). PMID:25220414

  7. Novel missense mutation in the P-box of androgen receptor in a patient with androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Noriyuki; Horikawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2008-03-01

    Mutations in the X-linked AR gene cause androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) by impairing androgen-dependent male sex differentiation to various degree. Here we describe a partial AIS patient with confliction with the assigned female sex. Although the patient was noticed to have ambiguous genitalia at birth, the patient was reared as a female with no medical intervention. At the age of 31 years, the patient visited us because the patient was dissatisfied with the assigned female sex. The patient was treated with systemic testosterone and topical dihydrotestosterone, but the external genitalia responded only minimally to